Science.gov

Sample records for platinum-group element accumulation

  1. Accumulation of platinum group elements by the marine gastropod Littorina littorea.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Rachel; Turner, Andrew

    2011-04-01

    The accumulation and trophic transfer of the platinum group elements (PGE): Rh, Pd and Pt; have been studied in short-term (5 day) exposures conducted in aquaria containing the marine macroalga, Ulva lactuca, and/or the grazing mollusc, Littorina littorea. Metals added to sea water (to concentrations of 20 μg L⁻¹) were taken up by U. lactuca in the order Rh, Pt > Pd and by L. littorea in the order Pd ≥ Pt ≥ Rh, with greatest metal accumulation in the latter generally occurring in the visceral complex and kidney. When fed contaminated alga, accumulation of Rh and Pd by L. littorea, relative to total available metal, increased by an order of magnitude, while accumulation of Pt was not readily detected. We conclude that the diet is the most important vector for accumulation of Rh and Pd, while accumulation of Pt appears to proceed mainly from the aqueous phase.

  2. Extra- and intra-cellular accumulation of platinum group elements by the marine microalga, Chlorella stigmatophora.

    PubMed

    Shams, Leyla; Turner, Andrew; Millward, Geoffrey E; Brown, Murray T

    2014-03-01

    To better understand the marine biogeochemistry of the platinum group elements (PGE), Rh(III), Pd(II) and Pt(IV) were added in combination and at ppb concentrations to cultures of the marine microalga, Chlorella stigmatophora, maintained in sea water at 15 °C and under 60 μmol m(-2) s(-1) PAR. The accumulation of PGE was established in short-term (24-h) exposures, and under varying conditions of algal biomass and PGE concentration, and in a longer-term exposure (156-h) by ICP-MS analysis of sea water and nitric acid digests and EDTA washes of the alga. In short-term exposures, and under all conditions, the extent of accumulation by C. stigmatophora was in the order: Rh > Pd > Pt; and Pd was internalised (or resistant to EDTA extraction) to a considerably greater extent than Rh and Pt. Accumulation isotherms were quasi-linear up to added PGE concentrations of 30 μg L(-1) and all metals displayed a significant reduction in accumulation on a weight-normalised basis with increasing density (biomass) of C. stigmatophora, an effect attributed to the production of exudates able to stabilise metals in sea water through complexation. In the longer-term exposure, kinetic constraints on the reactivities of Rh and, in particular, Pt, resulted in final degrees of accumulation and internalisation by C. stigmatophora that were greatest for Rh and similar between Pd and Pt. Among the PGE, therefore, Rh is predicted to participate in biological removal and transport processes in the marine environment to the greatest extent while decoupling in the biogeochemistries of Pd and Pt is predicted in shorter-term or more transient processes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Accumulation and distribution characteristics of platinum group elements in roadside dusts in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Yu, Yanke; Zhou, Huaidong; Lu, Jin

    2012-06-01

    The concentrations, distribution, and accumulation of platinum group elements (PGEs) were investigated in roadside dusts collected in four different foundational areas in Beijing during February to May 2010. The results showed that PGE levels in all samples were above the average upper crust values, with mean concentrations of 57.5 ng · g(-1) Pd, 28.2 ng · g(-1) Pt, and 9.8 ng · g(-1) Rh, respectively. Palladium concentration has increased rapidly in recent years. The rank of PGE levels in four different functional regions for roadside dusts was: heavy density traffic area > residential area > educational area > tourism area. Palladium, Pt, and Rh concentrations in dusts showed strong positive correlations, indicating a common traffic-related source of these metals. Meanwhile, PGEs in these samples were not correlated with other traffic-related metals except for Cr. The average PGE ratios of road dusts from Beijing were consistent with those in Germany and Western Australia, but lower than those in the United States and Mexico, indicating that various catalyst productions were used in different countries. In addition, grain-size partitioning of PGEs in dusts indicated that concentrations of PGEs differed from one particle size to another. The coarse fraction had higher PGE concentrations than the fine fraction in roadside dusts. These results showed that autocatalyst PGE contamination estimates in the environment would be significantly underestimated if only a fine-grain size fraction (<0.063 mm) is analyzed. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  4. Platinum group elements in the environment and their health risk.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Khaiwal; Bencs, László; Van Grieken, René

    2004-01-05

    Accumulation of platinum group elements (PGEs) in the environment has been increased over the time. Catalytic converters of modern vehicles are considered to be the main sources of PGE pollution, since the correlation is between the Pt:Rh ratios in various environmental compartments and in converter units. The present literature survey shows that the concentration of these metals has increased significantly in the last decades in diverse environmental matrices; like airborne particulate matter, soil, roadside dust and vegetation, river, coastal and oceanic environment. Generally, PGEs are referred to behave in an inert manner and to be immobile. However, there is an evidence of spread and bioaccumulation of these elements in the environment. Platinum content of road dusts can be soluble, consequently, it enters the waters, sediments, soil and finally, the food chain. The effect of chronic occupational exposure to Pt compounds is well-documented, and certain Pt species are known to exhibit allergenic potential. However, the toxicity of biologically available anthropogenic Pt is not clear. Hence, there is a need to study the effect on human health of long-term chronic exposure to low levels of Pt compounds.

  5. Photochemistry and charge transfer chemistry of the platinum group elements

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.

    1991-12-01

    Significant progress has been made on the photochemistry and photophysics of platinum group element dithiolate complexes. The specific systems under investigation are square planar complexes of Pt(II) containing a dithiolate chelate and two other donor groups to complete the coordination sphere. The donor groups may be amines, imines, phosphines, phosphites or olefins, and they can be either monodentate or joined together as part of a chelate ring.

  6. Platinum-group element abundance patterns in different mantle environments

    SciTech Connect

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Barfod, D.; Fitton, J.G.; Dawson, J.B.

    1997-11-28

    Mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania display differences in their platinum-group element (PGE) abundance patterns. The Cameroon Line lherzolites have uniform PGE patterns indicating a homogeneous upper mantle over several hundreds of kilometers, with approximately chondritic PGE ratios. The PGE patterns of the Tanzanian peridotites are similar to the PGE systematics of ultramafic rocks from ophiolites. The differences can be explained if the northern Tanzanian lithosphere developed in a fluid-rich suprasubduction zone environment, whereas the Cameroon Line lithosphere only experienced melt extraction from anhydrous periodotites. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. The plant availability of auto-cast platinum group elements.

    PubMed

    Hooda, P S; Miller, A; Edwards, A C

    2008-04-01

    The introduction of automobile catalysts has raised environmental concern, as this pollution control technology is also an emission source for platinum group elements (PGE). The main aim of this study was to assess soil and grass PGE concentrations in soils adjacent to five road networks. The soil and grass samples were collected from four distances at each site; they were 0, 1, 2 and 5 m from the road edges. The maximum soil Pt, Rh and Pd concentrations were measured at the road perimeters. Pd concentrations were much higher than Pt or Rh, possibly due to differences in its use, emission and/or soil chemistry. Rh and Pt soil concentrations accounted for 66 and 34% (P < 0.01) of the variability observed, respectively, in their plant concentrations. Grass Pd concentrations had no relationship with its total soil concentrations.

  8. Platinum-group element resources in podiform chromitites from California and Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Singer, D.A.; Moring, B.C.; Carlson, C.A.; McDade, J.M.; Wilson, S.A.

    1986-01-01

    Assays of Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir from approx 280 podiform chromite deposits in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic ophiolites are statistically analysed to estimate their possible by-product value from mining the chromite. The platinum-group elements occur in discrete platinum-group minerals, and in solid solution in Cu-Ni-Fe sulphides. Low grades and small amounts of total platinum-group elements in podiform chromite deposits imply a small resource. -G.J.N.

  9. Source characterisation of atmospheric platinum group element deposition into an ombrotrophic peat bog.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Sebastien; Hemond, Harold F; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard

    2004-04-01

    Platinum, palladium, rhodium, iridium and osmium were found to be enriched relative to their expected natural concentrations in peat samples from Thoreau's Bog, an ombrotrophic peat bog in Concord, Massachusetts. The source of osmium into the bog was determined from its isotopic composition (187Os/188Os). Osmium is composed of 4% lithogenic osmium from atmospheric soil dust, 41% of anthropogenic osmium and 55% of osmium from a non-lithogenic, non anthropogenic source, with rain being a likely candidate for the latter. Significant anthropogenic and rain contributions are also expected for iridium. In contrast, platinum, palladium and rhodium are almost exclusively anthropogenic. The larger enrichments of platinum, palladium and rhodium indicate that automobile catalysts are the source of platinum group elements to Thoreau's bog. The bog is located approximately 300 m from a major road and, therefore, the occurrence of platinum elements is evidence for regional dispersion of these metals. The absence of a clear trend following the introduction of catalysts indicates that platinum group elements are not quantitatively conserved in peat with downward leaching and plants playing an important role in the accumulation of platinum group elements.

  10. Platinum-group elements: so many excellent properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, Michael L.; Loferski, Patricia J.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum-group elements (PGE) include platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium. These metals have similar physical and chemical properties and occur together in nature. The properties of PGE, such as high melting points, corrosion resistance, and catalytic qualities, make them indispensable to many industrial applications. PGE are strategic and critical materials for many nations because they are essential for important industrial applications but are mined in a limited number of places and have no adequate substitutes. Exploration and mining companies have found approximately 104,000 metric tons of PGE (with minor gold) in mineral deposits around the world that could be developed. For PGE, almost all known production and resources are associated with three geologic features: the Bushveld Complex, a layered mafic-to-ultramafic intrusion in South Africa; the Great Dyke, a layered mafic-to-ultramafic intrusion in Zimbabwe; and sill-like intrusions associated with flood basalts in the Noril’sk-Talnakh area, Russia. To help predict where PGE supplies might be located, USGS scientists study how and where PGE resources are concentrated in the Earth's crust and use that knowledge to assess the likelihood that undiscovered PGE deposits may exist. Techniques used for assessing mineral resources were developed by the USGS to support the stewardship of Federal lands and evaluate mineral resource availability in a global context. The USGS also compiles statistics and information on the worldwide supply, demand, and flow of PGE. These data are all used to inform U.S. national policymakers.

  11. Platinum group elements in airborne particles in Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Sebastien; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Molina, Luisa T; Molina, Mario J; Ramos, Rafael; Hemond, Harold F

    2006-12-15

    Automobile exhaust catalysts using platinum group elements (PGE) have been mandatory on new cars in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) since 1991. Platinum, Pd, Rh, Ir, and Os concentrations and the isotopic composition of Os were determined in PM10 samples from the MCMA. Samples were prepared by isotope dilution NiS fire assay, and analysis was performed by magnetic sector ICP-MS using a single collector instrument for Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ir analysis and a multicollector instrument for Os analysis. Pt, Pd, and Rh concentrations at a downtown location (Merced) increased from < or =1.7 pg of Pt m(-3), 2.7 (4.0) pg of Pd m(-3), and 1.2+/-0.9 pg of Rh m(-3) in 1991 to 9.6 +/- 1.8 pg of Pt m(-3), 10.2+/-1.8 pg of Pd m(-3), and 2.8 +/-0.6 pg of Rh m(-3) in 2003. Concentrations at five sites in MCMA in 2003 averaged 9.3+/-1.9 pg of Pt m(-3), 11+/-4 pg of Pd m(-3), and 3.2+/- 1.0 pg of Rh m(-3). In contrast, Ir and Os concentrations and Os isotopic composition remained relatively constant and were 0.08+/-0.04 pg of Ir m(-3), 0.030 +/-0.007 pg of Os m(-3), and 0.60+/-0.04, respectively, in the MCMA in 2003. Elevated Pt, Pd, and Rh concentrations in the MCMA are attributed to automobile catalysts. A Pt-Pd-Rh concentration peak in 1993 suggests that early catalysts emitted a larger amount of PGE, possibly due to factors inherent in the technology or the use of inappropriate gasoline. Therefore, this study suggests that the current introduction of automobile catalysts in developing countries may result in elevated PGE concentrations if it is not accompanied by infrastructures and policy measures supporting their efficient use.

  12. Bioaccessibility of platinum group elements in automotive catalytic converter particulates.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew; Price, Simon

    2008-12-15

    The bioaccessibilities of the platinum group elements (PGE): Rh, Pd, and Pt; and the catalyzator poison, Pb, have been determined in particles derived from milled automotive catalytic converters using a physiologically based extraction test (PBET) that simulates, sequentially, the chemical conditions encountered in the human stomach and intestine. PGE accessibility, relative to total metal concentration, was generally less than a few percent, but increased in the stomach with decreasing pH (from 4 to 1) and/or increasing chloride concentration, and with decreasing particle concentration. In most cases, bioaccessibility increased from the acidic stomach to the neutral, carbonate-rich intestine. Bioaccessibility of Pb displayed similar pH and particle concentration dependencies to PGE in the stomach, but this metal exhibited significantly greater mobilization (up to 80%) overall and a reduction in accessibility from the stomach to intestine. Reaction kinetics of PGE dissolution in the stomach at pH 2.5 were modeled using a combined surface reaction-diffusion controlled mechanism with rate constants of 0.068, 0.031, and 0.015 (microg L(-1))(-1) h(-1) for Rh, Pd, and Pt, respectively. For Pb, however, mobilization proceeded via a different mechanism whose time-dependence was fitted with an empirical, logarithmic equation. Overall, PGE bioaccessibility appeared to be controlled by dissolution rates of metallic nanoparticles in the stomach, and solubility and kinetic constraints on inorganic species (chlorides, hydroxychlorides, and carbanatochlorides) and undefined organic complexes formed in the simulated gastrointestinal tract. Further studies are required to elucidate any effects engendered by the long-term oral exposure of small quantities of these species.

  13. Platinum group elements in mantle melts and mantle samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Stephen J.; Mungall, James E.; Maier, Wolfgang D.

    2015-09-01

    A large data compilation has been assembled of platinum group element (PGE) analyses in mantle melts and mantle rocks, the latter including an assortment of xenoliths and obducted mantle massifs. The degree of correlation has been investigated among the PGEs and with other major element variables such as Al2O3, TiO2 and Mg number, and the results are considered in the context of the current paradigm for the behaviour of highly siderophile elements in the silicate Earth. Primitive mantle melts have a wide range of PGE contents. Komatiites have the highest abundances of all the PGEs, show the strongest correlations between Pt and Rh, Pt and Pd and between the iridium-group PGEs Ir, Ru and Os (IPGEs). Most basalts of all affinities have lower levels of Pt and Pd and much lower levels of Ir, Ru and Os than komatiites. Within the basalt grouping Rh has stronger affinities with the IPGEs. Picrites and Archaean basalts are intermediate between these two groups. MORBs and a small proportion of continental LIP basalts show strong depletions in all PGEs attributable to retention of sulfide in their mantle source rocks, or sulfide liquid fractionation on ascent. The degree of PGE depletion in other basalts is probably attributable to equilibration with sulfide, but is less than would be expected under conventional models of sulfide extraction, and is instead attributed to mixing of magmas generated at variable depths incorporating both sulfide-saturated and undersaturated components. Basalts with Pt and Pd contents higher than typical komatiites are rare, a notable example being B1-type parent magmas to the Bushveld Complex, which have komatiite-like relative PGE abundances and Pt, Pd and Rh abundances up to a factor of two higher than komatiites for comparable Ti contents. The mantle composition array as a whole is characterized by variable degrees of depletion of Pt, Pd and Rh in Al-poor, melt-depleted harzburgite/dunite lithologies; lack of depletion in these elements in

  14. Concentrations of platinum group elements in 122 U.S. coal samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oman, C.L.; Finkelman, R.B.; Tewalt, S.J.

    1997-01-01

    Analysis of more than 13,000 coal samples by semi-quantitative optical emission spectroscopy (OES) indicates that concentrations of the platinum group elements (iridium, palladium, platinum, osmium, rhodium, and ruthenium) are less than 1 ppm in the ash, the limit of detection for this method of analysis. In order to accurately determine the concentration of the platinum group elements (PGE) in coal, additional data were obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy, an analytical method having part-per-billion (ppb) detection limits for these elements. These data indicate that the PGE in coal occur in concentrations on the order of 1 ppb or less.

  15. Platinum group elements determination in seawater by ICP-SFMS: Initial results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turetta, C.; Cozzi, G.; Varga, A.; Barbante, C.; Capodaglio, G.; Cescon, P.

    2003-05-01

    Studies performed on platinum group elements (PGE) in several environmental matrices have already highlighted their diffusion at a planetary level and their potential risk for human health. These elements, especially Rh, Pd and Pt, have been released in the environment over the previous decades, principally by cars equipped with catalytic converters. In order to evaluate their distribution in the environment and to understand their geochemical behaviour, it is important to study these elements also in non-conservative matrices, such as seawater. PGEs are present in seawater at very low levels (usually less then 1pg/g); only very sensitive instrumentation like ICP-SFMS, permits the determination of these elements in diluted seawater without any other manipulation of samples, reducing the risk of contamination associated with preconcentration techniques.

  16. Alteration of platinum-group minerals and dispersion of platinum-group elements during progressive weathering of the Aguablanca Ni-Cu deposit, SW Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Saioa; Prichard, Hazel M.; Velasco, Francisco; Fisher, Peter C.; McDonald, Iain

    2010-04-01

    The distribution, mineralogy and mobility of the platinum-group elements (PGE) in the surface environment are poorly understood. This study of the lower, less altered and upper, more altered gossan, overlying the Aguablanca Ni-Cu-(PGE) magmatic deposit (Spain), has shown that the platinum-group minerals (PGM) are progressively oxidised and dispersed into iron oxides that form the gossan. A combination of the characterization of PGE in host PGM, using a scanning electron microscope, and measurement of PGE at lower concentrations in host iron oxides, using laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS), has for the first time allowed the total distribution of the PGE within a gossan to be documented. This study has revealed a complete in situ alteration and dispersion sequence of the PGM including (1) breakdown of both the more stable Pt-arsenides, Pt/Pd-tellurides and the less stable bismuthotellurides, (2) formation of partially oxidised PGM, (3) development of a wide range of oxidised Pt- and Pd-bearing phases, (4) subsequent formation of Fe-PGE-oxides and PGE-hydroxides, (5) incorporation of PGE into ferruginous supergene products and lastly (6) concentration of PGE at the edges of veins and iron oxides. Dispersion of Pd is greater than for the other PGE with Pd being widely distributed throughout the iron oxides. This oxidising environment produced PGE-oxides rather than PGE-alloys, also commonly found in the surface environment, especially in placers. These results provide critical evidence for the stages of mineralogical change from PGE host mineralogy in magmatic ores to surface weathering producing PGE-oxides.

  17. Platinum-group element geochemistry of zoned ultramafic intrusive suites, Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, F.; Page, N.J.; Carlson, C.A.; Wilson, S.A.; Carlson, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Analyses for platinum-group elements of the varied rock suites of three Alaskan-type ultramafic to mafic multi-intrusive bodies are reported. Ir and Ru are less than analytical sensitivities of 100 and 20 ppb; Rh is less than or near 1 ppb. Average Pd assays vary among the rocks within intrusive complexes and between the three complexes (6.3, 13.7, 36.4 ppb); average Pt assays vary little among the same samples (27.9, 60.9, 34.0 ppb). Statistically adjusted Pt/(Pt + Pd) ratios increase in each suite from gabbro through clinopyroxenite to olivine-rich rocks, possibly owing to Pd fractionation.-G.J.N.

  18. Characterization of the Sukinda and Nausahi ultramafic complexes, Orissa, India by platinum-group element geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Banerji, P.K.; Haffty, J.

    1985-01-01

    Samples of 20 chromitite, 14 ultramafic and mafic rock, and 9 laterite and soil samples from the Precambrian Sukinda and Nausahi ultramafic complexes, Orissa, India were analyzed for platinum-group elements (PGE). The maximum concentrations are: palladium, 13 parts per billion (ppb); platinum, 120 ppb; rhodium, 21 ppb; iridium, 210 ppb; and ruthenium, 630 ppb. Comparison of chondrite-normalized ratios of PGE for the chromitite samples of lower Proterozoic to Archean age with similar data from Paleozoic and Mesozoic ophiolite complexes strongly implies that these complexes represent Precambrian analogs of ophiolite complexes. This finding is consistent with the geology and petrology of the Indian complexes and suggests that plate-tectonic and ocean basin developement models probably apply to some parts of Precambrian shield areas. ?? 1985.

  19. Mineralogical siting of platinum-group elements in pentlandite from the Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junge, Malte; Wirth, Richard; Oberthür, Thomas; Melcher, Frank; Schreiber, Anja

    2015-01-01

    The Bushveld Complex in South Africa hosts the world's largest resources of platinum-group elements (PGEs), which are mainly mined from three ore bodies, namely the Merensky Reef, the UG-2 chromitite, and the Platreef. In these ores, the PGEs are bimodally distributed, occurring both as discrete platinum-group minerals (PGMs) and hosted by sulfides. The presence of PGEs in sulfides has been demonstrated by electron probe microanalysis, laser ablation induced coupled plasma mass spectrometry, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and particle-induced X-ray emission. However, evidence is lacking on the mineralogical siting of the PGEs, e.g., whether they occur in solid solution, as nano-inclusions, and/or micro-inclusions. Therefore, in the present study, a combination of focused ion beam and transmission electron microscopy was used which allows to obtain crystal structural relationships between the host mineral and incorporated trace elements and revealing the physicochemical state of the PGE in sulfides. The present study confirms the existence of micrometer-sized discrete PGMs in the ores. Further, the PGEs occur in a number of forms, namely (1) as discrete nano-inclusions of PGMs, (2) as patchily distributed solid solution, (3) ordered within the pentlandite crystal structure, substituting for Ni and/or Fe (superlattice), and (4) as homogenous solid solution. Nanometer-sized PGMs (nPGMs) show no orientation relationship with the host sulfide mineral. Consequently, they are discrete phases, which were trapped within pentlandite during sulfide growth. Heterogeneous and patchy distributions of Rh and Ir within the pentlandite lattice suggest that Rh and Ir were already present within the sulfide liquid. The absence of possible reaction partners (e.g., Bi, As, and Sn) necessary for the formation of discrete PGMs forced Rh and Ir to remain in the crystal lattice of pentlandite and down-temperature exsolution caused patchy distribution patterns of Rh and Ir. High

  20. Leaves of Phragmites australis as potential atmospheric biomonitors of Platinum Group Elements.

    PubMed

    Bonanno, Giuseppe; Pavone, Pietro

    2015-04-01

    The increasing emissions of Platinum Group Elements (PGEs), namely Pt, Pd and Rh, may pose a significant risk to ecosystem processes and human health. A periodic assessment of PGEs distribution in the environment is thus of the utmost importance for the implementation of timely measures of mitigation. Although several studies have quantified PGEs in different life forms such as mammals, birds, fish, crustaceans, algae, mosses and even human beings, data about vascular plants need further surveys. This study aimed to test the suitability of the grass Phragmites australis (common reed) as a biomonitor of PGEs atmospheric pollution. The results showed that Pd and Pt concentrations in leaves are significantly higher in urban areas. In particular, Pd showed the highest range of values in line with current studies that consider palladium as the main element of traffic-related pollution. Overall, the leaves of Phragmites australis reflected the different gradient of PGEs emissions, and may thus be considered as potential biomonitors of atmospheric pollution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Partitioning of Si and platinum group elements between liquid and solid Fe-Si alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morard, G.; Siebert, J.; Badro, J.

    2014-05-01

    Crystallization of the Earth's inner core fractionates major and minor elements between the solid and liquid metal, leaving physical and geochemical imprints on the Earth's core. For example, the density jump observed at the Inner Core Boundary (ICB) is related to the preferential partitioning of lighter elements in the liquid outer core. The fractionation of Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid during inner core crystallization has been invoked as a process that explains the observed Os isotopic signature of mantle plume-derived lavas (Brandon et al., 1998; Brandon and Walker, 2005) in terms of core-mantle interaction. In this article we measured partitioning of Si, Os, Re and Pt between liquid and solid metal. Isobaric (2 GPa) experiments were conducted in a piston-cylinder press at temperatures between 1250 °C and 1600 °C in which an imposed thermal gradient through the sample provided solid-liquid coexistence in the Fe-Si system. We determined the narrow melting loop in the Fe-Si system using Si partitioning values and showed that order-disorder transition in the Fe-Si solid phases can have a large effect on Si partitioning. We also found constant partition coefficients (DOs, DPt, DRe) between liquid and solid metal, for Si concentrations ranging from 2 to 12 wt%. The compact structure of Fe-Si liquid alloys is compatible with incorporation of Si and platinum group elements (PGEs) elements precluding solid-liquid fractionation. Such phase diagram properties are relevant for other light elements such as S and C at high pressure and is not consistent with inter-elemental fractionation of PGEs during metal crystallization at Earth's inner core conditions. We therefore propose that the peculiar Os isotopic signature observed in plume-derived lavas is more likely explained by mantle source heterogeneity (Meibom et al., 2002; Baker and Krogh Jensen, 2004; Luguet et al., 2008).

  2. Levels of platinum group elements and rare-earth elements in wild mushroom species growing in Poland.

    PubMed

    Mleczek, Mirosław; Niedzielski, Przemysław; Kalač, Pavel; Siwulski, Marek; Rzymski, Piotr; Gąsecka, Monika

    2016-01-01

    Due to limited data-describing abilities of mushrooms to accumulate platinum group elements (PGEs) and rare-earth elements (REEs), the aim of this study was to determine, by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry followed by microwave-assisted sample digestion by nitric acid, the content of these elements in 20 mushroom species (10 above ground and 10 growing on wood), mostly edible, collected near a busy trunk road. The highest content of PGEs in above-ground mushroom species was observed in Lepista gilva and Suillus bovinus fruit bodies (0.38 ± 0.05 and 0.37 ± 0.03 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively), while in mushrooms growing on wood, the highest content was observed in Pleurotus ostreatus (0.35 ± 0.04 mg kg(-1) DW). The mean content of PGEs for both these groups was 0.23 ± 0.08 and 0.26 ± 0.07 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively. The highest content of REEs in Suillus luteus and Tricholoma equestra was 5.03 ± 0.50 and 2.18 ± 0.56 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively, but within mushrooms growing on wood in Ganoderma applanatum fruiting bodies it was 4.19 ± 0.78 mg kg(-1) DW. Mean contents of REEs were 1.39 ± 1.21 and 1.61 ± 0.97 mg kg(-1) DW in above-ground species and species growing on wood, respectively. Generally, the group of mushroom species growing on wood was capable of slightly higher accumulation of both REEs and PGEs. No limits have been established for both the groups until now.

  3. Platinum group element incorporation into human bones resulting from increased anthropogenic utilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrah, T. H.; Hannigan, R. E.; Campbell, E.; Prutsman-Pfeiffer, J.

    2009-12-01

    Platinum group elements (including Pt, Pd, Ru, Rh, Os, Ir) are rare precious metals that occur at exceedingly low concentrations in the Earth’s crust (~0.02-0.5 ng/g). Utilization of PGEs in the catalytic converter of automobiles, medical treatments, electronics, and as a catalyst, has rapidly increased since the early 20th century, leading to increased anthropogenic PGE emissions and consequently increasing concentrations in the environment. Recent reports indicate that environmental PGE concentrations are increasing in urban air, roadside soils, and aquatic environments (Rauch and Morrison, 2008). As a result, there is an increased potential for PGE uptake into the biosphere. To evaluate bio-incorporation of PGEs into the human body we use ICP-MS to analyze for PGE concentration in human bones. Human bone minerals serve as a reservoir for the majority of the body’s trace metals and provide a measure of PGE incorporation into the human body from various environmental sources. We compare PGE concentrations in femoral heads of 30 present-day modern humans to those in femurs of 10 humans exhumed from 18th and 19th century burial sites, whose metal exposures predate extensive anthropogenic use of PGEs.

  4. Potential mobilization of platinum-group elements by siderophores in surface environments.

    PubMed

    Dahlheimer, Susan R; Neal, Clive R; Fein, Jeremy B

    2007-02-01

    The emission of platinum-group elements (PGEs) from catalytic converters has led to increased environmental abundances of Pt, Pd, and Rh; however, little is known about the environmental effects and fate of these metals. Organic ligands found in soils have the potential to increase the mobility of PGEs and potentially increase the bioavailability of the metals. Here, we assessed the abilities of microbially produced iron-chelating ligands (siderophores) to complex with the PGEs. Batch experiments using the synthetic siderophore desferrioxamine-B (DFO-B) and powdered metal or oxide forms of Pt, Pd, or Rh showed that DFO-B enhances the solubility of Pt and Pd due to the formation of Pt- and Pd-DFO-B aqueous complexes, with estimated minimum stability constants on the order of 10(17-18) and 10(20-24), respectively. Dissolution rates for Pd are comparable to other mineral dissolution rates with DFO-B. DFO-B had little to no effect on the dissolution of Rh metal or Rh2O3. Our results indicate that siderophores have the potential to increase the mobility of Pt and Pd in environments with limited activities of free trivalent cations. These results have implications for the fate of catalytic converter-emitted Pt and Pd, and support the need for further Pt and Pd toxicity and bioaccumulation studies.

  5. Analyses of platinum group elements in mosses as indicators of road traffic emissions in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zechmeister, Harald G.; Hagendorfer, Harald; Hohenwallner, Daniela; Hanus-Illnar, Andrea; Riss, Alarich

    The concentrations of platinum group elements (PGE; platinum, palladium, rhodium) and 17 other elements in mosses growing at 32 sampling sites along 12 roads in Austria were analysed. The study included passive monitoring of naturally growing mosses with an experimental design using mosses samples exposed in a tunnel experiment. PGEs (Pt, Pd, Rh) were analysed by ICP-MS (ELAN DRC II, Perkin Elmer SCIEX) according to EN ISO 17294-2 Tl.29. Mean concentrations of PGEs in five moss species were: Pt 7.07±9.97, Pd 2.8±5.2 und Rh 0.6±0.8 ng g -1 dry weight. This is comparable to data derived from measurements of gasoline autocatalyst emissions or airborne particles (<10 μm). Compared to soils and road dust along highways, concentrations in mosses were lower by a factor of ten, compared to grasses they were comparable or somewhat higher. The ratios between the various PGEs were calculated as follows (mean values): Pt/Pd 7.9±10.2, Pt/Rh 12.6±8.3 and Pd/Rh 3.7±2.2. The number of light duty vehicles (<3.5 t) and the distance from the road were the main influential factors for PGE concentrations. Especially strong correlations could be found between Pt and Sb, Cu, Zn, and Cd (in decreasing order), which are all elements derived mainly from road traffic emissions. Cluster analysis (Partioning Around Medoids Method) separated elements derived mainly from soil dust (Ca, Al). An analysis of spatial deposition patterns of PGEs showed a reciprocal decrease of concentrations with increasing distance from the road, reaching background values at distances between 10 and 200 m, sometimes even more, but outside the spatial range of our investigation.

  6. Impact of platinum group elements on the soil invertebrate Folsomia candida.

    PubMed

    Nemcova, Barbora; Mikulaskova, Hana; Bednarova, Ivana; Beklova, Miroslava; Pikula, Jiri

    2013-01-01

    Trace concentrations of the platinum group elements (PGE; Pt, Pd and Rh) are nowadays an irreplaceable part of environmental analysis and assessment. These rare elements are used as effective substances in automotive catalysts to reduce pollution by emissions originating from fuel combustion. Due to their harmful potential, it is necessary to monitor their content and behaviour in different samples. Effect assessment using ecotoxicological bioassays with organisms at different trophic levels can provide valuable pieces of information on the risk of chemical substances in the ecosystem. The experiments were carried out as described in the OECD Guideline 232 [CSN ISO 11267 - Soil quality - Inhibition of reproduction of Collembola (Folsomia candida) by soil pollutants]. The reproductive effects of palladium (PdCl2) and rhodium (RhCl3) were examined. Concentrations of PGE tested were as follows: 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 µmol.L-1. The EC50 (medium effective concentration) was determined after 28 days of exposure. Inhibition of reproduction of PGE-exposed collembolans was compared against controls. Values of 28dEC50 of PdCl2 and RhCl3 amounted to 21.0 µmol.L-1 and 266.22 µmol.L-1, respectively. We can confirm that the relative order of toxicities is Pd (II) > Pt(IV) > Rh(III). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to use Folsomia candida as an indicator species to assess the risk of soil contamination by palladium and rhodium. However, more toxicity data for various species are needed to evaluate the environmental risks of PGEs in soils.

  7. Distribution of platinum group elements and other traffic related elements among different plants along some highways in Germany.

    PubMed

    Djingova, Rumiana; Kovacheva, Petya; Wagner, Gerhard; Markert, Bernd

    2003-06-01

    Using ICP-MS and ICP-AES platinum group elements (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru and Ir) and Ce, La, Nd, Pb and Zr have been determined in street dust, Taraxacum officinale (dandelion), Plantago lanceolata (plantain), Lolium multiflorum (annual ryegrass), Rhytidiadelphus squarrosus (moss) and Vascellum pratense (mushrooms) collected along highways and streets in Germany during 1999. Among the plants Taraxacum officinale (dandelion) reflects most adequately the pollution with the investigated elements matching the results from street dust. A strong positive correlation between all elements determined in the plants is established. Transfer factor for Pt between soil and plants has been determined in an agricultural experiment ranging between 0.004 and 0.008 for two types of soils.

  8. Platinum group elements in the feathers of raptors and their prey.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K H; Rauch, S; Morrison, G M; Lindberg, P

    2002-04-01

    Platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd), and rhodium (Rh) concentrations were determined in the feathers of three raptor species in Sweden, the sparrowhawk ( Accipiter nisus), the peregrine falcon ( Falco peregrinus), and the gyrfalcon ( Falco rusticolus), as well as the main prey of the sparrowhawk (the house sparrow, Passer domesticus) and the gyrfalcon (the willow grouse, Lagopus lagopus). The analysis of feathers from 1917-1999 revealed a clear temporal trend, with significantly higher Rh concentrations in sparrowhawk and peregrine falcon after 1986. There is evidence for increasing platinum group element (PGE) concentrations from 1917 to 1999 in peregrine falcon and sparrowhawk. This suggests that feathers reflect increased PGE concentrations in the environment over this time period. Mean concentrations of PGE in feathers of raptors after 1986 ranged from 0.3 to 1.8 ng x g(-1) for Pt, 0.6 to 2.1 ng x g(-1) for Pd (indicative values), and 0.1 to 0.6 ng x g(-1) for Rh. House sparrows in urban areas had significantly higher Pt and Pd concentrations than urban sparrowhawks. The higher Pd concentrations in relation to Pt and Rh may indicate the greater mobility of Pd in the environment. Although PGE concentrations are generally higher in birds living in urban areas, no significant spatial trend could be established. This is partly due to the widespread distribution of automobiles and partly because birds forage and integrate PGE exposure over large areas. Laser ablation analysis demonstrates that PGE contamination of feathers is predominantly external, consisting of small particles in the nanometer size range. Other indications of external contamination are that Pt and Pd levels are significantly higher in the vane than in the shaft and that PGE relative ratios (except Pd) reflect urban particles.

  9. Complex anthropogenic sources of platinum group elements in aerosols on Cape Cod, USA.

    PubMed

    Sen, Indra S; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Geboy, Nicholas

    2013-09-17

    Platinum group elements (PGE) of anthropogenic origin have been reported in rainwater, snow, roadside soil and vegetation, industrial waste, and urban airborne particles around the world. As recent studies have shown that PGE are bioavailable in the environment and pose health risks at chronic levels, the extent of PGE pollution is of global concern. In this study, we report PGE concentrations and osmium isotope ((187)Os/(188)Os) ratios of airborne particles (particulate matter, PM10) collected in Woods Hole, a small coastal village on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, U.S.A. The sampling site is more than 100 km away from the nearest urban centers (Boston, Providence) and has no large industrial emission center within a 30 km radius. The study reveals that, although PGE concentrations in rural airborne particulate matter are orders of magnitude lower than in urban aerosols, 69% of the total osmium is of anthropogenic origin. Anthropogenic PGE signatures in airborne particles are thus not restricted to large cities with high traffic flows and substantial industries; they can also be found in rural environments. We further conclude that the combination of Pt/Rh concentration ratios and (187)Os/(188)Os composition can be used to trace PGE sources. The Pt/Rh and (187)Os/(188)Os composition of Woods Hole aerosols indicate that the anthropogenic PGE fraction is primarily sourced from ore smelting processes, with possible minor contributions from fossil fuel burning and automobile catalyst-derived materials. Our results further substantiate the use of (187)Os/(188)Os in source apportionment studies on continental scales.

  10. [Pollution characteristics of platinum group elements in road rust in Xiamen].

    PubMed

    Hong, Zhen-yu; Hong, You-wei; Yin, Li-qian; Chen, Jin-sheng; Chen, Yan-ting; Xu, Ling-ling

    2015-01-01

    With the potential risks for the environment and human health, the concentration and distribution characteristics of platinum group element(PGEs) in road dust in Xiamen city were investigated. Road dust samples were collected from the traffic trunk road, tunnel, tourism area, and industrial area of Xiamen on October 2012. The samples were digested with aqua regia in a microwave assisted digestion system under high pressure condition, separated and purified with cation exchange resin( Dowex AG50W-X8), and the resulting solutions were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results showed that the average concentrations(range) of Pd, Pt and Rh in road dust were 246.82 (58.68-765.52) ng x g(-1), 95.45 (42.14-371.36) ng x g(-1) and 51.76 (21.04-119.72) ng x g(-1), respectively, which were two orders of magnitude higher than the background values. Compared with other cities worldwide, the concentrations of Pd, Pt and Rh in road dust in Xiamen were at higher levels. Theconcentrations of PGEs for different functional areas were listed in the following order: tunnel > urban district > industrial area > tourism area, which indicated that their spatial distributions were mainly affected by the traffic intensity. Correlation analysis results showed that concentration of Pd in the urban traffic artery was significantly correlated with Rh, while Pt was not so correlated with Pd and Rh, suggesting that other sources contributed to PGEs in road dust in addition to the vehicle emission. Although motor vehicle traveling was banned in tourist area, the concentration of PGEs was still at a high level. Some of them might originate from the road dust in surrounding area by atmosphere diffusion.

  11. [Migration and transformation of anthropogenic platinum group elements in environment: a review].

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Miao; Gao, Xue-Lu

    2012-12-01

    Anthropogenic platinum group elements (PGEs) are widely applied in vehicle exhaust catalytic converters (VECs), industrial catalysts, and pharmaceutics, making the PGEs, especially Pt, Pd, and Rh, become the newly environmental pollutants in some fields. Given the positive correlations between the Pt/Pd and Pt/Rh ratios in various environmental samples and the active components of VECs, the VECs containing PGEs as catalysts are regarded as the primary source of PGEs pollution. Sufficient reports indicated that in the past three decades, there was a significant increase of PGEs concentrations in diverse environmental matrices like airborne particulate matters, aquatic ecosystem components (e.g., river water, rain water, groundwater, seawater, and sediments), soils, road dusts, and organisms. It was generally assumed that anthropogenic PGEs behave in inert manner, and the health risks associated with the environmental exposures to PGEs are minimal. However, the recent studies on PGEs toxicity and environmental bioavailability indicated that once entering environment, anthropogenic PGEs might easily be mobilized and transformed into more toxic forms under the actions of various biogeochemical processes, and thereby, enhanced their bioavailability and posed potential health risks to human beings through food chain. This paper summarized the research results about the sources, distribution, and biogeochemical behaviors of PGEs in various environmental media, and it was considered that to establish the standards of PGEs for human health risks, to develop standard substances of PGEs for environmental measurements, to study the PGEs in the sediments of marginal seas, and to assess the toxicity of PGEs to marine mollusks, the present contamination status of PGEs in foods, and the risks of PGEs to human health would be the hot research topics in the future.

  12. Separating Continental Mineral Dust from Cosmic Dust using Platinum Group Element Concentrations and Osmium Isotopes in Ancient Polar Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, J. H.; Jackson, B.; Osterberg, E. C.; Sharma, M.

    2015-12-01

    The platinum group element (PGEs: Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Os, and Ru) accumulation in ancient polar archives have been argued to trace cosmic dust and "smoke" from larger meteors but the PGE concentration data lack specificity. For example, the extent to which the terrestrial volcanism/dust has contributed to the PGE inventory of polar ice cannot be readily evaluated. Since the Os isotope compositions (187Os/188Os ratio) of the terrestrial and extraterrestrial sources are distinctly different from each other, the PGE concentrations when combined with Os isotope composition have the potential to untangle contributions from these sources. Platinum group element concentration determinations in polar ice cores are highly challenging due to their extremely low concentrations (down to 10-15 g/g or fg/g). Here, a new procedure is presented that allows PGEs and Os isotope compositions to be determined from a ~50 g sample of polar ice. Decontaminated ice-melt is spiked with 101Ru, 106Pd, 190Os, 191Ir, and 198Pt and frozen at -20 °C in quartz-glass ampoules. A mixture of purified HNO3 and H2O2 is then added and the sample is heated to 300 °C at 128bar using a High Pressure Asher. This allows all spikes to be equilibrated with the sample PGEs and all Os species are oxidized to OsO4. The resulting OsO4 is extracted using distillation, purified, and measured using negative thermal ionization mass spectrometry. PGEs are then separated and purified using two stage column chromatography and their concentrations determined by isotope dilution using a triple quadruople inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer coupled to an Apex de-solvation nebulizer. The developed method was applied to modern Greenland firn and snow. The PGE concentrations of the firn are 4.0 fg/g for Ir, 20 fg/g for Ru, 590 fg/g for Pt, 38 fg/g for Pd, and 1.3 fg/g for Os, while those of the snow are 3.0 fg/g for Ir, 53 fg/g for Ru, 360 fg/g for Pt, 32 fg/g for Pd, and 0.4 fg/g for Os, respectively. A comparison

  13. Photochemistry and charge transfer chemistry of the platinum group elements. Progress report, May 1, 1991--April 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.

    1991-12-01

    Significant progress has been made on the photochemistry and photophysics of platinum group element dithiolate complexes. The specific systems under investigation are square planar complexes of Pt(II) containing a dithiolate chelate and two other donor groups to complete the coordination sphere. The donor groups may be amines, imines, phosphines, phosphites or olefins, and they can be either monodentate or joined together as part of a chelate ring.

  14. Platinum-group elements: quantification in collected exhaust fumes and studies of catalyst surfaces.

    PubMed

    Palacios, M A; Gómez, M M; Moldovan, M; Morrison, G; Rauch, S; Mcleod, C; Ma, R; Laserna, J; Lucena, P; Caroli, S; Alimonti, A; Petrucci, F; Bocca, B; Schramel, P; Lustig, S; Zischka, M; Wass, U; Stenbom, B; Luna, M; Saenz, J C; Santamaría, J; Torrens, J M

    2000-07-20

    Automotive catalytic converters, in which Pt, Pd and Rh (platinum-group elements; PGEs) are the active components for eliminating several noxious components from exhaust fumes, have become the main source of environmental urban pollution by PGEs. This work reports on the catalyst morphology through changes in catalyst surface by scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) and laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) from fresh to aged catalytic converters. The distribution of these elements in the fresh catalysts analysed (Pt-Pd-Rh gasoline catalyst) is not uniform and occurs mainly in a longitudinal direction. This heterogeneity seems to be greater for Pt and Pd. PGEs released by the catalysts, fresh and aged 30,000 km, were studied in parallel. Whole raw exhaust fumes from four catalysts of three different types were also examined. Two of these were gasoline catalysts (Pt-Pd Rh and Pd-Rh) and the other two were diesel catalysts (Pt). Samples were collected following the 91,441 EUDC driving cycle for light-duty vehicle testing. The results show that at 0 km the samples collected first have the highest content of particulate PGEs and although the general tendency is for the release to decrease with increasing number of samples taken, exceptions are frequent. At 30,000 km the released PGEs in gasoline and diesel catalysts decreased significantly. For fresh gasoline catalysts the mean of the total amount released was approximately 100, 250 and 50 ng km(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 400-800 ng km-1. After ageing the catalysts up to 30,000 km, the gasoline catalysts released amounts of Pt between 6 and 8 ng km(-1), Pd between 12 and 16 ng km(-1) and Rh between 3 and 12 ng km(-1). In diesel catalysts the Pt release varied in the range 108-150 ng km(-1). The soluble portion of PGEs in the HNO3 collector solution represented less than 5% of the total amount for fresh catalysts

  15. What Factors Control Platinum-Group Element (PGE) Abundances in Basalts From the Ontong Java Plateau?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazey, W. J.; Neal, C. R.

    2002-12-01

    Eleven samples encompassing four sites drilled by Ocean Drilling Program Leg 192 to the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) were analyzed for major, trace and platinum-group (PGEs: Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, and Pd) elements. Based on major and trace element chemistry, these are divided into two groups: a primitive group, which was newly discovered on Leg 192, and Kwaimbaita-type basalts, which are ubiquitous on the OJP (cf. Tejada et al., 2002, J. Pet. 43:449). The primitive group is relatively enriched in MgO, Ni, and Cr and relatively depleted in incompatible elements compared to the Kwaimbaita-type basalts. Petrography indicates that the fractionating phases during emplacement of both types of basalts were olivine and Cr-spinel +/- plagioclase +/- cpx. Normalized PGE profiles are fractionated, but exhibit a flattening between Ru and Ir and occasionally an enrichment in Ir. It has been shown that chromite can preferentially incorporate Os and Ru (Kd ?150) over Ir (Kd ?100), which may account for the Ir and Ru systematics. We do not consider sulfide to be a factor in fractionating the PGEs because it is either absent or present as a trace phase in these basalts and the OJP basalts are sulfur undersaturated (Michael and Cornell, 1996, EOS 77:714). Additionally, the primitive samples from the OJP also have Cu/Pd ratios (4500-8000) that are roughly similar to primitive mantle (7300), and have a generally flat transition from Pd to Y on a primitive mantle-normalized plot. It is unlikely that these samples reached sulfur saturation. The Kwaimbaita-type basalts have slightly elevated Cu/Pd ratios (9000-14000). While there are subtle differences between the PGE profiles of basalts from the Leg 192 drill cores compared to OJP basalts from subaerial outcrops in the Solomon Islands (e.g., the former have general lower Pt/Rh and higher Rh/Ru ratios), it is apparent that silicate and oxide phases are controlling the PGE profiles and abundances. For example, the six samples analyzed from Site

  16. Sulfide saturation history of the Stillwater Complex, Montana: chemostratigraphic variation in platinum group elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keays, Reid R.; Lightfoot, Peter C.; Hamlyn, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    A platinum group element (PGE) investigation of a 5.3 km-thick stratigraphic section of the Stillwater Complex, Montana was undertaken to refine and test a geochemical technique to explore for platiniferous horizons in layered mafic/ultramafic complexes. PGE, Au, major, and trace elements were determined in 92 samples from outcrops along traverses in the Chrome Mountain and Contact Mountain areas in the western part of the Stillwater Complex where the J-M reef occurs ˜1,460 m above the floor of the intrusion. A further 29 samples from a drill hole cored in the immediate vicinity of the J-M reef were analyzed to detail compositional variations directly above and below the J-M reef. Below the J-M reef, background concentrations of Pt (10 ppb) and Pd (7 ppb) are features of peridotites with intermediate S concentrations (mostly 100-200 ppm) and rocks from the Bronzitite, Norite I, and Gabbronorite I zones (mostly <100 ppm S). A sustained increase in S abundance commences at the J-M reef and continues to increase and peaks in the center of the 600 m-thick middle banded series. Over this same interval, Pt, Pd, and Au are initially elevated and then decrease in the order Pd > Pt > Au. Within the middle and upper banded series, S abundances fluctuate considerably, but exhibit an overall upward increase. The behavior of these elements records periodic sulfide saturation during deposition of the Peridotite zone, followed by crystallization under sulfide-undersaturated conditions until saturation is achieved at the base of the J-M reef. Following formation of the reef, sulfide-saturated conditions persisted throughout the deposition of most of the remaining Lower Layered Series. This resulted in a pronounced impoverishment in PGE abundance in the remaining magma, a condition that continued throughout deposition of the remainder of a succession, which is characterized by very low Pt (1.5 ppb) and Pd (0.7 ppb) abundances. Because only unmineralized rock was selected for study

  17. Platinum group elements in a 3.5 Ga nickel-iron occurrence - Possible evidence of a deep mantle origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tredoux, Marian; Hart, Rodger J.; Lindsay, Nicholas M.; De Wit, Maarten J.; Armstrong, Richard A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the results of new field observations and the geochemical analyses for the area of the Bon Accord (BA) (the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa) Ni-Fe deposit, with particular consideration given to the trace element, platinum-group element, and isotopic (Pb, Nd, and Os) compositions. On the basis of these data, an interpretation of BA is suggested, according to which the BA deposit is a siderophile-rich heterogeneity remaining in the deep mantle after a process of incomplete core formation. The implications of such a model for the study of core-mantle segregation and the geochemistry of the lowermost mantle are discussed.

  18. Platinum-Group Element Mineralization in the Fedorovatundra layered intrusion, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groshev, Nikolay; Subbotin, Victor; Korchagin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    The 2526 to 2485 Ma Fedorovatundra layered mafic intrusion in the central part of the Kola Peninsula, Russia, is the western massif of the Fedorova-Pana Complex (2526-2446 Ma), which is situated along the northern contact of the Early Proterozoic Imandra-Varzuga rift and Archean granite gneiss. The Fedorovatundra intrusion of approximately 4 km thick has two major parts: (1) located at the bottom of the intrusion Taxitic series (10 to 900 m) and composing the main volume of the massif Layered series (4000 m). The Taxitic series is distinctive, due to its predominant vary-textured often quartz-saturated norites and gabbronorites (with fewer amounts of leucogabbro, melanorite and Ol-gabbronorite) and abundant pyroxenite, less harzburgite xenoliths. Medium to coarse-grained mottled or massive leucocratic gabbronorite and leucogabbro prevails in the Layered series with mesocratic gabbronorite, pyroxenite and troctolite as subordinate rocks. Depending on its localization, geochemical features, mineral composition and economic value platinum-group element (PGE) mineralization of the Fedorovatundra intrusion is divided into 'marginal' (basal, contact) and 'reef' types. 'Marginal' type of mineralization is presented by irregular disseminated interstitial sulfides (1-2 vol. %) of pentlandite-pyrrhotite-chalcopyrite association (Cu/Ni = 1.8) in the Taxitic series. Less sulfides occur as uniformly disseminated aggregates, thin massive lenses and nests. PGE and base metals are concentrated in several ore horizons of 3.5 km long complicated structure. Thickness of ore horizons varies generally within 10-150 m, but it can rise up to 280 m in bulges. In the most common ore-bearing rock (taxitic gabbronorite) average Pt + Pd content is 1.6 ppm (Pd/Pt 4.5). The pyroxenite xenoliths occurring within the Taxitic series are practically barren of sulfide and can dilute higher PGE and base metal grades in the gabbronorite matrix. 'Marginal' mineralization of the Fedorovotundrovsky

  19. Environmental risk of particulate and soluble platinum group elements released from gasoline and diesel engine catalytic converters.

    PubMed

    Moldovan, M; Palacios, M A; Gómez, M M; Morrison, G; Rauch, S; McLeod, C; Ma, R; Caroli, S; Alimonti, A; Petrucci, F; Bocca, B; Schramel, P; Zischka, M; Pettersson, C; Wass, U; Luna, M; Saenz, J C; Santamaría, J

    2002-09-16

    A comparison of platinum-group element (PGE) emission between gasoline and diesel engine catalytic converters is reported within this work. Whole raw exhaust fumes from four catalysts of three different types were examined during their useful lifetime, from fresh to 80,000 km. Two were gasoline engine catalysts (Pt-Pd-Rh and Pd-Rh), while the other two were diesel engine catalysts (Pt). Samples were collected following the 91441 EUDC driving cycle for light-duty vehicle testing, and the sample collection device used allowed differentiation between the particulate and soluble fractions, the latter being the most relevant from an environmental point of view. Analyses were performed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) (quadrupole and high resolution), and special attention was paid to the control of spectral interference, especially in the case of Pd and Rh. The results obtained show that, for fresh catalysts, the release of particulate PGE through car exhaust fumes does not follow any particular trend, with a wide range (one-two orders of magnitude) for the content of noble metals emitted. The samples collected from 30,000-80,000 km present a more homogeneous PGE release for all catalysts studied. A decrease of approximately one order of magnitude is observed with respect to the release from fresh catalysts, except in the case of the diesel engine catalyst, for which PGE emission continued to be higher than in the case of gasoline engines. The fraction of soluble PGE was found to represent less than 10% of the total amount released from fresh catalysts. For aged catalysts, the figures are significantly higher, especially for Pd and Rh. Particulate PGE can be considered as virtually biologically inert, while soluble PGE forms can represent an environmental risk due to their bioavailability, which leads them to accumulate in the environment.

  20. Mobilization of the platinum group elements by low-temperature fluids: Implications for mineralization and the iridium controversy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Kim; Keays, Reid R.; Wallace, Malcolm W.; Gostin, Victor A.

    1992-01-01

    Geochemical investigations on the widely dispersed Late Proterozoic Acraman impact ejecta horizon and its host marine shales in the Adelaide Geosyncline provide strong evidence for low-temperature mobilization of the platinum group elements (PGE), including Ir. The ejecta horizon was formed when the middle Proterozoic dacitic volcanics in the Gawler Ranges, central South Australia, were impacted by a very large (ca. 4 km) meteorite. The resulting structure, now represented by Lake Acraman, is Australia's largest meteorite impact structure. Debris from the impact was blasted for many hundreds of kilometers, some falling into the shallow sea of the Adelaide Geosyncline, some 300 km to the east of the impact site.

  1. Osmium-Isotope and Platinum-Group-Element Systematics of Impact-Melt Rocks, Chesapeake Bay Impact Structure, Virginia, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seung Ryeol; Wright Horton, J., Jr.; Walker, Richard J.

    2005-01-01

    Osmium (Os) isotopes and platinum-group elements (PGEs) are useful for geochemically identifying a meteoritic component within impact structures, because meteorites are typically characterized by low (187)Os/(188)Os ratios and high PGE concentrations. In contrast, most types of crustal target rocks have high radiogenic Os and very low PGE concentrations. We have examined Os isotope and PGE systematics of impact-melt rocks and pre-impact target rocks from a 2004 test hole in the late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure and from nearby coreholes. Our goal is to determine the proportion of the projectile component in the melt rock Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  2. Antibacterial activity of microstructured sacrificial anode thin films by combination of silver with platinum group elements (platinum, palladium, iridium).

    PubMed

    Köller, Manfred; Bellova, Petri; Javid, Siyamak Memar; Motemani, Yahya; Khare, Chinmay; Sengstock, Christina; Tschulik, Kristina; Schildhauer, Thomas A; Ludwig, Alfred

    2017-05-01

    Five different Ag dots arrays (16 to 400dots/mm(2)) were fabricated on a continuous platinum, palladium, or iridium thin film and for comparison also on titanium film by sputter deposition and photolithographic patterning. To analyze the antibacterial activity of these microstructured films Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) were placed onto the array surfaces and cultivated overnight. To analyze the viability of planktonic as well as surface adherent bacteria, the applied bacterial fluid was subsequently aspirated, plated on blood agar plates and adherent bacteria were detected by fluorescence microscopy. A particular antibacterial effect towards S. aureus was induced by Ag dot arrays on each of the platinum group thin film (sacrificial anode system for Ag) in contrast to Ag dot arrays fabricated on the Ti thin films (non-sacrificial anode system for Ag). Among platinum group elements the Ir-Ag system exerted the highest antibacterial activity which was accompanied by most advanced dissolution of the Ag dots and Ag ion release compared to Ag dots on Pt or Pd. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Platinum group element mineralization of the Svetly Bor and Veresovy Bor clinopyroxenite-dunite massifs, Middle Urals, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, S. Yu.; Malitch, K. N.; Kozlov, A. V.; Badanina, I. Yu; Antonov, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    The new data for the geology and mineralogy of the platinum group element (PGE) mineralization related to the chromite-platinum ore zones within the dunite of the Svetly Bor and Veresovy Bor massifs in the Middle Urals are discussed. The geological setting of the chromite-platinum ore zones, their platinum content, compositional and morphological features of the platinum group minerals (PGM) are compared to those within the Nizhny Tagil massif, the world standard of the zonal complexes in the Platinum Ural belt. The chromite-platinum orebodies are spatially related to the contacts between differently granular dunites. Majority of PGM are formed by Pt-Fe alloys that are close in terms of stoichiometry to isoferroplatinum (Pt3Fe), and associated with Os-Ir alloys, Ru-Os and Ir-Rh sulfides, and Ir-Rh thiospinels of the cuproiridsite-cuprorhodsite-ferrorhodsite solid solution. The tetraferroplatinum (PtFe)-tulameenite (PtFe0.5Cu0.5) solid solution and Pt-Cu alloys belong to the later PGM assemblage. The established features of the chromite-platinum ore zones testify to the highly probable identification of the PGE mineralization within the dunite of the Svetly Bor and Vesesovy Bor massifs and could be used in prospecting and exploration for platinum.

  4. pH-dependent release of trace elements including platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sucha, Veronika; Mihaljevic, Martin; Ettler, Vojtech; Strnad, Ladislav

    2014-05-01

    The release of trace metals and platinum group elements (PGEs) from automobile exhaust catalysts represents a remarkable source of higly dispersed environmental contamination. Especially, PGEs have shown increasing research interest due to their possible bioaccessibility. In our research, we focused on leaching behaviour of trace metals from gasoline and diesel automobile catalysts. While catalysts for gasoline engines contain a mixture of Pt-Pd-Rh or Pd-Rh, catalysts for diesel engines are composed only of Pt. We used dust from two crushed gasoline and two crushed diesel catalysts (new and aged). The dust of gasoline catalysts contains significant concentrations of Pt (700 mg.kg-1), Pd (11 000 mg.kg-1) and Rh (700 mg.kg-1). And the dust of diesel catalysts are composed of Pt (3 900 mg.kg-1) and they contains negligible amounts of Pd dan Rh (< 0.5 mg.kg-1, < 0.1 mg.kg-1, respectively). To evaluate leaching of trace metals from dust we used pH-stat leaching test according to the European standard CEN/TS 14997. The concentrations of cations: PGEs (Pt, Pd a Rh), K, Na, Ca, Mg, Al, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, La and Ce were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), and anions: F-, Cl-, SO42- and NO3- by high-performance liquid chromatography. Although the dusts from catalysts were relatively stable to acid/base influence, the leaching of trace metals from catalysts showed a dependence on pH. Generally, the highest concentrations were released under acidic conditions. The leaching of PGEs was higher for Pt in diesel catalysts and for Pd and Rh in gasoline catalysts. The highest concentrations of Zn and Pb were observed in old catalysts. The rare earth metals were released more from gasoline catalysts. Catalysts particles represent health risk especially with respect to their PGEs contents.

  5. Platinum group elements geochemistry of ultramafic and associated rocks from Pindar in Madawara Igneous Complex, Bundelkhand massif, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaram, V.; Singh, S. P.; Satyanarayanan, M.; Anjaiah, K. V.

    2013-02-01

    Ultramafic rocks comprising dunite, harzburgite, lherzolite, olivine webserite and websterite occur as intrusives in the form of small hillocks at Pindar into the granite-gneisses of Bundelkhand Gneissic Complex (BnGC). The peridotites are dominated by olivine cumulates where chromite and precious metal-bearing sulphides crystallized along with pyroxenes, subsequent to crystallization of olivine into the interstitial spaces of cumulates during cooling. Ultramafic rocks of Pindar are characterized by high MgO (up to 46.0 wt%) and FeO (up to 5.8 wt%); low SiO2 (40.8 to 48.0 wt%), TiO2 (0.2 to 0.5 wt%), Al2O3 (~3.2 wt% av.), CaO (~2.7 wt% av.) and Cu (11 to 73 μg/g). Cr and Ni values range from 2297 to 3150 μg/g and 2434 to 2767 μg/g, respectively. Distribution of Ir (up to 20 ng/g), Ru (27 to 90 ng/g), Rh (3 to 14 ng/g), Pt (18 to 72 ng/g), Pd (10 to 27 ng/g) and Au (22 to 57 ng/g) indicate platinum group element (PGE) and associated gold mineralization in these ultramafic rocks. A mineral phase representing sperrylite (PtAs2) was also identified within the sulphides in scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) studies. The primitive mantle-normalized siderophile elements pattern shows platinum group element PGE (PPGE) enrichment (Rh, Pt, Pd). Discrimination diagrams of Pd/Ir vs. Ni/Cu, Pd/Pt vs. Ni/Cu, Cu/Pd vs. Pd, and Cu vs. Pd for the peridotites of Pindar attribute to affinity towards komatiite magma, derived from high degree of partial melting of prolonged depleted mantle, and the sulphur saturation condition incurred during the crystallization of chromite which was favourable for PGE mineralization.

  6. Platinum-group elements in rocks from the voikar-syninsky ophiolite complex, Polar Urals, U.S.S.R.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Aruscavage, P. J.; Haffty, J.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of platinum-group elements (PGE) in rocks collected from the Voikar-Syninsky ophiolite in the Polar Urals suggest that the distribution and geochemistry of PGE in this Paleozoic ophiolite are similar to those in Mesozoic ophiolites from elsewhere. Chondrite-normalized PGE patterns for chromitite, the tectonite unit, and ultramafic and mafic cumulate unit have negative slopes. These results are similar to those found for chromitites from other ophiolites; stratiform chromities show positive slopes. If the magmas that form both types of chromitite originate from similar mantle source material with respect to PGE content, the processes involved must be quite different. However, the distinct chondrite-normalized PGE patterns may reflect differing source materials. ?? 1983 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Increase of platinum group element concentrations in soils and airborne dust in an urban area in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, Hubertus; Anquandah, George A K; Schmidt, Christiane; Zachmann, Dieter; Bahadir, Muefit A

    2007-12-15

    Since 1993, all new cars sold in the European Union had to be fitted with catalytic converters. Undoubtedly, these measures brought about a great progress concerning traffic emission controls. However, this technology also led to new emissions. A rapid accumulation of the catalytic active noble metals Pt, Pd, and Rh in the environment was observed and concern arose about potential environmental and health risks. This work aimed at a contribution to a monitoring of platinum group element (PGE) emission and accumulation by comparing analytical data, all generated in 1999 and in 2005 in an urban area in Germany. Oriented at the 1999 sampling strategy, soil and airborne dust samples were taken in 2005 at the same sampling sites located mainly close to heavily used roads in the region of Braunschweig. For the enrichment of the analytes, conditioned soil samples as well as loaded glass fiber filters from air sampling were transferred to the nickel sulphide fire assay. For analyses, the ICP-MS technique was applied. High Pt, Pd, and Rh concentrations were detected especially in top soil layers (0-2 cm) directly at the roadsides or on center strips. At one road outside the city, where traffic moved with a constant speed of about 80 km/h, maximum concentrations in soil were found to be 50.4 microg/kg for Pt, 43.3 microg/kg for Pd, and 10.7 microg/kg for Rh. PGE concentrations were the highest close to that road and exponentially declined with growing distance. At a second road, where vehicles run with a constant speed of 50 km/h, the highest concentrations were detected in the center strip soil: 88.9 microg/kg (Pt), 77.8 microg/kg (Pd), and 17.6 microg/kg (Rh). At a third crowded street in the centre of Braunschweig with stop and go traffic, the highest soil concentrations were determined, namely 261 microg/kg for Pt, 124 microg/kg for Pd and 38.9 microg/kg for Rh. The sampling of airborne dust at this roadside revealed for Pt 159 pg/m(3) air or 1730 microg/kg dust, for Pd

  8. Efficient and Accurate Identification of Platinum-Group Minerals by a Combination of Mineral Liberation and Electron Probe Microanalysis with a New Approach to the Offline Overlap Correction of Platinum-Group Element Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Osbahr, Inga; Krause, Joachim; Bachmann, Kai; Gutzmer, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Identification and accurate characterization of platinum-group minerals (PGMs) is usually a very cumbersome procedure due to their small grain size (typically below 10 µm) and inconspicuous appearance under reflected light. A novel strategy for finding PGMs and quantifying their composition was developed. It combines a mineral liberation analyzer (MLA), a point logging system, and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). As a first step, the PGMs are identified using the MLA. Grains identified as PGMs are then marked and coordinates recorded and transferred to the EPMA. Case studies illustrate that the combination of MLA, point logging, and EPMA results in the identification of a significantly higher number of PGM grains than reflected light microscopy. Analysis of PGMs by EPMA requires considerable effort due to the often significant overlaps between the X-ray spectra of almost all platinum-group and associated elements. X-ray lines suitable for quantitative analysis need to be carefully selected. As peak overlaps cannot be avoided completely, an offline overlap correction based on weight proportions has been developed. Results obtained with the procedure proposed in this study attain acceptable totals and atomic proportions, indicating that the applied corrections are appropriate.

  9. Reliability assessment of MVP-BURN and JENDL-4.0 related to nuclear transmutation of light platinum group elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Atsunori; Nilsson, Mikael; Ozawa, Masaki; Chiba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    The Aprés ORIENT research program, as a concept of advanced nuclear fuel cycle, was initiated in FY2011 aiming at creating stable, highly-valuable elements by nuclear transmutation from ↓ssion products. In order to simulate creation of such elements by (n, γ) reaction succeeded by β- decay in reactors, a continuous-energy Monte Carlo burnup calculation code MVP-BURN was employed. Then, it is one of the most important tasks to con↓rm the reliability of MVP-BURN code and evaluated neutron cross section library. In this study, both an experiment of neutron activation analysis in TRIGA Mark I reactor at University of California, Irvine and the corresponding burnup calculation using MVP-BURN code were performed for validation of the simulation on transmutation of light platinum group elements. Especially, some neutron capture reactions such as 102Ru(n, γ)103Ru, 104Ru(n, γ)105Ru, and 108Pd(n, γ)109Pd were dealt with in this study. From a comparison between the calculation (C) and the experiment (E) about 102Ru(n, γ)103Ru, the deviation (C/E-1) was signi↓cantly large. Then, it is strongly suspected that not MVP-BURN code but the neutron capture cross section of 102Ru belonging to JENDL-4.0 used in this simulation have made the big di↑erence as (C/E-1) >20%.

  10. Distribution of platinum-group elements in the Bati Kef chromite deposit, Guleman-Elazig area, eastern Turkey.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, N.J.; Engin, T.; Singer, D.A.; Haffty, J.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of platinum-group elements (PGE) within chromite deposits from an ophiolite is determined and their geochemistry compared with chromitites from ophiolites and from stratiform layered complexes elsewhere in the world. The Guleman area chromitites are lenses of layered massive to disseminated chromite in dunite or sheared harzburgite along and near the dunite-harzburgite contact. PGE were analysed by a fire assay/spectrographic method. The analyses, in ppb, varied narrowly near the detection limits; only Ir was mostly detected (24-27 ppb) . The data plot as independent, slight variations of individual PGE with crude and irregular spatial distributions, oriented with respect to the land surface. Based on studies elsewhere, the PGE reside mostly in laurite, erlichmanite and Os/Ir alloys included within or interstitial to chromite. Average values for each PGE were normalized with respect to average chondrite concentrations for these elements. All patterns for ophiolite-chromitites (5) show depletion of these elements relative to chondrite average concentrations, with greater depletion in Pt and Pd than in Ir and Ru, to produce patterns with negative slopes. Chromitites from differentiated stratiform complexes (2) yield patterns with positive slopes. -G.J.N.

  11. Platinum group element and cerium concentrations in roadside environments in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Clare L S; Hassan Pour, Zahra; Zereini, Fathi

    2016-02-01

    Platinum (Pt), palladium (Pd) and rhodium (Rh) are accumulating globally in the environment, due to their use as catalysts to control automotive exhaust emissions. While environmental increases in platinum metal concentrations have been well documented for a number of countries, published data for Canada have been missing to date. The aim of this study is to examine the concentrations of Pt, Pd and Rh, as well as Ce, in soils and dust as a function of traffic volume in Toronto, Ontario. Soils and road and underpass dust were collected from two sites with medium and high volumes of traffic. Samples were acid digested and co-precipitated with Hg (for Pd) and Te (for Pt and Rh), prior to measurement using ICP-Q-MS. Palladium occurred at the highest levels in samples, followed by Pt and Rh. Median concentrations for all soil samples were 63 μg Pd/kg, 8.7 μg Pt/kg, 1.7 μg Rh/kg and 41 mg Ce/kg. The results support existing data regarding PGE accumulation trends in urban and roadside environments, due to their use as catalysts in automotive catalytic converters. This study also confirms a shift toward the heavier use of Pd as the catalyst of choice in recent years, as reflected in the higher concentrations measured for this metal relative to Pt and Rh. The results highlight a need to continue monitoring the accumulation of PGE, most notably Pd, in urban environments.

  12. Platinum-group element geochemistry of the Zhuqing Fe-Ti-V oxide ore-bearing mafic intrusions in western Yangtze Block, SW China: control of platinum-group elements by magnetite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-Peng; Zhu, Wei-Guang; Zhong, Hong; Bai, Zhong-Jie; He, De-Feng; Ye, Xian-Tao; Chen, Cai-Jie; Cao, Chong-Yong

    2014-06-01

    Platinum-group element (PGE) geochemistry combined with elemental geochemistry and magnetite compositions are reported for the Mesoproterozoic Zhuqing Fe-Ti-V oxide ore-bearing mafic intrusions in the western Yangtze Block, SW China. All the Zhuqing gabbros display extremely low concentrations of chalcophile elements and PGEs. The oxide-rich gabbros contain relatively higher contents of Cr, Ni, Ir, Ru, Rh, and lower contents of Pt and Pd than the oxide-poor gabbros. The abundances of whole-rock concentrations of Ni, Ir, Ru, and Rh correlate well with V contents in the Zhuqing gabbros, implying that the distributions of these elements are controlled by magnetite. The fractionation between Ir-Ru-Rh and Pt-Pd in the Zhuqing gabbros is mainly attributed to fractional crystallization of chromite and magnetite, whereas Ru anomalies are mainly due to variable degrees of compatibility of PGE in magnetite. The order of relative incompatibility of PGEs is calculated to be Pd < Pt < Rh < Ir < Ru. The very low PGE contents and Cu/Zr ratios and high Cu/Pd ratios suggest initially S-saturated magma parents that were highly depleted in PGE, which mainly formed due to low degrees of partial melting leaving sulfides concentrating PGEs behind in the mantle. Moreover, the low MgO, Ni, Ir and Ru contents and high Cu/Ni and Pd/Ir ratios for the gabbros suggest a highly evolved parental magma. Fe-Ti oxides fractionally crystallized from the highly evolved magma and subsequently settled in the lower sections of the magma chamber, where they concentrated and formed Fe-Ti-V oxide ore layers at the base of the lower and upper cycles. Multiple episodes of magma replenishment in the magma chamber may have been involved in the formation of the Zhuqing intrusions.

  13. Batch leaching tests of motherboards to assess environmental contamination by bromine, platinum group elements and other selected heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Almeida, César; Grosselli, Melina; González, Patricia; Martínez, Dante; Gil, Raúl

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a batch leaching test was executed to evaluate the toxicity associated with chemicals contained in motherboards. The leaching solutions used were distilled water, nitric acid, acetic acid and synthetic acid rain solution. A total of 21 elements including Ag, As, Au, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hf, Ir, Mn, Ni, Os, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rd, Rh, Se, U and Zn were analyzed. In this study, the pH values of all the leachates fell within the range of 2.33-4.88. The highest concentrations of metals were obtained from the acid rain solution, whilst the maximum value of bromine was achieved with solution of acetic acid. Appreciable concentrations of platinum group elements were detected with concentrations around 3.45, 1.43, 1.21 and 22.19 µg L(-1) for Ir, Pd, Pt and Rh, respectively. The different leaching of the motherboards revealed the predominant presence of the toxic substances in the leached from the e-waste. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Platinum group elements provide no indication of a meteoritic component in ICDP cores from the Bosumtwi crater, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goderis, S.; Tagle, R.; Schmitt, R. T.; Erzinger, J.; Claeys, P. H.

    In an attempt to identify the type of projectile, 14 samples from the Bosumtwi crater in Ghana were analyzed for platinum group element (PGE) concentrations by nickel sulfide fire assay inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The majority of the samples come from the impactite material recovered by cores LB-07A and LB-08A, which were drilled by the International Continental Scientific Drilling program (ICDP). One sample originates from the fallback material found at the contact between the impactite and the overlying lake sediment in core LB-05B. No clear signature of a meteoritic contamination was identified in the 13 impactite samples. The target rock apparently dominates the PGE contribution in the impactites. These results agree with the PGE concentrations reported for the suevites collected at the crater rim and in other parts of the Bosumtwi ICDP cores. However, based on Cr and Os isotopic signatures, a meteoritic component could be present in the sample of fallback material, supporting the reports of the existence of meteoritic material in the Ivory Coast tektites. Further analyses of the fallback material from the Bosumtwi drill cores should confirm (or not) this first result.

  15. Osmium isotope evidence for a crustal origin of platinum group elements in the Sudbury nickel ore, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickin, A. P.; Richardson, J. M.; Crocket, J. H.; McNutt, R. H.; Peredery, W. V.

    1992-09-01

    Sulphide ores from the International Nickel Company's (INCO) Creighton Mine, Sudbury, were analysed for osmium isotope ratios by ICP-MS. Rhenium and osmium abundances were determined by isotope dilution using a mixed spike in solid solution in a nickel sulphide matrix. Calculated initial 187Os /188Os ratios at 1.85 Ga (the emplacement age of the Sudbury complex) cluster around 0.60. The occurrence of less radiogenic compositions is attributed to post-emplacement, open-system behaviour of the Re/Os system. The Creighton results strongly overlap the initial ratios of published osmium data from two other Sudbury mines, suggesting a narrow range of isotope ratio in the original ore, within the range of estimated osmium isotope compositions in the country rock at 1.85 Ga, using published and new data. Therefore, the sulphide ores of the Sudbury complex can have an entirely crustal source without a mantle-derived contribution. This conclusion is consistent with published neodymium isotope data for the complex and supports the meteorite impact hypothesis, since this is the most effective means of fusing the large quantity of crustal rocks necessary to generate the complex. The extraction of platinum group elements (PGE) from this silicate melt by a nickel sulphide liquid was probably analogous to the laboratory fire assay procedure.

  16. Platinum group element enrichments and possible chondritic Ru:Ir across the Frasnian-Famennian boundary, western New York State.

    PubMed

    Over, D J; Conaway, C A; Katz, D J; Goodfellow, W D; Gregoire, D C

    1997-08-01

    The Frasnian-Famennian boundary is recognized as the culmination of a global mass extinction in the Late Devonian. In western New York State the boundary is a distinct horizon within a pyritic black shale bed of the upper Hanover Shale defined by the first occurrence of Palmatolepis triangularis in the absence of Frasnian conodonts. The boundary is characterized by a minor disconformity marked by a lag concentration of conodonts. Iridium at the boundary is 0.11-0.24 ng/g, two to five times background levels of <0.05 ng/g; other Ir enrichments of 0.38 ng/g and 0.49 ng/g occur within 50 cm of the conodont-constrained boundary. Numerous Ir enrichments in the boundary interval suggest extraterrestrial accretion and platinum group element (PGE) concentration at disconformities, or mobilization and concentration in organic-rich/pyritic-rich laminations from cosmic or terrestrial sources. PGE ratios of Pt/Pd and Ku/Ir at the boundary horizon approximate chondritic ratios and are suggestive of an unaltered extraterrestrial source. These values do not conclusively establish a single extraterrestrial impact as the ultimate cause of the Frasnian-Famennian mass extinction, especially given the presence of similar Ir enrichments elsewhere in the section and the absence at the boundary of microtektites and shocked mineral grains.

  17. Platinum group elements in stream sediments of mining zones: The Hex River (Bushveld Igneous Complex, South Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almécija, Clara; Cobelo-García, Antonio; Wepener, Victor; Prego, Ricardo

    2017-05-01

    Assessment of the environmental impact of platinum group elements (PGE) and other trace elements from mining activities is essential to prevent potential environmental risks. This study evaluates the concentrations of PGE in stream sediments of the Hex River, which drains the mining area of the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa), at four sampling points. Major, minor and trace elements (Fe, Ca, Al, Mg, Mn, V, Cr, Zn, Cu, As, Co, Ni, Cd, and Pb) were analyzed by FAAS and ETAAS in suspended particulate matter and different sediment fractions (<63, 63-500 and 500-2000 μm), and Pt, Pd, Rh, and Ir were measured by ICP-MS after removal of interfering elements (cation exchange resin 50W-DOWEX-X8). Procedures were blank-corrected and accuracy checked using reference materials. Nickel, Cr, Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir show concentrations 3-, 13- 18-, 28-, 48- and 44- fold the typical upper continental crust levels, respectively, although lower than concentrations reported for the parent rocks. The highest concentrations were observed closer to the mining area, decreasing with distance and in the <63 μm fraction, probably derived from atmospheric deposition and surface runoff of PGE-rich particles released from mining activities. Thus, mining activities are causing some disturbance of the surface PGE geochemical cycle, increasing the presence of PGE in the fine fraction of river sediments. We propose that indicators such as airborne particulate matter, and soil and river sediment quality, should be added to the protocols for evaluating the sustainability of mining activities.

  18. Platinum group elements and gold in ferromanganese crusts from Afanasiy-Nikitin seamount, equatorial Indian Ocean: Sources and fractionation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banakar, V.K.; Hein, J.R.; Rajani, R.P.; Chodankar, A.R.

    2007-01-01

    The major element relationships in ferromanganese (Fe-Mn) crusts from Afanasiy-Nikitin seamount (ANS), eastern equatorial Indian Ocean, appear to be atypical. High positive correlations (r = 0.99) between Mn/Co and Fe/Co ratios, and lack of correlation of those ratios with Co, Ce, and Ce/Co, indicate that the ANS Fe-Mn crusts are distinct from Pacific seamount Fe-Mn crusts, and reflect region-specific chemical characteristics. The platinum group elements (PGE: Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, and Pd) and Au in ANS Fe-Mn crusts are derived from seawater and are mainly of terrestrial origin, with a minor cosmogenic component. The Ru/Rh (0.5-2) and Pt/Ru ratios (7-28) are closely comparable to ratios in continental basalts, whereas Pd/Ir ratios exhibit values ( 0.75) correlations between water depth and Mn/Co, Fe/Co, Ce/Co, Co, and the PGEs. Fractionation of the PGE-Au from seawater during colloidal precipitation of the major-oxide phases is indicated by well-defined linear positive correlations (r > 0.8) of Co and Ce with Ir, Ru, Rh, and Pt; Au/Co with Mn/Co; and by weak or no correlations of Pd with water depth, Co-normalized major-element ratios, and with the other PGE (r < 0.5). The strong enrichment of Pt (up to 1 ppm) relative to the other PGE and its positive correlations with Ce and Co demonstrate a common link for the high concentrations of all three elements, which likely involves an oxidation reaction on the Mn-oxide and Fe-oxyhydroxide surfaces. The documented fractionation of PGE-Au and their positive association with redox sensitive Co and Ce may have applications in reconstructing past-ocean redox conditions and water masses.

  19. Thermodynamic calculations of the volatility of the platinum group elements (PGE): The PGE content of fluids at magmatic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Scott A.

    1987-11-01

    The volatilities of the platinum-group elements as metals, oxides and chlorides were calculated at temperatures of 800-1600 K. Only Pd is significantly volatile as the metal. At log fH2O = 1 Kbar and 1200 K., the concentration (weight) of Pd in the vapor reaches 1 ppt and at 1600 K attains several ppb. The PGE oxides are extremely volatile at atmospheric oxygen fugacities. However, only Os and Ru have significant volatilities (≥ ppt) as oxides (OsO 4, RuO 3) at oxygen fugacities typical of magmatic PGE deposits (near QFM) and only at temperatures greater than 1400 K. Data on the volatility of PGE chlorides exist only for Pd and Ru, both of which are somewhat more volatile as chlorides than as oxides. At 1400 log fH2O = 1 bars, fHCl = 100 bars and at QFM, the calculated vapor concentrations of PdCl 2 and RuCl 3 are 500 ppt and 20 ppt, respectively (and less in the presence of sulfur). However, higher concentrations of PGE may be attained at higher temperatures, higher fO2, higher fHCl or lower fH2. Also, any interactions between water vapor and PGE vapor species (e.g. ionization, solvation) would tend to increase the vapor concentration of PGE. Volatility of Ir as IrF 6 is insignificant at all conditions. Vapor transport of the more volatile PGE as chlorides may play some role in the transport of these metals in mafic igneous complexes such as the Stillwater or the Bushveld. However, under the conditions where the PGE are most volatile, the metals Fe, Ni and Cu are several factors often more volatile, so that enrichment of the PGE and Cu over Ni and Fe cannot be explained by chloride transport alone.

  20. Platinum group elements in a 3. 5 Ga nickel-iron occurrence: Possible evidence of a deep mantle origin

    SciTech Connect

    Tredoux, M.; Hart, R.J.; Lindsay, N.M.; Sellschop, J.P.F. ); de Wit, M.J. Lunar and Planetary Inst., Houston, TX ); Armstrong, R.A. )

    1989-01-10

    The Bon Accord (BA) Ni-Fe deposit occurs in chemically depleted ultramafic rocks of the circa 3.5 Ga Jamestown opholite complex in the Barberton greenstone belt of the Kaapvaal craton, South Africa. BA is unusual both mineralogically and chemically. It consists of a rare Ni-rich assemblage: Ni-oxide (bunsenite), -spinels (trevorite, nichromite), and -silicates (e.g., liebenbergite, the Ni end-member olivine) and their altered equivalents. NiO (average = 38%) and FeO + Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (average = 34%) are the major chemical constituents. The Cu and S contents are very low (both < 100 ppm), and no evidence for replacement of preexisting sulphides has been detected. BA is enriched in platinum group elements (PGE) and shows bimodal patterns on the standard PGE diagrams. Differences between the patterns are much greater for Os and Ir than for the other PGE. This observation is interpreted as being indicative of a high-temperature process (> 2000C; lower mantle). High Ni/Fe and Ni/Co ratios (relative to C-1 chondrite) suggest that BA might have been derived form siderophile-rich material that remained in the lower mantle after inefficient core formation. A model is presented wherein such a metal-silicate heterogeneity is fractionated and oxidized during ascent through the mantle in a thermal plume which originates in the lowermost mantle during formation of the Archean oceanic crust. Inclusion of such fractionated pods in the old subcontinental 'keel' of the Kaapvaal craton might constitute a potential PGE source, which could have been tapped by subsequent magmatic activity.

  1. Anthropogenic platinum group element (Pt, Pd, Rh) concentrations in PM10 and PM2.5 from Kolkata, India.

    PubMed

    Diong, Huey Ting; Das, Reshmi; Khezri, Bahareh; Srivastava, Bijayen; Wang, Xianfeng; Sikdar, Pradip K; Webster, Richard D

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates platinum group elements (PGEs) in the breathable (PM10) and respirable (PM2.5) fractions of air particulates from a heavily polluted Indian metro city. The samples were collected from traffic junctions at the heart of the city and industrial sites in the suburbs during winter and monsoon seasons of 2013-2014. PGE concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The PGE concentrations in the samples from traffic junctions are within the range of 2.7-111 ng/m(3) for Pd, 0.86-12.3 ng/m(3) for Pt and 0.09-3.13 ng/m(3) for Rh, and from industrial sites are within the range of 3.12-32.3 ng/m(3) for Pd, 0.73-7.39 ng/m(3) for Pt and 0.1-0.69 ng/m(3) for Rh. Pt concentrations were lower in the monsoon compared to winter while Pd concentrations increased during monsoon and Rh stayed relatively unaffected across seasons. For all seasons and locations, concentrations of Pd > Pt > Rh, indicating dominance of Pd-containing exhaust converters. Most of the PGEs were concentrated in the PM2.5 fraction. A strong correlation (R ≥ 0.62) between the PGEs from traffic junction indicates a common emission source viz. catalytic converters, whereas a moderate to weak correlation (R ≤ 0.5) from the industrial sites indicate mixing of different sources like coal, raw materials used in the factories and automobile. A wider range of Pt/Pd, Pt/Rh and Pd/Rh ratios measured in the traffic junction possibly hint towards varying proportions of PGEs used for catalyst productions in numerous rising and established car brands.

  2. Platinum-group elements and minerals in the lower and middle group chromitites of the western Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junge, Malte; Oberthür, Thomas; Osbahr, Inga; Gutter, Paul

    2016-10-01

    The chromitites of the Bushveld Complex in South Africa contain vast resources of platinum-group elements (PGE). However, knowledge of the distribution and the mineralogical siting of the PGE in the lower group (LG) and middle group (MG) chromitite seams of the Bushveld Complex is limited. We studied concentrates from the LG-6 and MG-2 chromitites of the western Bushveld Complex by a variety of microanalytical techniques. The dominant PGM are sulfides, namely laurite, cooperite-braggite, and malanite-cuprorhodsite, followed by PGE-sulfarsenides, sperrylite, and Pt-Fe alloys. Laurite is the most abundant PGM (vol%). The matching sets of PGM present in the LG and MG chromitites of both the western and the eastern Bushveld Complex, and in the UG-2 chromitite, show strong similarities which support the assumption of a characteristic and general chromitite-related PGM assemblage. Palladium and Rh contents in pentlandite are low and erratic although maximum contents of 7730 ppm Pd and 6020 ppm Rh were detected. Rare thiospinels of the polydymite-linnaeite-greigite series have PGE contents of 1430 ppm Pt, 5370 ppm Rh, and 1460 ppm Pd. The various PGE occur in different deportment: Platinum is generally present in the form of discrete PGM (sulfides, arsenides, alloys). Palladium is present as a large variety of discrete PGM and also incorporated in pentlandite. Rhodium forms discrete PGM and is occasionally present in pentlandite. The IPGE (Os, Ir, and Ru) are dominantly incorporated in laurite (often as inclusions in chromite) and also occur as sulfarsenides.

  3. Re-Os isotope and platinum group elements of a FOcal ZOne mantle source, Louisville Seamounts Chain, Pacific ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Hanyu, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Akira; Senda, Ryoko; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Fitton, Godfrey; Williams, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    The Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) is, besides the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain, one of the longest-lived hotspot traces. We report here the first Re-Os isotope and platinum group element (PGE) data for Canopus, Rigil, and Burton Guyots along the chain, which were drilled during IODP Expedition 330. The LSC basalts possess (187Os/188Os)i = 0.1245-0.1314 that are remarkably homogeneous and do not vary with age. A Re-Os isochron age of 64.9 ± 3.2 Ma was obtained for Burton seamount (the youngest of the three seamounts drilled), consistent with 40Ar-39Ar data. Isochron-derived initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1272 ± 0.0008, together with data for olivines (0.1271-0.1275), are within the estimated primitive mantle values. This (187Os/188Os)i range is similar to those of Rarotonga (0.124-0.139) and Samoan shield (0.1276-0.1313) basalts and lower than those of Cook-Austral (0.136-0.155) and Hawaiian shield (0.1283-0.1578) basalts, suggesting little or no recycled component in the LSC mantle source. The PGE data of LSC basalts are distinct from those of oceanic lower crust. Variation in PGE patterns can be largely explained by different low degrees of melting under sulfide-saturated conditions of the same relatively fertile mantle source, consistent with their primitive mantle-like Os and primordial Ne isotope signatures. The PGE patterns and the low 187Os/188Os composition of LSC basalts contrast with those of Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) tholeiites. We conclude that the Re-Os isotope and PGE composition of LSC basalts reflect a relatively pure deep-sourced common mantle sampled by some ocean island basalts but is not discernible in the composition of OJP tholeiites.

  4. Platinum Group Elements (PGE) geochemistry of komatiites and boninites from Dharwar Craton, India: Implications for mantle melting processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Manikyamba, C.; Santosh, M.; Ganguly, Sohini; Khelen, Arubam C.; Subramanyam, K. S. V.

    2015-06-01

    High MgO volcanic rocks having elevated concentrations of Ni and Cr are potential hosts for platinum group elements (PGE) owing to their primitive mantle origin and eruption at high temperatures. Though their higher PGE abundance is economically significant in mineral exploration studies, their lower concentrations are also valuable geochemical tools to evaluate petrogenetic processes. In this paper an attempt has been made to evaluate the PGE geochemistry of high MgO volcanic rocks from two greenstone belts of western and eastern Dharwar Craton and to discuss different mantle processes operative at diverse geodynamic settings during the Neoarchean time. The Bababudan greenstone belt of western and Gadwal greenstone belt of eastern Dharwar Cratons are dominantly composed of high MgO volcanic rocks which, based on distinct geochemical characteristics, have been identified as komatiites and boninites respectively. The Bababudan komatiites are essentially composed of olivine and clinopyroxene with rare plagioclase tending towards komatiitic basalts. The Gadwal boninites contain clinopyroxene, recrystallized hornblende with minor orthopyroxene, plagioclase and sulphide minerals. The Bababudan komatiites are Al-undepleted type (Al2O3/TiO2 = 23-59) with distinctly high MgO (27.4-35.8 wt.%), Ni (509-1066 ppm) and Cr (136-3036 ppm) contents. These rocks have low ΣPGE (9-42 ppb) contents with 0.2-2.4 ppb Iridium (Ir), 0.2-1.4 ppb Osmium (Os) and 0.4-4.4 ppb Ruthenium (Ru) among Iridium group PGE (IPGE); and 1.4-16.2 ppb Platinum (Pt), 2.8-19 ppb Palladium (Pd) and 0.2-9.8 ppb Rhodium (Rh) among Platinum group PGE (PPGE). The Gadwal boninites are high-Ca boninites with CaO/Al2O3 ratios varying between 0.8 and 1.0, with 12-24 wt.% MgO, 821-1168 ppm Ni and 2307-2765 ppm Cr. They show higher concentration of total PGE (82-207 ppb) with Pt concentration ranging from 13 to 19 ppb, Pd between 65 and 180 ppb and Rh in the range of 1.4-3 ppb compared to the Bababudan komatiites. Ir

  5. Determination of platinum group elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry combined with nickel sulfide fire assay and tellurium coprecipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yali; Guan, Xiyun; Du, Andao

    1998-09-01

    A method was developed for the determination of trace platinum group elements (PGEs) by nickel sulfide fire assay inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). With isotope dilution, the improved technique gives precise Os content data. Through the purification of the reagent nickel oxide, reagent blank was greatly reduced. Results obtained for the standard reference materials (SRM) GPt-1-GPt-7(GBW 07288-07294, China), DZ Σ-2 (GBW 07102, China) and Guilin Cu-Ni Ore are in good agreement with the recommended values for platinum group elements. The detection limits ranged from 0.01 to 0.39 ng/g. The relative standard deviations for Ru, Rh, Pd and Ir were less than 5%, for Os less than 1%, and Pt less than 8% for SRM GPt-6.

  6. Platinum group and chalcophile element systematics of serpentinized peridotites from the St. Elena ophiolite in Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, J.; Bizimis, M.; Schwarzenbach, E. M.; Foustoukos, D.; Frisby, C. P.; Brandon, A. D.; Gazel, E.

    2015-12-01

    We present in situ LA-ICPMS data on platinum group element (PGE) and chalcophile element (namely Cu, Ag, Te, Au, Pb) systematics in sulfides from partially serpentinized peridotites of the St. Elena ophiolite, Costa Rica. PGE are strong indicators of primary mantle processes, though their behavior during low temperature alteration processes such as serpentinization is not well understood. St. Elena sulfides are dominantly pentlandites that coexist with Fe-Ni alloys and native Cu. This indicates extremely low fO2 and fS2 conditions likely established during the early stages of serpentinization. We observe extremely variable PGE-Re concentrations in the sulfides, (e.g. [Os] = 2 - 100,000 times primitive mantle, PM). Low [Os] sulfides have high Pd/Os, which in turn correlates positively with Cu concentrations, suggesting Pd enrichment through Cu-rich fluids (e.g. Schwarzenbach et al., 2014, CMP) as opposed to melt-rock reaction. Sulfide PM-normalized PGE-Re patterns are dominated by strong Pt depletions (e.g., Pt/Pd = 0.80-0.0009). Occasional Pt enrichments over Pd and Ru (or Rh) in a PM-normalized pattern (~5% of the sulfide population) often correlate with Te and/or Au enrichments. Pt enrichment was also observed in a composite pentlandite-awaruite, suggesting possible exsolution of Pt from sulfides under extremely low fS2 conditions. Pb concentrations do not correlate with other chalcophiles or PGE. Pb ranges from 0.01-31.64 ppm with the majority of sulfides <5 ppm, and an average concentration of 2.77 ppm (n=64). Assuming that this Pb concentration is representative of mantle sulfides, this implies that Pb is not dominantly held in sulfides in the upper mantle. Combination of in situ and bulk rock PGE analyses will be used to distinguish the effects of primary magmatic signatures (e.g., melt depletion, melt-rock interaction) and secondary processes such as serpentinization on the PGE-Re and chalcophile element systematics of these sulfides.

  7. Platinum-group element concentrations in pyrite from the Main Sulfide Zone of the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, R.; Gervilla, F.; Barnes, S.-J.; Oberthür, T.; Lunar, R.

    2016-10-01

    The Main Sulfide Zone (MSZ) of the Great Dyke of Zimbabwe hosts the world's second largest resource of platinum-group elements (PGE) after the Bushveld Complex in South Africa. The sulfide assemblage of the MSZ comprises pyrrhotite, pentlandite, chalcopyrite, and minor pyrite. Recently, several studies have observed in a number of Ni-Cu-PGE ore deposits that pyrite may host significant amounts of PGE, particularly Pt and Rh. In this study, we have determined PGE and other trace element contents in pyrite from the Hartley, Ngezi, Unki, and Mimosa mines of the Great Dyke by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). Based on the textures and PGE contents, two types of pyrite can be differentiated. Py1 occurs as individual euhedral or subhedral grains or clusters of crystals mostly within chalcopyrite and pentlandite, in some cases in the form of symplectitic intergrowths, and is PGE rich (up to 99 ppm Pt and 61 ppm Rh; 1.7 to 47.1 ppm Ru, 0.1 to 7.8 ppm Os, and 1.2 to 20.2 ppm Ir). Py2 occurs as small individual euhedral or subhedral crystals within pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and less frequently within chalcopyrite and silicates and has low PGE contents (<0.11 ppm Pt, <0.34 ppm Rh, <2.5 ppm Ru, <0.37 ppm Ir, and <0.40 ppm Os). Py1 contains higher Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, and Pt contents than the associated pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite, whereas Py2 has similar PGE contents as coexisting pyrrhotite and pentlandite. Based on the textural relationships, two different origins are attributed for each pyrite type. Py1 intergrowth with pentlandite and chalcopyrite is inferred to have formed by late, low temperature (<300 °C) decomposition of residual Ni-rich monosulfide solid solution, whereas Py2 is suggested to have formed by replacement of pyrrhotite and pentlandite caused by late magmatic/hydrothermal fluids.

  8. Ni, Cu, Au, and platinum-group element contents of sulphides associated with intraplate magmatism: A synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, S.-J.; Zientek, M.L.; Severson, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    The tectonic setting of intraplate magmas, typically a plume intersecting a rift, is ideal for the development of Ni - Cu - platinum-group element-bearing sulphides. The plume transports metal-rich magmas close to the mantle - crust boundary. The interaction of the rift and plume permits rapid transport of the magma into the crust, thus ensuring that no sulphides are lost from the magma en route to the crust. The rift may contain sediments which could provide the sulphur necessary to bring about sulphide saturation in the magmas. The plume provides large volumes of mafic magma; thus any sulphides that form can collect metals from a large volume of magma and consequently the sulphides will be metal rich. The large volume of magma provides sufficient heat to release large quantities of S from the crust, thus providing sufficient S to form a large sulphide deposit. The composition of the sulphides varies on a number of scales: (i) there is a variation between geographic areas, in which sulphides from the Noril'sk - Talnakh area are the richest in metals and those from the Muskox intrusion are poorest in metals; (ii) there is a variation between textural types of sulphides, in which disseminated sulphides are generally richer in metals than the associated massive and matrix sulphides; and (iii) the massive and matrix sulphides show a much wider range of compositions than the disseminated sulphides, and on the basis of their Ni/Cu ratio the massive and matrix sulphides can be divided into Cu rich and Fe rich. The Cu-rich sulphides are also enriched in Pt, Pd, and Au; in contrast, the Fe-rich sulphides are enriched in Fe, Os, Ir, Ru, and Rh. Nickel concentrations are similar in both. Differences in the composition between the sulphides from different areas may be attributed to a combination of differences in composition of the silicate magma from which the sulphides segregated and differences in the ratio of silicate to sulphide liquid (R factors). The higher metal

  9. Platinum-group element abundance and distribution in chromite deposits of the Acoje Block, Zambales Ophiolite Complex, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacuta, G.C.; Kay, R.W.; Gibbs, A.K.; Lipin, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) occur in ore-grade concentration in some of the chromite deposits related to the ultramafic section of the Acoje Block of the Zambales Ophiolite Complex. The deposits are of three types: Type 1 - associated with cumulate peridotites at the base of the crust; Type 2 - in dunite pods from the top 1 km of mantle harzburgite; and Type 3 - like Type 2, but in deeper levels of the harzburgite. Most of the deposites have chromite compositions that are high in Cr with Cr/(Cr + Al) (expressed as chromium index, Cr#) > 0.6; high-Al (Cr# Pd, thought to be characteristic of PGE-barren deposits) and positive slope (Ir < Pd, characteristic of PGE-rich deposits). Iridium, Ru and Os commonly occur as micron-size laurite (sulfide) inclusions in unfractured chromite. Laurite and native Os are also found as inclusions in interstitial sulfides. Platinum and Pd occur as alloy inclusions (and possibly as solid solution) in interstitial Ni-Cu sulfides and as tellurobismuthides in serpentine and altered sulfides. Variability of PGE distribution may be explained by alteration, crystal fractionation or partial melting processes. Alteration and metamorphism were ruled out, because PGE contents do not correlate with degree of serpentinization or the abundance and type (hydroxyl versus non-hydroxyl) of silicate inclusions in chromite. Preliminary Os isotopic data do not support crustal contamination as a source of the PGEs in the Acoje deposits. The anomalous PGE concentrations in Type 1 high-Cr chromite deposits are attributed to two stages of enrichment: an early enrichment of their mantle source from previous melting events and a later stage of sulfide segregation accompanying chromite crystallization. High-Al chromite deposits which crystallized from basalts derived from relatively low degrees of melting owe their low PGE content to partitioning of PGEs in sulfides and alloys that remain in the mantle. High-Cr deposits crystallized from melts that were

  10. Laboratory partitioning of platinum-group elements (PGE) and gold with application to magmatic sulfide PGE deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleet, M. E.; Crocket, J. H.; Liu, Menghua; Stone, W. E.

    1999-06-01

    Apparent diversity in laboratory partitioning of platinum-group elements (PGE)-Au between (Fe,Ni)-sulfide liquid and S-saturated basaltic melt is resolved by recognizing the marked control exerted by variation in metal/S ratio of the sulfide liquid. Partition coefficients ( D) increase markedly for Os, Ir and Pd and somewhat for Pt with increase in S content. In addition, the partitioning is markedly dependent on concentration of PGE-Au in the sulfide fraction, for all precious metals in metal-rich sulfide, and for Ru, Pt and Pd in relatively S-rich sulfide. Reversal of partitioning of PGE-Au is presently demonstrated for experiments with metal-rich sulfide liquids. Erratic partitioning behaviour, with anomalously high D(PGE-Au) values, is minimised by degassing starting materials. Summary D(PGE-Au) values for metal-rich sulfide liquids and near-natural PGE-Au abundances are: Os(2.2), Ir(1.8), Ru(2.4), Pt(1.4), Pd(2.9), Au(0.9) (×10 3) for the CCO oxygen buffer and molar Ni/(Fe+Ni)=0.02, and Os(3.7), Ir(3.2), Ru(4.4), Pt(4.6), Pd(5.0), Au(3.0) (×10 3) for the IQF buffer and Ni/(Fe+Ni)=0.12. Thus, PGE-Au would not be extensively fractionated for equilibrium between sulfide and deep mantle melts. For more S-rich sulfide liquids (WM oxygen buffer) and 100-1000 ppm in the sulfide, D(PGE-Au) values are: Os(30), Ir(26), Ru(6.4), Pt(10), Pd(17) (×10 3) at Ni/(Fe+Ni)=0.36, and Os(10), Ir(51), Ru(3.5), Pt(13), Pd(25), Au (1.2) (×10 3) at Ni/(Fe+Ni)=0.66. The laboratory partitioning is notably differential within the PGE-Au group, with relatively high Ds for Ir and Pd and low Ds for Ru and Au. Although separation of an early-magmatic sulfide liquid would result in significant concentration of some PGE (e.g., Ir and Pd), sulfide liquid immiscibility alone would not account for the high abundance of PGE-Au in the reef deposits of the Bushveld and Stillwater Complexes.

  11. Positive anomaly in platinum group elements and the presence of shocked diamonds: Two question marks at the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, P. F.; Schryvers, D.; Tian, H.; Goderis, S.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, a large size impact was proposed as the cause of the global changes taking place at the Younger Dryas (YD) some 12,9 kyr ago. Impact evidence was reported in a C-rich black layer of broad geographic distribution. The impact markers consist of a large anomaly in the concentration of platinum group elements (PGE) and the presence of nanodiamonds, in particular lonsdaleite, which hexagonal structure is believed to be of shock origin. The impact is proposed to have occurred on the North American continent. A crater large enough (> 150 km) to induce a mass extinction some ~12.9 ka ago, formed in a geologically well-known area, is unlikely to have escaped detection. Therefore, an alternative hypothesis is that a cometary projectile exploded fully within the atmosphere spreading PGE and shock formed diamonds, without any target rock contribution, all around the Northern hemisphere. So far, PGE measurements failed to reproduce the elevated (> ppb) concentrations reported previously at Younger Dryas sites containing the black layer. In Lommel (Belgium) where the first study detected up to 117 ppb Ir, the Ir concentration is below the detection limit of the method (NiS fire assay + ICP-MS) used (0.06 ppb). At all sites analyzed the PGE pattern is typical of that of the continental crust. In several craters (Popigai, Ries) or at the KT boundary nanodiamonds have been reported associated with shocked materials. Several types of carbon components occur in the black layer of the Lommel section such as i) flakes reaching up to 1 µm, ii) nano particles of cubic diamond, 1 to 10 nm in size and iii) larger carbon onion-ring structures, which core can act as a nanoscopic pressure cell leading to the formation of nanodiamond by self- compression. The Lommel nanodiamonds present in the Younger Dryas layer do resemble nanodiamonds found in carbon spherules of unknown origin previously reported in top soil from several localities in Belgium and Germany. The C stable isotopic

  12. Biological role in the transformation of platinum-group mineral grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reith, Frank; Zammit, Carla M.; Shar, Sahar S.; Etschmann, Barbara; Bottrill, Ralph; Southam, Gordon; Ta, Christine; Kilburn, Matthew; Oberthür, Thomas; Ball, Andrew S.; Brugger, Joël

    2016-04-01

    Platinum-group elements are strategically important metals. Finding new deposits is becoming increasingly difficult owing to our limited understanding of the processes that affect their mobility in surface environments. Microorganisms have been shown to promote the mobility of metals around ore deposits. Here we show that microorganisms influence the mobility of platinum-group elements in mineral grains collected from Brazil, Australia and Colombia. Scanning electron microscopy showed biofilms covering the platinum-group mineral grains. The biofilms contained abundant platinum-group element nanoparticles and microcrystalline aggregates, and were dominated by Proteobacteria, many of which were closely related to known metal-resistant species. Some platinum-group mineral grains contained carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, selenium and iodine, suggesting the grains may be biogenic in origin. Molecular analyses show that Brazilian platinum-palladium grains hosted specific bacterial communities, which were different in composition from communities associated with gold grains, or communities in surrounding soils and sediments. Nano-phase metallic platinum accumulated when a metallophillic bacterium was incubated with a percolating platinum-containing medium, suggesting that biofilms can cause the precipitation of mobile platinum complexes. We conclude that biofilms are capable of forming or transforming platinum-group mineral grains, and may play an important role for platinum-group element dispersion and re-concentration in surface environments.

  13. Sniffing for Clues to the Dinosaurs Demise: Measurement of Osmium Isotope Compositions and Platinum Group Element Abundances in Volcanic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, K. W.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Mather, T.; Pyle, D.; Martin, R.; Gauthier, P.; Aiuppa, A.

    2005-12-01

    Platinum Group Elements (PGE: Os, Ir, Rh, Ru, Pt, Pd) and osmium isotopes measured in marine and terrestrial sediment, snow and ice records are important paleo-tracers of riverine, hydrothermal, extraterrestrial, volcanic and anthropogenic inputs into the global surficial environment. For instance, the marine Os isotope record across the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary (KTB) indicates that the onset of the main phase of Deccan volcanism and the transient late Maastrichtian warming preceded the large extraterrestrial impact and the related KTB mass extinction by several hundred thousand years [Ravizza and Peucker-Ehrenbrink, 2003]. Distinguishing extraterrestrial from volcanic PGE sources has been difficult due to the similarity in Os isotopic compositions, complex PGE fractionations, and our lack of knowledge of the Os isotopic composition and PGE abundances in volcanic aerosols. These difficulties have fueled vigorous debate about extraterrestrial vs. volcanic triggers of mass extinctions in the geologic record. To assess the volcanic contribution to the global Re-Os-PGE cycle we have initiated a study of Os isotopic compositions and PGE abundances in volcanic emissions from volcanoes around the globe. Here we report preliminary data on PGE abundances and Os isotopes measured in gas and aerosol filter samples from Vulcan Masaya, Nicaragua and Mt Etna, Italy. Samples were analyzed by ID-ICPMS (ThermoFinnigan ELEMENT 2 and NEPTUNE) at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Osmium isotope compositions of the filters are unradiogenic (0.1272 to 0.187). Osmium concentrations range from 28 to 97 pg/cubic meter and are 3-4 orders of magnitude lower than those measured by Krahenbuhl et al. [1992] during the spring 1984 eruption of Mauna Loa just after the lava fountaining phase. Normalized PGE abundance patterns are fractionated relative to carbonaceous chondrites and two important features distinguish the pattern from other important PGE sources: 1) Os/Ir is much higher

  14. Evidence from meimechites and other low-degree mantle melts for redox controls on mantle-crust fractionation of platinum-group elements

    PubMed Central

    Mungall, James E.; Hanley, Jacob J.; Arndt, Nicholas T.; Debecdelievre, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of the geochemistry of the chalcophile elements [i.e., Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd (platinum-group elements), and Au, Cu, Ni] has been informed for at least 20 years by the common assumption that when crust-forming partial melts are extracted from the upper mantle, sulfide liquid in the restite sequesters chalcophile elements until the extent of partial melting exceeds ≈25% and all of the sulfide has been dissolved in silicate melt [Hamlyn, P. R. & Keays, R. R. (1985) Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 49, 1797–1811]. Here we document very high, unfractionated, chalcophile element concentrations in small-degree partial melts from the mantle that cannot be reconciled with the canonical residual sulfide assumption. We show that the observed high, unfractionated platinum-group element concentrations in small-degree partial melts can be attained if the melting takes place at moderately high oxygen fugacity, which will reduce the amount of sulfide due to the formation of sulfate and will also destabilize residual monosulfide solid solution by driving sulfide melts into the spinel-liquid divariant field. Magmas formed at high oxygen fugacity by small degrees of mantle melting can be important agents for the transfer of chalcophile elements from the upper mantle to the crust and may be progenitors of significant ore deposits of Pt, Pd, and Au. PMID:16908861

  15. Platinum group elements and 187Os/ 188Os in a purported impact ejecta layer near the Eifelian-Givetian stage boundary, Middle Devonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Birger; Ellwood, Brooks B.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; El Hassani, Ahmed; Bultynck, Pierre

    2006-09-01

    A global faunal crisis close to the Eifelian-Givetian stage boundary in the mid-Devonian has been purported to be related to the impact of one or two major extraterrestrial bodies. This was based on unusual mineralogical and chemical features within a distinct composite marl bed, at a level c. 40 cm below the Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the Eifelian-Givetian boundary at Jebel Mech Irdane in Morocco. The impact relation has been challenged based partly on the absence of platinum group element data. We present here detailed Ir, Os, Pd and Pt as well as Os isotopic data across the bed at Mech Irdane and from a correlated 10 cm bed at a nearby site, Rich Haroun. Iridium concentrations of 0.13-0.28 ng/g in the beds represent a small enrichment compared to average shale, but Ir/Al ratios are only a factor 1.5-2 higher than background at respective site. Such small enrichments can readily be explained by terrestrial diagenetic processes, and do not require the presence of an extraterrestrial component. On an Al-normalized basis Pd and Pt show weak enrichments, typically a factor 2-4 higher than background. High 187Os/ 188Os ratios, 1.1-3.8, reflect ingrowth of radiogenic Os from Re, which is also evident from Os concentrations of up to 3 ng/g. The platinum group inter-element ratios are clearly non-chondritic. The overall platinum group and trace element (e.g. Co, Ni, As, V) patterns indicate that diagenetic processes at redox fronts have played a crucial role in shaping most element enrichments. If an excess siderophile-rich extraterrestrial component exists in these beds it represents less than 0.2‰ by weight.

  16. Partitioning of platinum-group elements and Au between sulfide liquid and basalt and the origins of mantle-crust fractionation of the chalcophile elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungall, James E.; Brenan, James M.

    2014-01-01

    The partitioning of platinum-group elements (PGE; Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, and Pd) and Au between sulfide melt and silicate melt (i.e., DPGEsul) exerts a critical control on the PGE composition of the Earth’s crust and mantle, but previous estimates have been plagued by experimental uncertainties and vary through several orders of magnitude. Here we present direct experimental measurements of DPGEsul, based on in situ microanalysis of the sulfide and silicate melt, with values ranging from ∼4 × 105 (Ru) to ∼2-3 × 106 (Ir, Pt). Our measurements of DPGEsul are >100 times larger than previous results but smaller than anticipated based on comparison of alloy solubilities in sulfide melts and S-free silicate melts. The presence of S in the silicate melt greatly increases alloy solubility. We use our new set of partition coefficients to develop a fully constrained model of PGE behavior during melting which accurately predicts the abundances of PGE in mantle-derived magmas and their restites, including mid-ocean ridge basalts, continental picrites, and the parental magmas of the Bushveld Complex of South Africa. Our model constrains mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) to be the products of pooled low and high degree fractional melts. Within-plate picrites are pooled products of larger degrees of fractional melting in columnar melting regimes. A significant control on PGE fractionation in mantle-derived magmas is exerted by residual alloy or platinum group minerals in their source. At low pressures (e.g., MORB genesis) the mantle residual to partial melting retains primitive mantle inter-element ratios and abundances of PGE until sulfide has been completely dissolved but then evolves to extremely high Pt/Pd and low Pd/Ir because Pt and Ir alloys form in the restite. During melting at high pressure to form picrites or komatiites Ir alloy appears as a restite phase but Pt alloy is not stable due to the large effect of pressure on fS2, and of temperature on fO2 along an internal

  17. Systematics of Platinum-Group Element Distribution in the Boninitic Thetford Mines Ophiolite Complex, Canada: Melting and Fractional Crystallization Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, P.; Bedard, J.; Tremblay, A.; Minarik, W.

    2004-05-01

    and chromite from the boninitic parent melt. Economic concentrations of PGE have been observed in intracrustal discordant chromitite (up to 20g/t) bodies in the Pyroxenitic Zone as well as in some pyroxenite (> 500 ppb) without visible mineralization. The diversity of the platinum group minerals involve Hg, S and As, and the different parageneses suggest that the PGE-rich fluids are either magmatic (e.g. Hall deposit) or deuteric (e.g. StarChrome deposit). The Pt-Pd enriched intracrustal discordant chromitites are slightly enriched (2%) in radiogenic 187Os, hinting at the involvement of crustal sources in their genesis, either as basement to the arc or a flux from subducted crust. The Pt-186Os system rules out large amounts of Os transport from subducted crust.

  18. Rhenium-osmium isotope and platinum-group elements in the Xinjie layered intrusion, SW China: Implications for source mantle composition, mantle evolution, PGE fractionation and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Hong; Qi, Liang; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Gou, Ti-Zhong; Zhu, Wei-Guang; Liu, Bing-Guang; Chu, Zhu-Yin

    2011-03-01

    The Xinjie mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion in the Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP) hosts Cu-Ni-platinum group element (PGE) sulfide ore layers within the lower part and Fe-Ti-V oxide-bearing horizons within the middle part. The major magmatic Cu-Ni-PGE sulfide ores and spatially associated cumulate rocks are examined for their PGE contents and Re-Os isotopic systematics. The samples yielded a Re-Os isochron with an age of 262 ± 27 Ma and an initial 187Os/ 188Os of 0.12460 ± 0.00011 ( γOs( t) = -0.5 ± 0.1). The age is in good agreement with the previously reported U-Pb zircon age, indicating that the Re-Os system remained closed for most samples since the intrusion emplacement. They have near-chondritic γOs( t) values ranging from -0.7 to -0.2, similar to those of the Lijiang picrites and Song Da komatiites. Exceptionally, two samples from the roof zone and one from upper sequence exhibit radiogenic γOs( t) values (+0.6 to +8.6), showing minor contamination by the overlying Emeishan basalts. The PGE-rich ores contain relatively high PGE and small amounts of sulfides (generally less than 2%) and the abundance of Cu and PGE correlate well with S, implying that the distribution of these elements is controlled by the segregation and accumulation of a sulfide liquid. Some ore samples are poor in S (mostly <800 ppm), which may due to late-stage S loss caused by the dissolution of FeS from pre-existing sulfides through their interaction with sulfide-unsaturated flowing magma. The combined study shows that the Xinjie intrusion may be derived from ferropicritic magmas. The sharp reversals in Mg#, Cr/FeO T and Cr/TiO 2 ratios immediately below Units 2-4, together with high Cu/Zr ratios decreasing from each PGE ore layer within these cyclic units, are consistent with multiple magma replenishment episodes. The sulfides in the cumulate rocks show little evidence of PGE depletion with height and thus appear to have segregated from successive inputs of fertile magma

  19. Platinum-group element distribution in base-metal sulfides of the UG2 chromitite, Bushveld Complex, South Africa—a reconnaissance study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbahr, Inga; Oberthür, Thomas; Klemd, Reiner; Josties, Anja

    2014-08-01

    Two drill cores of the UG2 chromitite from the eastern and western Bushveld Complex were studied by whole-rock analysis, ore microscopy, SEM/Mineral Liberation Analysis (MLA), and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analysis. The top and base of the UG2 main seam have the highest bulk-rock Pd and Pt concentrations. Sulfides mostly occur as aggregates of pentlandite, chalcopyrite, and rare pyrrhotite and pyrite or as individual grains associated mostly with chromite grains. In situ LA-ICP-MS analyses reveal that pentlandite carries distinctly elevated platinum-group element (PGE) contents. In contrast, pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite contain very low PGE concentrations. Pentlandite shows average maximum values of 350-1,000 ppm Pd, 200 ppm Rh, 130-175 ppm Ru, 20 ppm Os, and 150 ppm Ir, and is the principal host of Pd and Rh in the studied ores of the UG2. Mass balance calculations were conducted for samples representing the UG2 main seam of the drill core DT46, eastern Bushveld. Pentlandite consistently hosts elevated contents of the whole-rock Pd (up to 55 %) and Rh (up to 46 %), and erratic contents of Os (up to 50 %), Ir (2 to 17 %), and Ru (1-39 %). Platinum-group mineral (PGM) investigations support these mass balance results; most of the PGM are Pt-dominant such as braggite/cooperite and Pt-Fe alloys or laurite (carrying elevated concentrations of Os and Ir). Palladium and Rh-bearing PGM are rare. Both PGE concentrations and their distribution in base-metal sulfides (BMS) in the UG2 largely resemble that of the Merensky Reef, as most of the Pd and Rh are incorporated in pentlandite, whereas pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite are almost devoid of PGE.

  20. The mineralogy and mineral associations of platinum group elements and gold in the Platreef at Zwartfontein, Akanani Project, Northern Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Merwe, Frits; Viljoen, Fanus; Knoper, Mike

    2012-09-01

    The mineralogy of the platinum-group elements (PGE), and gold, in the Platreef of the Bushveld Complex, was investigated using an FEI Mineral Liberation Analyser. Polished sections were prepared from 171 samples collected from two boreholes, for the in-situ examination of platinum group minerals (PGM). PGM and gold minerals encountered include maslovite (PtBiTe, 32 area% of total PGM), kotulskite (Pd(BiTe), 17 %), isoferroplatinum (Pt3Fe, 15 %), sperrylite (PtAs2, 11 %), cooperite (PtS, 5 %), moncheite (PtTe2; 5 %), electrum (AuAg; 5 %), michenerite (PdBiTe; 3 %), Pd alloys (Pd, Sb, Sn; 3 %), hollingworthite ((Rh,Pt)AsS; 2 %), as well as minor (all <1 area% of total PGM) merenskyite (PdBiTe2), laurite (RuS2), rustenburgite (Pt0.4Pd0.4Sn0.2), froodite (PdBi2), atokite (Pd0.5Pt0.3Sn0.2), stumpflite (PtSb), plumbopalladinite (Pd3Pb2), and zvyagintsevite (Pd3Pb). An observed association of all PGM with base metal sulfides (BMS), and a pronounced association of PGE tellurides, arsenides and Pd&Pt alloys with secondary silicates, is consistent with the remobilisation and recrystallisation of some of the PGM's during hydrothermal alteration and serpentinisation subsequent to their initial (primary) crystallisation from BMS (e.g. Godel et al. J Petrol 48:1569-1604, 2007; Hutchinson and McDonald Appl Earth Sci (Trans Inst Min Metall B) 114:B208-224, 2008).

  1. Search for a meteoritic component in drill cores from the Bosumtwi impact structure, Ghana: Platinum group element contents and osmium isotopic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Iain; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Coney, Louise; Ferrière, Ludovic; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Koeberl, Christian

    An attempt was made to detect a meteoritic component in both crater-fill (fallback) impact breccias and fallout suevites (outside the crater rim) at the Bosumtwi impact structure in Ghana. Thus far, the only clear indication for an extraterrestrial component related to this structure has been the discovery of a meteoritic signature in Ivory Coast tektites, which formed during the Bosumtwi impact event. Earlier work at Bosumtwi indicated unusually high levels of elements that are commonly used for the identification of meteoritic contamination (i.e., siderophile elements, including the platinum group elements [PGE]) in both target rocks and impact breccias from surface exposures around the crater structure, which does not allow unambiguous verification of an extraterrestrial signature. The present work, involving PGE abundance determinations and Os isotope measurements on drill core samples from inside and outside the crater rim, arrives at the same conclusion. Despite the potential of the Os isotope system to detect even small amounts of extraterrestrial contribution, the wide range in PGE concentrations and Os isotope composition observed in the target rocks makes the interpretation of unradiogenic, high-concentration samples as an impact signature ambiguous.

  2. Platinum-group element signatures in the North Atlantic Igneous Province: Implications for mantle controls on metal budgets during continental breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Hannah S. R.; McDonald, Iain; Kerr, Andrew C.

    2015-09-01

    The North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) is a large igneous province (LIP) that includes a series of lava suites erupted from the earliest manifestations of the (proto)-Icelandic plume, through continental rifting and ultimate ocean opening. The lavas of one of these sub-provinces, the British Palaeogene Igneous Province (BPIP), were some of the first lavas to be erupted in the NAIP and overlie a thick crustal basement and sedimentary succession with abundant S-rich mudrocks. We present the first platinum-group element (PGE) and Au analyses of BPIP flood basalts from the main lava fields of the Isle of Mull and Morvern and the Isle of Skye, in addition to a suite of shallow crustal dolerite volcanic plugs on Mull, and other minor lavas suites. BPIP lavas display both S-saturated and S-undersaturated trends which, coupled with elevated PGE abundances (> MORB), suggest that the BPIP is one of the most prospective areas of the NAIP to host Ni-Cu-PGE-(Au) mineralisation in conduit systems. Platinum-group element, Au and chalcophile element abundances in lavas from West and East Greenland, and Iceland, are directly comparable to BPIP lavas, but the relative abundances of Pt and Pd vary systematically between lavas suites of different ages. The oldest lavas (BPIP and West Greenland) have a broadly chondritic Pt/Pd ratio ( 1.9). Lavas from East Greenland have a lower Pt/Pd ratio ( 0.8) and the youngest lavas from Iceland have the lowest Pt/Pd ratio of the NAIP ( 0.4). Hence, Pt/Pd ratio of otherwise equivalent flood basalt lavas varies temporally across the NAIP and appears to be coincident with the changing geodynamic environment of the (proto)-Icelandic plume through time. We assess the possible causes for such systematic Pt/Pd variation in light of mantle plume and lithospheric controls, and suggest that this reflects a change in the availability of lithospheric mantle Pt-rich sulphides for entrainment in ascending plume magmas. Hence the precious metal systematics

  3. Ir, Ru, Pt, and Pd in basalts and komatiites: New constraints for the geochemical behavior of the platinum-group elements in the mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Rehkaemper, M.; Halliday, A.N.; Fitton, J.G.; Lee, D.C.; Wieneke, M.; Arndt, N.T.

    1999-11-01

    The concentrations of the platinum-group elements (PGE) Ir, Ru, Pt, and Pd were determined in 18 mantle-derived basalts from a variety of tectonic settings and six komatiites from three locations. All analyses were performed using isotope dilution, Carius tube digestion, and the precise technique of multiple collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Multiple analyses of two samples indicate external reproducibilities, based upon separate dissolutions, or approximately 2--9% in the ppt to ppb concentration range. Mid-ocean ridge basalts from the Kolbeinsey Ridge, tholeiites from Iceland and alkali basalts from the Cameroon Line define three individual samples suites that are characterized by distinct major, trace, and platinum-group element systematics. All three-sample suites display correlations of the PGE with MgO, Ni, and Cr. The new analytical results are employed to constrain the geochemical behavior of the PGE during the formation and differentiation of mantle-derived melts. The PGE are inferred to be compatible in sulfides during partial melting with sulfide-silicate melt partition coefficients of {approximately}1 x 10{sup 4}. The fractionated PGE patterns of mantle melts re a consequence of the incompatibility of Pd in nonsulfide phases, whereas Ir and Ru must be compatible in at least one other mantle phase. Model calculations indicate that PGE alloys or spinel may be responsible for the higher compatibility of the latter elements during partial melting. It is further demonstrated that the shape of the melting regime has a profound effect on the PGE systematics of mantle magmas. The systematic trends of the three samples suites in plots of PGE against Ni and Cr are the results of magma differentiation processes that involve fractional crystallization of silicate minerals and the concurrent segregation of an immiscible sulfide liquid. The behavior of the PGE during magma fractionation indicates that the segregated sulfides probably equilibrate

  4. HRTEM-AEM-HAADF-STEM study of platinum-group elements within a mantle-derived Cr spinel (Lherz; North-Eastern Pyrenees, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraris, Cristiano; Lorand, Jean-Pierre

    2008-11-01

    As platinum group elements (PGE) like Ru, Os, Ir and Rh have appropriate charge and ionic radii to substitute the major cations in the spinel structure, Cr-spinel is one of the potential minerals that can fractionate such elements during the partial melting and fractional crystallization. However, whether PGE occur in solid solution or are physically collected as poly-metallic clusters of atoms on spinel grain boundaries is a central issue for PGE geochemistry. A PGE-bearing Cr-spinel separated from one harzburgite sample from Lherz has been analyzed by Transmission, Analytical and Scanning-Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM-AEM-STEM). Our analyses did not reveal any exsolution/cluster feature at the nanometric scale, except for Ir, which is concentrated as Ir-bearing lamellar rutile, about 100 nm width. Rutile appears to have enhanced unmixing of Ir from the spinel structure. The DCr spinel/silicate melt partition coefficients estimated from the Lherz Cr-spinel (Ir = 32 ± 0.7; Os = 28 ± 6; Ru = 12.5 ± 2; Pt = 1.5 ± 0.2; Pd = 0.2 ± 0.05) may be appropriate for modelling the behavior of PGE in sulfur-undersaturated melting processes of the shallow upper mantle, while being lower than those derived from experiments and natural ultramafic melts.

  5. Increase in platinum group elements in Mexico City as revealed from growth rings of Taxodium mucronatum ten.

    PubMed

    Morton-Bermea, Ofelia; Beramendi-Orosco, Laura; Martínez-Reyes, Ángeles; Hernández-Álvarez, Elizabeth; González-Hernández, Galia

    2016-02-01

    Tree rings may be used as indicators of contamination events providing information on the chronology and the elemental composition of the contamination. In this framework, we report PGEs enrichment in growth rings of Taxodium mucronatum ten for trees growing in the central area of Mexico City as compared to trees growing in a non-urban environment. Concentrations of PGE were determined by ICP-MS analysis on microwave-digested tree rings. The element found in higher concentrations was Pd (1.13-87.98 μg kg(-1)), followed by Rh (0.28-36.81 μg kg(-1)) and Pt (0.106-7.21 μg kg(-1)). The concentration trends of PGEs in the tree-ring sequences from the urban area presented significant correlation values when comparing between trees (r between 0.618 and 0.98, P < 0.025) and between elements within individual trees (r between 0.76 and 0.994, P < 0.01). Furthermore, a clear increase was observed for rings after 1997, with enrichment of up to 60 times the mean concentration found for the sequence from the non-urban area and up to 40 times the mean concentration for the pre-1991 period in the urban trees. These results also demonstrate the feasibility of applying T. mucronatum ten to be used as a bioindicator of the increase in PGE in urban environments.

  6. Experimental observations on noble metal nanonuggets and Fe-Ti oxides, and the transport of platinum group elements in silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anenburg, Michael; Mavrogenes, John A.

    2016-11-01

    Platinum group element (PGE) nanonuggets are a nuisance in experimental studies designed to measure solubility or partitioning of noble metals in silicate melts. Instead of treating nanonuggets as experimental artifacts, we studied their behaviour motivated by recent discoveries of PGE nanonuggets in a variety of natural settings. We used an experimental setup consisting of AgPd, Pt or AuPd capsules and Fe(-Ti) oxide-saturated hydrous peralkaline silicate melts to maximise nanonugget production. TABS (Te, As, Bi, Sb, Sn) commonly occur in PGM (platinum group minerals), prompting addition of Bi to our experiments to investigate its properties as well. Three-dimensional optical examination by 100× objective and immersion oil reveals variable colour which correlates with nanonugget size and shape due to plasmon resonance effects. We observe two textural types: (1) intermediate-sized nanonuggets dispersed in the glass and adhering to oxides, and (2) abundant fine nanonuggets dispersed in the glass with coarse euhedral crystals in contact with oxides. Slow cooling removes dispersed nanonuggets and greatly coarsens existing oxide-associated metal crystals. Nanonugget-free halos are commonly observed around oxide grains. All metal phases are composed of major (Ag, Pd) and trace (Pt, Ir, Au) capsule material. Our results show reduction processes, imposed by growing oxides, causing local metal saturation in the oxide rich zones with preferential nucleation on smaller oxide grains. The redox gradient then blocks additional metals from diffusing into oxide rich zones, forming halos. As the entire experimental charge is reduced throughout the run, nanonuggets form in the distal glass. Bismuth contents of metal phases do not depend on Bi2O3 amounts dissolved in the melt. Further PGM crystallisation consumes nanonuggets as feedstock. We conclude that the appearance of metallic PGE phases happens in two stages: first as nanonuggets and then as larger PGM. Once formed

  7. Distribution of platinum-group elements and Os isotopes in chromite ores from Mayarí-Baracoa Ophiolitic Belt (eastern Cuba)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervilla, F.; Proenza, J. A.; Frei, R.; González-Jiménez, J. M.; Garrido, C. J.; Melgarejo, J. C.; Meibom, A.; Díaz-Martínez, R.; Lavaut, W.

    2005-12-01

    The Mayarí-Baracoa ophiolitic belt in eastern Cuba hosts abundant chromite deposits of historical economic importance. Among these deposits, the chemistry of chromite ore is very variable, ranging from high Al (Cr#=0.43-0.55) to high Cr (Cr#=0.60-0.83) compositions. Platinum-group element (PGE) contents are also variable (from 33 ppb to 1.88 ppm) and correlate positively with the Cr# of the ore. Bulk PGE abundances correlate negatively with the Pd/Ir ratio showing that chromite concentrates mainly Os, Ir and Ru which gives rise to the characteristic negatively sloped, chrondrite-normalized PGE patterns in many chromitites. This is consistent with the mineralogy of PGEs, which is dominated by members of the laurite-erlichmanite solid solution series (RuS2-OsS2), with minor amounts of irarsite (IrAsS), Os-Ir alloys, Ru-Os-Ir-Fe-Ni alloys, Ni-Rh-As, and sulfides of Ir, Os, Rh, Cu, Ni, and/or Pd. Measured 187Os/188Os ratios (from 0.1304 to 0.1230) are among the lower values reported for podiform chromitites. The 187Os/188Os ratios decrease with increasing whole-rock PGE contents and Cr# of chromite. Furthermore, γOs values of all but one of the chromitite samples are negative indicating a subchondiritc mantle source. γOs decrease with increasing bulk Os content and decreasing 187Re/188Os ratios. These mineralogical and geochemical features are interpreted in terms of chromite crystallization from melts varying in composition from back-arc basalts (Al-rich chromite) to boninites (Cr-rich chromite) in a suprasubduction zone setting. Chromite crystallization occurs as a consequence of magma mixing and assimilation of preexisting gabbro sills at the mantle-crust transition zone. Cr#, PGE abundances, and bulk Os isotopic composition of chromitites are determined by the combined effects of mantle source heterogeneity, the degree of partial melting, the extent of melt-rock interactions, and the local sulfur fugacity. Small-scale (μm to cm) chemical and isotopic

  8. The pH-dependent release of platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel fuel catalysts: Implication for weathering in soils.

    PubMed

    Suchá, Veronika; Mihaljevič, Martin; Ettler, Vojtěch; Strnad, Ladislav

    2016-04-15

    Powdered samples of new and old gasoline catalysts (Pt, Pd, Rh) and new and old diesel (Pt) catalysts were subjected to a pH-static leaching procedure (pH 2-9) coupled with thermodynamic modeling using PHREEQC-3 to verify the release and mobility of PGEs (platinum group elements). PGEs were released under acidic conditions, mostly exhibiting L-shaped leaching patterns: diesel old: 5.47, 0.005, 0.02; diesel new: 68.5, 0.23, 0.11; gasoline old: 0.1, 11.8, 4.79; gasoline new 2.6, 25.2, 35.9 in mg kg(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. Only the new diesel catalyst had a strikingly different leaching pattern with elevated concentrations at pH 4, probably influenced by the dissolution of the catalyst carrier and washcoat. The pH-static experiment coupled with thermodynamic modeling was found to be an effective instrument for understanding the leaching behavior of PGEs under various environmental conditions, and indicated that charged Pt and Rh species may be adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of kaolinite or Mn oxides in the soil system, whereas uncharged Pd and Rh species may remain mobile in soil solutions.

  9. Platinum-group elements in sewage sludge and incinerator ash in the United Kingdom: assessment of PGE sources and mobility in cities.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M T; Prichard, H M; Sampson, J

    2010-02-15

    Platinum-group element (PGE) concentrations in sewage sludge and incinerator ash compared with average PGE concentrations in road dust show a common pattern, characterized by a negative Rh anomaly. This similarity, found at 9 UK incinerators, suggests that there is a universal characteristic PGE pattern produced by common processes of dispersal of Pt, Pd and Rh derived from automobile catalytic converters. Ninety-one sewage sludge and incinerator ash samples from the sewage treatment facilities in Sheffield, Birmingham and 7 other UK cities were analyzed for PGE. The highest concentrations are 602ppb Pt and 710ppb Pd with lower maximum concentrations of 65ppb Rh, 100ppb Ru, 33ppb Ir and 12ppb Os. Ash from incinerated sewage was found to have higher PGE concentrations compared to the original sludge and the PGE ratios are preserved during incineration. Rh is more mobilized and dispersed than the other PGE as it is transported from roads into the drainage system and into sewage. Pt/Pd ratios of 1.0 in road dust and 0.9 in sewage and incinerator ash suggest that Pd is more mobile than Pt during dispersal. PGE abundances in stored incinerator ash of varying ages appear to have been affected by the variation in use of Pt, Pd and Rh in catalytic converters due to variation in their market prices. Concentrations of Os, Ir and Ru in ashes are greater in Sheffield and London than all the other city sites and may be derived from point industrial sources.

  10. Determination of the platinum - Group elements (PGE) and gold (Au) in manganese nodule reference samples by nickel sulfide fire-assay and Te coprecipitation with ICP-MS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balaram, V.; Mathur, R.; Banakar, V.K.; Hein, J.R.; Rao, C.R.M.; Gnaneswara, Rao T.; Dasaram, B.

    2006-01-01

    Platinum group elements (PGE) and Au data in polymetallic oceanic ferromanganese nodule reference samples and crust samples obtained by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), after separation and pre-concentration by nickel sulfide fire-assay and Te coprecipitation, are presented. By optimizing several critical parameters such as flux composition, matrix matching calibration, etc., best experimental conditions were established to develop a method suitable for routine analysis of manganese nodule samples for PGE and Au. Calibrations were performed using international PGE reference materials, WMG-1 and WMS-1. This improved procedure offers extremely low detection limits in the range of 0.004 to 0.016 ng/g. The results obtained in this study for the reference materials compare well with previously published data wherever available. New PGE data arc also provided on some international manganese nodule reference materials. The analytical methodology described here can be used for the routine analysis of manganese nodule and crust samples in marine geochemical studies.

  11. Distribution and mineralogy of platinum-group elements in altered chromitites of the Campo Formoso layered intrusion (Bahia State, Brazil): control by magmatic and hydrothermal processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garuti, G.; Proenza, J. A.; Zaccarini, F.

    2007-03-01

    Polyphase, penetrative hydrothermal metasomatism in chromitites of the Campo Formoso layered intrusion produced spectacular chromite - ferrian chromite zoning and transformed the primary intercumulus silicates into a chlorite - serpentine - carbonate - talc assemblage. Alteration did not substantially modify the composition of chromite cores and the distribution of platinum-group elements (PGE) through the sequence of chromitite layers, which still are consistent with magmatic fractionation processes. Texture and composition of laurite and Os-Ir-Ru alloys included in chromite cores indicate that these PGM were not altered, and are probably magmaticin origin. In contrast, the PGM located in the intergranular chlorite matrix (laurite, Ir-Ru-Rh sulfarsenides and Pt-Pd compounds with Sb, Bi and Te) display evidence of hydrothermal reworking. These PGM are intimately intergrown with low-temperature Ni-sulfides. The paragenesis suggests that the Ni-sulfides-PGM assemblage formed at the expenses of unknown PGM precursors, which must have been originally present in the intercumulus silicate matrix. Mechanism of formation involves a sequence of dissolution-precipitation events controlled by variation of redox conditions during chromite alteration. The presence of a secondary ore mineral assemblage consisting of galena, bismuthinite, native antimony, and various Pb-Sb compounds suggests a possible contribution of fluids derived from the adjacent granite.

  12. Platinum-group element distribution in base-metal sulfides of the Merensky Reef from the eastern and western Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osbahr, Inga; Klemd, Reiner; Oberthür, Thomas; Brätz, Helene; Schouwstra, Robert

    2013-02-01

    Base-metal sulfides in magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE deposits are important carriers of platinum-group elements (PGE). The distribution and concentrations of PGE in pentlandite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, and pyrite were determined in samples from the mineralized portion of four Merensky Reef intersections from the eastern and western Bushveld Complex. Electron microprobe analysis was used for major elements, and in situ laser ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) for trace elements (PGE, Ag, and Au). Whole rock trace element analyses were performed on representative samples to obtain mineralogical balances. In Merensky Reef samples from the western Bushveld, both Pt and Pd are mainly concentrated in the upper chromitite stringer and its immediate vicinity. Samples from the eastern Bushveld reveal more complex distribution patterns. In situ LA-ICP-MS analyses of PGE in sulfides reveal that pentlandite carries distinctly elevated PGE contents, whereas pyrrhotite and chalcopyrite only contain very low PGE concentrations. Pentlandite is the principal host of Pd and Rh in the ores. Palladium and Rh concentrations in pentlandite reach up to 700 and 130 ppm, respectively, in the samples from the eastern Bushveld, and up to 1,750 ppm Pd and up to 1,000 ppm Rh in samples from the western Bushveld. Only traces of Pt are present in the base-metal sulfides (BMS). Pyrrhotite contains significant though generally low amounts of Ru, Os, and Ir, but hardly any Pd or Rh. Chalcopyrite contains most of the Ag but carries only extremely low PGE concentrations. Mass balance calculations performed on the Merensky Reef samples reveal that in general, pentlandite in the feldspathic pyroxenite and the pegmatoidal feldspathic pyroxenite hosts up to 100 % of the Pd and Rh and smaller amounts (10-40 %) of the Os, Ir, and Ru. Chalcopyrite and pyrrhotite usually contain less than 10 % of the whole rock PGE. The remaining PGE concentrations, and especially most of the Pt (up to

  13. Effects of mother lode-type gold mineralization on 187Os/188Os and platinum group element concentrations in peridotite: Alleghany District, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, R.J.; Böhlke, J.K.; McDonough, W.F.; Li, J.

    2007-01-01

    Osmium isotope compositions and concentrations of Re, platinum group elements (PGE), and Au were determined for host peridotites (serpentinites and barzburgites) and hydrothermally altered ultramafic wall rocks associated with Mother Lode-type hydrothermal gold-quartz vein mineralization in the Alleghany district, California. The host peridotites have Os isotope compositions and Re, PGE, and Au abundances typical of the upper mantle at their presumed formation age during the late Proterozoic or early Paleozoic. The hydrothermally altered rocks have highly variable initial Os isotope compositions with ??os, values (% deviation of 187OS/188OS from the chondritic average calculated for the approx. 120 Ma time of mineralization) ranging from -1.4 to -8.3. The lowest Os isotope compositions are consistent with Re depletion of a chondritic source (e.g., the upper mantle) at ca. 1.6 Ga. Most of the altered samples are enriched in Au and have depleted and fractionated abundances of Re and PGE relative to their precursor peridotites. Geoehemical characteristics of the altered samples suggest that Re and some PGE were variably removed from the ultramafic rocks during the mineralization event. In addition to Re, the Pt and Pd abundances of the most intensely altered rocks appear to have been most affected by mineralization. The 187Os-depleted isotopic compositions of some altered rocks are interpreted to be a result of preferential 187Os loss via destruction of Re-rich phases during the event. For these rocks, Os evidently is not a useful tracer of the mineralizing fluids. The results do, however, provide evidence for differential mobility of these elements, and mobility of 187Os relative to the initial bulk Os isotope composition during hydrothermal metasomatic alteration of ultramafic rocks. ?? 2007 Society of Economic Geologists, Inc.

  14. Platinum-group element, Gold, Silver and Base Metal distribution in compositionally zoned sulfide droplets from the Medvezky Creek Mine, Noril'sk, Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, S.-J.; Cox, R.A.; Zientek, M.L.

    2006-01-01

    Concentrations of Ag, Au, Cd, Co, Re, Zn and Platinum-group elements (PGE) have been determined in sulfide minerals from zoned sulfide droplets of the Noril'sk 1 Medvezky Creek Mine. The aims of the study were; to establish whether these elements are located in the major sulfide minerals (pentlandite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite and cubanite), to establish whether the elements show a preference for a particular sulfide mineral and to investigate the model, which suggests that the zonation in the droplets is caused by the crystal fractionation of monosulfide solid solution (mss). Nickel, Cu, Ag, Re, Os, Ir, Ru, Rh and Pd, were found to be largely located in the major sulfide minerals. In contrast, less than 25% of the Au, Cd, Pt and Zn in the rock was found to be present in these sulfides. Osmium, Ir, Ru, Rh and Re were found to be concentrated in pyrrhotite and pentlandite. Palladium and Co was found to be concentrated in pentlandite. Silver, Cd and Zn concentrations are highest in chalcopyrite and cubanite. Gold and platinum showed no preference for any of the major sulfide minerals. The enrichment of Os, Ir, Ru, Rh and Re in pyrrhotite and pentlandite (exsolution products of mss) and the low levels of these elements in the cubanite and chalcopyrite (exsolution products of intermediate solid solution, iss) support the mss crystal fractionation model, because Os, Ir, Ru, Rh and Re are compatible with mss. The enrichment of Ag, Cd and Zn in chalcopyrite and cubanite also supports the mss fractionation model these minerals are derived from the fractionated liquid and these elements are incompatible with mss and thus should be enriched in the fractionated liquid. Gold and Pt do not partition into either iss or mss and become sufficiently enriched in the final fractionated liquid to crystallize among the iss and mss grains as tellurides, bismithides and alloys. During pentlandite exsolution Pd appears to have diffused from the Cu-rich portion of the droplet into

  15. Platinum-group elements in the Merensky reef. I. PGE in solid solution in base metal sulfides and the down-temperature equilibration history of Merensky ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballhaus, C.; Ryan, C. G.

    1995-12-01

    The platinum-group elements (PGE) in base metal sulfides (BMS) of the Merensky reef are mostly close to the detection limit of the proton microprobe. The only phase that accommodates appreciable PGE is pentlandite. Total average PGE plus Au grades of the sulfide fraction of the Merensky reef are about 500 ppm. We estimate the modal proportions of the major BMS to be around 53 percent pyrrhotite, 25 percent pentlandite, and 22 percent chalcopyrite (ignoring minor phases). Using this estimate, we calculate by how much the sulfides are oversaturated with respect to individual PGE. With respect to Pt, the sulfides are many times oversaturated, i.e., nearly all Pt occurs as discrete PGE phases. With regard to Pd the sulfides are oversaturated by about a factor of two. The Ru and Rh levels are at and below saturation levels. Available experiments suggest that the entire PGE content of the sulfide fraction can easily be accommodated in solid solution in BMS at temperatures as low as 500°C. The fact that the BMS are oversaturated with most PGE thus indicates that the sulfides have continued to exsolve PGE below that temperature. Calculated sulfur fugacities indicate that f S2 is controlled by silica activity, as expected in high-temperature ores, suggesting that metal/sulfur ratios of the ore may not have changed much since complete solidification of the intercumulus silicate melt of the Merensky reef. All sulfides investigated have cooled below the maximum temperature of pentlandite-pyrite coexistence, which experiments place at 250±30°C. Final closure temperatures of the sulfide-PGE mineral assemblages, approximated by extrapolating the pentlandite-pyrrhotite solvus beyond its experimentally determined range, are possibly as low as 80 to 90°C.

  16. Direct determination of platinum group elements and their distributions in geological and environmental samples at the ng g(-1) level using LA-ICP-IDMS.

    PubMed

    Boulyga, Sergei F; Heumann, Klaus G

    2005-10-01

    Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma isotope dilution mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-IDMS) was applied to the direct and simultaneous determination of the platinum group elements (PGEs) Pt, Pd, Ru, and Ir in geological and environmental samples. A special laser ablation system with high ablation rates was used, along with sector field ICP-MS. Special attention was paid to deriving the distributions of PGEs in the pulverized samples. IDMS could not be applied to the (mono-isotopic) Rh, but the similar ablation behavior of Ru and Rh allowed Rh to be simultaneously determined via relative sensitivity coefficients. The laser ablation process produces hardly any oxide ions (which usually cause interference in PGE analysis with liquid sample injection), so the ICP-MS can be run in its low mass resolution but high-sensitivity mode. The detection limits obtained for the geological samples were 0.16 ng g(-1), 0.14 ng g(-1), 0.08 ng g(-1), 0.01 ng g(-1) and 0.06 ng g(-1) for Ru, Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt, respectively. LA-ICP-IDMS was applied to different geological reference materials (TDB-1, WGB-1, UMT-1, WMG-1, SARM-7) and the road dust reference material BCR-723, which are only certified for some of the PGEs. Comparisons with certified values as well as with indicative values from the literature demonstrated the validity of the LA-ICP-IDMS method. The PGE concentrations in subsamples of the road dust reference material correspond to a normal distribution, whereas the distributions in the geological reference materials TDB-1, WGB-1, UMT-1, WMG-1, and SARM-7 are more complex. For example, in the case of Ru, a logarithmic normal distribution best fits the analyzed concentrations in TDB-1 subsamples, whereas a pronounced nugget effect was found for Pt in most geological samples.

  17. Platinum-group element constraints on source composition and magma evolution of the Kerguelen Plateau using basalts from ODP Leg 183

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chazey, William J.; Neal, Clive R.

    2005-10-01

    Seventeen basalts from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 183 to the Kerguelen Plateau (KP) were analyzed for the platinum-group elements (PGEs: Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, and Pd), and 15 were analyzed for trace elements. Relative concentrations of the PGEs ranged from ˜0.1 (Ir, Ru) to ˜5 (Pt) times primitive mantle. These relatively high PGE abundances and fractionated patterns are not accounted for by the presence of sulfide minerals; there are only trace sulfides present in thin-section. Sulfur saturation models applied to the KP basalts suggest that the parental magmas may have never reached sulfide saturation, despite large degrees of partial melting (˜30%) and fractional crystallization (˜45%). First order approximations of the fractionation required to produce the KP basalts from an ˜30% partial melt of a spinel peridotite were determined using the PELE program. The model was adapted to better fit the physical and chemical observations from the KP basalts, and requires an initial crystal fractionation stage of at least 30% olivine plus Cr-spinel (49:1), followed by magma replenishment and fractional crystallization (RFC) that included clinopyroxene, plagioclase, and titanomagnetite (15:9:1). The low Pd values ([Pd/Pt] pm < 1.7) for these samples are not predicted by currently available K d values. These Pd values are lowest in samples with relatively higher degrees of alteration as indicated by petrographic observations. Positive anomalies are a function of the behavior of the PGEs; they can be reproduced by Cr-spinel, and titanomagnetite crystallization, followed by titanomagnetite resorption during the final stages of crystallization. Our modeling shows that it is difficult to reproduce the PGE abundances by either depleted upper or even primitive mantle sources. Crustal contamination, while indicated at certain sites by the isotopic compositions of the basalts, appears to have had a minimal affect on the PGEs. The PGE abundances measured in the Kerguelen Plateau

  18. Platinum-group element abundances and Re-Os isotopic systematics of the upper continental crust through time: Evidence from glacial diamictites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kang; Walker, Richard J.; Rudnick, Roberta L.; Gao, Shan; Gaschnig, Richard M.; Puchtel, Igor S.; Tang, Ming; Hu, Zhao-Chu

    2016-10-01

    The fine-grained matrix of glacial diamictites, deposited periodically by continental ice sheets over much of Earth history, provides insights into the average composition and chemical evolution of the upper continental crust (UCC) (Gaschnig et al., 2016, and references therein). The concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGEs, including Os, Ir, Ru, Pt and Pd) and the geochemically related Re, as well as 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios, are reported here for globally-distributed glacial diamictites that were deposited during the Mesoarchean, Paleoproterozoic, Neoproterozoic and Paleozoic eras. The medians and averages of PGE concentrations of these diamictite composites decrease from the Mesoarchean to the Neoproterozoic, mimicking decreases in the concentrations of first-row transition elements (Sc, V, Cr, Co and Ni). By contrast, Re concentrations are highly variable with no discernable trend, owing to its high solubility. Assuming these diamictites are representative of average UCC through time, the new data are fully consistent with the previous inference that the Archean UCC contained a greater proportion of mafic-ultramafic rocks relative to younger UCC. Linear regressions of PGEs versus Cr and Ni concentrations in all the diamictite composites from the four time periods are used to estimate the following concentrations of the PGEs in the present-day UCC: 0.059 ± 0.016 ng/g Os, 0.036 ± 0.008 ng/g Ir, 0.079 ± 0.026 ng/g Ru, 0.80 ± 0.22 ng/g Pt and 0.80 ± 0.26 ng/g Pd (2σ of 10,000 bootstrapping regression results). These PGE estimates are slightly higher than the estimates obtained from loess samples. We suggest this probably results from loess preferentially sampling younger UCC rocks that have lower PGE concentrations, or PGEs being fractionated during loess formation. A Re concentration of 0.25 ± 0.12 ng/g (2σ) is obtained from a regression of Re versus Mo. From this, time-integrated 187Re/188Os and 187Os/188Os ratios for the UCC are

  19. Platinum-group elements in alpine-type ultramafic rocks and related chromite ores of the main ophiolite belt of the Urals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volchenko, Yu. A.; Koroteev, V. A.; Neustroeva, I. I.

    2009-04-01

    On the basis of a representative collection of ultramafic rocks and chromite ores and a series of technological samples from the largest (Central and Western) deposits in the Rai-Iz massif of the Polar Urals and the Almaz-Zhemchuzhina and Poiskovy deposits in the Kempirsai massif of the southern Urals, the distribution and speciation of platinum-group elements (PGE) in various type sections of mafic-ultramafic massifs of the Main ophiolite belt of the Urals have been studied. Spectral-chemical and spectrophotometric analyses were carried out to estimate PGE in 700 samples of ultramafic rocks and chromite ores; 400 analyses of minerals from rocks, ores, and concentrates and 100 analyses of PGE minerals (PGM) in chromite ores and concentrates were performed using an electron microprobe. Near-chondritic and nonchondritic PGE patterns in chromitebearing sections have been identified. PGE mineralization has been established to occur in chromite ore from all parts of the mafic-ultramafic massifs in the Main ophiolite belt of the Urals. The PGE deposits and occurrences discovered therein are attributed to four types (Kraka, Kempirsai, Nurali-Upper Neiva, and Shandasha), which are different in mode of geological occurrence, geochemical specialization, and placer-forming capability. Fluid-bearing minerals of the pargasite-edenite series have been identified for the first time in the matrix of chromite ore of the Kempirsai massif (the Almaz-Zhemchuzhina deposit) and Voikar-Syn’ya massif (the Kershor deposit). The PGE grade in various types of chromite ore ranges from 0.1-0.2 to 1-2 g/t or higher. According to technological sampling, the average PGE grade in the largest deposits of the southeastern ore field of the Kempirsai massif is 0.5-0.7 g/t. Due to the occurrence of most PGE as PGM 10-100 mm in size and the proved feasibility of their recovery into nickel alloys, chromites of the Kempirsai massif can be considered a complex ore with elevated and locally high Os, Ir

  20. Platinum-group elements (PGE) and Rhenium in Marine Sediments across the Cretaceous-Tertiary Boundary: Constraints on Re-PGE Transport in the Marine Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus; Wasserburg, Gerald J.; Kyte, Frank T.

    2003-01-01

    The nature of Re-platinum-group element (PGE; Pt, Pd, Ir, Os, Ru) transport in the marine environment was investigated by means of marine sediments at and across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) at two hemipelagic sites in Europe and two pelagic sites in the North and South Pacific. A traverse across the KTB in the South Pacific pelagic clay core found elevated levels of Re, Pt, Ir, Os, and Ru, each of which is approximately symmetrically distributed over a distance of approx. 1.8 m across the KTB. The Re-PGE abundance patterns are fractionated from chondritic relative abundances: Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re contents are slightly subchondritic relative to Ir, and Os is depleted by approx. 95% relative to chondritic Ir proportions. A similar depletion in Os (approx. 90%) was found in a sample of the pelagic KTB in the North Pacific, but it is enriched in Ru, Pt, Pd, and Re relative to Ir. The two hemipelagic KTB clays have near-chondritic abundance patterns. The approx. 1.8-m-wide Re-PGE peak in the pelagic South Pacific section cannot be reconciled with the fallout of a single impactor, indicating that postdepositional redistribution has occurred. The elemental profiles appear to fit diffusion profiles, although bioturbation could have also played a role. If diffusion had occurred over approx. 65 Ma, the effective diffusivities are approx. 10(exp -13)sq cm/s, much smaller than that of soluble cations in pore waters (approx. 10(exp -5) sq cm/s). The coupling of Re and the PGEs during redistribution indicates that postdepositional processes did not significantly fractionate their relative abundances. If redistribution was caused by diffusion, then the effective diffusivities are the same. Fractionation of Os from Ir during the KTB interval must therefore have occurred during aqueous transport in the marine environment. Distinctly subchondritic Os/Ir ratios throughout the Cenozoic in the South Pacific core further suggest that fractionation of Os from Ir in the marine

  1. Abundances of platinum group elements in native sulfur condensates from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc: Implications for PGE mineralization in porphyry deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung-Woo; Campbell, Ian H.; Kim, Jonguk

    2016-02-01

    Some porphyry Cu-Au deposits, which are enriched in Pd, are potentially an economic source of Pd. Magmatic volatile phases are thought to transport the platinum group elements (PGEs) from the porphyry source magma to the point of deposition. However, the compatibilities of the PGEs in magmatic volatile phases are poorly constrained. We report PGE and Re contents in native sulfur condensates and associated altered dacites from the Niuatahi-Motutahi submarine volcano, Tonga rear arc, in order to determine the compatibility of PGEs and Re in magmatic volatile phases, and their mobility during secondary hydrothermal alteration. The native sulfur we analyzed is the condensate of a magmatic volatile phase exsolved from the Niuatahi-Motutahi magma. The PGEs are moderately enriched in the sulfur condensates in comparison to the associated fresh dacite, with enrichment factors of 11-285, whereas Au, Cu and Re are strongly enriched with enrichment factors of ∼20,000, ∼5000 and ∼800 respectively. Although the PGEs are moderately compatible into magmatic volatile phases, their compatibility is significantly lower than that of Au, Cu and Re. Furthermore, the compatibility of PGEs decrease in the order: Ru > Pt > Ir > Pd. This trend is also observed in condensates and sublimates from other localities. PGE mineralization in porphyry Cu-Au deposits is characterized by substantially higher Pd/Pt (∼7-60) and Pd/Ir (∼100-10,500) than typical orthomagmatic sulfide deposits (e.g. Pd/Pt ∼0.6 and Pd/Ir ∼20 for the Bushveld). It has previously been suggested that the high mobility of Pd, relative to the other PGEs, may account for the preferential enrichment of Pd in porphyry Cu-Au deposits. However, the low compatibility of Pd in the volatile phase relative to the other PGEs, shown in this study, invalidates this explanation. We suggest that the PGE geochemistry of Pd-rich Cu-Au deposits is principally derived from the PGE characteristics of the magma from which the ore

  2. Levels and risk assessment for humans and ecosystems of platinum-group elements in the airborne particles and road dust of some European cities.

    PubMed

    Gómez, B; Palacios, M A; Gómez, M; Sanchez, J L; Morrison, G; Rauch, S; McLeod, C; Ma, R; Caroli, S; Alimonti, A; Petrucci, E; Bocca, B; Schramel, P; Zischka, M; Petterson, C; Wass, U

    2002-11-01

    Traffic is the main source of platinum-group element (PGE) contamination in populated urban areas. There is increasing concern about the hazardous effects of these new pollutants for people and for other living organisms in these areas. Airborne and road dusts, as well as tree bark and grass samples were collected at locations in the European cities of Göteborg (Sweden), Madrid (Spain), Rome (Italy), Munich (Germany), Sheffield and London (UK). Today, in spite of the large number of parameters that can influence the airborne PGE content, the results obtained so far indicate significantly higher PGE levels at traffic sites compared with the rural or non-polluted zones that have been investigated (background levels). The average Pt content in airborne particles found in downtown Madrid, Göteborg and Rome is in the range 7.3-13.1 pg m(-3). The ring roads of these cities have values in the range 4.1-17.7 pg m(-3). In Munich, a lower Pt content was found in airborne particles (4.1 pg m(-3)). The same tendency has been noted for downtown Rh, with contents in the range 2.2-2.8 pg m(-3), and in the range 0.8-3.0 and 0.3 pg m(-3) for motorway margins in Munich. The combined results obtained using a wide-range airborne classifier (WRAC) collector and a PM-10 or virtual impactor show that Pt is associated with particles for a wide range of diameters. The smaller the particle size, the lower the Pt concentration. However, in particles

  3. Platinum Group Elements, 187OS/188OS and 87SR/86SR Isotope Systematics in Depleted Fluid-Modified Mariana Fore-Arc Peridotites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J.; Savov, I. P.; Shirey, S. B.; Horan, M. F.; Mock, T. D.

    2012-12-01

    The serpentine mud volcanoes of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana (IBM) fore-arc, collected during Ocean Drilling Program Leg 195 [1], contain hard-rock clasts of serpentine sampled from close to the décollement, which separates the down-going Pacific slab from the overlying mantle wedge. These clasts preserve evidence for melt depletion (>25 % melt extraction in many instances) in a sub-arc environment, and extensive (40 - 100%) serpentinization due to subsequent fluid / peridotite interaction, e.g. [2]. Platinum-group element (PGE) abundances are not consistent with melt-depletion alone [3]. Fractionation between I-PGE (Os, Ir, Ru) has resulted in groups of IBM serpentinites with either a high chondrite-normalized Os/Ir ratio (OsN/IrN) or a low OsN/IrN ratio. Similarly, fractionation of P-PGE (Pt, Pd) is marked, and distinguishes the IBM serpentinites from worldwide abyssal peridotites. Interaction with high-pH fluids [4] may have partially oxidized mantle sulphide, the major primary host for PGE in these rocks, leading to partial breakdown to sulphate and the selective redistribution of certain PGE (Os, Ru, Pt), a feature normally associated with sub-aerial weathering [5], but which likely prevails in other oxidizing environments. In particular, the Re-Os systematics of the high (OsN/IrN) IBM serpentinites have been disturbed by the addition of Os. Unlike peridotite xenoliths associated with magmatic regions of subduction zones where subduction-related Os-addition is unequivocally radiogenic and derived from crustal material [6][7], where Os has been added to the IBM serpentinites it is unradiogenic and was most likely derived from within the oceanic mantle. IBM serpentinites therefore preserve osmium isotope ratios that are exclusively sub-chondritic (187Os/188Os ≤ 0.127), as previously reported [8]. These serpentinized peridotites were produced by at least a three-step process: melt depletion, serpentinization, and the mobilization of Os, Ru and Pt to produce low Os

  4. Ages and sources of components of Zn-Pb, Cu, precious metal, and platinum group element deposits in the goodsprings district, Clark County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, Peter G.; Browne, Quentin J.; Fleck, Robert J.; Hofstra, Albert H.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    The Goodsprings district, Clark County, Nevada, includes zinc-dominant carbonate replacement deposits of probable late Paleozoic age, and lead-dominant carbonate replacement deposits, copper ± precious metal-platinum group element (PGE) deposits, and gold ± silver deposits that are spatially associated with Late Triassic porphyritic intrusions. The district encompasses ~500 km2 although the distribution of all deposits has been laterally condensed by late Mesozoic crustal contraction. Zinc, Pb, and Cu production from about 90 deposits was ~160,000 metric tons (t) (Zn > Pb >> Cu), 2.1 million ounces (Moz) Ag, 0.09 Moz Au, and small amounts of PGEs—Co, V, Hg, Sb, Ni, Mo, Mn, Ir, and U—were also recovered.Zinc-dominant carbonate replacement deposits (Zn > Pb; Ag ± Cu) resemble Mississippi Valley Type (MVT) Zn-Pb deposits in that they occur in karst and fault breccias in Mississippian limestone where the southern margin of the regional late Paleozoic foreland basin adjoins Proterozoic crystalline rocks of the craton. They consist of calcite, dolomite, sphalerite, and galena with variably positive S isotope compositions (δ34S values range from 2.5–13‰), and highly radiogenic Pb isotope compositions (206Pb/204Pb >19), typical of MVT deposits above crystalline Precambrian basement. These deposits may have formed when southward flow of saline fluids, derived from basinal and older sedimentary rocks, encountered thinner strata and pinch-outs against the craton, forcing fluid mixing and mineral precipitation in karst and fault breccias. Lead-dominant carbonate replacement deposits (Pb > Zn, Ag ± Cu ± Au) occur among other deposit types, often near porphyritic intrusions. They generally contain higher concentrations of precious metals than zinc-dominant deposits and relatively abundant iron oxides after pyrite. They share characteristics with copper ± precious metal-PGE and gold ± silver deposits including fine-grained quartz replacement of carbonate minerals

  5. Platinum group nuggets in deep sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Bates, B. A.; Wheelock, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    The existence of iron meteor oblation spheres in deep sea sediments was known for over a century. These spheres generally were believed to be composed of either pure magnetite and wustite or an oxide shell surrounding a NiFe metal core. A large number of 300 micron to 600 micron spheres found were pure oxide spheres, usually containing a solitary 10 micron platinum group nugget (pgn) composed almost entirely of group VIII metals. Twelve PGN's were analyzed and most had chondritic abundances with some depletions that correlate with element volatility. PGN formation by oxidation of a molten metal sphere entering the atmosphere cannot occur if the oxygen abundance in the atmosphere is less than half of its present value. The first appearance of PGN's in the geological record should mark when, in the Earth's history, oxygen rose to this level.

  6. Concentration of some platinum-group metals in coal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Finkelman, R.B.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    New data on some platinum group metals in coal indicate that the concentration of Pt is generally less than about 5 ppb, that of Pd is generally less than 1 ppb, and that of Rh is generally less than 0.5 ppb. No conclusive evidence was obtained concerning the mode of occurrence of these elements in coal. ?? 1981.

  7. Mineral resource of the month: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hilliard, Henry

    2003-01-01

    The precious metals commonly referred to as platinum-group metals (PGM) include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium and ruthenium. PGM are among the rarest of elements, and their market values — particularly for palladium, platinum and rhodium — are the highest of all precious metals.

  8. Multi-elemental characterization of tunnel and road dusts in Houston, Texas using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry: evidence for the release of platinum group and anthropogenic metals from motor vehicles.

    PubMed

    Spada, Nicholas; Bozlaker, Ayse; Chellam, Shankararaman

    2012-07-20

    Platinum group elements (PGEs) including Rh, Pd, and Pt are important tracers for vehicular emissions, though their measurement is often challenging and difficult to replicate in environmental campaigns. These challenges arise from sample preparation steps required for PGE quantitation, which often cause severe isobaric interferences and spectral overlaps from polyatomic species of other anthropogenically emitted metals. Consequently, most previous road dust studies have either only quantified PGEs or included a small number of anthropogenic elements. Therefore a novel analytical method was developed to simultaneously measure PGEs, lanthanoids, transition and main group elements to comprehensively characterize the elemental composition of urban road and tunnel dusts. Dust samples collected from the vicinity of high-traffic roadways and a busy underwater tunnel restricted to single-axle (predominantly gasoline-driven) vehicles in Houston, TX were analyzed for 45 metals with the newly developed method using dynamic reaction cell-quadrupole-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (DRC-q-ICP-MS). Average Rh, Pd and Pt concentrations were 152±52, 770±208 and 529±130 ng g(-1) respectively in tunnel dusts while they varied between 6 and 8 ng g(-1), 10 and 88 ng g(-1) and 35 and 131 ng g(-1) in surface road dusts. Elemental ratios and enrichment factors demonstrated that PGEs in dusts originated from autocatalyst attrition/abrasion. Strong evidence is also presented for mobile source emissions of Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Mo, Cd, Sn, Sb, Ba, W and Pb. However, all other elements including rare earths most likely arose from weathering, erosion and resuspension of crustal material. These are the first such detailed measurements in Houston, the largest city in TX and fourth largest in the United States. We posit that such investigations will assist in better understanding PGE concentrations in urban environments while providing elemental data necessary to better understand

  9. Determinations of Platinum-Group Element (PGE) Distributions Using Whole-rock, SEM, EMPA, Image Analysis, and LA-ICP-MS Techniques in the Kelly Lake Ni-Cu-PGE Deposit, Sudbury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huminicki, M. A.; Cabri, L.; Sylvester, P. J.; Tubrett, M. N.

    2004-05-01

    The Kelly Lake deposit is a Ni-Cu-PGE offset-style deposit that occurs at the south end of the Copper Cliff Offset (CCO), Sudbury. The deposit consists of four ore bodies (710, 720, 725, and 740) that were first identified in 1997 and contain a published 10.5 million tonnes of ore at 1.77% Ni, 1.34% Cu, and 3.6 g/tonne combined Pt + Pd + Au. The ore bodies have a sub-vertical orientation and plunge to the south. The CCO consists of an inclusion-and sulfide-poor marginal zone of quartz diorite (QD) and an inclusion- and sulfide-rich core of QD. The sulfide assemblage is similar to other deposits along the CCO, comprising pentlandite (Pn), pyrrhotite (Po), and chalcopyrite (Ccp) with minor pyrite (Py) and trace amounts of galena [PbS]. The platinum-group mineral assemblage consists of michenerite [(Pd,Pt)BiTe], sperrylite [PtAs2], and microinclusions of hollingworthite [(Rh,Pt,Pd)AsS] and ruarsite [RuAsS], which are associated with the bismuth-telluride, tsumoite [BiTe] and the sulfarsenide, cobaltite-gersdorfitte [(Co,Fe)AsS-NiAsS]. The purpose of this study was to determine the distribution of the platinum-group elements (PGE) within the Kelly Lake ores. Analyses were carried out using a combination of: 1) lead and nickel-sulfide fire-assay for whole rock PGE abundances; 2) scanning-electron-microscopy (SEM) image analysis, quantitative energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDXS), and quantitative electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) to determine size, shape, location, association, and mineral chemistry of discrete platinum-group minerals; and 3) laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to determine low-level PGE contents in solid solution and as microinclusions within the sulfides and sulfarsenides. SEM, EPMA, and LA-ICP-MS results indicate that the PGE occur: 1) primarily as discrete PGM (sperrylite and michenerite), 2) in solid-solution in cobaltite-gersdorfitte, and 3) as micro-inclusions of hollingworthite and ruarsite in

  10. Platinum-group element (PGE) geochemistry of Deccan orangeites, Bastar craton, central India: Implication for a non-terrestrial origin for iridium enrichment at the K-Pg boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalapathi Rao, N. V.; Lehmann, B.; Balaram, V.

    2014-04-01

    We report platinum group element (PGE) concentrations of twelve bulk-rock samples from the Behradih and Kodomali orangeite intrusions in the Mainpur field, Bastar craton, central India, which are emplaced synchronously with the Deccan flood basalts. Their palladium-group PGE (PPGE) (1.8-5.2 ppb Pt, 1.2-6.4 ppb Pd) contents are distinctly higher compared to their iridium-group PGE (IPGE) concentrations (0.8-2 ppb Os, 0.8-1.2 ppb Ir, 3.2-4.2 ppb Ru, and 0.2-0.8 ppb Rh). Their PGE contents as well as Pd/Ir ratios are either similar or even lower than those from the Mesoproterozoic and Cretaceous kimberlites and orangeites from the Kaapvaal craton (southern Africa), Cretaceous kimberlites from the Sao Fransisco craton (Brazil), Ordovician kimberlites from the North China craton and the Mesoproterozoic southern Indian kimberlites from the Eastern Dharwar craton. Anomalously elevated iridium (and other PGE) contents in sediments at the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) boundary are commonly attributed either to a large bolide impact triggering the K-Pg mass extinction or to terrestrial causes such as volcanic eruptions (Deccan flood basalts) or even to mantle-plume derived lithospheric gaseous explosions (Verneshots). Lack of unusually high abundances of PGE in the Mainpur orangeties as well as in the co-eval Deccan flood basalts and associated alkaline rocks implies that the anomalous iridium enrichment reported at the K-Pg boundary sections was not sourced from the mantle and likely originated from an extraterrestrial source.

  11. Extraterrestrial platinum group nuggets in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brownlee, D. E.; Bates, B. A.; Wheelock, M. M.

    1984-01-01

    A previously unrecognized property of iron cosmic spheres is reported. The most common spheres larger than 300 microns do not, in fact, contain FeNi metal cores, but instead contain a micrometer-sized nugget composed almost entirely of platinum group elements. These elements appear to have been concentrated by the oxidation of molten meteoritic metal during atmospheric entry. This process is critically dependent on the relative abundance of oxygen in the atmosphere, and the first appearance of the nuggets in the geological record may provide a marker indicating when the oxygen abundance attained half of its present level.

  12. Re-Os isotope and platinum-group element geochemistry of the Pobei Ni-Cu sulfide-bearing mafic-ultramafic complex in the northeastern part of the Tarim Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Sheng-Hong; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Lightfoot, Peter C.; Xu, Ji-Feng; Wang, Christina Yan; Jiang, Chang-Yi; Qu, Wen-Jun

    2014-03-01

    A number of mafic-ultramafic intrusions that host Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization occur in the northeastern Tarim Craton and the eastern Tianshan Orogenic Belt (NW China). The sulfide-mineralized Pobei mafic-ultramafic complex is located in the northeastern part of the Tarim Craton. The complex is composed of gabbro and olivine gabbro, cut by dunite, wehrlite, and melatroctolite of the Poyi and Poshi intrusions. Disseminated Ni-Cu sulfide mineralization is present towards the base of the ultramafic bodies. The sulfide mineralization is typically low grade (<0.5 wt.% Ni and <2 wt.% S) with low platinum-group element (PGE) concentrations (<24.5 ppb Pt and <69 ppb Pd); the abundance of Cu in 100 % sulfide is 1-8 wt.%, and Ni abundance in 100 % sulfide is typically >4 wt.%. Samples from the Pobei complex have ɛNd (at 280 Ma) values up to +8.1, consistent with the derivation of the magma from an asthenospheric mantle source. Fo 89.5 mol.% olivine from the ultramafic bodies is consistent with a primitive parental magma. Sulfide-bearing dunite and wehrlite have high Cu/Pd ratios ranging from 24,000 to 218,000, indicating a magma that evolved under conditions of sulfide saturation. The grades of Ni, Cu, and PGE in 100 % sulfide show a strong positive correlation. A model for these variations is proposed where the mantle source of the Pobei magma retained ~0.033 wt.% sulfide during the production of a PGE-depleted parental magma. The parental magma migrated from the mantle to the crust and underwent further S saturation to generate the observed mineralization along with its high Cu/Pd ratio at an R-factor varying from 100 to 1,200. The mineralization at Poshi and Poyi has very high γOs (at 280 Ma) values (+30 to +292) that are negatively correlated with the abundance of Os in 100 % sulfide (5.81-271 ppb) and positively correlated with the Re/Os ratios; this indicates that sulfide saturation was triggered by the assimilation of crustal sulfide with both high γOs and Re

  13. Incorporation of platinum-group elements and cobalt into subsidiary pyrite in alkalic Cu-Au porphyry deposits: significant implications for precious metal distribution in felsic magmatic-hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, J. J.; MacKenzie, M. K.

    2009-05-01

    Certain alkalic porphyry Cu-Au systems contain significant concentrations of the platinum-group elements (PGE) Pd and Pt, and may serve as important unconventional resources for these metals. Bulk rock analyses of ore styles from these deposits show no correlation between the PGE and Cu-Au abundance, suggesting that the timing/mechanisms of introduction and precipitation for the PGE and Cu-Au were not the same. To elucidate some uncertainties concerning PGE enrichment, we have performed a mineralogical evaluation of two PGE-bearing porphyry systems in British Columbia (the Afton and Mount Milligan deposits) with the aid of a variety of microanalytical techniques (LA-ICPMS, SEM, EMP). Discrete PGE mineralogy in these systems is predominantly represented by Hg-rich Pd-Pt-As-Sb species (naldrettite-stibiopalladinite-sperrylite) and Pd-Te-Hg species (kotulskite-temagamite). However, these mineral phases are unambiguously late- stage (with carbonate-chlorite alteration) and contribute insignificantly (<5-10%) to the total Pd+Pt grade based on mass balance calculations. Similarly, LA-ICPMS analyses of chalcopyrite, bornite, oxides and various common sulfosalts show that these do not contribute any Pd+Pt to the bulk grades. Suprisingly, pyrite is the predominant carrier of PGE. It occurs in trace to minor abundances and predates both the Cu-Au mineralising event and the late stage carbonate-chlorite alteration. LA-ICPMS analyses of pyrite show that at least 90% of the bulk Pd+Pt occurs within this atypical host mineral. The PGE are highly enriched in the cores of the pyrite grains (up to 90 ppm and 20 ppm, respectively) and their abundance correlates well with Co (up to 4 wt%). The rims of the pyrite grains are Co-PGE-poor but Ni-rich. Early Co- PGE enrichment in these deposits may implicate a mafic contributor to the PGE tenor of the deposits, but also a potential crystallographic (substitutional) control on Pd partitioning into pyrite. At Afton, the former is supported

  14. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan [Havana, IL; Silver, Ronald G [Peoria, IL; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna [Edelstein, IL; Eckstein, Colleen J [Metamora, IL

    2011-12-06

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  15. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Ragle, Christie Susan; Silver, Ronald G.; Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna; Eckstein, Colleen J.

    2012-08-07

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  16. Impact of platinum group metals on the environment: a toxicological, genotoxic and analytical chemistry study.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Zofia E; Newkirk, Catherine; Hicks, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies show particles of Platinum Group Metals (PGMs); primarily platinum, palladium and rhodium; released from automobile catalytic converters are being deposited alongside roadways. This deposition is leading to increasing concentrations of PGMs in the environment, raising concerns about the environmental impact and toxicity of these elements in living organisms. The objective of this study was to determine how PGMs alter the patterns of growth, development, and physiology by studying the toxicological and genotoxic effects of these metals. Two vastly different species were used as models: plant-a wild wetland common Sphagnum moss, and animal-6-week old rats Sprague-Dawley. Both species were exposed, in controlled environments, to different concentrations of the PGMs. Toxicological and genotoxic effects were determined by assessment of plant growth, animal survival and pathology, and influence on DNA in both models. Our results on the uptake of PGMs by Sphagnum showed significant decreases in plant length and biomass as PGM concentration increased. Histological and pathological analysis of the animal model revealed vacuolization, eosinophil inclusion bodies in adrenal glands, shrinkage of glomeruli in the kidney, and enlargement of white pulp in the spleen. In both models, DNA damage was detected. Chemical analysis using ICP-AES atomic absorption demonstrated accumulation of PGMs in plant tissues at all PGM levels, proportional to concentration.

  17. Contamination from gold and platinum-group metals mining in the Gulf of Darién, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez-Bedoya, L.; Palacio Baena, J.

    2013-12-01

    Gulf of Darién, triangular southernmost extension of the Caribbean Sea, bounded by Panama on the southwest and by Colombia on the southeast and east. The Gulf is made up of 17 municipalities in the department of Choco and Antioquia. The Gulf of Darién is a geostrategic region, rich in biodiversity, known for its natural resources of minerals, oil, lumber as well as its water and fertile land. The Darién also acts as the bridge between South America and Central America and has access to the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. The economy in the region is based mainly on agribusinesses, tourism and mining activities, mainly the 'mining of gold and platinum-group metals'. In our study we determined the degree of trace element contamination in estuarine sediment samples originated from mining activities and municipal waste water discharges of effluents on the gulf of Darién. . Surface samples were taken from 17 locations through the entire Gulf. Grain size, Corg, Ag, Al, Ca , Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb and Zn concentrations were analyzed, and enrichment factors (EF) as well as geo-accumulation indices (Igeo) were calculated. Concentrations of Pb, Zn, Ni, Cu and Cr show levels that are consistent with those typically found in urbanized marine environments. EF and Igeo values revealed that the Gulf is extremely contaminated with Ag and moderately contaminated with Cr and Zn. The sources of Cr, Ag, Hg and Zn are associated with the development of mining activities in the Atrato River basin. The observed enrichment of Ag may be explained as a residue of the extraction of gold and platinum-group metals.

  18. Partitioning of platinum-group elements (PGE) and chalcogens (Se, Te, As, Sb, Bi) between monosulfide-solid solution (MSS), intermediate solid solution (ISS) and sulfide liquid at controlled fO2-fS2 conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanan; Brenan, James

    2015-06-01

    In order to better understand the behavior of highly siderophile elements (HSEs: Os, Ir, Ru, Rh, Pt, Pd, Au, Re), Ag, Pb and chalcogens (As, Se, Sb, Te and Bi) during the solidification of sulfide magmas, we have conducted a series of experiments to measure partition coefficients (D values) between monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and sulfide melt, as well as MSS and intermediate solid solution (ISS), at 0.1 MPa and 860-926 °C, log fS2 -3.0 to -2.2 (similar to the Pt-PtS buffer), with fO2 controlled at the fayalite-magnetite-quartz (FMQ) buffer. The IPGEs (Os, Ir, Ru), Rh and Re are found to be compatible in MSS relative to sulfide melt with D values ranging from ∼20 to ∼5, and DRe/DOs of ∼0.5. Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, Pb, as well as the chalcogens, are incompatible in MSS, with D values ranging from ∼0.1 to ∼1 × 10-3. For the same metal/sulfur ratio, D values for the IPGEs, Rh and Re are systematically larger than most past studies, correlating with higher oxygen content in the sulfide liquid, reflecting the significant effect of oxygen on increasing the activity coefficients for these elements in the melt phase. MSS/ISS partitioning experiments reveal that Ru, Os, Ir, Rh and Re are partitioned into MSS by a factor of >50, whereas Pd, Pt, Ag, Au and the chalcogens partition from weakly (Se, As) to strongly (Ag, Au) into ISS. Uniformly low MSS- and ISS- melt partition coefficients for the chalcogens, Pt, Pd, Ag and Au will lead to enrichment in the residual sulfide liquid, but D values are generally too large to reach early saturation in Pt-Pd-chalcogen-rich accessory minerals, based on current solubility estimates. Instead, these phases likely precipitate at the last dregs of crystallization. Modeled evolution curves for the PGEs and chalcogens are in reasonably good agreement with whole-rock sulfide compositions for the McCreedy East deposit (Sudbury, Ontario), consistent with an origin by crystallization of MSS, then MSS + ISS from sulfide magma.

  19. Occurrence model for magmatic sulfide-rich nickel-copper-(platinum-group element) deposits related to mafic and ultramafic dike-sill complexes: Chapter I in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulz, Klaus J.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Nicholson, Suzanne W.; Seal, Robert R.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Chandler, Val W.; Mars, John L.

    2014-01-01

    The sulfides in magmatic Ni-Cu deposits generally constitute a small volume of the host rock(s) and tend to be concentrated in the lower parts of the mafic and/or ultramafic bodies, often in physical depressions or areas marking changes in the geometry of the footwall topography. In most deposits, the sulfide mineralization can be divided into disseminated, matrix or net, and massive sulfide, depending on a combination of the sulfide content of the rock and the silicate texture. The major Ni-Cu sulfide mineralogy typically consists of an intergrowth of pyrrhotite (Fe7S8), pentlandite ([Fe, Ni]9S8), and chalcopyrite (FeCuS2). Cobalt, PGE, and gold (Au) are extracted from most magmatic Ni-Cu ores as byproducts, although such elements can have a significant impact on the economics in some deposits, such as the Noril’sk-Talnakh deposits, which produce much of the world’s palladium. In addition, deposits may contain between 1 and 15 percent magnetite associated with the sulfides.

  20. International strategic minerals inventory summary report: platinum-group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sutphin, David M.; Page, Norman J

    1986-01-01

    Major world resources of platinum-group metals are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI}. ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of platinum-group metals on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  1. Mineral resource of the month: platinum group metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loferski, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    The article focuses on platinum group metals (PGMs) and their properties. According to the author, PGMs, which include iridium, osmium, palladium, platinum, rhodium, and ruthenium, are among the rarest mineral commodities in the Earth's crust. PGMs are primarily used as catalytic converters that clean harmful exhaust from vehicle engines. They are also used in the chemical industry as catalysts in the production of nitric acid and in the petroleum refining industry.

  2. Photochemistry and charge transfer chemistry of the platinum group elements

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.

    1992-12-01

    During the past 3 years, progress was made in elucidating the excited state structures of Pt(diimine)(dithiolate) complexes, while more recent efforts focused on the photochemistry of these complexes and electronic structure of other dithiolate systems. A carbonyl-Ir-maleonitrile dithiolate complex is also studied.

  3. Separation of platinum group metal ions by Donnan dialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brajter, K.; Slonawska, K.; Cox, J.A.

    1985-10-01

    Separations of metal ions on the basis of Donnan dialysis across anion-exchange membranes should be possible if the receiver electrolyte composition favors the formation of selected anionic complexes of the sample metal ions. Moreover, such a separation has the possibility of being better suited from some applications than batch or column experiments with anion-exchange resins. The above hypothesis are tested on the platinum-group metal ions, Pt(IV), Rh(III), Pd(II), Ir(III), and Ir(IV). 13 references, 4 tables.

  4. Recent strikes in South Africa’s platinum-group metal mines: effects upon world platinum-group metal supplies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yager, Thomas R.; Soto-Viruet, Yadira; Barry, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The recent labor disputes over wages and working conditions that have affected South Africa’s three leading platinum-group metal (PGM) producers have affected an industry already plagued by market pressures and labor unrest and raised the specter of constraints in the world’s supply of these metals. Although low demand for these metals in 2011 and 2012 helped to offset production losses of recent years, and particularly those losses caused by the strikes in 2012, a prolonged resumption of strikes could cause severe shortages of iridium, platinum, rhodium, ruthenium, and, to a lesser extent, palladium.

  5. Platinum group minerals (PGM) in the Falcondo Ni-laterite deposit, Loma Caribe peridotite (Dominican Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiglsperger, Thomas; Proenza, Joaquin A.; Zaccarini, Federica; Lewis, John F.; Garuti, Giorgio; Labrador, Manuel; Longo, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Two Ni-laterite profiles from the Loma Caribe peridotite (Dominican Republic) have been investigated for their platinum group element (PGE) geochemistry and mineralogy. One profile (Loma Peguera) is characterized by PGE-enriched (up to 3.5 ppm total PGE) chromitite bodies incorporated within the saprolite, whereas the second profile is chromitite-free (Loma Caribe). Total PGE contents of both profiles slightly increase from parent rocks (36 and 30 ppb, respectively) to saprolite (˜50 ppb) and reach highest levels within the limonite zone (640 and 264 ppb, respectively). Chondrite-normalized PGE patterns of saprolite and limonite reveal rather flat shapes with positive peaks of Ru and Pd. Three types of platinum group minerals (PGM) were found by using an innovative hydroseparation technique: (i) primary PGM inclusions in fresh Cr-spinel (laurite and bowieite), (ii) secondary PGM (e.g., Ru-Fe-Os-Ir compounds) from weathering of preexisting PGM (e.g., serpentinization and/or laterization), and (iii) PGM precipitated after PGE mobilization within the laterite (neoformation). Our results provide evidence that (i) PGM occurrence and PGE enrichment in the laterite profiles is independent of chromitite incorporation; (ii) PGE enrichment is residual on the profile scale; and (iii) PGE are mobile on a local scale leading to in situ growth of PGM within limonite, probably by bioreduction and/or electrochemical metal accretion.

  6. Trace element accumulation in lotic dragonfly nymphs: Genus matters

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Dean E.; Lindell, Angela H.; Stillings, Garrett K.; Blas, Susan A.; McArthur, J. Vaun

    2017-01-01

    Constituents of coal combustion waste (CCW) expose aquatic organisms to complex mixtures of potentially toxic metals and metalloids. Multi-element trace element analyses were used to distinguish patterns of accumulation among 8 genera of dragonfly nymphs collected from two sites on a CCW contaminated coastal plain stream. Dragonfly nymphs are exceptional for comparing trace element accumulation in syntopic macroinvertebrates that are all predators within the same order (Odonata) and suborder (Anisoptera), but differ vastly in habitat use and body form. Sixteen trace element (Be, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) were analyzed and trophic position and basal carbon sources assessed with stable isotope analyses (C and N). Trophic positions varied within relatively narrow ranges. Size did not appear to influence trophic position. Trophic position rarely influenced trace element accumulation within genera and did not consistently correlate with accumulation among genera. Patterns between δ13C and trace element accumulation were generally driven by differences between sites. An increase in trace element accumulation was associated with a divergence of carbon sources between sites in two genera. Higher trace element concentrations tended to accumulate in nymphs from the upstream site, closer to contaminant sources. Influences of factors such as body form and habitat use appeared more influential on trace element accumulation than phylogeny for several elements (Ni, Ba, Sr, V, Be, Cd, and Cr) as higher concentrations accumulated in sprawler and the climber-sprawler genera, irrespective of family. In contrast, As and Se accumulated variably higher in burrowers, but accumulation in sprawlers differed between sites. Greater variation between genera than within genera suggests genus as an acceptable unit of comparison in dragonfly nymphs. Overall, taxonomic differences in trace element accumulation can be substantial, often exceeding variation

  7. Trace element accumulation in lotic dragonfly nymphs: Genus matters.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Dean E; Lindell, Angela H; Stillings, Garrett K; Blas, Susan A; McArthur, J Vaun

    2017-01-01

    Constituents of coal combustion waste (CCW) expose aquatic organisms to complex mixtures of potentially toxic metals and metalloids. Multi-element trace element analyses were used to distinguish patterns of accumulation among 8 genera of dragonfly nymphs collected from two sites on a CCW contaminated coastal plain stream. Dragonfly nymphs are exceptional for comparing trace element accumulation in syntopic macroinvertebrates that are all predators within the same order (Odonata) and suborder (Anisoptera), but differ vastly in habitat use and body form. Sixteen trace element (Be, V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) were analyzed and trophic position and basal carbon sources assessed with stable isotope analyses (C and N). Trophic positions varied within relatively narrow ranges. Size did not appear to influence trophic position. Trophic position rarely influenced trace element accumulation within genera and did not consistently correlate with accumulation among genera. Patterns between δ13C and trace element accumulation were generally driven by differences between sites. An increase in trace element accumulation was associated with a divergence of carbon sources between sites in two genera. Higher trace element concentrations tended to accumulate in nymphs from the upstream site, closer to contaminant sources. Influences of factors such as body form and habitat use appeared more influential on trace element accumulation than phylogeny for several elements (Ni, Ba, Sr, V, Be, Cd, and Cr) as higher concentrations accumulated in sprawler and the climber-sprawler genera, irrespective of family. In contrast, As and Se accumulated variably higher in burrowers, but accumulation in sprawlers differed between sites. Greater variation between genera than within genera suggests genus as an acceptable unit of comparison in dragonfly nymphs. Overall, taxonomic differences in trace element accumulation can be substantial, often exceeding variation

  8. Donnan dialysis of bromocomplexes of some platinum group metal ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brajter, K.; Slonawska, K. ); Cox, J.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The separation of bromocomplexes of platinum group metals by Donnan dialysis is demonstrated with both anion and cation exchange membranes. The inclusion of ethylenediamine (en) in the sample improves the separation of Pd(II) from Pt(IV) with experiments performed with an anion exchange membrane and decreases the amount of metal retained on the membrane phase. With a cation exchange membrane, the addition of a ligand such as en is required for transport. With 5.6 mM en in the sample at pH 10, 74% of Pd(II) is transported across an anion exchange membrane into 0.5 M NH{sub 4} Br after 6 hours while only 8% of the Pt(IV) is dialyzed. Rhodium(III) and iridium(III) behave like Pt(IV). Using a cation exchange membrane under the same conditions except with a 1 hour dialysis results in a 30-fold preferential preconcentration of Pd(II) relative to Pt(IV), and, based on the amount retained in the membrane, a preconcentration of Ir(III) which exceeds that of Pd(II) and Pt(IV) by factors of 40 and 20, respectively.

  9. Pyrometallurgical Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Tang, Huimin; Ye, Lei; Ma, Yutian; Rao, Mingjun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-09-01

    As an important secondary resource with abundant platinum group metals (PGMs), spent catalysts demand recycling for both economic and environmental benefits. This article reviews the main pyrometallurgical processes for PGM recovery from spent catalysts. Existing processes, including smelting, vaporization, and sintering processes, are discussed based in part on a review of the physiochemical characteristics of PGMs in spent catalysts. The smelting technology, which produces a PGM-containing alloy, is significantly influenced by the addition of various collectors, such as lead, copper, iron, matte, or printed circuit board (PCB), considering their chemical affinities for PGMs. The vaporization process can recover PGMs in vapor form at low temperatures (250-700°C), but it suffers high corrosion and potential environmental and health risks as a result of involvement of the hazardous gases, mainly Cl2 and CO. The sintering process serves as a reforming means for recycling of the spent catalysts by in situ reduction of their oxidized PGMs components. Among these processes, the smelting process seems more promising although its overall performance can be further improved by seeking a suitable target-oriented collector and flux, together with proper pretreatment and process intensification using an external field.

  10. Pyrometallurgical Recovery of Platinum Group Metals from Spent Catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhiwei; Li, Zhizhong; Lin, Xiaolong; Tang, Huimin; Ye, Lei; Ma, Yutian; Rao, Mingjun; Zhang, Yuanbo; Li, Guanghui; Jiang, Tao

    2017-07-01

    As an important secondary resource with abundant platinum group metals (PGMs), spent catalysts demand recycling for both economic and environmental benefits. This article reviews the main pyrometallurgical processes for PGM recovery from spent catalysts. Existing processes, including smelting, vaporization, and sintering processes, are discussed based in part on a review of the physiochemical characteristics of PGMs in spent catalysts. The smelting technology, which produces a PGM-containing alloy, is significantly influenced by the addition of various collectors, such as lead, copper, iron, matte, or printed circuit board (PCB), considering their chemical affinities for PGMs. The vaporization process can recover PGMs in vapor form at low temperatures (250-700°C), but it suffers high corrosion and potential environmental and health risks as a result of involvement of the hazardous gases, mainly Cl2 and CO. The sintering process serves as a reforming means for recycling of the spent catalysts by in situ reduction of their oxidized PGMs components. Among these processes, the smelting process seems more promising although its overall performance can be further improved by seeking a suitable target-oriented collector and flux, together with proper pretreatment and process intensification using an external field.

  11. Trace element accumulation in aquatic plants: a literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Ganje, T.J.; Elseewi, A.A.; Page, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    Trace elements in sediments and its overlying waters are important constituents of an aquatic plant ecosystem. This review was undertaken to evaluate trace element accumulation in aquatic plants and ascertain to what extent sediment and its overlying waters play in trace element accumulation by aquatic plant species. Aquatic vascular plants tend to accumulate trace elements in relation to the trace element concentration of the water body and sediment in which they are grown and the extent of exposure to the water body. Trace element composition of bryophytes and algae is also closely related to composition of their aquatic environment. It is increasingly apparent that sediments and overlying waters alter the bioavailability of trace elements to aquatic plants in both natural and artificial water bodies, particularly where industrial and agricultural waters are discharged into waterways.

  12. Platinum group minerals in podiform chromitites of the Bou Azzer ophiolite, Anti Atlas, Central Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ghorfi, M.; Melcher, F.; Oberthür, T.; Boukhari, A. E.; Maacha, L.; Maddi, A.; Mhaili, M.

    2008-01-01

    The Neoproterozoic Bou Azzer ophiolite complex hosts numerous, small lenticular bodies of massive and disseminated chromite. Metallurgical-grade high-Mg and high-Cr spinels (cores with 48-62 wt% Cr2O3) reveal complex alteration patterns of successive Cr and Mn enrichment and loss of Al towards the rims, while the Mg# ratios [(Mg/(Mg + Fe2+)] remain almost constant. Concentration patterns of platinum-group elements are typical for ophiolitic chromitite poor in sulfides, with predominance of the IPGE, variable Rh, and low Pt and Pd. The most abundant platinum-group mineral is Rh-bearing laurite that occurs either included in spinel or in silicate matrix, whereas Os-Ir-Ru alloy is always included in spinel. Laurite inclusions reveal complex intergrowth textures with Rh-Ru-Pt rich alloy, and with Rh-rich sulfide. Most laurites display trends to sulfur-poor compositions leading to local formation of very fine-grained Ru-Os-Ir alloy phases. Ni-Co-Fe sulfides, arsenides and sulfarsenides devoid of PGE are associated with the alteration of chromite. Textural position and chemical composition of the base metal inclusions, as well as comparison of alteration features between chromite and accessory chromian spinel in the Co-Ni-As ores of the Bou Azzer ophiolite indicate a close connection. It is suggested that hydrothermal fluids percolated through the marginal zones of the ophiolite belt during greenschist facies metamorphism and deposited Ni-Co-Fe arsenides, sulfarsenides and minor sulfides as accessories within altered chromitites, and also in structurally favourable zones as Ni-Co-As ores.

  13. Platinum-group mineralization at the margin of the Skaergaard intrusion, East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jens C. Ø.; Rollinson, Gavyn K.; McDonald, Iain; Tegner, Christian; Lesher, Charles E.

    2017-08-01

    Two occurrences of platinum-group elements (PGEs) along the northern margin of the Skaergaard intrusion include a sulfide-bearing gabbro with slightly less than 1 ppm PGE + Au and a clinopyroxene-actinolite-plagioclase-biotite-ilmenite schist with 16 vol% sulfide and 1.8 ppm PGE + Au. Both have assemblages of pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite typical for orthomagmatic sulfides. Matching platinum-group mineral assemblages with sperrylite (PtAs2), kotulskite (Pd(Bi,Te)1-2), froodite (PdBi2), michenerite (PdBiTe), and electrum (Au,Ag) suggest a common origin. Petrological and geochemical similarities suggest that the occurrences are related to the Skaergaard intrusion. The Marginal Border Series locally displays Ni depletion consistent with sulfide fractionation, and the PGE fractionation trends of the occurrences are systematically enriched by 10-50 times over the chilled margin. The PGE can be explained by sulfide-silicate immiscibility in the Skaergaard magma with R factors of 110-220. Nickel depletion in olivine suggests that the process occurred within the host cumulate, and the low R factors require little sulfide mobility. The sulfide assemblages are different to the chalcopyrite-bornite-digenite assemblage found in the Skaergaard Layered Series and Platinova Reef. These differences can be explained by the early formation of sulfide melt, while magmatic differentiation or sulfur loss caused the unusual sulfide assemblage within the Layered Series. The PGEs indicate that the sulfides formed from the Skaergaard magma. The sulfides and PGEs could not have formed from the nearby Watkins Fjord wehrlite intrusion, which is nearly barren in sulfide. We suggest that silicate-sulfide immiscibility led to PGE concentration where the Skaergaard magma became contaminated with material from the Archean basement.

  14. Platinum-group mineralization at the margin of the Skaergaard intrusion, East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Jens C. Ø.; Rollinson, Gavyn K.; McDonald, Iain; Tegner, Christian; Lesher, Charles E.

    2017-01-01

    Two occurrences of platinum-group elements (PGEs) along the northern margin of the Skaergaard intrusion include a sulfide-bearing gabbro with slightly less than 1 ppm PGE + Au and a clinopyroxene-actinolite-plagioclase-biotite-ilmenite schist with 16 vol% sulfide and 1.8 ppm PGE + Au. Both have assemblages of pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite typical for orthomagmatic sulfides. Matching platinum-group mineral assemblages with sperrylite (PtAs2), kotulskite (Pd(Bi,Te)1-2), froodite (PdBi2), michenerite (PdBiTe), and electrum (Au,Ag) suggest a common origin. Petrological and geochemical similarities suggest that the occurrences are related to the Skaergaard intrusion. The Marginal Border Series locally displays Ni depletion consistent with sulfide fractionation, and the PGE fractionation trends of the occurrences are systematically enriched by 10-50 times over the chilled margin. The PGE can be explained by sulfide-silicate immiscibility in the Skaergaard magma with R factors of 110-220. Nickel depletion in olivine suggests that the process occurred within the host cumulate, and the low R factors require little sulfide mobility. The sulfide assemblages are different to the chalcopyrite-bornite-digenite assemblage found in the Skaergaard Layered Series and Platinova Reef. These differences can be explained by the early formation of sulfide melt, while magmatic differentiation or sulfur loss caused the unusual sulfide assemblage within the Layered Series. The PGEs indicate that the sulfides formed from the Skaergaard magma. The sulfides and PGEs could not have formed from the nearby Watkins Fjord wehrlite intrusion, which is nearly barren in sulfide. We suggest that silicate-sulfide immiscibility led to PGE concentration where the Skaergaard magma became contaminated with material from the Archean basement.

  15. Complexing sorbents with heterocyclic amino groups for concentrating platinum-group metals

    SciTech Connect

    Myasoedova, G.V.; Shcherbinina, N.I.; Komozin, P.N.

    1995-06-01

    Sorbents prepared on the basis of amines, in particular, those bearing heterocyclic amino groups and nitrogen-containing matrices, hold much promise for the sorptifve sepatration of platinum-group metals. The results of the study of new complexing sorbents based on 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine (melamine) and bearing 3(5)-methylpyrazole, imidazole, and benzimidazole groups are presented in this work. The sorption and complexing properties of the sorbents with respect to platinum-group metals were studied. The possibility of using new sorbents for the group concentration of platinum-group metals was demonstrated.

  16. The Bioaccumulation and Toxicity of Platinum Group Metals in Developing Chick Embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Ioana; Monahan, Jennifer; Markopoulos, Marjorie; Gagnon, Zofia; Nejame, Britney; Cawley, Jacob; Reens, David

    2008-10-01

    Recent studies showed that platinum group metals (PGMs) such as Pt, Pd, and Rh from automobile catalytic converters, can accumulate in the soft tissues of a variety of living organisms. However, the effects of PGMs on bone and organs development of animals are not clearly understood. To examine these aspects, developing chick embryos were injected with 0.1, 1.0, 5, or 10 ppm solutions of Pt, Rh, Pd, or with a PGMs mixture. 1) Pathological Changes: were observed for all PGM treatments above 1 ppm. Bone Cells Assesment: Chondrocyte cells in thibiotarsus showed decreased diameter and length. 2) PGMs Accumulation in Tissues: was quantified by GFAAS spectrometry on finely ground tissue powder. 3) Bone Demineralization: was detected by micro-Raman spectroscopy imaging on paraffin embedded bone sections. 4) DNA Damage in Cells: was determined by using a Comet assay and fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxidative Damage in Tissues: was analyzed using a glutathione peroxidase assay. The overall results indicated that PGMs presence in our environment raises concerns about their long-term health effects on all organisms.

  17. X-ray characterization of platinum group metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Eric J.

    Platinum group metals (PGMs) are used extensively as catalysts, employed in several sectors of the world energy economy. Fuel cells employing PGM catalysts show promise as power sources in the proposed hydrogen economy, using alcohols as hydrogen storage media. Currently, the most economically important application for PGMs is for the mitigation of emissions from internal combustion engines via catalytic converters. In all applications, efficient use of these expensive metals to fabricate robust catalysts is of the utmost importance. Understanding the catalyst structure/property relationship is the key to the improvement of existing catalysts and the discovery of new catalysts. For example, catalyst particle size can have profound effects on catalyst activity, as in the case of gold nanoparticles. Catalyst particle size control and stability is also important for the efficient use of PGM metals and catalyst deactivation prevention. The challenge is to identify and characterize structural features and determine if and how these features may relate to catalytic properties. The ultimate goal is to simultaneously measure catalyst structural characteristics and catalytic properties under operando conditions, unambiguously establishing the structure/property link. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are important techniques used for the characterization of PGM catalysts. Microstructural information such as crystallite size, as small as ~ 1 nm, and microstrain can be obtained from Bragg diffraction peak shapes in X-ray diffraction patterns, and long range crystal structure information is found in the intensities and positions of these peaks. In contrast, X-ray absorption spectroscopy provides information about the chemical state and local structure of selected atoms. From the average nearest neighbor coordination numbers, crystallite sizes can also be inferred, with particularly high sensitivity in the sub-nm size range. Electron microscopy

  18. First determination of the levels of platinum group metals in Manta birostris (manta ray) caught along the Ghanaian coastline.

    PubMed

    Essumang, D K

    2010-06-01

    Tissues from Manta birostris caught by fishermen from Dixcove in the western part of Ghana were analyzed for their Platinum, palladium and rhodium concentrations (PGM). The use of chondrichthyan fish has permitted the study of trace levels of Platinum group metals (PGMs) which have travelled very far into the sea. The analysis showed that Ghana's coastline is fairly polluted with these platinum group metals (PGMs). PGM concentration in manta ray recorded a range of (0.15-0.85) microg/g for Pt, (0.033-0.67) microg/g for Pd and (0.007-0.145) microg/g for Rh. Comparing these values to the UK dietary intake of 0.2 microg/day for Pt and Rh and 1.0 microg/day for Pd, its indicates that the values obtained from the analysis for Pt was above the required level. This is the first study to show the accumulation of PGM in chondrichthyan fish, although the sources of this pollution are not clear as manta birostris is migratory and therefore need to be investigated further. The presence of the PGM is very significant, since manta ray meat is consumed in Ghana. This may presents a health risk, due to a possible accumulation of PGMs in humans.

  19. The platinum group metals in Younger Dryas Horizons are terrestrial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Y.; Wikes, E.; Kennett, J.; West, A.; Sharma, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Younger Dryas (YD) event, which began 12,900 years ago, was a period of abrupt and rapid cooling in the Northern Hemisphere whose primary cause remains unclear. The prevalent postulated mechanism is a temporary shutdown of the thermohaline circulation following the breakup of an ice dam in North America. Firestone et al. (2007) proposed that the cooling was triggered by multiple cometary airbursts and/or impacts that engendered enormous environmental changes and disrupted the thermohaline circulation. The evidence in support for this hypothesis is a black layer in North America and in Europe marking the YD boundary containing charcoal, soot, carbon spherules and glass-like carbon suggesting extensive and intense forest fires. This layer is also enriched in magnetic grains high in iridium, magnetic microspherules, fullerenes containing extraterrestrial He-3, and nanodiamonds. Whereas the nanodiamonds could be produced in an impact or arrive with the impactor, the cometary burst/impact hypothesis remains highly controversial as the YD horizon lacks important impact markers such as craters, breccias, tektites and shocked minerals. Firestone et al. (2007) contend that bulk of Ir found at the YD boundary is associated with magnetic grains. The key issue is whether this Ir is meteorite derived. We used Ir and Os concentrations and Os isotopes to investigate the provenance of the platinum group metals in the YD horizon. The bulk sediment samples from a number of North American YD sites (Blackwater Draw, Murray Springs, Gainey, Sheriden Cave, and Myrtle Beach) and a site in Europe (Lommel) do not show any traces of meteorite derived Os and Ir. The [Os] = 2 to 45 pg/g in these sediments and the 187Os/188Os ratios are similar to the upper continental crustal values (~1.3), much higher than those in meteorites (0.13). Higher [Os] is observed in Blackwater Draw (= 194 pg/g). However, the Os/Ir ratio in Blackwater Draw is 5 (not 1 as expected for a meteorite) and 187Os/188

  20. A Comparative Life Cycle Assessment of Recycling the Platinum Group Metals from Automobile Catalytic Converter: An Australian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodrat, Maryam; Rhamdhani, M. Akbar; Sharafi, Pezhman; Samali, Bijan

    2017-12-01

    This study provides a comparison between environmental impacts of the recovery of platinum group metals (PGMs) from the end-of-life catalytic converters by hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical methods. A gate to grave life cycle assessment of a typical three-way catalytic converter manufactured for an Australian passenger car was carried out using GaBi professional environmental package. Recovery rates, as well as qualities, quantities, losses, and fugitive emissions for all materials and elements used in both methods were calculated based on the developed flowsheets. A life cycle impact assessment was then made by carrying out a mass balance calculation. Inventory data show that the hydrometallurgical route for recycling of the platinum group metals out of catalytic converter scrap has lower impacts on the environment compared with the pyrometallurgical method. In terms of emission effects, the hydrometallurgical process was found to be highly advantageous since it causes insignificant emissions to air, sea water, and fresh water. It is also found that the hydrometallurgical route performs comparatively superior in terms of acidification, eutrophication, fossil depletion, and human toxicity. The obtained results are applicable only to the Australian setting.

  1. C-H Oxidation by Platinum Group Metal Oxo or Peroxo Species

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Meng; Crabtree, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    While C–H oxidation by ruthenium oxo compounds has been broadly applied in organic synthesis, examples of C–H oxidation by metal oxo complexes from the rest of the platinum group are still rare. We survey the preparation and reactivity of these late-transition metal oxo and peroxo complexes in this tutorial review.

  2. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads. PMID:26560353

  3. Hydroponic screening of poplar for trace element tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Migeon, Aude; Richaud, Pierre; Guinet, Frédéric; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2012-04-01

    Using the nutrient film technique, we screened 21 clones of poplar for growth in the presence of a mix of trace elements (TE) and for TE accumulation capacities. Poplar cuttings were exposed for four weeks to a multipollution solution consisting in 10 microM Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb, and 200 microM Zn. Plant biomass and TE accumulation patterns in leaves varied greatly between clones. The highest Cd and Zn concentrations in leaves were detected in P. trichocarpa and P. trichocarpa hybrids, with the clone Skado (P. trichocarpa x P. maximowiczii) accumulating up to 108 mg Cd kg(-1) DW and 1510 mg Zn kg(-1) DW when exposed to a multipollution context. Our data also confirm the importance of pH and multipollution, as these factors greatly affect TE accumulation in above ground biomass. The NFT technique applied here to a large range of poplar clones also revealed the potential of the Rochester, AFO662 and AFO678 poplar clones for use in phytostabilization programs and bioenergy production, where production of less contaminated above ground biomass is suitable.

  4. Germanium and Rare Earth Element accumulation in woody bioenergy crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschel, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Germanium and REEs are strategic elements that are used for high tech devices and engineered systems, however these elements are hardly concentrated into mineable ore deposits. Since these elements occur widely dispersed in the earth crust with concentrations of several mgṡkg-1 (Ge 1.6 mgṡkg-1, Nd 25 mgṡkg-1) a new possibility to gain these elements could be phytomining, a technique that uses plants to extract elements from soils via their roots. Since knowledge about accumulating plant species is quite limited we conducted research on the concentrations of strategic elements in wood and leaves of fast growing tree species (Salix spec., Populus spec., Betula pendula, Alnus glutinosa, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer pseudoplatanus). In total 35 study sites were selected in the mining affected area around Freiberg (Saxony, Germany), differing in their species composition and degree of contamination with toxic trace metals (Pb, As, Cd). On each site plant tissues (wood and leaves, respectively) of different species were sampled. In addition soil samples were taken from a soil depth of 0 - 30 cm and 30 - 60 cm. The aim of our work was to investigate correlations between the concentrations of the target elements in plant tissues and soil characteristics like pH, texture, nutrients and concentrations in six operationally defined soil fractions (mobile, acid soluble, oxidizable, amorphic oxides, crystalline oxides, residual or siliceous). Concentrations of elements in soil extracts and plant tissues were measured with ICP-MS. The element Nd was selected as representative for the group of REEs, since this element showed a high correlation with the concentrations of the other REE We found that the concentration of Nd in the leaves (0.31 mgṡkg-1Nd) were several times higher than in herbaceous species (0.05 mgṡkg-1 Nd). The concentration of Ge in leaves were ten times lower than that of Nd whereas in herbaceous species Nd and Ge were in equal magnitude. Within the tree

  5. The activation energy values estimated by the Arrhenius equation as a controlling factor of platinum-group mineral formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrou, Athinoula L.; Economou-Eliopoulos, Maria

    2009-03-01

    In ophiolite complexes and Ural/Alaskan-type intrusions the platinum-group element minerals (PGM) occur as laurite (RuS 2), erlichmanite (OsS 2), irarsite (IrAsS) and alloys (Os-Ir-Ru and Pt-Fe). They are commonly found as small inclusions (normally less than 10 μm, occasionally up to 100 μm) in chromite. The origin of coarse-grained PGM, in the form of 0.5-10 mm nuggets, in placer deposits related with mafic/ultramafic complexes remains still unclear. Literature data on grain size ( r) of platinum-group minerals (PGM) and their formation temperature (range of temperatures between 700 and 1100 °C), revealed an Arrhenius temperature dependence. Correlation of the rate of crystal formation that depends on temperature (T) with the size ( r) of the grain results in a linear relationship between ln( r) and 1/T. From the slope of the line n × ln( r) = -const. + Eact/ RT the activation energy for the formation of IPGM (Ir-platinum-group minerals) was estimated, for the first time in the present study, to be approximately 450 ± 45 kJ mol -1. Applying the Arrhenius equation, the corresponding formation temperature for extremely large IPGM grains (up to 1.3 mm) in chromite ores related to ophiolites was found to be approximately 740 °C. It seems to be consistent with a lower formation temperature than with the typical formation temperature of small PGM grains associated with ophiolitic chromitites. This suggests that coarse-grained PGM in mafic/ultramafic complexes, along the permeable shear zones, may have been re-crystallized during plastic deformation at relatively lower temperatures (700-800 °C), under appropriate pressure, temperature, redox conditions and an increased H 2O content. Thus, applying the plot of ln( r) versus 1/T on large Os-Ir-Ru-minerals (sulfides or alloys), characterized by an r value falling into the linear part of the graph and having evidence supporting their formation at relatively high temperatures, then the corresponding formation

  6. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods.

    PubMed

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Comparative study of hematological responses to platinum group metals, antimony and silver nanoparticles in animal models.

    PubMed

    Newkirk, Catherine E; Gagnon, Zofia E; Pavel Sizemore, Ioana E

    2014-01-01

    Research was conducted to examine the hematological effects of heavy metals (platinum (Pt ((IV))), palladium (Pd ((II))), rhodium (Rh ((III))), antimony (Sb ((III)) and Sb ((V))), and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs)) on white blood cells in mammalian (rat) and avian (chick embryo) models. These metals are used in many everyday products and are accumulating in our environment. Six-week old Sprague-Dawley female rats were treated daily by gavage and six-day old, fertile, specific pathogen-free white leghorn strain chick embryos' eggs were injected on days 7 and 14 of incubation with 0.0, 1.0, 5.0 or 10.0 ppm concentrations of Pt ((IV)) and a platinum group metal (PGM) mix of Pt ((IV)), Pd ((II)) and Rh ((III)). Chick embryos were also tested with 1.0 or 5.0 ppm of antimony compounds (Sb ((III)) and Sb ((V))) and 0.0, 15.0, 30.0, 60.0, or 100.0 ppm of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). After 8 weeks of treatment, blood was obtained from the rats by jugular cut down and from chick embryos on day 20 of incubation by heart puncture. Blood smears were made and stained and a differential white cell count was performed on each. Examination of the smears revealed unconventional dose responses, stimulation of the immune response, and decreases in leukocyte production with various metals and concentrations. Chick embryos responded differently than rats to Pt and the PGM mix; suggesting that species differences and/or stage of development are important components of response to heavy metals. Route of administration of the metals might also influence the response. All of the heavy metals tested affected the immune responses of the tested animals as demonstrated by changes in the types and numbers of leukocytes. Our findings warrant further research to determine the mechanism of these effects and to understand and prevent toxicological effects in humans and other living organisms.

  8. Microbeam Hard X-ray Photoemission Study on Platinum-Group Metal Pernitrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Kazuo; Mizui, Tatsuya; Komabuchi, Mai; Kato, Masahiko; Terabe, Toshiki; Suzuki, Kentaro; Niwa, Ken; Shirako, Yuichi; Hasegawa, Masashi; Akaogi, Masaki; Kojitani, Hiroshi; Ikenaga, Eiji

    2017-06-01

    Using microbeam hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we clarified the valence-band electronic structures and chemical states of platinum-group metal (Ru, Ir, and Pt) pernitrides, which have been synthesized in supercritical nitrogen fluid under extremely high pressures and temperatures. Their nitrogen contents relative to the platinum-group metal are estimated to be 2 from the photoemission intensity, which is consistent with the studies reported to date. The observed valence-band structures agree quite well with theoretically predicted structures for the pyrite-type PtN2, arsenopyrite-type IrN2, and marcasite-type RuN2. The origin of their extremely large bulk moduli is discussed based on the current results of the valence-band structures and core-level chemical shifts.

  9. Alteration of detrital platinum-group-minerals (PGM) in rivers of the Eastern Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melcher, F.; Oberthür, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Bushveld Complex, South Africa, is the world´s largest resource and leading producer of platinum-group elements (PGE). Current mines work the Merensky Reef, the UG-2 chromitite and the Platreef in the Critical Zone; limited platinum production from ultramafic pipes has long ceased. Although the initial discovery of platinum in the Bushveld Complex in 1924 was made by panning in a river bed, exploitation of placer PGM was never economic. More than 6000 PGM grains were separated from stream sediments of rivers draining the Critical Zone of the Eastern Bushveld Complex. The PGM assemblage is composed of grains of Pt-Fe alloy (73.2 %), braggite-cooperite (14.2 %), sperrylite (10.2 %), and a variety of rarer PGM including laurite, Rh-sulfides, Pd-Sb-As-Te phases and Ru-rich alloys. Unaltered PGM nuggets occur in about equal proportions as mono- or polyphase grains. Pt-Fe alloy grains are up to 1.6 mm in diameter (usually 100-200 micrometer). More than 78% of the Pt-Fe grains have compositions ranging from [Pt3Fe] to [Pt1.5Fe] (ferroan platinum). The remaining Pt-Fe alloys are solid solutions of tetraferroplatinum [PtFe], ferronickelplatinum [Pt2FeNi] and tulameenite [Pt2FeCu]. Almost 75 % of the [PtFe] grains and 43 % of the ferroan platinum grains are altered. Ferroan platinum is frequently mantled by [Pt(Fe,Cu,Ni)], and many of these rims have an additional outermost rim close to [Ni2FePt] in composition. In addition, Pd-Pb and Pd-Hg phases are also present in the alteration rims. Pt-rich or Ru-rich oxides represent further oxidation products of primary PGM. More than 50 % of the investigated Pt-Pd sulfides (braggite-cooperite) are severely corroded and rimmed by a porous phase of native Pt, which occasionally has distinct contents of Pd. In contrast, most of the sperrylite grains are unaltered. In summary, the mineralogical composition of placer PGM from the Eastern Bushveld does not unequivocally indicate a single source of PGM. Contributions from the Merensky

  10. Mineral potential for nickel, copper, platinum group elements(PGE), and chromium deposits hosted in ultramafic rocks in the Islamic Republic of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 67): Chapter G in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Marsh, Erin; Anderson, Eric D.

    2015-01-01

    PRISM-I summary documents mention the presence of mafic-ultramafic igneous intrusive rocks in several areas of Mauritania and a number of chromium (Cr) and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni (±Co, Au)) occurrences associated with them. Permissive geologic settings generally include greenstone belts of any age, layered mafic-ultramafic and unlayered gabbro-anorthosite intrusive complexes in cratonic settings, ophiolite complexes, flood basalt provinces, and fluid-rich shear zones cutting accumulations of mafic-ultramafic rocks. Regions of Mauritania having these characteristics that are discussed in PRISM-I texts include the Mesoarchean greenstone belts of the TasiastTijirit terrane in the southwestern Rgueïbat Shield, two separate layered ultramafic complexes in the Amsaga Complex west of Atar, serpentinized metadunites in Mesoarchean rocks of the Rgueïbat Shield in the Zednes map sheet, several lateritized annular mafic-ultramafic complexes in the Paleoproterozoic northwestern portion of the Rgueïbat Shield, and the serpentinized ophiolitic segments of the Gorgol Noir Complex in the axial portion of the southern Mauritanides. Bureau de Recherches Géologiques et Minières (BRGM) work in the “Extreme Sud” zone also suggests that small copper occurrences associated with the extensive Jurassic microgabbroic intrusive rocks in the Taoudeni Basin of southeastern Mauritania could have potential for magmatic Cu-Ni (PGE, Co, Au) sulfide mineralization. Similarly, Jurassic mafic intrusive rocks in the northeastern Taoudeni Basin may be permissive. Known magmatic Cu-Ni deposits of these types in Mauritania are few in number and some uncertainty exists as to the nature of several of the more important ones.

  11. Permissive tracts for nickel, copper, platinum group elements (PGE), and chromium deposits of Mauritania (phase V, deliverable 66): Chapter G1 in Second projet de renforcement institutionnel du secteur minier de la République Islamique de Mauritanie (PRISM-II)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Taylor, Cliff D.; Horton, John D.

    2012-01-01

    This report contains the USGS results of the PRISM-II Mauritania Minerals Project and is presented in cooperation with the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines of the Islamic Republic of Mauritania. The Report is composed of separate chapters consisting of multidisciplinary interpretive reports with accompanying plates on the geology, structure, geochronology, geophysics, hydrogeology, geochemistry, remote sensing (Landsat TM and ASTER), and SRTM and ASTER digital elevation models of Mauritania. The syntheses of these multidisciplinary data formed the basis for additional chapters containing interpretive reports on 12 different commodities and deposit types known to occur in Mauritania, accompanied by countrywide mineral resource potential maps of each commodity/deposit type. The commodities and deposit types represented include: (1) Ni, Cu, PGE, and Cr deposits hosted in ultramafic rocks; (2) orogenic, Carlin-like, and epithermal gold deposits; (3) polymetallic Pb-Zn-Cu vein deposits; (4) sediment-hosted Pb-Zn-Ag deposits of the SEDEX and Mississippi Valley-type; (5) sediment-hosted copper deposits; ( 6) volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits; (7) iron oxide copper-gold deposits; (8) uranium deposits; (9) Algoma-, Superior-, and oolitic-type iron deposits; (10) shoreline Ti-Zr placer deposits; (11) incompatible element deposits hosted in pegmatites, alkaline rocks, and carbonatites, and; (12) industrial mineral deposits. Additional chapters include the Mauritanian National Mineral Deposits Database are accompanied by an explanatory text and the Mauritania Minerals Project GIS that contains all of the interpretive layers created by USGS scientists. Raw data not in the public domain may be obtained from the Ministry of Petroleum, Energy, and Mines in Nouakchott, Mauritania.

  12. Estimated thermodynamic stability of intermetallides of actinides with platinum-group metals

    SciTech Connect

    Kalevich, E.S.; Ryabinin, M.A.; Vasil`ev, V.Y.

    1994-07-01

    The upper limits of the molar free energy of formation of intermetallides of actinides (An = Am, Cm, Bk, Cf) with platinum-group metals (M = Pt, Ir, Pd, Rh) and AnM{sub y} (y = 2, 3, 5) are calculated. The quantity {triangle}G{sup O}{sub f} varies from -340 kJ/mole for Cf compounds to -400 kJ/mole for Am compounds. The change of {triangle}G{sup O}{sub f}(AnM{sub y}) as a function of An atomic number correlates with the change of other properties of the studied intermetallides.

  13. Platinum-group minerals from the Jinbaoshan Pd-Pt deposit, SW China: evidence for magmatic origin and hydrothermal alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Christina Yan; Prichard, Hazel M.; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Fisher, Peter C.

    2008-09-01

    The Jinbaoshan Pt-Pd deposit in Yunnan, SW China, is hosted in a wehrlite body, which is a member of the Permian (˜260 Ma) Emeishan Large Igneous Province (ELIP). The deposit is reported to contain one million tonnes of Pt-Pd ore grading 0.21% Ni and 0.16% Cu with 3.0 g/t (Pd + Pt). Platinum-group minerals (PGM) mostly are ˜10 μm in diameter, and are commonly Te-, Sn- and As-bearing, including moncheite (PtTe2), atokite (Pd3Sn), kotulskite (PdTe), sperrylite (PtAs2), irarsite (IrAsS), cooperite (PtS), sudburyite (PdSb), and Pt-Fe alloy. Primary rock-forming minerals are olivine and clinopyroxene, with clinopyroxene forming anhedral poikilitic crystals surrounding olivine. Primary chromite occurs either as euhedral grains enclosed within olivine or as an interstitial phase to the olivine. However, the intrusion has undergone extensive hydrothermal alteration. Most olivine grains have been altered to serpentine, and interstitial clinopyroxene is often altered to actinolite/tremolite and locally biotite. Interstitial chromite grains are either partially or totally replaced by secondary magnetite. Base-metal sulfides (BMS), such as pentlandite and chalcopyrite, are usually interstitial to the altered olivine. PGM are located with the BMS and are therefore also interstitial to the serpentinized olivine grains, occurring within altered interstitial clinopyroxene and chromite, or along the edges of these minerals, which predominantly altered to actinolite/tremolite, serpentine and magnetite. Hydrothermal fluids were responsible for the release of the platinum-group elements (PGE) from the BMS to precipitate the PGM at low temperature during pervasive alteration. A sequence of alteration of the PGM has been recognized. Initially moncheite and atokite have been corroded and recrystallized during the formation of actinolite/tremolite, and then, cooperite and moncheite were altered to Pt-Fe alloy where they are in contact with serpentine. Sudburyite occurs in veins

  14. Platinum group metal particles aggregation in nuclear glass melts under the effect of temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanotin, Caroline; Puig, Jean; Neyret, Muriel; Marchal, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The viscosity of simulated high level radioactive waste glasses containing platinum group metal particles is studied over a wide range of shear stress, as a function of the particles content and the temperature, thanks to a stress imposed rheometer, coupled to a high-temperature furnace. The system shows a very shear thinning behavior. At high shear rate, the system behaves as a suspension of small clusters and individual particles and is entirely controlled by the viscosity of the glass matrix as classical suspensions. At low shear rate, above a certain fraction in platinum group metal particles, the apparition of macroscopic aggregates made up of chains of RuO2 particles separated by thin layers of glass matrix strongly influences the viscosity of the nuclear glass and leads, in particular, to the apparition of yield stress and thixotropic effects. The maximum size of these clusters as well as their effective volume fraction have been estimated by a balance between Van der Waals attractive forces and hydrodynamic forces due to shear flow. We showed experimentally and theoretically that this aggregation phenomenon is favored by an increase of the temperature, owing to the viscosity decrease of the glass matrix, leading to an unusual increase of the suspension viscosity.

  15. Versatile Oxidation Methods for Organic and Inorganic Substrates Catalyzed by Platinum-Group Metals on Carbons.

    PubMed

    Sawama, Yoshinari; Asai, Shota; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2016-02-01

    Platinum-group metals on activated carbon catalysts, represented by Pd/C, Ru/C, Rh/C, etc., are widely utilized to accomplish green and sustainable organic reactions due to their favorable features, such as easy handling, recoverability, and reusability. The efficient oxidation methods of various organic compounds using heterogeneous platinum-group metals on carbons with or without added oxidants are summarized in this Personal Account. The oxidation of internal alkynes into diketones was effectively catalyzed by Pd/C in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide and molecular oxygen or pyridine N-oxide. The Pd/C-catalyzed mild combustion of gaseous hydrogen with molecular oxygen provided hydrogen peroxide, which could be directly utilized for the oxidation of sulfide derivatives into sulfoxides. Furthermore, the Ru/C-catalyzed aerobic oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols gave the corresponding aldehydes and ketones, respectively. On the other hand, the dehydrogenative oxidation of secondary alcohols into ketones was achieved using Rh/C in water, and primary alcohols were effectively dehydrogenated by Pd/C in water under mildly reduced pressure to produce carboxylic acids.

  16. Thickness dependence of the resistivity of platinum-group metal thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Shibesh; Sankaran, Kiroubanand; Moors, Kristof; Pourtois, Geoffrey; Van Elshocht, Sven; Bömmels, Jürgen; Vandervorst, Wilfried; Tőkei, Zsolt; Adelmann, Christoph

    2017-07-01

    We report on the thin film resistivity of several platinum-group metals (Ru, Pd, Ir, and Pt). Platinum-group thin films show comparable or lower resistivities than Cu for film thicknesses below about 5 nm due to a weaker thickness dependence of the resistivity. Based on experimentally determined mean linear distances between grain boundaries as well as ab initio calculations of the electron mean free path, the data for Ru, Ir, and Cu were modeled within the semiclassical Mayadas-Shatzkes model [Phys. Rev. B 1, 1382 (1970)] to assess the combined contributions of surface and grain boundary scattering to the resistivity. For Ru, the modeling results indicated that surface scattering was strongly dependent on the surrounding material with nearly specular scattering at interfaces with SiO2 or air but with diffuse scattering at interfaces with TaN. The dependence of the thin film resistivity on the mean free path is also discussed within the Mayadas-Shatzkes model in consideration of the experimental findings.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of platinum-group-metal nanoparticles by using HEPES as a reductant and stabilizer.

    PubMed

    So, Man-Ho; Ho, Chi-Ming; Chen, Rong; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-06-01

    Platinum-group-metal (Ru, Os, Rh, Ir, Pd and Pt) nanoparticles are synthesized in an aqueous buffer solution of 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid (HEPES) (200 mM, pH 7.4) under hydrothermal conditions (180 degrees C). Monodispersed (monodispersity: 11-15%) metal nanoparticles were obtained with an average particle size of less than 5 nm (Ru: 1.8+/-0.2, Os: 1.6+/-0.2, Rh: 4.5+/-0.5, Ir: 2.0+/-0.3, Pd: 3.8+/-0.4, Pt: 1.9+/-0.2 nm). The size, monodispersity, and stability of the as-obtained metal nanoparticles were affected by the HEPES concentration, pH of the HEPES buffer solution, and reaction temperature. HEPES with two tertiary amines (piperazine groups) and terminal hydroxyl groups can act as a reductant and stabilizer. The HEPES molecules can bind to the surface of metal nanoparticles to prevent metal nanoparticles from aggregation. These platinum-group-metal nanoparticles could be deposited onto the surface of graphite, which catalyzed the aerobic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes.

  18. Platinum-Group Elements in Basalts Derived From the Icelandic Mantle Plume -Past and Present.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momme, P.; Oskarsson, N.; Gronvold, K.; Tegner, C.; Brooks, K.; Keays, R.

    2001-12-01

    Paleogene basalts ( ~55Ma) derived from the ancestral Iceland mantle plume and extruded during continental rifting are exposed along the Blosseville Kyst in central East Greenland. These basalts comprise three intercalated series, viz: a low-Ti, high-Ti and a very high-Ti series. The two Ti-rich series are interpreted to represent continental flood basalts formed by low degrees of partial melting (degree of melting F=3-9%) while the low-Ti series are believed to have formed by higher degrees of partial melting (F:15-25%). All three of the East Greenland basalt series are enriched in the PGE, relative to normal MORB. During differentiation of the low-Ti series, Pd increase from 11 to 24 ppb whereas Pt and Ir decrease from 12 and 0.6 ppb to 3 and <0.05 ppb respectively. The primitive basalts (molar Mg#60) of the dominant high-Ti series contain ~6-10 ppb Pd, ~7-10 ppb Pt and ~0.2 ppb Ir whereas the most evolved basalts (Mg#43) contain 25 ppb Pd, 5 ppb Pt and <0.05 ppb Ir. The PGE-rich nature of these basalts is surprising because low degree partial melts are generally S-saturated and hence strongly depleted in the PGE (cf, Keays, 1995). However, our data indicates that all of the East Greenland magmas were S-undersaturated and as they underwent differentiation, Pd behaved incompatibly while Ir and Pt behaved compatibly. Primitive Holocene Icelandic olivine tholeiites contain 120 ppm Cu, 6 ppb Pd, 4 ppb Pt and 0.2 ppb Ir while their picritic counterparts contain 74 ppm Cu, 17 ppb Pd, 7 ppb Pt and 0.3 ppb Ir. Both the olivine tholeiites and the picrites are believed to have formed by high degrees of partial melting (15-25%) which would have exhausted all of the sulphides in the mantle source region and produced S-undersaturated magmas. In Icelandic samples with 10-14wt% MgO, Cu and the PGEs vary systematically between the primitive picrite and olivine tholeiite compositions given above i.e there is an inverse correlation between Cu and the PGEs. This is best explained by mixing between parental olivine tholeiite and picrite magmas. The low Cu/Pd ratio in the most primitive picrite probably reflect derivation from a depleted mantle where Cu was less efficiently retained in sulphides compared to Pd during previous melt extraction episodes. Whithin the analysed suite of olivine tholeiites, Ir decreases from 0.15 to 0.06 ppb, Pd increases from ~6 to ~15 ppb and Pt/Pd ratio decreases from 0.8-0.2 during differentiation (7-4wt% MgO); these variations provide further evidence that the olivine tholeiite magmas remained S-undersaturated throughout their differentiation. To summarize, (1) Continental flood basalts and low-Ti tholeiites in the Paleogene East Greenland flood basalt sequence, as well as Holocene Icelandic olivine tholeiites are PGE-rich relative to normal MORB. (2) Their PGE-contents vary as a function of S-undersaturated differentiation. (3) Cu-PGE variations in Icelandic samples with 10-14 wt% MgO suggest that they represent mixtures between distinct tholeiitic (Cu/Pd: 20000) and depleted picritic (Cu/Pd: 4400) parental liquids. Reference: Keays RR (1995) The role of komatiitic magmatism and S-saturation in the formation of ore deposits. Lithos 34:1-18.

  19. Platinum-group element (PGE) deposits and occurrences: Mineralization styles, genetic concepts, and exploration criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, W. D.

    2005-02-01

    PGE mineralization has been identified in various rock types and at various stratigraphic levels in layered intrusions of any age, size and magmatic lineage, but the most important deposits occur as relatively narrow stratiform reefs in the lower to central ultramafic-mafic portions of large tholeiitic intrusions of late Archean to early Proterozoic age. One of the main challenges in exploration is that the reefs tend to be sulfide-poor. In many chromitites, magnetitites and silicate-hosted ores, the rocks contain no visible sulfides, possibly due to (late) magmatic sulfide resorption. As a result, some deposits may have been overlooked, particularly those in the upper portions of the intrusions that were in the past considered to be relatively unprospective. Amongst lithogeochemical tools, Cu/Pd ratios have proven to be particularly useful to evaluate the PGE potential of intrusions and to delineate the position of the reefs within the intrusions. The origin of the PGE mineralization remains controversial. A possible explanation for the low sulfide contents of many PGE-rich intrusions is that most of their parental magmas were strongly undersaturated in sulfur and at least partially derived from the S-poor and PGE-enriched sub-continental lithospheric mantle. Sulfide saturation upon emplacement in the crust may have been reached during differentiation. Empirical evidence supports theoretical considerations that chromite and magnetite precipitation may be particularly conducive to trigger sulfide melt saturation, due to a pronounced decrease in FeO content of the magma. The importance of magma mixing in triggering sulfide supersaturation remains unclear. The same applies to contamination; some intrusions show a distinct crustal component, but many others do not, and there is little if any correlation between sulfide content and crustal component. Together with the general paucity of sulfides in the intrusions this could suggest that contamination is not critical in reef formation and may indeed be a negative factor. Other processes may also be relevant to reef formation. Data from the well-studied Bushveld Complex suggest that the magmas had reached sulfide saturation prior to emplacement, and that sulfides were entrained in the magma during ascent and emplacement. Sulfide entrainment has previously been recognised as one of the key factors in the formation of massive Ni-Cu sulfide deposits, and it is suggested here that it is also relevant to the formation of PGE deposits.

  20. Accumulation of elements by edible mushroom species: part I. Problem of trace element toxicity in mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Mleczek, Mirosław; Siwulski, Marek; Stuper-Szablewska, Kinga; Rissmann, Iwona; Sobieralski, Krzysztof; Goliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate Cd, Co, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, Sr and Zn accumulation in six edible mushroom species and to assess their risk and benefits to human consumers. Mushrooms (Leccinium aurantiacum, Xerocomus badius, Lactarius deliciosus, Boletus edulis, Cantharellus cibarius and Suillus luteus) were collected from selected regions of Poland during 1990-2010. The highest diversity between studied mushroom species was observed in terms of Cu and Zn accumulation. Significant differences in the accumulation efficiency were found among the six mushroom species examined. The most efficient were Boletus edulis (Cd and Hg), Suillus luteus (Cu and Sr), and Lactarius deliciosus (Pb and Zn). In the case of Co and Ni, the most effective were Xerocomus badius and Leccinium aurantiacum, respectively. The calculated bioconcentration factor (BCF) values of Cd, Cu, Hg, Sr and Zn were > 1 for all species in this study while Co, Ni and Pb usually were bioexcluded (BCF < 1). Additionally, based on the calculated daily intake rates of trace elements determined it can be concluded that occasional consumption of fruiting bodies of L. aurantiacum, X. badius, L. deliciosus, B. edulis, C. cibarius and S. luteus collected in Poland is safe and this finding largely agrees with results from recent studies by other authors.

  1. Nickel and platinum group metal nanoparticle production by Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20.

    PubMed

    Capeness, M J; Edmundson, M C; Horsfall, L E

    2015-12-25

    Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 is an anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria. While Desulfovibrio species have previously been shown to reduce palladium and platinum to the zero-state, forming nanoparticles in the process; there have been no reports that D. alaskensis is able to form these nanoparticles. Metal nanoparticles have properties that make them ideal for use in many industrial and medical applications, such as their size and shape giving them higher catalytic activity than the bulk form of the same metal. Nanoparticles of the platinum group metals in particular are highly sought after for their catalytic ability and herein we report the formation of both palladium and platinum nanoparticles by D. alaskensis and the biotransformation of solvated nickel ions to nanoparticle form.

  2. Polyhydrides of Platinum Group Metals: Nonclassical Interactions and σ-Bond Activation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Esteruelas, Miguel A; López, Ana M; Oliván, Montserrat

    2016-08-10

    The preparation, structure, dynamic behavior in solution, and reactivity of polyhydride complexes of platinum group metals, described during the last three decades, are contextualized from both organometallic and coordination chemistry points of view. These compounds, which contain dihydrogen, elongated dihydrogen, compressed dihydride, and classical dihydride ligands promote the activation of B-H, C-H, Si-H, N-H, O-H, C-C, C-N, and C-F, among other σ-bonds. In this review, it is shown that, unlike other more mature areas, the chemistry of polyhydrides offers new exciting conceptual challenges and at the same time the possibility of interacting with other fields including the conversion and storage of regenerative energy, organic synthetic chemistry, drug design, and material science. This wide range of possible interactions foresees promising advances in the near future.

  3. First find of nephrite with accessory minerals of the platinum group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatarinov, A. V.; Yalovik, L. I.; Kanakin, S. V.; Zyablitsev, A. Yu.

    2017-03-01

    The relic minerals of the platinum group (MPG) were found for the first time in nephrite of tremolite-diopside composition associated genetically with the boninite dike of the Gorlyk-Gol deposit. This latter is confined to a segment of the zone of serpentinite mélange in the southern part of the Ospinsko-Kitoi ultrabasite massif in the East Sayan ophiolite belt. The micro- and nanophases of MPG were identified: rutheniridosmine with Ni and Fe admixtures, ruthenium, rutheniridium, iridoarsenite, omeiite, and laurite. The MPG sources are chromium spinels from harzburgites and dunites of the Ospinsko-Kitoi massif subjected to deforming transformations in the zone of the serpentinite mélange.

  4. Life cycle benefits of using nanotechnology to stabilize platinum-group metal particles in automotive catalysts.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shannon M; Lave, Lester B; Matthews, H Scott

    2005-03-01

    Due to advances in nanotechnology, the approach to catalytic design is transitioning from trial-and-error to planned design and control. Expected advances should enable the design and construction of catalysts to increase reaction speed, yield, and catalyst durability while also reducing active species loading levels. Nanofabrication techniques enabling precise control over the shape, size, and position of nanoscale platinum-group metal (PGM) particles in automotive catalysts should result in reduced PGM loading levels. These reductions would decrease energy consumption, improve environmental quality, and contribute to sustainable resource usage. We estimate the amount of PGM required to meet U.S. vehicle emissions standards through 2030 based on current catalysttechnology. We then estimate the range of PGM that could be saved from potential nanotechnology advances. Finally, we employ economic input-output and process-based life cycle assessment models to estimate the direct and life cycle benefits from reducing PGM mining and refining.

  5. Noble metals in mid-ocean ridge volcanism: A significant fractionation of gold with respect to platinum group metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crocket, James H.

    1988-01-01

    Hydrothermal precipitates, black smoker particulate, and massive sulphide dredge samples from the Explorer Ridge on the Juan de Fuca Plate and the TAG hydrothermal area on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge were analyzed for selected noble metals including Au, Ir and Pd by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. The preliminary results indicate that gold contents may reach the ppm range although values in the neighborhood of 100 to 200 ppb are more typical. The platinum group elements (PGE) represented by Ir and Pd are typically less than 0.02 ppb and less than 2 ppb respectively. These abundances represent a significant enrichment of gold relative to the PGE in comparison with average noble metal abundances in mid-ocean ridge basalts (MORB). A partial explanation of this distinctive fractionation can be found in the concepts of sulfur-saturation of basic magma in mid-ocean ridge (MOR) settings, and the origin of MOR hydrothermal fluids. Experimental and petrological data suggest that MORBs are sulfur-saturated at the time of magma generation and that an immiscible sulfide component remains in the mantle residue. Hence, MORBs are noble metal-poor, particularly with respect to PGE. Consequently, black smoker fluids can be expected to reflect the low Ir and Pd contents of the rock column. The average Au content of MORB is 1.3 ppb, and so the rock column is not significantly enriched in Au. The generation of fluids which precipitate solids with 200 ppb Au is apparently dependent on highly efficient fluid chemistry to mobilize Au from the rock column, high Au solubility in seawater hydrothermal fluids and efficient precipitation mechanisms to coprecipitate Au on Fe, Zn and Cu sulfides. Significant differences in these parameters appear to be the ultimate cause of the strong Au-PGE fractionation in the MOR setting. It does not appear from the current data base that MOR hydrothermal fluids are significant contributors to the Ir enrichment seen in Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary

  6. Electrochemical metallization switching with a platinum group metal in different oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongrui; Jiang, Hao; Hyung Jang, Moon; Lin, Peng; Ribbe, Alexander; Xia, Qiangfei; Yang, J. Joshua

    2016-07-01

    In a normal electrochemical metallization (ECM) switch, electrochemically active metals, such as Ag and Cu are used to provide mobile ions for the conducting filament. In both ECM and valence change memory (VCM) devices, platinum group metals, such as Pt and Pd, are typically used as the counter electrode and assumed to be chemically and physically inert. In this study, we explore whether the so-called inert metal itself can form a conducting filament and result in repeatable resistance switching. Pd and different oxide host matrices are used for this purpose. We have observed that the transport of oxygen anions dominates over Pd metal cations in ALD deposited AlOx and HfOx. However, in sputtered SiOx, Pd cation transport was revealed, accompanied by the formation of nano-crystalline Pd filament(s) in the junctions. Based on these observations, memristors with reversible and repeatable switching were obtained by using Pd doped SiOx as the switching material.In a normal electrochemical metallization (ECM) switch, electrochemically active metals, such as Ag and Cu are used to provide mobile ions for the conducting filament. In both ECM and valence change memory (VCM) devices, platinum group metals, such as Pt and Pd, are typically used as the counter electrode and assumed to be chemically and physically inert. In this study, we explore whether the so-called inert metal itself can form a conducting filament and result in repeatable resistance switching. Pd and different oxide host matrices are used for this purpose. We have observed that the transport of oxygen anions dominates over Pd metal cations in ALD deposited AlOx and HfOx. However, in sputtered SiOx, Pd cation transport was revealed, accompanied by the formation of nano-crystalline Pd filament(s) in the junctions. Based on these observations, memristors with reversible and repeatable switching were obtained by using Pd doped SiOx as the switching material. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  7. Origin of platinum-group mineral assemblages in a mantle tectonite at Unst deduced from mineral chemistry and osmium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badanina, Inna Yu.; Lord, Richard A.; Malitch, Kreshimir N.; Meisel, Thomas C.

    2013-04-01

    assemblage is likely to reflect processes such as in-situ serpentinisation, alteration during emplacement or regional greenschist metamorphism. Whole-rock platinum-group element (PGE) concentrations give negatively sloped chondrite-normalized PGE patterns, typical of podiform chromitite, where refractory PGE (Os, Ir and Ru) prevail over less refractory PGE (Rh, Pt and Pd). The osmium isotope results identify similarly 'unradiogenic' 187Os/188Os values for 'primary' and 'secondary' PGM assemblages (with mean 187Os/188Os values of 0.12419 and 0.12464, respectively), being within uncertainty of the chromitite composition (0.1240±0.0006). This implies that the whole-rock Os isotope budget is largely controlled by laurite-dominant assemblages, supporting the conclusion that the 'secondary' PGM assemblage inherited the subchondritic osmium isotope signature of the 'primary' PGM. No evidence for other source contributions during later thermal events has been observed. The Os-isotope data provide further support for an Enstatite Chondrite Reservoir model for the convective upper mantle as defined by Walker et al. (2002) and are consistent with origin of the complex as a Caledonian ophiolite formed in a supra-subduction zone. This study was supported by Russian Foundation for Basic Research (grant 12-05-01166-a to IYuB) and the Uralian Division of Russian Academy of Sciences (project No 12-P-5-1020). References: Andrews, D.R.A., Brenan, J.M. (2002) Phase-equilibrium constraints on the magmatic origin of laurite and Os-Ir alloy. Can. Mineral. 40, 1705-1716. Walker, R.J., Prichard, H.M., Ishiwatari, A., Pimentel, M. (2002) The osmium isotopic composition of convecting upper mantle deduced from ophiolite chromites. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 66, 329-345.

  8. Platinum-group minerals in the LG and MG chromitites of the eastern Bushveld Complex, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberthür, Thomas; Junge, Malte; Rudashevsky, Nikolay; de Meyer, Eveline; Gutter, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The chromitites of the Bushveld Complex in South Africa contain vast resources of platinum-group elements (PGE); however, except for the economic upper group (UG)-2 chromitite seam, information on the distribution of the PGE in the ores and on the mineralogical nature, assemblages, and proportions of platinum-group minerals (PGM) is essentially missing. In the present geochemical and mineralogical study, PGE concentrates originating from the lower group (LG)-6 and middle group (MG)-1/2 chromitites were investigated with the intention to fill this gap of knowledge. Chondrite-normalized PGE patterns of bulk rock and concentrates are characterized by a positive slope from Os to Rh, a slight drop to Pt, and an increase to Pd again. The pronounced similarities of the PGE patterns indicate similar primary processes of PGE concentration in the chromitites, namely "sulfide control" of the PGE mineralization, i.e., co-precipitation of chromite and sulfide. Further, the primary control of PGE concentration in chromitites appears to be dual in character: (i) base-level concentrations of IPGE (up to ˜500 ppb) hosted within chromite and (ii) co-precipitation of chromite and sulfide, the latter containing virtually the entire remaining PGE budget. Sulfides (chalcopyrite, pentlandite, and pyrite; pyrrhotite is largely missing) are scarce within the chromitites and occur mainly interstitial to chromite grains. Pd and Rh contents in pentlandite are low and erratic. Essentially, the whole PGE inventory of the ores occurs in the form of discrete PGM. The PGM are almost always associated with sulfides. The dominant PGM are various Pt-Pd-Rh sulfides (cooperite/braggite [(Pt,Pd)S] and malanite/cuprorhodsite [CuPt2S4]/[CuRh2S4]), laurite [RuS2], the main carrier of the IPGE (Os, Ir, Ru), sulfarsenides [(Rh,Pt,Ir)AsS], sperrylite [PtAs2], Pt-Fe alloys, and a large variety of mainly Pd-rich PGM. The LG and MG chromitites have many characteristics in common and define a general, "typical

  9. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal–nitrogen coordination

    PubMed Central

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon–nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation. PMID:26059552

  10. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Setzler, Brian P; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-06

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW(-1) in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  11. Activity targets for nanostructured platinum-group-metal-free catalysts in hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setzler, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Wittkopf, Jarrid A.; Yan, Yushan

    2016-12-01

    Fuel cells are the zero-emission automotive power source that best preserves the advantages of gasoline automobiles: low upfront cost, long driving range and fast refuelling. To make fuel-cell cars a reality, the US Department of Energy has set a fuel cell system cost target of US$30 kW-1 in the long-term, which equates to US$2,400 per vehicle, excluding several major powertrain components (in comparison, a basic, but complete, internal combustion engine system costs approximately US$3,000). To date, most research for automotive applications has focused on proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), because these systems have demonstrated the highest power density. Recently, however, an alternative technology, hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs), has gained significant attention, because of the possibility to use stable platinum-group-metal-free catalysts, with inherent, long-term cost advantages. In this Perspective, we discuss the cost profile of PEMFCs and the advantages offered by HEMFCs. In particular, we discuss catalyst development needs for HEMFCs and set catalyst activity targets to achieve performance parity with state-of-the-art automotive PEMFCs. Meeting these targets requires careful optimization of nanostructures to pack high surface areas into a small volume, while maintaining high area-specific activity and favourable pore-transport properties.

  12. Magnetic Concentration of Platinum Group Metals from Catalyst Scraps Using Iron Deposition Pretreatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taninouchi, Yu-ki; Watanabe, Tetsuo; Okabe, Toru H.

    2017-08-01

    Spent automobile catalysts are the most important secondary source of platinum group metals (PGMs). However, effective recovery of PGMs from catalyst scraps is difficult because they are present in only small quantities as chemically stable substances. In this study, in order to improve the efficiency of the existing recycling processes, the authors experimentally investigated a novel physical concentration pretreatment process for PGMs using samples that simulate an automobile catalyst. In order to magnetically separate PGMs directly from the catalysts, ferromagnetic Fe was deposited on the PGM particles (or the porous catalyst layer) using an electroless plating technique. By using a plating bath containing sodium borohydride and potassium sodium tartrate as the reducing and complexing agents, respectively, Fe was successfully deposited on the sample without requiring complicated pretreatments such as sensitization and activation. After Fe deposition and subsequent pulverization, the PGMs could be extracted and concentrated in the form of magnetic powder using a magnet. The proposed magnetic concentration process was demonstrated to be feasible, and it has the potential to make the recycling of PGMs more efficient and environmentally friendly.

  13. Highly active oxygen reduction non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst without direct metal-nitrogen coordination.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Kara; Miner, Elise; Jia, Qingying; Tylus, Urszula; Ramaswamy, Nagappan; Liang, Wentao; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jaouen, Frédéric; Mukerjee, Sanjeev

    2015-06-10

    Replacement of noble metals in catalysts for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction with transition metals mostly create active sites based on a composite of nitrogen-coordinated transition metal in close concert with non-nitrogen-coordinated carbon-embedded metal atom clusters. Here we report a non-platinum group metal electrocatalyst with an active site devoid of any direct nitrogen coordination to iron that outperforms the benchmark platinum-based catalyst in alkaline media and is comparable to its best contemporaries in acidic media. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy in conjunction with ex situ microscopy clearly shows nitrided carbon fibres with embedded iron particles that are not directly involved in the oxygen reduction pathway. Instead, the reaction occurs primarily on the carbon-nitrogen structure in the outer skin of the nitrided carbon fibres. Implications include the potential of creating greater active site density and the potential elimination of any Fenton-type process involving exposed iron ions culminating in peroxide initiated free-radical formation.

  14. A Capped Octahedral MHC6 Compound of a Platinum Group Metal.

    PubMed

    Eguillor, Beatriz; Esteruelas, Miguel A; Lezáun, Virginia; Oliván, Montserrat; Oñate, Enrique; Tsai, Jui-Yi; Xia, Chuanjun

    2016-06-27

    A MHC6 complex of a platinum group metal with a capped octahedral arrangement of donor atoms around the metal center has been characterized. This osmium compound OsH{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}3 , which reacts with HBF4 to afford the 14 e(-) species [Os{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}(Ph2 BIm)2 ]BF4 stabilized by two agostic interactions, has been obtained by reaction of OsH6 (PiPr3 )2 with N,N'-diphenylbenzimidazolium chloride ([Ph2 BImH]Cl) in the presence of NEt3 . Its formation takes place through the C,C,C-pincer compound OsH2 {κ(3) -C,C,C-(C6 H4 -BIm-C6 H4 )}(PiPr3 )2 , the dihydrogen derivative OsCl{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}(η(2) -H2 )(PiPr3 )2 , and the five-coordinate osmium(II) species OsCl{κ(2) -C,C-(PhBIm-C6 H4 )}(PiPr3 )2 .

  15. Peruvian perovskite Between Transition-metal to PGM/PlatinumGroupMetal Catalytic Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksoed, Wh-

    2016-11-01

    Strongly correlated electronic materials made of simple building blocks, such as a transition-metal ion in an octahedral oxygen cage forming a perovskite structure- Dagotto & Tokura for examples are the high-temperature superconductivity & the CMR/Colossal Magnetoresistance . Helium-4 denotes from LC Case,ScD: "Catalytic Fusion of Deuterium into Helium-4"- 1998 dealt with gaseous D2- "contacted with a supported metallic catalyst at superatmospheric pressure". The catalyst is a platinum-group metal, at about 0.5% - 1% by weight, on activated C. Accompanies Stephen J Geier, 2010 quotes "transition metal complexes", the Energy thus produced is enormous, and because the deuterium is very cheap in the form of heavy water (less than US 1/g), the fuel cost is very low (<<1 %/KwH). "The oceans contain enough deuterium to satisfy the Earth's energy needs for many millions of year" to keep "maria"/Latin name of seas &Deuteronomy to be eternally preserves. Heartfelt Gratitudes to HE. Mr. Prof. Ir. HANDOJO.

  16. Accumulation and oxidation of elemental mercury in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Soares, Liliane Catone; Egreja Filho, Fernando Barboza; Linhares, Lucília Alves; Windmoller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Yoshida, Maria Irene

    2015-09-01

    The role of chemical and mineralogical soil properties in the retention and oxidation of atmospheric mercury in tropical soils is discussed based on thermal desorption analysis. The retention of gaseous mercury by tropical soils varied greatly both quantitatively and qualitatively with soil type. The average natural mercury content of soils was 0.08 ± 0.06 μg g(-1) with a maximum of 0.215 ± 0.009 μg g(-1). After gaseous Hg(0) incubation experiments, mercury content of investigated soils ranged from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 735 ± 23 μg g(-1), with a mean value of 44 ± 146 μg g(-1). Comparatively, A horizon of almost all soil types adsorbed more mercury than B horizon from the same soil, which demonstrates the key role of organic matter in mercury adsorption. In addition to organic matter, pH and CEC also appear to be important soil characteristics for the adsorption of mercury. All thermograms showed Hg(2+) peaks, which were predominant in most of them, indicating that elemental mercury oxidized in tropical soils. After four months of incubation, the thermograms showed oxidation levels from 70% to 100%. As none of the samples presented only the Hg(0) peak, and the soils retained varying amounts of mercury despite exposure under the same incubation conditions, it became clear that oxidation occurred on soil surface. Organic matter seemed to play a key role in mercury oxidation through complexation/stabilization of the oxidized forms. The lower percentages of available mercury (extracted with KNO3) in A horizons when compared to B horizons support this idea. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational Respiratory Exposure to Platinum Group Metals: A Review and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Linde, Stephanus J L; Franken, Anja; du Plessis, Johannes L

    2017-09-15

    Platinum group metals (PGMs) is a group of metals that include platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium. Occupational respiratory exposure to platinum has been reported since 1945, but studies investigating occupational exposure to palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, and osmium are scarce. This review provides a summation of the information available on the respiratory exposure to PGMs in various industrial settings, methods used to assess exposure, and the possible adverse health effects resulting from occupational exposure to PGMs. Of these effects, respiratory sensitization caused by soluble PGMs is of most importance. Metallic PGMs have not been shown to cause allergic reactions. This review reiterates that occupational respiratory exposure to PGMs is dependent on the type of industry where exposure takes place, the chemical form (soluble or insoluble) of the PGMs present in the workplace air, and the tasks performed by workers in the specific work areas. Sensitization to soluble platinum is associated with the degree of exposure to soluble platinum compounds, and the highest concentrations of soluble PGMs in workplace air have been reported for precious metals refineries where personal exposures frequently exceed the occupational exposure limit for soluble platinum (2 μg/m(3)). Additionally, this review emphasizes that personal exposure monitoring is preferred over area monitoring when assessing workers' exposure to PGMs. The legislation applicable to occupational exposure to PGMs is also discussed, and it is highlighted that the occupational exposure limit for soluble platinum has remained unchanged, in most countries, since 1970 and that too few countries have classified PGM compounds as respiratory or skin sensitizers. Finally, recommendations are made to ensure that future investigations are comparable in terms of the type of exposure monitoring (personal or area) conducted, the type of tasks included in the exposure monitoring

  18. Fractionation of the platinum-group elments and Re during crystallization of basalt in Kilauea Iki Lava Lake, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pitcher, L.; Helz, R.T.; Walker, R.J.; Piccoli, P.

    2009-01-01

    Kilauea Iki lava lake formed during the 1959 summit eruption of Kilauea Volcano, then crystallized and differentiated over a period of 35??years. It offers an opportunity to evaluate the fractionation behavior of trace elements in a uniquely well-documented basaltic system. A suite of 14 core samples recovered from 1967 to 1981 has been analyzed for 5 platinum-group elements (PGE: Ir, Os, Ru, Pt, Pd), plus Re. These samples have MgO ranging from 2.4 to 26.9??wt.%, with temperatures prior to quench ranging from 1140????C to ambient (110????C). Five eruption samples were also analyzed. Osmium and Ru concentrations vary by nearly four orders of magnitude (0.0006-1.40??ppb for Os and 0.0006-2.01??ppb for Ru) and are positively correlated with MgO content. These elements behaved compatibly during crystallization, mostly likely being concentrated in trace phases (alloy or sulfide) present in olivine phenocrysts or included chromite. Iridium also correlates positively with MgO, although less strongly than Os and Ru. The somewhat poorer correlation for Ir, compared with Os and Ru, may reflect variable loss of Ir as volatile IrF6 in some of the most magnesian samples. Rhenium is negatively correlated with MgO, behaving as an incompatible trace element. Its behavior in the lava lake is complicated by apparent volatile loss of Re, as suggested by a decrease in Re concentration with time of quenching for lake samples vs. eruption samples. Platinum and Pd concentrations are negatively, albeit weakly, correlated with MgO, so these elements were modestly incompatible during crystallization of the major silicate phases. Palladium contents peaked before precipitation of immiscible sulfide liquid, however, and decline sharply in the most differentiated samples. In contrast, Pt appears to have been unaffected by sulfide precipitation. Microprobe data confirm that Pd entered the sulfide liquid before Re, and that Pt is not strongly chalcophile in this system. Occasional high Pt values

  19. Root anatomy and element distribution vary between two Salix caprea isolates with different Cd accumulation capacities

    PubMed Central

    Vaculík, Marek; Konlechner, Cornelia; Langer, Ingrid; Adlassnig, Wolfram; Puschenreiter, Markus; Lux, Alexander; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the influence of toxic elements on root anatomy and element distribution is still limited. This study describes anatomical responses, metal accumulation and element distribution of rooted cuttings of Salix caprea after exposure to Cd and/or Zn. Differences in the development of apoplastic barriers and tissue organization in roots between two distinct S. caprea isolates with divergent Cd uptake and accumulation capacities in leaves might reflect an adaptive predisposition based on different natural origins. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) revealed that Cd and Zn interfered with the distribution of elements in a tissue- and isolate-specific manner. Zinc, Ca, Mg, Na and Si were enriched in the peripheral bark, K and S in the phloem and Cd in both vascular tissues. Si levels were lower in the superior Cd translocator. Since the cuttings originated from stocks isolated from polluted and unpolluted sites we probably uncovered different strategies against toxic elements. PMID:22325439

  20. Root anatomy and element distribution vary between two Salix caprea isolates with different Cd accumulation capacities.

    PubMed

    Vaculík, Marek; Konlechner, Cornelia; Langer, Ingrid; Adlassnig, Wolfram; Puschenreiter, Markus; Lux, Alexander; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2012-04-01

    The understanding of the influence of toxic elements on root anatomy and element distribution is still limited. This study describes anatomical responses, metal accumulation and element distribution of rooted cuttings of Salix caprea after exposure to Cd and/or Zn. Differences in the development of apoplastic barriers and tissue organization in roots between two distinct S. caprea isolates with divergent Cd uptake and accumulation capacities in leaves might reflect an adaptive predisposition based on different natural origins. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) revealed that Cd and Zn interfered with the distribution of elements in a tissue- and isolate-specific manner. Zinc, Ca, Mg, Na and Si were enriched in the peripheral bark, K and S in the phloem and Cd in both vascular tissues. Si levels were lower in the superior Cd translocator. Since the cuttings originated from stocks isolated from polluted and unpolluted sites we probably uncovered different strategies against toxic elements.

  1. Morphology of the base of the J-M Reef Package and its bearing on the localization of platinum group metal mineralization in the Stillwater Complex, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfgram, D. . Dept. of Geological Engineering); Evans-Holmgren, J.A.

    1993-04-01

    Economic concentrations of platinum group metals (PGM) in the Stillwater Complex are typically localized within a unique lithologic sequence, the J-M Reef Package. The J-M Reef Package is generally believed to be the result of the influx of a pulse of undifferentiated' magma into the chamber subsequent to the appearance of plagioclase as a cumulus mineral in the more differentiated resident melt. Underground workings of Stillwater Mining Company, together with over 3,000 underground core holes on 50-foot centers, facilitate the definition of the igneous stratigraphy below the J-M Reef Package and the relationship of its base to it. As much as 350 feet of consolidated footwall igneous cumulates were removed by thermochemical ablation in terraced channels prior to the accumulation of the J-M Reef Package. Distribution of PGM mineralization within the J-M Reef Package, as well as the differential accumulation of the Reef Package itself, is related to channel morphology. Models of ore genesis must account for a new magma pulse that debouched with vigor along the top of the pre-existing cumulus pile.

  2. Peatlands as Dynamic Biogeochemical Ecotones: Elemental Concentrations, Stoichiometries and Accumulation in Peatland Soils of Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. R.; Wang, M.; Talbot, J.; Riley, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Peatlands act as biogeochemical interfaces between terrestrial and aquatic systems and are 'hotspots', particularly for carbon cycling and the accumulation of nutrients and other elements within the peat profile. This results in storage of substantial amounts of carbon, nutrients and metals, particularly in northern peatlands. Using a data base of over 400 peat profiles and 1700 individual peat samples from bog, fen and swamp sites in Ontario, Canada, we examine the profile concentrations of C, N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Hg, Pb, As, Cu, Mn, Zn, Fe and Al, and estimate the storage and accumulation of these elements. We show how these profiles, spatial patterns, stoichiometries and accumulation rates are controlled by biogeochemical processes and influenced by geochemical setting, hydrology, atmospheric input and pollution, and ecological and microbial transformations.

  3. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by these materials.

  4. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by these materials.

  5. Multi-element accumulation near Rumex crispus roots under wetland and dryland conditions.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, La Toya T; Jacob, Donna L; Otte, Marinus L

    2010-05-01

    Rumex crispus was grown under wet and dry conditions in two-chamber columns such that the roots were confined to one chamber by a 21 mum nylon mesh, thus creating a soil-root interface ('rhizoplane'). Element concentrations at 3 mm intervals below the 'rhizoplane' were measured. The hypothesis was that metals accumulate near plant roots more under wetland than dryland conditions. Patterns in element distribution were different between the treatments. Under dryland conditions Al, Ba, Cu, Cr, Fe, K, La, Mg, Na, Sr, V, Y and Zn accumulated in soil closest to the roots, above the 'rhizoplane' only. Under wetland conditions Al, Fe, Cr, K, V and Zn accumulated above as well as 3 mm below the 'rhizoplane' whereas La, Sr and Y accumulated 3 mm below the 'rhizoplane' only. Plants on average produced 1.5 times more biomass and element uptake was 2.5 times greater under wetland compared to dryland conditions. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Biodiversity of Mineral Nutrient and Trace Element Accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Ivan; Hermans, Christian; Lahner, Brett; Yakubova, Elena; Tikhonova, Marina; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Chao, Dai-yin; Salt, David E.

    2012-01-01

    In order to grow on soils that vary widely in chemical composition, plants have evolved mechanisms for regulating the elemental composition of their tissues to balance the mineral nutrient and trace element bioavailability in the soil with the requirements of the plant for growth and development. The biodiversity that exists within a species can be utilized to investigate how regulatory mechanisms of individual elements interact and to identify genes important for these processes. We analyzed the elemental composition (ionome) of a set of 96 wild accessions of the genetic model plant Arabidopsis thaliana grown in hydroponic culture and soil using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The concentrations of 17–19 elements were analyzed in roots and leaves from plants grown hydroponically, and leaves and seeds from plants grown in artificial soil. Significant genetic effects were detected for almost every element analyzed. We observed very few correlations between the elemental composition of the leaves and either the roots or seeds. There were many pairs of elements that were significantly correlated with each other within a tissue, but almost none of these pairs were consistently correlated across tissues and growth conditions, a phenomenon observed in several previous studies. These results suggest that the ionome of a plant tissue is variable, yet tightly controlled by genes and gene×environment interactions. The dataset provides a valuable resource for mapping studies to identify genes regulating elemental accumulation. All of the ionomic data is available at www.ionomicshub.org. PMID:22558123

  7. Trace elements accumulation in edible tissues of five sturgeon species from the Caspian Sea.

    PubMed

    Pourang, N; Tanabe, S; Rezvani, S; Dennis, J H

    2005-01-01

    This study is focused on twenty trace elements (Ag, Ba, Bi, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Ga, In, Mn, Mo, Pb, Rb, Sb, Sn, Sr, Ti, V, Zn) accumulation in muscles of five sturgeon species (Acipenser guldenstaedti, A. persicus, A. nudiventris, A. stellatus and Huso huso) from the southern part of the Caspian Sea. Moreover the relationships between some biological characteristics and the levels of the selected elements as well as inter-elemental relationships were assessed. The samples (10 specimens for each the five species) were collected from two important sturgeon fishery zones located in the Iranian part of the Sea in 2002. Concentrations of the elements were determined using ICP-MS. Only in the case of Cs could significant differences between two selected sampling areas be detected. There were significant differences in levels of Co, Ga, Rb, Sn, Ti, Pb and Bi in muscles of the species. Only in the case of Cd weight related differences among the species were found. The significant length dependent relationships were observed for Ga and Ba. Patterns of elements accumulation were assessed by statistical methods and compared to the other researches. In all the cases, the amounts of toxic trace elements (Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn) were markedly below the international guidelines for human consumption.

  8. The first occurrence of platinum group minerals (PGM) in a chromite deposit in the Eastern Desert, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhaddad, M. A.

    1996-07-01

    The platinum-group mineralogy (PGM) of the chromitite from Gebel Lawi, in the southeastern desert has been investigated. The most abundant base metal sulfides (BMS) associated with the Lawi chromite are pentlandite, millerite and heazlewoodite. The major platinum-group minerals identified were as follows: laurite (IrOsRu)S2, osmian iridium (OsIr), hollingworthite (RhAsS), tellurian arsenopalladinite (PdTeSbAs), potarite (PdHg) besides cuprian palladian gold (CuPdAu), a Pd-Sb-Hg and HgTe phases. Laurite and osmian iridium occur preferentially in chromite. Os-Ir commonly forms composite PGM with laurite. Hollingworthite and tellurian arsenopalladinite are included within serpentine and, close to the base-metal sulfides, the cuprian palladian gold shares boundaries with chromite. Potarite together with the Pd-Sb-Hg and HgTe phases are embedded in serpentine. Palladium is the most abundant PGE in the Gebel Lawi chromite. A paragenetic sequence of PGM formation is described. Textural evidence indicates that Os-, Ir- and Ru-bearing PGM formed early and were followed by Rh- and Pd-bearing PGM. The concentration of all five PGE could be magmatic, but much of the PGE mineralogy except for laurite and osmian iridium in the center of chromite grains, has been modified by subsequent processes. At later stages, the environment became Te-, Sb-, As- and Hg-rich, which finally led to the formation of low-temperature alteration minerals.

  9. Assessment of trace element accumulation in surface sediments off Chennai coast after a major flood event.

    PubMed

    Gopal, V; Krishnakumar, S; Simon Peter, T; Nethaji, S; Suresh Kumar, K; Jayaprakash, M; Magesh, N S

    2017-01-30

    The present study was conducted to assess the trace element concentration in marine surface sediments after major flood event of Chennai metropolis, India. Thirty surface samples were collected from off Chennai coast. Trace elements, organic matter, CaCO3, sand-silt-clay and C/N ratios were studied to understand the accumulation dynamics on sediments. The elemental concentration, calcium carbonate and OM distribution suggest that they are derived from urban runoff and transported through Adyar and Cooum Rivers. The enrichment factor reveals that the sediments are enriched by Pb, Cu, Zn, Cr, Co, Ni followed by Fe. The observed Igeo value shows that the samples are contaminated by Pb, Cu and Zn. The elemental concentration of the surface sediments is low when compared to other coastal region except Pb. The elevated level of Pb in the surface sediments is probably due to migration of contaminated urban soil from industrial and transportation sectors into marine environment.

  10. Global exploration and production capacity for platinum-group metals from 1995 through 2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum-group metals (PGMs) are required in a variety of commercial, industrial, and military applications for many existing and emerging technologies, yet the United States is highly dependent on foreign sources of PGMs. Information on global exploration for PGMs since 1995 has been used in this study as a basis for identifying locations where the industry has determined that exploration has provided data sufficient to warrant development of a new mine or expansion of an existing operation or where a significant increase in capacity for PGMs is anticipated by 2015. Discussions include an overview of the industry and the selected sites, factors affecting mineral supply, and circumstances leading to the development of mineral properties with the potential to affect mineral supply. Of the 52 sites or regional operations that were considered in this analysis, 16 sites were producing before 1995, 28 sites commenced production from 1995 through 2010, and 8 sites were expected to begin production from 2011 through 2015 if development plans came to fruition. The United States imports PGMs primarily from Canada, Russia, South Africa, and Zimbabwe to meet increasing demand for these materials in a variety of specialized and high-tech applications. Feed sources of PGMs are changing in South Africa and Russia, which together accounted for about 89 percent of platinum production and 82 percent of palladium production in 2009. A greater amount of South African PGM capacity is likely to come from deeper, higher cost Upper Group Reef seam 2 deposits and deposits in the Eastern Bushveld area. Future Russian PGM capacity is likely to come from ore zones with generally lower PGM content and different platinum-to-palladium ratios than the nickel-rich ore that dominated PGM supply in the 1990s. Because PGM supply from Canada and Russia is derived as a byproduct of copper and nickel mining, the PGM supply from these countries is influenced by economic, environmental, political, and

  11. Phytoaccumulation of trace elements by wetland plants: 3. Uptake and accumulation of ten trace elements by twelve plant species

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, J.H.; Zayed, A.; Zhu, Y.L.; Yu, M.; Terry, N.

    1999-10-01

    Interest is increasing in using wetland plants in constructed wetlands to remove toxic elements from polluted wastewater. To identify those wetland plants that hyperaccumulate trace elements, 12 plant species were tested for their efficiency to bioconcentrate 10 potentially toxic trace elements including As, b, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mn, Hg, Ni, and Se. Individual plants were grown under carefully controlled conditions and supplied with 1 mg L{sup {minus}1} of each trace element individually for 10 d. Except B, all elements accumulated to much higher concentrations in roots than in shoots. Highest shoot tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW) of the various trace elements were attained by the following species: umbrella plant (Cyperus alternifolius L.) for Mn (198) and Cr (44); water zinnia (Wedelia trilobata Hitchc.) for Cd (148) and Ni (80); smartweed (Polygonum hydropiperoides Michx.) for Cu (95) and Pb (64); water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes L.) for Hg (92), As (34), and Se (39); and mare's tail (hippuris vulgaris L.) for B (1132). Whereas, the following species attained the highest root tissue concentrations (mg kg{sup {minus}1} DW); stripped rush (Baumia rubiginosa) for Mn (1683); parrot's feather (Myriophyllum brasiliense Camb.) for Cd (1426) and Ni (1077); water lettuce for Cu (1038), Hg (1217), and As (177); smartweed for Cr (2980) and Pb (1882); mare's tail for B (1277); and monkey flower (Mimulus guttatus Fisch.) for Se (384). From a phytoremediation perspective, smartweed was probably the best plant species for trace element removal from wastewater due to its faster growth and higher plant density.

  12. Seedling emergence, growth and trace elements tolerance and accumulation by Lamiaceae species in a mine soil.

    PubMed

    Parra, A; Zornoza, R; Conesa, E; Gómez-López, M D; Faz, A

    2014-10-01

    The potential use of three Laminaceae species (Lavandula dentata, Rosmarinus officinalis and Thymus vulgaris) for the phytostabilisation of a trace elements contaminated (acid) soil has been evaluated. These species were grown in mine tailing soil unamended (TS) and amended with calcium carbonate and pig manure (ATS), and unpolluted substrate for control (CT); plant growth, root characterisation, soil trace elements contents and their accumulation in plants were measured. Results indicated that seed emergence was independent from substrate characteristics, but seedlings died in TS with 40% survival in ATS. The biomass of L. dentata and T. vulgaris and root development in R. officinalis were negatively affected when grown in TS but without differences between ATS and CT. Applicating amendments reduced soil exchangeable and extractable fractions concentrations of trace elements in ATS compared with TS. The establishment of L. dentata and R. officinalis were related to trace elements immobilisation. Trace element concentrations in plants grown in tailing soils were similar to those reported for control, although applicating amendments reduced Zn accumulation in all species, and favoured increased absorption and aerial translocation of As and Pb by L. dentata and T. vulgaris; nonetheless, levels were below toxicity thresholds. Thus, these species fulfill the criteria for phytostabilisation purposes, aided by employing amendments.

  13. Fatigue Damage Accumulation Under Quasi-Random Loading of Composite Airframe Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strizhius, V.

    2016-09-01

    To perform engineering estimations of the fatigue life of quasi-randomly loaded layered composites, with geometric concentrators, representing the longitudinal elements of composite wing of a transport airplane, a special rule of fatigue damage accumulation is suggested. The main propositions of the method for calculating the fatigue life of these elements by using this rule are formulated. The examples of estimations presented show a good agreement between analytical results and experimental data. A number of important conclusions about the effect of different levels of cyclic loading and "GAG" cycles of different flight types of the quasi-random "TWIST" program on the total fatigue life are made.

  14. Accumulation of trace elements in harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) from Pangnirtung in the Baffin Island, Canada.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Nomura, Kumiko; Kunito, Takashi; Anan, Yasumi; Iwata, Hisato; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2011-01-01

    Nineteen trace elements were determined in liver, muscle, kidney, gonads, and hair of 18 harp seals (Phoca groenlandica) from Pangnirtung in the Baffin Island, Canada. Concentrations of V, Mn, Fe, Cu, Mo, Ag, and Hg in the liver, Co, Cd, and Tl in the kidney, and Ba and Pb in the hair were significantly higher than those in other tissues. Significant positive correlations between Hg concentrations in the hair, and liver, kidney and testis imply usefulness of the hair sample for non-destructive monitoring of Hg in the harp seals. It is suggested that whereas Hg preferentially accumulates in the liver, the accumulation in other tissues is induced at higher hepatic Hg levels. In contrast, Se may not be accumulated in other tissues compared with the liver even at higher hepatic Hg levels because of the presence of excess Se for Hg detoxification in other tissues.

  15. [Uptake and accumulation characteristics of silicon and other nutritional elements in different age Phyllostachys praecox plants].

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhang-Ting; Jiang, Pei-Kun; Song, Zhao-Liang; Meng, Ci-Fu; Wu, Jia-Sen

    2013-05-01

    The samples of different age (1-4 years old) Phyllostachys praecox plants and their organs (leaf, branch, and culm) were collected from their main production area in Lin' an County, Zhejiang Province of East China to study the contents and the uptake and accumulation characteristics of silicon and other nutritional elements, as well as the interrelations between Si and other nutrient elements. In the P. praecox plants, the C content in aboveground part was in the order of culm > branch> leaf, whereas the Si, N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Al, Fe and Mn contents were in the order of leaf > branch > culm. Mn was mainly accumulated in leaf, while the other nine nutrient elements were mainly accumulated in the culm of 1-year old plants. The average Si content in the aboveground part of 3-4 year old plants was 13.66 g x kg(-1), suggesting that P. praecox belonged to Si accumulation plant. The leaf N, P, K, and Mg contents decreased, while the C, Al, and Mn contents increased with increasing plant age. The Si uptake by the aboveground part was mainly occurred in the second year (57.1%), while the N and K uptake was mainly in the first two years (67.7% - 93.7%). Thereafter, the N and K flowed out from the aboveground part, with the outflow rates reached 19.1% - 39.1% of the total accumulated amounts. The Si in P. praecox was significantly correlated with Ca, Al, and Mn, and negatively correlated with N, P, K, and Mg.

  16. Accumulation of airborne elements from vehicles in transplanted lichens in urban sites

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, J.; Kauppi, M.; Kauppi, A.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of the current study is to compare the short-term accumulation capacity of two epiphytic lichens characterized by a different type of thallus. The lichens Hypogynmia physodes (L.) Nyl. and Usnea hirta (L.) Weber em. Mot. were transplanted either to the vicinity of streets of low volume and slow traffic or to the vicinity of a highway in the city of Oulu, N. Finland, for a period of 45 d. Eleven elements were analyzed before and after transplantation. The two lichen species were found to possess a similar accumulating capacity for K and Mn. Hypogynmia physodes manifests a higher accumulating capacity than U. hirta for Na, Fe, and Cu. whereas the more sensitive lichen U. hirta exhibits a higher accumulating capacity for Mg, despite a higher primary concentration of these elements in the thallus of H. physodes. Our findings show a relative high concentration of K, Fe, Mg, Zn, Mn, Pb, and Cu in thalli of H. physodes and Mg, Zn, Pb, Cu, and Cd in U. hirta in material transplanted to streets of low volume and slow traffic, over and above the concentration found in thalli retrieved form the vicinity of the highway. This may be explained by the higher rate of abrasion of car engines running idle near traffic lights and by the lesser ventilation near the close-clustered streets of the inner city. 65 refs., 8 tabs.

  17. Accumulation of rare earth elements in human bone within the lifespan.

    PubMed

    Zaichick, Sofia; Zaichick, Vladimir; Karandashev, Vasilii; Nosenko, Sergey

    2011-02-01

    For the first time, the contents of rare earth elements (REEs) in a rib bone of a healthy human were determined. The mean value of the contents of Ce, Dy, Er, Gd, La, Nd, Pr, Sm, Tb, and Yb (10 elements out of 17 total REEs), as well as the upper limit of means for Ho, Lu, Tm, and Y (4 elements) were measured in the rib bone tissue of 38 females and 42 males (15 to 55 years old) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We found age-related accumulation of REEs in the bone tissue of healthy individuals who lived in a non-industrial region. It was calculated that during a lifespan the content of REEs in a skeleton of non-industrial region residents may increase by one to two orders of magnitude. Using our results as indicative normal values and published data we estimated relative Gd accumulation in the bone tissue of patients according to magnetic resonance imaging with contrast agent and La accumulation in the bone tissue of patients receiving hemodialysis after treatment with lanthanum carbonate as a phosphate binder. It was shown that after such procedures contents of Gd and La in the bone tissue of patients are two to three orders of magnitude higher than normal levels. In our opinion, REEs incorporation may affect bone quality and health similar to other potentially toxic trace metals. The impact of elevated REEs content on bone physiology, biochemistry and morphology requires further investigation.

  18. Rare Earth and other Chemical Elements Accumulation in Vines of Fogo Island (Cape Verde)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marques, Rosa; Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Rocha, Fernando; Dias, Maria Isabel; Franco, Dulce

    2017-04-01

    The Fogo Island is the fourth bigger island of the Cape Verde (central Atlantic Ocean). This archipelago is located 570 kilometres off the coast of West Africa, and is characterized by a semi-arid climate. The volcanic soils of the caldera of this island, with an active volcanism during historical times, have been used for viticulture. The study of uptake of chemical elements by vines - absorption and translocation to grapes - grown in soils developed on alkaline pyroclasts is the main goal of this work. The concentrations of 27 chemical elements in bark, leafs and grapes of two vines, as well as in the corresponding soils (< 2 mm) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Irradiations of milled samples and standards were made in the core grid of the Portuguese Research Reactor (CTN/IST, Bobadela). The distribution patterns of the enrichment factors (EF) in the different parts of the plants are similar for the two sampling sites. Significant EF were found for the majority of the chemical elements studied, in the several parts of the plants, particularly in grapes where Cr, As, Sb and U are accumulated (EF > 50). The bioavailable fraction of Cr and As in these soils may be due to the low percentage of iron oxides (particularly in the form of nanoparticles), which play an important role in the retention of these elements. The factors responsible for the phytoavailability of Sb in soils and its uptake by plants it's still poorly known. Although the Sb concentrations in earth's crust are low, higher concentrations of this element in soils may be related with hydrothermal and volcanic processes. Also, the temperature may influence the accumulation of Sb in plants, with an increase of the Sb uptake by plants at higher temperatures, due to an increased desorption rate of Sb from soil particles. Concerning U, its mobility and dispersion in soils is controlled by its oxidation state, its adsorption capacity in clay minerals or iron oxides, and the ability

  19. Xylella fastidiosa differentially accumulates mineral elements in biofilm and planktonic cells.

    PubMed

    Cobine, Paul A; Cruz, Luisa F; Navarrete, Fernando; Duncan, Daniel; Tygart, Melissa; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2013-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a bacterial plant pathogen that infects numerous plant hosts. Disease develops when the bacterium colonizes the xylem vessels and forms a biofilm. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy was used to examine the mineral element content of this pathogen in biofilm and planktonic states. Significant accumulations of copper (30-fold), manganese (6-fold), zinc (5-fold), calcium (2-fold) and potassium (2-fold) in the biofilm compared to planktonic cells were observed. Other mineral elements such as sodium, magnesium and iron did not significantly differ between biofilm and planktonic cells. The distribution of mineral elements in the planktonic cells loosely mirrors the media composition; however the unique mineral element distribution in biofilm suggests specific mechanisms of accumulation from the media. A cell-to-surface attachment assay shows that addition of 50 to 100 µM Cu to standard X. fastidiosa media increases biofilm, while higher concentrations (>200 µM) slow cell growth and prevent biofilm formation. Moreover cell-to-surface attachment was blocked by specific chelation of copper. Growth of X. fastidiosa in microfluidic chambers under flow conditions showed that addition of 50 µM Cu to the media accelerated attachment and aggregation, while 400 µM prevented this process. Supplementation of standard media with Mn showed increased biofilm formation and cell-to-cell attachment. In contrast, while the biofilm accumulated Zn, supplementation to the media with this element caused inhibited growth of planktonic cells and impaired biofilm formation. Collectively these data suggest roles for these minerals in attachment and biofilm formation and therefore the virulence of this pathogen.

  20. An early nodulin-like protein accumulates in the sieve element plasma membrane of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Junaid A; Wang, Qi; Sjölund, Richard D; Schulz, Alexander; Thompson, Gary A

    2007-04-01

    Membrane proteins within the sieve element-companion cell complex have essential roles in the physiological functioning of the phloem. The monoclonal antibody line RS6, selected from hybridomas raised against sieve elements isolated from California shield leaf (Streptanthus tortuosus; Brassicaceae) tissue cultures, recognizes an antigen in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotype Columbia that is associated specifically with the plasma membrane of sieve elements, but not companion cells, and accumulates at the earliest stages of sieve element differentiation. The identity of the RS6 antigen was revealed by reverse transcription-PCR of Arabidopsis leaf RNA using degenerate primers to be an early nodulin (ENOD)-like protein that is encoded by the expressed gene At3g20570. Arabidopsis ENOD-like proteins are encoded by a multigene family composed of several types of structurally related phytocyanins that have a similar overall domain structure of an amino-terminal signal peptide, plastocyanin-like copper-binding domain, proline/serine-rich domain, and carboxy-terminal hydrophobic domain. The amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of the 21.5-kD sieve element-specific ENOD are posttranslationally cleaved from the precursor protein, resulting in a mature peptide of approximately 15 kD that is attached to the sieve element plasma membrane via a carboxy-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchor. Many of the Arabidopsis ENOD-like proteins accumulate in gametophytic tissues, whereas in both floral and vegetative tissues, the sieve element-specific ENOD is expressed only within the phloem. Members of the ENOD subfamily of the cupredoxin superfamily do not appear to bind copper and have unknown functions. Phenotypic analysis of homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants for the gene At3g20570 shows minimal alteration in vegetative growth but a significant reduction in the overall reproductive potential.

  1. Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J. R.; Karigan, G. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An accumulator particularly adapted for use in controlling the pressure of a stream of fluid in its liquid phase utilizing the fluid in its gaseous phase was designed. The accumulator is characterized by a shell defining a pressure chamber having an entry throat for a liquid and adapted to be connected in contiguous relation with a selected conduit having a stream of fluid flowing through the conduit in its liquid phase. A pressure and volume stabilization tube, including an array of pressure relief perforations is projected into the chamber with the perforations disposed adjacent to the entry throat for accommodating a discharge of the fluid in either gaseous or liquid phases, while a gas inlet and liquid to gas conversion system is provided, the chamber is connected with a source of the fluid for continuously pressuring the chamber for controlling the pressure of the stream of liquid.

  2. Trace element accumulation in Cassiopea sp. (Scyphozoa) from urban marine environments in Australia.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Michelle A; Kingsford, Michael J

    2010-03-01

    Jellyfishes are robust, short-lived animals, tolerant to a wide range of environmental conditions and pollutants. The benthic jellyfish, Cassiopea sp. was collected from five locations along the north and eastern coast of Australia and analysed for trace elements to determine if this species has potential as a marine biomonitor. Both the oral arm and bell tissues readily accumulated aluminium, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, copper, iron, manganese and zinc above ambient seawater levels. In contrast, lithium appeared to be actively regulated within the tissues while calcium, magnesium and strontium reflected the ambient environment. The multi-element signatures showed spatial variation, reflecting the geographical separations between locations, with locations closer together showing more similar elemental patterns. The combination of bioaccumulative capacity, life history traits and biophysical aspects indicate that this species has high potential as a biomonitor in coastal marine systems.

  3. Early diagenesis and trace element accumulation in North American Arctic margin sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyk, Zou Zou A.; Gobeil, Charles; Goñi, Miguel A.; Macdonald, Robie W.

    2017-04-01

    Concentrations of redox-sensitive elements (S, Mn, Mo, U, Cd, Re) were analyzed in a set of 27 sediment cores collected along the North American Arctic margin (NAAM) from the North Bering Sea to Davis Strait via the Canadian Archipelago. Sedimentary distributions and accumulation rates of the elements were used to evaluate early diagenesis in sediments along this section and to estimate the importance of this margin as a sink for key elements in the polar and global oceans. Distributions of Mn, total S and reduced inorganic S demonstrated that diagenetic conditions and thus sedimentary carbon turnover in the NAAM is organized regionally: undetectable or very thin layers (<0.5 cm) of surface Mn enrichment occurred in the Bering-Chukchi shelves; thin layers (1-5 cm) of surface Mn enrichment occurred in Barrow Canyon and Lancaster Sound; and thick layers (5-20 cm) of surface Mn enrichment occurred in the Beaufort Shelf, Canadian Archipelago, and Davis Strait. Inventories of authigenic S below the Mn-rich layer decreased about fivefold from Bering-Chukchi shelf and Barrow Canyon to Lancaster Sound and more than ten-fold from Bering-Chukchi shelf to Beaufort Shelf, Canadian Archipelago and Davis Strait. The Mn, total S and reduced inorganic S distributions imply strong organic carbon (OC) flux and metabolism in the Bering-Chukchi shelves, lower aerobic OC metabolism in Barrow Canyon and Lancaster Sound, and deep O2 penetration and much lower OC metabolism in the Beaufort Shelf, Canadian Archipelago, and Davis Strait. Accumulation rates of authigenic S, Mo, Cd, Re, and U displayed marked spatial variability along the NAAM reflecting the range in sedimentary redox conditions. Strong relationships between the accumulation rates and vertical carbon flux, estimated from regional primary production values and water depth at the coring sites, indicate that the primary driver in the regional patterns is the supply of labile carbon to the seabed. Thus, high primary production

  4. Accumulation of elements by edible mushroom species II. A comparison of aluminium, barium and nutritional element contents.

    PubMed

    Mleczek, Mirosław; Siwulski, Marek; Stuper-Szablewska, Kinga; Sobieralski, Krzysztof; Magdziak, Zuzanna; Goliński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare accumulation efficiency of Al, Ba and nutritional elements (Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na) exhibited by six edible mushrooms collected in particular regions of Poland during the last 20 years. The studied mushroom species were Boletus edulis, Cantharellus cibarius, Lactarius deliciosus, Leccinum aurantiacum, Suillus luteus and Xerocomus badius. The highest and the lowest concentrations of the elements in tested mushroom species were 11 - 410, 34 - 337, 16785 - 34600, 140 - 607, 12 - 75 and 16 - 143 mg kg(-1)d.m., respectively. The highest average concentrations of Al, Mg and Mn were observed in Suillus luteus fruiting bodies, while for Ba, Ca, K and Na it was in Lactarius deliciosus. BCF >1 was found for K and Mg in all tested mushroom species and additionally for the highest Ca and Na concentrations of all tested mushroom species except for C. cibarius and S. luteus, respectively. For the other tested elements (Al, Ba, Fe and Mn) BCF values < 1 were recorded.

  5. Linking structure to function: The search for active sites in non-platinum group metal oxygen reduction reaction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Holby, Edward F.; Zelenay, Piotr

    2016-05-17

    Atomic-scale structures of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) active sites in non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalysts, made from pyrolysis of carbon, nitrogen, and transition-metal (TM) precursors have been the subject of continuing discussion in the fuel cell electrocatalysis research community. We found that quantum chemical modeling is a path forward for understanding of these materials and how they catalyze the ORR. Here, we demonstrate through literature examples of how such modeling can be used to better understand non-PGM ORR active site relative stability and activity and how such efforts can also aid in the interpretation of experimental signatures produced by thesemore » materials.« less

  6. Placer and lode platinum-group minerals in south Kalimantan, Indonesia: evidence for derivation from Alaskan-type ultramafic intrusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    Platinum-group minerals occur in significant proportions in placer deposits in several localities in South Kalimantan. They consist of Pt-Fe alloy that may be intergrown with or contain inclusions of Ir-Os-Ru alloy, laurite and chromite. Alluvial PGM found along Sungai Tambanio are in part derived from chromatite schlieren in dunitic bodies intruded into clinopyroxene cumulates that may be part of an Alaskan-type ultramafic complex. A chromitite schlieren in serpentinite from one of these dunitic bodies is anomalous in PGE. The chondrite-normalized PGE pattern for this rock, pan concentrates from this area, and PGM concentrates from diamond-Au-PGM placer deposits have an "M'-shaped pattern enriched in Ir and Pt that is typical of PGE-mineralization associated with Alaskan-type ultramafic complexes. -Authors

  7. Calculating the melting curves by the thermodynamic data matching method: Platinum-group refractory metals (Ru, Os, and Ir)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulyamina, E. Yu.; Zitserman, V. Yu.; Fokin, L. R.

    2017-01-01

    A technique for reconstructing thermal properties, including the melting curve, of refractory metals based on the use of experimental data on caloric properties available up to the melting point and some regularities of the Debye-Grüneisen theory has been proposed. The calculation result is the consistent system of high-temperature thermal data, including the thermal expansion coefficient, solid-phase density, and volume jump upon melting. This technique was tried-out on refractory platinum-group metals based on experimental data on the enthalpy of the metals and confirmed by consistency with a thermodynamic calculation using shock-wave experiments and results obtained by the quantum molecular dynamics method.

  8. Development of deuterium labeling method based on the heterogeneous platinum group metal-catalyzed C-H activation.

    PubMed

    Sajiki, Hironao

    2013-01-01

    Deuterium (D) labeled compounds are utilized in various scientific fields such as mechanistic elucidation of reactions, preparation of new functional materials, tracers for microanalysis, deuterium labeled heavy drugs and so on. Although the H-D exchange reaction is a straightforward method to produce deuterated organic compounds, many precedent methods require expensive deuterium gas and/or harsh reaction conditions. A part of our leading research agendas is intended to the development of novel and functional heterogeneous platinum-group catalysts and the reclamation of unknown functionalities of existing heterogeneous platinum-group catalysts. During the course of the study, benzylic positions of substrates were site-selectively deuterated under mild and palladium-on-carbon (Pd/C)-catalyzed hydrogenation conditions in heavy water (D2O). Heat conditions promoted the H-D exchange reactivity and facilitated the H-D exchange reaction at not only the benzylic sites but also inactive C-H bonds and heterocyclic nuclei. It is noteworthy that platinum-on-carbon (Pt/C) indicated a quite high affinity toward aromatic nuclei, and the H-D exchange reaction was strongly enhanced by the use of Pt/C as a catalyst under milder conditions. The mixed use of Pd/C and Pt/C was found to be more efficient in the H-D exchange reaction compared to the independent use of Pd/C or Pt/C. Furthermore, simple alkanes could also be efficiently deuterated under rhodium-on-carbon (Rh/C)-catalyzed conditions. The use of ruthenium-on-carbon (Ru/C) enabled the regiospecific and efficient deuterium incorporation at α-positions of alcohols and results were applied as a regio- and stereoselective multi-deuteration method of sugar derivatives.

  9. Trace element accumulation in bivalve mussels Anodonta woodiana from Taihu Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbo; Yang, Jian; Gan, Juli

    2010-11-01

    Data are presented for 13 trace metals (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, and Pb) in 38 bivalve mussels Anodonta woodiana from four separate sites (Huzhou, Dapu, Sansandao, and Manshan) around the Taihu Lake of China. All elemental concentrations generally ranked in decreasing order, Mn > Fe > Zn > As ≈ Cu ≈ Cd ≈ Se > Pb > Mo ≈ Ag, except that Cr, Co, and Ni were not detected. Anodonta woodiana was able to bioaccumulate essential Mn and toxic Cd to the extremely high level of 19,240 and 53 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. Geographical differences in the concentrations of trace elements were usually significant between sampling sites except for As and Pb, and the mussels from Sanshandao site had mostly accumulated or were contaminated with essential and toxic elements. The residue level of Cd in A. woodiana from the Sanshandao and Manshan sites appeared to be even higher than those of the essential elements Cu and Se, and exceeded the corresponding maximum residue limits of China. The present study provides the most recent information on trace element bioaccumulation or contamination in Taihu Lake and, further, suggests that A. woodiana can be used as a suitable bioindicator for inland water environmental monitoring.

  10. Photochemistry and charge transfer chemistry of the platinum group elements. Summary progress report, May 1, 1990--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenberg, R.

    1992-12-01

    During the past 3 years, progress was made in elucidating the excited state structures of Pt(diimine)(dithiolate) complexes, while more recent efforts focused on the photochemistry of these complexes and electronic structure of other dithiolate systems. A carbonyl-Ir-maleonitrile dithiolate complex is also studied.

  11. Pollution problems in the northeast Atlantic: lessons learned for emerging pollutants such as the platinum group elements.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Sonia M; Glegg, Gillian A; Pereira, M Eduardo; Duarte, Armando C

    2009-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of the evolution of pollution problems in the Northeast Atlantic and associated responses and considers the effectiveness of these measures on environmental contamination. It identifies shortcomings in past practices and shows how marine environmental pollution may be perpetuated if new products and processes release novel contaminants or "emerging substances" without adequate management on a precautionary basis. The study concludes that it is necessary to develop innovative techniques capable of making reasonable quantitative estimates of not only environmental pathways, loads, and concentrations but also the socioeconomic drivers and "upstream" control measures (control, reduction, or elimination of emissions) so that a clear understanding of the causes and effects of our actions can be obtained. The development of a European Observatory for Emerging Substances to coordinate concerns, observations, and practices is suggested as a proactive approach for anticipating emerging problems.

  12. Distribution of Platinum-Group Elements in Chromite Ores of the Sorkhband Ultramafic Complex, Kerman, Southeastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafzadeh, Alireza; Arvin, Mohsen; Ahmadipour, Hamid; Pan, Yuanming

    2016-10-01

    The Ordovician Sorkhband ultramafic complex lies in southern Kerman Province of Iran. The wedge shape complex covers an area of more than 100 km2 and is divided into: lower part comprises of dunites, largest podiform chromitite deposits in Iran (Faryab mine), olivine clinopyroxenite dykes and massive's, wehrlite and olivine websterite dykes; and upper part comprises of clinopyroxene bearing harzburgites, with subordinate lenses and dykes of dunite, massive and dyke like olivine clinopyroxenite and minor orthopyroxenite dykes with no significant chromitite mineralization. Chromitite orebodies exhibit variable sizes and shapes, forming pods, lenses, bands, vein-like bodies and rich dissemination. Podiform chromitites in dunite form tabular to lenticular bodies although may occur also as pencil-like masses. The chromitites occur in four distinct textural modes. Massive, disseminated, banded and nodular chromitites are the most common textural types and commonly grade into one other. Massive chromitites have sharp contacts with the enclosing dunite whereas disseminated bodies grade outward into dunite and occasionally pass into interbanded chromitite and dunite. A detailed electron microprobe study reveals very high Cr#, Mg# and very low TiO2 contents for chromian spinels in chromitites. The Sorkhband chromitites contain up to 440 ppb total PGE, and display a systematic enrichment in IPGE relative to PPGE, with a steep negative slope in the PGE spidergrams and very low PPGE/IPGE ratios, a feature typical of ophiolitic podiform chromitites worldwide. The mineral chemistry data and PGE geochemistry of the chromitites indicates that the Sorkhband ultramafic complex was generated from an arc-related magma with boninitic affinity in a supra-subduction zone setting.

  13. Accumulation Rates of Trace Elements in the Cariaco Basin-A 20-kyr History of Seawater Chemistry and Global Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piper, D. Z.; Dean, W. E.

    2002-12-01

    A sediment core from the Cariaco Basin on the Venezuelan continental shelf, which collected sediment as old as 20 kyr, was analyzed for its major-element-oxide and trace-element concen-trations. The elements can be partitioned between a siliciclastic, terrigenous-derived fraction and two seawater-derived fractions. The marine fractions are (1) a biogenic fraction represented by nutrient trace elements taken up mostly by phytoplankton in the photic zone, and (2) a hydroge-nous fraction derived from bottom water via adsorption and precipitation reactions. The present-day export of organic matter from the photic zone, redox conditions and advection of bottom water, and the flux of terrigenous debris into the basin are used to calculate current trace-element accu-mulation rates. The sums of calculated accumulation rates of Cd, Cu, Mo, Ni, V, and Zn show excellent agreement with their measured bulk rates of accumulation in the uppermost surface sediment. This agreement between current measured and calculated accumulation rates of trace elements supports a model of trace-element accumulation rates in the subsurface sediment that gives a 20-kyr history of upwelling into the photic zone, bottom-water advection, and sediment provenance. Extrema in the trace-element accumulation rates and interpreted hydrographic properties of the water column correspond to changes in eustatic sea level and global climate.

  14. Accumulation of rare earth elements by siderophore-forming Arthrobacter luteolus isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara, India.

    PubMed

    Emmanuel, E S Challaraj; Ananthi, T; Anandkumar, B; Maruthamuthu, S

    2012-03-01

    In this study, Arthrobacter luteolus, isolated from rare earth environment of Chavara (Quilon district, Kerala, India), were found to produce catechol-type siderophores. The bacterial strain accumulated rare earth elements such as samarium and scandium. The siderophores may play a role in the accumulation of rare earth elements. Catecholate siderophore and low-molecular-weight organic acids were found to be present in experiments with Arthrobacter luteolus. The influence of siderophore on the accumulation of rare earth elements by bacteria has been extensively discussed.

  15. Effects of land use and parent materials on trace elements accumulation in topsoil.

    PubMed

    Tu, Cheng-Long; He, Teng-Bing; Liu, Cong-Qiang; Lu, Xiao-Hui

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effects of parent material and land use on the concentration of trace elements in the agricultural topsoil of Guizhou Province, China, a total of 584 agricultural topsoil samples were collected in a typical region. The results indicate that the contents of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Hg, and Pb) in agricultural soils were greater than in the uncultivated soils, and the paddy fields exhibited higher contents of trace elements than dry lands. The enrichments of most trace elements in agricultural topsoil derived from carbonate rock were more serious. In paddy fields, Cd, Cr, and As showed positive relationships with soil organic matter ( < 0.01) but were not affected by pH, carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratio, and clay ( > 0.05). Lead and Hg formed the second component in principal component analysis (PCA) and were closely related to pH and clay content. In dry lands, the trace elements were well correlated with pH, C/N, and clay ( < 0.05). Analysis of PCA and correlation showed that Cd, Cr, and Hg were mainly derived from inorganic fertilizers, whereas Pb and As were primarily from organic manures. These results suggest that the effect of anthropogenic activities on paddy fields is more serious than on dry lands. Parent materials not only serve as sources of soil trace elements but also control the loss and accumulation of trace elements by affecting soil physicochemical properties, especially in dry lands. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  16. LINE-1 Retrotransposable Element DNA Accumulates in HIV-1-Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E.; Buzdin, Anton A.; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V.; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Ostrowski, Mario A.

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4+ cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity. PMID:24089548

  17. Accumulation and distribution of metallic elements and metalloids in edible Amanita fulva mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Drewnowska, Małgorzata; Chudzińska, Maria; Barałkiewicz, Danuta

    2017-03-01

    Baseline concentrations of Ag, Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sr, Tl, V, U and Zn were presented in Amanita fulva collected from unpolluted areas in Poland. There is no previous data published on the bio-element constituents of A. fulva. A very narrow range of values was determined by ICP-DRC-MS and ICP-AES for the trace elements Ag, Co, Cu, Cr, Ni, Rb, Sr, Tl and Zn in caps and of Ag, Co, Cu, Mn, Ni, Sr, U and Zn in stipes and also for the macro elements K, P, Na and Mg. The fruitbodies of A. fulva from the northern (Baltic Sea coastal forests) and southwestern (Lower Silesia forests) sites differed substantially in cadmium, lead and uranium, and those from the Lower Silesia region showed them in greater concentrations. This observation may imply that A. fulva under typical geochemical site conditions is able to regulate the accumulation of many of the elements mentioned in fruiting bodies.

  18. LINE-1 retrotransposable element DNA accumulates in HIV-1-infected cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, R Brad; Song, Haihan; Xu, Yang; Garrison, Keith E; Buzdin, Anton A; Anwar, Naveed; Hunter, Diana V; Mujib, Shariq; Mihajlovic, Vesna; Martin, Eric; Lee, Erika; Kuciak, Monika; Raposo, Rui André Saraiva; Bozorgzad, Ardalan; Meiklejohn, Duncan A; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Ostrowski, Mario A

    2013-12-01

    Type 1 long-interspersed nuclear elements (L1s) are autonomous retrotransposable elements that retain the potential for activity in the human genome but are suppressed by host factors. Retrotransposition of L1s into chromosomal DNA can lead to genomic instability, whereas reverse transcription of L1 in the cytosol has the potential to activate innate immune sensors. We hypothesized that HIV-1 infection would compromise cellular control of L1 elements, resulting in the induction of retrotransposition events. Here, we show that HIV-1 infection enhances L1 retrotransposition in Jurkat cells in a Vif- and Vpr-dependent manner. In primary CD4(+) cells, HIV-1 infection results in the accumulation of L1 DNA, at least the majority of which is extrachromosomal. These data expose an unrecognized interaction between HIV-1 and endogenous retrotransposable elements, which may have implications for the innate immune response to HIV-1 infection, as well as for HIV-1-induced genomic instability and cytopathicity.

  19. A new fungal isolate, Penidiella sp. strain T9, accumulates the rare earth element dysprosium.

    PubMed

    Horiike, Takumi; Yamashita, Mitsuo

    2015-05-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions.

  20. A New Fungal Isolate, Penidiella sp. Strain T9, Accumulates the Rare Earth Element Dysprosium

    PubMed Central

    Horiike, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    With an aim to develop a highly efficient method for the recovery of rare earth elements (REEs) by using microorganisms, we attempted to isolate dysprosium (Dy)-accumulating microorganisms that grow under acidic conditions from environmental samples containing high concentrations of heavy metals. One acidophilic strain, T9, which was isolated from an abandoned mine, decreased the concentration of Dy in medium that contained 100 mg/liter Dy to 53 mg/liter Dy after 3 days of cultivation at pH 2.5. The Dy content in the cell pellet of the T9 strain was 910 μg/mg of dry cells. The T9 strain also accumulated other REEs. Based on the results of 28S-D1/D2 rRNA gene sequencing and morphological characterization, we designated this fungal strain Penidiella sp. T9. Bioaccumulation of Dy was observed on the cell surface of the T9 strain by elemental mapping using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Our results indicate that Penidiella sp. T9 has the potential to recover REEs such as Dy from mine drainage and industrial liquid waste under acidic conditions. PMID:25710372

  1. Accumulation of metallic elements by Amanita muscaria from rural lowland and industrial upland regions.

    PubMed

    Lipka, Krzysztof; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2017-03-04

    This study was carried out on the accumulation and occurrence of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Rb, Sr and Zn in the mushroom Amanita muscaria and forest topsoil from two lowland sites in the Tuchola Pinewoods in the north-central region and an upland site in the Świetokrzyskie Mountains in the south-central region of Poland. Topsoil from the upland location showed Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, Na and Zn at significantly higher concentration levels (pseudo-total fraction and often also the labile or extractable fraction) than at both lowland locations, where topsoil was richer in Mg, and similar in Rb. Amanita muscaria from the upland region differed from individuals collected in the lowland sites by higher concentration levels of Cd, Cu, Hg and Mn in caps. This could be related to higher concentration levels of the metallic elements in topsoil in the upland region. On other side, A. muscaria from the upland site was poorer in Co and Fe in caps, and in Ca, Co, Fe and Sr in stipes. In spite of the differences in content of the geogenic metallic elements in topsoil between the lowland and upland locations, A. muscaria from both regions was able to regulate uptake and accumulation of Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, K, Mg, Na, Rb and Zn, which were at similar concentration levels in caps but not necessarily in stipes.

  2. Growth and elemental accumulation by canola on soil amended with coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Murray, B.R.; Nissanka, S.P.

    2008-05-15

    To explore the agronomic potential of an Australian coal fly ash, we conducted two glasshouse experiments in which we measured chlorophyll fluorescence, CO{sub 2} assimilation (A), transpiration, stomatal conductance, biomass accumulation, seed yield, and elemental uptake for canola (Brassica napus) grown on soil amended with an alkaline fly ash. In Experiment 1, application of up to 25 Mg/ha of fly ash increased A and plant weight early in the season before flowering and seed yield by up to 21%. However, at larger rates of ash application A, plant growth, chlorophyll concentration, and yield were all reduced. Increases in early vigor and seed yield were associated with enhanced uptake of phosphorus (P) by the plants treated with fly ash. Fly ash application did not influence accumulation of B, Cu, Mo, or Zn in the stems at any stage of plant growth or in the seed at harvest, except Mo concentration, which was elevated in the seed. Accumulation of these elements was mostly in the leaves, where concentrations of Cu and Mo increased with any amount of ash applied while that of B occurred only with ash applied at 625 Mg/ha. In Experiment 2, fly ash applied at 500 Mg/ha and mixed into the whole 30 cm soil core was detrimental to growth and yield of canola, compared with restricting mixing to 5 or 15 cm depth. In contrast, application of ash at 250 Mg/ha with increasing depth of mixing increased A and seed yield. We concluded that fly ash applied at not more than 25 Mg/ha and mixed into the top 10 to 15 cm of soil is sufficient to obtain yield benefits.

  3. Elemental Sulfur and Thiol Accumulation in Tomato and Defense against a Fungal Vascular Pathogen1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jane S.; Hall, Sharon A.; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Beale, Michael H.; Cooper, Richard M.

    2002-01-01

    The occurrence of fungicidal, elemental S is well documented in certain specialized prokaryotes, but has rarely been detected in eukaryotes. Elemental S was first identified in this laboratory as a novel phytoalexin in the xylem of resistant genotypes of Theobroma cacao, after infection by the vascular, fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae. In the current work, this phenomenon is demonstrated in a resistant line of tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, in response to V. dahliae. A novel gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy method using isotope dilution analysis with 34S internal standard was developed to identify unambiguously and quantify 32S in samples of excised xylem. Accumulation of S in vascular tissue was more rapid and much greater in the disease-resistant than in the disease-susceptible line. Levels of S detected in the resistant variety (approximately 10 μg g−1 fresh weight excised xylem) were fungitoxic to V. dahliae (spore germination was inhibited >90% at approximately 3 μg mL−1). Scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive x-ray microanalysis confirmed accumulation of S in vascular but not in pith cells and in greater amounts and frequency in the Verticillium spp.-resistant genotype. More intensive localizations of S were occasionally detected in xylem parenchyma cells, vessel walls, vascular gels, and tyloses, structures in potential contact with and linked with defense to V. dahliae. Transient increases in concentrations of sulfate, glutathione, and Cys of vascular tissues from resistant but not susceptible lines after infection may indicate a perturbation of S metabolism induced by elemental S formation; this is discussed in terms of possible S biogenesis. PMID:11788760

  4. Transport and accumulation of radionuclides and stable elements in a Missouri River Reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Callendar, Edward; Robbins, John A.

    1993-01-01

    Several long sediment cores from the Cheyenne River Embayment of Lake Oahe, a 250-km-long Missouri River reservoir in South Dakota, have been analyzed for radionuclides and stable elements. The combination of fine-scale sampling and rapid sedimentation produces radionuclide distributions that can be used to estimate the detailed chronology of particle transport processes in the Oahe reservoir system. A self-consistent and quantitative treatment of the 137Cs data suggests processes to which characteristic times may be associated. Times that characterize system-wide processes include (1) an integration time of several years reflecting retention of the sediment-bound tracer in regions within or external to the reservoir, (2) a relaxation time of approximately 15 years reflecting a decreasing rate of sediment accumulation ascribed to shoreline stabilization, (3) a time of a few months characterizing the breadth of riverine signatures in cores due to integration effects in the Cheyenne River system and deltaic deposits, and (4) times of a few years associated with propagation of riverine load signatures along the embayment. The distribution of total sedimentary arsenic confirms the validity of the variable sedimentation model. In 1977, a tailings retention facility was built at the Homestake Mine site, and the unrestricted input of As ceased. As a result of this remedial action, the concentration of sedimentary As decreased dramatically. In the upper section of the core, above the depth represented by the year 1976, the concentration of As decreases tenfold. In this same core the distribution of lithologically discriminating chemical elements, calcium and vanadium, relate to major flow events in the Cheyenne River basin. Because there is minimal diagenesis of chemical constituents in these rapidly accumulating sediments, stable element signatures, in addition to radiotracers, may be used to reconstruct hydrologic events in drainage basins that contribute sediment to

  5. Chromatographic separation of platinum group metals from simulated high level liquid waste using macroporous silica-based adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanlai; Kim, Seong-Yun; Ito, Tatsuya; Tokuda, Haruki; Hitomi, Keitaro; Ishii, Keizo

    2013-10-18

    To separate platinum group metals (PGMs) from high level liquid waste, three novel macroporous silica-based adsorbents, namely, (Crea+Dodec)/SiO2-P, (Crea+TOA)/SiO2-P and (MOTDGA+TOA)/SiO2-P, were synthesized by introducing extractants Crea (N',N'-di-n-hexyl-thiodiglycolamide), TOA (Tri-n-octylamine), MOTDGA (N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-di-n-octyl-thiodiglycolamide) along with theirs modifier, Dodec (n-dodecyl alcohol), into 50μm diameter SiO2-P particles by impregnation. Chromatographic separation of PGMs from simulated high level liquid waste was investigated by column method. It was found that 100% of Pd(II) and Re(VII) could be eluted out from simulate HLLW in 3.0M HNO3 solution using three adsorbents. For Ru(III) and Rh(III), high temperature has distinct effect on the adsorption rate and a further study for Ru(III) and Rh(III) is necessary to separate them from HLLW completely. In all six column experiments, a relatively satisfactory chromatographic separation operating for PGMs from simulated HLLW was obtained using (Crea+TOA)/SiO2-P adsorbent packed column at 323K.

  6. Assessing Economic Modulation of Future Critical Materials Use: The Case of Automotive-Related Platinum Group Metals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingshu; Everson, Mark P; Wallington, Timothy J; Field, Frank R; Roth, Richard; Kirchain, Randolph E

    2016-07-19

    Platinum-group metals (PGMs) are technological and economic enablers of many industrial processes. This important role, coupled with their limited geographic availability, has led to PGMs being labeled as "critical materials". Studies of future PGM flows have focused on trends within material flows or macroeconomic indicators. We complement the previous work by introducing a novel technoeconomic model of substitution among PGMs within the automotive sector (the largest user of PGMs) reflecting the rational response of firms to changing prices. The results from the model support previous conclusions that PGM use is likely to grow, in some cases strongly, by 2030 (approximately 45% for Pd and 5% for Pt), driven by the increasing sales of automobiles. The model also indicates that PGM-demand growth will be significantly influenced by the future Pt-to-Pd price ratio, with swings of Pt and Pd demand of as much as 25% if the future price ratio shifts higher or lower even if it stays within the historic range. Fortunately, automotive catalysts are one of the more effectively recycled metals. As such, with proper policy support, recycling can serve to meet some of this growing demand.

  7. Electrochemical study on the adsorption of carbon oxides and oxidation of their adsorption products on platinum group metals and alloys.

    PubMed

    Siwek, Hanna; Lukaszewski, Mariusz; Czerwiński, Andrzej

    2008-07-07

    CO(2) reduction and CO adsorption on noble metals (Pt, Rh, Pd) and their alloys (Pt-Rh, Pd-Pt, Pd-Rh, Pd-Pt-Rh) prepared as thin rough deposits have been studied by chronoamperometry (CA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The influence of alloy surface composition on the values of surface coverage, eps (electron per site) and potential of the oxidation of CO(2) reduction and CO adsorption products is shown. The oxidation of the adsorbate on Pt-Rh alloys proceeds more easily (at lower potentials) than on pure metals. On the other hand, in the case of Pd-Pt and Pd-Rh alloys the adsorbate oxidation is more difficult and requires higher potentials than on Pt or Rh. The analysis of the EQCM signal is presented for the case of adsorption and oxidation of carbon oxide adsorption products on the electrodes studied. The comparison of adsorption parameters and the EQCM response obtained for platinum group metals and alloys leads to the conclusion that reduced CO(2) cannot be totally identified with adsorbed CO.

  8. Determination of platinum group metal catalyst residues in active pharmaceutical ingredients by means of total reflection X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-08-01

    The control of metal catalyst residues (i.e., platinum group metals (PGMs)) in different stages of the manufacturing processes of the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) and, especially, in the final product is crucial. For API specimens, there are strict guidelines to limit the levels of metal residues based on their individual levels of safety concern. For PGMs the concentration limit has been established at 10 mg/kg in the API. Therefore great effort is currently being devoted to the development of new and simple procedures to control metals in pharmaceuticals. In the present work, an analytical methodology based on benchtop total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) has been developed for the rapid and simple determination of some PGM catalyst impurities (Rh, Pd, Ir and Pt) in different types of API samples. An evaluation of different sample treatments (dissolution and digestion of the solid pharmaceutical samples) has been carried out and the developed methodologies have been validated according to the analytical parameters to be considered and acceptance criteria for PGM determination according to the United States Pharmacopeia (USP). Limits of quantification obtained for PGM metals were in the range of 2-4 mg/kg which are satisfactory according to current legislation. From the obtained results it is shown that the developed TXRF method can be implemented in the pharmaceutical industries to increase productivity of the laboratory; offering an interesting and complementary analytical tool to other atomic spectroscopic methods.

  9. Elements uptake by metal accumulator species grown on mine tailings amended with three types of biochar.

    PubMed

    Fellet, G; Marmiroli, M; Marchiol, L

    2014-01-15

    Mine tailings are of great concern due to the risk their toxic inorganic elements pose to the environment. The application of biochar as an amendment may be a solution to reduce the risk of pollutant diffusion. The main purpose of the research was to verify the effects of different types of biochar produced from different feedstocks (pruning residues, fir tree pellets and manure pellets) on changing the substrate conditions to promote plant growth for the phytostabilization of mine tailings. The SEM/EDX characterization showed different structures in terms of porosity and granulosity as well as the element composition. The plants used in the pot experiment were Anthyllis vulneraria subsp. polyphylla (Dc.) Nyman, Noccaea rotundifolium (L.) Moench subsp. cepaeifolium and Poa alpina L. subsp. alpina. The biochars were applied at three doses: 0, 1.5 and 3%dw. Although to different extents, the biochars induced significant changes of the substrates in terms of pH, EC, CEC and bioavailability of the metals. The biochar from manure pellets and pruning residues reduced shoot Cd and Pb accumulations. The former also led to a higher biomass production that peaked at the1.5% dose. Biochar has great potential as an amendment for phytoremediation but its effects depend on the type of feedstock it derives from. The characteristics of the substrate to be treated are crucial for the biochar selection. © 2013.

  10. Accumulation of particulate matter and trace elements on vegetation as affected by pollution level, rainfall and the passage of time.

    PubMed

    Przybysz, A; Sæbø, A; Hanslin, H M; Gawroński, S W

    2014-05-15

    Particulate matter is harmful to human health. To reduce its concentration in air, plants could be used as biological filters, accumulating particulate matter on their foliage. In a study carried out at three sites with differing pollution levels and exposure to precipitation, the capacity of evergreen species (Taxus baccata L., Hedera helix L. and Pinus sylvestris L.) to accumulate particulate matter and trace elements from ambient air in urban areas was investigated. The effects of rainfall and the passage of time on particulate matter deposition on foliage were also determined. The results showed that foliage accumulated an increasing quantity of particulate matter in successive months, but the actual amount of particulate matter and trace elements accumulated differed considerably between sites and plant species. The greatest accumulation of air pollutants occurred on the foliage of plants protected from the rain at a site exposed to traffic related pollution and the smallest accumulation at a rural site. Among the species analysed, the deposited mass of particulate matter and trace elements was the greatest on P. sylvestris. In all species, precipitation removed a considerable proportion of particles accumulated on foliage. Most of the removed particulate matter was large size fraction, but little belong to the smallest size fraction. These results showed that both, the dynamics of deposition and leaf washing by rain during the season need to be considered when evaluating the total effect of vegetation in pollutant remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Accumulation of biomass and mineral elements with calendar time by corn: application of the expanded growth model.

    PubMed

    Overman, Allen R; Scholtz, Richard V

    2011-01-01

    The expanded growth model is developed to describe accumulation of plant biomass (Mg ha(-1)) and mineral elements (kg ha(-1)) in with calendar time (wk). Accumulation of plant biomass with calendar time occurs as a result of photosynthesis for green land-based plants. A corresponding accumulation of mineral elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium occurs from the soil through plant roots. In this analysis, the expanded growth model is tested against high quality, published data on corn (Zea mays L.) growth. Data from a field study in South Carolina was used to evaluate the application of the model, where the planting time of April 2 in the field study maximized the capture of solar energy for biomass production. The growth model predicts a simple linear relationship between biomass yield and the growth quantifier, which is confirmed with the data. The growth quantifier incorporates the unit processes of distribution of solar energy which drives biomass accumulation by photosynthesis, partitioning of biomass between light-gathering and structural components of the plants, and an aging function. A hyperbolic relationship between plant nutrient uptake and biomass yield is assumed, and is confirmed for the mineral elements nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). It is concluded that the rate limiting process in the system is biomass accumulation by photosynthesis and that nutrient accumulation occurs in virtual equilibrium with biomass accumulation.

  12. Accumulation of biomass and mineral elements with calendar time by cotton: application of the expanded growth model.

    PubMed

    Overman, Allen R; Scholtz, Richard V

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of plant biomass (Mg ha(-1)) with calendar time (wk) occurs as a result of photosynthesis for green land-based plants. A corresponding accumulation of mineral elements (kg ha(-1)) such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium occurs from the soil through plant roots. Field data from literature for the warm-season annual cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) are used in this analysis. The expanded growth model is used to describe accumulation of biomass and mineral elements with calendar time. The growth model predicts a simple linear relationship between biomass yield and the growth quantifier, which is confirmed with the data. The growth quantifier incorporates the unit processes of distribution of solar energy which drives biomass accumulation by photosynthesis, partitioning of biomass between light-gathering and structural components of the plants, and an aging function. A hyperbolic relationship between plant nutrient uptake and biomass yield is assumed, and is confirmed for the mineral elements nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. It is concluded that the rate limiting process in the system is biomass accumulation by photosynthesis and that nutrient accumulation occurs in virtual equilibrium with biomass accumulation. The expanded growth model describes field data from California and Alabama rather well. Furthermore, all model parameters were common for the two sites with the exception of the yield factor A which accounts for differences in soil types, environmental conditions, fertilizer levels, and plant population.

  13. Accumulation of Biomass and Mineral Elements with Calendar Time by Corn: Application of the Expanded Growth Model

    PubMed Central

    Overman, Allen R.; Scholtz, Richard V.

    2011-01-01

    The expanded growth model is developed to describe accumulation of plant biomass (Mg ha−1) and mineral elements (kg ha−1) in with calendar time (wk). Accumulation of plant biomass with calendar time occurs as a result of photosynthesis for green land-based plants. A corresponding accumulation of mineral elements such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium occurs from the soil through plant roots. In this analysis, the expanded growth model is tested against high quality, published data on corn (Zea mays L.) growth. Data from a field study in South Carolina was used to evaluate the application of the model, where the planting time of April 2 in the field study maximized the capture of solar energy for biomass production. The growth model predicts a simple linear relationship between biomass yield and the growth quantifier, which is confirmed with the data. The growth quantifier incorporates the unit processes of distribution of solar energy which drives biomass accumulation by photosynthesis, partitioning of biomass between light-gathering and structural components of the plants, and an aging function. A hyperbolic relationship between plant nutrient uptake and biomass yield is assumed, and is confirmed for the mineral elements nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K). It is concluded that the rate limiting process in the system is biomass accumulation by photosynthesis and that nutrient accumulation occurs in virtual equilibrium with biomass accumulation. PMID:22194842

  14. Biomonitoring of genotoxic effects and elemental accumulation derived from air pollution in community urban gardens.

    PubMed

    Amato-Lourenco, Luís Fernando; Lobo, Debora Jã A; Guimarães, Eliane T; Moreira, Tiana Carla Lopes; Carvalho-Oliveira, Regiani; Saiki, Mitiko; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Mauad, Thais

    2017-01-01

    Urban gardening is a growing global phenomenon with a positive impact on society. Despite several associated benefits, growing vegetables in urban gardens that are localized in highly polluted areas poses questions about the safety of the produced food. Therefore, the identification of risk factors that result in possible deleterious effects to human health is important for realizing all of the benefits to society. We evaluated the use of two biomonitoring methods in ten urban gardens of Sao Paulo city and one control site: the micronuclei frequencies for early tetrads of Tradescantia pallida (Rose) Hunt. cv. "Purpurea" Boom (hereafter, Trad-MCN) as a short-term indicator of genotoxic response and tree barks to quantify the accumulation of traffic-related chemical elements as a long-term biomarker of air pollution in urban gardens. Mature plants of Tradescantia pallida were exposed in each garden, and their inflorescences were sampled over three months. A random set of 300 early tetrads in 13 to 21 slides per garden were evaluated for micronuclei frequencies. Elemental concentrations in 428 tree barks samples from 107 different trees in the areas surrounding urban gardens were quantified using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. The frequency of Trad-MCN has a significant correlation with traffic variables and chemical elements related to road dust and tailpipe emissions deposited in tree barks. Negative associations between Trad-MCN and both the distance through traffic and the presence of vertical obstacles were observed in the community gardens. The Mn/Zn concentrations in tree barks were associated with increased Trad-MCN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluating the abnormal ossification in tibiotarsi of developing chick embryos exposed to 1.0ppm doses of platinum group metals by spectroscopic techniques.

    PubMed

    Stahler, Adam C; Monahan, Jennifer L; Dagher, Jessica M; Baker, Joshua D; Markopoulos, Marjorie M; Iragena, Diane B; NeJame, Britney M; Slaughter, Robert; Felker, Daniel; Burggraf, Larry W; Isaac, Leon A C; Grossie, David; Gagnon, Zofia E; Sizemore, Ioana E Pavel

    2013-04-01

    Platinum group metals (PGMs), i.e., palladium (Pd), platinum (Pt) and rhodium (Rh), are found at pollutant levels in the environment and are known to accumulate in plant and animal tissues. However, little is known about PGM toxicity. Our previous studies showed that chick embryos exposed to PGM concentrations of 1mL of 5.0ppm (LD50) and higher exhibited severe skeletal deformities. This work hypothesized that 1.0ppm doses of PGMs will negatively impact the mineralization process in tibiotarsi. One milliliter of 1.0ppm of Pd(II), Pt(IV), Rh(III) aqueous salt solutions and a PGM-mixture were injected into the air sac on the 7th and 14th day of incubation. Control groups with no-injection and vehicle injections were included. On the 20th day, embryos were sacrificed to analyze the PGM effects on tibiotarsi using four spectroscopic techniques. 1) Micro-Raman imaging: Hyperspectral Raman data were collected on paraffin embedded cross-sections of tibiotarsi, and processed using in-house-written MATLAB codes. Micro-Raman univariate images that were created from the ν1(PO4(3-)) integrated areas revealed anomalous mineral inclusions within the bone marrow for the PGM-mixture treatment. The age of the mineral crystals (ν(CO3(2-))/ν1(PO4(3-))) was statistically lower for all treatments when compared to controls (p≤0.05). 2) FAAS: The percent calcium content of the chemically digested tibiotarsi in the Pd and Pt groups changed by ~45% with respect to the no-injection control (16.1±0.2%). 3) Micro-XRF imaging: Abnormal calcium and phosphorus inclusions were found within the inner longitudinal sections of tibiotarsi for the PGM-mixture treatment. A clear increase in the mineral content was observed for the outer sections of the Pd treatment. 4) ICP-OES: PGM concentrations in tibiotarsi were undetectable (<5ppb). The spectroscopic techniques gave corroborating results, confirmed the hypothesis, and explained the observed pathological (skeletal developmental abnormalities

  16. Assessment of trace element accumulation by earthworms in an orchard soil remediation study using soil amendments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Centofantia, Tiziana; Chaney, Rufus L.; Beyer, W. Nelson; McConnell, Laura L.; Davis, A. P.; Jackson, Dana

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed potential bioaccumulation of various trace elements in grasses and earthworms as a consequence of soil incorporation of organic amendments for in situ remediation of an orchard field soil contaminated with organochlorine and Pb pesticide residues. In this experiment, four organic amendments of differing total organic carbon content and quality (two types of composted manure, composted biosolids, and biochar) were added to a contaminated orchard field soil, planted with two types of grasses, and tested for their ability to reduce bioaccumulation of organochlorine pesticides and metals in earthworms. The experiment was carried out in 4-L soil microcosms in a controlled environment for 90 days. After 45 days of orchardgrass or perennial ryegrass growth, Lumbricus terrestris L. were introduced to the microcosms and exposed to the experimental soils for 45 days before the experiment was ended. Total trace element concentrations in the added organic amendments were below recommended safe levels and their phytoavailablity and earthworm availability remained low during a 90-day bioremediation study. At the end of the experiment, total tissue concentrations of Cu, Cd, Mn, Pb, and Zn in earthworms and grasses were below recommended safe levels. Total concentrations of Pb in test soil were similar to maximum background levels of Pb recorded in soils in the Eastern USA (100 mg kg−1 d.w.) because of previous application of orchard pesticides. Addition of aged dairy manure compost and presence of grasses was effective in reducing the accumulation of soil-derived Pb in earthworms, thus reducing the risk of soil Pb entry into wildlife food chains.

  17. Accumulation of trace elements and organochlorines by surf scoters wintering in the Pacific northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Henny, C.J.; Blus, L.J.; Grove, R.A.; Thompson, S.P.

    1991-01-01

    Selenium, cadmium, mercury, copper, manganese, zinc, aluminum, lead, PCBs and DDE were accumulated by segments of the surf scoter (Melanitta perspicillata) population that winters in the Pacific Northwest, but whether the uptake occurred on breeding and/or wintering grounds was uncertain for some contaminants. Surf scoters collected in Puget Sound and San Francisco Bay (in another study) during the same period (January 1985) contained similar concentrations of cadmium, but Alsea Bay scoters contained more. Cadmium was inversely related to both liver and body weights of Northwest scoters in January; similar weight losses were reported in experimental laboratory studies. Northwest and north San Francisco Bay scoters contained similar mercury concentrations, but those in south San Francisco Bay contained higher concentrations. San Francisco Bay scoters contained higher arsenic and selenium concentrations than those in the Northwest; however, the 43.4 ppm (geometric mean, dry wt) selenium in livers at Commencement Bay in January was above levels associated with the reproductive problems in aquatic birds at Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge. Even higher concentrations of some elements may be found in surf scoters in March, because a later collection (March) at San Francisco Bay yielded higher concentrations than found there in January. Trace element concentrations in birds at a given wintering location are variable among species and may be influenced by diet, breeding grounds, and physiology (e.g., at Commencement Bay surf scoters with a sediment-associated diet contained 50X more cadmium in their kidneys than did fish-eating western grebes [Aechmophorus occidentalis]). The numerous wildlife species that live on estuaries require further attention.

  18. Materials discovery by crystal growth: Lanthanide metal containing oxides of the platinum group metals (Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, Pd, Pt) from molten alkali metal hydroxides

    SciTech Connect

    Mugavero, Samuel J.; Gemmill, William R.; Roof, Irina P.; Loye, Hans-Conrad zur

    2009-07-15

    This review addresses the process of materials discovery via crystal growth, specifically of lanthanide metal containing oxides of the platinum group metals (Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, Pd, Pt). It provides a detailed overview of the use of hydroxide fluxes for crystal growth. The melt chemistry of hydroxide fluxes, specifically, the extensive acid base chemistry, the metal cation solubility, and the ability of hydroxide melts to oxidize metals are described. Furthermore, a general methodology for the successful crystal growth of oxides is provided, including a discussion of experimental considerations, suitable reaction vessels, reaction profiles and temperature ranges. Finally, a compilation of complex platinum group metal oxides recently synthesized using hydroxide melts, focusing on their crystal growth and crystal structures, is included. - Graphical abstract: A review that addresses the process of materials discovery via crystal growth using hydroxide fluxes. It provides a detailed overview of the use of hydroxide fluxes for crystal growth and describes the melt chemistry of hydroxide fluxes, specifically, the extensive acid base chemistry, the metal cation solubility, and the ability of hydroxide melts to oxidize metals. In addition, a compilation of complex platinum group metal oxides recently synthesized using hydroxide melts is included.

  19. Trace element differentiation in ferruginous accumulation soil patterns under tropical rainforest of southern Cameroon, the role of climatic change.

    PubMed

    Temgoua, Emile; Pfeifer, Hans-Rudolf; Bitom, Dieudonné

    2003-03-01

    Regions under tropical rainforest cover, such as central Africa and Brazil are characterised by degradation and dismantling of old ferricrete structures. In southern Cameroon, these processes are relayed by present-day ferruginous accumulation soil facies, situated on the middle and the lower part of hill slopes. These facies become progressively harder towards the surface, containing from bottom to top, mainly kaolinite, kaolinite-goethite and Al-rich goethite-hematite, and are discontinuous to the relictic hematite-dominated ferricrete that exist in the upper part of the hill slope. These features were investigated in terms of geochemical differentiation of trace elements. It appears that, in contrast to the old ferricrete facies, the current ferruginous accumulations are enriched in transitional trace elements (V, Cr, Co, Y, Sc) and Pb, while alkali-earth elements are less differentiated. This recent chemical accumulation is controlled both by intense weathering of the granodiorite bedrock and by mobilisation of elements previously accumulated in the old ferricrete. The observed processes are clearly linked to the present-day humid climate with rising groundwater tables. They slowly replace the old ferricretes formed during Cretaceous time under more seasonal climatic conditions, representing an instructive case of continuos global change.

  20. Trace element accumulation in hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) and green turtles (Chelonia mydas) from Yaeyama Islands, Japan.

    PubMed

    Anan, Y; Kunito, T; Watanabe, I; Sakai, H; Tanabe, S

    2001-12-01

    Concentrations of 18 trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) were determined in the liver, kidney, and muscle of green turtles (Chelonia mydas) and hawksbill turtles (Eretmochelys imbricata) from Yaeyama Islands, Okinawa, Japan. Accumulation features of trace elements in the three tissues were similar between green and hawksbill turtles. No gender differences in trace element accumulation in liver and kidney were found for most of the elements. Significant growth-dependent variations were found in concentrations of some elements in tissues of green and hawksbill turtles. Significant negative correlations (p < 0.05) were found between standard carapace length (SCL) and the concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Se in the kidney and V in muscle of green turtles and Mn in the liver, Rb and Ag in kidney, and Hg in muscle of hawksbill turtles. Concentrations of Sr, Mo, Ag, Sb, and Tl in the liver, Sb in kidney, and Sb and Ba in muscle of green turtles and Se and Hg in the liver and Co, Se, and Hg in kidney of hawksbill turtles increased with an increase in SCL (p < 0.05). Green and hawksbill turtles accumulated extremely high concentrations of Cu in the liver and Cd in kidney, whereas the levels of Hg in liver were low in comparison with those of other higher-trophic-level marine animals. High accumulation of Ag in the liver of green turtles was also observed. To evaluate the trophic transfer of trace elements, concentrations of trace elements were determined in stomach contents of green and hawksbill turtles. A remarkably high trophic transfer coefficient was found for Ag and Cd in green turtles and for Cd and Hg in hawksbill turtles.

  1. Accumulation of neurotoxic organochlorines and trace elements in brain of female European eel (Anguilla anguilla).

    PubMed

    Bonnineau, C; Scaion, D; Lemaire, B; Belpaire, C; Thomé, J-P; Thonon, M; Leermaker, M; Gao, Y; Debier, C; Silvestre, F; Kestemont, P; Rees, J-F

    2016-07-01

    Xenobiotics such as organochlorine compounds (OCs) and metals have been suggested to play a significant role in the collapse of European eel stocks in the last decades. Several of these pollutants could affect functioning of the nervous system. Still, no information is so far available on levels of potentially neurotoxic pollutants in eel brain. In present study, carried out on female eels caught in Belgian rivers and canals, we analyzed brain levels of potentially-neurotoxic trace elements (Ag, Al, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, MeHg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Sb, Zn) and OCs (Polychlorinated biphenyls, PCBs; Hexachlorocyclohexanes, HCHs; Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites, DDTs). Data were compared to levels in liver and muscle tissues. Eel brain contained very high amounts of OCs, superior to those found in the two other tissues. Interestingly, the relative abundance of PCB congeners markedly differed between tissues. In brain, a predominance of low chlorinated PCBs was noted, whereas highly chlorinated congeners prevailed in muscle and liver. HCHs were particularly abundant in brain, which contains the highest amounts of β-HCH and ϒ-HCH. p,p'-DDTs concentration was similar between brain and muscle (i.e., about twice that of liver). A higher proportion of p,p'-DDT was noticed in brain. Except for Cr and inorganic Hg, all potentially neurotoxic metals accumulated in brain to levels equal to or lower than hepatic levels. Altogether, results indicate that eel brain is an important target for organic and, to a lesser extent, for inorganic neurotoxic pollutants.

  2. Expression of Genes for Si Uptake, Accumulation, and Correlation of Si with Other Elements in Ionome of Maize Kernel.

    PubMed

    Bokor, Boris; Ondoš, Slavomír; Vaculík, Marek; Bokorová, Silvia; Weidinger, Marieluise; Lichtscheidl, Irene; Turňa, Ján; Lux, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The mineral composition of cells, tissues, and organs is decisive for the functioning of the organisms, and is at the same time an indicator for understanding of physiological processes. We measured the composition of the ionome in the different tissues of maize kernels by element microanalysis, with special emphasis on silicon (Si). We therefore also measured the expression levels of the Si transporter genes ZmLsi1, ZmLsi2 and ZmLsi6, responsible for Si uptake and accumulation. Two weeks after pollination ZmLsi1 and ZmLsi6 genes were expressed, and expression continued until the final developmental stage of the kernels, while ZmLsi2 was not expressed. These results suggest that exclusively ZmLsi1 and ZmLsi6 are responsible for Si transport in various stages of kernel development. Expression level of ZmLsi genes was consistent with Si accumulation within kernel tissues. Silicon was mainly accumulated in pericarp and embryo proper and the lowest Si content was detected in soft endosperm and the scutellum. Correlation linkages between the distribution of Si and some other elements (macroelements Mg, P, S, N, P, and Ca and microelements Cl, Zn, and Fe) were found. The relation of Si with Mg was detected in all kernel tissues. The Si linkage with other elements was rather specific and found only in certain kernel tissues of maize. These relations may have effect on nutrient uptake and accumulation.

  3. Expression of Genes for Si Uptake, Accumulation, and Correlation of Si with Other Elements in Ionome of Maize Kernel

    PubMed Central

    Bokor, Boris; Ondoš, Slavomír; Vaculík, Marek; Bokorová, Silvia; Weidinger, Marieluise; Lichtscheidl, Irene; Turňa, Ján; Lux, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The mineral composition of cells, tissues, and organs is decisive for the functioning of the organisms, and is at the same time an indicator for understanding of physiological processes. We measured the composition of the ionome in the different tissues of maize kernels by element microanalysis, with special emphasis on silicon (Si). We therefore also measured the expression levels of the Si transporter genes ZmLsi1, ZmLsi2 and ZmLsi6, responsible for Si uptake and accumulation. Two weeks after pollination ZmLsi1 and ZmLsi6 genes were expressed, and expression continued until the final developmental stage of the kernels, while ZmLsi2 was not expressed. These results suggest that exclusively ZmLsi1 and ZmLsi6 are responsible for Si transport in various stages of kernel development. Expression level of ZmLsi genes was consistent with Si accumulation within kernel tissues. Silicon was mainly accumulated in pericarp and embryo proper and the lowest Si content was detected in soft endosperm and the scutellum. Correlation linkages between the distribution of Si and some other elements (macroelements Mg, P, S, N, P, and Ca and microelements Cl, Zn, and Fe) were found. The relation of Si with Mg was detected in all kernel tissues. The Si linkage with other elements was rather specific and found only in certain kernel tissues of maize. These relations may have effect on nutrient uptake and accumulation. PMID:28674553

  4. Comparison of elemental accumulation rates between ferromanganese deposits and sediments in the South Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.; Schornick, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of accumulation of Fe and Mn, as well as Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn, Hg, U and Th have been determined for five ferromanganese deposits from four localities in the South Pacific Ocean. Manganese is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate roughly equivalent to that found to be accumulating in sediments in the same area. Iron shows a deficiency in accumulation in nodules and crusts with respect to sediments, especially near the continents, but also in the central and south-central Pacific. Copper is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate one order of magnitude less than the surrounding sediments. This is interpreted as meaning that most of the Mn is supplied as an authigenic phase to both sediments and nodules while Fe is supplied mostly by ferromanganese micro-nodules and by detrital and adsorbed components of sediments; and Cu is enriched in sediments relative to nodules and crusts most probably through biological activity. ?? 1974.

  5. Decrease in air pollution load in urban environment of Bratislava (Slovakia) inferred from accumulation of metal elements in lichens.

    PubMed

    Guttová, Anna; Lackovičová, Anna; Pišút, Ivan; Pišút, Peter

    2011-11-01

    The study illustrates the response of epiphytic lichens to changing atmospheric conditions in Central Europe, where the emission of air pollutants has significantly decreased from 1990, in the area in and around Bratislava City. Variation in concentrations of seven metal elements (Cu, Cd, Cr, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) in the thalli of Evernia prunastri, Hypogymnia physodes and Parmelia sulcata is assessed. Samples of these species were exposed in lichen bags in 39 sites throughout the territory of the city (more than 300 km(2)) during the period December 2006-February 2007. The samples were analyzed by AAS for metal element contents prior to and after exposure. The decrease in air pollution (for all studied elements by more than 90%) corresponded to a decrease in the accumulation of elements in lichen thalli, e.g. the contents of Pb decreased by 69% and of Cd by 34% on average. The results show also variations in accumulation between with different lichen species. The background values of metal element contents in thalli of H. physodes growing in situ were measured in semi-natural sites in Slovakia. It is suggested that these can be used as a reference in large-scale monitoring studies in Central Europe. Analysis of compatible data from the current study, and the study performed at the end of 1990s shows a significant decrease of metal elements in the air pollution load.

  6. Trace-element accumulation by Hygrohypnum ochraceum in the upper Rio Grande Basin, Colorado and New Mexico, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, L.F.; Porter, S.D.

    1997-12-01

    Accumulation of 12 trace elements by transplanted aquatic bryophytes (Hygrohypnum ochraceum) was determined at 13 sites in the Rio Grande and tributary streams in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico as part of the US Geological Survey`s National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purposes of the study were to determine the spatial distribution of trace elements in relation to land-use practices in the upper Rio Grande Basin, compare accumulation rates of metals in bryophytes at sites contaminated by trace elements, and evaluate transplanted aquatic bryophytes as a tool for examining the bioavailability of trace elements in relation to concentrations in water and bed sediment. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in bryophytes, water, and bed sediment were significantly higher at sites that receive drainage from mining areas than at sites near agricultural or urban activities. Concentrations of most trace elements were lower in a tributary stream below an urban source than at sites near mining or agricultural use. Concentrations of Cu and Zn in bryophytes correlated with concentrations in water and bed sediment. In addition, bryophyte concentrations of As, Cd, and Pb correlated with concentrations in bed sediment. Transplanted bryophytes can provide an indication of bioavailability. Rates of accumulation were related to the magnitude of ambient trace-element concentrations; maximal uptake occurred during the first 10 d of exposure. Trace-element concentrations in transplanted bryophytes could potentially be used to predict water and sediment concentrations that represent an integration of conditions over short to intermediate lengths of time, rather than instantaneous conditions as measured using water samples.

  7. Trace-element accumulation by Hygrohypnum ochraceum in the upper Rio Grande Basin, Colorado and New Mexico, Usa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.F.; Porter, S.D.

    1997-01-01

    Accumulation of 12 trace elements by transplanted aquatic bryophytes (Hygrohypnum ochraceum) was determined at 13 sites in the Rio Grande and tributary streams in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. The purposes of the study were to determine the spatial distribution of trace elements in relation to land-use practices in the upper Rio Grande Basin, compare accumulation rates of metals in bryophytes at sites contaminated by trace elements, and evaluate transplanted aquatic bryophytes as a tool for examining the bioavailability of trace elements in relation to concentrations in water and bed sediment. Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in bryophytes, water, and bed sediment were significantly higher at sites that receive drainage from mining areas than at sites near agricultural or urban activities. Concentrations of most trace elements were lower in a tributary stream below an urban source than at sites near mining or agricultural use. Concentrations of Cu and Zn in bryophytes correlated with concentrations in water and bed sediment. In addition, bryophyte concentrations of As, Cd, and Pb correlated with concentrations in bed sediment. Transplanted bryophytes can provide an indication of bioavailability. Rates of accumulation were related to the magnitude of ambient trace-element concentrations; maximal uptake occurred during the first 10 d of exposure. Trace-element concentrations in transplanted bryophytes could potentially be used to predict water and sediment concentrations that represent an integration of conditions over short to intermediate lengths of time, rather than instantaneous conditions as measured using water samples.

  8. Accumulation of cadmium, zinc, and copper by Helianthus annuus L.: impact on plant growth and uptake of nutritional elements.

    PubMed

    Rivelli, Anna Rita; De Maria, Susanna; Puschenreiter, Markus; Gherbin, Piergiorgio

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the effects on physiological response, trace elements and nutrients accumulation of sunflower plants grown in soil contaminated with: 5 mg kg(-1) of Cd; 5 and 300 mg kg(-1) of Cd and Zn, respectively; 5, 300, and 400 mg kg(-1) of Cd, Zn, and Cu, respectively. Contaminants applied did not produce large effects on growth, except in Cd-Zn-Cu treatment in which leaf area and total dry matter were reduced, by 15%. The contamination with Cd alone did not affect neither growth nor physiological parameters, despite considerable amounts of Cd accumulated in roots and older leaves, with a high bioconcentration factor from soil to plant. By adding Zn and then Cu to Cd in soil, significant were the toxic effects on chlorophyll content and water relations due to greater accumulation of trace elements in tissues, with imbalances in nutrients uptake. Highly significant was the interaction between shoot elements concentration (Cd, Zn, Cu, Fe, Mg, K, Ca) and treatments. Heavy metals concentrations in roots always exceeded those in stem and leaves, with a lower translocation from roots to shoots, suggesting a strategy of sunflower to compartmentalise the potentially toxic elements in physiologically less active parts in order to preserve younger tissues.

  9. Leaching and accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge under concomitant thermophilic and low pH conditions.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gil, G; Lopes, S I C; Saikaly, P E; Lens, P N L

    2012-12-01

    The leaching and/or accumulation of trace elements in sulfate reducing granular sludge systems was investigated. Two thermophilic up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors operated at pH 5 were fed with sucrose (4 gCOD l(reactor)(-1)d(-1)) and sulfate at different COD/SO(4)(2-) ratios. During the start-up of such acidogenic systems, an initial leaching of trace elements from the inoculum sludge occurred regardless of trace elements supplementation in the reactor influent. The granular sludge maintained the physical structure despite high Fe leaching. After start-up and nonetheless the acidic conditions, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mo and Se were retained or accumulated by the sludge when added. Particularly, Ni and Co accumulated in the carbonates and exchangeable fractions ensuring potential bioavailability. Otherwise, the initial stock in the inoculum sludge sufficed to operate the process for nearly 1 year without supplementation of trace elements and no significant sludge wash-out occurred.

  10. Micro-spatial variation of elemental distribution in estuarine sediment and their accumulation in mangroves of Indian Sundarban.

    PubMed

    Bakshi, Madhurima; Ram, S S; Ghosh, Somdeep; Chakraborty, Anindita; Sudarshan, M; Chaudhuri, Punarbasu

    2017-05-01

    This work describes the micro-spatial variation of elemental distribution in estuarine sediment and bioaccumulation of those elements in different mangrove species of the Indian Sundarbans. The potential ecological risk due to such elemental load on this mangrove-dominated habitat is also discussed. The concentrations of elements in mangrove leaves and sediments were determined using energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. Sediment quality and potential ecological risks were assessed from the calculated indices. Our data reflects higher concentration of elements, e.g., Al, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, and Pb, in the sediment, as compared to that reported by earlier workers. Biological concentration factors for K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn in different mangroves indicated gradual elemental bioaccumulation in leaf tissues (0.002-1.442). Significant variation was observed for elements, e.g., Ni, Mn, and Ca, in the sediments of all the sites, whereas in the plants, significant variation was found for P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn. This was mostly due to the differences in uptake and accumulation potential of the plants. Various sediment quality indices suggested the surface sediments to be moderately contaminated and suffering from progressive deterioration. Cu, Cr, Zn, Mn, and Ni showed higher enrichment factors (0.658-1.469), contamination factors (1.02-2.7), and geo-accumulation index (0.043-0.846) values. The potential ecological risk index values considering Cu, Cr, Pb, and Zn were found to be within "low ecological risk" category (20.04-24.01). However, Cr and Ni in the Sundarban mangroves exceeded the effect range low and probable effect level limits. Strong correlation of Zn with Fe and K was observed, reflecting their similar transportation and accumulation process in both sediment and plant systems. The plant-sediment elemental correlation was found to be highly non-linear, suggesting role of some physiological and edaphic factors in

  11. Heavy element accumulation in Evernia prunastri lichen transplants around a municipal solid waste landfill in central Italy.

    PubMed

    Nannoni, Francesco; Santolini, Riccardo; Protano, Giuseppe

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents the results of a biomonitoring study to evaluate the environmental impact of airborne emissions from a municipal solid waste landfill in central Italy. Concentrations of 11 heavy elements, as well as photosynthetic efficiency and cell membrane integrity were measured in Evernia prunastri lichens transplanted for 4months in 17 monitoring sites around the waste landfill. Heavy element contents were also determined in surface soils. Analytical data indicated that emissions from the landfill affected Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sb and Zn concentrations in lichens transplanted within the landfill and along the fallout direction. In these sites moderate to severe accumulation of these heavy elements in lichens was coupled with an increase in cell membrane damage and decrease in photosynthetic efficiency. Nevertheless, results indicated that landfill emissions had no relevant impact on lichens, as heavy element accumulation and weak stress symptoms were detected only in lichen transplants from sites close to solid waste. The appropriate management of this landfill poses a low risk of environmental contamination by heavy elements. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Different Accumulation of Elements in Proximal and Distal Parts of the Left Anterior Descending Artery Beneath the Myocardial Bridge.

    PubMed

    Tohno, Yoshiyuki; Tohno, Setsuko; Minami, Takeshi; Pakdeewong-Ongkana, Nutcharin; Suwannahoy, Patipath; Quiggins, Ranida

    2016-05-01

    To elucidate the action of the myocardial bridge (MB) on the coronary artery, the authors first prepared the hearts with the MB located in the middle one third of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and then investigated element accumulation in the LAD artery of the hearts with the MB by direct chemical analysis. Eighty-four formalin-fixed adult Thai hearts were dissected and the MBs were found in 39 of 84 hearts with a total of 44 MBs. The 37 MBs were located in the middle one third of the LAD artery. To examine the action of the MB on element accumulation in the LAD artery, the hearts with the MB which was located in the middle one third of the LAD artery and was longer than 1.5 cm were used as Materials. The left main coronary (LMC) and LAD arteries were removed from these hearts successively and the isolated arteries were divided into eight to ten segments. After incineration of arteries with nitric acid and perchloric acid, seven element contents of Ca, P, S, Mg, Zn, Fe, and Na were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. To examine the endothelial changes of the LAD artery, the inner surface of segments of the LAD artery was observed by scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the extent of accumulation of Ca, P, Zn, and Na was not uniform throughout the LAD artery and was higher in the proximal part than in the distal part with regard to the LAD artery beneath the MB (the tunneled LAD artery). The extent of accumulation of Ca, P, Zn, and Na in the proximal part of the tunneled LAD artery was similar to that in the segments proximal to the MB, whereas the extent of accumulation of Ca, P, Zn, and Na in the distal part of the tunneled LAD artery was similar to that in the segments distal to the MB.

  13. Adaptive response of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis to accumulation of elements and translocation in Phragmites australis affected by cadmium stress.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaochen; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Zhu, Shishu; Ma, Fang; Wu, Jieting; Yang, Jixian; Wang, Li

    2017-07-15

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been reported to play a central role in improving plant tolerance to cadmium (Cd)-contaminated sites. This is achieved by enhancing both the growth of host plants and the nutritive elements in plants. This study assessed potential regulatory effects of AM symbiosis with regard to nutrient uptake and transport, and revealed different response strategies to various Cd concentrations. Phragmites australis was inoculated with Rhizophagus irregularis in the greenhouse cultivation system, where it was treated with 0-20 mg L(-1) of Cd for 21days to investigate growth parameters, as well as Cd and nutritive element distribution in response to AM fungus inoculation. Mycorrhizal plants showed a higher tolerance, particularly under high Cd-level stress in the substrate. Moreover, our results determined the roots as dominant Cd reservoirs in plants. The AM fungus improved Cd accumulation and saturated concentration in the roots, thus inhibiting Cd uptake to shoots. The observed distributions of nutritive elements and the interactions among these indicated the highest microelement contribution to roots, Ca contributed maximally in leaves, and K and P contributed similarly under Cd stress. In addition, AM fungus inoculation effectively impacted Mn and P uptake and accumulation while coping with Cd toxicity. This study also demonstrated translocation factor from metal concentration (TF) could be a good parameter to evaluate different transportation strategies induced by various Cd stresses in contrast to the bioconcentration factor (BCF) and translocation factor from metal accumulation (TF'). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Kale carotenoids are unaffected by, whereas biomass production, elemental concentrations, and selenium accumulation respond to, changes in selenium fertility.

    PubMed

    Lefsrud, Mark G; Kopsell, Dean A; Kopsell, David E; Randle, William M

    2006-03-08

    Selenium (Se) is a micronutrient in mammalian nutrition and is accumulated in kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala), which has high levels of lutein and beta-carotene. Selenium, lutein, and beta-carotene have important human health benefits and possess strong antioxidant properties. The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of different Se [as sodium selenate (Na(2)SeO(4)) and sodium selenite (Na(2)SeO(3))] fertility levels on (1) biomass accumulation, (2) the accumulation patterns of carotenoid pigments, and (3) elemental accumulation in the leaves of kale. Winterbor kale was greenhouse-grown using nutrient solution culture with Se treatment concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5 mg Se/L as Na(2)SeO(4) and 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0 mg Se/L as Na(2)SeO(3). Increases in either selenate (SeO(4)(-)(2)) or selenite (SeO(3)(-)(2)) resulted in decreases in kale leaf tissue biomass. Neither of the Se treatments had an effect on the accumulation of lutein or beta-carotene in leaf tissues. Increasing SeO(4)(-)(2) significantly increased the accumulation of kale leaf Se; however, leaf tissue Se did not significantly change over the SeO(3)(-)(2) treatments. Increases in SeO(4)(-)(2) affected the leaf tissue concentrations of P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Mn, and Mo, whereas SeO(3)(-)(2) only affected B and S. Growing kale in the presence of SeO(4)(-)(2) would result in the accumulation of high levels of tissue Se without affecting carotenoid concentrations.

  15. Comparison in accumulation of lanthanide elements among three Brassicaceae plant sprouts.

    PubMed

    Anan, Yasumi; Awaya, Yumi; Ogihara, Yurie; Yoshida, Miyuki; Yawata, Ayako; Ogra, Yasumitsu

    2012-07-01

    Three kinds of sprouts in the Brassicaceae family of plants, namely, pink kale, radish and mustard were evaluated for the possibility of phytoremediation of lanthanides. The mustard sprout more efficiently accumulated lanthanides (e.g. 0.26 nmol La/g) than other Brassicaceae family plant sprouts (0.16 nmol La/g in the radish), however the radish sprout showed the fastest growth among three sprouts. Faster growth compensated for less efficiency in lanthanide accumulation (28 pmol La in the radish vs. 12 pmol La in the mustard) indicating that the radish is the most preferable sprout for the phytoremediation of lanthanides.

  16. Long-term biomonitoring of soil contamination using poplar trees: accumulation of trace elements in leaves and fruits.

    PubMed

    Madejón, P; Ciadamidaro, L; Marañón, T; Murillo, J M

    2013-01-01

    Phytostabilization aims to immobilize soil contaminants using higher plants. The accumulation of trace elements in Populus alba leaves was monitored for 12 years after a mine spill. Concentrations of As and Pb significantly decreased, while concentrations of Cd and Zn did not significantly over time. Soil concentrations extracted by CaCl2 were measured by ICP-OES and results of As and Pb were below the detection limit. Long-term biomonitoring of soil contamination using poplar leaves was proven to be better suited for the study of trace elements. Plants suitable for phytostabilization must also be able to survive and reproduce in contaminated soils. Concentrations of trace elements were also measured in P. alba fruiting catkins to determine the effect on its reproduction potential. Cadmium and Zn were found to accumulate in fruiting catkins, with the transfer coefficient for Cd significantly greater than Zn. It is possible for trace elements to translocate to seed, which presents a concern for seed germination, establishment and colonization. We conclude that white poplar is a suitable tree for long-term monitoring of soil contaminated with Cd and Zn, and for phytostabilization in riparian habitats, although some caution should be taken with the possible effects on the food web. Supplemental materials are available for this article. Go to the publisher's online edition of International Journal of Phytoremediation to view the supplemental file.

  17. Properties and behavior of the platinum group metals in the glass resulting from the vitrification of simulated nuclear fuel reprocessing waste

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, C. ); Luckscheiter, B. )

    1991-12-01

    Two types of platinum group metal particles were found in borosilicate nuclear waste glasses: needle-shaped RuO{sub 2} particles and spherical PdRh{sub {ital x}}Te{sub {ital y}} alloys. They form a dense sediment of high electrical conductivity and relatively high viscosity at the bottom of the ceramic melting furnace. The sludge shows a non-Newtonian flow behavior. The viscosity and conductivity of the sludge depend not only on the platinum group metal content but also on the texture and morphology of the RuO{sub 2} particles. RuO{sub 2} forms long, needle-shaped crystals which are caused by alkalimolybdate salt melts that formed in the calcine layer. The salt melts oxidize the Ru present as small RuO{sub 2} particles after calcination to higher oxidation states. Ruthenium (VI) compounds are formed, presumably, which are not stable with respect to RuO{sub 2} under the melting conditions. RuO{sub 2} precipitates and crystallizes into long, needle-like particles.

  18. Potentially toxic element contamination in soil and accumulation in maize plants in a smelter area in Kosovo.

    PubMed

    Nannoni, Francesco; Rossi, Sara; Protano, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    A biogeochemical field study was carried out in the industrial area of Kosovska Mitrovica in northern Kosovo, where agricultural soils were contaminated by potentially toxic elements due to smelting activity. Total and bioavailable contents of As, Cd, Co, Cu, Pb, Sb, U and Zn in soil and their concentrations in maize roots and grains were determined. Soil contamination by As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Sb and Zn was variable from slightly to highly contaminated soils and influenced both the bioavailable fraction and accumulation of these potentially toxic elements in maize tissues. The comparison between potentially toxic element concentrations in roots and grains indicated that maize is able to limit the transfer of non-essential elements to edible parts. The plant-to-soil bioconcentration indices suggested that the transfer of potentially toxic elements from soil to plant was predicted better by bioavailable concentrations than by the total contents. These indices further identified some competitions and interactions among these elements in root uptake and root-to-grain translocation.

  19. Chemical element accumulation in tree bark grown in volcanic soils of Cape Verde-a first biomonitoring of Fogo Island.

    PubMed

    Marques, Rosa; Prudêncio, Maria Isabel; Freitas, Maria do Carmo; Dias, Maria Isabel; Rocha, Fernando

    2015-10-03

    Barks from Prosopis juliflora (acacia) were collected in 12 sites of different geological contexts over the volcanic Fogo Island (Cape Verde). Elemental contents of Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na, Zn and some rare earth elements (REE)-La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Tb, Yb, and Lu, were obtained for biological samples and topsoils by using k 0-standardized and comparative method of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), aiming the evaluation of chemical elements uptake by acacia bark. This first biomonitoring study of Fogo Island showed that, in general, significant accumulations of trace elements present in high amounts in these soils occur. This can be partially explained by the semi-arid climate with a consequent bioavailability of chemical elements when rain drops fall in this non-polluted environment. REE enrichment factors (EFs) increase with the decrease of ionic radius. Heavy REE (HREE) are significantly enriched in bark, which agrees with their release after the primary minerals breakdown and the formation of more soluble compounds than the other REE, and uptake by plants. Among the potential harmful chemical elements, Cr appears to be partially retained in nanoparticles of iron oxides. The high EFs found in tree barks of Fogo Island are certainly of geogenic origin rather than anthropogenic input since industry and the use of fertilizers is scarce.

  20. A biogeochemical approach to understanding the accumulation patterns of trace elements in three species of dragonfly larvae: evaluation as biomonitors.

    PubMed

    Lavilla, Isela; Rodríguez-Liñares, Genma; Garrido, Josefina; Bendicho, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    The accumulation patterns of different trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) were studied in three species of dragonfly larvae (Cordulegaster boltoni, Boyeria irene and Onychogomphus uncatus). Additionally these species were assessed as potential biomonitors in a lotic ecosystem (Louro River, Spain). Element concentrations were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in both dragonfly larvae and river sediments. The surface of the larvae was observed and analyzed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A desorption test was used to establish the percentage of element adsorbed into the exoskeleton. Field biomonitoring studies were made considering the first part of the river as a control area in relation to the second part, which was severely polluted by industrial and domestic activities. Upon application of principal component analysis (PCA), two different element groups were found in relation to element bioaccumulation. Cu, Cd and Zn were mainly associated with the inner part of the larvae. As, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were found on the outer body parts, related with deposition of oxyhydroxides in the hydrocycle. SEM revealed a layer of inorganic particles, similar in composition to fine bed sediments. Significant relations between the element content of this group and that of sediments at the sampling site were found. Differences in bioaccumulation for each of the three species, except for As, were observed. Dragonfly larvae revealed their ability to reflect environmental concentrations of As in freshwater media.

  1. Quantitative micro-PIXE comparison of elemental distribution in Ni-hyperaccumulating and non-accumulating genotypes of Senecio coronatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, J.; Przybyłowicz, W. J.; Prozesky, V. M.; Pineda, C. A.

    1997-07-01

    The Ni hyperaccumulator, plant species Senecio coronatus (Thunb.) Harv., Asteraceae is an example of plant adaptation mechanisms to different ecological conditions. This widespread species can inter alia be found on serpentine outcrops and the genotypes growing in serpentine soils show different ways of adaptation. The populations from two distant localities take up and translocate Ni in concentrations which are normally phytotoxic, while plants growing on a different site, in the vicinity of another hyperaccumulating species, absorb amounts which are typical for most of the plants found on serpentine soils. The NAC nuclear microprobe was used to compare the distribution of Ni and other elements in selected organs and cells with simultaneous use of PIXE and proton BackScattering (BS). Quantitative maps of stems showed large differences in concentrations and distributions of major and trace elements. In hyperaccumulating genotypes Ni is present everywhere within stem tissues, but the highest concentrations were found in the epidermis, cortex and phloem. In non-accumulating plants Ni was concentrated in the phloem. In the leaf epidermis Ni was concentrated in the cell walls for both accumulating and non-accumulating plants. These results suggest that biochemical diversity is more than morphological, because investigated genotypes belong to the same taxon.

  2. Oak leaves as accumulators of airborne elements in an area with geochemical and geothermal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Bargagli, R; Monaci, F; Agnorelli, C

    2003-01-01

    The Colline Metallifere (Tuscany) was a major Italian mining district (FeS2, Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn) for centuries, and in the last fifty years it has become the most important area for the exploitation of geothermal resources. Leaves of the widespread oak Quercus pubescens and surface soils were collected from 90 sampling sites in the area and their elemental composition was compared. The results showed that the composition of oak leaves was not significantly affected by the presence of mineral deposits (metal sulphide ores) or soils with high concentrations of Cr, Mg, and Ni (ultramafic). Arsenic was the only element showing higher concentrations in leaves from sites with deposits of metal sulphide ores or As-polluted soils around abandoned smelting plants. Compared to the composition of epiphytic lichens andepigeic mosses from the same sites in the Colline Metallifere, the elemental composition of Q. pubescens leaves was less affected by element contributions from adsorbed soil particles. It was thus easier to evaluate atmospheric inputs of elements in oak leaves than in cryptogams.

  3. Evaluation of urban environment pollution based on the accumulation of macro- and trace elements in epiphytic lichens.

    PubMed

    Parzych, Agnieszka; Astel, Aleksander; Zduńczyk, Anna; Surowiec, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium, zinc, nickel, copper, manganese, iron and lead accumulation properties of three epiphytic lichen species (Hypogymnia physodes (L.) Nyl., Parmelia sulcata Taylor and Xanthoria parietina (L.) Th. Fr.) were compared. An assessment of pollution of the municipal environment in Słupsk (Poland) according to macro- and trace elements was also done. Lichen samples were taken in Autumn 2013 from Betula pendula, Fraxinus excelsior, Acer platanoides, A. pseudoplatanus and Populus sp. trees. Sampling stations comprised of house development areas, green urban parks, vicinity of streets with heavy traffic and industrial enterprises. It was found that lichens represent diverse accumulation properties to pollutants according to the species. X. parietina indicated the highest bioaccumulation in relation to N, K, Mg, Zn and Fe, the thalli of H. physodes accumulated the largest amounts of Ni and Pb, while P. sulcata P and Cu. Manganese was accumulated in similar quantities by all species. Evidences acquired by the use of factor analysis proved that pollution in Słupsk municipal environment is a serious issue with three major sources domination: street dust, marine factor and residual oil combustion. The high-risk areas were detected and visualized using surface maps based on Kriging algorithm. It was seen that the highest pollution occurs in the town centre, while the smallest happened on its outskirts and in urban parks.

  4. Heavy metals effects on forage crops yields and estimation of elements accumulation in plants as affected by soil.

    PubMed

    Grytsyuk, N; Arapis, G; Perepelyatnikova, L; Ivanova, T; Vynograds'ka, V

    2006-02-01

    Heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn) effect on the productivity of forage crops (clover and perennial cereal grasses) and their accumulation in plants, depending on the concentration of these elements in a soil, has been studied in micro-field experiments on three types of soil. The principle objective was to determine regularities of heavy metals migration in a soil-plant system aiming the estimation of permissible levels of heavy metals content in soils with the following elaboration of methods, which regulate the toxicants transfer to plants. Methods of field experiments, agrochemical and atomic absorption analysis were used. Results were statistically treated by Statistica 6.0, S-Plus 6. Experimental results have shown that the intensity of heavy metals accumulation in plants depends on the type of the soil, the species of plants, the physicochemical properties of heavy metals and their content in the soil. Logarithmic interdependency of heavy metals concentration in soils and their accumulation in plants is suggested. However, the strong correlation between the different heavy metals concentrations in the various soils and the yield of crops was not observed. Toxicants accumulation in crops decreased in time.

  5. An Untranslated cis-Element Regulates the Accumulation of Multiple C4 Enzymes in Gynandropsis gynandra Mesophyll Cells[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Steven J.; Reyna-Llorens, Ivan; Knerova, Jana; Stanley, Susan

    2016-01-01

    C4 photosynthesis is a complex phenotype that allows more efficient carbon capture than the ancestral C3 pathway. In leaves of C4 species, hundreds of transcripts increase in abundance compared with C3 relatives and become restricted to mesophyll (M) or bundle sheath (BS) cells. However, no mechanism has been reported that regulates the compartmentation of multiple enzymes in M or BS cells. We examined mechanisms regulating CARBONIC ANHYDRASE4 (CA4) in C4 Gynandropsis gynandra. Increased abundance is directed by both the promoter region and introns of the G. gynandra gene. A nine-nucleotide motif located in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) is required for preferential accumulation of GUS in M cells. This element is present and functional in three additional 5′ UTRs and six 3′ UTRs where it determines accumulation of two isoforms of CA and pyruvate,orthophosphate dikinase in M cells. Although the GgCA4 5′ UTR is sufficient to direct GUS accumulation in M cells, transcripts encoding GUS are abundant in both M and BS. Mutating the GgCA4 5′ UTR abolishes enrichment of protein in M cells without affecting transcript abundance. The work identifies a mechanism that directs cell-preferential accumulation of multiple enzymes required for C4 photosynthesis. PMID:26772995

  6. Trace element accumulation in relation to trophic niches of shorebirds using intertidal mudflats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucia, Magali; Bocher, Pierrick; Chambosse, Mélanie; Delaporte, Philippe; Bustamante, Paco

    2014-09-01

    This study investigated the link between trace element concentrations and respective diets of two shorebird species present in the Pertuis Charentais, Atlantic coast of France: the Dunlin (Calidris alpina) and Redshank (Tringa totanus). Trace element concentrations (Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Zn) were investigated in the liver, kidney, muscle and feathers of 28 dunlins and 15 redshanks accidentally dead during catches by mist net. Analyses of carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios were carried out in liver, muscle and feathers to determine whether differences in diet explained the variations in elemental levels. These results were compared to previous data obtained on two other shorebird species present on the same sites: the Black-tailed Godwit (Limosa limosa) and the Red Knot (Calidris canutus). This study demonstrated that shorebirds of the Pertuis Charentais were characterized by differential trace element bioaccumulation. Arsenic and Se concentrations in internal tissues were elevated in red knots and dunlins, whereas redshanks displayed higher Cd concentrations. These trace element bioaccumulation discrepancies could mainly come from divergences of trophic habits between shorebirds. Species with the highest trophic position displayed the highest Hg concentrations in the liver, muscle and feathers demonstrating therefore the biomagnification potential of this metal, as opposed to Cd and Pb. The same trend was observed in muscle and feathers for Se and only in feathers for As. These data highlighted the need to study several tissues to obtain a full comprehension of trace element exposure and pathways especially for long-distance migrating species using various habitats and sites.

  7. Accumulation and sub-cellular partitioning of metals and As in the clam Venerupis corrugata: Different strategies towards different elements.

    PubMed

    Velez, Cátia; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of the present study was to assess accumulation, tolerance and sub-cellular partitioning of As, Hg, Cd and Pb in Venerupis corrugata. Results showed an increase of elements accumulation in V. corrugata with the increase of exposure. However, organisms presented higher capacity to accumulate Hg, Cd and Pb (BCF ≥ 12.8) than As (BCF ≤ 2.1) and higher accumulation rate for Cd and Pb than for Hg and As. With the increase of Hg exposure concentrations clams tended to increase the amount of metal bound to metal-sensitive fractions, which may explain the mortality recorded at the highest exposure concentration. Cd sub-cellular partitioning showed that with the increase of exposure concentrations V. corrugata increased the amount of metal in the cellular debris fraction, probably bound to the cellular membranes which explain the mortality recorded at the highest concentration. Results on As partitioning demonstrated that most of the metalloid was associated with fractions in the biologically detoxified metal compartment (BDM). Since high mortality was observed in clams exposed to As our results may indicate that this strategy was not enough to prevent clams from toxic effects and mortality occurred. When exposed to Pb most of the metal was in the BDM compartment, but in this case the metal was mostly in the metal-rich granules fraction which seemed to be efficient in preventing clams from toxicity, and no mortality was recorded. Our study further revealed that As and Hg were the most available elements to be biomagnified through the food chain.

  8. Rice tissue accumulation of particular elements is dependent on the plant’s physiology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The leaves, grain and other parts of a rice plant require mineral nutrients for various metabolic and other physiological functions. Breeders sometimes want to manipulate the element composition of the grain. Nutrient-dense grain, which is primarily seen as a means for improving nutrition in some co...

  9. Element uptake, accumulation, and resorption in leaves of mangrove species with different mechanisms of salt regulation

    Treesearch

    E. Medina; W. Fernandez; F. Barboza

    2015-01-01

    Element uptake from substrate and resorption capacity of nutrients before leaf shedding are frequently species-specific and difficult to determine in natural settings. We sampled populations of Rhizophora mangle (salt-excluding species) and Laguncularia racemosa (salt-secreting species) in a coastal lagoon in the upper section of the Maracaibo strait in western...

  10. The sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) genome reflects a recent history of biased accumulation of transposable elements.

    PubMed

    Staton, S Evan; Bakken, Bradley H; Blackman, Benjamin K; Chapman, Mark A; Kane, Nolan C; Tang, Shunxue; Ungerer, Mark C; Knapp, Steven J; Rieseberg, Loren H; Burke, John M

    2012-10-01

    Aside from polyploidy, transposable elements are the major drivers of genome size increases in plants. Thus, understanding the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), especially given its large genome size (∼3.5 Gb) and the well-documented cases of amplification of certain transposons within the genus, is of considerable importance for understanding the evolutionary history of this emerging model species. By analyzing approximately 25% of the sunflower genome from random sequence reads and assembled bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones, we show that it is composed of over 81% transposable elements, 77% of which are long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons. Moreover, the LTR retrotransposon fraction in BAC clones harboring genes is disproportionately composed of chromodomain-containing Gypsy LTR retrotransposons ('chromoviruses'), and the majority of the intact chromoviruses contain tandem chromodomain duplications. We show that there is a bias in the efficacy of homologous recombination in removing LTR retrotransposon DNA, thereby providing insight into the mechanisms associated with transposable element (TE) composition in the sunflower genome. We also show that the vast majority of observed LTR retrotransposon insertions have likely occurred since the origin of this species, providing further evidence that biased LTR retrotransposon activity has played a major role in shaping the chromatin and DNA landscape of the sunflower genome. Although our findings on LTR retrotransposon age and structure could be influenced by the selection of the BAC clones analyzed, a global analysis of random sequence reads indicates that the evolutionary patterns described herein apply to the sunflower genome as a whole.

  11. Field study on the accumulation of trace elements by vegetables produced in the vicinity of abandoned pyrite mines.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Paula; Simões, Isabel; Palma, Patrícia; Amaral, Olga; Matos, João Xavier

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the accumulation of trace elements (TE) by vegetables produced in the vicinity of abandoned pyrite mines, eighteen different small farms were selected near three mines from the Portuguese sector of the Iberian Pyrite Belt (São Domingos, Aljustrel and Lousal). Total and bioavailable As, Cu, Pb, and Zn concentrations were analyzed in the soils, and the same TE were analyzed in three different vegetables, lettuce (Lactuca sativa), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), and cabbage (Brassica oleracea), collected at the same locations. The soils were contaminated with As, Cu, Pb, and Zn, since their total concentrations exceeded the considered soil quality guideline values for plant production in the majority of the sampling sites. The maximum total concentrations for those TE were extremely high in some of the sampling sites (e.g. 1,851 mg As kg(-1) in São Domingos, 1,126 mg Cu kg(-1) in Aljustrel, 4,946 mg Pb kg(-1) in São Domingos, and 1,224 mg Zn kg(-1) in Aljustrel). However, the soils were mainly circumneutral, a factor that contributes to their low bioavailable fractions. As a result, generally, the plants contained levels of these elements characteristic of uncontaminated plants, and accumulation factors for all elements <1, typical of excluder plants. Furthermore, the estimated daily intake (EDI) for Cu and Zn, through the consumption of these vegetables, falls below the recommended upper limit for daily intake of these elements. The sampling site that stood out from the others was located at São João de Negrilhos (Aljustrel), where bioavailable Zn levels were higher, a consequence of the slight acidity of the soil. Therefore, the Zn content in vegetables was also higher, characteristic of contaminated plants, emphasizing the risk of Zn entering the human food chain via the consumption of crops produced on those soils. © 2013.

  12. Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Gretchen Loeffler; Wright, Meredith S; Hopkins, William A; Meyer, Judy L

    2009-07-01

    Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have elevated trace element concentrations in their tissues, but this relationship and its potential consequences are unclear for lotic organisms. To explore these patterns in a lotic environment, we transplanted Corbicula fluminea from a reference stream to a stream receiving CFPP discharge. We assessed trace element accumulation and glutathione concentration in clam tissue, shell growth, and condition index at five sites along a contamination gradient. Clams at the most upstream and contaminated site had the highest growth rate, condition index, glutathione concentrations, and concentrations of arsenic (7.85+/-0.25 microg/g [dry mass]), selenium (17.75+/-0.80 microg/g), and cadmium (7.28+/-0.34 microg/g). Mercury concentrations declined from 4.33+/-0.83 to 0.81+/-0.11 microg/g [dry mass] in clams transplanted into the selenium-rich environment nearest the power plant, but this effect was not as evident at less impacted, downstream sites. Even though dilution of trace elements within modest distances from the power plant reduced bioaccumulation potential in clams, long-term loading of trace elements to downstream depositional regions (e.g., slow moving, silty areas) is likely significant.

  13. Accumulation of trace elements and growth responses in Corbicula fluminea downstream of a coal-fired power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, G.L.; Wright, M.S.; Hopkins, W.A.; Meyer, J.L.

    2009-07-15

    Lentic organisms exposed to coal-fired power plant (CFPP) discharges can have elevated trace element concentrations in their tissues, but this relationship and its potential consequences are unclear for lotic organisms. To explore these patterns in a lotic environment, we transplanted Corbicula fluminea from a reference stream to a stream receiving CFPP discharge. We assessed trace element accumulation and glutathione concentration in clam tissue, shell growth, and condition index at five sites along a contamination gradient. Clams at the most upstream and contaminated site had the highest growth rate, condition index, glutathione concentrations, and concentrations of arsenic (7.85 {+-} 0.25 {mu} g/g (dry mass)), selenium (17.75 {+-} 0.80 {mu} g/g), and cadmium (7.28 {+-} 0.34 {mu} g/g). Mercury concentrations declined from 4.33 {+-} 0.83 to 0.81 {+-} 0.11 {mu} g/g (dry mass) in clams transplanted into the selenium-rich environment nearest the power plant, but this effect was not as evident at less impacted, downstream sites. Even though dilution of trace elements within modest distances from the power plant reduced bioaccumulation potential in clams, long-term loading of trace elements to downstream depositional regions (e.g., slow moving, silty areas) is likely significant.

  14. Direct Simulations of Coupled Transport and Reaction on Nano-Scale X-Ray Computed Tomography Images of Platinum Group Metal-Free Catalyst Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, S.; Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; Zelenay, P.; Litster, S.

    2016-08-22

    The nano/micro-scale geometry of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) catalyst layers critically affects cell performance. The small length scales and complex structure of these composite layers make it challenging to analyze cell performance and physics at the particle scale by experiment. We present a computational method to simulate transport and chemical reaction phenomena at the pore/particle-scale and apply it to a PEFC cathode with platinum group metal free (PGM-free) catalyst. Here, we numerically solve the governing equations for the physics with heterogeneous oxygen diffusion coefficient and proton conductivity evaluated using the actual electrode structure and ionomer distribution obtained using nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT). Using this approach, the oxygen concentration and electrolyte potential distributions imposed by the oxygen reduction reaction are solved and the impact of the catalyst layer structure on performance is evaluated.

  15. Mineralogy and composition of the chromitites and their platinum-group minerals from Ortaca (Muğla-SW Turkey): evidence for ophiolitic chromitite genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, I.; Sadiklar, M. B.; Tarkian, M.; Karsli, O.; Aydin, F.

    2005-03-01

    A large number of podiform chromitite bodies of massive, disseminated and nodular type have been located in ultramafic units, composed of depleted mantle harzburgite and dunite of the Marmaris Peridotite from Ortaca (Muğla, SW Turkey). The chromite ore bodies are surrounded by dunite envelopes of variable thickness, exhibiting transitional boundaries to harzburgite host rocks. Chromitites, containing a large number of inclusions, i.e. silicates, base metal sulphides and alloys, and platinum-group minerals (PGM) have a wide range of chemical composition. The Cr# [Cr/(Cr + Al)] values of most chromitites are high (0.61 0.81) and Mg# [Mg/(Mg + Fe2 + )] values range between 0.65 and 0.71 with TiO2 content lower than 0.24 wt.%, which may reflect the crystallization of chromites from boninitic magmas in supra-subduction setting environment.

  16. Direct Simulations of Coupled Transport and Reaction on Nano-Scale X-Ray Computed Tomography Images of Platinum Group Metal-Free Catalyst Cathodes

    DOE PAGES

    Ogawa, S.; Komini Babu, S.; Chung, H. T.; ...

    2016-08-22

    The nano/micro-scale geometry of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) catalyst layers critically affects cell performance. The small length scales and complex structure of these composite layers make it challenging to analyze cell performance and physics at the particle scale by experiment. We present a computational method to simulate transport and chemical reaction phenomena at the pore/particle-scale and apply it to a PEFC cathode with platinum group metal free (PGM-free) catalyst. Here, we numerically solve the governing equations for the physics with heterogeneous oxygen diffusion coefficient and proton conductivity evaluated using the actual electrode structure and ionomer distribution obtained using nano-scalemore » resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT). Using this approach, the oxygen concentration and electrolyte potential distributions imposed by the oxygen reduction reaction are solved and the impact of the catalyst layer structure on performance is evaluated.« less

  17. The role of phloem sieve elements and laticifers in the biosynthesis and accumulation of alkaloids in opium poppy.

    PubMed

    Samanani, Nailish; Alcantara, Joenel; Bourgault, Richard; Zulak, Katherine G; Facchini, Peter J

    2006-08-01

    The benzylisoquinoline alkaloids of opium poppy, including the narcotic analgesics morphine and codeine, accumulate in the multinucleate cytoplasm of specialized laticifers that accompany vascular tissues throughout the plant. In mature opium poppy plants, immunofluorescence labeling using specific antibodies showed that four alkaloid biosynthetic enzymes, (S)-norcoclaurine 6-O-methyltransferase (6OMT), (S)-coclaurine N-methyltransferase (CNMT), (S)-3'-hydroxy-N-methylcoclaurine-4'-O-methyltransferase (4'OMT) and salutaridinol-7-O-acetyltransferase (SAT) were restricted to sieve elements of the phloem adjacent or proximal to laticifers. The identity of sieve elements was confirmed by (i) the specific immunogold labeling of the characteristic cytoplasm of this cell type, (ii) the co-localization of a sieve element-specific H(+)-ATPase with all biosynthetic enzymes and (iii) the strict association of sieve plates with immunofluorescent cells. The localization of laticifers was demonstrated antibodies specific to major latex protein (MLP), which is characteristic of this cell type. In situ hybridization using antisense RNA probes for 6OMT, CNMT, 4'OMT and SAT showed that the corresponding gene transcripts were found in the companion cell paired with each sieve element. Seven benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthetic enzymes, (S)-N-methylcoclaurine 3'-hydroxylase (CYP80B1), berberine bridge enzyme, codeinone reductase, 6OMT, CNMT, 4'OMT and SAT were localized by immunofluorescence labeling to the sieve elements in the root and hypocotyl of opium poppy seedlings. The abundance of these enzymes increased rapidly between 1 and 3 days after seed germination. The localization of seven biosynthetic enzymes to the sieve elements provides strong support for the unique, cell type-specific biosynthesis of benzylisoquinoline alkaloids in the opium poppy.

  18. Trace element accumulation and trophic relationships in aquatic organisms of the Sundarbans mangrove ecosystem (Bangladesh).

    PubMed

    Borrell, Asunción; Tornero, Victoria; Bhattacharjee, Dola; Aguilar, Alex

    2016-03-01

    The Sundarbans forest is the largest and one of the most diverse and productive mangrove ecosystems in the world. Located at the northern shoreline of the Bay of Bengal in the Indian Ocean and straddling India and Bangladesh, the mangrove forest is the result of three primary river systems that originate further north and northwest. During recent decades, the Sundarbans have been subject to increasing pollution by trace elements caused by the progressive industrialization and urbanization of the basins of these three rivers. As a consequence, animals and plants dwelling downstream in the mangroves are exposed to these pollutants in varying degrees, and may potentially affect human health when consumed. The aim of the present study was to analyse the concentrations of seven trace elements (Zn, Cu, Cr, Hg, Pb, Cd and As) in 14 different animal and plant species collected in the Sundarbans in Bangladesh to study their transfer through the food web and to determine whether their levels in edible species are acceptable for human consumption. δ(15)N values were used as a proxy of the trophic level. A decrease in Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd levels was observed with increasing trophic position. Trace element concentrations measured in all organisms were, in general, lower than the concentrations obtained in other field studies conducted in the same region. When examined with respect to accepted international standards, the concentrations observed in fish and crustaceans were generally found to be safe for human consumption. However, the levels of Zn in Scylla serrata and Cr and Cd in Harpadon nehereus exceeded the proposed health advisory levels and may be of concern for human health.

  19. Accumulation of heavy metals and trace elements in fluvial sediments received effluents from traditional and semiconductor industries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Liang-Ching; Huang, Ching-Yi; Chuang, Yen-Hsun; Chen, Ho-Wen; Chan, Ya-Ting; Teah, Heng Yi; Chen, Tsan-Yao; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Liu, Yu-Ting; Tzou, Yu-Min

    2016-09-01

    Metal accumulation in sediments threatens adjacent ecosystems due to the potential of metal mobilization and the subsequent uptake into food webs. Here, contents of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and trace elements (Ga, In, Mo, and Se) were determined for river waters and bed sediments that received sewage discharged from traditional and semiconductor industries. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the metal distribution in relation to environmental factors such as pH, EC, and organic matter (OM) contents in the river basin. While water PCA categorized discharged metals into three groups that implied potential origins of contamination, sediment PCA only indicated a correlation between metal accumulation and OM contents. Such discrepancy in metal distribution between river water and bed sediment highlighted the significance of physical-chemical properties of sediment, especially OM, in metal retention. Moreover, we used Se XANES as an example to test the species transformation during metal transportation from effluent outlets to bed sediments and found a portion of Se inventory shifted from less soluble elemental Se to the high soluble and toxic selenite and selenate. The consideration of environmental factors is required to develop pollution managements and assess environmental risks for bed sediments.

  20. Accumulation of heavy metals and trace elements in fluvial sediments received effluents from traditional and semiconductor industries

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Liang-Ching; Huang, Ching-Yi; Chuang, Yen-Hsun; Chen, Ho-Wen; Chan, Ya-Ting; Teah, Heng Yi; Chen, Tsan-Yao; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Liu, Yu-Ting; Tzou, Yu-Min

    2016-01-01

    Metal accumulation in sediments threatens adjacent ecosystems due to the potential of metal mobilization and the subsequent uptake into food webs. Here, contents of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and trace elements (Ga, In, Mo, and Se) were determined for river waters and bed sediments that received sewage discharged from traditional and semiconductor industries. We used principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the metal distribution in relation to environmental factors such as pH, EC, and organic matter (OM) contents in the river basin. While water PCA categorized discharged metals into three groups that implied potential origins of contamination, sediment PCA only indicated a correlation between metal accumulation and OM contents. Such discrepancy in metal distribution between river water and bed sediment highlighted the significance of physical-chemical properties of sediment, especially OM, in metal retention. Moreover, we used Se XANES as an example to test the species transformation during metal transportation from effluent outlets to bed sediments and found a portion of Se inventory shifted from less soluble elemental Se to the high soluble and toxic selenite and selenate. The consideration of environmental factors is required to develop pollution managements and assess environmental risks for bed sediments. PMID:27681994

  1. Study of the Accumulation of Toxic and Essential Ultra-Trace Elements in Fruits of Sorbus domestica L.

    PubMed

    Zeiner, Michaela; Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Majić, Boris; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2017-03-24

    In the present work, the accumulation of selected toxic and essential ultra-trace elements in fruits of service tree (Sorbus domestica L.) were determined depending on harvest time. Samples were collected from the same sampling area in two different years and within one year in September and October (maturity state). Harvesting the fruits in the same area excludes the influence of metals taken up via roots, thus the impact of airborne contamination by heavy metal translocation can be studied. All samples were dried and digested using an acidic microwave assisted digestion system prior to quantification by inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry (ICP-SFMS). The elements chosen were Arsenic and Cadmium as well as Lithium, Molybdenum, and Selenium. The Arsenic content rose with maturity in mesocarp. Cadmium found in the mesocarp was unaffected by ripeness. For Selenium and Molybdenum, no statistically significant effect of ripeness could be found on their content in mesocarp. Lithium could not be detected in the majority of fruit samples. Differences between the metal concentrations based on the year of harvest were found for Arsenic, Molybdenum, and Selenium, depending on precipitation. The drier the season, the more Arsenic was accumulated. For Molybdenum and Selenium, the opposite effect was observed.

  2. The Dynamics of the roo Transposable Element In Mutation-Accumulation Lines and Segregating Populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Papaceit, Montserrat; Ávila, Victoria; Aguadé, Montserrat; García-Dorado, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    We estimated the number of copies for the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposable element roo in a set of long-standing Drosophila melanogaster mutation-accumulation full-sib lines and in two large laboratory populations maintained with effective population size ∼500, all of them derived from the same isogenic origin. Estimates were based on real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization. Considering previous estimates of roo copy numbers obtained at earlier stages of the experiment, the results imply a strong acceleration of the insertion rate in the accumulation lines. The detected acceleration is consistent with a model where only one (maybe a few) of the ∼70 roo copies in the ancestral isogenic genome was active and each active copy caused new insertions with a relatively high rate (∼10−2), with new inserts being active copies themselves. In the two laboratory populations, however, a stabilized copy number or no accelerated insertion was found. Our estimate of the average deleterious viability effects per accumulated insert [E(s) < 0.003] is too small to account for the latter finding, and we discuss the mechanisms that could contain copy number. PMID:17890368

  3. Multivariate characterization of elements accumulated in Wolfiporia extensa mushroom from Yunnan province of China.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Yuanzhong

    2017-03-04

    Dried sclerotia of Wolfiporia extensa have been used as medicine in Asia from Eastern Han Dynasty, and also used as traditional snack called "fulingjiabing" in Beijing, China. In this paper, 18 macro and trace elements (Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Se, Sr, V, and Zn) in both flesh and peel of Wolfiporia extensa from seven sites of Yunnan province in China were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. The average recovery rates of certified reference materials for GBW10015 (spinach leaves) ranged from 90.5 to 113%, for GBW10028 (citrus leaves) from 92.8 to 106%, and for GBW07603 (bush branch and leaves) from 83.3 to 114.6%. Generally speaking, the concentration of all elements determined was at common level. The results of this survey indicate that mineral compositions in peel were higher than in flesh. In peel, the contents of investigated trace metals in mushroom samples were found to be in the range of 1,660-13,400 µg·g(-1) dry matter (dm) for Fe and 29.6-710 µg·g(-1) dm for Mn. The mean contents of Cr, Cu, Rb, V, and Zn in peel were between 10 and 20 µg·g(-1) dm, followed by As, Co, Li, Ni, Pb, Se, and Sr with mean contents between 1 and 10 µg·g(-1) dm, while Ag, Cd, and Cs had mean contents of <1 µg·g(-1) dm. In flesh, the concentration of Fe was in the range of 54-900 µg·g(-1) dm, and it was 1.5-49 µg·g(-1) dm for Mn, followed by Ba, Cu, Rb, and Zn in the range of 1 to 10 µg·g(-1) dm, while for Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Li, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, and V it was <1 µg·g(-1) dm. The concentration of toxic elements, such as As, Cd, and Pb, in both flesh and peel was below the permissible limits of World Health Organization. However, As and Pb contents in peel were higher than the limits permitted in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. The results of principal component analysis showed that the flesh of Wolfiporia extensa from all the seven sites of the Yunnan province tend to cluster together, most probably

  4. Uranium, yttrium, and rare earth elements accumulation during the Cretaceous anoxic events in carbonaceous rocks in the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelyeva, Olga; Philosofova, Tatyana; Bergal-Kuvikas, Olga; Savelyeva, Svetlana

    2017-04-01

    We have studied the carbonate-siliceous section of paleooceanic Albian-Cenomanian deposits on the Kamchatsky Mys peninsula (Eastern Kamchatka, Russia) [1].The section is represented by a rhythmic alternation of planktonic limestones and jaspers, accumulated in the open ocean environment. The rhythmicity can be attributed to climate variations that reflect a fluctuation of astronomical parameters (Milankovitch cycles) [2, 3].The section contains two beds enriched in organic carbon, corresponding to the two oceanic anoxic events - MCE and OAE2 [3]. The maximum content of organic matter in those beds reaches 68%. Our geochemical studies revealed an enrichment of the carbonaceous rocks in some major and trace elements including PGE, in comparison with the surrounding limestone and jasper [4].The accumulation of the ore elements in carbonaceous beds is caused by euxinic conditions during sedimentation.The content of uranium, yttrium, and rare earth elements in carbonaceous rocks is up to 60, 142 and 312 ppm respectively. Phosphate grains (bone detritus) with microinclusions of yttrium and uranium minerals were revealed in the carbonaceous rocks using the scanning electron microscope. These data prove the hypothesis of the sorbtion of U and Y by phosphate detritus from seawater. Microprobe analysis also showed an increased content of Cu, Zn, V in some pyrite framboids, which indicates that these elements are fixed in rocks by Fe-sulphide phase or organic matter under euxinic conditions. Our research may bring us closer to understanding the mechanism of syngenetic accumulation of metals in the black shales. This work was supported by the RFBR (No. 16-05-00546). [1] Palechek, T.N., Savelyev, D.P., Savelyeva, O.L. (2010) Stratigraphy and Geological Correlation 18, (1) 63-82. [2] Savelyeva, O.L. (2010). Vestnik Kraunts. Nauki o zemle 1 (15), 45-55 (in Russian). [3] Savelyev, D.P., Savelyeva, O.L., Palechek, T.N., Pokrovsky, B.G. (2012) Geophysical Research Abstracts, 14, EGU

  5. Traffic-related trace element accumulation in roadside soils and wild grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guanxing; Yan, Xuedong; Zhang, Fan; Zeng, Chen; Gao, Dan

    2013-12-30

    This research examines traffic-source trace elements accumulations and distributions in roadside soils and wild grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. A total of 100 soil samples and 100 grass samples including Achnatherum splendens, Anaphalis nepalensis, Artemisia sphaerocephala, Carex moorcroftii, Iris lacteal, Kobresia myosuroides, Oreosolen wattii, Oxytropis ochrocephala and Stellera chamaejasme were collected at 100 sites from different road segments. The contents of metals and metalloids, including Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Ni and As, in the soil and grass samples were analyzed using ICP-MS. The total mean concentrations of the eight trace elements in soils are Cu (22.84 mg/kg), Zn (100.56 mg/kg), Cd (0.28 mg/kg), Pb (28.75 mg/kg), Cr (36.82 mg/kg), Co (10.24 mg/kg), Ni (32.44 mg/kg) and As (21.43 mg/kg), while in grasses are Cu (9.85 mg/kg), Zn (31.47 mg/kg), Cd (0.05 mg/kg), Pb (2.06 mg/kg), Cr (14.16 mg/kg), Co (0.55 mg/kg), Ni (4.03 mg/kg) and As (1.33 mg/kg). The metal and metalloid concentrations in the nine grass species were all below the critical values of hyperaccumulators. The mean values and Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) results indicate that: (1) the concentrations of the trace elements in the soils are higher than those in the grasses, (2) the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb in the soils decrease as the roadside distance increases, (3) the concentrations of trace elements in the grasses are the highest at 10 m from the road edge, (4) the higher the traffic volume, the higher the concentrations of the trace elements in the roadside soils and grasses, and (5) when the land cover is meadow, the lower the sand content in the soil, the lower the trace element concentrations. With a trace element's bioavailability represented by its transfer factor (TF) from the soil to the grass, the TFs of the eight trace elements are not in the same orders for different grass species.

  6. The effects of copper, manganese and zinc on plant growth and elemental accumulation in the manganese-hyperaccumulator Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huijun; Wu, Liangqi; Chai, Tuanyao; Zhang, Yuxiu; Tan, Jinjuan; Ma, Shengwen

    2012-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were used to estimate major, minor and trace elements in Cu-, Zn- and Mn-treated Phytolacca americana. The effects of the addition of Cu, Zn and Mn on morphological parameters, such as root length, shoot height, and fresh and dry weights of shoots and roots, were also examined. In addition, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidases (GPX) and catalase (CAT) and the expression of Fe-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, metallothionein-2 and glutathione S-transferase (GST) exposed to the highest amounts of Cu, Zn or Mn were detected. Our results confirmed the following: (1) Zn supplementation leads to chlorosis, disturbed elemental homeostasis and decreased concentrations of micro- and macroelements such as Fe, Mg, Mn, Ca and K. Cu competed with Fe, Mn and Zn uptake in plants supplemented with 25 μM Cu. However, no antagonistic interactions took place between Cu, Zn, Mn and Fe uptake in plants supplemented with 100 μM Cu. Mn supplementation at various concentrations had no negative effects on elemental deficits. Mn was co-located with high concentrations of Fe and Zn in mature leaves and the concentrations of macro elements were unchanged. (2) P. americana supplemented with increased concentrations of Zn and Cu exhibited lower biomass production and reduced plant growth. (3) When plants were supplemented with the highest Zn and Cu concentrations, symptoms of toxicity corresponded to decreased SOD or CAT activities and increased APX and GPX activities. However, Mn tolerance corresponded to increased SOD and CAT activities and decreased POD and APX activities. Our study revealed that heavy metals partially exert toxicity by disturbing the nutrient balance and modifying enzyme activities that induce damage in plants. However, P. americana has evolved hyper accumulating mechanisms to maintain elemental balance and redox homeostasis under

  7. Trace element accumulation in woody plants of the Guadiamar Valley, SW Spain: a large-scale phytomanagement case study.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, María T; Marañón, Teodoro; Murillo, José M; Schulin, Rainer; Robinson, Brett H

    2008-03-01

    Phytomanagement employs vegetation and soil amendments to reduce the environmental risk posed by contaminated sites. We investigated the distribution of trace elements in soils and woody plants from a large phytomanaged site, the Guadiamar Valley (SW Spain), 7 years after a mine spill, which contaminated the area in 1998. At spill-affected sites, topsoils (0-25 cm) had elevated concentrations of As (129 mg kg(-1)), Bi (1.64 mg kg(-1)), Cd (1.44 mg kg(-1)), Cu (115 mg kg(-1)), Pb (210 mg kg(-1)), Sb (13.8 mg kg(-1)), Tl (1.17 mg kg(-1)) and Zn (457 mg kg(-1)). Trace element concentrations in the studied species were, on average, within the normal ranges for higher plants. An exception was white poplar (Populus alba), which accumulated Cd and Zn in leaves up to 3 and 410 mg kg(-1) respectively. We discuss the results with regard to the phytomanagement of trace element contaminated sites.

  8. Traffic-Related Trace Element Accumulation in Roadside Soils and Wild Grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guanxing; Yan, Xuedong; Zhang, Fan; Zeng, Chen; Gao, Dan

    2013-01-01

    This research examines traffic-source trace elements accumulations and distributions in roadside soils and wild grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. A total of 100 soil samples and 100 grass samples including Achnatherum splendens, Anaphalis nepalensis, Artemisia sphaerocephala, Carex moorcroftii, Iris lacteal, Kobresia myosuroides, Oreosolen wattii, Oxytropis ochrocephala and Stellera chamaejasme were collected at 100 sites from different road segments. The contents of metals and metalloids, including Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Ni and As, in the soil and grass samples were analyzed using ICP-MS. The total mean concentrations of the eight trace elements in soils are Cu (22.84 mg/kg), Zn (100.56 mg/kg), Cd (0.28 mg/kg), Pb (28.75 mg/kg), Cr (36.82 mg/kg), Co (10.24 mg/kg), Ni (32.44 mg/kg) and As (21.43 mg/kg), while in grasses are Cu (9.85 mg/kg), Zn (31.47 mg/kg), Cd (0.05 mg/kg), Pb (2.06 mg/kg), Cr (14.16 mg/kg), Co (0.55 mg/kg), Ni (4.03 mg/kg) and As (1.33 mg/kg). The metal and metalloid concentrations in the nine grass species were all below the critical values of hyperaccumulators. The mean values and Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) results indicate that: (1) the concentrations of the trace elements in the soils are higher than those in the grasses, (2) the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb in the soils decrease as the roadside distance increases, (3) the concentrations of trace elements in the grasses are the highest at 10 m from the road edge, (4) the higher the traffic volume, the higher the concentrations of the trace elements in the roadside soils and grasses, and (5) when the land cover is meadow, the lower the sand content in the soil, the lower the trace element concentrations. With a trace element’s bioavailability represented by its transfer factor (TF) from the soil to the grass, the TFs of the eight trace elements are not in the same orders for different grass species. PMID:24380977

  9. Human intron-encoded AluACA RNAs and telomerase RNA share a common element promoting RNA accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ketele, Amandine; Kiss, Tamás; Jády, Beáta E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mammalian cells express hundreds of intron-encoded box H/ACA RNAs which fold into a common hairpin-hinge-hairpin-tail structure, interact with 4 evolutionarily conserved proteins, dyskerin, Nop10, Nhp2 and Gar1, and function mainly in RNA pseudouridylation. The human telomerase H/ACA RNA (hTR) directs telomeric DNA synthesis and it carries a 5′-terminal domain encompassing the telomeric template sequence. The primary hTR transcript is synthesized from an independent gene by RNA polymerase II and undergoes 3′ end processing controlled by the 3′-terminal H/ACA domain. The apical stem-loop of the 3′ hairpin of hTR carries a unique biogenesis-promoting element, the BIO motif that promotes hTR processing and RNP assembly. AluACA RNAs represent a distinct class of human H/ACA RNAs; they are processed from intronic Alu repetitive sequences. As compared to canonical H/ACA RNAs, the AluACA RNAs carry unusually short or long 5′ hairpins and generally, they accumulate at low levels. Here, we demonstrate that the suboptimal 5′ hairpins are responsible for the weak expression of AluACA RNAs. We also show that AluACA RNAs frequently carry a processing/stabilization element that is structurally and functionally indistinguishable from the hTR BIO motif. Both hTR and AluACA biogenesis-promoting elements are located in the terminal stem-loop of the 3′-terminal H/ACA hairpin, they show perfect structural conservation and are functionally interchangeable in in vivo RNA processing reactions. Our results demonstrate that the BIO motif, instead of being confined to hTR, is a more general H/ACA RNP biogenesis-facilitating element that can also promote processing/assembly of intron-encoded AluACA RNPs. PMID:27726486

  10. Distinct 3'-untranslated region elements regulate stage-specific mRNA accumulation and translation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    McNicoll, François; Müller, Michaela; Cloutier, Serge; Boilard, Nathalie; Rochette, Annie; Dubé, Marthe; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2005-10-21

    We recently characterized a large developmentally regulated gene family in Leishmania encoding the amastin surface proteins. While studying the regulation of these genes, we identified a region of 770 nucleotides (nt) within the 2055-nt 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) that regulates stage-specific gene expression at the level of translation. An intriguing feature of this 3'-UTR regulatory region is the presence of a approximately 450-nt element that is highly conserved among several Leishmania mRNAs. Here we show, using a luciferase reporter system and polysome profiling experiments, that the 450-nt element stimulates translation initiation of the amastin mRNA in response to heat shock, which is the main environmental change that the parasite encounters upon its entry into the mammalian host. Deletional analyses depicted a second region of approximately 100 nucleotides located at the 3'-end of several amastin transcripts, which also activates translation in response to elevated temperature. Both 3'-UTR regulatory elements act in an additive manner to stimulate amastin mRNA translation. In addition, we show that acidic pH encountered in the phagolysosomes of macrophages, the location of parasitic differentiation, triggers the accumulation of amastin transcripts by a distinct mechanism that is independent of the 450-nt and 100-nt elements. Overall, these important findings support the notion that stage-specific post-transcriptional regulation of the amastin mRNAs in Leishmania is complex and involves the coordination of distinct mechanisms controlling mRNA stability and translation that are independently triggered by key environmental signals inducing differentiation of the parasite within macrophages.

  11. Accumulation and Translocation of Essential and Nonessential Elements by Tomato Plants (Solanum lycopersicum) Cultivated in Open-Air Plots under Organic or Conventional Farming Techniques.

    PubMed

    Liñero, Olaia; Cidad, Maite; Carrero, Jose Antonio; Nguyen, Christophe; de Diego, Alberto

    2015-11-04

    A 5-month experiment was performed to study the accumulation of several inorganic elements in tomato plants cultivated using organic or synthetic fertilizer. Plants were harvested in triplicate at six sampling dates during their life cycle. Statistical and chemometric analysis of data indicated the sequestration of toxic elements and of Na, Zn, Fe, and Co in roots, while the rest of the elements, including Cd, were mainly translocated to aboveground organs. A general decreasing trend in element concentrations with time was observed for most of them. A negative correlation between some element concentrations and ripening stage of fruits was identified. Conventionally grown plants seemed to accumulate more Cd and Tl in their tissues, while organic ones were richer in some nutrients. However, there was no clear effect of the fertilizer used (organic vs synthetic) on the elemental composition of fruits.

  12. Element accumulation in boreal bryophytes, lichens and vascular plants exposed to heavy metal and sulfur deposition in Finland.

    PubMed

    Salemaa, Maija; Derome, John; Helmisaari, Heljä-Sisko; Nieminen, Tiina; Vanha-Majamaa, Ilkka

    2004-05-25

    Macronutrient (N, P, K, Mg, S, Ca), heavy metal (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Ni, Cd, Pb) and Al concentrations in understorey bryophytes, lichens and vascular plant species growing in Scots pine forests at four distances from the Harjavalta Cu-Ni smelter (0.5, 2, 4 and 8 km) were compared to those at two background sites in Finland. The aim was to study the relationship between element accumulation and the distribution of the species along a pollution gradient. Elevated sulfur, nitrogen and heavy metal concentrations were found in all species groups near the pollution source. Macronutrient concentrations tended to decrease in the order: vascular plants>bryophytes>lichens, when all the species groups grew on the same plot. Heavy metal concentrations (except Mn) were the highest in bryophytes, followed by lichens, and were the lowest in vascular plants. In general, vascular plants, being capable of restricting the uptake of toxic elements, grew closer to the smelter than lichens, while bryophytes began to increase in the understorey vegetation at further distances from the smelter. A pioneer moss (Pohlia nutans) was an exception, because it accumulated considerably higher amounts of Cu and Ni than the other species and still survived close to the smelter. The abundance of most of the species decreased with increasing Cu and Ni concentrations in their tissues. Cetraria islandica, instead, showed a positive relationship between the abundance and Cu, Ni and S concentrations of the thallus. It is probable that, in addition to heavy metals, sporadically high SO(2) emissions have also affected the distribution of the plant species.

  13. The accumulation of elements in plants growing spontaneously on small heaps left by the historical Zn-Pb ore mining.

    PubMed

    Stefanowicz, Anna M; Stanek, Małgorzata; Woch, Marcin W; Kapusta, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    The study evaluated the levels of nine metals, namely Ca, Cd, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Pb, Tl, and Zn, in soils and tissues of ten plant species growing spontaneously on heaps left by historical mining for Zn-Pb ores. The concentrations of Cd, Pb, Tl, and Zn in heap soils were much higher than in control soils. Plants growing on heaps accumulated excessive amounts of these elements in tissues, on average 1.3-52 mg Cd kg(-1), 9.4-254 mg Pb kg(-1), 0.06-23 mg Tl kg(-1) and 134-1479 mg Zn kg(-1) in comparison to 0.5-1.1 mg Cd kg(-1), 2.1-11 mg Pb kg(-1), 0.02-0.06 mg Tl kg(-1), and 23-124 mg Zn kg(-1) in control plants. The highest concentrations of Cd, Pb, and Zn were found in the roots of Euphorbia cyparissias, Fragaria vesca, and Potentilla arenaria, and Tl in Plantago lanceolata. Many species growing on heaps were enriched in K and Mg, and depleted in Ca, Fe, and Mn. The concentrations of all elements in plant tissues were dependent on species, organ (root vs. shoot), and species-organ interactions. Average concentrations of Ca, K, and Mg were generally higher in shoots than in roots or similar in the two organs, whereas Cd, Fe, Pb, Tl, and Zn were accumulated predominantly in the roots. Our results imply that heaps left by historical mining for Zn-Pb ores may pose a potential threat to the environment and human health.

  14. Changes in element accumulation, phenolic metabolism, and antioxidative enzyme activities in the red-skin roots of Panax ginseng.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ying; Yang, Zhenming; Gao, Lingling; Liu, Wen; Liu, Rongkun; Zhao, Junting; You, Jiangfeng

    2017-07-01

    Red-skin root disease has seriously decreased the quality and production of Panax ginseng (ginseng). To explore the disease's origin, comparative analysis was performed in different parts of the plant, particularly the epidermis, cortex, and/or fibrous roots of 5-yr-old healthy and diseased red-skin ginseng. The inorganic element composition, phenolic compound concentration, reactive oxidation system, antioxidant concentrations such as ascorbate and glutathione, activities of enzymes related to phenolic metabolism and oxidation, and antioxidative system particularly the ascorbate-glutathione cycle were examined using conventional methods. Aluminum (Al), iron (Fe), magnesium, and phosphorus were increased, whereas manganese was unchanged and calcium was decreased in the epidermis and fibrous root of red-skin ginseng, which also contained higher levels of phenolic compounds, higher activities of the phenolic compound-synthesizing enzyme phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and the phenolic compound oxidation-related enzymes guaiacol peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase. As the substrate of guaiacol peroxidase, higher levels of H2O2 and correspondingly higher activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were found in red-skin ginseng. Increased levels of ascorbate and glutathione; increased activities of l-galactose 1-dehydrogenase, ascorbate peroxidase, ascorbic acid oxidase, and glutathione reductase; and lower activities of dehydroascorbate reductase, monodehydroascorbate reductase, and glutathione peroxidase were found in red-skin ginseng. Glutathione-S-transferase activity remained constant. Hence, higher element accumulation, particularly Al and Fe, activated multiple enzymes related to accumulation of phenolic compounds and their oxidation. This might contribute to red-skin symptoms in ginseng. It is proposed that antioxidant and antioxidative enzymes, especially those involved in ascorbate-glutathione cycles, are activated to protect against phenolic compound oxidation.

  15. Specific accumulation of cadmium and other trace elements in Sarcodon imbricatus using ICP-MS with a chemometric approach.

    PubMed

    Mędyk, Małgorzata; Chudzińska, Maria; Barałkiewicz, Danuta; Falandysz, Jerzy

    2017-05-04

    Fungi can effectively accumulate various metallic elements, metalloids and non-metals in fruiting bodies. This study provides information on the accumulation of Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cs, Cu, Cr, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr, V, Tl, U and Zn in the edible mushroom Sarcodon imbricatus (L.) P. Karst. using the technique of inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry with a dynamic reaction cell mode. Mushrooms were foraged from four regions in Poland. Baseline concentrations of minerals, expressed in mg kg(-1) dry biomass (db), were in the composite samples of caps in the range: for Ag (0.27-0.29), As (1.0-1.9), Ba (0.31-0.45), Cd (4.5-6.3), Co (0.23-1.9), Cu (28-35), Cr (0.19-0.29), Cs (20-38), Li (0.013-0.020), Mn (5.9-8.8), Ni (0.81-1.4), Pb (0.94-1.6), Rb (490-700), Sr (0.14-0.19), Tl (0.058-0.11), U (0.002-0.002), V (0.044-0.054) and Zn (140-160). Concentration levels of Ag, As, Cd, Cs, Pb and Zn were higher in caps than in stipes of S. imbricatus, whereas for other elements the distribution between caps and stipes was nearly equal or for some differed depending on the location. Certainly, the content of toxic Cd in S. imbricatus was elevated (0.45-0.63 mg kg(-1) in fresh caps) and therefore eating this mushroom could increase exposure to Cd. In addition, the content of toxic As in S. imbricatus was elevated.

  16. Element accumulation patterns of deciduous and evergreen tree seedlings on acid soils: implications for sensitivity to manganese toxicity.

    PubMed

    St Clair, Samuel B; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2005-01-01

    Foliar nutrient imbalances, including the hyperaccumulation of manganese (Mn), are correlated with symptoms of declining health in sensitive tree species growing on acidic forest soils. The objectives of this study were to: (1) compare foliar nutrient accumulation patterns of six deciduous (sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), red maple (Acer rubrum L.), red oak (Quercus rubra L.), white oak (Quercus alba L.), black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) and white ash (Fraxinus americana L.)) and three evergreen (eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis L.), white pine (Pinus strobus L.) and white spruce (Picea glauca (Moench) Voss.)) tree species growing on acidic forest soils; and (2) examine how leaf phenology and other traits that distinguish evergreen and deciduous tree species influence foliar Mn accumulation rates and sensitivity to excess Mn. For the first objective, leaf samples of seedlings from five acidic, non-glaciated field sites on Pennsylvania's Allegheny Plateau were collected and analyzed for leaf element concentrations. In a second study, we examined growth and photosynthetic responses of seedlings exposed to excess Mn in sand culture. In field samples, Mn in deciduous foliage hyperaccumulated to concentrations more than twice as high as those found in evergreen needles. Among species, sugar maple was the most sensitive to excess Mn based on growth and photosynthetic measurements. Photosynthesis in red maple and red oak was also sensitive to excess Mn, whereas white oak, black cherry, white ash and the three evergreen species were tolerant of excess Mn. Among the nine species, relative rates of photosynthesis were negatively correlated with foliar Mn concentrations, suggesting that photosynthetic sensitivity to Mn is a function of its rate of accumulation in seedling foliage.

  17. Surface disposal of produced waters in western and southwestern Pennsylvania: potential for accumulation of alkali-earth elements in sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skalak, Katherine J.; Engle, Mark A.; Rowan, Elisabeth L.; Jolly, Glenn D.; Conko, Kathryn M.; Benthem, Adam J.; Kraemer, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Waters co-produced with hydrocarbons in the Appalachian Basin are of notably poor quality (concentrations of total dissolved solids (TDS) and total radium up to and exceeding 300,000 mg/L and 10,000 pCi/L, respectively). Since 2008, a rapid increase in Marcellus Shale gas production has led to a commensurate rise in associated wastewater while generation of produced water from conventional oil and gas activities has continued. In this study, we assess whether disposal practices from treatment of produced waters from both shale gas and conventional operations in Pennsylvania could result in the accumulation of associated alkali earth elements. The results from our 5 study sites indicate that there was no increase in concentrations of total Ra (Ra-226) and extractable Ba, Ca, Na, or Sr in fluvial sediments downstream of the discharge outfalls (p > 0.05) of publicly owned treatment works (POTWs) and centralized waste treatment facilities (CWTs). However, the use of road spreading of brines from conventional oil and gas wells for deicing resulted in accumulation of Ra-226 (1.2 ×), and extractable Sr (3.0 ×), Ca (5.3 ×), and Na (6.2 ×) in soil and sediment proximal to roads (p < 0.05). Although this study is an important initial assessment of the impacts of these disposal practices, more work is needed to consider the environmental consequences of produced waters management.

  18. Differential patterns of accumulation and retention of dietary trace elements associated with coal ash during larval development and metamorphosis of an amphibian.

    PubMed

    Heyes, Andrew; Rowe, Christopher L; Conrad, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    We performed an experiment in which larval gray tree frogs (Hyla chrysoscelis) were raised through metamorphosis on diets increased with a suite of elements associated with coal combustion residues (silver [Ag], arsenic [As], cadmium [Cd], chromium [Cr], copper [Cu], mercury [Hg], lead [Pb], selenium [Se], vanadium [V], and zinc [Zn]) at "low" and "high" concentrations. We quantified accumulation of metals at three life stages (mid-larval development, initiation of metamorphosis, and completion of metamorphosis) as well as effects on survival, metabolic rate, size at metamorphosis, and duration and loss of weight during metamorphosis. Most elements were accumulated in a dose-dependent pattern by some or all life stages, although this was not the case for Hg. For most elements, larval body burdens exceeded those of later life stages in some or all treatments (control, low, or high). However for Se, As, and Hg, body burdens in control and low concentrations were increased in later compared with earlier life stages. A lack of dose-dependent accumulation of Hg suggests that the presence of high concentrations of other elements (possibly Se) either inhibited accumulation or increased depuration of Hg. The duration of metamorphosis (forelimb emergence through tail resorption) was lengthened in individuals exposed to the highest concentrations of elements, but there were no other statistically significant biological effects. This study shows that patterns of accumulation and possibly depuration of metals and trace elements are complex in animals possessing complex life cycles. Further study is required to determine specific interactions affecting these patterns, in particular which elements may be responsible for affecting accumulation or retention of Hg when organisms are exposed to complex mixtures of elements.

  19. The spatial distribution, accumulation and potential source of seldom monitored trace elements in sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Huaidong; Xu, Dongyu; Wei, Xin; Gao, Li

    2015-01-01

    The alteration of hydrologic condition of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) after impoundment has caused numerous environmental changes. This study investigated the distribution, accumulation and potential sources of the seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs) in sediments from three tributaries (ZY, MX and CT) and one mainstream (CJ) in TGR during different seasons. The average contents of most SMTEs excluding Sb in the winter were similar to that in the summer. For Sb, its average concentrations in the summer and winter were roughly six and three times higher than its background value, respectively. Contamination factor (CF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) demonstrated that most of the sediments were obviously contaminated by Sb. The enrichment factors (EF) of Ga and Sb were higher than 2.0, revealing the possible anthropogenic inputs; However, the EFs of other SMTEs were lower than 1.5, indicating the natural inputs. Correlation and principal component analysis suggested the most SMTEs were positively correlated with major elements (Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) and clay contents, which implies that SMTEs had the same sources with these major metals, and the fine particles might be a major carrier for transporting SMTEs from the rivers to the TGR. PMID:26538153

  20. Variation in trace-element accumulation in predatory fishes from a stream contaminated by coal combustion waste.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Dean E; Lindell, Angela H; Stillings, Garrett K; Mills, Gary L; Blas, Susan A; McArthur, J Vaun

    2014-04-01

    Extensive and critical evaluation can be required to assess contaminant bioaccumulation in large predatory fishes. Species differences in habitat use, resource use, and trophic level, often influenced by body form, can result in diverging contaminant bioaccumulation patterns. Moreover, the broad size ranges inherent with large-bodied fish provide opportunity for trophic and habitat shifts within species that can further influence contaminant exposure. We compared contaminant bioaccumulation in four fish species, as well as two herbivorous invertebrates, from a coal combustion waste contaminated stream. Muscle, liver, and gonad tissue were analyzed from fish stratified across the broadest size ranges available. Effects of trophic position (δ (15)N), carbon sources (δ (13)C), and body size varied among and within species. Mercury and cesium concentrations were lowest in the invertebrates and increased with trophic level both among and within fish species. Other elements, such as vanadium, cadmium, barium, nickel, and lead, had greater levels in herbivorous invertebrates than in fish muscle. Sequestration by the fish livers averted accumulation in muscle. Consequently, fish liver tissue appeared to be a more sensitive indicator of bioavailability, but exceptions existed. Despite liver sequestration, within fishes, muscle concentrations of many elements still tended to increase by trophic level. Notable variation within some species was observed. These results illustrate the utility of stable isotope data in exploring differences of bioaccumulation within taxa. Our analyses suggest a need for further evaluation of the underlying sources of this variability to better understand contaminant bioaccumulation in large predatory fishes.

  1. Effects of ocean acidification on trace element accumulation in the early-life stages of squid Loligo vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lacoue-Labarthe, T; Réveillac, E; Oberhänsli, F; Teyssié, J L; Jeffree, R; Gattuso, J P

    2011-09-01

    The anthropogenic release of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into the atmosphere leads to an increase in the CO(2) partial pressure (pCO(2)) in the ocean, which may reach 950 μatm by the end of the 21st century. The resulting hypercapnia (high pCO(2)) and decreasing pH ("ocean acidification") are expected to have appreciable effects on water-breathing organisms, especially on their early-life stages. For organisms like squid that lay their eggs in coastal areas where the embryo and then paralarva are also exposed to metal contamination, there is a need for information on how ocean acidification may influence trace element bioaccumulation during their development. In this study, we investigated the effects of enhanced levels of pCO(2) (380, 850 and 1500 μatm corresponding to pH(T) of 8.1, 7.85 and 7.60) on the accumulation of dissolved (110m)Ag, (109)Cd, (57)Co, (203)Hg, (54)Mn and (65)Zn radiotracers in the whole egg strand and in the different compartments of the egg of Loligo vulgaris during the embryonic development and also in hatchlings during their first days of paralarval life. Retention properties of the eggshell for (110m)Ag, (203)Hg and (65)Zn were affected by the pCO(2) treatments. In the embryo, increasing seawater pCO(2) enhanced the uptake of both (110m)Ag and (65)Zn while (203)Hg showed a minimum concentration factor (CF) at the intermediate pCO(2). (65)Zn incorporation in statoliths also increased with increasing pCO(2). Conversely, uptake of (109)Cd and (54)Mn in the embryo decreased as a function of increasing pCO(2). Only the accumulation of (57)Co in embryos was not affected by increasing pCO(2). In paralarvae, the CF of (110m)Ag increased with increasing pCO(2), whereas the (57)Co CF was reduced at the highest pCO(2) and (203)Hg showed a maximal uptake rate at the intermediate pCO(2). (54)Mn and (65)Zn accumulation in paralarvae were not significantly modified by hypercapnic conditions. Our results suggest a combined effect of pH on the adsorption and

  2. Platinum-group elements in southern Africa: mineral inventory and an assessment of undiscovered mineral resources: Chapter Q in Global mineral resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zientek, Michael L.; Causey, J. Douglas; Parks, Heather L.; Miller, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The large layered intrusions in southern Africa—the Bushveld Complex and the Great Dyke—are now and will continue to be a major source of the world’s supply of PGE. Mining will not deplete the identified mineral resources and reserves or potential undiscovered mineral resources for many decades; however, in the near-term, PGE supply could be affected by social, environmental, political, and economic factors.

  3. Assessment of metallic mineral resources in the Humboldt River Basin, Northern Nevada, with a section on Platinum-Group-Element (PGE) Potential of the Humboldt Mafic Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.; Ludington, Steve; Mihalasky, Mark J.; Peters, Stephen G.; Theodore, Ted G.; Ponce, David A.; John, David A.; and Berger, Byron R.; Zientek, Michael L.; Sidder, Gary B.; Zierenberg, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    The Humboldt River Basin is an arid to semiarid, internally drained basin that covers approximately 43,000 km2 in northern Nevada. The basin contains a wide variety of metallic and nonmetallic mineral deposits and occurrences, and, at various times, the area has been one of the Nation's leading or important producers of gold, silver, copper, mercury, and tungsten. Nevada currently (2003) is the third largest producer of gold in the world and the largest producer of silver in the United States. Current exploration for additional mineral deposits focuses on many areas in northern Nevada, including the Humboldt River Basin.

  4. Transmission Electron Microscope Study of Platinum Group Element-Rich Micronuggets from Two Spherule Layer Intersections, Barberton Greenstone Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr-Westheide, T.; Greshake, A.; Wirth, R.; Reimold, W. U.; Fritz, J.

    2016-08-01

    New results of a comprehensive transmission electron microscope (TEM) study including microstructural and chemical analyses of three submicrometer sized, primary PGE metal nuggets in Archean spherule layer material from the Barberton Mountain Land.

  5. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER. PMID:27034988

  6. Levels of platinum group metals in selected species (Sarotherodon melanotheron, Chonophorus lateristriga, Macrobrachium vollenhovenii and Crassostrea tulipa) in some estuaries and lagoons along the coast of Ghana.

    PubMed

    Essumang, D K; Adokoh, C K; Boamponsem, L

    2010-10-12

    The use of some biota as bioindicators of heavy metal pollution has been demonstrated as particularly adequate due to their capacity of bioconcentration. This study evaluated the levels of platinum group metals (PGMs) in some selected species along the coastal belt of Ghana, using the neutron activation analysis (NAA) method. The result was processed to evaluate pollution indices in order to map the distribution of the metals in those species in the lagoons and estuaries along the costal belt of Ghana. The analysis showed significant levels of all PGMs in blackchin tilapia (Sarotherodon melanotheron Cichlidae), brown goby (Chonophorus lateristriga Gobiidae), shrimp (Macrobrachium vollenhovenii Palaemonidae), and mangrove oysters (Crassostrea tulipa Ostreidae) in the lagoons and river Pra estuary. However, the oysters showed an elevated mean concentration of 0.13 μg/g (dry weight) Pd. From the pollution indices, most of the sampling sites registered mean contamination factor (CF) values between 1.20 and 3.00 for Pt, Pd, and Rh. The pollution load index (PLI) conducted also gave an average pollution index between 0.79 and 2.37, indicating progressive contamination levels. The results revealed that anthropogenic sources, industrial and hospital effluent, etc., together with vehicular emissions, could be the contributing factors to the deposition of PGMs along the Ghanaian coast.

  7. Resolving Electrode Morphology’s Impact on Platinum Group Metal-Free Cathode Performance Using Nano-CT of 3D Hierarchical Pore and Ionomer Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Komini Babu, Siddharth; Chung, Hoon T.; Zelenay, Piotr; Litster, Shawn

    2016-11-02

    This paper reports on the characterization of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) cathodes featuring a platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst using nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) and morphological analysis. PGM-free PEFC cathodes have gained significant interest in the past decade since they have the potential to dramatically reduce PEFC costs by eliminating the large platinum (Pt) raw material cost. However, several challenges remain before they are commercially viable. Since these catalysts have lower volumetric activity, the PGM-free cathodes are thicker and are subject to increased gas and proton transport resistances that reduce the performance. To better understand the efficacy of the catalyst and improve electrode performance, a detailed understanding the correlation between electrode fabrication, morphology, and performance is crucial. In this work, the pore/solid structure and the ionomer distribution was resolved in three dimensions (3D) using nano-CT for three PGM-free electrodes of varying Nafion® loading. The associated transport properties were evaluated from pore/particlescale simulations within the nano-CT imaged structure. These characterizations are then used to elucidate the microstructural origins of the dramatic changes in fuel cell performance with varying Nafion® ionomer loading. We show that this is primarily a result of distinct changes in ionomer’s spatial distribution. The significant impact of electrode morphology on performance highlights the importance of PGM-free electrode development in concert with efforts to improve catalyst activity and durability.

  8. Integration of Platinum Group Metal-Free Catalysts and Bilirubin Oxidase into a Hybrid Material for Oxygen Reduction: Interplay of Chemistry and Morphology.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Carbonell, Santiago; Babanova, Sofia; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Workman, Michael J; Santoro, Carlo; Mirabal, Alex; Calabrese Barton, Scott; Atanassov, Plamen

    2017-04-10

    Catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) electrocatalysts integrated with an enzyme (bilirubin oxidase, BOx) in neutral media was studied. The effects of chemical and morphological characteristics of PGM-free materials on the enzyme enhancement of the overall ORR kinetics was investigated. The surface chemistry of the PGM-free catalyst was studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Catalyst surface morphology was characterized using two independent methods: length-scale specific image analysis and nitrogen adsorption. Good agreement of macroscopic and microscopic morphological properties was found. Enhancement of ORR activity by the enzyme is influenced by chemistry and surface morphology of the catalyst itself. Catalysts with a higher nitrogen content, specifically pyridinic moieties, showed the greatest enhancement. Furthermore, catalysts with a higher fraction of surface roughness in the range of 3-5 nm exhibited greater performance enhancement than catalysts lacking features of this size. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Platinum group metal-free electrocatalysts: Effects of synthesis on structure and performance in proton-exchange membrane fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Workman, Michael J.; Dzara, Michael; Ngo, Chilan; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Serov, Alexey; McKinney, Sam; Gordon, Jonathan; Atanassov, Plamen; Artyushkova, Kateryna

    2017-04-01

    Development of platinum group metal free catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) requires understanding of the interactions between surface chemistry and performance, both of which are strongly dependent on synthesis conditions. To elucidate these complex relationships, a set of Fe-N-C catalysts derived from the same set of precursor materials is fabricated by varying several key synthetic parameters under controlled conditions. The results of physicochemical characterization are presented and compared with the results of rotating disk electrode (RDE) analysis and fuel cell testing. We find that electrochemical performance is strongly correlated with three key properties related to catalyst composition: concentrations of 1) atomically dispersed Fe species, 2) species in which N is bound to Fe, and 3) surface oxides. Not only are these factors related to performance, these types of chemical species are shown to correlate with each other. This study provides evidence supporting the role of iron coordinated with nitrogen as an active species for the ORR, and offers synthetic pathways to increase the density of atomically dispersed iron species and surface oxides for optimum performance.

  10. Study on separation of platinum group metals from high level liquid waste using macroporous (MOTDGA-TOA)/SiO{sub 2}-P silica-based absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Tatsuya; Kim, Seong-Yun; Xu, Yuanlai; Hitomi, Keitaro; Ishii, Keizo; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kimura, Takaumi

    2013-07-01

    The recovery of platinum group metals (PGMs) from high level liquid waste (HLLW) by macroporous silica-based adsorbent, (MOTDGA-TOA)/SiO{sub 2}-P has been developed by impregnating two extractants of N,N'-dimethyl-N,N'-di-n-octyl-thio-diglycolamide (MOTDGA) and tri-n-octylamine (TOA) into a silica/polymer composite support (SiO{sub 2}-P). The adsorption of Ru(III), Rh(III) and Pd(II) have been investigated in simulated HLLW by batch method. The adsorbent has shown good uptake property for Pd(II). In addition, the combined use of MOTDGA and TOA improved the adsorption of Ru(III) and Rh(III) better than the individual use of them. The usability of adsorbent in radiation fields was further confirmed by irradiation experiments. The adsorbent remained to have the uptake capability for PGMs over the absorbed dose of 100 kGy, corresponding with one really adsorbed by the adsorbent, and showed good retention capability for Pd(II) even at the absorbed dose of 800 kGy. The chromatographic separation of metal ions was demonstrated with the adsorbent packed column, there is no influence of Re(VII) (instead of Tc) on the excellent separation behavior of Pd(II). (authors)

  11. Universal dependence of hydrogen oxidation and evolution reaction activity of platinum-group metals on pH and hydrogen binding energy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jie; Sheng, Wenchao; Zhuang, Zhongbin; Xu, Bingjun; Yan, Yushan

    2016-03-01

    Understanding how pH affects the activity of hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is key to developing active, stable, and affordable HOR/HER catalysts for hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. A common linear correlation between hydrogen binding energy (HBE) and pH is observed for four supported platinum-group metal catalysts (Pt/C, Ir/C, Pd/C, and Rh/C) over a broad pH range (0 to 13), suggesting that the pH dependence of HBE is metal-independent. A universal correlation between exchange current density and HBE is also observed on the four metals, indicating that they may share the same elementary steps and rate-determining steps and that the HBE is the dominant descriptor for HOR/HER activities. The onset potential of CO stripping on the four metals decreases with pH, indicating a stronger OH adsorption, which provides evidence against the promoting effect of adsorbed OH on HOR/HER.

  12. Role of ligands in accumulation and fractionation of rare Earth elements in plants: examples of phosphate and citrate.

    PubMed

    Ding, Shiming; Liang, Tao; Zhang, Chaosheng; Yan, Juncai; Zhang, Zili; Sun, Qin

    2005-10-01

    Few studies have been carried out on the effects of ligands on rare earth element (REE) bioaccumulation processes. In this study, the effects of phosphate (Pi, an inorganic ligand) and citrate (an organic ligand) on accumulation and fractionation of REEs in wheat were investigated using aqueous culture with extraneous mixed REEs (MRE). The results show that initial Pi solution culture at various levels followed by exposure to a fixed-MRE solution did not significantly change the total concentrations of REEs (SigmaREE) in roots, whereas the SigmaREE in leaves dramatically decreased with increasing levels of Pi applied. Simultaneous culture of wheat with mixture of MRE and citrate solutions caused obvious decreases of the SigmaREE in both roots and leaves. Compared with MRE, significant fractionations of REEs were found in wheat organs when no ligand was applied. Notable middle REE (MREE) enrichment and M-type tetrad effect were observed in the roots, and heavy REE (HREE) enrichment and W-type tetrad effect existed in the leaves. Pi treatments did not significantly affect the fractionations of REEs in the roots, but enrichment of HREEs in the leaves slightly increased at the highest level of Pi applied. Fractionations of REEs in both roots and leaves decreased with increasing levels of citrate applied; at higher levels of citrate (> or =150 microM), no above fractionation features were observed in wheat, but light REE (LREE) enrichment existed in the roots and leaves. The results indicate that ligands might play important roles in accumulation and fractionation of REEs during bioaccumulation processes.

  13. Trace element accumulation in the moss Hypnum cupressiforme Hedw. and the trees Quercus ilex L. and Pinus halepensis Mill. in Catalonia.

    PubMed

    Sardans, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep

    2005-09-01

    We studied trace element accumulation in the moss Hypnum cupressiforme and the widely distributed Mediterranean trees Quercus ilex and Pinus halepensis located at increasing distances from the Barcelona Metropolitan Area. Hypnum cupressiforme, Quercus ilex and, to a somewhat lesser extent, Pinus halepensis, have proved to be adequate as possible accumulative monitoring species in relation to trace elements pollution. No significant effects of crown orientation were found. One-year old leaves generally accumulated more trace elements than current-year leaves. All the studied trace elements showed greatest concentrations in the Barcelona Metropolitan Area, with lead, cadmium and arsenic concentrations being especially high. In general, trace element concentrations in biomass were similar or higher than the values reported from other Mediterranean urban areas of Europe. The top soil-layer concentrations were also higher in the Barcelona Metropolitan Area indicating the existence of mechanisms of atmospheric deposition and/or concentration in the soil. The lower values of Pb of airborne origin relative to other elements such as Cd, Cu, Zn and Sb suggest that traffic exhausts are not the only important focus of pollutants in this area. The results of biomass concentrations and of enrichment factor of biomasses respect to bedrock and soils show that atmospheric inputs account for the higher trace element concentrations in the Barcelona Metropolitan Area.

  14. Interseismic strain accumulation at the Mw8.8 2010 Maule earthquake by means of finite element modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, M.; Tassara, A.; Araya, R.; Bataille, K.

    2012-04-01

    We implemented a two-dimensional finite element model that simulates the accumulation of crustal deformation due to the tectonic loading on a locked subduction fault and applied this model to study the seismic cycle of the Mw8.8 2010 Maule (Central Chile) earthquake. Our goal is to gain insigth into the fundamental factors controling elastic strain build-up and release in subduction zones and to evaluate different approaches proposed for modeling surface deformation as observed by GPS-based crustal velocities. By applying the finite element technique we developed a linear elasticity solver that allows us to assess a realistic plate geometry, rheology and relative velocity of subducting plate in a coupled seismic zone. Constraining parameters such as convergence velocity as well as the geometry of the subduction zone are supported by independent geophysical data so we concentrate on the influence of mechanical slab thickness, variations in the updip and downdip limit, degree of coupling and rheology. We have introduced idealized geometric models, noting that our numerical solution reproduce the analytical solution for an elastic half-space and that the surface displacement field obtained for a curved fault and non-zero slab thickness model mimics the predictions of a simple backslip model when the slab thickness tends to zero. We compared model predictions with GPS observations in a EW profile crossing the Maule earthquake rupture area in an attempt for determining the parameters of the seismogenic zone most suitable for this region. Our preliminary results, that consider a realistic geometry and uniform convergence velocity, suggest little influence of the subducting plate thickness for the same downdip limit and the fit to observations is only locally achieved within the margin of error of GPS speeds. We will show results for the inter- and co-seismic phases of the seismic cycle.

  15. Accumulation of airborne trace elements in mosses, lichens and synthetic materials exposed at urban monitoring stations: towards a harmonisation of the moss-bag technique.

    PubMed

    Giordano, S; Adamo, P; Spagnuolo, V; Tretiach, M; Bargagli, R

    2013-01-01

    Mosses, lichens and cellulose filters were exposed for 17 weeks at four urban monitoring stations in Naples (S Italy) to assess the accumulation of airborne Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, and Zn. In each site, the element accumulation was significantly higher in the moss Hypnum cupressiforme than in the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea. Acid washed mosses accumulated the highest amount of trace elements, but the differences in element concentrations among the moss samples exposed after water washing and different devitalisation treatments (acid washing, oven drying and water boiling) and between the lichen samples exposed with and without the nylon bag were not statistically significant. The cellulose filters showed the lowest accumulation capability. The reciprocal ordination of sites and exposed materials showed an increasing contamination gradient (especially for Pb, Cu and Zn) from the background site to the trafficked city streets; this pattern was undetectable from PM(10) data recorded by the automatic monitoring devices operating in the four exposure sites. The element profile in exposed materials did not change substantially throughout the urban area and particles of polluted urban soils seem the main source of airborne metals in Naples. Through a comprehensive evaluation of the results from this and previous studies, a protocol is suggested for the moss-bag monitoring of trace element deposition in urban environments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Resolving Electrode Morphology’s Impact on Platinum Group Metal-Free Cathode Performance Using Nano-CT of 3D Hierarchical Pore and Ionomer Distribution

    DOE PAGES

    Komini Babu, Siddharth; Chung, Hoon T.; Zelenay, Piotr; ...

    2016-11-02

    This paper reports on the characterization of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) cathodes featuring a platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) catalyst using nano-scale resolution X-ray computed tomography (nano-CT) and morphological analysis. PGM-free PEFC cathodes have gained significant interest in the past decade since they have the potential to dramatically reduce PEFC costs by eliminating the large platinum (Pt) raw material cost. However, several challenges remain before they are commercially viable. Since these catalysts have lower volumetric activity, the PGM-free cathodes are thicker and are subject to increased gas and proton transport resistances that reduce the performance. To better understand the efficacymore » of the catalyst and improve electrode performance, a detailed understanding the correlation between electrode fabrication, morphology, and performance is crucial. In this work, the pore/solid structure and the ionomer distribution was resolved in three dimensions (3D) using nano-CT for three PGM-free electrodes of varying Nafion® loading. The associated transport properties were evaluated from pore/particlescale simulations within the nano-CT imaged structure. These characterizations are then used to elucidate the microstructural origins of the dramatic changes in fuel cell performance with varying Nafion® ionomer loading. We show that this is primarily a result of distinct changes in ionomer’s spatial distribution. The significant impact of electrode morphology on performance highlights the importance of PGM-free electrode development in concert with efforts to improve catalyst activity and durability.« less

  17. Air breathing cathodes for microbial fuel cell using Mn-, Fe-, Co- and Ni-containing platinum group metal-free catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Kodali, Mounika; Santoro, Carlo; Serov, Alexey; ...

    2017-02-07

    Here we discuss the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is one of the major factors that is limiting the overall performance output of microbial fuel cells (MFC). In this study, Platinum Group Metal-free (PGM-free) ORR catalysts based on Fe, Co, Ni, Mn and the same precursor (Aminoantipyrine, AAPyr) were synthesized using identical sacrificial support method (SSM). The catalysts were investigated for their electrochemical performance, and then integrated into an air-breathing cathode to be tested in “clean” environment and in a working microbial fuel cell (MFC). Their performances were also compared to activated carbon (AC) based cathode under similar conditions. Results showedmore » that the addition of Mn, Fe, Co and Ni to AAPyr increased the performances compared to AC. Fe-AAPyr showed the highest open circuit potential (OCP) that was 0.307 ± 0.001 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and the highest electrocatalytic activity at pH 7.5. On the contrary, AC had an OCP of 0.203 ± 0.002 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and had the lowest electrochemical activity. In MFC, Fe-AAPyr also had the highest output of 251 ± 2.3 μWcm–2, followed by Co-AAPyr with 196 ± 1.5 μWcm–2, Ni-AAPyr with 171 ± 3.6 μWcm–2, Mn-AAPyr with 160 ± 2.8 μWcm–2 and AC 129 ± 4.2 μWcm–2. The best performing catalyst (Fe-AAPyr) was then tested in MFC with increasing solution conductivity from 12.4 mScm–1 to 63.1 mScm–1. A maximum power density of 482 ± 5 μWcm–2 was obtained with increasing solution conductivity, which is one of the highest values reported in the field.« less

  18. Quantitative elemental analysis on aluminum accumulation by HVTEM-EDX in liver tissues of mice orally administered with aluminum chloride.

    PubMed

    Kametani, Kiyokazu; Nagata, Tetsuji

    2006-06-01

    Quantitative elemental analysis on Al was carried out by high-accelerating voltage transmission electron microscopy (HVTEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX) using an accelerating voltage at 300 kV with high permeability in 1-mum-thick samples obtained from mice administered with aluminum chloride solution for 3, 9, and 17 weeks. By light microscopic observation, no morphological changes were observed in the hepatocytes and macrophages in the liver tissues of mice that were administered with excess Al as compared with the normal control mice. In contrast, by electron microscopic observation, ultrastructural changes were observed in the lysosomes in the hepatocytes as well as the pinocytotic vesicles in the macrophages in the experimental animals. Therefore, the concentrations of Al detected in lysosomes in hepatocytes and pinocytotic vesicles in macrophages of livers of mice administered with Al were measured in relationship to those administration periods. Moreover, transitional changes of hepatocyte lysosome ratios by image analysis and the macrophage counts in the unit area increased in liver tissues of mice administered with Al as compared with normal control mice. From the results, it was demonstrated that hepatocyte lysosome ratio and macrophage count increased in liver tissues of treated mice during those short-term excessive Al administration periods. It was also clarified that the concentrations of Al in both hepatocytes and macrophages increased as observed by HVTEM-EDX. In conclusion, Al accumulated in hepatocytes and macrophages at 3 and 9 weeks administration, while the ultrastructural changes remained in the hepatocytes and macrophages. In contrast, Al concentration did not increase in the liver at 17 weeks administration.

  19. Alleviation of environmental risks associated with severely contaminated mine tailings using amendments: Modeling of trace element speciation, solubility, and plant accumulation.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Tania; Bes, Cleménce; Bernal, Maria Pilar; Clemente, Rafael

    2016-11-01

    Tailings are considered one of the most relevant sources of contamination associated with mining activities. Phytostabilization of mine spoils may need the application of the adequate combination of amendments to facilitate plant establishment and reduce their environmental impact. Two pot experiments were set up to assess the capability of 2 inorganic materials (calcium carbonate and a red mud derivate, ViroBind(TM) ), alone or in combination with organic amendments, for the stabilization of highly acidic trace element-contaminated mine tailings using Atriplex halimus. The effects of the treatments on tailings and porewater physico-chemical properties and trace-element accumulation by the plants, as well as the processes governing trace elements speciation and solubility in soil solution and their bioavailability were modeled. The application of the amendments increased tailings pH and decreased (>99%) trace elements solubility in porewater, but also changed the speciation of soluble Cd, Cu, and Pb. All the treatments made A. halimus growth in the tailings possible; organic amendments increased plant biomass and nutritional status, and reduced trace-element accumulation in the plants. Tailings amendments modified trace-element speciation in porewater (favoring the formation of chlorides and/or organo-metallic forms) and their solubility and plant uptake, which were found to be mainly governed by tailing/porewater pH, electrical conductivity, and organic carbon content, as well as soluble/available trace-element concentrations. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2874-2884. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  20. Mutations that alter a repeated ACCA element located at the 5' end of the Potato virus X genome affect RNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Mi-Ri; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Choi, Hong-Soo; Hemenway, Cynthia L; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2008-08-15

    The repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence and structural (SL1) elements in the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of the Potato virus X (PVX) RNA play vital roles in the PVX life cycle by controlling translation, RNA replication, movement, and assembly. It has already been shown that the repeated ACCA or AC-rich sequence affect both gRNA and sgRNA accumulation, while not affecting minus-strand RNA accumulation, and are also required for host protein binding. The functional significance of the repeated ACCA sequence elements in the 5' NTR region was investigated by analyzing the effects of deletion and site-directed mutations on PVX replication in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and NT1 protoplasts. Substitution (ACCA into AAAA or UUUU) mutations introduced in the first (nt 10-13) element in the 5' NTR of the PVX RNA significantly affected viral replication, while mutations introduced in the second (nt 17-20) and third (nt 20-23) elements did not. The fourth (nt 29-32) ACCA element weakly affected virus replication, whereas mutations in the fifth (nt 38-41) significantly reduced virus replication due to the structure disruption of SL1 by AAAA and/or UUUU substitutions. Further characterization of the first ACCA element indicated that duplication of ACCA at nt 10-13 (nt 10-17, ACCAACCA) caused severe symptom development as compared to that of wild type, while deletion of the single element (nt 10-13), DeltaACCA) or tripling of this element caused reduced symptom development. Single- and double-nucleotide substitutions introduced into the first ACCA element revealed the importance of CC located at nt positions 11 and 12. Altogether, these results indicate that the first ACCA element is important for PVX replication.

  1. Species classification and bioactive ingredients accumulation of BaiJiangCao based on characteristic inorganic elements analysis by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and multivariate analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wen-Lan, Li; Xue, Zhang; Xin-Xin, Yang; Shuai, Wang; Lin, Zhao; Huan-Jun, Zhao; Yong-Rui, Bao; Chen-Feng, Ji; Ning, Chen; Zheng, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patrinia scabiosaefolia Fisch and Patrinia villosa (Thunb.) Juss., two species herbs with the same Chinese name “BaiJiangCao”, are important ancient herbal medicines widely used for more than 2000 years. The clinical application of two species herb is confused due to the difficult identification. Objective: The objective was to authenticate the species of BaiJiangCao and analyze the accumulation of bioactive ingredients based on characteristic inorganic elements analysis. Materials and Methods: Content of 32 inorganic elements in BaiJiangCao from different habitats were determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and the characteristic inorganic elements were picked to distinguish the species of the herb by principal component analysis and cluster analysis. Contents of two bioactive ingredients, luteoloside, and oleanolic acid, in the samples, were also analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography method. Relationship between accumulation of bioactive ingredients and content of macroelements in BaiJiangCao was established by statistics. Results: A 4 macroelements (Na, Mg, K, Fe) in 32 determined inorganic elements were picked for characteristic inorganic elements. Content of Na, Mg, K and Fe showed positive correlations with that of luteoloside, content of Na, Mg showed positive correlations with that of oleanolic acid, but content of K and Fe showed negative correlations with that of oleanolic acid. Conclusion: It is for the first time to utilize the characteristic inorganic elements as an index to classify the herb species by the method of ICP-MS and multivariate analysis. And it is also the first report to investigate the influence of inorganic elements in herb on the accumulation of bioactive components which could affect the pharmacological efficacy of the herb medicine. And this method could also be utilized in research of corresponding aspects. PMID:26600721

  2. Comparative analysis of pepper and tomato reveals euchromatin expansion of pepper genome caused by differential accumulation of Ty3/Gypsy-like elements

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Among the Solanaceae plants, the pepper genome is three times larger than that of tomato. Although the gene repertoire and gene order of both species are well conserved, the cause of the genome-size difference is not known. To determine the causes for the expansion of pepper euchromatic regions, we compared the pepper genome to that of tomato. Results For sequence-level analysis, we generated 35.6 Mb of pepper genomic sequences from euchromatin enriched 1,245 pepper BAC clones. The comparative analysis of orthologous gene-rich regions between both species revealed insertion of transposons exclusively in the pepper sequences, maintaining the gene order and content. The most common type of the transposon found was the LTR retrotransposon. Phylogenetic comparison of the LTR retrotransposons revealed that two groups of Ty3/Gypsy-like elements (Tat and Athila) were overly accumulated in the pepper genome. The FISH analysis of the pepper Tat elements showed a random distribution in heterochromatic and euchromatic regions, whereas the tomato Tat elements showed heterochromatin-preferential accumulation. Conclusions Compared to tomato pepper euchromatin doubled its size by differential accumulation of a specific group of Ty3/Gypsy-like elements. Our results could provide an insight on the mechanism of genome evolution in the Solanaceae family. PMID:21276256

  3. Influence of ph in the Uptake and Accumulation of Mineral Elements on Vine Leaf (Vitis vinifera L.) from Castilla-La Mancha (SPAIN.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo, Sandra; Amorós, José Angel; Pérez-de-los-Reyes, Caridad; García-Navarro, Francisco J.; Higueras, Pablo; Sanchez-Ormeño, Mónica

    2015-04-01

    Each soil-plant system has specific parameters on the uptake of different minerals in the soil, depending on several factors. One of these factors, perhaps the most important, is the pH. 101 Vineyard plots have been selected in Castilla-La Mancha (Spain) and have been analysed (pH among other parameters) by the methods described by FAO. Leaf samples have also been taken in each plot. We analysed the content of 25 mineral elements in both soil and leaf through FRX technique. In addition, we calculated the BAC (bioaccumulation coefficient, calculated as the ratio between the concentration of element in the plant and soil) to stablish if the soil pH influences the accumulation of mineral elements for the plant. As a result we have observed a different behavior of groups of elements for acids or alkaline soils. Thus, the alkaline elements (Na, K, Rb) have a higher BAC value in alkaline soils except cesium (Cs) that has a similar value; while the alkaline-earth elements (Ca, Mg, Sr) present lower BAC in alkaline soils except for barium (Ba) that shows similar value in both cases. Rare Earths (Y, La, Ce, Th and Nd) have very similar values in bioaccumulation for acidic and alkaline soils, while metals (Fe, Al, V, Cr, Co, Cu, Rb and Pb) show a higher bioaccumulation in alkaline soils. Instead Mn, Zn and Ga are preferently bioaccumulated in acid soils. The values obtained for the sulfur (S) are superior in acid soils. We conclude that certain mineral elements accumulate in the leaves of vines depending on the soil pH. The pH will influence the ionic form in which the element is present in the soil and plants preferentially uptake mineral elements in certain ionic forms.

  4. Accumulation of germanium and rare earth elements in functional groups of selected energy crops cultivated on two different soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiche, Oliver; Székely, Balázs

    2016-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted to investigate the uptake of Ge and selected REEs in functional groups of selected crop species. Five species belonging to the functional group of grasses (Hordeum vulgare, Zea mays, Avena sativa, Panicum miliaceum and Phalaris arundinacea) and four species from the group of herbs (Lupinus albus, Lupinus angustifolius, Fagopyrum esculentum and Brassica napus) were cultivated in parallel on two soils with slightly alkaline (soil A: pH = 7.8) and slightly acidic (soil B: pH = 6.8) conditions. After harvest, concentrations of Ge, La, Nd, Gd, Er, P, Fe, Mn and Si in shoot tissues were determined with ICP-MS. Concentrations of Ge were significantly higher in grasses than in herbs. Conversely, concentrations of La and Nd were significantly higher in herbs, than in grasses. Highest concentrations were measured in Brassica napus (REEs) and Zea mays (Ge). Concentrations of Ge significantly correlated with that of Si in the shoots showing low concentrations in herbs and high concentrations in grasses, indicating a common mechanism during the uptake in grasses. Concentrations of REEs correlated significantly with that of Fe, indicating increasing concentrations of REEs with increasing concentrations of Fe. Cultivation of species on the slightly acidic soil significantly increased the uptake Ge in Lupinus albus and Phalaris arundinacea and the uptake of La and Nd in all species except of Phalaris arundinacea. This study demonstrated that commonly used field crops could be regarded as suitable candidates for a phytomining of Ge and REEs, since these species develop high yields of shoots, high concentrations of elements and are widely used in agricultural practice. Under soil conditions where bioavailability of Ge and REEs is expected to be low (soil A) accumulation can be estimated at 1.8 g/ha Ge in Z. mays and 3.7 g/ha REEs (1.5 g/ha La, 1.4 g/ha Nd, 0.6 g/ha Gd, 0.3 g/ha Er), respectively, in B. napus, assuming a constant high efficiency of

  5. Reduction of organic and inorganic selenium compounds by the edible medicinal basidiomycete Lentinula edodes and the accumulation of elemental selenium nanoparticles in its mycelium.

    PubMed

    Vetchinkina, Elena; Loshchinina, Ekaterina; Kursky, Viktor; Nikitina, Valentina

    2013-12-01

    We report for the first time that the medicinal basidiomycete Lentinula edodes can reduce selenium from inorganic sodium selenite (Se(IV)) and the organoselenium compound 1,5-diphenyl-3-selenopentanedione-1,5 (DAPS-25) to the elemental state, forming spherical nanoparticles. Submerged cultivation of the fungus with sodium selenite or with DAPS-25 produced an intense red coloration of L. edodes mycelial hyphae, indicating accumulation of elemental selenium (Se(0)) in a red modification. Several methods, including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and X-ray fluorescence, were used to show that red Se(0) accumulated intracellularly in the fungal hyphae as electron-dense nanoparticles with a diameter of 180.51±16.82 nm. Under designated cultivation conditions, shiitake did not reduce selenium from sodium selenate (Se(VI)).

  6. Seasonal Variation in the Accumulation of Trace Elements and Contaminants in Five Shrimp Species from Iskenderun Bay and Their Consumibility as Human Food.

    PubMed

    Kaymacı, Sevtap; Altun, Beyza Ersoy

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal accumulation of trace elements and contaminants in the muscle tissue of five shrimp species; Speckled Shrimp, Deepwater Rose Shrimp, Red Shrimp, Grooved Shrimp and Green Tiger Shrimp, from Iskenderun Bay of Eastern Mediterranean Sea were investigated. It was observed the period of year for the accumulation of such elements is important. Results indicate that peaks are generally reached in autumn and in spring. The levels of Zn, Fe, Cu and Ni were the highest in autumn whereas the maximum Sn and Cr concentrations were obtained in spring. The levels of Cu and Zn were found to be within the permissible limits for human consumption. Contaminants were accumulated at the highest levels in autumn. Attention has to be drawn that Cd values were above permissible limits for deepwater pink shrimp caught in autumn and winter, and for green tiger shrimp caught in autumn. Besides, the accumulation of high level of Pb in the tissue of all species except grooved shrimp whose value was low in spring should also be considered as a warning signal.

  7. Accumulation of nonessential trace elements (Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb) in Atlantic horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) early life stages.

    PubMed

    Bakker, Aaron K; Dutton, Jessica; Sclafani, Matthew; Santangelo, Nicholas

    2017-10-15

    During early development, benthic organisms can accumulate nonessential trace elements through aqueous and particulate sources. This study investigated the accumulation of Ag, As, Cd, Cr, Hg and Pb in Atlantic horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) pre-spawned eggs, embryos, and developing larvae collected from 5 sites on Long Island, NY and compared these concentrations to that found in sediment, pore water, and overlying water. All investigated elements were detected in embryos and larvae at all sites. Arsenic was found at the highest concentration in each life stage across all 5 sites, followed by Ag, whereas Cd, Hg and Pb concentrations varied between sites. Chromium was not detected in pre-spawned eggs, but was present in embryos and larvae at all sites, however, along with Hg, significantly increased from embryo to larvae at most sites. We conclude that observed accumulation patterns are likely a result of abiotic factors, differences in uptake pathways between life stages and the rate of excretion. Future laboratory studies are required to understand the factors influencing the aqueous and dietary uptake of nonessential trace elements in the early life stages of Atlantic horseshoe crabs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Active moss biomonitoring applied to an industrial site in Romania: relative accumulation of 36 elements in moss-bags.

    PubMed

    Culicov, O A; Mocanu, R; Frontasyeva, M V; Yurukova, L; Steinnes, E

    2005-09-01

    Active moss biomonitoring using the species Sphagnum girgensohnii was tested at a strongly polluted site in Romania (Baia Mare) according to a novel sampling design. Nine moss transplants from each of the two background areas (Dubna, Russia and Vitosha Mountain, Bulgaria) were deployed in parallel on balconies about 24 m above street level for 4 months. The samples were analyzed for 36 elements using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Based on the results obtained the sampling variability is discussed in relation to the analytical variability, and the relative uptake of the different elements is assessed. The moss-bags using Sphagnum girgensohnii demonstrate a high or a very high relative uptake for a majority of the 36 investigated elements, but the values depend on the initial element concentration in the moss. Moss leaves analyzed separately showed somewhat higher levels than stems for many elements. Practical considerations however still speak in favor of using the whole moss for transplants.

  9. Osmium-isotope ratios of platinum-group minerals associated with ultramafic intrusions: Os-isotopic evolution of the oceanic mantle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Keiko; Hart, Stanley R.

    1991-12-01

    Osmium-isotope ratios were determined by an ion microprobe on the individual platinum-group minerals (PGM) from placers, which are associated with ultramafic intrusions of late Precambrian to Tertiary age. Unlike Os-isotope ratios in large layered mafic intrusions, these 187Os/ 186Os ratios are low, and within a narrow range from 0.99 to 1.12, which is attributed to the occurrences of the intrusions. There was no opportunity to incorporate old crustal Os because of the small sizes of the intrusions and the mode of emplacement into the upper crustal level. In addition, the interaction with the host volcanic rocks of similar age, if any, would not have seriously affected the 187Os/ 86Os ratios of the peridotites. While different phases of PGM in one grain have similar 187Os/ 186Os ratios, there is a significant variation in a given district. The variation is attributed to a long-term heterogeneity in Re/Os ratios of the oceanic upper mantle. The lowest value in each area is lower than the value expected from the evolution of bulk Earth composition. The lowering may be due to primordially low Re/Os ratios in the mantle or preferential removal of Re by partial melting to form the continental crust. The former model is rejected because most chondrites have higher Re/Os ratios than type C1 and the core-mantle separation would not have lowered Re/Os ratios. The low 187Os/ 186Os ratios are, therefore attributed to the extraction of continental crust by preferential removal of Re from the mantle through partial melting. The model is consistent with the depleted nature of oceanic peridotites (positive ɛ Nd, negative ɛ Sr, and low Re/Os ratios). Calculations of 187Os/ 186Os ratios of the mantle residue suggest that the observed data are in accordance with a model involving the extraction of ˜ 2% melt by fractional fusion from the mantle of C1 chondritic composition at ˜ 2.0 Ga. If the bulk Earth has higher Re/Os ratios, as proposed by Martin [1], then the observed data

  10. Holm Oak (Quercus ilex L.) canopy as interceptor of airborne trace elements and their accumulation in the litter and topsoil.

    PubMed

    Fantozzi, Federica; Monaci, Fabrizio; Blanusa, Tijana; Bargagli, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the role of urban Holm Oak (Quercus ilex L.) trees as an airborne metal accumulators and metals' environmental fate. Analyses confirmed Pb, Cd, Cu and Zn as a main contaminants in Siena's urban environment; only Pb concentrations decreased significantly compared to earlier surveys. Additionally, we determined chemical composition of tree leaves, litter and topsoil (underneath/outside tree crown) in urban and extra-urban oak stands. Most notably, litter in urban samples collected outside the canopy had significantly lower concentrations of organic matter and higher concentrations of Pb, Cu, Cd and Zn than litter collected underneath the canopy. There was a greater metals' accumulation in topsoil, in samples collected under the tree canopy and especially near the trunk ('stemflow area'). Thus, in urban ecosystems the Holm Oak stands likely increase the soil capability to bind metals.

  11. Increased Variation in Adh Enzyme Activity in Drosophila Mutation-Accumulation Experiment Is Not Due to Transposable Elements at the Adh Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aquadro, C. F.; Tachida, H.; Langley, C. H.; Harada, K.; Mukai, T.

    1990-01-01

    We present here a molecular analysis of the region surrounding the structural gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in 47 lines of Drosophila melanogaster that have each accumulated mutations for 300 generations. While these lines show a significant increase in variation of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme activity compared to control lines, we found no restriction map variation in a 13-kb region including the complete Adh structural gene and roughly 5 kb of both 5' and 3' sequences. Thus, the rapid accumulation of ADH activity variation after 28,200 allele generations does not appear to have been due to the mobilization of transposable elements into or out of the Adh structural gene region. PMID:1963870

  12. ACCUMULATION AND TISSUE DISPOSITION OF PARTICLE ASSOCIATED ELEMENTS IN THE RAT AFTER REPEATED INTRATRACHAEL ADMINISTRATION OF SOURCE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to determine the fate of source particle tracer elements following repeated intratracheal instillation (IT) to rats. PM samples comprised Mt. St. Helens ash (MSH) with no water-soluble metals, and oil flyash emission PM (EPM) with water-leachable solubl...

  13. ACCUMULATION AND TISSUE DISPOSITION OF PARTICLE ASSOCIATED ELEMENTS IN THE RAT AFTER REPEATED INTRATRACHAEL ADMINISTRATION OF SOURCE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to determine the fate of source particle tracer elements following repeated intratracheal instillation (IT) to rats. PM samples comprised Mt. St. Helens ash (MSH) with no water-soluble metals, and oil flyash emission PM (EPM) with water-leachable solubl...

  14. The appreciation of mineral element accumulation level in some herbaceous plants species by ICP-AES method.

    PubMed

    Elekes, Carmen Cristina; Dumitriu, Irina; Busuioc, Gabriela; Iliescu, Nicoleta S

    2010-07-01

    From the metallurgic industry zone of Dambovita County, we harvested and analyzed seven herbaceous plants species (Lolium perenne, Festuca pratensis, Stipa capillata, Agrostis alba, Cynodon dactylon, Luzula campestris, and Agrostis tenuis) to establish the heavy metal accumulation levels in these species. The heavy metal contents (for Cr, Mn, Zn, Sr, Cu, Ba, and Sn) were determined by analyzing the dry matter with an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer. This method has detection limits of 0.4-0.6 mg/kg for the analyzed metals. The heavy metal concentrations in plants harvested from the industrial area are in milligram per kilogram of dry matter and ranged from 10.03 to 191.98 mg/kg of dry matter for Cr, 165.89 to 1,103.92 mg/kg of dry matter for Mn, 62.09 to 921.67 mg/kg of dry matter for Zn, 29.21 to 50.12 mg/kg of dry matter for Sr, 0.99 to 113.83 mg/kg of dry matter for Cu, 58.66 to 133.51 mg/kg of dry matter for Ba, and 8.38 to 276.44 mg/kg of dry matter for Sn. The heavy metal accumulation levels in the studied species of plants were calculated by the rapport between the concentration level of the metal in plant samples and the level of the same metal in the soil, near the radicular system for each species of plants. The highest accumulation levels were found in A. alba for Cr (267.69%); in L. perenne for Mn (51.45%), Sr (114.35%), and Ba (60.81%); and in C. dactylon for Zn (136.62%), Cu (97.65%), and F. pratensis for Sn (704.00%).

  15. Vertical distribution of trace-element concentrations and occurrence of metallurgical slag particles in accumulated bed sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.; Bell, P.R.; Lowther, J.S.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from six locations in Lake Roosevelt to determine the vertical distributions of trace-element concentrations in the accumulated sediments of Lake Roosevelt. Elevated concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc occurred throughout much of the accumulated sediments. Concentrations varied greatly within the sediment core profiles, often covering a range of 5 to 10 fold. Trace-element concentrations typically were largest below the surficial sediments in the lower one-half of each profile, with generally decreasing concentrations from the 1964 horizon to the surface of the core. The trace-element profiles reflect changes in historical discharges of trace elements to the Columbia River by an upstream smelter. All samples analyzed exceeded clean-up guidelines adopted by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation for cadmium, lead, and zinc and more than 70 percent of the samples exceeded cleanup guidelines for mercury, arsenic, and copper. Although 100 percent of the samples exceeded sediment guidelines for cadmium, lead, and zinc, surficial concentrations of arsenic, copper, and mercury in some cores were less than the sediment-quality guidelines. With the exception of copper, the trace-element profiles of the five cores collected along the pre-reservoir Columbia River channel typically showed trends of decreasing concentrations in sediments deposited after the 1964 time horizon. The decreasing concentrations of trace elements in the upper half of cores from along the pre-reservoir Columbia River showed a pattern of decreasing concentrations similar to reductions in trace-element loading in liquid effluent from an upstream smelter. Except for arsenic, trace-element concentrations typically were smaller at downstream reservoir locations along the pre-reservoir Columbia River. Trace-element concentration in sediments from the Spokane Arm of the reservoir showed distinct differences compared to the similarities

  16. Lead, platinum, and other heavy elements in the primary cosmic radiation: HEAO-3 results ssc wg032961 cb553097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Brewster, N. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    An observation of the abundances of cosmic-ray lead and platinum-group nuclei using data from the HEAO-3 Heavy Nuclei Experiment (HNE) which consisted of ion chambers mounted on both sides of a plastic Cerenkov counter is reported. Further analysis with more stringent selections, inclusion of additional data, and a calibration at the LBL Bevalac, have allowed obtaining the abundance ratio of lead and the platinum group of elements for particles that had a cutoff rigidity R sub c 5 GV.

  17. Lead, platinum, and other heavy elements in the primary cosmic radiation: HEAO-3 results ssc wg032961 cb553097

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Brewster, N. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.

    1985-01-01

    An observation of the abundances of cosmic-ray lead and platinum-group nuclei using data from the HEAO-3 Heavy Nuclei Experiment (HNE) which consisted of ion chambers mounted on both sides of a plastic Cerenkov counter is reported. Further analysis with more stringent selections, inclusion of additional data, and a calibration at the LBL Bevalac, have allowed obtaining the abundance ratio of lead and the platinum group of elements for particles that had a cutoff rigidity R sub c 5 GV.

  18. Accumulation and health risk assessment of trace elements in Carassius auratus gibelio from subsidence pools in the Huainan coalfield in China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lanlan; Liu, Guijian; Wang, Jie; Liu, Yuan

    2017-08-30

    Microelement (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations were determined in the muscle, skin, gill, and liver tissues of Carassius auratus gibelio collected from subsidence pools at three different coal mines in the Huainan coalfield in China. The concentrations of elements in the water were within the allowable levels for raising fish. However, the higher levels of these metals in sediment may pose potential harm on fish. It was found that the concentrations of Cr, Ni, and Zn in all fish tissues were higher, while As, Cd, and Pb levels were relatively low. Microelement accumulation appeared to be more widespread in subsidence pools than that in natural water. Elements accumulated in fish tissues differently: the highest metal concentrations were generally found in the liver tissues of the fish analyzed, whereas the lowest were recorded in the muscles. The mean element concentrations in muscle tissue from C. auratus gibelio collected from subsidence pools (As, 0.16 mg/kg; Cd, 0.06 mg/kg; Cr, 6.21 mg/kg; Cu, 1.61 mg/kg; Ni, 3.88 mg/kg; Pb, 1.76 mg/kg; and Zn, 12.80 mg/kg dry weight) were far below the allowable limit of the hygienic standard in fish proposed by the Ministry of Health in China, suggesting that the fish were safe for human consumption. A health risk assessment also suggested there was no risk from the analyzed elements for inhabitants near the Huainan coalfield that consume fish.

  19. Partitioning of trace elements and metals between quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse aerosols in indoor and outdoor air in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.; Sunyer, J.

    2015-04-01

    Particle size distribution patterns of trace elements and metals across three size fractions (<0.25 μm, quasi-ultrafine particles, q-UF; 0.25-2.5 μm, accumulation particles; 2.5-10 μm, coarse particles) were analysed in indoor and outdoor air at 39 primary schools across Barcelona (Spain). Special attention was paid to emission sources in each particle size range. Results evidenced the presence in q-UF particles of high proportions of elements typically found in coarse PM (Ca, Al, Fe, Mn or Na), as well as several potentially health-hazardous metals (Mn, Cu, Sn, V, Pb). Modal shifts (e.g., from accumulation to coarse or q-UF particles) were detected when particles infiltrated indoors, mainly for secondary inorganic aerosols. Our results indicate that the location of schools in heavily trafficked areas increases the abundance of q-UF particles, which infiltrate indoors quite effectively, and thus may impact children exposure to these health-hazardous particles.

  20. Trace element and nutrient accumulation in sunflower plants two years after the Aznalcóllar mine spill.

    PubMed

    Madejón, P; Murillo, J M; Marañón, T; Cabrera, F; Soriano, M A

    2003-05-20

    The failure of a tailing pond dam at the Aznalcóllar pyrite mine (SW Spain) in April 1998 released a toxic spill affecting approximately 4300 ha along the Agrio and Guadiamar valleys. Two years later, we have studied yield and concentration of mineral nutrients and trace elements in sunflower plants grown in the spill-affected soil, and in an adjacent unaffected soil as comparison. The study has been carried out in plants at seedling (V4) and mature (R8) stages. Shoot and root biomass of sunflower seedlings was significantly smaller in the affected soil than in the unaffected soil, but there was no significant difference at the mature stage. Oil production was greater in the spill-affected plants. We have not detected any 'fertilising' effect caused by the acid waters of the spill on the main nutrient (N, P and Ca) acquisition, as documented in 1998 for sunflower plants flooded by the spill. Sunflower plants growing in the spill-affected soil reached adequate levels of nutrients. None of the trace elements measured-As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Tl-reached levels either phytotoxic or toxic for humans or animals in seeds and the above-ground part of the spill-affected plants. We evaluate the potential use of sunflower plants for phytoremediation. The potential for phytoextraction is very low; however, it may be used for soil conservation. The production of oil (usable for industrial purposes) may add some value to this crop.

  1. Accumulation of trace elements, pesticides, and polychlorinated biphenyls in sediments and the clam Corbicula manilensis of the Apalachicola River, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elder, J.F.; Mattraw, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of trace element and synthetic organic compound concentrations in botton materials was conducted on the Apalachichola River in northwest Florida in 1979-80 as part of the Apalachicola River Quality Assessment. Substances analyzed included trace elements (predominantly heavy metals), organochlorine insecticides, organophosphorus insecticides, chlorinated phenoxy-acid herbicides, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Three kinds of materials were surveyed: fine-grained sediments, whole-body tissue of the Asiatic clam Corbicula manilensis, and bottom-load organic detritus. No hazardous levels of any of the substances were found. Concentrations in the fine-grained sediments and clams were generally at least ten times lower than maximum limits considered safe for biota of aquatic systems. A comparison of trace-substance data from the Apalachicola River with data from Lake Seminole (upstream) and Apalachicola Bay (downstream) showed lower concentrations in riverine clams. Sediment concentrations in all parts of the system were comparable. Most trace substances in the Apalachicola River enter the river from the upstream part of the basin (the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers in Georgia and Alabama) and from nonpoint sources throughout the basin. There are no major point discharges along the Apalachicola. Trend analysis was limited by the scope of the study, but did not reveal any spatial or temporal trends in concentrations of any of the substances analyzed. Concentrations of organic compounds and most metals in Corbicula manilensis did not correlate with those in sediments.

  2. Effects of elevated CO2 concentrations and fly ash amended soils on trace element accumulation and translocation among roots, stems and seeds of Glycine max (L.) Merr.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, J H; Klumpp, A; Fangmeier, A; Pignata, M L

    2011-03-15

    The carbon dioxide (CO(2)) levels of the global atmosphere and the emissions of heavy metals have risen in recent decades, and these increases are expected to produce an impact on crops and thereby affect yield and food safety. In this study, the effects of elevated CO(2) and fly ash amended soils on trace element accumulation and translocation in the root, stem and seed compartments in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] were evaluated. Soybean plants grown in fly ash (FA) amended soil (0, 1, 10, 15, and 25% FA) at two CO(2) regimes (400 and 600 ppm) in controlled environmental chambers were analyzed at the maturity stage for their trace element contents. The concentrations of Br, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn in roots, stems and seeds in soybeans were investigated and their potential risk to the health of consumers was estimated. The results showed that high levels of CO(2) and lower concentrations of FA in soils were associated with an increase in biomass. For all the elements analyzed except Pb, their accumulation in soybean plants was higher at elevated CO(2) than at ambient concentrations. In most treatments, the highest concentrations of Br, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Pb were found in the roots, with a strong combined effect of elevated CO(2) and 1% of FA amended soils on Pb accumulation (above maximum permitted levels) and translocation to seeds being observed. In relation to non-carcinogenic risks, target hazard quotients (TQHs) were significant in a Chinese individual for Mn, Fe and Pb. Also, the increased health risk due to the added effects of the trace elements studied was significant for Chinese consumers. According to these results, soybean plants grown for human consumption under future conditions of elevated CO(2) and FA amended soils may represent a toxicological hazard. Therefore, more research should be carried out with respect to food consumption (plants and animals) under these conditions and their consequences for human health. Copyright © 2010

  3. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-09-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation.

  4. Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced sterol-regulatory element binding protein activation and hepatic lipid accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Qian; Zhang, Cheng; He, Wei; Wang, Hua; Chen, Yuan-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Chen, Xi; Xu, De-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation. The present study showed that acute alcohol intoxication caused hepatic lipid accumulation in Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP)-1, a transcription factor regulating fatty acid and triglyceride (TG) synthesis, was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic Fas, Acc, Scd-1 and Dgat-2, the key genes for fatty acid and TG synthesis, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Additional experiment showed that hepatic MyD88 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic NF-κB was activated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Moreover, hepatic GSH content was reduced and hepatic MDA level was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic CYP2E1 was elevated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Hepatic p67phox and gp91phox, two NADPH oxidase subunits, were up-regulated in alcohol-treated Tlr4-wild-type mice but not in Tlr4-mutant mice. Alpha-phenyl-N-t-butylnitrone (PBN), a free radical spin-trapping agent, protected against alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. In conclusion, Tlr4-mutant mice are resistant to acute alcohol-induced hepatic SREBP-1 activation and hepatic lipid accumulation. PMID:27627966

  5. New insights from age determination on toxic element accumulation in striped and bottlenose dolphins from Atlantic and Mediterranean waters.

    PubMed

    Lahaye, V; Bustamante, P; Dabin, W; Van Canneyt, O; Dhermain, F; Cesarini, C; Pierce, G J; Caurant, F

    2006-10-01

    This study aimed at comparing toxic element (Hg, Cd) bioaccumulation in relation to age for bottlenose (Tursiops truncatus) and striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) from Mediterranean and Atlantic waters. Metal concentrations were also measured in selected prey to infer metal exposure through the diet. As expected, Mediterranean prey exhibited the highest Hg levels, probably as a consequence of the Hg enrichment of the Mediterranean Sea. Comparing the predators from each area and taking age into account, Mediterranean bottlenose dolphins displayed higher Hg levels than Atlantic dolphins (p = 0.032), whereas Mediterranean striped dolphins did not (p = 0.691). The consumption of Myctophid fish, which showed the highest Hg levels (105+/-80 ngg(-1) w.wt.) among Atlantic prey, may explain the high Hg levels in the liver of the Atlantic striped dolphins and suggested a preferential offshore feeding behaviour in this area. Concerning Cd, no clear differences were found between geographical areas.

  6. Determination of trace elements in human liver biopsy samples by ICP-MS and TXRF: hepatic steatosis and nickel accumulation.

    PubMed

    Varga, Imre; Szebeni, Agnes; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Kovács, Béla

    2005-10-01

    Human liver biopsy samples, collected from 52 individuals, were analysed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometry in a retrospective study (i.e. patient selection and liver biopsy were not for the purpose of element analysis). The freeze-dried samples (typically 0.5-2 mg dry weight) were digested in a laboratory microwave digestion system and solutions with a final volume of 1 mL were prepared. The concentrations of Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Pb were determined by use of a Thermo Elemental X7 ICP-MS spectrometer. TXRF measurements were performed with an Atomika Extra IIA spectrometer. Yttrium was employed as an internal standard, prepared by dissolution of 5N-purity yttria (Y(2)O(3)) in our laboratory. The accuracy was tested by analysis of NIST 1577a Bovine Liver certified reference material. The concentrations of Fe, Cu, Zn, and Rb determined in human liver biopsy samples were in good agreement with data published by other authors. The distribution of nickel in the samples was surprisingly uneven-nickel concentrations ranged from 0.7 to 12 microg g(-1) (dry weight) in 38 samples and in several samples were extremely high, 36-693 microg g(-1). Analysis of replicate procedural blanks and control measurements were performed to prevent misinterpretation of the data. For patients with steatosis (n=14) Ni concentrations were consistently high except for two who had levels close to those measured for the normal group. As far as we are aware no previous literature data are available on the association of steatosis with high concentration of nickel in human liver biopsies taken from living patients.

  7. Hotspots for selected metal elements and microbes accumulation and the corresponding water quality deterioration potential in an unchlorinated drinking water distribution system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Tao, Yu; Zhang, Ya; Lut, Maarten; Knibbe, Willem-Jan; van der Wielen, Paul; Liu, Wentso; Medema, Gertjan; van der Meer, Walter

    2017-11-01

    Biofilm formation, loose deposit accumulation and water quality deterioration in drinking water distribution systems have been widely reported. However, the accumulation and distribution of harbored elements and microbes in the different niches (loose deposits, PVC-U biofilm, and HDPE biofilm) and their corresponding potential contribution to water quality deterioration remain unknown. This precludes an in-depth understanding of water quality deterioration and the development of proactive management strategies. The present study quantitatively evaluated the distribution of elements, ATP, Aeromonas spp., and bacterial communities in distribution pipes (PVC-U, D = 110 mm, loose deposit and biofilm niches) and household connection pipes (HDPE, D = 32 mm, HDPE biofilm niches) at ten locations in an unchlorinated distribution system. The results show that loose deposits in PVC-U pipes, acting as sinks, constitute a hotspot (highest total amount per meter pipe) for elements, ATP, and target bacteria groups (e.g., Aeromonas spp., Mycobacterium spp., and Legionella spp.). When drinking water distribution system niches with harbored elements and microbes become sources in the event of disturbances, the highest quality deterioration potential (QDP) is that of HDPE biofilm; this can be attributed to its high surface-to-volume ratio. 16s rRNA analysis demonstrates that, at the genus level, the bacterial communities in the water, loose deposits, PVC-U biofilm, and HDPE biofilm were dominated, respectively, by Polaromonas spp. (2-23%), Nitrosipra spp. (1-47%), Flavobacterium spp. (1-36%), and Flavobacterium spp. (5-67%). The combined results of elemental composition and bacterial community analyses indicate that different dominant bio-chemical processes might occur within the different niches-for example, iron-arsenic oxidizing in loose deposits, bio-calumniation in PVC-U biofilm, and methane oxidizing in HDPE biofilm. The release of 20% loose deposits, 20% PVC-U biofilm

  8. Trace element accumulation in short-tailed albatrosses (Diomedea albatrus) and black-footed albatrosses (Diomedea nigripes) from Torishima Island, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinsuke, T.; Tokutaka, I.; Takashi, K.; Miyako, T.; Fumio, S.; Nariko, O.

    2003-05-01

    Concentrations of 19 trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) were determined in liver, kidney, muscle, feather and stomach content of short-tailed albatross and feather of black-footed albatross from Torishima Island, Japan. For most of the elements, concentrations in liver and kidney were higher than those in muscle and feather, whereas concentrations of Ga, Sr and Ba were highest in feather of short-taled albatross. Metal concentrations in tissues of short-tailed albatross were within the range of those reported for albatrosses from other locations. Concentrations of Cr, Mn, Hg and Pb were relatively low in the tissues of short-tailed albatross, indicating less contamination by those metals in this species of Torishima Island. No significant differences were observed in metal concentrations in feather between short-tailed albatross and black-footed albatross. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the trace element accumulation in tissues of short-tailed albatross.

  9. The sequestration of trace elements by willow (Salix purpurea)--which soil properties favor uptake and accumulation?

    PubMed

    Cloutier-Hurteau, Benoît; Turmel, Marie-Claude; Mercier, Catherine; Courchesne, François

    2014-03-01

    The effect of soil properties on trace element (TE) extraction by the Fish Creek willow cultivar was assessed in a 4-month greenhouse experiment with two contrasted soils and two mycorrhizal treatments (Rhizophagus irregularis and natives). Aboveground tissues represented more than 82 % of the willow biomass and were the major sink for TE. Cadmium and Zn were concentrated in leaves, while As, Cu, Ni, and Pb were mostly found in roots. Willow bioconcentration ratios were below 0.20 for As, Cu, Ni, and Pb and reached 10.0 for Cd and 1.97 for Zn. More significant differences in willow biomass, TE concentrations, and contents were recorded between soil types than between mycorrhizal treatments. A slight significant increase in Cu extraction by willow in symbiosis with Rhizophagus irregularis was observed and was linked to increased shoot biomass. Significant regression models between TE in willow and soil properties were found in leaves (As, Ni), shoots (As, Cd, Cu, Ni), and roots (As, Cu, Pb). Most of the explanation was shared between soil water-soluble TE and fertility variables, indicating that TE phytoextraction is related to soil properties. Managing interactions between TE and major nutrients in soil appeared as a key to improve TE phytoextraction by willows.

  10. Accumulation and fractionation of rare earth elements in atmospheric particulates around a mine tailing in Baotou, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingqing; Liang, Tao

    2014-05-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) have been increasingly emitted into the atmosphere with a worldwide increase in use of these metals. However, the research on REEs in atmospheric particulates is fairly limited. In this paper, atmospheric particulates including total suspended particulate (TSP) matter and particles with an equivalent aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10) were collected around a rare earth mine tailing in Baotou, the largest rare earth industrial base in China, in August 2012 and March 2013, for the analyses of REE levels and distributions. The total concentrations of REEs for TSP were 172.91 and 297.49 ng/m3, and those for PM10 were 63.23 and 105.52 ng/m3, in August 2012 and March 2013, respectively. Enrichment factors for all 14 analyzed REEs in the TSP and PM10 indicated that the REE enrichment in atmosphere particulates was caused by anthropogenic sources and influenced by the strong wind in spring season. The spatial distribution of REEs in TSP showed a strong gradient in the prevailing wind direction. The chondrite-normalized patterns of REEs in TSP and PM10 were similar with the conspicuous fractionation between light REEs and heavy REEs.

  11. Macro and trace elements in Common Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius) mushroom from the European background areas in Poland: Composition, accumulation, dietary exposure and data review for species.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Drewnowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an up-to-date information on accumulation, occurrence, intake and possible health risks associated with noxious metallic elements (Ag, Cd, Hg, Pb) among mineral constituents (Ag, Al, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, P, Pb, Rb, Sr and Zn) contained in Common Chanterelle (Cantharellus cibarius) mushrooms, a species subjected to a broad use within the domestic market of Poland and widely exported abroad, and presents a short review of data from the available literature. The tasty values of C. cibarius seem to be more rated than the essential minerals contained in its flesh and nominally taken with 1,000 g of fresh fruiting bodies eaten per capita annually, while the contents of toxic or potentially toxic metals, such as Cd, Pb, Hg and Ag, are much below the tolerance limits.

  12. Cultivation of garden vegetables in Peoria Pool sediments from the Illinois River: a case study in trace element accumulation and dietary exposures.

    PubMed

    Ebbs, Stephen; Talbott, Jonathan; Sankaran, Renuka

    2006-08-01

    This case study was conducted to evaluate the use of reclaimed lake sediment as a growth media for vegetable production and to estimate whether accumulation of micronutrients and heavy metals in the vegetables would impact human nutrition or health, respectively. Five plant species, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), broccoli (Brassica oleracea L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), pepper (Capsicum annum L.), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.), were grown in pots containing either reclaimed sediment from the Illinois River or a reference soil. Edible and vegetative tissues from the plants were analyzed for 19 elements, including As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mo, Ni, Pb, Se, and Zn. Tomato and pepper grown in sediment showed significantly greater biomass and yield as compared to plants from the reference soil. Elemental analysis of the tissues revealed that Zn and Mo were the only elements that were significantly greater in sediment-grown plants on a consistent basis. While significant, Zn concentrations were no more than 3-fold higher than those in plants from the reference soil. The same trend was observed for Mo, except for bean tissues, which showed a 10-fold greater concentration in sediment-grown plants. The projected dietary intake of Cu, Mo, and Zn from consumption of sediment-grown vegetable tissues was significantly higher than for soil-grown plants, although the contribution to the recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for these elements was substantial only for Mo. Intake of sediment-grown beans would have provided 500% of the dietary Mo RDA. While this is below the lowest observable adverse effect level (LOAEL) value for this element, there is no evidence to indicate that there would be a nutritional or therapeutic benefit from the consumption of bean containing this level of Mo. The dietary exposures to Cd and Pb would have been below the pertinent limits for all age and gender groups with the exception of the cumulative dietary Cd exposure to the 1-3 year age group

  13. Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus 50 kDa protein is targeted to plasmodesmata and accumulates in sieve elements in transgenic plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, N; Oogake, S; Terada, M; Miyabayashi, S; Ikeda, Y; Takahashi, T; Ogawa, K

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the in situ localization of the 50 kDa protein encoded by ORF2 of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) genome which is thought to be a movement protein. In immunogold electron microscopy of ACLSV-infected Chenopodium quinoa leaves, the 50 kDa protein was localized on plasmodesmata and nearby cytoplasm. Observation of transgenic Nicotiana occidentalis leaves expressing the 50 kDa protein fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) by fluorescence and confocal laser scanning microscopes revealed that green fluorescence was observed as spots on the cell wall or strands passing through the cell wall of several cell types, i.e., epidermal, palisade and spongy mesophyll and collenchyma cells. In transverse and longitudinal sections of leaf veins of transgenic plants showed that the 50K-EGFP fusion accumulated in sieve elements and formed an extensive interconnecting network of threadlike structure. These results indicated that ACLSV 50 kDa protein can target plasmodesmata and traffic into sieve elements.

  14. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  15. Migration of trace elements from basalt substrate to co-located vegetation (lichens and mosses) at the Wudalianchi volcanos, Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Yuan; Ju, Yiwen; Li, Boping; Sun, Yimin

    2016-03-01

    Vegetation (e.g., lichens and mosses) living on the basalt substrate have potential to accumulate trace elements in their tissues. Here, we analyze the trace elements in basalt (collected from major volcanic center to jet plate places, representing four different eruption phases) and adjacent lichens and mosses to assess their elemental source-receptor relation. The results indicate that As, Sr, Mo, Cd, and Ba are enriched in basalt, and depleted in lichens and mosses. However, Zn, Hg, and Pb are enriched in lichens and mosses and depleted in basalt. Moreover, with the increase of basalt age, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Cu are gradually enriched in lichen and moss, but gradually depleted in basalt. Compared with transition metals, large ion lithophiles, the platinum group, and rare earth elements, Cr, Co, Cu, Zn, and Os are more easily absorbed by No. 1 lichen. Specifically, S is highly assimilated in vegetation, with a highest value of 166, followed by I, C, Pb, Zn, and Hg. In addition, the hydrogen and oxygen isotopic compositions of water samples suggest that the surface water in the Wenbo area came from meteoric waters in summer with a high humidity, while the underground water in the Beiyaoquan area came from meteoric waters in winter with a low humidity.

  16. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-10-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized using a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N) ratio, bulk stable organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C), and carbohydrate composition analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.21±0.45% in the upper reach, down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.1‰ to -21.3‰ in Lingdingyang Bay and the South China Sea shelf, with a trend of enrichment seawards. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio offshore. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments. Total neutral sugars, as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose), were between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that significant amounts of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 78±11% for Lingdingyang Bay, 34±4% for the inner shelf, and 5.5±1% for the outer shelf. The molecular composition of the carbohydrate in the surface sediments also suggested that the inner estuary was rich in terrestrially derived carbohydrates but that their contribution decreased offshore. A relatively high abundance of deoxyhexoses in the estuary and shelf indicated a considerable bacterial source of these carbohydrates, implying that sediment organic matter had undergone extensive degradation and/or transformation during transport. Sediment budget based on calculated regional accumulation rates

  17. Predicting cadmium accumulation and toxicity in a green alga in the presence of varying essential element concentrations using a biotic ligand model.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Michel; Campbell, Peter G C; Fortin, Claude

    2014-01-21

    This study refines the Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) approach by integrating the modulating effects of various essential elements on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics in the freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The algae were first acclimated to a low (LM) or high trace metal (HM) medium as well as to low or high free Cd(2+) and Co(2+) concentrations. The short-term Cd transport capacity and affinity were then quantified in exposure media in which essential trace metals and calcium concentrations were manipulated. The results show that after acclimation to the LM medium, exposure to high free Ca(2+) decreases the capacity of the Cd transport system. Also, acclimation to high (10(-9) M free Co(2+)) or low (10(-11) M free Co(2+)) did not significantly affect Cd uptake rates. When all essential trace metals were simultaneously increased in the acclimation (and exposure) medium, the capacity of the transport system decreased by ∼ 60%, a decrease close to that due to high [Zn(2+)] alone, suggesting that Zn is the main trace metal modulator of the Cd transporter capacity. Changes in Cd toxicity (growth inhibition) in the presence of different essential trace metal concentrations were strongly related to the steady-state concentration of intracellular cadmium, regardless of the cell's nutritional state. Our BLM incorporating the physiological effects of Ca(2+) and other trace metals predicts steady-state Cd accumulation in the presence of varying concentrations of essential elements at 7 nM free Cd(2+), but predictions over a wide range of free [Cd(2+)] proved to be more difficult.

  18. Accumulation of As, Cd and selected trace elements in tubers of Scirpus aritimus L. from Doñana marshes (South Spain)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madejon, P.; Murillo, J.M.; Maranon, T.; Espinar, J.L.; Cabrera, F.

    2006-01-01

    The collapse of a pyrite-mining, tailing dam on 1998 contaminated an area of 4286 ha along the Agrio and Guadiamar river valleys in southern Spain. Over 2700 ha of the Doñana marshes, an important wintering area for wetland European birds, were contaminated. This study reports analyses of the tubers of Scirpus maritimus (an important food for greylag geese, Anser anser) collected in 2000 in the “Entremuros” (spill-affected area) and in nearby unaffected Doñana marshes (control areas). In the spill-affected area mean tuber tissue concentrations of Cd (0.25 mg kg−1) and Zn (61 mg kg−1) were greater than in those tubers from the control area (0.02 mg kg−1 for Cd, and 22 mg kg−1 for Zn); values of Cd and Zn in “Entremuros” (samples collected two years after the mine spill) were much smaller than those reported only a few months after the accident. Trace elements (As, Fe, Mn and Tl, and to a lesser extent Cd and Pb) showed a preferential accumulation in the outer skin of tubers. Surprisingly, concentrations of As and Fe were greater in tubers from some marsh sites not affected by the mine-spill than in tubers from the “Entremuros”. We suggest that relic river channels within the Doñana marshes may be contaminated by trace elements from historic mining activities. An exhaustive study of macrophytes and other plant species in this area is recommended to identify potential risks to wildlife.

  19. Influence of organic selenium supplementation on the accumulation of toxic and essential trace elements involved in the antioxidant system of chicken.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Athanasios C; Zoidis, Evangelos; Georgiou, Constantinos A; Demiris, Nikolaos; Surai, Peter F; Fegeros, Konstantinos

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the interactions between selenium (Se) and various trace elements, both toxic and essential, involved in the antioxidant system. A total of 128 day-old chicks (Gallus gallus, broilers) were used to investigate the effect of Se yeast supplementation on the accumulation of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu) iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn). There were four replicates of four dietary treatments: T1 (basal diet with no added Se, analyzed to contain 0.21 mg kg(-1)), T2 (T1 with 0.15 mg kg(-1) Se added), T3 (T1 with 0.3 mg kg(-1) Se) and T4 (T1 with 3.0 mg kg(-1) Se). At week 4 and 6, two chickens per replicate pen were sacrificed for whole blood, breast muscle and liver sampling. Samples were analyzed by ICP-MS. Supplementation with Se-yeast, not only increased Se concentration but also reduced Cd concentration in the tissues. Selenium was negatively correlated with Cd and positively correlated with Zn, Cu and Fe. Cadmium was negatively correlated with Zn and Cu. Zinc was positively correlated with Cu. Iron was negatively correlated with Cu and uncorrelated with Zn and Cd. The balance between Se, Cu, Fe and Zn is important for proper antioxidant defense since they are an integral part of various antioxidant enzymes.

  20. Platinum Group Coatings for Refractory Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    Currently the only effective materials available for oxidation protective coatings are silicide -based, These materials are not without their...the silicide and the base metal, repeated temperature cycling results in craching of the coating which allows oxygen to diffuse into the cracks and...ultimately destroy the base material. The upper limit for silicide coatings is approximately 1400 0 C but at these temperatures evaporation of the

  1. Mineralogy and mineral chemistry of detrital heavy minerals from the Rhine River in Germany as evidence to their provenance, sedimentary and depositional history: focus on platinum-group minerals and remarks on cassiterite, columbite-group minerals and uraninite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberthür, Thomas; Melcher, Frank; Goldmann, Simon; Wotruba, Hermann; Gerdes, Axel; Dijkstra, Arjan; Dale, Christopher W.

    2016-03-01

    In the course of studying the gold-bearing heavy mineral spectrum of sediments from the upper Rhine River, a distinct suite of detrital grains comprising platinum-group minerals (PGM), cassiterite, columbite-group minerals and uraninite was identified and investigated using conventional and modern analytical methods. This study aimed to characterize the selected mineral groups mineralogically and geochemically in order to identify possible source areas and to reconstruct different aspects of the complex sedimentary history of the Rhine River sediments. The PGM assemblage is dominated by grains of Ru-Os-Ir alloys (~70 %), followed by Pt-Fe alloys, sperrylite and rare other PGM. Accordingly, this PGM assemblage represents highly mature, physically and chemically extremely resistant compounds which may have experienced and survived repeated reworking during their sedimentary history. Pt-Fe alloys and sperrylite may originate from various sources; however, the predominant Ru-Os-Ir alloy grains point to an origin from ophiolite sequences of unknown age (but likely pre-Alpine; Variscan or older). The exact locations of the primary sources and the complex, prolonged sedimentary history of the detrital PGM with possibly multiple intermittent storages remain unknown. Detrital cassiterite grains were dated by the U-Pb method using LA-ICP-MS. The age dates of cassiterite largely overlap with zircon age distributions by peaking distinctly at ca. 325 Ma (majority of ages), thereby implying a predominantly Variscan age of the cassiterite grains and possible derivation from mineralization in the Black Forest area. Columbite-group minerals are dominantly tapiolite originating from pegmatites. Rare uraninite grains attest that this mineral experienced rapid erosion, transport and deposition in a reducing environment.

  2. Sources and accumulation of organic carbon in the Pearl River Estuary surface sediment as indicated by elemental, stable carbon isotopic, and carbohydrate compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B.; Dai, M.; Huang, W.; Liu, Q.; Chen, H.; Xu, L.

    2010-04-01

    Organic matter in surface sediments from the upper reach of the Pearl River Estuary and Lingdingyang Bay, as well as the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf was characterized by a variety of techniques, including elemental (C and N), stable carbon isotopic (δ 13C) composition, as well as molecular-level analyses. Total organic carbon (TOC) content was 1.61±1.20% in the upper reach down to 1.00±0.22% in Lingdingyang Bay and to 0.80±0.10% on the inner shelf and 0.58±0.06% on the outer shelf. δ13C values ranged from -25.11‰ to -21.28‰ across the studied area, with a trend of enrichment seaward. The spatial trend in C/N ratios mirrored that of δ13C, with a substantial decrease in C/N ratio from 10.9±1.3 in the Lingdingyang Bay surface sediments to 6.5±0.09 in the outer shelf surface sediments. Total carbohydrate yields ranged from 22.1 to 26.7 mg (100 mg OC)-1, and typically followed TOC concentrations in the estuarine and shelf sediments, suggesting that the relative abundance of total carbohydrate was fairly constant in TOC. Total neutral sugars as detected by the nine major monosaccharides (lyxose, rhamnose, ribose, arabinose, fucose, xylose, galactose, mannose, and glucose) yielded between 4.0 and 18.6 mg (100 mg OC)-1 in the same sediments, suggesting that a significant amount of carbohydrates were not neutral aldoses. The bulk organic matter properties, isotopic composition and C/N ratios, combined with molecular-level carbohydrate compositions were used to assess the sources and accumulation of terrestrial organic matter in the Pearl River Estuary and the adjacent northern South China Sea shelf. Results showed a mixture of terrestrial riverine organic carbon with in situ phytoplankton organic carbon in the areas studied. Using a two end-member mixing model based on δ13C values and C/N ratios, we estimated that the terrestrial organic carbon contribution to the surface sediment TOC was ca. 57±13% for Lingdingyang Bay, 19±2% for the inner shelf

  3. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  4. Accumulation of antimony and other potentially toxic elements in plants around a former antimony mine located in the Ribes Valley (Eastern Pyrenees)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Corrales, Isabel; Duran, Paola; Roca, Núria; Tume, Pedro; Barceló, Juan; Poschenrieder, Charlotte

    2010-05-01

    Soil contamination by antimony is of increasing environmental concern due to the use of this amphoterous p-block element in many industrial applications such as flame retardant, electronics, alloys, rubber and textile industries. However, little is still known about the response of plants to antimony. Here we report on the accumulation of antimony and other potentially toxic elements (mainly As, Pb and Cu) in plants growing around a former antimony mine in the ribes Valley located in the Eastern Pyrenees (424078E, 4686100N alt. 1145 m.a.s.l) that was operating approximately between the years 1870 to 1960. The ore mineral veins are included in quartz gangue. The main ores were: Sulphides: Stibnite (Sb2S3), Pyrite (FeS2), Sphalerite (ZnS), Arsenopyrite (FeAs), Galenite (PbS), Chalcopyrite (CuFeS2), Tetrahydrite (Cu5Sb2S3). Sulphosals: Boulangerite (5PbS•2Sb2S3), Jamesonite (4PbS•FeS•3Sb2S3), Zinckenite (6PbS•7Sb2S3), Plagionite (5PbS•4Sb2S3), Bournonite PbCu (Sb,As)S3, Pyrargirite (Ag3SbS3). Soil and plant samples were taken at five locations with different levels of Sb, As, and polymetallic contamination. Both pseudototal (aqua regia soluble) and extractable (EDTA) concentrations of metals from sites with low (sites 1 and 2), moderate (site 3 and 4) and high (sites 5 and 6) pollutant burdens were studied. The range of agua regia and EDTA values in mgkg-1 is as follows: Sb 8-2904 and 0.88-44; As: 33-16186 and 3.2-167; Pb: 79-4794 and 49-397; Cu: 66-712 and 48-56 mg•kg-1, respectively). While sites 1 to 4 had alkaline soil pH (7.4-8.7), sites 5 and 6 were acidic with values of 6 and 4.6, respectively. Different herbaceous plant species (Poa annua, Echium vulgare, Sonchus asper, Barbera verna among others) at the low and moderately polluted sites were able to efficiently restrict Sb and As transport to shoots showing average concentration ranges between 5.5 and 23 mg/kg As and 1.21 mg/kg and 4.9 mg/kg Sb. However, at the highly polluted acidic sites (5 and

  5. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  6. Lead, platinum and other heavy elements in the primary cosmic radiation: HEAO-3 results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddington, C. J.; Binns, W. R.; Brewster, N. R.; Fixsen, D. J.; Garrard, T. L.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Newport, B. J.; Stone, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    An observation of the abundances of cosmic-ray lead and platinum-group nuclei using data from the HEAO-3 Heavy Nuclei Experiment (HNE) which consisted of ion chambers mounted on both sides of a plastic Cherenkov counter (Binns et al., 1981) is reported. Further analysis with more stringent selections, inclusion of additional data, and a calibration at the LBL Bevalac, have allowed the determination of the abundance ratio of lead and the platinum group of elements for particles that had a cutoff rigidity R(c) 5 GV. The observed ratio for Pb/Pt is distinctly lower than that predicted by any of the standard models for cosmic ray sources. It is possible that the difference is not an indication that the cosmic ray source composition is greatly different from that of the solar system, but rather that there is less Pb in the solar system and in the r-process than is assumed in the standard models.

  7. Minor elements in magnetic concentrates from the Syenite-Shonkinite Province, southern Asir, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Overstreet, W.C.; Day, G.W.; Botinelly, Theodore; VanTrump, George

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic concentrates from 106 localities in three plutons of syenite and one pluton of shonkinite in the southern Asir were analyzed spectrographically for 31 elements to determine if anomaly-enhancement techniques would identify mineralization not disclosed by conventional geochemical sample media. Positive anomalies are lacking for all elements except vanadium. Vanadium contents as high as 0.7 percent were identified in magnetic concentrates from the syenite pluton to the southeast of Suq al Ithnayn, but magnetite is sparse. This observation indicates a need to reexamine magnetite-rich drill core for possible ore-grade tenors in vanadium from the zoned pluton at Lakathah. Experimental analyses for platinum-group metals in magnetic concentrates from layered mafic plutons at Jabal Sha'i', Jabal al Ashshar, and Hishshat al Hawi should be performed to determine whether micron-size particles of the platinum-group metals are present in mafic rocks of the Arabian Shield.

  8. In situ Re-Os isotopic analysis of platinum-group minerals from the Mayarí-Cristal ophiolitic massif (Mayarí-Baracoa Ophiolitic Belt, eastern Cuba): implications for the origin of Os-isotope heterogeneities in podiform chromitites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesi, Claudio; González-Jiménez, José María; Gervilla, Fernando; Garrido, Carlos J.; Griffin, William L.; O'Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Proenza, Joaquín A.; Pearson, Norman J.

    2011-06-01

    Chromitite pods in the Mayarí-Cristal ophiolitic massif (eastern Cuba) were formed in the Late Cretaceous when island arc tholeiites and MORB-like back-arc basin basalts reacted with residual mantle peridotites and generated chromite-rich bodies enclosed in dunite envelopes. Platinum-group minerals (PGM) in the podiform chromitites exhibit important Os-isotope heterogeneities at the kilometric, hand sample and thin section scales. 187Os/188Os calculated at the time of chromitite crystallization (~90 Ma) ranges between 0.1185 and 0.1295 (γOs = -7.1 to +1.6, relative to enstatite chondrite), and all but one PGM have subchondritic 187Os/188Os. Grains in a single hand sample have initial 187Os/188Os that spans from 0.1185 to 0.1274, and in one thin section it varies between 0.1185 and 0.1232 in two PGM included in chromite which are only several millimeters apart. As the Os budget of a single micrometric grain derives from a mantle region that was at least several m3 in size, the variable Os isotopic composition of PGM in the Mayarí-Cristal chromitites probably reflects the heterogeneity of their mantle sources on the 10-100 m scale. Our results show that this heterogeneity was not erased by pooling and mingling of individual melt batches during chromitite crystallization but was transferred to the ore deposits on mineral scale. The distribution of the Os model ages calculated for PGM shows four main peaks, at ~100, 500, 750 and 1,000 Ma. These variable Os model ages reflect the presence of different depleted domains in the oceanic (Pacific-related) upper mantle of the Greater Antilles paleo-subduction zone. The concordance between the age of crystallization of the Mayarí-Cristal chromitites and the most recent peak of the Os model age distribution in PGM supports that Os in several grains was derived from fertile domains of the upper mantle, whose bulk Os isotopic composition is best approximated by that of enstatite chondrites; on the other hand, most PGM are

  9. Single kernel ionomic profiles are highly heritable indicators of genetic and environmental influences on elemental accumulation in maize grain (Zea mays)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ionome, or elemental profile, of a maize kernel represents at least two distinct ideas. First, the collection of elements within the kernel are food, feed and feedstocks for people, animals and industrial processes. Second, the ionome of the kernel represents a developmental end point that can s...

  10. Accumulation of Trace Metal Elements (Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) in Surface Sediment via Decomposed Seagrass Leaves: A Mesocosm Experiment Using Zostera marina L.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Shinya; Konuma, Susumu; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the sediment of seagrass ecosystems was examined using mesocosm experiments containing Zostera marina (eelgrass) and reference pools. Lead was approximately 20-fold higher in the surface sediment in the eelgrass pool than in eelgrass leaves and epiphytes on the eelgrass leaves, whereas zinc and cadmium were significantly lower in the surface sediment than in the leaves, with intermediate concentrations in epiphytes. Copper concentrations were similar in both the surface sediment and leaves but significantly lower in epiphytes. Carbon and nitrogen contents increased significantly with increasing δ13C in surface sediments of both the eelgrass and reference pools. Copper, Zn, Cd, and Pb also increased significantly with increasing δ13C in the surface sediment in the eelgrass pool but not in the reference pool. By decomposition of eelgrass leaves with epiphytes, which was examined in the eelgrass pool, copper and lead concentrations increased more than 2-fold and approximately a 10-fold, whereas zinc and cadmium concentrations decreased. The high copper and lead concentrations in the surface sediment result from accumulation in decomposed, shed leaves, whereas zinc and cadmium remobilized from decomposed shed leaves but may remain at higher concentrations in the leaves than in the original sediments. The results of our mesocosm study demonstrate that whether the accumulation or remobilization of trace metals during the decomposition of seagrass leaves is trace metal dependent, and that the decomposed seagrass leaves can cause copper and lead accumulation in sediments in seagrass ecosystems.

  11. Accumulation of Trace Metal Elements (Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb) in Surface Sediment via Decomposed Seagrass Leaves: A Mesocosm Experiment Using Zostera marina L.

    PubMed Central

    Konuma, Susumu; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb in the sediment of seagrass ecosystems was examined using mesocosm experiments containing Zostera marina (eelgrass) and reference pools. Lead was approximately 20-fold higher in the surface sediment in the eelgrass pool than in eelgrass leaves and epiphytes on the eelgrass leaves, whereas zinc and cadmium were significantly lower in the surface sediment than in the leaves, with intermediate concentrations in epiphytes. Copper concentrations were similar in both the surface sediment and leaves but significantly lower in epiphytes. Carbon and nitrogen contents increased significantly with increasing δ13C in surface sediments of both the eelgrass and reference pools. Copper, Zn, Cd, and Pb also increased significantly with increasing δ13C in the surface sediment in the eelgrass pool but not in the reference pool. By decomposition of eelgrass leaves with epiphytes, which was examined in the eelgrass pool, copper and lead concentrations increased more than 2-fold and approximately a 10-fold, whereas zinc and cadmium concentrations decreased. The high copper and lead concentrations in the surface sediment result from accumulation in decomposed, shed leaves, whereas zinc and cadmium remobilized from decomposed shed leaves but may remain at higher concentrations in the leaves than in the original sediments. The results of our mesocosm study demonstrate that whether the accumulation or remobilization of trace metals during the decomposition of seagrass leaves is trace metal dependent, and that the decomposed seagrass leaves can cause copper and lead accumulation in sediments in seagrass ecosystems. PMID:27336306

  12. Evidence for contrasting accumulation pattern of cadmium in relation to other elements in Senilia senilis and Tagelus adansoni from the Bijagós archipelago, Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Catry, Teresa; Figueira, Paula; Carvalho, Lina; Monteiro, Rui; Coelho, Pedro; Lourenço, Pedro Miguel; Catry, Paulo; Tchantchalam, Quintino; Catry, Inês; Botelho, Maria J; Pereira, Eduarda; Granadeiro, José Pedro; Vale, Carlos

    2017-09-16

    Shellfish harvesting in intertidal areas is a widespread and economically important activity in many countries across West Africa. However, in some areas, there is virtually no information concerning the levels of contaminants (and other elements related to nutritional aspects) in the harvested species. We collected sediments and several individuals of the West African bloody cockle Senilia senilis and of the razor clam Tagelus adansoni during the dry season of 2015 nearby three islands in the Bijagós archipelago, Guinea-Bissau. Aluminium, Ca, Fe, Mg, As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn were determined in sediments and whole soft tissues of the two bivalves. Sediments showed uniformly low trace element concentrations, pointing to an ecosystem with low levels of trace element contamination. T. adansoni presented higher concentrations of most elements than S. senilis, with the exception of Cd that showed up to 40 times higher values in S. senilis than in T. adansoni from the same sites. Furthermore, Cd concentrations (25±8.7 mg kg(-1), dw) in S. senilis are clearly above the maximum level established for human consumption. Future studies should clarify whether biological factors are the major responsible for this unusual situation.

  13. Size effect of elemental selenium nanoparticles (Nano-Se) at supranutritional levels on selenium accumulation and glutathione S-transferase activity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Dungeng; Zhang, Jinsong; Liu, Qingliang; Taylor, Ethan Will

    2007-10-01

    It has been shown that 36 nm Nano-Se has lower toxicity than selenite or selenomethionine, but these forms of selenium (Se) all possess similar ability to increase selenoenzyme levels. The size of nanoparticles plays an important role in their biological activity: as expected, 5-200 nm Nano-Se can directly scavenge free radicals in vitro in a size-dependent fashion. However, in Se-deficient cells and Se-deficient mice, the size effect of Nano-Se on increasing selenoenzymes and liver Se disappears unexpectedly. We hypothesize that under conditions of Se deficiency, the avidity of Se uptake mechanisms may be increased to maintain the biosynthesis of selenoenzymes, which are fundamental for redox homeostasis. This increased avidity may override the potential advantage of small size Nano-Se seen under Se-replete conditions, thereby eliminating the size effect. Once selenoenzymes have been saturated, Se uptake mechanisms may downregulate; accordingly, the size effect of Nano-Se can then reappear. To test this hypothesis, Se-deficient mice were administered either 36 or 90 nm Nano-Se at supranutritional doses, in both a short-term model and a single-dose model. Under these conditions, Nano-Se showed a size effect on Se accumulation and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. A size effect of Nano-Se was found in 15 out of 18 total comparisons between sizes at the same dose and time in the two models. Furthermore, the magnitude of the size effect was more prominent on Se accumulation than on GST activity. GST is strictly regulated by transcriptional and translational mechanisms, so its increase in activity normally does not exceed 3-fold. In contrast, the homeostasis of Se accumulation is not as tightly controlled. In the present experiments, GST activity had reached or was approaching saturation, but liver Se was far below saturation. Therefore, our results strongly suggest that the saturation profile of the tested biomarker has an impact on the size effect of Nano

  14. Mining Critical Metals and Elements from Seawater: Opportunities and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Diallo, Mamadou S; Kotte, Madhusudhana Rao; Cho, Manki

    2015-08-18

    The availability and sustainable supply of technology metals and valuable elements is critical to the global economy. There is a growing realization that the development and deployment of the clean energy technologies and sustainable products and manufacturing industries of the 21st century will require large amounts of critical metals and valuable elements including rare-earth elements (REEs), platinum group metals (PGMs), lithium, copper, cobalt, silver, and gold. Advances in industrial ecology, water purification, and resource recovery have established that seawater is an important and largely untapped source of technology metals and valuable elements. This feature article discusses the opportunities and challenges of mining critical metals and elements from seawater. We highlight recent advances and provide an outlook of the future of metal mining and resource recovery from seawater.

  15. Accumulation and tissue distribution of heavy metals and essential elements in loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) from Spanish Mediterranean coastline of Murcia.

    PubMed

    Jerez, Silvia; Motas, Miguel; Cánovas, Régulo Angel; Talavera, Jesús; Almela, Ramón Miguel; Del Río, Alejandro Bayón

    2010-01-01

    Sea turtles are of increasing interest as potential bioindicators of the heavy metal pollution in marine ecosystems. In the present work, concentrations of heavy metals and essential elements (As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Se, Zn) in different organs and tissues (liver, kidney, muscle, bone, blood, central nervous system and skin) of loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) were determined from stranded animals found along the Spanish Mediterranean coastlines of Murcia. Relatively high average levels of As (skin: 52.13 microg g(-1) dry weight; muscle: 40.95 microg g(-1) dry weight), and especially high individual levels of Zn in muscle tissue (1002.4 microg g(-1) dry weight) were detected. Furthermore, a significant degree of organotrophism of Cd was observed in kidney tissue. The concentrations detected, the distribution among the tissues and the differences observed between juvenile and adult specimens are generally compatible with chronic exposure to the elements studied, whilst levels produced by acute exposure were ruled out.

  16. Possible lin between elevated accumulation of trace elements and canine distemper virus infection in the Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) stranded in 2000 and 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinsuke, T.; Takashi, K.; Yasumi, A.; Tokutaka, I.; Reiji, K.

    2003-05-01

    In the Caspian Sea, a die-off of thousands of Caspian seals (Phoca caspica) occurred in 1997 and 2000. While a direct cause for these deaths seems to be canine distemper virus (CDV) infection, immunosuppression due to environmental pollutants is considered as one of the possible explanations for the development of the disease. The purpose of this work is to examine whether exposure to trace metals could be one of the factors involved in the mass mortality of Caspian seals. Concentrations of 13 trace elements weredetermined in liver, kidney and muscle of Caspian seals found stranded along the coasts of the Caspian Sea in 2000 and 2001. Concentrations of toxic elemen ts (Ag, Cd, Hg, Tl and Pb) in the Caspian seals collected in 2000 and 2001 were comparable to or lower than those in healthy Caspian seals collected in 1993 and 1998 and in seals from other regions, suggesting that these elements would not be the causative agent for the death of Caspian seals. In contrast, Zn and Fe concentrations in the stranded Caspian seals were apparently higher than those in seals from other locations. These results suggest the disturbance in homeostatic control and nutritional statu s of essential elements in the stranded Caspian seals.

  17. Accumulation of trace elements used in semiconductor industry in Formosan squirrel, as a bio-indicator of their exposure, living in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshinari; Watanabe, Izumi; Oshida, Tatsuo; Chen, Yen-Jean; Lin, Liang-Kong; Wang, Yu-Huang; Yang, Kouh-Cheng; Kuno, Katsuji

    2007-07-01

    Concentrations of 17 trace elements were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) in Formosan squirrels (Callosciurus erythraeus) of Taiwan and Japan to document trace element pollution in Taiwan. High concentrations of elements used to produce semiconductors - Ga, As, Cd, In and Tl - were found in animals captured in Miaoli County, which is the nearest site to Hsinchu City, a chief city of Taiwan's semiconductor industry. Significant correlations between Ga, As, In and Tl were found in the kidney, liver, lung and muscle tissues of Taiwanese squirrels. Hierarchical cluster analysis indicated that Ga, As, In and Tl were of the same clade, indicating that Ga, As, In and Tl were discharged from an identical origin. Molar ratios of Ga/As concentration in lungs of animals captured in Miaoli resembled those of animals after intratracheal administration of particulate gallium arsenide (GaAs). This result might indicate that the higher concentrations of Ga and As in the specimens in Miaoli resulted from atmospheric exposure to GaAs.

  18. Improved stratigraphic dating at a low accumulation Alpine ice core through laser ablation trace element profiling at sub-mm depth resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohleber, Pascal; Spaulding, Nicole; Mayewski, Paul; Sneed, Sharon; Handley, Mike; Erhardt, Tobias; Wagenbach, Dietmar

    2015-04-01

    The small scale Colle Gnifetti glacier saddle (4450 m asl, Monte Rosa region) is the only ice core drilling site in the European Alps with a net accumulation low enough to offer multi-millennia climate records. However, a robust interpretation of such long term records (i.e. mineral dust, stable water isotopes) at the Colle Gnifetti (CG) multi core array is strongly challenged by depositional noise associated with a highly irregular annual layer stratigraphy. In combination with a relatively large vertical strain rate and rapid layer thinning, annual layer counting gets increasingly ambiguous as of approximately 100 years. In addition, this prevents clear attribution of likely volcanic horizons to historical eruption dates. To improve stratigraphic dating under such intricate conditions, we deployed laser ablation (LA) ICP-MS at sub-mm sample resolution. We present here the first LA impurity profiles from a new Colle Gnifetti ice core drilled 73 m to bedrock in 2013 at a site where the net snow accumulation is around 20 cm w.e. per year. We contrast the LA signal variability (including Ca, Fe, Na) to continuous flow analyses (CFA) records at cm-resolution (Ca, Na, melt water conductivity, micro- particle) recorded over the whole core length. Of special concern are the lower 28 m to bedrock, which have been continuously profiled in LA Ca, thus offering the direct comparison of Ca-signals between CFA and LA. By this means, we first validate at upper depths LA based annual layer identification through agreement with CFA based counting efforts before demonstrating the LA based counting still works at depths where CFA derived annual layers become spurious since embedded in strong, multi-year cycles. Finally, LA ice core profiling of our CG core has potential for not only dating improvement but also reveals benefits in resolving highly thinned basal ice sections including accounting for micro-structural features such as grain boundaries.

  19. Effects of dietary molybdenum, sulfur and zinc on the excretion and tissue accumulation of trace elements in sheep fed palm kernel cake-based diets.

    PubMed

    Al-Kirshi, R A; Alimon, A R; Ivan, M

    2011-08-01

    Twelve male 8-month-old lambs were used in a 6-month feeding experiment to determine the effects of dietary Mo, Mo + S and Zn supplements on the body retention and tissue accumulation of dietary Cu, Zn and Fe. The lambs were divided into four groups of three lambs each and each group was fed ad libitum one of four diets. A control diet was based on palm kernel cake (PKC) and grass hay. Three additional diets were the control supplemented with either Mo or Mo+S or Zn. At 3 months of the experiment, feces and urine were collected and sampled for 6 days. At the end of the experiment (6 months), blood was sampled and then the sheep were slaughtered. The liver and kidney were removed and sampled for chemical analysis. In comparison with the control, each dietary supplement decreased (P<0.05) the Cu concentration in the liver, but only the Mo+S supplement decreased it to a safe range of below 350 μg/g dry matter. This was accompanied by the body retention of dietary Cu of 24.6%, 6.7%, 2.5% and 6.5% for the control, Mo, Mo+S and Zn treatments, respectively. The blood plasma concentration of Cu was decreased (P<0.05) by the Zn supplement, but was not affected by other supplements (P>0.05). It was concluded that from the supplements tested, only Mo+S appeared to be effective in reducing the retention and liver accumulation of the dietary Cu to prevent chronic Cu toxicity in sheep fed PKC-based diets.

  20. Body distribution of trace elements in black-tailed gulls from Rishiri Island, Japan: age-dependent accumulation and transfer to feathers and eggs.

    PubMed

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Taro; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Anan, Yasumi; Kubota, Reiji; Yasunaga, Genta; Kunito, Takashi; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Ogi, Haruo; Shibata, Yasuyuki

    2005-09-01

    Body distribution and maternal transfer of 18 trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) to eggs were examined in black-tailed gulls (Larus crassirostris), which were culled in Rishiri Island, Hokkaido Prefecture, Japan. Manganese, Cu, Rb, Mo, and Cd showed the highest levels in liver and kidney, Ag, Sb, and Hg in feather, and V, Sr, and Pb in bone. Maternal transfer rates of trace elements ranged from 0.8% (Cd) to as much as 65% (Tl) of maternal body burden. Large amounts of Sr, Ba, and Tl were transferred to the eggs, though maternal transfer rates of V, Cd, Hg, and Pb were substantially low. It also was observed that Rb, Sr, Cd, Cs, and Ba hardly were excreted into feathers. Concentrations of Co in liver, Ba in liver and kidney, and Mo in liver increased significantly with age, whereas Se in bone and kidney, Hg in kidney, and Cr in feather decreased with age in the known-aged black-tailed gulls (2-20 years old). It also was suggested that feathers might be useful to estimate contamination status of trace elements in birds, especially for Hg on a population basis, although the utility is limited on an individual basis for the black-tailed gulls. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the maternal transfer rate of multielements and also on the usefulness of feathers to estimate contamination status of Hg in birds on a population basis.

  1. Trace element (Cd, Cu, Hg, Se, Zn) accumulation and tissue distribution in loggerhead turtles (Caretta caretta) from the Western Mediterranean Sea (southern Italy).

    PubMed

    Maffucci, F; Caurant, F; Bustamante, P; Bentivegna, F

    2005-02-01

    Cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) were determined in the liver, kidney and muscle of 29 loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, from the South Tyrrhenian Sea (Western Mediterranean). No significant differences (p>0.05) were detected between males and females. Trace element concentrations were not influenced by the size of the specimen except Se in the liver, which was negatively correlated with the curved carapace length (p<0.001). Muscles generally displayed the lowest trace element burdens, with the exception of Zn which contained concentrations as high as 176 microgg-1dwt. Kidneys displayed the highest Cd and Se mean concentrations (57.2+/-34.6 and 15.5+/-9.1 microgg-1dwt, respectively), while liver exhibited the highest Cu and Hg levels (37.3+/-8.7 and 1.1+/-1.7 microgg-1dwt, respectively). Whichever tissue is considered, the toxic elements had elevated coefficients of variation (i.e. from 60% to 177%) compared to those of the essential ones (i.e. from 14% to 65%), which is a consequence of homeostatic processes for Cu, Se and Zn. Globally, the concentrations of Hg remained low in all the considered tissues, possibly the result of low trophic level in sea turtles. In contrast, the diet of loggerhead turtles would result in a significant exposure to Cd. Highly significant correlations between Cd and Cu and Zn in the liver and kidney suggest that efficient detoxification processes involving MT occur which prevent Cd toxicity in loggerhead turtles.

  2. Trace Element Accumulation and Tissue Distribution in the Purpleback Flying Squid Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis from the Central and Southern South China Sea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yan Yan; Shen, Yu; Huang, Hui; Yang, Xian Qing; Zhao, Yong Qiang; Cen, Jian Wei; Qi, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis is a species of cephalopod that is becoming economically important in the South China Sea. As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn concentrations were determined in the mantle, arms, and digestive gland of S. oualaniensis from 31 oceanographic survey stations in the central and southern South China Sea. Intraspecific and interspecific comparisons with previous studies were made. Mean concentrations of trace elements analyzed in arms and mantle were in the following orders: Zn > Cu > Cd > Cr > As > Hg. In digestive gland, the concentrations of Cd and Cu exceed that of Zn. All the Pb concentrations were under the detected limit.

  3. Accumulation of 20 elements in great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) and its main prey, common carp (Cyprinus carpio) and Prussian carp (Carassius gibelio).

    PubMed

    Skoric, Stefan; Visnjić-Jeftic, Zeljka; Jaric, Ivan; Djikanovic, Vesna; Mickovic, Branislav; Nikcevic, Miroslav; Lenhardt, Mirjana

    2012-06-01

    In this study, 20 heavy metals and trace elements (Al, As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Si, Se, Sr and Zn) were analyzed in different tissues (muscle, liver, intestine, feather and bone) of the great cormorant (Phalacrocorax carbo) and in different tissues (muscle, liver, gills, kidney and gonad) of their main prey (common carp-Cyprinus carpio and Prussian carp-Carassius gibelio) during the nesting season. Cormorant and fish specimens were collected at the Ečka Fishing Farm (Serbia) and from the nearby river. Principal components analysis (PCA) showed that cormorant livers were differentiated from other four tissues by higher concentrations of Hg, Fe, Cu and Mo, feathers by higher concentrations of Al and Si, and bones by higher concentrations of Sr and Mg. Differentiation among the three age classes of cormorants was observed only with regard to elemental concentrations in their feathers: subadult cormorants were differentiated by higher Hg and Zn concentrations, while the adults were separated by higher concentrations of Fe. In comparison with their prey (common carp and Prussian carp) cormorants were differentiated by higher concentrations of Fe, Hg and Cu in the muscle. Toxic mercury concentrations above 4μgg(-1)dw were determined in the liver of juvenile cormorants, as well as in the liver and feathers of subadults. Hg concentrations were significantly correlated among all studied tissues. Cormorant had significantly higher concentrations of Fe and Hg in muscle and liver than two studied fish species.

  4. Influence of soil properties on trace element availability and plant accumulation in a Mediterranean salt marsh polluted by mining wastes: implications for phytomanagement.

    PubMed

    Conesa, H M; María-Cervantes, A; Alvarez-Rogel, J; González-Alcaraz, M N

    2011-09-15

    The aims of this study were to determine the factors which control metal and As phytoavailability in the different microenvironments (Sand Dunes, Salt Flat, Dry River and Shrubs) present at a Mediterranean salt marsh polluted by mining wastes. We performed a field study following a plot sampling survey. The analyses of soil parameters (pH, electrical conductivity (EC), organic carbon contents, etc.), total metal and As concentrations and their phytoavailability assessed with EDTA were related to each microenvironment and the corresponding plant species uptake. The averages of pH and EC were slightly alkaline (pH ≈ 7.5) and saline (≈ 2.2 to 17.1 dS m(-1)) respectively. The soil samples from the Salt Flat subzone showed the highest metal concentrations (e.g. 51 mg kg(-1) Cd, 11,600 mg kg(-1) Pb) while for As, the highest concentrations occurred in the Dry River (380 mg kg(-1) As). The total metal and EDTA-extractable concentrations occurred as it follows: Salt Flat>Dry River>Degraded Dunes>Shrubs. In relation to plant metal and As accumulation, the highest root concentrations were obtained in the species from the Salt Flat subzone: ~17 mg kg(-1) As, ~620 mg kg(-1) Pb, for both, Juncus maritimus and Arthrocnemum macrostachyum. However the highest metal and As shoot concentrations occurred in species from the Sand Dunes: ~23 mg kg(-1) As ~270 mg kg(-1) Pb for Dittrichia viscosa; ~23 mg kg(-1) As, ~390 mg kg(-1) Zn for Crucianella maritima. The occurrence of edaphic gradients including salinity and texture determined the vegetation distribution. However, it cannot be concluded that there was a disturbance due to metal(loid)s soil concentrations in terms of vegetation composition except in the Degraded Dunes and Dry River. The higher EDTA-extractable concentrations were coincidental with the most saline soils but this did not result in higher metal(loid)s plant accumulation.

  5. Killing of VRE Enterococcus faecalis by commensal strains: Evidence for evolution and accumulation of mobile elements in the absence of competition.

    PubMed

    Gaca, Anthony O; Gilmore, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci are members of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and most animals that, over the past 3 decades, have emerged as leading causes of multidrug resistant hospital acquired infection (HAI). In addition to their general hardiness, many traits have entered enterococcal lineages through horizontal gene transfer, which has led to the evolution of pathogenic hospital-associated lineages uniquely adapted for survival and proliferation in the antibiotic perturbed ecology of the gastrointestinal tract. We recently observed that the accretion of mobile genetic elements in the prototype vancomycin resistant E. faecalis, clinical isolate V583, renders it unable to co-exist with native enterococci in healthy human fecal flora. In this addendum, we discuss how these findings inform our understanding of how multidrug resistant enterococci evolve, and the implications for the development of treatments that limit colonization and spread of highly antibiotic refractory microbes of this type.

  6. Changes in growth rate and macroelement and trace element accumulation in Hydrocharis morsus-ranae L. during the growing season in relation to environmental contamination.

    PubMed

    Polechońska, Ludmiła; Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra; Dambiec, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    The temporal variations in plant chemistry connected with its life cycle may affect the cycling of elements in an ecosystem as well as determine the usefulness of the species in phytoremediation and bioindication. In this context, there is a gap in knowledge on the role of floating plants for elements cycling in aquatic reservoirs. The aim of the study was to determine if there are variations in Hydrocharis morsus-ranae (European frog-bit) bioaccumulation capacity and the growth rate of its population during the growing season and to test the impact of environmental pollution on these features. The content of macroelements (Ca, K, Mg, N, Na, P, S) and trace metals (Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Hg, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Zn) was determined in H. morsus-ranae collected monthly from June to October from habitats differing in environmental contamination. The results showed that the highest content of most trace metals (Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Ni, Zn) and some nutrients (N, P) in plants as well as the greatest bioaccumulation efficiency occurred simultaneously in the beginning of the growing season. In the following months, a dilution effect (manifested by a decrease in content) related to the rapid growth was observed. Co, Mn, and Ni content in plant tissues reflected the level of environmental contamination throughout the growing season which makes H. morsus-ranae a potential biomonitor of pollution for these metals. Considering the great bioaccumulation ability, high sensitivity to contamination, and low biomass of European frog-bit in polluted systems, further investigation is required to assess the real phytoremediation capability of the species.

  7. Spatial Variation in the Accumulation of Elements in Thalli of the Lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea (L.) Zopf Transplanted Around a Biomass Power Plant in Italy.

    PubMed

    Lucadamo, Lucio; Corapi, Anna; Loppi, Stefano; De Rosa, Rosanna; Barca, Donatella; Vespasiano, Giovanni; Gallo, Luana

    2016-04-01

    Thalli of the lichen Pseudevernia furfuracea were transplanted for 3 months at 32 sites located in and around an industrial area of S Italy whose main anthropogenic sources of atmospheric trace elements are a biomass power plant and vehicular emissions. Meteorological stations were deployed at four sites for finer detection of local wind patterns. The station near the biomass power plant showed a significant S-SE wind component not detectable by measurements made at the regional scale or by the other local meteorological stations. Sb, Sn, and Mo showed a very high degree of covariance and a statistically significant correlation with traffic rate. No element concentrations in the exposed thalli were correlated with distance from the biomass power plant, although Ti and Co concentrations showed a significant correlation with the "Potential Number of Times the Winds coming from the biomass power plant Reach each exposure Site" (PNTWRS). This value is calculated dividing the time (minutes) during the experimental trimester that the wind blows from the power plant into each of the four geographical sides by the time (minutes) the winds passing through the power plant take to reach the exposure sites in each of the four geographical sides.) during the period of thalli transplantation. Moreover, there were significant differences among clusters of sites with different levels of enrichment of Ti, Co, Al, V, and Cu and a "local control" group. These results, together with the high covariance of the Al-Ti and V-Co pairs, indicate an association between the biomass power plant and spatial variation of Ti, Co, Al, and V levels in the transplanted lichens. The nature of the fuels used in the biomass power plant explains the spatial variation of As, Cr, Cu, and Zn concentrations.

  8. Growth and elemental accumulation of plants grown in acidic soil amended with coal fly ash-sewage sludge co-compost

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.W.C.; Selvam, A.

    2009-10-15

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and heavy-metal accumulation of Brassica chinensis and Agropyron elongatum in 10 and 25% ash-sludge co-compost (ASC)-amended loamy acidic soil (pH 4.51) at two different application rates: 20% and 40% (v/v). Soil pH increased, whereas electrical conductivity decreased with the amendment of ASC to soil. Bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn contents of ASC-amended soil decreased, whereas Ni, Pb, and B contents increased. Concentrations of bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn in sludge compost (SC)-amended soils were 5.57, 20.8, and 8.19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. These concentrations were significantly lower than those in soil receiving an application rate of 20 or 25% ASC as 2.64, 8.48, and 5.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. Heavy metals and B contents of the composting mass significantly increased with an increase in ASC application rate from 20 to 40% (6.2 to 16.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 10% ASC- and 9.4 to 18.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 25% ASC-amended soil. However, when the ash content in co-compost increased from 10 to 25% during composting, bioavailable heavy-metal contents decreased. However, B contents increased with an increase in ash content. Addition of co-composts increased the dry-weight yield of the plants, and this increase was more obvious as the ash amendment rate in the co-composts and the ASC application rate increased. In case of B. chinensis, the biomass of 2.84 g/plant for 40% application of 25% ASC was significantly higher than SC (0.352 g/plant), which was 40% application of 10% ASC (0.434 g/plant) treatments. However, in A. elongatum, the differences between biomass of plants grown with 10% (1.34-1.94 g/ plant) and 25% ASC (2.12-2.21 g/plant) were not significantly different. ASC was favorable in increasing the growth of B. chinensis and A. elongatum. The optimal ash amendment to the sludge composting and ASC application rates were at 25 and 20%, respectively.

  9. Growth and elemental accumulation of plants grown in acidic soil amended with coal fly ash-sewage sludge co-compost.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan W C; Selvam, Ammaiyappan

    2009-10-01

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and heavy-metal accumulation of Brassica chinensis and Agropyron elongatum in 10 and 25% ash-sludge co-compost (ASC)--amended loamy acidic soil (pH 4.51) at two different application rates: 20% and 40% (v/v). Soil pH increased, whereas electrical conductivity decreased with the amendment of ASC to soil. Bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn contents of ASC-amended soil decreased, whereas Ni, Pb, and B contents increased. Concentrations of bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn in sludge compost (SC)-amended soils were 5.57, 20.8, and 8.19 mg kg(-1), respectively. These concentrations were significantly lower than those in soil receiving an application rate of 20 or 25% ASC as 2.64, 8.48, and 5.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. Heavy metals and B contents of the composting mass significantly increased with an increase in ASC application rate from 20 to 40% (6.2 to 16.6 mg kg(-1) for 10% ASC- and 9.4 to 18.6 mg kg(-1) for 25% ASC-amended soil. However, when the ash content in co-compost increased from 10 to 25% during composting, bioavailable heavy-metal contents decreased. However, B contents increased with an increase in ash content. Addition of co-composts increased the dry-weight yield of the plants, and this increase was more obvious as the ash amendment rate in the co-composts and the ASC application rate increased. In case of B. chinensis, the biomass of 2.84 g/plant for 40% application of 25% ASC was significantly higher than SC (0.352 g/plant), which was 40% application of 10% ASC (0.434 g/plant) treatments. However, in A. elongatum, the differences between biomass of plants grown with 10% (1.34-1.94 g/ plant) and 25% ASC (2.12-2.21 g/plant) were not significantly different. Furthermore, there were fewer plant-available heavy metals in 25% ASC, which decreased the uptake of heavy metals by plants. ASC was favorable in increasing the growth of B. chinensis and A. elongatum. The optimal ash amendment to the sludge composting

  10. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  11. SU-E-J-96: Multi-Axis Dose Accumulation of Noninvasive Image-Guided Breast Brachytherapy Through Biomechanical Modeling of Tissue Deformation Using the Finite Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Rivard, MJ; Ghadyani, HR; Bastien, AD; Lutz, NN; Hepel, JT

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Noninvasive image-guided breast brachytherapy delivers conformal HDR Ir-192 brachytherapy treatments with the breast compressed, and treated in the cranial-caudal and medial-lateral directions. This technique subjects breast tissue to extreme deformations not observed for other disease sites. Given that, commercially-available software for deformable image registration cannot accurately co-register image sets obtained in these two states, a finite element analysis based on a biomechanical model was developed to deform dose distributions for each compression circumstance for dose summation. Methods: The model assumed the breast was under planar stress with values of 30 kPa for Young’s modulus and 0.3 for Poisson’s ratio. Dose distributions from round and skin-dose optimized applicators in cranial-caudal and medial-lateral compressions were deformed using 0.1 cm planar resolution. Dose distributions, skin doses, and dose-volume histograms were generated. Results were examined as a function of breast thickness, applicator size, target size, and offset distance from the center. Results: Over the range of examined thicknesses, target size increased several millimeters as compression thickness decreased. This trend increased with increasing offset distances. Applicator size minimally affected target coverage, until applicator size was less than the compressed target size. In all cases, with an applicator larger or equal to the compressed target size, > 90% of the target covered by > 90% of the prescription dose. In all cases, dose coverage became less uniform as offset distance increased and average dose increased. This effect was more pronounced for smaller target-applicator combinations. Conclusions: The model exhibited skin dose trends that matched MC-generated benchmarking results and clinical measurements within 2% over a similar range of breast thicknesses and target sizes. The model provided quantitative insight on dosimetric treatment variables over

  12. Elemental selenium particles at nano-size (Nano-Se) are more toxic to Medaka (Oryzias latipes) as a consequence of hyper-accumulation of selenium: a comparison with sodium selenite.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongcheng; Zhang, Jinsong; Wang, Thanh; Luo, Wenru; Zhou, Qunfang; Jiang, Guibin

    2008-09-29

    Recent studies have shown that elemental selenium particles at nano-size (Nano-Se) exhibited comparable bioavailability and less toxicity in mice and rats when compared to sodium selenite, selenomethinine and methylselenocysteine. However, little is known about the toxicity profile of Nano-Se in aquatic animals. In the present study, toxicities of Nano-Se and selenite in selenium-sufficient Medaka fish were compared. Selenium bioaccumulation and subsequent clearance in fish livers, gills, muscles and whole bodies were examined after 10 days of exposure to Nano-Se and selenite (100 microg Se/L) and again after 7 days of depuration. Both forms of selenium exposure effectively increased selenium concentrations in the investigated tissues. Surprisingly, Nano-Se was found to be more hyper-accumulated in the liver compared to selenite with differences as high as sixfold. Selenium clearance of both Nano-Se and selenite occurred at similar ratios in whole bodies and muscles but was not rapidly cleared from livers and gills. Nano-Se exhibited strong toxicity for Medaka with an approximately fivefold difference in terms of LC(50) compared to selenite. Nano-Se also caused larger effects on oxidative stress, most likely due to more hyper-accumulation of selenium in liver. The present study suggests that toxicity of nanoparticles can largely vary between different species and concludes that the evaluation of nanotoxicology should be carried out on a case-by-case basis.

  13. Overexpression of SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) promotes de novo fatty acid synthesis and triacylglycerol accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, H F; Luo, J; Zhao, W S; Yang, Y C; Tian, H B; Shi, H B; Bionaz, M

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1; gene name SREBF1) is known to be the master regulator of lipid homeostasis in mammals, including milk fat synthesis. The major role of SREBP1 in controlling milk fat synthesis has been demonstrated in bovine mammary epithelial cells. Except for a demonstrated role in controlling the expression of FASN, a regulatory role of SREBP1 on milk fat synthesis is very likely, but has not yet been demonstrated in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC). To explore the regulatory function of SREBP1 on de novo fatty acids and triacylglycerol synthesis in GMEC, we overexpressed the mature form of SREBP1 (active NH2-terminal fragment) in GMEC using a recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-nSREBP1), with Ad-GFP (recombinant adenovirus of green fluorescent protein) as control, and infected the GMEC for 48 h. In infected cells, we assessed the expression of 20 genes related to milk fat synthesis using real time-quantitative PCR, the protein abundance of SREBP1 and FASN by Western blot, the production of triacylglycerol, and the fatty acid profile. Expression of SREBF1 was modest in mammary compared with the other tissues in dairy goats but its expression increased approximately 30-fold from pregnancy to lactation. The overexpression of the mature form of SREBP1 was confirmed by >200-fold higher expression of SREBF1 in Ad-nSREBP1 compared with Ad-GFP. We observed no changes in amount of the precursor form of SREBP1 protein but a >10-fold increase of the mature form of SREBP1 protein with Ad-nSREBP1. Compared with Ad-GFP cells (control), Ad-nSREBP1 cells had a significant increase in expression of genes related to long-chain fatty acid activation (ACSL1), transport (FABP3), desaturation (SCD1), de novo synthesis of fatty acids (ACSS2, ACLY, IDH1, ACACA, FASN, and ELOVL6), and transcriptional factors (NR1H3 and PPARG). We observed a >10-fold increase in expression of INSIG1 but SCAP was downregulated by Ad-nSREBP1. Among genes related to

  14. The Cenomanian-Turonian oceanic anoxic event in Tibet, a real anoxic condition? Clues from Phosphorus, Carbon and Traces Elements accumulations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bomou, B.; Adatte, T.; Föllmi, K. B.; Caron, M.; Tantawy, A. A.; Fleitmann, D.; Matera, V.; Huang, Y.

    2009-04-01

    a plateau which ends the excursion. A bloom of Heterohelix and Guembelitria, low oxygen tolerant foraminifera, is observed in the upper part of the δ13C shift (W. archaeocretacea zone) indicative of depleted oxygen conditions. Significant peaks in Ptot is observed at the onset of the δ13C shift, followed by a depletion at the end of R. cushmani zone, persisting up to the end of W. archaeocretacea zone. In Tibet, P distribution patterns during OAE2 are quite similar to the ones observed in numerous sections in western Tethys and Central Atlantic (England, Italia, Spain and USA, Mort et al., 2007) and appear therefore to be global, coinciding partly with increased detrital inputs. Trace-metals values are under background level compared with sections characterized by strong anoxic conditions and redox sensitive elements such as Va, Ni, Co, U, generally indicative of anoxic conditions, do not show any increase during the maximum of δ13C excursion and Heterohelix and Guembelitria shifts. This suggests that dysoxic rather than anoxic conditions prevailed in Tibet area during OAE 2. Increased Mg, Na, Ca contents to the detriment of Al suggest a change to more arid climate conditions from the base of archaeocretacea zone upwards. REFERENCES JENKYNS, H.C. (1980). Cretaceous anoxic events: from continents to oceans. Journal of the Geological Society, 137, 171-188. LI, X., JENKYNS, H.C., WANG, C., HU, X., CHEN, X., WEI, Y., HUANG, Y. & CUI, J. (2006). Upper Cretaceous carbon-and oxygen-isotope stratigraphy of hemipelagic carbonate facies from southern Tibet, China. Journal of the Geological Society, 163, 375-382. MORT, H., ADATTE, T., FÖLLMI, K., KELLER, G., STEINMANN, P., MATERA, V., BERNER, Z., & STÜBEN, D. (2007). Phosphorus and the roles of productivity and nutrient recycling during Oceanic Anoxic Event 2. Geology, 35, 6, 483-486. SCHLANGER, S.O. & JENKYNS, H.C. (1976). Cretaceous anoxic events: causes and consequences. Geologie en Mijnbouw, 55, 179-184. SCHOLLE, P

  15. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  16. Effects of L1 retrotransposon insertion on transcript processing, localization and accumulation: lessons from the retinal degeneration 7 mouse and implications for the genomic ecology of L1 elements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jichao; Rattner, Amir; Nathans, Jeremy

    2006-07-01

    The retinal degeneration 7 (rd7) mouse is a naturally occurring model of enhanced S-cone syndrome, Goldman-Favre syndrome and clumped pigmentary retinopathy in humans, allelic disorders caused by inactivation of a photoreceptor-specific nuclear hormone receptor, NR2E3. We show here that the rd7 mutation arose from the antisense insertion of a long interspersed nuclear element (LINE-1) (or L1) into exon 5 of the mouse Nr2e3 gene. L1 insertion blocks splicing of Nr2e3 intron 5 by separating an inefficient splice donor from essential splicing enhancers within exon 5, with the result that incompletely spliced transcripts accumulate to high levels at the mutant Nr2e3 locus in photoreceptor nuclei. The high efficiency of transcription through the 7 kb L1 was unexpected and led us to compare the effect on transcript abundance of sense or antisense L1 insertions in transfected cells. In a variety of sequence contexts antisense L1 insertions had little or no effect on transcript levels or the production of full-length transcripts, whereas sense L1 insertions reduced transcript levels from several-fold to more than 10-fold. A bioinformatic analysis of all mouse L1s shows a approximately 2-fold under-representation of L1s in introns when compared with bulk genomic DNA, and, within introns, a further approximately 2-fold under-representation of sense when compared with antisense L1s. Interestingly, there is no evidence for orientation-specific positive or negative selection within any subregions of the L1 element. These data suggest that L1s have evolved to present the host transcriptional machinery with a minimally disruptive profile in the antisense orientation such that antisense intronic L1s often escape purifying negative selection.

  17. Accumulation of the precious metals platinum, palladium and rhodium from automobile catalytic converters in Paratenuisentis ambiguus as compared with its fish host, Anguilla anguilla.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, S; von Bohlen, A; Messerschmidt, J; Sures, B

    2005-03-01

    The platinum group metals (PGM) Pt, Pd and Rh are emitted into the environment mainly by catalytic exhaust gas converters of cars. As PGM accumulate in sediments of aquatic ecosystems, the study was focused on the uptake of the noble metals by European eels, Anguilla anguilla infected with the acanthocephalan Paratenuisentis ambiguus. Eels were exposed to ground catalytic converter material for six weeks. After exposure Pt and Pd were detected in the liver and kidney of the eels and in the parasites. Palladium was also found in fish muscle and intestine. No Rh uptake by the eel tissues and the parasites occurred. Paratenuisentis ambiguus contained the highest levels of both metals with 40 times higher Pt concentrations and four times higher Pd concentrations than the liver of its host. Due to its accumulation capacity for PGM, P. ambiguus can be applied as a sensitive accumulation indicator in field studies to assess the degree of environmental PGM contamination in aquatic ecosystems.

  18. Selenium accumulation by plants

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral element for animals and humans, which they acquire largely from plants. The Se concentration in edible plants is determined by the Se phytoavailability in soils. Selenium is not an essential element for plants, but excessive Se can be toxic. Thus, soil Se phytoavailability determines the ecology of plants. Most plants cannot grow on seleniferous soils. Most plants that grow on seleniferous soils accumulate <100 mg Se kg–1 dry matter and cannot tolerate greater tissue Se concentrations. However, some plant species have evolved tolerance to Se, and commonly accumulate tissue Se concentrations >100 mg Se kg–1 dry matter. These plants are considered to be Se accumulators. Some species can even accumulate Se concentrations of 1000–15 000 mg Se kg–1 dry matter and are called Se hyperaccumulators. Scope This article provides an overview of Se uptake, translocation and metabolism in plants and highlights the possible genetic basis of differences in these between and within plant species. The review focuses initially on adaptations allowing plants to tolerate large Se concentrations in their tissues and the evolutionary origin of species that hyperaccumulate Se. It then describes the variation in tissue Se concentrations between and within angiosperm species and identifies genes encoding enzymes limiting the rates of incorporation of Se into organic compounds and chromosomal loci that might enable the development of crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible portions. Finally, it discusses transgenic approaches enabling plants to tolerate greater Se concentrations in the rhizosphere and in their tissues. Conclusions The trait of Se hyperaccumulation has evolved several times in separate angiosperm clades. The ability to tolerate large tissue Se concentrations is primarily related to the ability to divert Se away from the accumulation of selenocysteine and selenomethionine, which might be incorporated

  19. Selenium accumulation by plants.

    PubMed

    White, Philip J

    2016-02-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral element for animals and humans, which they acquire largely from plants. The Se concentration in edible plants is determined by the Se phytoavailability in soils. Selenium is not an essential element for plants, but excessive Se can be toxic. Thus, soil Se phytoavailability determines the ecology of plants. Most plants cannot grow on seleniferous soils. Most plants that grow on seleniferous soils accumulate <100 mg Se kg(-1) dry matter and cannot tolerate greater tissue Se concentrations. However, some plant species have evolved tolerance to Se, and commonly accumulate tissue Se concentrations >100 mg Se kg(-1) dry matter. These plants are considered to be Se accumulators. Some species can even accumulate Se concentrations of 1000-15 000 mg Se kg(-1 )dry matter and are called Se hyperaccumulators. This article provides an overview of Se uptake, translocation and metabolism in plants and highlights the possible genetic basis of differences in these between and within plant species. The review focuses initially on adaptations allowing plants to tolerate large Se concentrations in their tissues and the evolutionary origin of species that hyperaccumulate Se. It then describes the variation in tissue Se concentrations between and within angiosperm species and identifies genes encoding enzymes limiting the rates of incorporation of Se into organic compounds and chromosomal loci that might enable the development of crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible portions. Finally, it discusses transgenic approaches enabling plants to tolerate greater Se concentrations in the rhizosphere and in their tissues. The trait of Se hyperaccumulation has evolved several times in separate angiosperm clades. The ability to tolerate large tissue Se concentrations is primarily related to the ability to divert Se away from the accumulation of selenocysteine and selenomethionine, which might be incorporated into non-functional proteins

  20. Highly siderophile element constraints on accretion and differentiation of the Earth-Moon system.

    PubMed

    Day, James M D; Pearson, D Graham; Taylor, Lawrence A

    2007-01-12

    A new combined rhenium-osmium- and platinum-group element data set for basalts from the Moon establishes that the basalts have uniformly low abundances of highly siderophile elements. The data set indicates a lunar mantle with long-term, chondritic, highly siderophile element ratios, but with absolute abundances that are over 20 times lower than those in Earth's mantle. The results are consistent with silicate-metal equilibrium during a giant impact and core formation in both bodies, followed by post-core-formation late accretion that replenished their mantles with highly siderophile elements. The lunar mantle experienced late accretion that was similar in composition to that of Earth but volumetrically less than (approximately 0.02% lunar mass) and terminated earlier than for Earth.

  1. Chalcophile elements in Martian meteorites indicate low sulfur content in the Martian interior and a volatile element-depleted late veneer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2017-04-01

    It is generally believed that the Martian mantle and core are rich in sulfur and that shergottites originated from sulfide-saturated magma. However, recent work suggests that the high FeO contents would require very high S concentrations in shergottite parent magmas at sulfide saturation. Here we combine new and published data on chalcophile elements in shergottites, nakhlites and ALH84001 to constrain the sulfide saturation state of the parent magmas and the chalcophile element concentrations in their mantle sources. Regardless of the MgO content and the long-term depletion history of incompatible lithophile elements as indicated by initial ε143Nd, different groups of shergottites display limited variations in ratios of Pt, Pd, Re, Cu, S, Se and Te. The emplacement of most shergottites within the crust and limited variations of ratios of chalcophile elements with substantial differences in volatility during eruption (e.g., Cu/S, Cu/Se and Pt/Re) indicate little degassing losses of S, Se, Te and Re from shergottites. Limited variations in ratios of elements with very different sulfide-silicate melt partition coefficients and negative correlations of chalcophile elements with MgO require a sulfide-undersaturated evolution of the parent magmas from mantle source to emplacement in the crust, consistent with the FeO-based argument. Sulfide petrography and the komatiite-like fractionation of platinum group elements (PGE) in shergottites also support this conclusion. The absence of accumulated sulfides in the ancient Martian cumulate ALH84001 results in very low contents of PGE, Re, Cu, Se and Te in this meteorite, hinting that sulfide-undersaturated magmas may have occurred throughout the Martian geological history. The negative correlation of Cu and MgO contents in shergottites suggests approximately 2 ± 0.4 (1s) μg/g Cu in the Martian mantle. The ratios of Cu, S, Se and Te indicate 360 ± 120 μg/g (1s) S, 100 ± 27 ng/g (1s) Se and 0.50 ± 0.25 ng/g (1s) Te in the

  2. Domestic Production Issues in Chromium and Platinum-Group Metals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    recovered. A typical origin scenario involves peridotite altering to serpentine which is subsequently weathered into a soil in a tropical environment...made up of darker minerals. Typical examples of ultramafic rocks are dunite and peridotite and for mafic rocks, basalt and gabbro (24:39,42). The rock...layers, are believed to contain potential chromite resources 158:33,341. The the olivine-rich rocks in the Ultramafic zone are known as the Peridotite

  3. Platinum Group Metal Recycling Technology Development - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Shore

    2009-08-19

    BASF Catalysts LLC, formerly Engelhard Corporation, has completed a project to recover Pt from PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies. The project, which began in 2003, has met the project objective of an environmentally-friendly, cost-effective method for recovery of platinum without release of hydrogen fluoride. This has been achieved using a combination of milling, dispersion and acid leaching. 99% recovery of Pt was achieved, and this high yield can be scaled up using one vessel for a single leach and rinse. Leaching was been successfully achieved using a 10% solids level, double the original target. At this solids content, the reagent and utility costs represent ~0.35% of the Pt value of a lot, using very conservative assumptions. The main cost of the process is capital depreciation, followed by labor.

  4. Generalized Combinatoric Accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yum, Dae Hyun; Seo, Jae Woo; Lee, Pil Joong

    The accumulator was introduced as a decentralized alternative to digital signatures. While most of accumulators are based on number theoretic assumptions and require time-consuming modulo exponentiations, Nyberg's combinatoric accumulator dose not depend on any computational assumption and requires only bit operations and hash function evaluations. In this article, we present a generalization of Nyberg's combinatoric accumulator, which allows a lower false positive rate with the same output length. Our generalization also shows that the Bloom filter can be used as a cryptographic accumulator and moreover excels the Nyberg's accumulator.

  5. Experimental investigations on the chemical state of solid fission-product elements in U3Si2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugajin, M.; Itoh, A.

    1994-10-01

    The uranium silicide U3Si2 has a congruent melting point of 1665 C and possesses higher uranium density (11.3 g U/cc) and higher thermal conductivity than the uranium dioxide currently used in light water reactors. U3Si2 is in use as a research reactor fuel (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, NUREG-1313, July, 1988), representing a potentiality for power reactor fuel. A first attempt is made in this study to predict the chemical state of the solid fission-product elements comprising zirconium, molybdenum, rare earth elements, alkaline earth metals and elements of the platinum group. Ternary phase equilibria in the U-Mo-Si and U-Ru-Si systems are also investigated to supplement the fission product chemistry in U3Si2.

  6. Fractionation of highly siderophile and chalcogen elements during magma transport in the mantle: Constraints from pyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zaicong; Becker, Harry

    2015-06-01

    Sulfide segregation from sulfur saturated basic magmas affects the compositions of chalcophile elements such as the highly siderophile elements (HSE) and the chalcogens S, Se, Te to variable extent. Whether this process predominantly occurs in the lower crust or in the mantle and how segregation of liquid sulfide and accumulation affects concentrations and ratios of these elements at different mantle depths and in presumed primitive basic magmas remains uncertain. Abundances of the HSE, S, Se and Te and Os isotopes in websterites and spinel clinopyroxenites of the Balmuccia peridotite massif (Ivrea-Verbano Zone, Italian Alps) provide new insight on sulfide segregation and the compositional change of melt and peridotite during magma transport in the mantle. Balmuccia websterites and clinopyroxenites formed from late Paleozoic and Mesozoic melt influx into stretched continental lithospheric mantle of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, respectively. The HSE and chalcogen element compositions of websterites and clinopyroxenites reflect the segregation and accumulation of sulfide melt from S saturated silicate melts with different abundances and ratios of chalcogens and the HSE. The pyroxenites display large variations in abundances of the platinum group elements (PGE) and Te whereas abundances of less chalcophile elements S, Se and Re are much less variable. The fractionation between the PGE and fractionation of Re/Os, S/Se and Se/Te in the mantle pyroxenites are consistent with sulfide melt-silicate melt partitioning with a sequence of apparent coefficients of DPGE > DAu ⩾ DTe > DSe ⩾ DS ≈ DRe. Concentrations in ocean ridge basalts and in gabbros of the lower oceanic crust are also consistent with such fractionation. Websterites which have formed during refertilization of depleted peridotites display ratios of the HSE and moderately suprachondritic initial 187Os/188Os similar to interstitial sulfides of refertilized peridotites. These compositions are different from

  7. Antarctic accumulation seasonality.

    PubMed

    Sime, Louise C; Wolff, Eric W

    2011-11-09

    The resemblance of the orbitally filtered isotope signal from the past 340 kyr in Antarctic ice cores to Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity has been used to suggest that the northern hemisphere may drive orbital-scale global climate changes. A recent Letter by Laepple et al. suggests that, contrary to this interpretation, this semblance may instead be explained by weighting the orbitally controlled Antarctic seasonal insolation cycle with a static (present-day) estimate of the seasonal cycle of accumulation. We suggest, however, that both time variability in accumulation seasonality and alternative stable seasonality can markedly alter the weighted insolation signal. This indicates that, if the last 340 kyr of Antarctic accumulation has not always looked like the estimate of precipitation and accumulation seasonality made by Laepple et al., this particular accumulation weighting explanation of the Antarctic orbital-scale isotopic signal might not be robust.

  8. Similar Evolutionary Trajectories for Retrotransposon Accumulation in Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Reuben M.; Kortschak, R. Daniel; Raison, Joy M.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The factors guiding retrotransposon insertion site preference are not well understood. Different types of retrotransposons share common replication machinery and yet occupy distinct genomic domains. Autonomous long interspersed elements accumulate in gene-poor domains and their nonautonomous short interspersed elements accumulate in gene-rich domains. To determine genomic factors that contribute to this discrepancy we analyzed the distribution of retrotransposons within the framework of chromosomal domains and regulatory elements. Using comparative genomics, we identified large-scale conserved patterns of retrotransposon accumulation across several mammalian genomes. Importantly, retrotransposons that were active after our sample-species diverged accumulated in orthologous regions. This suggested a similar evolutionary interaction between retrotransposon activity and conserved genome architecture across our species. In addition, we found that retrotransposons accumulated at regulatory element boundaries in open chromatin, where accumulation of particular retrotransposon types depended on insertion size and local regulatory element density. From our results, we propose a model where density and distribution of genes and regulatory elements canalize retrotransposon accumulation. Through conservation of synteny, gene regulation and nuclear organization, mammalian genomes with dissimilar retrotransposons follow similar evolutionary trajectories. PMID:28945883

  9. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page What research is being ...

  10. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-02-29

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  11. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  12. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approximate 10 to the 25th g in mass; and a later stage in which the approximately 10 to the 25th g planetesimals accumulate into the final planets. In the terrestrial planet region, an initial planetesimal swarm corresponding to the critical mass of dust layer gravitational instabilities is considered. In order to better understand the accumulation history of Mercury-sized bodies, 19 Monte-Carlo simulations of terrestrial planet growth were calculated. A Monte Carlo technique was used to investigate the orbital evolution of asteroidal collision debris produced interior to 2.6 AU. It was found that there are two regions primarily responsible for production of Earth-crossing meteoritic material and Apollo objects. The same techniques were extended to include the origin of Earth-approaching asteroidal bodies. It is found that these same two resonant mechanisms predict a steady-state number of Apollo-Amor about 1/2 that estimated based on astronomical observations.

  13. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  14. Control of helium accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, V.; Miley, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    The fishbone like oscillations in ignited tokamaks are addressed in an exploratory manner. The effects of the strong m = 1 oscillations and the weak high-frequency oscillations are examined in order to explore the feasibility of utilizing these oscillations for alpha accumulation control. The prospects of achieving small scale continuous alpha removal from the plasma center by mild fishbone-like oscillations are examined.

  15. Trace elements in dialysis.

    PubMed

    Filler, Guido; Felder, Sarah

    2014-08-01

    In end-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD), pediatric nephrologists must consider the homeostasis of the multiple water-soluble ions that are influenced by renal replacement therapy (RRT). While certain ions such as potassium and calcium are closely monitored, little is known about the handling of trace elements in pediatric dialysis. RRT may lead to accumulation of toxic trace elements, either due to insufficient elimination or due to contamination, or to excessive removal of essential trace elements. However, trace elements are not routinely monitored in dialysis patients and no mechanism for these deficits or toxicities has been established. This review summarizes the handling of trace elements, with particular attention to pediatric data. The best data describe lead and indicate that there is a higher prevalence of elevated lead (Pb, atomic number 82) levels in children on RRT when compared to adults. Lead is particularly toxic in neurodevelopment and lead levels should therefore be monitored. Monitoring of zinc (Zn, atomic number 30) and selenium (Se, atomic number 34) may be indicated in the monitoring of all pediatric dialysis patients to reduce morbidity from deficiency. Prospective studies evaluating the impact of abnormal trace elements and the possible therapeutic value of intervention are required.

  16. Elemental metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ping; Georgiou, Constantinos A; Brusic, Vladimir

    2017-01-10

    Elemental metabolomics is quantification and characterization of total concentration of chemical elements in biological samples and monitoring of their changes. Recent advances in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry have enabled simultaneous measurement of concentrations of > 70 elements in biological samples. In living organisms, elements interact and compete with each other for absorption and molecular interactions. They also interact with proteins and nucleotide sequences. These interactions modulate enzymatic activities and are critical for many molecular and cellular functions. Testing for concentration of > 40 elements in blood, other bodily fluids and tissues is now in routine use in advanced medical laboratories. In this article, we define the basic concepts of elemental metabolomics, summarize standards and workflows, and propose minimum information for reporting the results of an elemental metabolomics experiment. Major statistical and informatics tools for elemental metabolomics are reviewed, and examples of applications are discussed. Elemental metabolomics is emerging as an important new technology with applications in medical diagnostics, nutrition, agriculture, food science, environmental science and multiplicity of other areas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Dust Accumulation on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Since landing on Mars a year ago, NASA's pair of six-wheeled geologists have been constantly exposed to martian winds and dust. As a result, the Spirit rover has gradually experienced a slight decline in power as a thin layer of dust has accumulated on the solar panels, blocking some of the sunlight that is converted to electricity. In this enlarged image of a postage-stamp-size (3-centimeter-square, 1.2-inch-square) portion of one of Spirit's solar panels, a fine layer of martian dust coats electrical connections and metal surfaces. Individual silt grains or clumps of dust are visible where sediment has accumulated in crevices between solar cells and circuits. The upper right half of the image shows the edge of one of the rover's solar cells. The lower left half shows electrical wires bonded with silicon adhesive to the underlying composite surface; the circular abrasions are the result of sanding by hand on Earth. The braided wire is connected to a thermocouple used to measure temperature based on electrical resistance. Spirit took this image with its microscopic imager on martian day, or sol, 350 (Dec. 26, 2004).

  18. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  19. State of the art and development trends in the production, properties, and uses of transplutonium elements at the Lenin Reactor Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Vasil'ev, V.Ya.; Gordeev, Ya.N.; Zinkovskii, V.I.; Karelin, E.A.; Klinov, A.V.; Kosulin, N.S.; Nikolaev, V.M.; Seleznev, A.G.; Timofeev, G.A.; Toporov, Yu.G.; Tsykanov, V.A.

    1987-03-01

    Some results are reported from the Reactor Research Institute on the properties, production methods, and uses of the transplutonium elements (TPE), which have been obtained between 1976 and 1982. A comprehensive technology has been devised for processing irradiated reactor targets, which provides high yields. Calculations and experiments have defined the optimum design of the high-frequency trap on the SM-2 reactor. Neutron sources have been made for general industrial and medical purposes containing californium 252. It is shown that curium occurs in the hexavalent state in aqueous solution. Measurements have been made on the resonant-level parameters of berkelium 249 and californium 249. TPE compounds with platinum-group metals have been made and examined. The properties of the TPE metals have also been examined. Future problems have been discussed.

  20. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  1. COST action TD1407: network on technology-critical elements (NOTICE)--from environmental processes to human health threats.

    PubMed

    Cobelo-García, A; Filella, M; Croot, P; Frazzoli, C; Du Laing, G; Ospina-Alvarez, N; Rauch, S; Salaun, P; Schäfer, J; Zimmermann, S

    2015-10-01

    The current socio-economic, environmental and public health challenges that countries are facing clearly need common-defined strategies to inform and support our transition to a sustainable economy. Here, the technology-critical elements (which includes Ga, Ge, In, Te, Nb, Ta, Tl, the Platinum Group Elements and most of the rare-earth elements) are of great relevance in the development of emerging key technologies-including renewable energy, energy efficiency, electronics or the aerospace industry. In this context, the increasing use of technology-critical elements (TCEs) and associated environmental impacts (from mining to end-of-life waste products) is not restricted to a national level but covers most likely a global scale. Accordingly, the European COST Action TD1407: Network on Technology-Critical Elements (NOTICE)-from environmental processes to human health threats, has an overall objective for creating a network of scientists and practitioners interested in TCEs, from the evaluation of their environmental processes to understanding potential human health threats, with the aim of defining the current state of knowledge and gaps, proposing priority research lines/activities and acting as a platform for new collaborations and joint research projects. The Action is focused on three major scientific areas: (i) analytical chemistry, (ii) environmental biogeochemistry and (iii) human exposure and (eco)-toxicology.

  2. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  3. WEALTH INEQUALITY AND ACCUMULATION.

    PubMed

    Killewald, Alexandra; Pfeffer, Fabian T; Schachner, Jared N

    2017-07-01

    Research on wealth inequality and accumulation and the data upon which it relies have expanded substantially in the twenty-first century. While the field has experienced rapid growth, conceptual and methodological challenges remain. We begin by discussing two major unresolved methodological concerns facing wealth research: how to address challenges to causal inference posed by wealth's cumulative nature and how to operationalize net worth, given its highly skewed nature. To underscore the need for continued empirical attention to net worth, we review trends in wealth levels and inequality and evaluate wealth's distinctiveness as an indicator of social stratification. Next, we provide an overview of data sources available for wealth research. We then review recent empirical evidence on the effects of wealth on other social outcomes, as well as research on the determinants of wealth. We close with a list of promising avenues for future research on wealth, its causes, and its consequences.

  4. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  5. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  6. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  7. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  8. THE ACCUMULATION OF ELECTROLYTES

    PubMed Central

    Jacques, A. G.

    1938-01-01

    Experiments on Valonia were carried out as follows: Stage I.—Cells in dim light accumulated 0.08 M ammonia (NH3 + NH4OH + NH4+) from sea water containing 0.0025 M ammonia (but the concentration of undissociated ammonia appeared to remain less inside than outside). Potassium came out. Stage II.—Cells in dim light in nearly ammonia-free normal sea water lost ammonia which was replaced by sodium entering from the sea water. Potassium in the sap remained practically constant. Stage III.—The cells were placed in stronger light where the loss of ammonia continued and potassium entered. Sodium entered more rapidly than in Stage II. Stage IV.—Cells transferred to sea water containing 0.0025 M ammonia again accumulated ammonia up to 0.1345 M. The results in general harmonize with the view that the direction of movement of a base M through the protoplasm depends on the difference of the activity products (M)o(OH)o and (M)i(OH)i where the subscripts o and i refer to sea water and sap respectively. On this basis, if the entrance of ammonia raised the internal concentration of OH sufficiently in Stage I potassium should come out in Stage I, as actually happened. The behavior of sodium is in doubt. If the internal pH in Stage II were sufficiently high sodium should enter but not potassium. This was actually found. In Stage III, if we suppose that the effect of stronger light is to increase the external pH (by photosynthesis) more than the internal pH (as found by Crozier) we can understand why potassium entered, because such an increase in pH could readily make the external value of (K) (OH) greater than the internal. This would also explain why sodium entered more rapidly than in Stage II. When ammonia is coming out of the cell, sodium and potassium may enter more rapidly than usual without raising the internal concentration of halide above a certain critical value at which entrance appears to be checked. PMID:19873074

  9. Comparative physiology of elemental distributions in plants

    PubMed Central

    Conn, Simon; Gilliham, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Background Plants contain relatively few cell types, each contributing a specialized role in shaping plant function. With respect to plant nutrition, different cell types accumulate certain elements in varying amounts within their storage vacuole. The role and mechanisms underlying cell-specific distribution of elements in plants is poorly understood. Scope The phenomenon of cell-specific elemental accumulation has been briefly reviewed previously, but recent technological advances with the potential to probe mechanisms underlying elemental compartmentation have warranted an updated evaluation. We have taken this opportunity to catalogue many of the studies, and techniques used for, recording cell-specific compartmentation of particular elements. More importantly, we use three case-study elements (Ca, Cd and Na) to highlight the basis of such phenomena in terms of their physiological implications and underpinning mechanisms; we also link such distributions to the expression of known ion or solute transporters. Conclusions Element accumulation patterns are clearly defined by expression of key ion or solute transporters. Although the location of element accumulation is fairly robust, alterations in expression of certain solute transporters, through genetic modifications or by growth under stress, result in perturbations to these patterns. However, redundancy or induced pleiotropic expression effects may complicate attempts to characterize the pathways that lead to cell-specific elemental distribution. Accumulation of one element often has consequences on the accumulation of others, which seems to be driven largely to maintain vacuolar and cytoplasmic osmolarity and charge balance, and also serves as a detoxification mechanism. Altered cell-specific transcriptomics can be shown, in part, to explain some of this compensation. PMID:20410048

  10. Element 117

    SciTech Connect

    2010-04-08

    An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

  11. Element 117

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-09-30

    An international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, including two Department of Energy national laboratories and two universities, has discovered the newest superheavy element, element 117. The team included scientists from the Joint Institute of Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), the Research Institute for Advanced Reactors (Dimitrovgrad), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

  12. ITER helium ash accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. ); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. . Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  13. Nonlocal effects on dynamic damage accumulation in brittle solids

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, E.P.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents a nonlocal analysis of the dynamic damage accumulation processes in brittle solids. A nonlocal formulation of a microcrack based continuum damage model is developed and implemented into a transient dynamic finite element computer code. The code is then applied to the study of the damage accumulation process in a concrete plate with a central hole and subjected to the action of a step tensile pulse applied at opposite edges of the plate. Several finite element discretizations are used to examine the mesh size effect. Comparisons between calculated results based on local and nonlocal formulations are made and nonlocal effects are discussed.

  14. Selenium accumulation in plants--phytotechnological applications and ecological implications.

    PubMed

    Valdez Barillas, José Rodolfo; Quinn, Colin F; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2011-01-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace element for many organisms including humans, yet toxic at higher levels. Both Se deficiency and toxicity are problems worldwide. Since plants readily accumulate and volatilize Se, they may be used both as a source of dietary Se and for removing excess Se from the environment. Plant species differ in their capacity to metabolize and accumulate Se, from non-Se accumulators (< 100 mg Se/kg DW), to Se-accumulators (100-1000 mg Se/kg DW) to Se hyperaccumulators (> 1,000 mg Se/kg DW). Here we review plant mechanisms of Se metabolism in these various plant types. We also summarize results from genetic engineering that have led to enhanced plant Se accumulation, volatilization, and/or tolerance, including field studies. Before using Se-accumulating plants at a large scale we need to evaluate the ecological implications. Research so far indicates that plant Se accumulation significantly affects the plant's ecological interactions below and above ground. Selenium canprotect plants from fungal pathogens and from a variety of invertebrate and vertebrate herbivores, due to both deterrence and toxicity. However, specialist (Se-tolerant herbivores), detritivores and endophytes appear to utilize Se hyperaccumulator plants as a resource. These findings are relevant for managing phytoremediation of Se and similar elements.

  15. Process development for elemental recovery from PGM tailings by thermochemical treatment: Preliminary major element extraction studies using ammonium sulphate as extracting agent.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sameera; van der Merwe, Elizabet M; Altermann, Wladyslaw; Doucet, Frédéric J

    2016-04-01

    Mine tailings can represent untapped secondary resources of non-ferrous, ferrous, precious, rare and trace metals. Continuous research is conducted to identify opportunities for the utilisation of these materials. This preliminary study investigated the possibility of extracting major elements from South African tailings associated with the mining of Platinum Group Metals (PGM) at the Two Rivers mine operations. These PGM tailings typically contain four major elements (11% Al2O3; 12% MgO; 22% Fe2O3; 34% Cr2O3), with lesser amounts of SiO2 (18%) and CaO (2%). Extraction was achieved via thermochemical treatment followed by aqueous dissolution, as an alternative to conventional hydrometallurgical processes. The thermochemical treatment step used ammonium sulphate, a widely available, low-cost, recyclable chemical agent. Quantification of the efficiency of the thermochemical process required the development and optimisation of the dissolution technique. Dissolution in water promoted the formation of secondary iron precipitates, which could be prevented by leaching thermochemically-treated tailings in 0.6M HNO3 solution. The best extraction efficiencies were achieved for aluminium (ca. 60%) and calcium (ca. 80%). 35% iron and 32% silicon were also extracted, alongside chromium (27%) and magnesium (25%). Thermochemical treatment using ammonium sulphate may therefore represent a promising technology for extracting valuable elements from PGM tailings, which could be subsequently converted to value-added products. However, it is not element-selective, and major elements were found to compete with the reagent to form water-soluble sulphate-metal species. Further development of this integrated process, which aims at achieving the full potential of utilisation of PGM tailings, is currently underway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  17. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  18. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  19. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  20. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  1. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  2. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  3. Selenium accumulation and metabolism in algae.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Michela; Ertani, Andrea; Parrasia, Sofia; Vecchia, Francesca Dalla

    2017-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an intriguing element because it is metabolically required by a variety of organisms, but it may induce toxicity at high doses. Algae primarily absorb selenium in the form of selenate or selenite using mechanisms similar to those reported in plants. However, while Se is needed by several species of microalgae, the essentiality of this element for plants has not been established yet. The study of Se uptake and accumulation strategies in micro- and macro-algae is of pivotal importance, as they represent potential vectors for Se movement in aquatic environments and Se at high levels may affect their growth causing a reduction in primary production. Some microalgae exhibit the capacity of efficiently converting Se to less harmful volatile compounds as a strategy to cope with Se toxicity. Therefore, they play a crucial role in Se-cycling through the ecosystem. On the other side, micro- or macro-algae enriched in Se may be used in Se biofortification programs aimed to improve Se content in human diet via supplementation of valuable food. Indeed, some organic forms of selenium (selenomethionine and methylselenocysteine) are known to act as anticarcinogenic compounds and exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects in humans and other mammals. Here, we want to give an overview of the developments in the current understanding of Se uptake, accumulation and metabolism in algae, discussing potential ecotoxicological implications and nutritional aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Element bioaccumulation from coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Ogugbuaja, V.O.

    1984-01-01

    Element bioaccumulation from 2.3 ..mu..m hopper ash obtained from a power plant burning Southeast Ohio coal has been investigated. Experiments were designed to examine relationships among exposure route, dose mass, and accumulation. Ash doses of 50 and 100 mg and 50, 100, and 200 mg were administered intratracheally and intragastrically, respectively, to female Fisher rats. To evaluate the elemental distribution with time, respective groups of animals were sacrificed 3 and 14 days postexposure. Pronounced association of As with red blood cells of rats intragastrically exposed was indicated. This clearly demonstrates the reported tendency of As to bind to erythrocytes. Liver apparently accumulated most elements detected, with significant storage of particularly Fe, Se, Zn, and As. Doses of 100 and 200 mg instilled by intragastric gavage provided high concentrations of these elements; 20-115% accumulations were obtained 14 days after dosing. Kidney, spleen, and brain did not substantially accumulate the elements studied. Generally, 50 mg dose resulted in substantially higher organ elemental contents compared to other doses. Element concentrations in various tissues following pulmonary exposure were low other than for the lung which is as a result of incomplete ash clearance. Feces was a major elimination route for intragastric administration while urine was mostly a negligible elimination route.

  5. Trace elements in sulfide inclusions from Yakutian diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanova, G. P.; Griffin, W. L.; Ryan, C. G.; Shestakova, O. Y.; Barnes, S.-J.

    1996-07-01

    Sulfide inclusions in diamonds may provide the only pristine samples of mantle sulfides, and they carry important information on the distribution and abundances of chalcophile elements in the deep lithosphere. Trace-element abundances were measured by proton microprobe in >50 sulfide inclusions (SDI) from Yakutian diamonds; about half of these were measured in situ in polished plates of diamonds, providing information on the spatial distribution of compositional variations. Many of the diamonds were identified as peridotitic or eclogitic from the nature of coexisting silicate or oxide inclusions. Known peridotitic diamonds contain SDIs with Ni contents of 22 36%, consistent with equilibration between olivine, monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and sulfide melt, whereas SDIs in eclogitic diamonds contain 0 12% Ni. A group of diamonds without silicate or oxide inclusions has SDIs with 11 18% Ni, and may be derived from pyroxenitic parageneses. Eclogitic SDIs have lower Ni, Cu and Te than peridotitic SDIs; the ranges of the two parageneses overlap for Se, As and Mo. The Mo and Se contents range up to 700 and 300 ppm, respectively; the highest levels are found in peridotitic diamonds. Among the in-situ SDIs, significant Zn and Pb levels are found in those connected by cracks to diamond surfaces, and these elements reflect interaction with kimberlitic melt. Significant levels of Ru (30 1300 ppm) and Rh (10 170 ppm) are found in many peridotitic SDIs; SDIs in one diamond with wustite and olivine inclusions and complex internal structures have high levels of other platinum-group elements (PGEs) as well, and high chondrite-normalized Ir/Pd. Comparison with experimental data on element partitioning between crystals of monosulfide solid solution (MSS) and sulfide melts suggests that most of the inclusions in both parageneses were trapped as MSS, while some high-Cu SDIs with high Pd±Rh may represent fractionated sulfide melts. Spatial variations of SDI composition within

  6. Metal accumulation capacity of five species of Sphagnum moss

    SciTech Connect

    Aulio, K.

    1985-10-01

    The present paper describes the first experimental evidence of the species-specific differences in the cation accumulation properties in Sphagnum mosses. Manganese was chosen for the object of the experiments because this element appears to show the greatest variability under natural conditions.

  7. Two age-related accumulation profiles of toxic metals.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Kazuya; Yasuda, Yuichi; Tsutsui, Toyoharu

    2012-07-01

    In order to investigate the body burden levels of toxic metals in Japanese, five toxic metal concentrations in scalp hair samples from 28,424 subjects from infant to elderly were determined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The geometric mean of hair mercury concentrations showed a high-significant age-correlated increase (r = 0.341, p < 0.0001) with a peak at the 6th decade of life and then decreased with further aging in both sexes. The mean mercury concentrations in male adults were significantly higher than those in female (p < 0.001), indicating the gender difference (male > female) in mercury accumulation. Arsenic also showed a similar accumulation profile with age dependency and gender difference in adult subjects. In contrast, cadmium, lead and aluminium exhibited another type of accumulation profile: the highest burden level was observed in infants aged 0-3 years old for every element in both sexes. In addition, cadmium was found to have a character accumulating in aged females, with significant age-dependency (r = 0.134, p < 0.0001) and gender difference (female > male). These findings suggest that toxic metals are classified into two families on the basis of their accumulation profiles, and that the three elements of mercury, arsenic and cadmium which accumulate age-dependently in adults, may play a role in aging process and higher burden with them may lead to acceleration of aging.

  8. Accumulation of cadmium by plants of Zawar Mines, Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Aery, N C; Tiagi, Y D

    1988-01-01

    Several plants of the Zawar Zinc Deposits of Rajasthan (India) accumulate very high levels of cadmium. The maximum concentration namely 420 micrograms g-1 was found in the stems of Crotalaria linifolia. Some other cadmium accumulators with the concentration of the metal in microgram g-1 are Impatients balsamina (380), Dyerophytum indicum (282) and Melhania futteyporensis (245). The sequence of cadmium accumulation in different organs of the same plant species was roots greater than stems greater than leaves. Cadmium levels in the leaves of Celosia argentea, Crotalaria linifolia, Impatiens balsamina and Triumfetta pentandra showed a significant (linear) plant-soil relationship. The respective biological absorption coefficients (BAC - concentration of the element in the plant divided by concentration of the same element in the substrate) for these plants were 2.74, 4.13, 5.49 and 4.65.

  9. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  10. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  11. Strain accumulation in quasicrystalline solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nori, Franco; Ronchetti, Marco; Elser, Veit

    1988-01-01

    The relaxation of two-dimensional quasicrystalline elastic networks when their constituent bonds are perturbed homogeneously is studied. Whereas ideal, quasi-periodic networks are stable against such perturbations, significant accumulations of strain in a class of disordered networks generated by a growth process are found. The grown networks are characterized by root mean square phason fluctuations which grow linearly with system size. The strain accumulation observed in these networks also grows linearly with system size. Finally, dependence of strain accumulation on cooling rate is found.

  12. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  13. Choice Rules and Accumulator Networks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a preference accumulation model that can be used to implement a number of different multi-attribute heuristic choice rules, including the lexicographic rule, the majority of confirming dimensions (tallying) rule and the equal weights rule. The proposed model differs from existing accumulators in terms of attribute representation: Leakage and competition, typically applied only to preference accumulation, are also assumed to be involved in processing attribute values. This allows the model to perform a range of sophisticated attribute-wise comparisons, including comparisons that compute relative rank. The ability of a preference accumulation model composed of leaky competitive networks to mimic symbolic models of heuristic choice suggests that these 2 approaches are not incompatible, and that a unitary cognitive model of preferential choice, based on insights from both these approaches, may be feasible. PMID:28670592

  14. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  15. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  16. Rice Genotype Variation in Leaf-Grain Element Concentration Associations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As a major food crop of the world, rice can also be a major source of mineral nutrients for much of the world's population. The control of accumulation of particular elements in the grain varies by element. There is considerable variation among rice genotypes for concentrations of specific elements ...

  17. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Eric M; Wang, Jianmin; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan; Yan, Wengui; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2015-08-01

    Effects of soil-arsenic (As), phosphorus and iron oxide on As accumulation in rice grain were investigated. Cultivars that have significantly different sensitivity to As, straighthead-resistant Zhe 733 and straighthead-susceptible Cocodrie, were used to represent different cultivar varieties. The grain accumulation of other elements of concern, selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) was also monitored. Results demonstrated that high soil-As not only resulted in high grain-As, but could also result in high grain-Se, and Zhe 733 had significantly less grain-As than Cocodrie did. However, soil-As did not impact grain-Mo and Cd. Among all elements monitored, iron oxide amendment significantly reduced grain-As for both cultivars, while the phosphate application only reduced grain-Se for Zhe 733. Results also indicated that cultivar type significantly impacted grain accumulation of all monitored trace elements. Therefore, applying iron oxide to As-contaminated land, in addition to choosing appropriate rice cultivar, can effectively reduce the grain accumulation of As.

  18. Geomycology. [fungal biosolubilization and accumulation of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puerner, N. J.; Siegel, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Fungi have long been known to have capabilities for reduction and alkylation of arsenate and selenate but their general capabilities for solubilizing and accumulating metallic substances have been given serious attention only in recent years. Common members of the Aspergillaceae cultured on boron, copper, lead and other metals or oxides can solubilize and concentrate the elements or their compounds. To account for biosolubilization of the metals, we have set up a model study, incubating selected metals, e.g., mercury, in solutions of various metabolites including L-lysine and citric acid. Results of 100-300 days incubation showed that many metals can in fact be readily solubilized, and in some cases more effectively at pH 6-7 than at pH 1.5-2.

  19. Geomycology. [fungal biosolubilization and accumulation of metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puerner, N. J.; Siegel, S. M.

    1976-01-01

    Fungi have long been known to have capabilities for reduction and alkylation of arsenate and selenate but their general capabilities for solubilizing and accumulating metallic substances have been given serious attention only in recent years. Common members of the Aspergillaceae cultured on boron, copper, lead and other metals or oxides can solubilize and co