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Sample records for play humour learning

  1. Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Primary School Students' Attitudes on Play, Humour, Learning and Self-Concept: A Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillemyr, Ole Fredrik; Sobstad, Frode; Marder, Kurt; Flowerday, Terri

    2010-01-01

    Based on theory and research, social aspects like friendship and sense of relatedness are fundamental in the development of children's cultural identity and achievement of outcomes. It is argued that this is a motivational aspect often neglected in research studies focusing on students' motivation and learning. Theory and research on motivation…

  2. Humour as EFL Learning-Teaching Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Duleimi, Abbas Deygan Darweesh; Aziz, Rana Naji

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that humour is beneficial in the classroom because it increases social bonding between teachers and students, salience of information, and ultimately recall and retention. The current study attempts to test some assumptions about humour as a pedagogical tool. Results have indicated that using humour to teach material…

  3. Enjoyable learning: the role of humour, games, and fun activities in nursing and midwifery education.

    PubMed

    Baid, Heather; Lambert, Nicky

    2010-08-01

    Education that captures the attention of students is an essential aspect of promoting meaningful, active learning. Rather than standing at the front of a group of learners simply speaking about a topic, teachers have the opportunity of livening up their teaching with humour, games, and other fun activities. This article critically evaluates the benefits and limitations of humour within nursing education as well as the use of games and fun activities as teaching strategies. Examples of various games and interactive activities are also provided.

  4. Early humour production.

    PubMed

    Hoicka, Elena; Akhtar, Nameera

    2012-11-01

    The current studies explored early humour as a complex socio-cognitive phenomenon by examining 2- and 3-year-olds' humour production with their parents. We examined whether children produced novel humour, whether they cued their humour, and the types of humour produced. Forty-seven parents were interviewed, and videotaped joking with their children. Other parents (N= 113) completed a survey. Parents reported children copy jokes during the first year of life, and produce novel jokes from 2 years. In play sessions, 3-year-olds produced mostly novel humorous acts; 2-year-olds produced novel and copied humorous acts equally frequently. Parents reported children smile, laugh, and look for a reaction when joking. In play sessions, 2- and 3-year-olds produced these behaviours more when producing humorous versus non-humorous acts. In both parent reports and play sessions, they produced novel object-based (e.g., underwear on head) and conceptual humour (e.g., 'pig says moo') and used wrong labels humorously (e.g., calling a cat a dog). Thus, parent report and child behaviour both confirm that young children produce novel humorous acts, and share their humour by smiling, laughing, and looking for a reaction.

  5. Early Humour Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoicka, Elena; Akhtar, Nameera

    2012-01-01

    The current studies explored early humour as a complex socio-cognitive phenomenon by examining 2- and 3-year-olds' humour production with their parents. We examined whether children produced novel humour, whether they cued their humour, and the types of humour produced. Forty-seven parents were interviewed, and videotaped joking with their…

  6. Playful Learning and Montessori Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lillard, Angeline S.

    2013-01-01

    Although Montessori education is often considered a form of playful learning, Maria Montessori herself spoke negatively about a major component of playful learning--pretend play, or fantasy--for young children. In this essay, the author discusses this apparent contradiction: how and why Montessori education includes elements of playful learning…

  7. Learning Through Play

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ethics Occupational Therapy Assistants Advocacy & Policy New Evaluation Codes Learn how to use the new OT CPT® Evaluation codes correctly . Congressional Affairs AOTPAC Federal Regulatory Affairs Health ...

  8. Learning, Play, and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to ... Month-Old About the Play & Learn Center Your Child's Development: Newborn Your Child’s Development: 3-5 Days Contact ...

  9. Creative Play in Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeSelms, Carolann

    Creativity is the formulation and expression of an idea which is novel and useful to the creator. It is inherent in the foreign language classroom. Interpretation of experience, or creative play, is a normal part of first language use; with guidance it can be part of the second language learning experience. The effective teacher will consciously…

  10. Why did the proton cross the road? Humour and science communication.

    PubMed

    Riesch, Hauke

    2015-10-01

    The use of humour in public discourse about science has grown remarkably over the past few years, and when used in science communication activities is being seen as a great way to bring science to the public through laughter. However, barely any research has been published either on the often-assumed beneficial learning effects of humour in informal science education, or on the wider social functions and effects of humour about science and how humorous public discourse about science can influence the public understanding of science and the science-society relationship. This research note reviews some of the literature on the psychology and sociology of humour and comedy and tries to apply some of its insights to the effects humour might have when used in science communication. Although not intended to be anti-humour, this note attempts at least to start a more critical conversation on the value of humour in the communication of science.

  11. Learning Through Play and Laughter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth

    Programs for young children should cultivate children's real feelings, both rage and joy, and help children learn to accept and live with their feelings in non-destructive ways. Strong feelings, even negative ones, are sources of energy; rather than suppressing children's negative energy, teachers should recognize its creative aspects and use…

  12. Play to Learn, Learn to Play: Language Learning through Gaming Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryu, Dongwan

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers have investigated learning through playing games. However, after playing games, players often go online to establish and participate in the online community where they enrich their game experiences, discuss game-related issues, and create fan-fictions, screenshots, or scenarios. Although these emerging activities are an essential…

  13. The Case for Mixed Methodologies in Researching the Teacher's Use of Humour in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Struthers, John

    2011-01-01

    Inconsistencies within the literature result in teachers not having sufficient guidance to develop their humour use in support of learning without risking their professionalism. This article argues for more comprehensive evidence to guide teachers' use of humour, based on mixed methodological approaches. The case is also made for the Interpersonal…

  14. Outdoor Play and Learning: Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burriss, Kathleen; Burriss, Larry

    2011-01-01

    This study describes national school district policy and practice regarding elementary school children's outdoor learning and play. District representatives from 173 randomly selected school districts completed questionnaires describing policy and practice related to recess, outdoor play, outdoor curricular studies, playground materials, ADA…

  15. The Common Core's First Casualty: Playful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowdon, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Although the Common Core standards do not prescribe pedagogy or forbid playful learning, kindergarten teachers will find it challenging to maintain a playful classroom under this reform. Kindergarten teachers have to cover a more rigorous and accelerated curriculum now, and they are doing so in a context that rewards procedural teaching.

  16. Exploring Play/Playfulness and Learning in the Adult and Higher Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanis, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Play and playfulness and their role in learning are researched extensively in early childhood education. However, as the child matures into an adult, play and playfulness are given less attention in the teaching and learning process. In adult education, there is very little research about play/playfulness and its significance for learning. Despite…

  17. Immunoglobulins in human aqueous humour.

    PubMed Central

    Sen, D. K.; Sarin, G. S.; Saha, K.

    1977-01-01

    The immunoglobulin concentrations in human aqueous humour from 44 patients aged 35 to 85 years with cataracts were measured by a standard immunodiffusion method. IgG was found in all the samples (mean level 7-0 mg/100 ml. IgD, IgA or IgM could not be detected. There was no significant difference in IgG levels in aqueous humour between the two sexes, in different age groups, and in the different types of cataracts. PMID:403928

  18. Perceptual learning during action video game playing.

    PubMed

    Green, C Shawn; Li, Renjie; Bavelier, Daphne

    2010-04-01

    Action video games have been shown to enhance behavioral performance on a wide variety of perceptual tasks, from those that require effective allocation of attentional resources across the visual scene, to those that demand the successful identification of fleetingly presented stimuli. Importantly, these effects have not only been shown in expert action video game players, but a causative link has been established between action video game play and enhanced processing through training studies. Although an account based solely on attention fails to capture the variety of enhancements observed after action game playing, a number of models of perceptual learning are consistent with the observed results, with behavioral modeling favoring the hypothesis that avid video game players are better able to form templates for, or extract the relevant statistics of, the task at hand. This may suggest that the neural site of learning is in areas where information is integrated and actions are selected; yet changes in low-level sensory areas cannot be ruled out.

  19. 'Here's the weavery looming up': verbal humour in a woman with high-functioning autism.

    PubMed

    Werth, A; Perkins, M; Boucher, J

    2001-06-01

    A case study of Grace, a 29-year-old woman with high-functioning autism, is presented. Grace is unusual for a person with autism in that she produces a great deal of humorous and creative word play. She is also unusual in that she writes and then audio-records 'letters' to her family, and produces copious cartoon-like drawings which she annotates, with the result that multiple examples of her humour are available in permanent form. We present examples of Grace's use of puns, jokes, neologisms, 'portmanteau' words, irreverent humour, irony, sarcasm and word play based on her obsessional interests. The examples are used to illustrate the forms and content of Grace's humour, and are discussed in relation to current theories of autism and of normal humour.

  20. Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old A A A What's in this article? ... Learning What Your Baby Is Learning By 4 months old, your baby has learned to recognize you ...

  1. Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Print A A A What's in this ... Learning What Your Baby Is Learning By 4 months old, your baby has learned to recognize you ...

  2. The neural basis of humour comprehension and humour appreciation: The roles of the temporoparietal junction and superior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Darren W; Wallace, Marc G; Modirrousta, Mandana; Polimeni, Joseph O; McKeen, Nancy A; Reiss, Jeffrey P

    2015-12-01

    Psychological well-being and social acumen benefit from the recognition of humourous intent and its enjoyment. The enjoyment of humour requires recognition, but humour recognition is not necessarily accompanied by humour enjoyment. Humour recognition is crucial during social interactions, while the associated enjoyment is less critical. Few neuroimaging studies have explicitly differentiated between the neural foundations of humour comprehension and humour appreciation. Among such studies, design limitations have obscured the specification of neural correlates to humour comprehension or appreciation. We implemented a trichotomous response option to address these design limitations. Twenty-four participants rated 120 comics (90 unaltered with humourous intent and 30 caption-altered without humourous intent) as either funny jokes (FJ), not funny jokes but intended to be funny (NFJ), or not intended to be funny or non-jokes (NJ). We defined humour comprehension by NFJ minus NJ and humour appreciation by FJ minus NFJ. We measured localized blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) neural responses with a 3T MRI scanner. We tested for BOLD responses in humour comprehension brain regions of interest (ROIs), humour appreciation ROIs, and across the whole-brain. We found significant NFJ-NJ BOLD responses in our humour comprehension ROIs and significant FJ-NFJ BOLD responses in select humour appreciation ROIs. One key finding is that comprehension accuracy levels correlated with humour-comprehension responses in the left temporo-parietal junction (TPJ). This finding represents a novel and precise neural linkage to humour comprehension. A second key finding is that the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) was uniquely associated with humour-appreciation. The SFG response suggests that complex cognitive processing underlies humour appreciation and that current models of humour appreciation be revised. Finally, our research design provides an operational distinction between humour

  3. Making Humour Work: Creativity on the Job

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Janet

    2007-01-01

    There is a long research tradition associating humour with creativity, although relatively little research which focuses on the use of humour among professionals in particular workplaces. Addressing this gap, this paper analyses ordinary everyday workplace interaction in a range of New Zealand white collar organizations in order to examine claims…

  4. Chinese and German Teachers' Conceptions of Play and Learning and Children's Play Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Shu-Chen; Rao, Nirmala

    2011-01-01

    Commonalities and distinctions in Hong Kong-Chinese and German kindergarten teachers' conceptions of play and learning were examined. Six video clips of play episodes reflecting common play behavior and themes were selected from observations made during free play in two kindergartens in Hong Kong and two in Germany. Ten Chinese and seven German…

  5. Playing with Mathematics: Play in Early Childhood as a Context for Mathematical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Education Research Group of Australasia, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Play is an essential part of young children's lives. This symposium highlights the integral role of play in young children's mathematics learning and examines the teacher's role in facilitating and extending this. Papers examine key tenets of play, contributing to theoretical understandings and presenting data on teacher's perceptions of play and…

  6. Science Concepts Young Children Learn through Water Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Carol M.

    2012-01-01

    Water is fascinating, fun, and multifaceted. Children can play with it endlessly. But play, for play's sake, is not water's only value (Crosser, 1994, Tovey, 1993). Indeed, water play is a compelling focus of study for young children (Chalufour & Worth, 2005). The concepts that young children learn from water play are essential for early childhood…

  7. Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old A A A What's in this article? ... baby becomes more mobile during these next few months. What Is My Child Learning? Your little one ...

  8. The Playing Learning Child: Towards a Pedagogy of Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuelsson, Ingrid Pramling; Carlsson, Maj Asplund

    2008-01-01

    From children's own perspective, play and learning are not always separate in practices during early years. The purpose of this article is, first, to scrutinise the background and character of early years education in terms of play and learning. Second, to elaborate the findings of several years of research about children's learning in preschool…

  9. Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Print A A A What's in this ... baby becomes more mobile during these next few months. What Is My Child Learning? Your little one ...

  10. Learning through Play. Pediatric Round Table: 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chance, Paul

    Summarized in this volume are concepts, presented and developed at a roundtable discussion by scientists and child health professionals, focusing on aspects of children's play behavior. Participants sought to answer three questions: (1) What is play behavior and what is known about it? (2) How does play contribute to infant and child development?…

  11. More than Just Play: Enhanced Teacher Preparation through Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, H. Nicole; DeCou, Heather L.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the research behind and development of Play Lab, a play-based authentic learning environment for university students learning to teach children with developmental disabilities and the case study analysis from the Play Lab's first year of implementation. Data from (a) pre-development surveys which were triangulated with (b)…

  12. Nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Fatemeh; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid; Shali, Mahboubeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Providing holistic nursing care when there is a shortage of personnel and equipment exposes nurses to stress and a higher risk of occupational burnout. Humour can promote nurses’ health and influence nursing care. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of humour in clinical settings and factors affecting it. Methods: This qualitative study investigated nurses’ experiences of humour. Five hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences provided the setting for this study. The participants comprised of 17 nurses with master’s and Baccalaureate degrees (BSN) in nursing. These nurses worked at educational hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences and had minimum work experience of 12 months in various clinical wards. Nurses from all wards were invited to participate in this study. The data were collected through semi structure interviews using guides comprising probing questions. Telephonic interviews were used to further supplement the data. The data were analysed using conventional content analysis. Results: The data were classified into five themes including the dynamics of humour, condition enforcement, Risk making probability, Instrumental use and Change: opportunities and threats. Conclusion: Understanding nurses’ perceptions and experiences of humour helps identify its contributing factors and provides valuable guidelines for enhancing nurses and patients’ mental, emotional and physical health. Spreading a culture of humour through teaching methods can improve workplace cheerfulness and highlights the importance of humour in patient care in nurses and nursing students. PMID:26034735

  13. Mathematical Learning in a Context of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edo, Meque; Planas, Nuria; Badillo, Edelmira

    2009-01-01

    In this article we analyse a didactical situation centred on the creation and use of a symbolic play environment in a class of pupils aged five and six years-old. The main source of data for this paper comes from an experimentation planned in relation to the following research question: does symbolic play in simulated contexts help pupils to…

  14. Endangered Play, Endangered Development: A Constructivist View of the Role of Play in Development and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Diane E.

    Piagetian and Vygotskian theories may be used as starting points to examine the role of play in development and learning from a constructivist perspective, including how children use play to deepen their understanding and skills, encounter new problems, and incorporate newly mastered skills into their play. Contemporary factors such as an emphasis…

  15. Learning through Play: Portraits, Photoshop, and Visual Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honeyford, Michelle A.; Boyd, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Play has a significant role in language and literacy learning. However, even when valued in schools, opportunities for play are limited beyond early childhood education. This study of an after-school program for adolescents looks closely at several forms of play that students engaged in to produce self-portraits. The study suggests that play and…

  16. Cats and Portals: Video Games, Learning, and Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gee, James Paul

    2008-01-01

    The author builds on arguments he has made elsewhere that good commercial video games foster deep learning and problem solving and that such games in fact promote mastery as a form of play. Here he maintains that some good video games engage players with an important type of play, namely of play as discovery, of play as surmising new possibilities…

  17. This is funny: on the beneficial role of self-enhancing and affiliative humour in job design.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Anja; Vander Elst, Tinne; Dikkers, Josje; De Lange, Annet; De Witte, Hans

    2012-02-01

    Building on positive psychology, the present study aims to address the role of humour in the workplace, and particularly in job design, one of the crucial job aspects contributing to employee well-being. Specifically, we examine the main effects of self-enhancing and affiliative types of humour both on burnout and work engagement. Furthermore, we study whether these humour styles serve as personal resources, moderating the associations of job hindrances (i.e., role conflict), job challenges (i.e., workload) and job resources (i.e., social support) with burnout and work engagement, as outlined in the Job Demands-Resources model. Results in a large sample of Belgian employees ( N = 1200) showed that both types of humour related negatively to burnout and positively to work engagement. No interactions between humour and the job characteristics were found in the prediction of burnout. The significant interactions in predicting work engagement showed that self-enhancing and affiliative humour played a positive role, particularly when role conflict and social support were low. No interactions with workload were found. The discussion aims to shed light on the unexpected results and to further the study of the humour-health hypothesis.

  18. Learning Recycling from Playing a Kinect Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González Ibánez, José de Jesús Luis; Wang, Alf Inge

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of gesture-based computing and inexpensive gesture recognition technology such as the Kinect have opened doors for a new generation of educational games. Gesture based-based interfaces make it possible to provide user interfaces that are more nature and closer to the tasks being carried out, and helping students that learn best…

  19. Relationships Play Primary Role in Boys' Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichert. Michael; Hawley. Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is a pantheon of literature and popular panic pointing toward the academic ascent of girls and the decline of boys. On the contrary, the reality is different: Boys are learning and succeeding in many places. Two studies find that the places where boys excel have several common characteristics, including teachers who relate to the boys…

  20. Helping Children Play and Learn Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrosky, Michaelene M.; Meadan, Hedda

    2010-01-01

    During the early childhood years, children learn to interact with one another in ways that are positive and successful. Researchers stress the importance of positive peer relationships in childhood and later life. The absence of positive social interactions in childhood is linked to negative consequences later in life, such as withdrawal,…

  1. Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old A A A What's in this article? ... start responding even more to you during these months — and will even give you a smile! Babies ...

  2. Outdoor Play and Learning for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Suzanne M.

    Infants and toddlers like to crawl, climb, run, and explore in wide open, outdoor spaces. This publication provides ideas for day care providers on using outdoor play to facilitate learning in infants and toddlers. Section 1 discusses the benefits of daily outdoor play, including learning to interact with others, practicing language skills,…

  3. Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old KidsHealth > For Parents > Learning, Play, and Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Print A A A What's in this ... start responding even more to you during these months — and will even give you a smile! Babies ...

  4. Playing with Liquid Foams: Learning Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritacco, Hernan

    2008-01-01

    Who has never played with soap bubbles? They are so beautiful and amazing, they have a perfect spherical shape and surprising tints. Foams are structures of bubbles of an incredible complexity and they are a perfect system to stimulate students' interest in the chemistry and physics of surface phenomena. In this article I propose a simple…

  5. Young Children's Block Play and Mathematical Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Boyoung; Chae, Jeong-Lim; Boyd, Barbara Foulks

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated young children's mathematical engagement in play with wooden unit blocks. Two boys, ages 6 and 7, were independently observed completing the task of filling outlined regions with the various sets of blocks. Three major mathematical actions were observed: categorizing geometric shapes, composing a larger shape…

  6. Children's Perspectives of Play and Learning for Educational Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, Maryanne; Danby, Susan; Einarsdóttir, Jóhanna; Bourne, Jane; Jones, Desley; Ross, Sharon; Knaggs, Helen; Carter-Jones, Claire

    2015-01-01

    Play as a learning practice increasingly is under challenge as a valued component of early childhood education. Views held in parallel include confirmation of the place of play in early childhood education and, at the same time, a denigration of the role of play in favor for more teacher-structured and formal activities. As a consequence,…

  7. Children's Active Learning through Unstructured Play in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fatai O., Ismail Abdul; Faqih, Asrul; Bustan, Wafa K.

    2014-01-01

    Play is generally identified as a basic tool for effective learning and development in children. This study explores the ways in which amorphous or unstructured play contributes to children's overall development at the pre-primary level, helping to develop cognitive, social, and motor skills. The findings indicate that through unstructured play,…

  8. Play as a Context for Literacy Learning: A Qualitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dever, Martha T.; Wishon, Philip M.

    1995-01-01

    Examined the effect of sociodramatic play on the literacy learning of first graders. Found that sociodramatic play provided a vehicle through which the players practiced what they knew about literacy and provided an opportunity to think about literacy in the context of various play themes. Adult mediation enhanced the players' incorporation of…

  9. Children Learning to Use Technologies through Play: A Digital Play Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bird, Jo; Edwards, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly acknowledged as an important aspect of early childhood education. A significant problem for early childhood education has been how to understand the pedagogical use of technologies in a sector that values play-based learning. This paper presents a new framework to understand how children learn to use…

  10. The Transfer of Learning from Play Practices to Game Play in Young Adult Soccer Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Josh E.; Ward, Phillip; Wallhead, Tristan L.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Physical educators and coaches face an ongoing problem of presenting fun and enjoyable practices that also provide efficient learning of technical and tactical sports skills. Effective instruction also promotes the transfer of learning from practice tasks to the real game. Play Practice (PP) describes a structure for teaching sports…

  11. Examining Charisma in Relation to Students' Interest in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Huang, Yun-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Teachers, especially their teaching behaviours, play an important role in students' learning and students with a high interest in learning show deeper understanding in the classroom. This study intends to explore how far the teacher's charisma--knowledge, character traits, teaching techniques and humour--contribute to students' interest in…

  12. Role-playing in the problem-based learning class.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2012-01-01

    Learning and teaching have been conceptualized and executed in many styles, such as self-learning, peer learning, and interaction between the learner and mentor. Today, openness to alternative ideas and embracing innovative approaches in nursing education are encouraged in order to meet students' learning interests and needs, and to address ever-changing healthcare requests. Problem-based learning has been widely adopted in nursing education, with various positive effects on students' learning, such as motivated learning, team work, problem-solving skills and critical thinking. Role-plays have been demonstrated as an effective learning strategy that includes an active and experiential feature that facilitates students' autonomy in their health-related learning. However, there is a lack of discussion of whether and how role-play can be used in problem-based learning (PBL). This paper shows the development of a classroom-based innovation using role-play in the PBL class for higher diploma year-one nurse students (a total of 20 students, five per group). This paper consists of five sections: a) the literature on PBL and nurse education, and role-plays as the innovation; b) the PBL case scenario with the illustration of the two role-play scripts, c) student evaluation on role-play in the PBL class; d) discussions on both achievements and limitations of this innovation, and e) the conclusion. It is hoped that this paper will be an example to other nurse educators who are keen on exploring interactive and student-driven learning and teaching strategies in the PBL class.

  13. Achievement Evaluation within a Non-Conventional Framework: Some Experiences in Physics and Humour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worner, C. H.; Romero, A.; Bustamante, G.

    2010-01-01

    An achievement evaluation of a non-conventional physics course for liberal arts students is presented. The theoretical ground for this course focuses on the use of humour as a teaching tool. Preliminary evidence shows that a learning process is accomplished. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)

  14. Learning Physics through Play in an Augmented Reality Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyedy, Noel; Danish, Joshua A.; Delacruz, Girlie; Kumar, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The Learning Physics through Play Project (LPP) engaged 6-8-year old students (n = 43) in a series of scientific investigations of Newtonian force and motion including a series of augmented reality activities. We outline the two design principles behind the LPP curriculum: 1) the use of socio-dramatic, embodied play in the form of participatory…

  15. Play: Ten Power Boosts for Children's Early Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice

    2007-01-01

    Play is children's work. Alice Honig enumerates from the heart 10 ways in which children learn through play, including building dexterity; social skills; cognitive and language skills; number and time concepts; spatial understanding; reasoning of cause and effect; clarification of pretend versus real; sensory and aesthetic appreciation; extended…

  16. Learning to Play Games or Playing Games to Learn? A Health Education Case Study with Soweto Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amory, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of an educational computer video game in teaching and learning. Cultural-historical activity theory is used heuristically to explore the social and cultural interactions during game play. It is argued that knowledge construction occurs when video games function as a tool to mediate learning rather…

  17. Playing to Learn: A Qualitative Analysis of Bilingual Pupil-Pupil Talk during Board Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Heather

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores what happens when bilingual learners come together to play a board game specially designed to facilitate an interactive context in which the learning of English as a second or additional language is promoted. An example of the interactive behaviour of one group of bilingual learners is then presented in order to illustrate such…

  18. Home Video Games: Children and Parents Learn to Play and Play to Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Edna

    Twenty families in the San Francisco Bay area (California) with new Atari home video game sets were studied from February through June 1981 to obtain data on how the game-playing affected family interaction. Records of play were kept for one week each month and each family member was interviewed at the beginning and the end of the study. It was…

  19. Development of a Measure of Humour Appreciation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chik, Maria P. Y.; Leung, C. S. Benjamin; Molloy, Geoffrey N.

    2005-01-01

    The procedure for the development of a measure of humour appreciation among a convenience sample of 53 primary school children attending a one-week summer program held in Hong Kong is described. Two sets of visual stimuli depicting pictures of local celebrities portrayed either veridically (congruously) or incongruously were established from a…

  20. Play, attention, and learning: how do play and timing shape the development of attention and influence classroom learning?

    PubMed

    Hedges, James H; Adolph, Karen E; Amso, Dima; Bavelier, Daphne; Fiez, Julie A; Krubitzer, Leah; McAuley, J Devin; Newcombe, Nora S; Fitzpatrick, Susan M; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2013-07-01

    The behavioral and neurobiological connections between play and the development of critical cognitive functions, such as attention, remain largely unknown. We do not yet know how these connections relate to the formation of specific abilities, such as spatial ability, and to learning in formal environments, such as in the classroom. Insights into these issues would be beneficial not only for understanding play, attention, and learning individually, but also for the development of more efficacious systems for learning and for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Different operational definitions of play can incorporate or exclude varying types of behavior, emphasize varying developmental time points, and motivate different research questions. Relevant questions to be explored in this area include, How do particular kinds of play relate to the development of particular kinds of abilities later in life? How does play vary across societies and species in the context of evolution? Does play facilitate a shift from reactive to predictive timing, and is its connection to timing unique or particularly significant? This report will outline important research steps that need to be taken in order to address these and other questions about play, human activity, and cognitive functions.

  1. Play, attention, and learning: How do play and timing shape the development of attention and influence classroom learning?

    PubMed Central

    Hedges, James H; Adolph, Karen E; Amso, Dima; Bavelier, Daphne; Fiez, Julie A; Krubitzer, Leah; McAuley, J Devin; Newcombe, Nora S; Fitzpatrick, Susan M; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral and neurobiological connections between play and the development of critical cognitive functions, such as attention, remain largely unknown. We do not yet know how these connections relate to the formation of specific abilities, such as spatial ability, and to learning in formal environments, such as in the classroom. Insights into these issues would be beneficial not only for understanding play, attention, and learning individually, but also for the development of more efficacious systems for learning and for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders. Different operational definitions of play can incorporate or exclude varying types of behavior, emphasize varying developmental time points, and motivate different research questions. Relevant questions to be explored in this area include, How do particular kinds of play relate to the development of particular kinds of abilities later in life? How does play vary across societies and species in the context of evolution? Does play facilitate a shift from reactive to predictive timing, and is its connection to timing unique or particularly significant? This report will outline important research steps that need to be taken in order to address these and other questions about play, human activity, and cognitive functions. PMID:23763338

  2. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  3. Playing to Learn: A Training Manual for Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Asha; Swaminathan, Mina

    This guide for trainers offers a comprehensive child-centered perspective on training field workers in early childhood education. The theme of the role of play in child growth, development, and learning runs throughout the guide while its form, a series of structured exercises to help trainers handle all aspects of the subject, emphasizes the…

  4. Breathing and the Oboe: Playing, Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunt, Helena

    2004-01-01

    Breathing and breath control are central to playing the oboe, yet few detailed educational resources are available to support their teaching and learning. This paper presents a review of existing knowledge and expertise in the field. It highlights common ground and points of controversy, and indicates some key areas for consideration. It points to…

  5. Children's Play and Culture Learning in an Egalitarian Foraging Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyette, Adam H.

    2016-01-01

    Few systematic studies of play in foragers exist despite their significance for understanding the breadth of contexts for human development and the ontogeny of cultural learning. Forager societies lack complex social hierarchies, avenues for prestige or wealth accumulation, and formal educational institutions, and thereby represent a contrast to…

  6. Learning about water resource sharing through game play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewen, Tracy; Seibert, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Games are an optimal way to teach about water resource sharing, as they allow real-world scenarios to be enacted. Both students and professionals learning about water resource management can benefit from playing games, through the process of understanding both the complexity of sharing of resources between different groups and decision outcomes. Here we address how games can be used to teach about water resource sharing, through both playing and developing water games. An evaluation of using the web-based game Irrigania in the classroom setting, supported by feedback from several educators who have used Irrigania to teach about the sustainable use of water resources, and decision making, at university and high school levels, finds Irrigania to be an effective and easy tool to incorporate into a curriculum. The development of two water games in a course for masters students in geography is also presented as a way to teach and communicate about water resource sharing. Through game development, students learned soft skills, including critical thinking, problem solving, team work, and time management, and overall the process was found to be an effective way to learn about water resource decision outcomes. This paper concludes with a discussion of learning outcomes from both playing and developing water games.

  7. Humour in health‐care interactions: a risk worth taking

    PubMed Central

    McCreaddie, May; Payne, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Humour is a complex, dynamic phenomenon that mainly occurs in social situations between two or more people. Most humour research reviews rehearsed as opposed to spontaneous humour and rarely review the patients’ perspective. Aim  We explore patients’ perspectives on the use of humour in health care. We discuss the asymmetrical and divergent humour use between patients and clinical nurse specialists and posit nurses’ approaches to risk as a contributing factor. Design  A constructivist grounded theory collated researcher‐provoked (interviews, observation, field notes, pre‐and post‐interaction audio diaries) and non‐researcher‐provoked data (naturally occurring interactions) over 18 months. This paper is based upon four patient focus groups. A constant comparison approach to data collection and analyses was applied using interpretative and illustrative frameworks that balanced what was ‘known’ and ‘unknown’ about humour. Setting and participants  Patients were recruited from four patient–peer groups. Three audio‐taped (n = 20) and one observed focus group interactions (n = 12) were undertaken at the groups’ regular meeting places. Results  Patients hold a broad appreciation of humour and recognize it as being evident in subtle and nuanced forms. Patients wish health‐care staff to initiate and reciprocate humour. Conclusion  A chasm exists between what patients apparently want with regard to humour use in health‐care interactions and what actually transpires. Initiating humour involves risk, and risk‐taking requires a degree of self‐esteem and confidence. Nurses are, arguably, risk‐averse and have low self‐esteem. Future research could review confidence and self‐esteem markers with observed humour use in nurses and their interactions across a range of specialities. PMID:22212380

  8. Learning by playing: how to create the perfect learning game for and with optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haist, Tobias; Burla, Avinash

    2010-08-01

    For children, playing and learning is often one thing. They learn while playing and by playing the right games they learn a lot. It is therefore obvious that we should use (among other things) games in order to fascinate children for optics and to teach them the basic laws of optics. In this contribution we will introduce different optical games for children in preschool and elementary school. The majority of commercial learning games on the market do not achieve the ambitious goal of leading to fun and knowledge since very often there are serious design flaws within these games. We introduce ten design rules for learning games that will enable you to create your own successful learning game for a special topic. Exemplary, we will show games based on and for color mixing and polarization.

  9. Pupils' Humour Directed at Teachers: Its Types and Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Šedová, Klára

    2013-01-01

    Based on an analysis of 137 texts written by pupils, this paper examines pupils' humour directed at teachers, its types and social functions. The collected data are divided into three categories that describe different modes of teachers as targets of pupils' humour. The first mode describes teachers as unintentionally comical, the second as duped…

  10. Just Clowning Around: Classroom Perspectives on Children's Humour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobday-Kusch, Jody; McVittie, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Using a post-structural, interpretive perspective, we studied children's humour in a grade-1 and -2 classroom. In this article, we report our observations of two boys who took on the role of "class clown." The boys used humour to negotiate power, which we defined as participation in discourse, taking on the role of class clowns and…

  11. Learning Pre-Played Solos: Self-Regulated Learning Strategies in Jazz/Improvised Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Siw G.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the self-regulated learning strategies of two advanced students in jazz/improvised music education when learning pre-played solos over well-known jazz tunes. The students were enrolled in a well-established performance degree programme in a music conservatoire, and videotaped their own individual practice sessions. In…

  12. Students' Learning Outcomes and Learning Experiences through Playing a Serious Educational Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Meng-Tzu; Annetta, Len

    2012-01-01

    This study attempted to examine students' learning outcomes and their learning experiences through playing a Serious Educational Game. A mixed-method research design was employed collecting both quantitative and qualitative data. A total of 98 middle-school students ranging from sixth to eighth grades participated through paper-and-pencil…

  13. Learning with Serious Games: Is Fun Playing the Game a Predictor of Learning Success?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iten, Nina; Petko, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Serious games are generally considered to induce positive effects in the areas of learning motivation and learning gains. Yet few studies have examined how these factors are related. Therefore, an empirical study was conducted to test the relationship between anticipated enjoyment and willingness to play, as well as between game enjoyment,…

  14. "I Already Know What I Learned": Young Children's Perspectives on Learning through Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colliver, Yeshe; Fleer, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Around the world, if and how young children learn through their play in early childhood education and care contexts has been the subject of much debate. Yet rarely has the debate heard from the young children themselves, often due to the pervasive belief that they do not understand learning. To redress this, a qualitative case study was conducted…

  15. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  16. Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning: Teaching and Learning or Playing and Becoming?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woolf, Alison Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This article advocates the use of free play in the provision of the Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) programme in schools. It uses case studies to illustrate how children develop and use the five strands of SEAL while playing. The author draws on recent research and literature to support the idea that SEAL skills are caught rather…

  17. Adult Play-Learning: Observing Informal Family Education at a Science Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanhadilok, Peeranut; Watts, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the issues surrounding the nature of adult play. More specifically, we explore "family play-learning", where play activities result in forms of added knowledge or insight for the adults involved. Adult play itself is an under-researched area, and play-learning even more so. We discuss related research and, in…

  18. Learning to Play: Play Deprivation among Young Children in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comfort, Randy Lee

    2005-01-01

    Children who enter foster care typically have had little or not experience with play. This article describes the impact of play deprivation on early development. It provides guidelines for recognizing play deprivation and describes ways to help babies and young children develop a repertoire of play behaviors that is based on secure relationships…

  19. "Prey Play": Learning about Predators and Prey through an Interactive, Role-Play Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Cynthia C. M.; Dodd, Kristen; Drennon, Katherine; Nagle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    "Prey Play" is an interactive role-play activity that provides fifth-grade students with opportunities to examine predator-prey interactions. This four-part, role-play activity allows students to take on the role of a predator and prey as they reflect on the behaviors animals exhibit as they collect food and interact with one another, as well as…

  20. Play for Mortal Stakes; Vocation and the Liberal Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerson, Martin

    The ideal of liberal learning should be bonded with a sense of the utilitarian, the professional. Modern students call not for a traditional liberal learning but a learning directed to action, to improving the social order and the environment. Colleges can achieve a new synthesis of liberal and professional learning by making graduate and…

  1. Proteomic Analyses of the Vitreous Humour

    PubMed Central

    Angi, Martina; Kalirai, Helen; Coupland, Sarah E.; Damato, Bertil E.; Semeraro, Francesco; Romano, Mario R.

    2012-01-01

    The human vitreous humour (VH) is a transparent, highly hydrated gel, which occupies the posterior segment of the eye between the lens and the retina. Physiological and pathological conditions of the retina are reflected in the protein composition of the VH, which can be sampled as part of routine surgical procedures. Historically, many studies have investigated levels of individual proteins in VH from healthy and diseased eyes. In the last decade, proteomics analyses have been performed to characterise the proteome of the human VH and explore networks of functionally related proteins, providing insight into the aetiology of diabetic retinopathy and proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Recent proteomic studies on the VH from animal models of autoimmune uveitis have identified new signalling pathways associated to autoimmune triggers and intravitreal inflammation. This paper aims to guide biological scientists through the different proteomic techniques that have been used to analyse the VH and present future perspectives for the study of intravitreal inflammation using proteomic analyses. PMID:22973072

  2. What controls aqueous humour outflow resistance?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The bulk of aqueous humour outflow resistance is generated in or near the inner wall endothelium of Schlemm's canal in normal eyes, and probably also in glaucomatous eyes. Fluid flow through this region is controlled by the location of the giant vacuoles and pores found in cells of the endothelium of Schlemm's canal, but the flow resistance itself is more likely generated either in the extracellular matrix of the juxtacanalicular connective tissue or the basement membrane of Schlemm's canal. Future studies utilizing in vitro perfusion studies of inner wall endothelial cells may give insights into the process by which vacuoles and pores form in this unique endothelium and why inner wall pore density is greatly reduced in glaucoma. PMID:16386733

  3. Amnesia in an actor: Learning and re-learning of play passages despite severe autobiographical amnesia.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, Michael D; Morton, John

    2015-06-01

    We describe the case of an accomplished actor, whom we term AB, who suffered severe amnesia following a cardiac arrest and hypoxic brain damage, affecting medial temporal and thalamic structures. His performance on standard episodic memory tests, and on measures of retrograde amnesia, including autobiographical memory, was severely impaired. When presented with passages from plays he had not appeared in, AB showed a severe impairment at the first learning trial, but thereafter showed a 'normal' learning curve for this semantically and syntactically complex material. On being presented with passages from plays he had performed in the past, AB did not show any recognition of them whatsoever, as one might expect from his severe episodic memory impairment. However, AB showed a striking benefit (savings score) in relearning passages he had previously performed, compared with new passages, despite not having any autobiographical recall of having performed the relearned passages before. Moreover, although his initial recall performance in learning these passages was impaired compared with healthy control actors of similar age and experience, AB demonstrated the same incremental learning rate on subsequent learning trials of the passages as did the controls. We conclude that, although severely impaired at the first learning trial (on both 'new' and 'old' passages), AB was able to employ his long-established semantic and procedural skills to attempt the task, and that thereafter he showed a 'normal' rate of incremental learning from a lower baseline.

  4. Inquiry, play, and problem solving in a process learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thwaits, Anne Y.

    United States. This dissertation presents an account of the history of the institution and the continuing legacy of the early Exploratorium and its founder, Frank Oppenheimer. I argue that the institution is an early example of a constructivist learning museum. I then describe how art encourages learning in the museum. It provides means of presenting information that engage all of the senses and encourage emotional involvement. It reframes familiar sights so that viewers look more closely in search of recognition, and it presents intangible or dematerialized things in a tangible way. It facilitates play, with its many benefits. It brings fresh perspectives and processes to problem solving and the acquisition of new knowledge. This project is the study of an institution where art and science have always coexisted with equal importance, setting it apart from more traditional museums where art was added as a secondary focus to the original disciplinary concentration of the institution. Many of the exhibits were created by artists, but the real value the visual arts bring to the museum is in its contributions to processes such as inquiry, play, problem-solving, and innovation.

  5. What's so funny? Modelling incongruity in humour production.

    PubMed

    Hull, Rachel; Tosun, Sümeyra; Vaid, Jyotsna

    2017-04-01

    Finding something humorous is intrinsically rewarding and may facilitate emotion regulation, but what creates humour has been underexplored. The present experimental study examined humour generated under controlled conditions with varying social, affective, and cognitive factors. Participants listed five ways in which a set of concept pairs (e.g. MONEY and CHOCOLATE) were similar or different in either a funny way (intentional humour elicitation) or a "catchy" way (incidental humour elicitation). Results showed that more funny responses were produced under the incidental condition, and particularly more for affectively charged than neutral concepts, for semantically unrelated than related concepts, and for responses highlighting differences rather than similarities between concepts. Further analyses revealed that funny responses showed a relative divergence in output dominance of the properties typically associated with each concept in the pair (that is, funny responses frequently highlighted a property high in output dominance for one concept but simultaneously low in output dominance for the other concept); by contrast, responses judged not funny did not show this pattern. These findings reinforce the centrality of incongruity resolution as a key cognitive ingredient for some pleasurable emotional elements arising from humour and demonstrate how it may operate within the context of humour generation.

  6. What Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers Learn from Play: 12 Ideas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author presents the 12 benefits of playing as a reference and guide for teachers in helping young children develop their cognitive skills, motor ability, socio-emotional, and academic development during play time. The following 12 benefits are described: (1) Play Enhances Bodily Gracefulness; (2) Play Promotes Social Skills;…

  7. An exploration into the role of humour in the nursing student-nurse teacher relationship.

    PubMed

    Struthers, J

    1994-03-01

    Nurse teachers can often find themselves in various situations where they resort to using humour. An exploration of the role of humour within the educational relationship between nurse teachers and nursing students is the focus of this paper. Consideration is given to the nurse teachers' requirement to develop self-awareness in their own understanding of humour in order to facilitate and recognize the reasons for the nursing students' use of humour. The development of the appropriate use of humour by nursing students may lead to enhanced nursing practice, thereby reinforcing the need for inclusion of the theory of humour in both teacher training and the nursing curriculum.

  8. Active Learning by Play Dough Modeling in the Medical Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herur, Anita; Kolagi, Sanjeev; Chinagudi, Surekharani; Manjula, R.; Patil, Shailaja

    2011-01-01

    Active learning produces meaningful learning, improves attitudes toward learning, and increases knowledge and retention, but is still not fully institutionalized in the undergraduate sciences. A few studies have compared the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations, student seminars, quizzes, and use of CD-ROMs with blackboard teaching and…

  9. Efficacy of role play in concert with lecture to enhance student learning of immunology.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Samantha L

    2010-01-01

    Despite numerous reports that active learning increases student understanding, many barriers still exist that prevent faculty from shedding the traditional passive lecture and adopting active learning strategies in the classroom. This study looks at the use of role play as an active learning technique to convey new material, or as reinforcement to traditional lecture. A pre- and post-test survey was utilized to determine student learning gains, along with an anonymous survey to determine student attitudes about role play. Student learning gains are similar regardless of class size, role-playing participation or learning style, and reflect an increase in lower order cognition. Attitudes and learning gains indicate role play is preferable as a reinforcement technique, although the order does not matter if both lecture and role play are utilized to convey information. These data provide insight into the best practices of role-playing implementation in concert with traditional lecture format.

  10. Towards a New Learning: Play and Game-Based Approaches to Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Sara

    2013-01-01

    This position paper introduces the idea of a "new learning" which brings together elements of play and game-based learning approaches into education. The paper argues for a better understanding of the division between structured and unstructured play time in how one designs and delivers learning at all levels from primary to tertiary.…

  11. Let's Play: Learning Games for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Phyllis Jack

    2000-01-01

    Recommends play activities in which children look, listen, taste, smell, and touch. Includes appropriate ages for activities and gives directions for several games, including peek and seek, water play, bean bags, and hot potato. (DLH)

  12. Children's Virtual Play Worlds Culture, Learning, and Participation. New Literacies and Digital Epistemologies. Volume 58

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Anne, Ed.; Marsh, Jackie, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    As children's digital lives become more relevant to schools and educators, the question of play and learning is being revisited in new and interesting ways. "Children's Virtual Play Worlds: Culture, Learning, and Participation" provides a more reasoned account of children's play engagements in virtual worlds through a number of scholarly…

  13. Birds of a Feather Laugh Together: An Investigation of Humour Style Similarity in Married Couples

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Christian Martin; Campbell, Lorne John

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigated the degree of similarity in humour styles between spouses as assessed with the Humour Styles Questionnaire (HSQ). Furthermore, self-esteem was investigated as a potential moderator of partner humour style similarity. A sample of 116 heterosexual, married couples independently completed questionnaires assessing self-reported humour styles across the 32 item HSQ, as well as global self-esteem. Results indicated that there is significant positive association between the humour styles of married partners. This association was moderated by individual self-esteem. Specifically, participants with high self-esteem were found to have greater humour style similarity with their partners. Similarity was also greater for positive compared to negative types of humour. Implications for the use of dyadic data in investigating the roles of humour within couples are discussed. PMID:27547257

  14. Early Learning and Development: Cultural-Historical Concepts in Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    "Early Learning and Development" provides a unique synthesis of cultural-historical theory from Vygotsky, Elkonin and Leontiev in the 20th century to the ground-breaking research of scholars such as Siraj-Blatchford, Kratsova and Hedegaard today. It demonstrates how development and learning are culturally embedded and institutionally defined, and…

  15. Trainee Teachers' e-Learning Experiences of Computer Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Pam Wright highlights the role of technology in providing situated learning opportunities for preservice teachers to explore the role commercial computer games may have in primary education. In a study designed to assess the effectiveness of an online unit on gaming incorporated into a course on learning technologies, Wright found that thoughtful…

  16. PLAYful Practices: Students at Creekview High School Discuss Participatory Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Buffy

    2012-01-01

    Much of the literature about participatory learning in schools and libraries is dominated by adult voices. What do sites of participatory learning look like from the student perspective? What does it mean to student learners to develop and apply the four practices of participation--create, circulate, collaborate, and connect? How does…

  17. The Effects of Experiential Learning with Playfulness in the Adult Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spaulding, James T.

    2010-01-01

    Adult learning practices that incorporate experiential learning and playfulness promise greater learner involvement and engagement, produce better results than "teaching-to-the-test" lectures and presentations, and represent a major opportunity to improve adult learning. The author developed such an adult learning activity for an adult Safe…

  18. Word-Play and "Musike": Young Children Learning Literacies while Communicating Playfully

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcock, Sophie; Cullen, Joy; St George, Alison

    2008-01-01

    This paper explores young children's rhythmic, musical, humorous and playful communication in the context of empowering themselves to create meaningful curriculum during teacher-controlled routine morning-tea times in an early childhood education centre. The data, presented as "events", formed part of an interpretive qualitative study…

  19. Playful Talk: Negotiating Opportunities to Learn in Collaborative Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Florence R.; Wilson, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines the role of playful talk in negotiating the "how" of collaborative group work in a 6th-grade science classroom. Here we develop and test a Vygotsky-derived hypothesis that postulates playful talk as a mechanism for identity exploration and group status negotiation. Our findings indicate that students utilized the…

  20. Working across Disciplines to Understand Playful Learning in Educational Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Aalsvoort, Geerdina; Broadhead, Pat

    2016-01-01

    Educators stress the importance of play for children's cognitive, social, physical, and emotional development. In order to effectively advocate for the inclusion of play in education settings, it is important to fully understand it. Two researchers, one from England and one from the Netherlands, sought common ground for understanding what children…

  1. The Power of Play: Learning What Comes Naturally

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    2008-01-01

    Although under attack from some goal-oriented politicians and parents and ofen considered superfluous by school administrators and teachers, free play remains vital to human health and creativity. Contrary to the notion that play should serve utilitarian ends or consist primarily of organized sports, the author makes a case for self-initiated…

  2. Reclaiming Play: Helping Children Learn and Thrive in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlsson-Paige, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Child development theorists, researchers, and educators have long known that play is one of children's most valuable resources, vital to their social, emotional, and cognitive growth. Through play children make sense of the world around them and work through new experiences, ideas, and feelings. But in recent years, a host of social forces and…

  3. Learning Through Play: Joslyn Multi-Service Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Sharon Lee

    1974-01-01

    In an old, wood frame school building, a day care facility, based on a modular, movable, and highly flexible series of components, permits active use and almost constant change in a learning situation. (Author)

  4. An Analysis of the Language of Humour in Chinua Achebe's "A Man of the People"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjei, Daniel Oppong

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows how humour is deployed in Achebe's "A Man of the People" by analysing the make-up of the various instances of humour as well as their significance in attaining the desired effects. To Veatch (1998), humour contains two incongruous elements; one element is socially normal while the other is a violation of the…

  5. Framing Young Children's Humour and Practitioner Responses to It Using a Bakhtinian Carnivalesque Lens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tallant, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a pilot study offering an alternative framing of children's humour and laughter in an early childhood education setting. It employs a Bakhtinian carnivalesque lens to explore the nature of children's humour in an urban nursery and investigate the framing of children's humour and laughter outside the popular…

  6. [Sense of humour in schizophrenia--ability of humour reception and possibilities of its application in therapeutic interventions].

    PubMed

    Parnowska, Dorota; Braniecka, Anna; Radomska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The existing research on sense of humour in schizophrenia is focused on two main areas, mainly, assessment of patients' abilities to understand and appreciate humour and denoting the possibilities of its application in therapeutic programs concentrating on the improvement of patients' functionality and preventing illness relapses. The vast majority of the conclusions from the above mentioned research corroborate the opinion on the usefulness of developing and reinforcing sense of humour in schizophrenia, emphasizing its beneficial effect on the patients' quality of life, above all, in terms of reducing aggression, anxiety and depression as well as improving general life satisfaction and social functioning. At the same time numerous research indicate low reception of humour in schizophrenia which can negatively influence its effective usage in therapeutic interventions. Further constraint with regard to the therapy can constitute an intensified fear for being laughed at, which has been confirmed in numerous empirical reports. Therefore, it seems that addressing humorous therapeutic interventions to the above mentioned group of patients requires especially careful planning taking into consideration its cognitive and affective limitations in the perception of humour and intensified fear for being laughed at.

  7. Passion play: Will Wright and games for science learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ching, Dixie

    2012-12-01

    Researchers and instructional designers are exploring the possibilities of using video games to support STEM education in the U.S., not only because they are a popular media form among youth, but also because well-designed games often leverage the best features of inquiry learning. Those interested in using games in an educational capacity may benefit from an examination of the work of video game designer Will Wright. Wright designs through a constructivist lens and his open-ended, sandbox games ( SimCity, The Sims, Spore) present wide "possibility spaces" that allow players to exercise their critical thinking and problem solving skills. His games invoke a delight in discovery that inspire creative acts and interest-driven learning both during and outside of the game. Finally, he reminds us that failure-based learning is a viable strategy for building expertise and understanding.

  8. Outdoor Learning: Supervision Is More than Watching Children Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Heather; Thompson, Donna; Hudson, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Early childhood programs strive to provide good-quality care and education as young children develop their physical, emotional, social, and intellectual skills. In order to provide children with positive, developmentally appropriate learning opportunities, educators ensure the safety and security of children, indoors and outdoors. The outdoor…

  9. Pedagogical Dramas and Transformational Play: Narratively Rich Games for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barab, Sasha A.; Dodge, Tyler; Ingram-Goble, Adam; Pettyjohn, Patrick; Peppler, Kylie; Volk, Charlene; Solomou, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Although every era is met with the introduction of powerful technologies for entertainment and learning, videogames represent a new contribution binding the two and bearing the potential to create sustained engagement in a curricular drama where the player's knowledgeable actions shape an unfolding fiction within a designed world. Although…

  10. A Clean and Healthy Place to Play and Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Bobbie

    2012-01-01

    Asking parents about their top priority when choosing a child care program, most will say their child's health and safety. Children thrive in safe, healthy, and loving environments that help them learn about themselves and the world around them; a place where they can exercise their curiosity and explore without being exposed to danger or health…

  11. Children at Play: Learning Gender in the Early Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    This captivating book illuminates our understanding of how young children develop gender identities. A two year longitudinal research project on children's own understandings of gender casts new light on how 3 and 4 year old newcomers in early years classes learn rules for gendered behaviour from older children, in their imaginative and…

  12. The Role Distance Learning Has to Play in Offender Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seelig, Caroline; Rate, Leanne

    2014-01-01

    This article looks into the uses of digital and online tools in distance learning to improve literacy and numeracy of offenders in New Zealand prisons. Looking at the benefits and restrictions of digital education within the prison environment, this article discusses the solutions that Open Polytechnic, in partnership with the the New Zealand…

  13. Play School: Where Children and Families Learn and Grow Together

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Lori Berger

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of national research confirms that significant levels of learning and growth occur during early childhood, and that it is important, from a public policy perspective, to increase access to quality programs and services that support the development of skills and attitudes children need to succeed. Clearly, no one-size-fits-all…

  14. Passion Play: Will Wright and Games for Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Dixie

    2012-01-01

    Researchers and instructional designers are exploring the possibilities of using video games to support STEM education in the U.S., not only because they are a popular media form among youth, but also because well-designed games often leverage the best features of inquiry learning. Those interested in using games in an educational capacity may…

  15. Social Play of Young Children At-Risk of Learning Difficulties: A Situated Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Aalsvoort, Geerdina M.; Van Tol, Annemarie M.; Karemaker, Arjette M.

    2004-01-01

    The question asked by this study was whether information on play behaviour of young children at-risk of learning difficulties could act as a diagnostic means of investigating emerging learning difficulties. A sociocultural perspective was taken to examine the role of interaction during the play of students in a regular primary school and in a…

  16. The Swedish National Curriculum: Play and Learning with Fundamental Values in Focus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette; Arlemalm-Hagser, Eva

    2011-01-01

    In Sweden, early childhood education is unique in its combination of learning and play, care and fostering fundamental values. The aim of this article is to discuss and problematise current Swedish research from the early childhood education field with a focus on play and learning in relation to three fundamental values affirmed in the Swedish…

  17. What Can Chinese and German Children Tell Us about Their Learning and Play in Kindergarten?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Shu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated Hong Kong and German children's perceptions of play and learning and their relationships. Forty-eight children (24 German and 24 Chinese) playing and learning in the classroom were observed and videotaped for five consecutive days. They were interviewed 3 times about their kindergarten experiences by using free- and…

  18. What Do Students Learn by Playing an Online Simulation Game?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franciosi, Stephan J.; Mehring, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest that simulations and games not only improve target language skills, but they can also support knowledge creation regarding a broader variety of topics. Thus, we wanted to explore how playing an online simulation game affected knowledge of energy supply and its relationship to environmental and economic factors among learners of…

  19. Considering Counterfactuals: The Relationship between Causal Learning and Pretend Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopnik, Alison; Walker, Caren M.

    2013-01-01

    Many researchers have long assumed imaginative play critical to the healthy cognitive, social, and emotional development of children, which has important implications for early-education policy and practice. But, the authors find, a careful review of the existing literature highlights a need for a better theory to clarify the nature of the…

  20. Evolution and Natural Selection: Learning by Playing and Reflecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrero, David; del Castillo, Héctor; Monjelat, Natalia; García-Varela, Ana Belén; Checa, Mirian; Gómez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Scientific literacy is more than the simple reproduction of traditional school science knowledge and requires a set of skills, among them identifying scientific issues, explaining phenomena scientifically and using scientific evidence. Several studies have indicated that playing computer games in the classroom can support the development of…

  1. Learning by Thinking during Play: The Power of Reflection to Aid Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmon, Angela K.

    2016-01-01

    Coupled with reflection, play leads to the development of thinking dispositions and promotes deep learning and understanding. The twenty-first century world demands that children learn how to learn by becoming reflective, self-regulating inquirers capable of metacognition (thinking about thinking). This manuscript aims to analyse how young minds…

  2. Readings from...Play as a Medium for Learning and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris, Ed.

    The chapters and essays in this book are drawn from the 1988 edition of "Play as a Medium for Learning and Development." The first chapter, "The Challenge of Educational Play," by Bernard Spodek and Olivia N. Saracho, is followed by two essays: (1) "Play and the Origin of Species," (Michael J. Ellis); and (2)…

  3. Exploring Hispanic Teacher Candidates' Beliefs about the Value of Play in Children's Learning and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortez-Castro, Diana H.

    2015-01-01

    Play has been globally recognized as valuable to children's learning and development (Frost et al., 2012). The value of play is acknowledged as a developmentally appropriate practice in part because it fosters cognitive, physical, emotional, and social benefits to children. Play is also known as a human right that should be protected. However, in…

  4. Value of Play as An Early Learning Instrument in Bangladesh Context: A Socio-Cultural Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chowdhury, Nurun Nahar; Rivalland, Corine

    2012-01-01

    In early childhood education the dominant discourse of play-based pedagogy is greatly influenced by a western play approach. This paper examines how play is valued as early learning in Bangladesh. It reports on a qualitative study that explored the understandings of four parents and four early childhood educators in semi-rural Bangladesh. Findings…

  5. When Playing Meets Learning: Methodological Framework for Designing Educational Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linek, Stephanie B.; Schwarz, Daniel; Bopp, Matthias; Albert, Dietrich

    Game-based learning builds upon the idea of using the motivational potential of video games in the educational context. Thus, the design of educational games has to address optimizing enjoyment as well as optimizing learning. Within the EC-project ELEKTRA a methodological framework for the conceptual design of educational games was developed. Thereby state-of-the-art psycho-pedagogical approaches were combined with insights of media-psychology as well as with best-practice game design. This science-based interdisciplinary approach was enriched by enclosed empirical research to answer open questions on educational game-design. Additionally, several evaluation-cycles were implemented to achieve further improvements. The psycho-pedagogical core of the methodology can be summarized by the ELEKTRA's 4Ms: Macroadaptivity, Microadaptivity, Metacognition, and Motivation. The conceptual framework is structured in eight phases which have several interconnections and feedback-cycles that enable a close interdisciplinary collaboration between game design, pedagogy, cognitive science and media psychology.

  6. Humour processing in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Henley, Susie M.D.; Downey, Laura E.; Woollacott, Ione O.; Golden, Hannah L.; Fletcher, Phillip D.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Humour is a complex cognitive and emotional construct that is vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, notably the frontotemporal lobar degenerations. However, humour processing in these diseases has been little studied. Here we assessed humour processing in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 22, mean age 67 years, four female) and semantic dementia (n = 11, mean age 67 years, five female) relative to healthy individuals (n = 21, mean age 66 years, 11 female), using a joint cognitive and neuroanatomical approach. We created a novel neuropsychological test requiring a decision about the humorous intent of nonverbal cartoons, in which we manipulated orthogonally humour content and familiarity of depicted scenarios. Structural neuroanatomical correlates of humour detection were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Assessing performance in a signal detection framework and after adjusting for standard measures of cognitive function, both patient groups showed impaired accuracy of humour detection in familiar and novel scenarios relative to healthy older controls (p < .001). Patient groups showed similar overall performance profiles; however the behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia group alone showed a significant advantage for detection of humour in familiar relative to novel scenarios (p = .045), suggesting that the behavioural variant syndrome may lead to particular difficulty decoding novel situations for humour, while semantic dementia produces a more general deficit of humour detection that extends to stock comedic situations. Humour detection accuracy was associated with grey matter volume in a distributed network including temporo-parietal junctional and anterior superior temporal cortices, with predominantly left-sided correlates of processing humour in familiar scenarios and right-sided correlates of processing novel humour. The findings quantify deficits of core cognitive operations underpinning humour

  7. Humour processing in frontotemporal lobar degeneration: A behavioural and neuroanatomical analysis.

    PubMed

    Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Henley, Susie M D; Downey, Laura E; Woollacott, Ione O; Golden, Hannah L; Fletcher, Phillip D; Mummery, Catherine J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rohrer, Jonathan D; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2015-08-01

    Humour is a complex cognitive and emotional construct that is vulnerable in neurodegenerative diseases, notably the frontotemporal lobar degenerations. However, humour processing in these diseases has been little studied. Here we assessed humour processing in patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (n = 22, mean age 67 years, four female) and semantic dementia (n = 11, mean age 67 years, five female) relative to healthy individuals (n = 21, mean age 66 years, 11 female), using a joint cognitive and neuroanatomical approach. We created a novel neuropsychological test requiring a decision about the humorous intent of nonverbal cartoons, in which we manipulated orthogonally humour content and familiarity of depicted scenarios. Structural neuroanatomical correlates of humour detection were assessed using voxel-based morphometry. Assessing performance in a signal detection framework and after adjusting for standard measures of cognitive function, both patient groups showed impaired accuracy of humour detection in familiar and novel scenarios relative to healthy older controls (p < .001). Patient groups showed similar overall performance profiles; however the behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia group alone showed a significant advantage for detection of humour in familiar relative to novel scenarios (p = .045), suggesting that the behavioural variant syndrome may lead to particular difficulty decoding novel situations for humour, while semantic dementia produces a more general deficit of humour detection that extends to stock comedic situations. Humour detection accuracy was associated with grey matter volume in a distributed network including temporo-parietal junctional and anterior superior temporal cortices, with predominantly left-sided correlates of processing humour in familiar scenarios and right-sided correlates of processing novel humour. The findings quantify deficits of core cognitive operations underpinning humour

  8. Regiomontanus or learning how to play with science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marian, Anca-Catalina

    2016-04-01

    Although at the international school competitions, Romanian students are in the top, but few students decide to learn science in school. The major problem is "how to motivate students to study science?" In cooperation with Meridian Zero Astroclub, Oradea, we provide students non-formal space where non-formal activities can approach them to the work of a researcher. Five days in September, ten to fifteen students are invited in a journey through the science world. • Formation of the Moon's craters • Solar radiation • Solar cycles • Constellations • Solar System • Eratosthenes experiment These topics are examples from our activities. Working with students from 4 years old to 18 years old, all activities are developed in the form of games, combining mathematical skills with physics or astronomy. Older students are put in the position of teachers for younger students. Results: A better understanding of physical processes, a higher interest in science, a better application of mathematical concepts in class.

  9. Using a Linguistic Theory of Humour in Teaching English Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdulmajeed, Rufaidah Kamal; Hameed, Sarab Khalil

    2017-01-01

    Teachers who teach a new language grammar do not usually have the time and the proper situation to introduce humour when starting a new topic in grammar. There are many different opinions about teaching grammar. Many teachers seem to believe in the importance of grammar lessons devoted to a study of language rules and practical exercises. Other…

  10. Science Teachers' Perceptions of the Relationship Between Game Play and Inquiry Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezei, Jessica M.

    The implementation of inquiry learning in American science classrooms remains a challenge. Teachers' perceptions of inquiry learning are predicated on their past educational experiences, which means outdated methods of learning may influence teachers' instructional approaches. In order to enhance their understanding and ultimately their implementation of inquiry learning, teachers need new and more relevant models. This study takes a preliminary step exploring the potential of game play as a valuable experience for science teachers. It has been proposed that game play and inquiry experiences can embody constructivist processes of learning, however there has been little work done with science teachers to systematically explore the relationship between the two. Game play may be an effective new model for teacher education and it is important to understand if and how teachers relate game playing experience and knowledge to inquiry. This study examined science teachers' game playing experiences and their perceptions of inquiry experiences and evaluated teacher's recognition of learning in both contexts. Data was collected through an online survey (N=246) and a series of follow-up interviews (N=29). Research questions guiding the study were: (1) What is the nature of the relationship between science teachers' game experience and their perceptions of inquiry? (2) How do teachers describe learning in and from game playing as compared with inquiry science learning? and (3) What is the range of similarities and differences teachers articulate between game play and inquiry experiences?. Results showed weak quantitative links between science teachers' game experiences and their perceptions of inquiry, but identified promising game variables such as belief in games as learning tools, game experiences, and playing a diverse set of games for future study. The qualitative data suggests that teachers made broad linkages in terms of parallels of both teaching and learning. Teachers

  11. Student Voices about the Role Feedback Plays in the Enhancement of Their Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, Christine; Dixon, Helen; Ward, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    If feedback is to be framed as purposeful dialogue then both students and teachers have significant roles to play. Students must be willing and able to provide feedback to teachers not only about their learning needs but also about the teaching they experience. In turn, teachers must create the conditions that support active student learning and…

  12. Learning Strategies and Learner Attitudes in the Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game Cube World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goh, Shu Li

    2016-01-01

    The rapid progress of technology has revolutionized learning and in the field of computer assisted language learning, the use of digital games has expanded significantly. One type of game that has been attracting interest is massively multiplayer online role-playing games (henceforth MMORPGs). Recent research has drawn attention to the potential…

  13. Our Special World: Parents and Preschoolers Living, Learning and Playing Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Early Childhood Education.

    This booklet describes specific ways that parents can help their preschool children learn during the routines of a typical day. It provides general guidelines on safety, child development, and parental expectations, as well as learning activities that can be used when children are waking up, dressing, getting ready for preschool, playing alone,…

  14. The Value of ICT from a Learning Game-Playing Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeill, Michael C.; Fry, Joan M.

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) case study in physical education teacher education from a student perspective. Action research evaluated the impact of a range of ICT options on student teachers' learning to play as well as learning to teach games in a secondary school context. Although multiple media were…

  15. To What Extent Might Role Play Be a Useful Tool for Learning Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Helen

    2012-01-01

    To most children in primary school role-play is just something you do, and something you enjoy. It is part-and-parcel of being at school, part of the normal classroom activity. So, why can it not just be a normal part of learning mathematics? Can we study learners "in role", and make judgments about what they learn, and how they learn? This is the…

  16. Playing for Keeps: Life and Learning on a Public School Playground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meier, Deborah; Engel, Brenda S.; Taylor, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Why is play important in the lives of children? What crucial aspects of learning are being neglected in the current near-elimination of recess time in public schools? "Playing for Keeps", co-authored by the well-known writer and educational leader Deborah Meier, and two colleagues with equally long experience in schools, explores these…

  17. Play Learning Centers for Preschool Handicapped Children: Research and Demonstration Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Louis; And Others

    Described are the construction and analysis of three play learning centers for preschool mentally retarded and cerebral palsied children, and pre-adolescent and adolescent emotionally disturbed children. Section I of the report provides an introduction on the importance of play, research on playground equipment, considerations in designing play…

  18. Kindergartens in Cognitive Times: Imagination as a Dialectical Relation between Play and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    2011-01-01

    Traditionally, play has been viewed as the guiding pedagogical practice for kindergartens in most industrialised countries. Central to this approach has been a strong belief in free play. As governments are spending more money on early childhood education, many Western countries are demanding greater learning outcomes for preschool aged children.…

  19. The Impact of Individual, Competitive, and Collaborative Mathematics Game Play on Learning, Performance, and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plass, Jan L.; O'Keefe, Paul A.; Homer, Bruce D.; Case, Jennifer; Hayward, Elizabeth O.; Stein, Murphy; Perlin, Ken

    2013-01-01

    The present research examined how mode of play in an educational mathematics video game impacts learning, performance, and motivation. The game was designed for the practice and automation of arithmetic skills to increase fluency and was adapted to allow for individual, competitive, or collaborative game play. Participants (N = 58) from urban…

  20. E-learning Constructive Role Plays for EFL Learners in China's Tertiary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Lin; Suwanthep, Jitpanat

    2011-01-01

    Recently, speaking has played an increasingly important role in second/foreign language settings. However, in many Chinese universities, EFL students rarely communicate in English with other people effectively. The existing behavioristic role plays on New Horizon College English (NHCE) e-learning do not function successfully in supplementing EFL…

  1. Learning to Deflect: Conceptual Change in Physics during Digital Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sengupta, Pratim; Krinks, Kara D.; Clark, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    How does deep conceptual change occur when students play well-designed educational games? To answer this question, we present a case study in the form of a microgenetic analysis of a student's processes of knowledge construction as he played a conceptually-integrated digital game (SURGE Next) designed to support learning about Newtonian mechanics.…

  2. Development of Young Adults' Fine Motor Skills when Learning to Play Percussion Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gzibovskis, Talis; Marnauza, Mara

    2012-01-01

    When playing percussion instruments, the main activity is done with the help of a motion or motor skills; to perform it, developed fine motor skills are necessary: the speed and precision of fingers, hands and palms. The aim of the research was to study and test the development of young adults' fine motor skills while learning to play percussion…

  3. Lisa Murphy on Play: The Foundation of Children's Learning, Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Discover why school readiness IS children's play. This updated guide includes timely research and new stories that highlight how play is vital to the social, physical, cognitive, and spiritual development of children. Learn the seven things we must do with children every day and why they are so important. Use your daily observations to incorporate…

  4. Postmorbid learning of saxophone playing in a patient with frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hanna; Chin, Juhee; Suh, Mee Kyung; Kim, Hee Jin; Kim, Yeo Jin; Ye, Byoung Seok; Lee, Na Kyung; Kim, Eun Joo; Seo, Sang Won; Na, Duk L

    2015-01-01

    Some patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) show an artistic enhancement of musical abilities. However, no patients with FTD, to date, have been reported to be able to learn how to play a musical instrument after disease onset. Herein we describe a patient (J. K.) who had never played any musical instruments premorbidly, but who learned to play the saxophone after being diagnosed with a behavioral variant of FTD. He mastered a repertoire that consisted of 10 pieces of Korean folk songs over a period of three years. Furthermore, his saxophone skills were high enough to outperform other students in his class.

  5. You Like It, You Learn It: Affectivity and Learning in Competitive Social Role Play Gaming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brom, Cyril; Šisler, Vít; Slussareff, Michaela; Selmbacherová, Tereza; Hlávka, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    Despite the alleged ability of digital game-based learning (DGBL) to foster positive affect and in turn improve learning, the link between affectivity and learning has not been sufficiently investigated in this field. Regarding learning from team-based games with competitive elements, even less is known about the relationship between…

  6. Transfer of humoural immunity over two generations in urban pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, A.; Jacquin, L.; Haussy, C.; Perret, S.; Gasparini, J.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal antibodies (MatAb) are known to provide passive protection early in life for young vertebrates but their effects on the development of offspring immune response across generations are still unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of antigen exposure (keyhole limpet haemocyanin, KLH) experienced by urban pigeon (Columba livia) females on the amount of antigen-specific antibodies (Abs) transferred into the egg yolk of their daughters and on the humoural immune response towards this same antigen in their grandchildren. We found that chicks from KLH-injected maternal grandmothers had a higher humoural response than chicks from sham-injected grandmothers. However, we did not detect a significant effect of female KLH exposure on the ability of their daughters to transmit anti-KLH Abs into their eggs. These results suggest that antigen exposure at one generation may shape the immune profile of offspring over two next generations, although the underlying mechanisms remain to be investigated. PMID:26559513

  7. Learning to Play, Playing to Learn: Comparing the Experiences of Adult Foreign Language Learners with Off-the-Shelf and Specialized Games for Learning German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Grove, Frederik; Van Looy, Jan; Mechant, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Learning opportunities offered by digital games have become an important research topic in recent years. Language learning is one of the areas in which games could prosper but the question then is whether these should be specialized language-learning games or commercial off-the-shelf games for entertainment. The goal of this paper is to compare…

  8. Senior veterinary students' perceptions of using role play to learn communication skills.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Jennifer C; Bateman, Shane W

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies of veterinary practice have suggested a correlation between well-developed communication skills and job satisfaction, career retention, customer satisfaction, decreased lawsuits, and financial remuneration for veterinarians. Veterinary educators are under growing pressure to teach functional communication skills to veterinary students; however, the methods employed have not been well evaluated. In this study we have evaluated veterinary student's attitudes to learning communication skills by participating in role play. The study indicates that experiential learning modalities such as role play are perceived as effective by students, despite reluctance to participate and some discomfort surrounding participation.

  9. Don't Forget, Thursday Is Test[icle] Time! The Use of Humour in Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2014-01-01

    Sexuality and humour share a fraught relationship at school, so that how humour might be productively employed in sexuality education constitutes a "risky" consideration. This paper explores the role of humour in sexuality education as observed in a Year 9 New Zealand health class. Adding to existing literature emphasising students' use…

  10. Relationships among Humour, Self-Esteem, and Social Support to Burnout in School Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Sammy K.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the total, direct, and indirect effects of humour on burnout among 539 school teachers. As predicted, those with high humour reported significantly lower levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation but higher levels of personal accomplishment. Self-esteem consistently explained parts of the associations between humour…

  11. Humour in Cognitive and Social Development: Creative Artists and Class Clowns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewell, Paul

    2005-01-01

    There are a number of characteristics of gifted children reported by teachers and researchers. Such characteristics may include curiosity, advanced mathematical skills, large vocabulary, acute sense of humour. This paper examines the demands that humour, as a creative activity, makes on cognitive and social development. It is derived from research…

  12. The Use of Bright and Dark Types of Humour is Rooted in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Papousek, Ilona; Ruch, Willibald; Rominger, Christian; Kindermann, Elisabeth; Scheidl, Katharina; Schulter, Günter; Fink, Andreas; Weiss, Elisabeth M.

    2017-01-01

    The ways in which humour can be used are related to the manifold interpersonal functions humour can serve, some of which are positive, and some negative. In the present study, phasic changes in the functional coupling of prefrontal and posterior cortex (EEG coherence) during other people’s auditory displays of happy and sad mood were recorded to predict people’s typical use of humour in social interactions. Greater use of benevolent humour, the intentions of which are in keeping with the characteristics of “laughing-with” humour, was associated with greater decreases of prefrontal-posterior coupling during the processing of happy laughter. More loose prefrontal-posterior coupling indicates loosening of control of the prefrontal cortex over the incoming perceptual information, thereby opening up the perceptual gate and allowing the brain to become more affected by the social-emotional signals. Greater use of humour styles linked to malicious intentions of “laughing-at” humour was associated with responses indicating a wider opened perceptual gate during the processing of other people’s crying. The findings are consistent with the idea that typical humour styles develop in line with the rewarding values of their outcomes (e.g., interaction partners are happy or hurt), which in turn are defined through the individuals’ latent interpersonal goals. PMID:28211496

  13. Humour among Chinese and Greek Preschool Children in Relation to Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guo, Juan; Zhang, XiangKui; Wang, Yong; Xeromeritou, Aphrodite

    2011-01-01

    The researchers studied humour among Chinese and Greek preschool children in relation to cognitive development. The sample included 55 Chinese children and 50 Greek children ages 4½ to 5½ years. Results showed that both Chinese and Greek children's humour recognition were significantly and positively correlated to their cognitive development, but…

  14. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children. The Transdisciplinary Play-Based Curriculum. Collection 2: Modules 9-16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Toni W.

    Read, Play, and Learn is a play-based curriculum designed to promote growth across all of the areas of development important to a young child. With a school-year's worth of ready-to-use lessons or modules, the curriculum provides story-related activities centered around themes such as enjoying seasonal festivities, sharing emotions, making…

  15. Read, Play, and Learn! Storybook Activities for Young Children. The Transdisciplinary Play-Based Curriculum. Collection 1: Modules 1-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linder, Toni W.

    Read, Play, and Learn is a play-based curriculum designed to promote growth across all of the areas of development important to a young child. With a school-year's worth of ready-to-use lessons or modules, the curriculum provides story-related activities centered around themes such as enjoying seasonal festivities, sharing emotions, making…

  16. The Outdoor Environment in Norwegian Kindergartens as Pedagogical Space for Toddlers' Play, Learning and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Thomas; Martinsen, Marianne T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines some characteristics of the outdoor environment in Norwegian kindergartens. Understood as pedagogical space, outdoor conditions may enhance or restrict the youngest children's possibilities for play, learning and development. In 117 of 133 kindergartens (response rate: 87 %) participating in a longitudinal study, the heads of…

  17. Throwing and Catching as Relational Skills in Game Play: Situated Learning in a Modified Game Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacPhail, Ann; Kirk, David; Griffin, Linda

    2008-01-01

    In this article, we were interested in how young people learn to play games within a tactical games model (TGM) approach (Griffin, Oslin, & Mitchell, 1997) in terms of the physical-perceptual and social-interactive dimensions of situativity. Kirk and MacPhail's (2002) development of the Bunker-Thorpe TGfU model was used to conceptualize the…

  18. Preschool Interactive Peer Play Mediates Problem Behavior and Learning for Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Bell, Elizabeth R.; Romero, Sandy L.; Carter, Tracy M.

    2012-01-01

    The study employed a developmental, ecological, and resiliency framework to examine whether interactive peer play competencies mediated associations between teacher reported problem behavior and learning outcomes for a representative sample of urban low-income children (N = 507 across 46 Head Start classrooms). Structural equation models provided…

  19. What Do Students Learn from a Role-Play Simulation of an International Negotiation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnurr, Matthew A.; De Santo, Elizabeth M.; Green, Amanda D.

    2014-01-01

    This article uses pre- and post-surveys to assess learning outcomes associated with a role-play simulation set within a fictionalized extension of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Quantitative and qualitative data suggest that the simulation increased student appreciation of the complexity of international negotiation, but decreased student…

  20. Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games as Arenas for Second Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates contemporary research on the use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) in language education. The development and key features of these games are explored. This is followed by an examination of the theories proposed as a basis for game-based learning, and the claims made regarding the value of…

  1. Designing After-School Learning Using the Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital games have become popular for engaging students in a range of learning goals, both in the classroom and the after-school space. In this article, I discuss a specific genre of video game, the massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMO), which has been identified as a dynamic environment for encountering 21st-century workplace…

  2. Using Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games for Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childress, Marcus D.; Braswell, Ray

    2006-01-01

    This article addresses the use of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) to foster communication and interaction and to facilitate cooperative learning in an online course. The authors delineate the definition and history of massively multiplayer online games (MMOGs), and describe current uses of MMORPGs in education, including…

  3. Learning and Teaching Breathing and Oboe Playing: Action Research in a Conservatoire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunt, Helena

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents findings from action research in a conservatoire (the Guildhall School of Music & Drama) which focused on teaching and learning effective breathing in playing the oboe. A range of approaches and techniques emerged from a literature review. These were implemented in practice with oboe students at the Guildhall School, and…

  4. In the Sandbox: Individuals and Collectives in Organizational Learning as Sense-Making through Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova-Nowak, Irina V.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a grounded theory of connections between individual and collective (group and organizational) levels of analysis through the examination of play and sense-making as integral parts of organizational learning (OL) by relying on the meta-paradigm theoretical framework. The study employed grounded theory as its…

  5. Game-as-Teacher: Modification by Adaptation in Learning through Game-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopper, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper will explore how game-play in video games as well as game centered approaches in physical education (PE) such as Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) can draw on complexity thinking to inform the learning process in physical education. Using the video game concept of game-as-teacher (Gee, 2007), ideas such as enabling constraints…

  6. Play or Learn: European-American and Chinese Kindergartners' Perceptions about the Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Kindergarten is the age at which children's future time perspective emerges. This capacity enables them to form goals based on past and ongoing experiences and project themselves in the future. This development may play an important role in guiding children in self-regulated learning. When faced with the conflict between their need to…

  7. Play as Mediator for Knowledge-Creation in Problem Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsted, Ann Charlotte; Bing, Rie Grønbeck; Kristensen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article recounts reflections by a small group of students and their supervisor on play utilized at their meetings as part of a Problem Based Learning (PBL) process. The students experienced how a less traditional professor-student relationship arose, which transformed their interaction and relationship into a more holistic, trustful,…

  8. The Education Pacific Islands Children Deserve: The Learn and Play Project in the Solomon Islands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maebuta, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The Learn and Play Project was initiated by Solomon Islands Football Federation and aimed at educating and providing football skills training for primary school dropouts. The aim of this paper is to report the implementation of the programme in a case study school. Because the project is still being implemented, this paper is not intended to…

  9. Do the Planful Behaviors of Special Needs Preschoolers Affect Learning as Exhibited through Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fender, Molly C.

    This qualitative and quantitative study focused on two groups of preschoolers (ages 4-6) enrolled in rural special education classes. The study specifically examined children's planful behaviors and the relationship of planfulness to learning as exhibited through play. Also examined were children's planning levels when planning was explicitly…

  10. Understanding Producers' Intentions and Viewers' Learning Outcomes in a Science Museum Theater Play on Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peleg, R.; Baram-Tsabari, A.

    2016-01-01

    Science museums often introduce plays to liven up exhibits, attract visitors to specific exhibitions, and help visitors to "digest" difficult content. Most previous research has concentrated on viewers' learning outcomes. This study uses performance and spectator analyses from the field of theater studies to explore the link between…

  11. Teaching Play Skills to Children with Autism through Video Modeling: Small Group Arrangement and Observational Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozen, Arzu; Batu, Sema; Birkan, Binyamin

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine if video modeling was an effective way of teaching sociodramatic play skills to individuals with autism in a small group arrangement. Besides maintenance, observational learning and social validation data were collected. Three 9 year old boys with autism participated in the study. Multiple probe…

  12. Outdoor Play in Preschools in England and South Korea: Learning from Polyvocal Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Kwi-Ok; Waller, Tim

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses a cross-cultural and collaborative project, in preschools in England and South Korea. The aim of the project is to investigate the pedagogy of outdoor play and learning in two different cultural contexts, from the perspectives of the practitioners. Although there has been a growing academic interest in the use of outdoor…

  13. Perceived Playfulness, Gender Differences and Technology Acceptance Model in a Blended Learning Scenario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla-Melendez, Antonio; del Aguila-Obra, Ana Rosa; Garrido-Moreno, Aurora

    2013-01-01

    The importance of technology for education is increasing year-by-year at all educational levels and particularly for Universities. This paper reexamines one important determinant of technology acceptance and use, such as perceived playfulness in the context of a blended learning setting and reveals existing gender differences. After a literature…

  14. Creative and Playful Learning on Technology-Enriched Playgrounds: An International Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randolph, Justus J.; Kangas, Marjaana; Ruokamo, Heli; Hyvönen, Pirkko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to determine the degree that creative and playful learning (CPL) in a technology-enriched playground influences academic achievement of students and what factors are responsible for successes. The participants were 276 students from 12 elementary classrooms in the Netherlands and Finland. The…

  15. What Do Caregivers Notice and Value about How Children Learn through Play in a Children's Museum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letourneau, Susan M.; Meisner, Robin; Neuwirth, Jessica L.; Sobel, David M.

    2017-01-01

    In two studies, Providence Children's Museum investigated caregivers' observations and perceptions of their children's play and learning at the museum. In the first, caregivers (N = 40) were interviewed about what they observed children doing, what they believed children were thinking about, and their own thoughts and actions while watching…

  16. Deal Me In! The Use of Playing Cards in Learning and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golick, Margie

    This book presents a collection of card games that can be used as learning tools in early childhood classrooms. Each game description includes approximate number of players, step-by-step instructions for playing and suggested variations. Charts with a variety of categories are included to help the teacher find the card games most appropriate to…

  17. Facebook Levels the Playing Field: Dyslexic Students Learning through Digital Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barden, Owen

    2014-01-01

    Dyslexia has an ambivalent relationship with learning technology. Any potential gains may be nullified if the technology is perceived to exacerbate stigma. This paper examines the use of an "everyday" technology, Facebook, by a small group of sixth form students labelled as dyslexic. "Levelling the playing field" is a phrase…

  18. Learning More about Those Who Play in Session: The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project (Phase I)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Simone F.; LeBlanc, Michael; Mullen, Jodi Ann; Ray, Dee; Baggerly, Jennifer; White, JoAnna; Kaplan, David

    2007-01-01

    Through a joint research committee sponsored by the Association for Play Therapy (APT) and the American Counseling Association (ACA), The National Play Therapy in Counseling Practices Project conducted the first phase of investigation. Findings offered a snapshot of mental health providers of play therapy, regarding the nature of who they are and…

  19. Sharing humour and laughter in autism and Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Vasudevi; Williams, Emma; Vaughan, Amy

    2002-05-01

    Everyday humour and laughter can tell us about children's ability to engage with and understand others. A group of 19 pre-school children with autism and 16 pre-school children with Down's syndrome, matched on non-verbal mental age, participated in a cross-sectional study. Parental reports revealed no group differences in overall frequencies of laughter or laughter at tickling, peekaboo or slapstick. However, in the autism group, reported laughter was rare in response to events such as funny faces or socially inappropriate acts, but was common in strange or inexplicable situations. Reported responses to others' laughter also differed: children with autism rarely attempted to join in others' laughter and rarely attempted to re-elicit it through acts of clowning or teasing. Analysis of videotaped interactions also showed no group differences in frequencies of child or adult laughter. However, the children with autism showed higher frequencies of unshared laughter in interactive situations and lower frequencies of attention or smiles in response to others' laughter. Humour is an affective and cultural phenomenon involving the sharing of affect, attention and convention; children with autism show problems in some simple affective and mutual as well as joint attentional and cultural aspects of humorous engagement.

  20. Mechatronics Learning Studio: From "Play and Learn" to Industry-Inspired Green Energy Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habash, R. W. Y.; Suurtamm, C.; Necsulescu, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of the teaching of electrical engineering to mechanical engineering students based on motivation and a pedagogical strategy incorporating interdisciplinary mechatronics projects in a learning studio environment. Implementation of student projects within the curriculum has been demonstrated to be highly…

  1. Learning to Play the Literacy and Learning Games--A Question of Enculturation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelm, Jeffrey D., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding that learning must be relevant and purposeful to be effective and engaging, Wilhelm emphasizes the value of teaching students "how to participate in meaningful activity in ways that make them increasingly expert in creating culture and . . . cultural meanings." He offers bullet points that suggest starting with students' experiences,…

  2. PlayPhysics: An Emotional Games Learning Environment for Teaching Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Karla; Kevitt, Paul Mc; Lunney, Tom; Noguez, Julieta; Neri, Luis

    To ensure learning, game-based learning environments must incorporate assessment mechanisms, e.g. Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITSs). ITSs are focused on recognising and influencing the learner's emotional or motivational states. This research focuses on designing and implementing an affective student model for intelligent gaming, which reasons about the learner's emotional state from cognitive and motivational variables using observable behaviour. A Probabilistic Relational Models (PRMs) approach is employed to derive Dynamic Bayesian Networks (DBNs). The model uses the Control-Value theory of 'achievement emotions' as a basis. A preliminary test was conducted to recognise the students' prospective-outcome emotions with results presented and discussed. PlayPhysics is an emotional games learning environment for teaching Physics. Once the affective student model proves effective it will be incorporated into PlayPhysics' architecture. The design, evaluation and postevaluation of PlayPhysics are also discussed. Future work will focus on evaluating the affective student model with a larger population of students, and on providing affective feedback.

  3. Learning to play the violin: motor control by freezing, not freeing degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Konczak, Jürgen; Vander Velden, Heidi; Jaeger, Lukas

    2009-05-01

    Playing a violin requires precise patterns of limb coordination that are acquired over years of practice. In the present study, the authors investigated how motion at proximal arm joints influenced the precision of bow movements in novice learners and experts. The authors evaluated the performances of 11 children (4-12 years old), 3 beginning-to-advanced level adult players, and 2 adult concert violinists, using a musical work that all had mastered as their first violin piece. The authors found that learning to play the violin was not associated with a release or freeing of joint degrees of freedom. Instead, learning was characterized by an experience-dependent suppression of sagittal shoulder motion, as documented by an observed reduction in joint angular amplitude. This reduction in the amplitude of shoulder flexion-extension correlated highly with a decrease of bow-movement variability. The remaining mechanical degrees of freedom at the elbow and shoulder showed patterns of neither suppression nor freeing. Only violinists with more than 700 practice hr achieved sagittal shoulder range of motion comparable to experts. The findings imply that restricting joint amplitude at selected joint degrees of freedom, while leaving other degrees of freedom unconstrained, constitutes an appropriate strategy for learning complex, high-precision motor patterns in children and adults. The findings also highlight that mastering even seemingly simple bowing movements constitutes a prolonged learning process.

  4. New Concepts of Play and the Problem of Technology, Digital Media and Popular-Culture Integration with Play-Based Learning in Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Technology, digital media and popular culture form an important aspect of young children's life-worlds in contemporary post-industrial societies. A problem for early childhood educators is how to most effectively integrate these aspects of children's life-worlds into the provision of play-based learning. Traditionally, research has considered…

  5. The Role of Motive Objects in Early Childhood Teacher Development Concerning Children's Digital Play and Play-Based Learning in Early Childhood Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuttall, Joce; Edwards, Susan; Mantilla, Ana; Grieshaber, Sue; Wood, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Digital technologies are increasingly accepted as a viable aspect of early childhood curriculum. However, teacher uptake of digital technologies in early childhood education and their use with young children in play-based approaches to learning have not been strong. Traditional approaches to the problem of teacher uptake of digital technologies in…

  6. Understanding Producers' Intentions and Viewers' Learning Outcomes in a Science Museum Theater Play on Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, R.; Baram-Tsabari, A.

    2016-10-01

    Science museums often introduce plays to liven up exhibits, attract visitors to specific exhibitions, and help visitors to "digest" difficult content. Most previous research has concentrated on viewers' learning outcomes. This study uses performance and spectator analyses from the field of theater studies to explore the link between producers' intended aims, the written script, and the learning outcomes. We also use the conflict of didactics and aesthetics, common to the design of both educational plays and science museum exhibits, as a lens for understanding our data. "Darwin's journey," a play about evolution, was produced by a major science museum in Israel. The producers' objectives were collected through in-depth interviews. A structural analysis was conducted on the script. Viewer ( n = 103) and nonviewer ( n = 90) data were collected via a questionnaire. The results show strong evidence for the encoding of all of the producers' aims in the script. Explicit and cognitive aims were decoded as intended by the viewers. The evidence was weak for the decoding of implicit and affective aims. While the producers were concerned with the conflict of didactics and aesthetics, this conflict was not apparent in the script. The conflict is discussed within the broader context of science education in informal settings.

  7. A narrative inquiry: how do nurses respond to patients' use of humour?

    PubMed

    Haydon, Gunilla; Riet, Pamela van der

    2014-01-01

    In today's healthcare system where technical instruments and test results are used to implement care it is easy to lose the human aspect of nursing. Personal interaction can get lost and nurses sometimes miss humorous attempts made by patients. Humour is a very personal concept, what one person thinks is funny does not necessarily make another person smile, or might even be hurtful. Humour is an important communication tool for patients as it humanises the nurses, creates a bond and opens communication lines. Humour has the potential to change the hospital experience for patients. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance of humour in the therapeutic relationship between patient and nurse. Semi-structured interviews were held with four registered nurses and narrative inquiry was used to analyse and present the findings because of its ability to capture human interaction and experience.

  8. The humour effect: differential processing and privileged retrieval.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stephen R

    2002-03-01

    The effects of humour on memory and heart rate were explored as a function of experimental design. In within-subject manipulations, original humorous cartoons were better remembered than the literal translations and weird cartoons, whereas literal and weird cartoons were equally well remembered. Good recall of humorous cartoons occurred at the expense of recall of non-humorous cartoons. Secondary heart-rate deceleration was larger in response to original cartoons than to literal and weird cartoons. Neither the memory nor the heart-rate effects were found in between-subjects comparisons. The results were consistent with differential processing resulting from within-list contrasts. However, retrieval processes also favoured good recall of humorous material.

  9. Giocampus school: a "learning through playing" approach to deliver nutritional education to children.

    PubMed

    Rosi, Alice; Brighenti, Furio; Finistrella, Viviana; Ingrosso, Lisa; Monti, Giorgia; Vanelli, Maurizio; Vitale, Marco; Volta, Elio; Scazzina, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To improve nutritional knowledge of children, single-group educational interventions with pre/post knowledge assessment were performed in primary schools in Parma, Italy, participating to the Giocampus Program. A total of 8165 children (8-11 years old) of 3rd, 4th and 5th grades of primary school were involved in 3 hours per class nutritional lessons, with specifically designed games and activities for each school grade. To evaluate children learning, a questionnaire was administered before and after three months of educational intervention. A total of 16330 questionnaires were analysed. Children nutritional knowledge significantly increased (p< 0.001) in all school grades. The integrated "learning through playing" approach, including the educational figures, tools and games, was successful in improving children's nutritional knowledge. A stable integration of this method in primary school settings could prepare a new generation of citizens, better educated on health-promotion lifestyles.

  10. Effects of e-learning, lectures, and role playing on nursing students’ knowledge acquisition, retention and satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Pourghaznein, Tayebeh; Sabeghi, Hakimeh; Shariatinejad, Keyvan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nursing education can maintain its dynamic quality when it moves toward innovation and modern methods of teaching and learning. Therefore, teachers are required to employ up to date methods in their teaching plans. This study evaluated the effects of e-learning, lectures, and role playing on nursing students’ learning, retention, and satisfaction. Methods: Sixty nursing students were selected as an experiment and control groups during two consecutive semesters. The educational content was presented as e-learning and role playing during one semester (experiment group) and as lectures in the next semester (control group). A questionnaire containing three parts was used to assess demographics, learning and satisfaction statuses. The questionnaire also included a final openended question to evaluate the students’ ideas about the whole course. Results: The mean scores of posttest were 16.13 ± 1.37 using role playing, 15.50 ± 1.44 using e-learning and 16.45 ± 1.23 using lectures. The differences between the mean scores of posttest and pretest were 12.84 ± 1.43, 12.56 ± 1.57, and 13.73 ± 1.53 in the mentioned methods, respectively. Lectures resulted in significantly better learning compared to role playing and e-learning. In contrast, retention rates were significantly lower using lectures than using role playing and e-learning. Students’ satisfaction from e-learning was significantly lower than lecturing and role playing. Conclusion: Due to the lower rates of retention following lectures, the teachers are recommended to use student- centered approaches in their lectures. Since students’ satisfaction with e-learning was lower than the other methods, further studies are suggested to explore the problems of e-learning in Iran. PMID:26000257

  11. Understanding Computational Thinking before Programming: Developing Guidelines for the Design of Games to Learn Introductory Programming through Game-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazimoglu, Cagin; Kiernan, Mary; Bacon, Liz; MacKinnon, Lachlan

    2011-01-01

    This paper outlines an innovative game-based approach to learning introductory programming that is grounded in the development of computational thinking at an abstract conceptual level, but also provides a direct contextual relationship between game-play and learning traditional introductory programming. The paper proposes a possible model for,…

  12. Designing Online Role Plays with a Focus on Story Development to Support Engagement and Critical Learning for Higher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dracup, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Online role plays, as they are designed for use in higher education in Australia and internationally, are active and authentic learning activities (Wills, Leigh & Ip, 2011). In online role plays, students take a character role in developing a story that serves as a metaphor for real-life experience in order to develop a potentially wide range…

  13. Toy Story: what I have learned from playing with toys about the physics of living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert H.

    2011-02-01

    Yogi Berra once noted that "You can observe a lot just by watching." A similar remark can be made about toys: you can learn a lot of physics by playing with certain children's toys, and given that physics also applies to life, you could hope that it would also be possible to learn about the physics of living cells by close observation of toys, loosely defined. I'll start out with a couple of toys, rubber duckies and something called a soliton machine and discuss insights (or failures) in how "energy" moves in biological molecules. I'll bring back the rubber duckies and a toy suggested by one of the eccentrics known to roam the halls of academia to discuss how this lead to studies how cells move and collective aspects of cell movement. Then I'll talk about mazes and how they lead to experiments on evolution and cancer. Hopefully this broad range of toys will show how indeed "You can observe a lot just by watching" about some of the fundamental physics of living cells.

  14. Laughing it off? Humour, affect and emotion work in communities living with nuclear risk.

    PubMed

    Parkhill, K A; Henwood, K L; Pidgeon, N F; Simmons, P

    2011-06-01

    Over the past two decades, an increasing number of risk researchers have recognized that risks are not simply objective hazards but that the meanings of risk are discursively negotiated, dynamic and embedded within the wider social relations that constitute everyday life. A growing interest in the complexity and nuances of risk subjectivities has alerted sociocultural researchers not only to what is said in a risk situation, but also to how it is said and to what is unsaid and even, in a particular context, unsayable; to the intangible qualities of discourse that communicate additional meanings. Humour is both an intangible and marks such intangible meanings, yet it has largely been ignored and insufficiently theorized by risk researchers. In this paper, we draw upon insights from the humour literature - suspending the belief that humour is inherently good - to analyse and theorize humour as a way of examining the meanings and functions of risk. We show how humour can both mask and carefully reveal affectively charged states about living with nuclear risk. As such, it helps risk subjects to live with risk by suppressing vulnerabilities, enabling the negotiation of what constitutes a threat, and engendering a sense of empowerment. We conclude that humorous talk can be serious talk which can enrich our understandings of the lived experience of risk and of risk subjectivities.

  15. Humour as a Resource and Strategy for Boys to Gain Status in the Field of Informal School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huuki, Tuija; Manninen, Sari; Sunnari, Vappu

    2010-01-01

    Through a feminist approach this paper illustrates how humour is used as a resource and strategy for status among Finnish school boys and in constructing culturally accepted masculinity in the field of informal school. Based on interview and observation material collected in three schools, the results suggest that although humour is often…

  16. Learning Partners: Escribamos! Leamos! Juguemos a las Ciencias! Juguemos a las Matematicas! (Learning Partners: Let's Write! Let's Read! Let's Play Mathematics! Let's Play Science!)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

    This Spanish-language document consists of four single-sheet sets of guidelines developed by the Family Involvement Partnership for Learning to assist parents in facilitating their children's elementary school success. The front part of the sheets describes general ways parents can support their children, including modeling writing, reading aloud,…

  17. Fetch, plug, and play: How secondary science instructors use digital learning objects in their classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looser, Theresa A.

    This mixed methods exploratory research study describes how United States science teachers who used digital learning objects in their secondary classrooms implemented them. The types of digital learning objects and frequency of use in addition to instructional strategies used with digital learning objects and instructors' reasons for using them were explored. An online survey and four interviews were conducted with instructors who used digital learning objects in traditional classrooms, and artifacts that included sample digital learning objects and lesson plans that integrate them in classrooms were collected and analyzed. Data from this exploratory research study indicates that digital learning objects shift the focus of education from the instructor to the learner. Participants talked and wrote about students' active engagement in their learning with instructors as facilitators providing scaffolding and support for student learning. Interactive digital learning objects providing immediate feedback opportunities allowed students to control the learning pace, manipulate and extend learning in new ways that are difficult to find in other learning activities. Models and visualizations extended and enriched learning, making abstract concepts more concrete by providing multiple perspectives that provoke learner reflection and restructuring of their knowledge leading to higher levels of learning. Digital learning objects were used to motivate students by gaining their attention, providing relevant content, encouraging learner confidence, and gaining learner satisfaction. This study may benefit secondary instructors by helping them build upon the experiences described by study participants. Results indicate that digital learning objects promoted learner-centered classrooms and exhibited instructional strategies consistent with constructivist learning theory.

  18. Humour-related interventions for people with mental illness: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Abraham; Kohn, Paul M; Edwards, Kim R; Podnar, David; Caird, Sara; Martin, Rod

    2014-08-01

    This study explored the feasibility and effects of humour-related interventions for mentally ill adults. Twelve, randomly assigned, participated in each of 3 arms--stand up comedy training (the experimental arm), discussing comedy videos (the active control arm), and no humour-related intervention (the passive control arm). Quantitative and qualitative data were collected at baseline, end of interventions (3 months) and follow up (after another 3 months). Scale comparisons were largely negative, although self-esteem marginally increased in the experimental arm. Interview responses indicated benefits for the interventions, including improved self-esteem in the experimental arm. These results, though mixed, justify further study.

  19. Evolving toward Laughter in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strean, William B.

    2008-01-01

    Lowman (1995) described the relationship between teacher and student and student engagement as the two most important ingredients in learning in higher education. Humour builds teacher-student connection (Berk, 1998) and engages students in the learning process. The bond between student and teacher is essential for learning, satisfaction, and…

  20. Learning higher-order generalizations through free play: Evidence from 2- and 3-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Sim, Zi L; Xu, Fei

    2017-04-01

    Constructivist views of cognitive development often converge on 2 key points: (a) the child's goal is to build large conceptual structures for understanding the world, and (b) the child plays an active role in developing these structures. While previous research has demonstrated that young children show a precocious capacity for concept and theory building when they are provided with helpful data within training settings, and that they explore their environment in ways that may promote learning, it remains an open question whether young children are able to build larger conceptual structures using self-generated evidence, a form of active learning. In the current study, we examined whether children can learn high-order generalizations (which form the basis for larger conceptual structures) through free play, and whether they can do so as effectively as when provided with relevant data. Results with 2- and 3-year-old children over 4 experiments indicate robust learning through free play, and generalization performance was comparable between free play and didactic conditions. Therefore, young children's self-directed learning supports the development of higher-order generalizations, laying the foundation for building larger conceptual structures and intuitive theories. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Musical skill in dementia: a violinist presumed to have Alzheimer's disease learns to play a new song.

    PubMed

    Cowles, Anne; Beatty, William W; Nixon, Sara Jo; Lutz, Lanna J; Paulk, Jason; Paulk, Kayla; Ross, Elliott D

    2003-12-01

    Previous studies have described patients with possible or probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) who continued to play familiar songs skillfully, despite their dementias. There are no reports about patients with dementia who successfully learned to play new songs, and two papers describe failures of patients with AD to learn to play a new song although they continued to play familiar songs competently. In the present paper we describe a moderately demented patient (SL) with probable AD who learned to play a song (Cossackaya!) on the violin that was published after the apparent onset of his dementia. He showed modest retention of the song at delays of 0 and 10 minutes. This contrasts with his profound disturbance in both recall and recognition on other anterograde memory tests (word lists, stories, figures, environmental sounds, sounds of musical instruments), and marked impairment on measures of remote memory (famous faces, autobiographical memory). SL showed milder deficits in confrontation naming, verbal fluency and attention, but no dyspraxia or aphasic comprehension deficits. Except for the Block Design test, his visuospatial skills were intact. SL's learning of the new song in the absence of any evidence of episodic memory is reminiscent of patients with temporal lobe amnesia who show better memory for song melody than for lyrics or verse, although his retention was not as good.

  2. Pretend Play: A Natural Path to Learning. Australian Early Childhood Resource Booklets No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creaser, Barbara

    This resource booklet focuses on the definitions, developmental stages, and the benefits of socio-dramatic play. The booklet deals with the players, shows how adults can support children's play, describes the play environment, and offers some suggestions for development of curriculum based on play. The booklet discusses children's approach to…

  3. From Play to Thoughtful Learning: A Design Strategy to Engage Children with Mathematical Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sedig, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Many children do not like learning mathematics. They do not find mathematics fun, motivating, and engaging, and they think it is difficult to learn. Computer-based games have the potential and possibility of addressing this problem. This paper proposes a strategy for designing game-based learning environments that takes advantage of the…

  4. Bridging Home and School: Understanding Immigrant Mothers' Cultural Capital and Concerns about Play-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yahya, Raudhah

    2016-01-01

    This article explores immigrant mothers' experiences and perspectives on early learning to identify the underlying principles of parents' learning theories and their concerns about pedagogic practices at school. It employs data from interviews with nineteen immigrant mothers that reveal a discord between learning beliefs and practices at home and…

  5. Designing and Integrating Purposeful Learning in Game Play: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ke, Fengfeng

    2016-01-01

    Via a systematic review of the literature on learning games, this article presents a systematic discussion on the design of intrinsic integration of domain-specific learning in game mechanics and game world design. A total of 69 articles ultimately met the inclusion criteria and were coded for the literature synthesis. Exemplary learning games…

  6. The Role Service-Learning Plays in the Transition from College to Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starr, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to understand how college graduates used their service-learning experiences while in college to enhance their work lives after graduation. Service learning in higher education is a community-based, reciprocal approach using experiential education theories. Through service-learning activities associated with…

  7. Context-Aware Mobile Role Playing Game for Learning--A Case of Canada and Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Chris; Chang, Maiga; Kinshuk; Huang, Echo; Chen, Ching-Wen

    2014-01-01

    The research presented in this paper is part of a 5-year renewable national research program in Canada, namely the NSERC/iCORE/Xerox/Markin research chair program that aims to explore possibilities of adaptive mobile learning and to provide learners with a learning environment which facilitates personalized learning at any time and any place. One…

  8. Outdoor Settings for Playing and Learning: Designing School Grounds to Meet the Needs of the Whole Child and Whole Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Robin C.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a list of imaginative design options for optimal outdoor learning as well as intimate contact with nature. Focuses on entrances, pathways, signage and displays, barriers and enclosures, manufactured equipment and play structures, multipurpose game settings, groundcovers and safety surfaces, landforms and topography, trees and vegetation,…

  9. The Role of Cultural Artefacts in Play as Tools to Mediate Learning in an Intercultural Preschool Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennig, Kelly; Kirova, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Starting with the research question "What is the role of play as a means of genuine inclusion of home language and cultural traditions in an intercultural early learning programme?", the article focuses on the role of cultural artefacts in a programme in which the majority of the children were refugees from Africa. The sociocultural…

  10. Virginia Standards of Learning (Grades 6 through 12) That Are Covered When Students Attend Live Performances of Shakespeare's Plays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookshire, Cathy A.

    This paper outlines Standards of Learning for grades 6-12 students in Virginia that are covered when they attend live performances of William Shakespeare's plays. The paper details separate standards for each grade in English, subdivided into standards which fulfill requirements in Oral Language, Reading/Literature, Writing, and Research, along…

  11. Learning in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game: The Development of Government Leadership Competencies and Performance Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Tammy

    2011-01-01

    The increase of technological capabilities has opened the door to innovations that help people learn. One popular form of training over the past 10 years has been in Serious Game--simulations used for training rather than entertainment. The purpose of the study was to determine whether participants who played a massively multiplayer online role…

  12. The Gift of Music. A Successful Method for Learning To Read, Play, and More Deeply Enjoy Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geltman, Eve

    This book introduces music reading skills in 21 lessons that focus on the violin but which may be applied to the study of any musical instrument. The lessons are designed for beginning music students and build upon previous lessons in the book. This volume focuses on the violin because of the large number of students presently learning to play it…

  13. Does Linguistic Input Play the Same Role in Language Learning for Children with and without Early Brain Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Meredith L.; Levine, Susan C.; Fisher, Joan A.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Children with unilateral pre- or perinatal brain injury (BI) show remarkable plasticity for language learning. Previous work highlights the important role that lesion characteristics play in explaining individual variation in plasticity in the language development of children with BI. The current study examines whether the linguistic input that…

  14. Just Pretending Can Be Really Learning: Children Use Pretend Play as a Source for Acquiring Generic Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutherland, Shelbie L.; Friedman, Ori

    2013-01-01

    Children can acquire generic knowledge by sharing in pretend play with more knowledgeable partners. We report 3 experiments in which we investigated how this learning occurs-how children draw generalizations from pretense, and whether they resist doing so for pretense that is unrealistic. In all experiments, preschoolers watched pretend scenarios…

  15. "I'm Just Playing iPad": Comparing Prekindergarteners' and Preservice Teachers' Social Interactions While Using Tablets for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Holly Carrell; Adair, Jennifer Keys

    2015-01-01

    In this article we share descriptive findings from two qualitative, grounded theory (Glaser, 1978, 1992, 1998) studies on how two distinct groups of learners--prekindergarteners and preservice teachers in early childhood education coursework--used touch-screen tablets in their playful, discovery-based learning processes. We found similarities…

  16. The Effect of Ability, Achievement, and Number of Plays on Learning from a Simulation Game. Report Number 115.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Keith J.

    This study examines the effect on learning of repeated plays of the simulation game "Trade and Develop" (T/D). It also examines the effects of students' ability, using a general measure (determined by school tracking procedures) and a specific measure (achievement test in the specific class). The results of the study indicate that, after playing…

  17. "Play to Learn": A Case-Study of Parent/Carer and Child Engagement with a Physical Activity Website Resource

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Helen; Fleming, Scott

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, Sport Wales produced guidance for practitioners delivering the new Foundation Phase curriculum for children aged three to seven years. A focus was on physical development and in 2009 a resource entitled "Play to Learn" was developed supported by a website launched in 2011. The present study addresses (non-)engagement with the…

  18. A Study of Humour and Communicative Intention Following Right Hemisphere Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheang, Henry S.; Pell, Marc D.

    2006-01-01

    This research provides further data regarding non-literal language comprehension following right hemisphere damage (RHD). To assess the impact of RHD on the processing of non-literal language, ten participants presenting with RHD and ten matched healthy control participants were administered tasks tapping humour appreciation and pragmatic…

  19. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of aqueous humour samples in necrotising retinitis

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T H C; Rozenberg, F; Cassoux, N; Rao, N A; LeHoang, P; Bodaghi, B

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the diagnostic value of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed on aqueous humour for the detection of viral DNA in patients with necrotising herpetic retinitis. Methods: The clinical features and laboratory results of 22 patients (29 eyes) presenting with necrotising herpetic retinitis between March 1999 and June 2001 were reviewed retrospectively. Aqueous humour was obtained after anterior chamber paracentesis and PCR was performed in all cases. Results: Viral DNA was detected in the aqueous humour of 19 patients (86.4%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seroconversion was evidenced in one additional patient. In the acute retinal necrosis (ARN) group (n = 19), varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA was identified in six patients, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) DNA in two patients, herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) DNA in four patients, and cytomegalovirus (CMV) genome in four patients. In the progressive outer retinal necrosis (PORN) group (n = 3), VZV DNA was detected in all patients. No sample was positive for more than one virus. Conclusions: PCR analysis of aqueous humour in patients with clinical features of necrotising viral retinitis can provide specific aetiological orientation and the method appears to be safe and highly sensitive. PMID:12488268

  20. Laughing with the Lecturer: The Use of Humour in Shaping University Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tait, Gordon; Lampert, Jo; Bahr, Nan; Bennet, Pepita

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the ways in which humour is used by university academics to shape teaching personas. Based upon the work of Mauss and Foucault, and employing semi-structured, in-depth interviews with a range of university teachers, this research suggests that most tertiary teachers deliberately fashion various kinds of teaching persona, which…

  1. The social meaning and function of humour in physiotherapy practice: An ethnography.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Di

    2010-01-01

    An ethnographic study was undertaken over a period of 8 months to explore the social meaning and function of humour in the practice of a team of physiotherapists in a UK National Health Service hospital. Interviews were carried out following the observations to gain the therapists' perspectives in an open critical exploration of assumptions and ideas. The analysis was iterative and followed a systematic recognised ethnographic approach. The findings revealed explicit and implicit meanings of the team's humorous interactions. Explicitly, they appeared light-hearted and enhanced camaraderie but implicitly they demonstrated the team leadership and management skills of the most senior member of the team who had an authoritative influence on the other members, and facilitated this explicit marker of membership. By hiding their concerns in humour, the team members were able to avoid a real confrontation with issues of authority and hierarchy that underscored these activities. Humour, in this instance, was used as a stabilising force to give the team a sense of certainty juxtaposed by the prevailing unpredictability of their daily activities; it was part of their professional culture to allow them to handle stressful situations and to build up a socialisation process. By creating a collective identity, the individual members came to understand the team's underlying philosophy of practice. As a resource, humour was seen to be used as a vehicle of negotiation and a catalyst for change.

  2. Playing Smart: A Parent's Guide to Enriching, Offbeat Learning Activities for Ages 4-14.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Susan K.; Espeland, Pamela, Ed.

    Recognizing that children need enrichment at home, this book offers hundreds of unusual ways for kids and parents to spend time together. It also demonstrates the fun people can have while learning, and the learning that goes on while having fun. Using this book as a guide, parents and children can survey new subjects ranging from cultural…

  3. A Space for Academic Play: Student Learning Journals as Transitional Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Creme, Phyllis

    2008-01-01

    This article builds on the author's previous research on student learning journals to explore how their use can give students a "space" to engage meaningfully and in their own way with their university work. Drawing on the psychoanalytical concept of transitional space and on notions of narrative, it is argued that the student learning journal can…

  4. Active Learning through Role Playing: Virtual Babies in a Child Development Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Devereaux A.; Hupp, Julie M.

    2009-01-01

    The authors designed an active learning project for a child development course in which students apply core concepts to a hypothetical baby they "raise" during the term. Students applied developmental topics to their unique, developing child. The project fostered student learning and enthusiasm for the material. The project's versatility makes it…

  5. PlayIt: Game Based Learning Approach for Teaching Programming Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathrani, Anuradha; Christian, Shelly; Ponder-Sutton, Agate

    2016-01-01

    This study demonstrates a game-based learning (GBL) approach to engage students in learning and enhance their programming skills. The paper gives a detailed narrative of how an educational game was mapped with the curriculum of a prescribed programming course in a computing diploma study programme. Two separate student cohorts were invited to…

  6. Playing Games: Do Game Consoles Have a Positive Impact on Girls' Learning Outcomes and Motivation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitching, Lucy; Wheeler, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Games based learning is currently a hotly debated topic in education and is a fertile field of study (Holmes, 2011; Abrams, 2009). Many schools are exploring ways in which games can be embedded into the curriculum, to enhance learning through deeper engagement and higher levels of motivation (Miller & Robertson, 2010). This paper explores the…

  7. Theatre as a Tool in the Language Classroom: Let's Play, Motivate and Learn!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Michele S.

    1985-01-01

    Dramatic activities, tasks that unite language learning with bodily movements, voice intonation, emotion, and imagination, may be eased into the traditional classroom structure to enrich and enhance the intellectual aspects of language learning and to motivate students. These activities can be modified to meet the needs and difficulty levels of…

  8. Investigating the Roles of Perceived Playfulness, Resistance to Change and Self-Management of Learning in Mobile English Learning Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Rui-Ting; Jang, Syh-Jong; Machtmes, Krisanna; Deggs, David

    2012-01-01

    Although there is a growing interest in mobile learning, there are limited studies that focus on student knowledge acquisition. As applications and usages of mobile technology have become more and more accepted, it is important and meaningful that researchers and practitioners of mobile learning understand the potential factors that could…

  9. Play along: effects of music and social interaction on word learning

    PubMed Central

    Verga, Laura; Bigand, Emmanuel; Kotz, Sonja A.

    2015-01-01

    Learning new words is an increasingly common necessity in everyday life. External factors, among which music and social interaction are particularly debated, are claimed to facilitate this task. Due to their influence on the learner’s temporal behavior, these stimuli are able to drive the learner’s attention to the correct referent of new words at the correct point in time. However, do music and social interaction impact learning behavior in the same way? The current study aims to answer this question. Native German speakers (N = 80) were requested to learn new words (pseudo-words) during a contextual learning game. This learning task was performed alone with a computer or with a partner, with or without music. Results showed that music and social interaction had a different impact on the learner’s behavior: Participants tended to temporally coordinate their behavior more with a partner than with music, and in both cases more than with a computer. However, when both music and social interaction were present, this temporal coordination was hindered. These results suggest that while music and social interaction do influence participants’ learning behavior, they have a different impact. Moreover, impaired behavior when both music and a partner are present suggests that different mechanisms are employed to coordinate with the two types of stimuli. Whether one or the other approach is more efficient for word learning, however, is a question still requiring further investigation, as no differences were observed between conditions in a retrieval phase, which took place immediately after the learning session. This study contributes to the literature on word learning in adults by investigating two possible facilitating factors, and has important implications for situations such as music therapy, in which music and social interaction are present at the same time. PMID:26388818

  10. Play along: effects of music and social interaction on word learning.

    PubMed

    Verga, Laura; Bigand, Emmanuel; Kotz, Sonja A

    2015-01-01

    Learning new words is an increasingly common necessity in everyday life. External factors, among which music and social interaction are particularly debated, are claimed to facilitate this task. Due to their influence on the learner's temporal behavior, these stimuli are able to drive the learner's attention to the correct referent of new words at the correct point in time. However, do music and social interaction impact learning behavior in the same way? The current study aims to answer this question. Native German speakers (N = 80) were requested to learn new words (pseudo-words) during a contextual learning game. This learning task was performed alone with a computer or with a partner, with or without music. Results showed that music and social interaction had a different impact on the learner's behavior: Participants tended to temporally coordinate their behavior more with a partner than with music, and in both cases more than with a computer. However, when both music and social interaction were present, this temporal coordination was hindered. These results suggest that while music and social interaction do influence participants' learning behavior, they have a different impact. Moreover, impaired behavior when both music and a partner are present suggests that different mechanisms are employed to coordinate with the two types of stimuli. Whether one or the other approach is more efficient for word learning, however, is a question still requiring further investigation, as no differences were observed between conditions in a retrieval phase, which took place immediately after the learning session. This study contributes to the literature on word learning in adults by investigating two possible facilitating factors, and has important implications for situations such as music therapy, in which music and social interaction are present at the same time.

  11. Playing for Identity: Cricket, Social Positioning and Shared Learning in Italian Public Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zoletto, Davide

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on the ways in which a cultural practice such as playing cricket in public might contribute to structuring the identity of young immigrants in Italy, and on the role that the practice of cricket in Italian public parks might play in intercultural educational projects which aim to foster cross-cultural interactions in non-formal…

  12. Online Role-Plays: Combining Situational and Interactional Authenticity in Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia Martins, Maria de Lurdes; Moreira, Gillian; Moreira, António

    2013-01-01

    Role-plays have been almost ubiquitous in foreign language classes and their potential has been widely recognised. In the last decade, the dissemination of Web 2.0 has created a wide range of possibilities for this type of activity, including conducting online role-plays between institutions, the opportunity to combine synchronous and asynchronous…

  13. Pedagogical Play Types: What Do They Suggest for Learning about Sustainability in Early Childhood Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Susan; Cutter-Mackenzie, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Sustainability education is increasingly understood as necessary for young children. An important aspect of early childhood sustainability education is associated with how best to integrate the conceptual basis of sustainability education with existing play-based pedagogies. Play-based pedagogies can be understood as occurring along a continuum,…

  14. Learning How to Play Ball: Applying Sabermetric Thinking to Benchmarking in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    Although the notion is certainly cliched, baseball often serves as an excellent metaphor for life. Some of the methodologies currently being used to measure, evaluate, manage, and even play baseball may serve as references for ways that higher education may be measured, evaluated, managed, and played. This chapter proposes and presents…

  15. What Can Students Learn in an Extended Role-Play Simulation on Technology and Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loui, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    In a small course on technology and society, students participated in an extended role-play simulation for two weeks. Each student played a different adult character in a fictional community, which faces technological decisions in three scenarios set in the near future. The three scenarios involved stem cell research, nanotechnology, and privacy.…

  16. Low-status monkeys "play dumb" when learning in mixed social groups.

    PubMed

    Drea, C M; Wallen, K

    1999-10-26

    Many primates, including humans, live in complex hierarchical societies where social context and status affect daily life. Nevertheless, primate learning studies typically test single animals in limited laboratory settings where the important effects of social interactions and relationships cannot be studied. To investigate the impact of sociality on associative learning, we compared the individual performances of group-tested rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) across various social contexts. We used a traditional discrimination paradigm that measures an animal's ability to form associations between cues and the obtaining of food in choice situations; but we adapted the task for group testing. After training a 55-member colony to separate on command into two subgroups, composed of either high- or low-status families, we exposed animals to two color discrimination problems, one with all monkeys present (combined condition), the other in their "dominant" and "subordinate" cohorts (split condition). Next, we manipulated learning history by testing animals on the same problems, but with the social contexts reversed. Monkeys from dominant families excelled in all conditions, but subordinates performed well in the split condition only, regardless of learning history. Subordinate animals had learned the associations, but expressed their knowledge only when segregated from higher-ranking animals. Because aggressive behavior was rare, performance deficits probably reflected voluntary inhibition. This experimental evidence of rank-related, social modulation of performance calls for greater consideration of social factors when assessing learning and may also have relevance for the evaluation of human scholastic achievement.

  17. Leveling the playing field: Grounding learning with embedded simulations in geoscience.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Allison J; Wiley, Jennifer; Moher, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Although desktop simulations can be useful in representing scientific phenomena during inquiry activities, they do not allow students to embody or contextualize the spatial aspects of those phenomena. One learning technology that does attempt to combine embodiment and grounded experience to support learning in science is Embedded Phenomena. The objective of this research was to investigate the effectiveness of a classroom-based Embedded Phenomena activity for learning in geoscience, and to investigate whether individual differences in spatial skills had an impact on the effectiveness. The simulated scientific phenomenon was earthquakes, and 44 fifth grade (10-year old) students learned from a unit containing both content instruction and simulations. In the embedded condition, 15 earthquake events were simulated within the classroom space and students enacted the computation of epicenters with strings and their bodies. Students in the non-embedded condition received the same content instruction and did the same activities, but the epicenter computations were done with maps instead of with students' bodies. Students in the embedded condition showed greater learning gains overall. Further, the Embedded Phenomena activity attenuated the effect of individual differences in spatial skills on learning in science such that low spatial individuals performed as well as high spatial individuals in the embedded condition.

  18. Language Learning Enhanced by Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) and the Underlying Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yongjun; Song, Hongwen; Liu, Xiaoming; Tang, Dinghong; Chen, Yue-e; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) have increased in popularity among children, juveniles, and adults since MMORPGs’ appearance in this digital age. MMORPGs can be applied to enhancing language learning, which is drawing researchers’ attention from different fields and many studies have validated MMORPGs’ positive effect on language learning. However, there are few studies on the underlying behavioral or neural mechanism of such effect. This paper reviews the educational application of the MMORPGs based on relevant macroscopic and microscopic studies, showing that gamers’ overall language proficiency or some specific language skills can be enhanced by real-time online interaction with peers and game narratives or instructions embedded in the MMORPGs. Mechanisms underlying the educational assistant role of MMORPGs in second language learning are discussed from both behavioral and neural perspectives. We suggest that attentional bias makes gamers/learners allocate more cognitive resources toward task-related stimuli in a controlled or an automatic way. Moreover, with a moderating role played by activation of reward circuit, playing the MMORPGs may strengthen or increase functional connectivity from seed regions such as left anterior insular/frontal operculum (AI/FO) and visual word form area to other language-related brain areas. PMID:28303097

  19. Language Learning Enhanced by Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) and the Underlying Behavioral and Neural Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Song, Hongwen; Liu, Xiaoming; Tang, Dinghong; Chen, Yue-E; Zhang, Xiaochu

    2017-01-01

    Massive Multiple Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) have increased in popularity among children, juveniles, and adults since MMORPGs' appearance in this digital age. MMORPGs can be applied to enhancing language learning, which is drawing researchers' attention from different fields and many studies have validated MMORPGs' positive effect on language learning. However, there are few studies on the underlying behavioral or neural mechanism of such effect. This paper reviews the educational application of the MMORPGs based on relevant macroscopic and microscopic studies, showing that gamers' overall language proficiency or some specific language skills can be enhanced by real-time online interaction with peers and game narratives or instructions embedded in the MMORPGs. Mechanisms underlying the educational assistant role of MMORPGs in second language learning are discussed from both behavioral and neural perspectives. We suggest that attentional bias makes gamers/learners allocate more cognitive resources toward task-related stimuli in a controlled or an automatic way. Moreover, with a moderating role played by activation of reward circuit, playing the MMORPGs may strengthen or increase functional connectivity from seed regions such as left anterior insular/frontal operculum (AI/FO) and visual word form area to other language-related brain areas.

  20. Teaching Psychosomatic Medicine Using Problem-Based Learning and Role-Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heru, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Problem-based learning (PBL) has been implemented in medical education world-wide. Despite its popularity, it has not been generally considered useful for residency programs. The author presents a model for the implementation of PBL in residency programs. Method: The author presents a description of a PBL curriculum for teaching…

  1. "You Play on Them. They're Active." Enhancing the Mathematics Learning of Reluctant Teenage Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calder, Nigel; Campbell, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project that examined the beliefs and attitudes of reluctant 16 to 18-year-old learners when using apps in their numeracy and literacy programmes. In particular, it considers the students' change of attitude towards numeracy learning. The data were consistent that the use of apps in the numeracy programme was…

  2. Kindergarten Children Demonstrating Numeracy Concepts through Drawings and Explanations: Intentional Teaching within Play-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chigeza, Philemon; Sorin, Reesa

    2016-01-01

    Using both child-guided and adult-guided learning, Intentional Teaching in the early years can be a powerful tool for enhancing young children's numeracy skills. As Epstein (2009) notes, this can include providing "opportunities for children to represent things by drawing, building and moving" (p. 47). This paper investigates how…

  3. Collaborating with Users to Design Learning Spaces: Playing Nicely in the Sandbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    What should a campus do when it needs more learning spaces but can't construct new buildings? Dr. Benjamin Sill's first task when he became the director of Clemson University's general engineering program was to find space for classrooms and for the advising program. His search ended in the old YMCA building (Holtzendorff Hall), where space was…

  4. Playing the Game of School Mathematics: Being Explicit for Indigenous Learners and Access to Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on studies of successful remote schools in one region of Australia, it was found that two key strategies were common in the approaches at these schools. First, to make the strategies and expectations being adopted explicit to all those involved in the learning enterprise, and second, that consistency in approaches was crucial. Bourdieu's…

  5. Thematic Analysis of the "Games" Students Play in Asynchronous Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMillan, Thalia; Forte, Michele; Grant, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the student-student relationship within the asynchronous online classroom, as evidenced by conversations in an online discussion board, is a balancing act potentially more complex than those occurring in real-time. In order for learning to truly be considered effective, a collaborative, safe environment needs to exist among…

  6. Playing to Learn: A Review of Physical Games in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Brian; Masuhara, Hitomi

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the potential of competitive games involving physical movement to facilitate the acquisition of a second or foreign language and argues that such activities can promote educational development too. It first provides a critical overview of the literature on physical games in language learning. Then, it outlines our…

  7. Learn and Play in the Garden: Games, Crafts, and Activities for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herd, Meg

    This book features activities, games, and crafts about gardening for children aged 6 to 12. The organization of the book is based on the seasons and the activities emphasize learning through fun. The spring section includes: (1) "Creating Your Own Vegetable Garden"; (2) "Safe Spraying"; (3) "What to Grow"; (4)…

  8. Development of a Computer-Based Visualised Quantitative Learning System for Playing Violin Vibrato

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Tracy Kwei-Liang; Lin, Huann-shyang; Chen, Ching-Kong; Tsai, Jih-Long

    2015-01-01

    Traditional methods of teaching music are largely subjective, with the lack of objectivity being particularly challenging for violin students learning vibrato because of the existence of conflicting theories. By using a computer-based analysis method, this study found that maintaining temporal coincidence between the intensity peak and the target…

  9. More than Child's Play: Games Have Potential Learning and Assessment Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Vicki; Popovic, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that games provide good learning environments, particularly in their ability to drive tenacity and intrinsic motivation, two key characteristics needed for student success. Advancing technology now enables games to also serve as assessments with real-time data that gives teachers the ability to have immediate…

  10. Spirituality Expressed in Creative Learning: Young Children's Imagining Play as Space for Mediating Their Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodliff, Gill

    2013-01-01

    Historically underpinning principles of the English curriculum framework for children from birth to five years explicitly acknowledged a spiritual dimension to children's uniqueness and well-being. Yet spirituality receives scant reference in the discourse of creative learning and teaching. This paper considers the relationship of spirituality to…

  11. Authentic Role-Playing as Situated Learning: Reframing Teacher Education Methodology for Higher-Order Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaman, Lori Hostetler; Flanagan, Toni Michele

    2013-01-01

    This article draws from situated learning theory, teacher education research, and the authors' collaborative self-study to propose a teacher education pedagogy that may help to bridge the theory-into-practice gap for preservice teachers. First, we review the Interstate Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium standards to confirm the call for…

  12. Mind Boggling! Considering the Possibilities of Brain Gym in Learning to Play an Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Hilary; Hibbert, Fiona

    2005-01-01

    This paper is one of the first presentations of research into brain gym's effectiveness in learning musical instruments. Brain gym (or Edu-K) is the popular, over-arching name for a system of exercises, approaches, and techniques intended to improve mental and physical performance. We explain the basic concepts and activities of brain gym and…

  13. The Effect of Playing a Persuasive Game on Attitude and Affective Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruggiero, Dana

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether a persuasive game may serve as a way to change attitude towards the homeless and increase affective learning, this study examined, experimentally, the effects of persuasive rhetoric and ethos in a video game designed to put the player in the shoes of an almost-homeless person for thirty days. Data were collected from 5139…

  14. Playing and Learning: An iPad Game Development & Implementation Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, Jennifer; de Castell, Suzanne; Muehrer, Rachel; McLaughlin-Jenkins, Erin

    2016-01-01

    There is a great deal of enthusiasm for the use of games in formal educational contexts; however, there is a notable and problematic lack of studies that make use of replicable study designs to empirically link games to learning (Young, et al., 2012). This paper documents the iterative design and development of an educationally focused game,…

  15. There Is Space to Play! Mexican American Children of Immigrants Learning With(in) Cherry Orchards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morales, María Isabel

    2016-01-01

    While some children spend their summers in camps or other recreational activities, many children of immigrants in Washington state spend them picking cherries and learning with(in) orchards. Children's experiences consist of multiple narratives demonstrating that children's lives are complicated, yet full of possibilities for teaching and…

  16. Effects of Constructing versus Playing an Educational Game on Student Motivation and Deep Learning Strategy Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vos, Nienke; van der Meijden, Henny; Denessen, Eddie

    2011-01-01

    In this study the effects of two different interactive learning tasks, in which simple games were included were described with respect to student motivation and deep strategy use. The research involved 235 students from four elementary schools in The Netherlands. One group of students (N = 128) constructed their own memory "drag and…

  17. Collaboration through Role Play among Graduate Students in Educational Leadership in Distance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Barbara B.; McClannon, Terry W.; Wallace, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    This project addresses the challenge of preparing educational leaders for future roles in administration in K-12 schools. Through a project-based learning scenario set in a 3-D virtual world, graduate students in school administration and instructional technology worked together in simulated school teams to develop proposals for integrating…

  18. Everyday Creative Play: Simple Fun Things You Can Do To Help Your Young Child Learn.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Church, Lisa R.

    Noting that parents are their children's first teachers, this book presents activities to help parents prepare their children for school. The chapters are: (1) "Getting Started," which discusses chores, hobbies, television viewing, socialization, preschool, learning styles, supplies, work area, and motivation; (2) "Reading,"…

  19. Make Your Own Preschool Games: A Personalized Play and Learn Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Sally

    Noting that parents can capitalize on the opportunity to enhance their child's brain growth during the first 5 years, this book guides parents in actively promoting the motor, cognitive, and social skills that will enhance their child's readiness for later formal, academic learning. Presented in 4 parts, the book provides more than 75 activities…

  20. Clay Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  1. Play Projects and Preschool Standards: Nurturing Children's Sense of Wonder and Joy in Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Gera; Crowley, Kathy E.

    2006-01-01

    This book offers lively, creative ideas to develop children's curiosity while helping them build the skills needed to succeed in kindergarten and beyond while meeting standards and benchmarks. "Play, Projects and Preschool Standards" has won the Distinguished Achievement Award for "Best Teacher Resource" in the professional…

  2. Nature and Young Children: Encouraging Creative Play and Learning in Natural Environments. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Now in its second edition, "Nature and Young Children" promotes the holistic development of children by connecting them with nature. It offers advice and guidance on how to set up indoor and outdoor nature play spaces as well as encouraging environmentally responsible attitudes, values and behaviour in your early childhood setting. Covering topics…

  3. Sustainability and Science Learning: Perceptions from 8th Grade Students Involved with a Role Playing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Sofia; Baptista, Mónica; Freire, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Raising awareness about sustainability is an urgent need and as such education for sustainability has gained relevancy for the last decades. It is acknowledged that science education can work as an important context for educating for sustainability. The goal of the present paper is to describe a role-playing activity about the construction of a…

  4. Playing and Learning Together: Patterns of Social Interaction in Handicapped and Nonhandicappped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers-Warren, Ann; And Others

    Two projects at the Kansas Early Childhood Institute investigated characteristics of social interaction by handicapped, at risk, and nonhandicapped children. The first project examined patterns of social interaction and play behavior among preschool children in an integrated classroom. A longitudinal observation of four mild to moderately retarded…

  5. Students' Aesthetic Experiences of Playing Exergames: A Practical Epistemology Analysis of Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha; Quennerstedt, Mikael; Öhman, Marie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore Swedish junior high school students meaning-making of participating in exergaming in school based on their aesthetic judgments during game play. A transactional approach, drawing on the work of John Dewey, was used in the study and the data consisted of video- and audio recordings of ongoing video gaming. A…

  6. Keeping Current. The Games Students Play: Having Fun and Learning in the Library Media Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Past research has indicated that children become active learners by "active play" which may include board games. In this article, the author describes how the use of games in school libraries may make children more responsive to the school library media center. Games encourage teamwork and creativity, and experts believe that children retain…

  7. [The impact of digital media on relations, play and learning in young children].

    PubMed

    Panayoty-Vanhoutte, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Screens are occupying an increasingly bigger place in families, which can have harmful consequences on the development of young children. To ensure their harmonious construction, children must not be deprived of games which involve interaction with the outside world and adults. They need exchanges with their parents and with professionals aware of the role which they have to play in a child's discoveries.

  8. Enhance Learning on Software Project Management through a Role-Play Game in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maratou, Vicky; Chatzidaki, Eleni; Xenos, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a role-play game for software project management (SPM) in a three-dimensional online multiuser virtual world. The Opensimulator platform is used for the creation of an immersive virtual environment that facilitates students' collaboration and realistic interaction, in order to manage unexpected events occurring during the…

  9. Young Children's Learning of Novel Digital Interfaces: How Technology Experience, Age, and Design Come into Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilutz, Shuli

    2009-01-01

    This study looks at the relationship between age, technology experience, and design factors in determining young children's comprehension of novel digital interfaces. In Experiment 1, 35 preschoolers played three games that varied in complexity and familiarity. Parental questionnaires were used to assess children's previous technology experience.…

  10. Purposeful Play with Your Preschooler: A Learning-Based Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maffei, Anthony C.; Hauck, Teresa M.

    Noting that the preschool years play a crucial role in cognitive development, this book offers Piagetian-based educational activities for parents or teachers and preschool children that can be integrated into daily routines in a variety of everyday settings. The book is divided into two parts, the first describing cognitive development from a…

  11. Worlding through Play: Alternate Reality Games, Large-Scale Learning, and "The Source"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jagoda, Patrick; Gilliam, Melissa; McDonald, Peter; Russell, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Gamification--the use of game mechanics in conventionally nongame activities--has received attention in the field of education. Games, however, are not reducible to the common mechanisms of gamification that target extrinsic motivation, and may also include elements such as role playing, world making, and collective storytelling. Here, the authors…

  12. Using humour as an extrinsic source of emotion regulation in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Harm, Jonathan; Vieillard, Sandrine; Didierjean, André

    2014-10-01

    It has been suggested that intrinsic abilities for regulating emotions remain stable or improve with ageing, but, to date, no studies have examined age-related differences in extrinsic emotion regulation. Since humour has been found to be an effective form of emotion regulation, we used a paradigm similar to that of Strick and colleagues (2009) with two objectives: to compare extrinsic humorous emotion regulation in young and older adults and to test whether the potential beneficial effect of humour on negative emotion is better explained by the cognitive distraction hypothesis or by the positive affect elicitation hypothesis. To this end, neutral, moderately, and strongly negative pictures followed by humorous, simply positive, or weird cartoons, controlled for both their funniness and cognitive demands, were presented to 26 young and 25 older adults with the instruction to report their negative feelings. When induced to feel moderately negative emotions, both young and older adults reported a lower negative feeling after viewing the humorous cartoons than after the other ones. This indicates that the extrinsic humorous emotion regulation skill remains stable with ageing and suggests that the beneficial effect of humour on emotional feeling cannot be seen as a purely cognitive distraction.

  13. Sharing laughter: the humour of pre-school children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Reddy, V; Williams, E; Vaughan, A

    2001-10-01

    Humour and laughter have often been portrayed as fundamentally cultural and social phenomena. They can be used to tell us about children's ability to engage socially and to understand others, but have rarely been explored for this purpose. The present paper summarises the results of a study of simple forms of humour in children with Down syndrome and with autism, two groups which are reported to differ in their sociality and interpersonal understanding. Sixteen children with Down syndrome and 19 children with autism, matched on non-verbal mental age, participated in a cross-sectional study. Parental reports and video-tapes of naturalistic interaction between parents and children were analysed to show that although there were no overall differences in the presence or frequency of child or parent laughter between the two groups, there were differences in what sorts of events were more likely to prompt child laughter, the extent to which child laughter was shared, and how the children responded to others' laughter. The children with Down syndrome were more likely than the children with autism to laugh at funny faces and socially inappropriate acts and less likely to laugh in strange or inexplicable situations, and more likely to laugh at shared events. They also responded to others' laughter with attention or smiles more, and tried to re-elicit it through acts of clowning. Children with Down syndrome are thus active participants in humour and laughter, sharing it at both an emotional and a cultural level.

  14. Play to Learn: Great Projects to Try, Websites to Bookmark, and a World of Learning to Share with Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    When kids play video games, they want to perfect their skills, advance to the next level, and become a master. It is the kind of focus that many teachers would love to see in their classrooms. From elementary through high school, computer games are being woven into the curriculum to engage students in new ways. However, many schools lack the…

  15. Parent-nursing student communication practice: role-play and learning outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mark J; Taylor, Erin A; High, Patricia L

    2012-02-01

    Parents accompanying their child's hospitalization can experience stress associated with the child's illness, treatments, and major alterations in family life. Nurses often serve as the primary communicator and cultural broker because of their constant presence at the child's bedside. Nursing students may not have essential parent-nurse communication competencies. In an innovative method of teaching nursing students about communicating with parents, 64 undergraduate nursing students participated in a parent-led postconference with a nursing instructor. The parents provided background and led role-play activities and debriefing sessions with students. Feedback provided by students before and after the parent session included requests for additional parents' experiences, appreciation and exceeded expectations of hands-on experience, recognized value of information provided, and the recommendation that all students attend. We demonstrate that empathy is a teachable skill, nursing students are apprehensive about communicating with parents, and nursing students do not understand how much families rely on nurses.

  16. "Live, Learn and Play": building strategic alliances between professional sports and public health.

    PubMed

    Yancey, Antronette; Winfield, David; Larsen, Judi; Anderson, Michele; Jackson, Portia; Overton, Jeff; Wilson, Shawn; Rossum, Allen; Kumanyika, Shiriki

    2009-10-01

    Public-private partnerships allow communities and corporate entities to pool resources to address a mission of relevance to their common constituency or consumer base. Collaborations between public health and professional sports may present unique opportunities to improve health outcomes related to physical activity since athletes are fitness icons, both for adults and children. There are many "win-win" opportunities, as sports venues regularly host huge numbers of spectators, offering food and entertainment, providing hours of exposure, and introducing new ideas for engaging fans in order to remain a competitive draw. In 2008, the San Diego Padres embarked on a communitywide fitness initiative, FriarFit, including incorporating 10-minute Instant Recess breaks during their Sunday homestand pre-game shows. Many lessons have been learned that may be useful to others mounting such initiatives, such as: there is more at stake in cost-benefit and risk-benefit assessment for sports executives, requiring greater caution and circumspection than is typical for public health projects; the core business of the corporate entity must be accommodated without undermining the health objectives; and health aims must be addressed in a way that is financially viable and delivers tangible value for profit-making concerns, in terms of marketing, revenues or brand enhancement.

  17. Symbolic Play and Novel Noun Learning in Deaf and Hearing Children: Longitudinal Effects of Access to Sound on Early Precursors of Language

    PubMed Central

    Quittner, Alexandra L.; Cejas, Ivette; Wang, Nae-Yuh; Niparko, John K.; Barker, David H.

    2016-01-01

    In the largest, longitudinal study of young, deaf children before and three years after cochlear implantation, we compared symbolic play and novel noun learning to age-matched hearing peers. Participants were 180 children from six cochlear implant centers and 96 hearing children. Symbolic play was measured during five minutes of videotaped, structured solitary play. Play was coded as "symbolic" if the child used substitution (e.g., a wooden block as a bed). Novel noun learning was measured in 10 trials using a novel object and a distractor. Cochlear implant vs. normal hearing children were delayed in their use of symbolic play, however, those implanted before vs. after age two performed significantly better. Children with cochlear implants were also delayed in novel noun learning (median delay 1.54 years), with minimal evidence of catch-up growth. Quality of parent-child interactions was positively related to performance on the novel noun learning, but not symbolic play task. Early implantation was beneficial for both achievement of symbolic play and novel noun learning. Further, maternal sensitivity and linguistic stimulation by parents positively affected noun learning skills, although children with cochlear implants still lagged in comparison to hearing peers. PMID:27228032

  18. Learning About Semi Conductors for Teaching—the Role Played by Content Knowledge in Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollnick, Marissa

    2016-09-01

    This study focuses on how teachers learn to teach a new topic and the role played by their developing content knowledge as they teach. The paper is based on seven high school science teachers' studies on the teaching of semiconductors, at the time a new topic in the curriculum. Analysis of artefacts such as teacher concept maps, video recordings of lessons, journals and other classroom-based evidence shows how the extent and type of teachers' content knowledge informed their choice of teaching approaches and how their learning of content took place alongside the development of teaching strategies. The development of content knowledge was combined with increased understanding of how to teach the topic in almost all cases. Evidence of development of teachers' PCK was found in their increased ability to design teaching strategies, and their use of representations and suitable assessment tasks for their lessons. Some specific common teaching strategies were identified across the teachers. These strategies could add to the canon of teachers' topic - specific professional knowledge for semiconductors. The study provides increased understanding of how teachers simultaneously master content and its teaching and how mediated self-reflection is a fruitful approach for assisting teachers to learn to teach a new topic.

  19. Looking into Children's Play Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mabry, Mark; Fucigna, Carolee

    2009-01-01

    Play, particularly children's sociodramatic play, is the cornerstone of early childhood classrooms in the United States. Early childhood educators learn and expound mantras of "the value of play," "play-based programs," "children learning through play," and "play as child's work." They strive to promote the importance of making a place for play in…

  20. LC-ESI-MSD fast determination of residual mitomycin C in hen aqueous humour after corneal refractive surgery.

    PubMed

    Nozal, M J; Bernal, J L; Martín, M T; Bernal, J; Torres, R M; Merayo, J

    2006-01-23

    A simple, fast and reliable method has been developed for the assay of traces of mitomycin C (MMC) in hen aqueous humour samples. The determination was carried out by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrospray ionization mass spectrometric detection. In isocratic elution analysis, the mobile phase was a mixture of water-acetonitrile (78:22, v/v) and the chromatographic column was C(18) at 35 degrees C. The method has been validated over a range from 0.1 to 250 microg L(-1) in hen aqueous humour with correlation coefficients higher than 0.999. Limit of detection and limit of quantification for MMC based in signal to noise ratio of 3 and 10, respectively, were 20 and 71 ng L(-1). The developed method allows the analysis of MMC in hen aqueous humour samples obtained at different times and conditions in order to evaluate and compare the efficacy of the drug administration.

  1. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes

    PubMed Central

    Zouache, Moussa A.; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac0.67, where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma. PMID:26990431

  2. Allometry and Scaling of the Intraocular Pressure and Aqueous Humour Flow Rate in Vertebrate Eyes.

    PubMed

    Zouache, Moussa A; Eames, Ian; Samsudin, Amir

    2016-01-01

    In vertebrates, intraocular pressure (IOP) is required to maintain the eye into a shape allowing it to function as an optical instrument. It is sustained by the balance between the production of aqueous humour by the ciliary body and the resistance to its outflow from the eye. Dysregulation of the IOP is often pathological to vision. High IOP may lead to glaucoma, which is in man the second most prevalent cause of blindness. Here, we examine the importance of the IOP and rate of formation of aqueous humour in the development of vertebrate eyes by performing allometric and scaling analyses of the forces acting on the eye during head movement and the energy demands of the cornea, and testing the predictions of the models against a list of measurements in vertebrates collated through a systematic review. We show that the IOP has a weak dependence on body mass, and that in order to maintain the focal length of the eye, it needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the pressure drop across the eye resulting from gravity or head movement. This constitutes an evolutionary constraint that is common to all vertebrates. In animals with cornea-based optics, this constraint also represents a condition to maintain visual acuity. Estimated IOPs were found to increase with the evolution of terrestrial animals. The rate of formation of aqueous humour was found to be adjusted to the metabolic requirements of the cornea, scaling as Vac(0.67), where Vac is the volume of the anterior chamber. The present work highlights an interdependence between IOP and aqueous flow rate crucial to ocular function that must be considered to understand the evolution of the dioptric apparatus. It should also be taken into consideration in the prevention and treatment of glaucoma.

  3. Play Is the Way

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Steve; Sanderson, Rebecca Cornelli

    2012-01-01

    Historically, play has been viewed as a frivolous break from important endeavors like working and learning when, in fact, a child's ability to fully and freely engage in play is essential to their learning, productivity, and overall development. A natural drive to play is universal across all young mammals. Children from every society on earth…

  4. The Cstf2t Polyadenylation Gene Plays a Sex-Specific Role in Learning Behaviors in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Grozdanov, Petar N.; Bergeson, Susan E.; Grammas, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation is an essential mechanism for the processing of mRNA 3′ ends. CstF-64 (the 64,000 Mr subunit of the cleavage stimulation factor; gene symbol Cstf2) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA polyadenylation site usage. We discovered a paralogous form of CstF-64 called τCstF-64 (Cstf2t). The Cstf2t gene is conserved in all eutherian mammals including mice and humans, but the τCstF-64 protein is expressed only in a subset of mammalian tissues, mostly testis and brain. Male mice that lack Cstf2t (Cstf2t-/- mice) experience disruption of spermatogenesis and are infertile, although female fertility is unaffected. However, a role for τCstF-64 in the brain has not yet been determined. Given the importance of RNA polyadenylation and splicing in neuronal gene expression, we chose to test the hypothesis that τCstF-64 is important for brain function. Male and female 185-day old wild type and Cstf2t-/- mice were examined for motor function, general activity, learning, and memory using rotarod, open field activity, 8-arm radial arm maze, and Morris water maze tasks. Male wild type and Cstf2t-/- mice did not show differences in learning and memory. However, female Cstf2t-/- mice showed significantly better retention of learned maze tasks than did female wild type mice. These results suggest that τCstf-64 is important in memory function in female mice. Interestingly, male Cstf2t-/- mice displayed less thigmotactic behavior than did wild type mice, suggesting that Cstf2t may play a role in anxiety in males. Taken together, our studies highlight the importance of mRNA processing in cognition and behavior as well as their established functions in reproduction. PMID:27812195

  5. The Cstf2t Polyadenylation Gene Plays a Sex-Specific Role in Learning Behaviors in Mice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jaryse C; Martinez, Joseph M; Grozdanov, Petar N; Bergeson, Susan E; Grammas, Paula; MacDonald, Clinton C

    2016-01-01

    Polyadenylation is an essential mechanism for the processing of mRNA 3' ends. CstF-64 (the 64,000 Mr subunit of the cleavage stimulation factor; gene symbol Cstf2) is an RNA-binding protein that regulates mRNA polyadenylation site usage. We discovered a paralogous form of CstF-64 called τCstF-64 (Cstf2t). The Cstf2t gene is conserved in all eutherian mammals including mice and humans, but the τCstF-64 protein is expressed only in a subset of mammalian tissues, mostly testis and brain. Male mice that lack Cstf2t (Cstf2t-/- mice) experience disruption of spermatogenesis and are infertile, although female fertility is unaffected. However, a role for τCstF-64 in the brain has not yet been determined. Given the importance of RNA polyadenylation and splicing in neuronal gene expression, we chose to test the hypothesis that τCstF-64 is important for brain function. Male and female 185-day old wild type and Cstf2t-/- mice were examined for motor function, general activity, learning, and memory using rotarod, open field activity, 8-arm radial arm maze, and Morris water maze tasks. Male wild type and Cstf2t-/- mice did not show differences in learning and memory. However, female Cstf2t-/- mice showed significantly better retention of learned maze tasks than did female wild type mice. These results suggest that τCstf-64 is important in memory function in female mice. Interestingly, male Cstf2t-/- mice displayed less thigmotactic behavior than did wild type mice, suggesting that Cstf2t may play a role in anxiety in males. Taken together, our studies highlight the importance of mRNA processing in cognition and behavior as well as their established functions in reproduction.

  6. [The republic of "humours": Scholarly quarrels in Bayle's dictionary].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Isabelle

    2016-12-01

    Quarrelling is a 'routine' activity of the Republic of Letters. This article demonstrates that quarrels played a key role in the field of historical criticism. The contention of this article is twofold. First, it explores the epistemological issues raised by Bayle while reporting the quarrels of the Republic of Letters, and demonstrates their creative potential, thus applying to historiography conclusions drawn by recent research on scientific controversies. It offers a new understanding of scholarly quarrels, here understood as a socially and intellectually structuring activity. Second, this article takes issue with the debate over Bayle's historical pyrrhonism. As will be shown, the quarrels constitute a key element within a method of writing history that is both conscious of its limits and confident of its investigative powers.

  7. Toddlers: Learning by Playing

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding ... to 2-Year-Old Snacks for Toddlers Toddler Reading Time Games for Toddlers Home and Away: How ...

  8. Toddlers: Learning by Playing

    MedlinePlus

    ... working, by age: Early Toddler Skills (12-24 months) walks independently pulls/carries toys while walking stoops ... stairs walks backward Older Toddler Skills (24-36 months) balances 1 to 2 seconds on one foot ...

  9. A comparison of the effects of preferred music, arithmetic and humour on cold pressor pain.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Laura A; MacDonald, Raymond A R; Brodie, Eric E

    2006-05-01

    Research studies of 'audioanalgesia', the ability of music to affect pain perception, have significantly increased in number during the past two decades. Listening to preferred music in particular may provide an emotionally engaging distraction capable of reducing both the sensation of pain itself and the accompanying negative affective experience. The current study uses experimentally induced cold pressor pain to compare the effects of preferred music to two types of distracting stimuli found effective within the previous studies; mental arithmetic, a cognitive distraction, and humour, which may emotionally engage us in a similar manner to music. Forty-four participants (24 females, 20 males) underwent three cold pressor trials in counterbalanced order. The Paced Auditory Serial Addition Task provided the cognitive distraction and a choice was given from three types of audiotaped stand-up comedy. Participants provided their own preferred music. A circulating and cooling water bath administered cold pressor stimulation. Tolerance time, pain intensity on visual analogue scale and the pain rating index and perceived control were measured. Preferred music listening was found to significantly increase tolerance in comparison to the cognitive task, and significantly increase perceived control in comparison to humour. Ratings of pain intensity did not significantly differ. The results suggest preferred music listening to offer effective distraction and enhancement of control as a pain intervention under controlled laboratory conditions.

  10. Child's Play: Revisiting Play in Early Childhood Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dau, Elizabeth, Ed.; Jones, Elizabeth, Ed.

    Noting that play is an essential aspect of learning for young children, this book presents a collection of articles on children's play in Australia. Part 1, "Play, Development, and Learning," contains the following chapters: (1) "The Role of Play in Development and Learning" (Ann Glover); (2) "Stop, Look, and Listen:…

  11. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  12. The play approach to learning in the context of families and schools: an alternative paradigm for nutrition and fitness education in the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Rickard, K A; Gallahue, D L; Gruen, G E; Tridle, M; Bewley, N; Steele, K

    1995-10-01

    An alternative paradigm for nutrition and fitness education centers on understanding and developing skill in implementing a play approach to learning about healthful eating and promoting active play in the context of the child, the family, and the school. The play approach is defined as a process for learning that is intrinsically motivated, enjoyable, freely chosen, nonliteral, safe, and actively engaged in by young learners. Making choices, assuming responsibility for one's decisions and actions, and having fun are inherent components of the play approach to learning. In this approach, internal cognitive transactions and intrinsic motivation are the primary forces that ultimately determine healthful choices and life habits. Theoretical models of children's learning--the dynamic systems theory and the cognitive-developmental theory of Jean Piaget--provide a theoretical basis for nutrition and fitness education in the 21st century. The ultimate goal is to develop partnerships of children, families, and schools in ways that promote the well-being of children and translate into healthful life habits. The play approach is an ongoing process of learning that is applicable to learners of all ages.

  13. The role of the lymphatic system in drainage of cerebrospinal fluid and aqueous humour.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, M W; Cole, D F

    1980-02-01

    1. The jugular lymphatic trunks were cannulated in anaesthetized rabbits and cats. Over 6-8 hr, the mean lymph flow was 2.3 microliters min-1 in the rabbit (one side only) and 5.0 microliters min-1 in the cat (sum of both sides). 2. After a single injection of radio-iodinated albumin into a lateral cerebral ventricle without significant rise in pressure, a mean of 14.4% of the radioactivity was recovered in deep cervical lymph of one side in the rabbit and of 12.9% in that of both sides in the cat. 3. During slow infusion of [125I]albumin and fluorescent dextran of 150,000 mol. wt. into a lateral ventricle of the cat at 20 microliters min-1, radioactivity and fluorescence reached plateaus in deep cervical lymph at 47.4 and 50.0% of their concentrations in cisternal c.s.f. respectively. 4. No significant radioactivity, other than from blood, was detected in superficial cervical lymph after intraventricular injection of radio-iodinated albumin in the cat. 5. No significant radioactivity, other than from blood, was detected in deep cervical lymph of the rabbit or in deep and superficial cervical lymph of the cat within 6 hr after injection of radio-iodinated albumin into the aqueous humour or orbital fat. 6. Gradients of radioactivity in tissues within the orbit suggested that there is a small flow of c.s.f., 0.05-0.15 microliters min-1 in the rabbit, passing centrifugally along the subarachnoid space of the optic nerve, through the posterior part of the globe and into the orbital tissue. Also a small proportion of aqueous humour, 1-2% or more, drains through the anterior sclera into the surrounding tissue. 7. A substantial quantity of cerebrospinal fluid drains into the deep cervical lymphatic system of the rabbit, 30% or more, and of the cat, 10-15% or more. The small component of aqueous humour drainage passing through the wall of the glove does not enter cervical lymph within 6 hr, if at all.

  14. Learning through Play for School Readiness: A Training Program for Parents and Other Caregivers of Preschool Children. Learning Games To Strengthen Children's School Readiness Skills. [Videotape with Facilitator's Manual].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Jerome; Singer, Dorothy

    This video-based program trains parents and other child caregivers to engage 3- to 5-year-olds in simple, motivating learning games to strengthen cognitive, social, and motor school-readiness skills. The training materials consist of a manual for training facilitators and a training video demonstrating how to play each learning game with preschool…

  15. Confronting Pedagogy in "Confronting Globalization": The Use of Role-Play Simulations to Foster Interdisciplinary/Global Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeNardis, Lesley A.

    2015-01-01

    With the increasing emphasis on global learning as part of the redesigned institutional mission of American higher education, there will arguably be a need for a variety of global learning experiences across the undergraduate curriculum. Efforts to incorporate global learning in course content at home by globalizing or internationalizing the…

  16. Let the Music Play!--A Short-Term but No Long-Term Detrimental Effect of Vocal Background Music with Familiar Language Lyrics on Foreign Language Vocabulary Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Groot, Annette M. B.; Smedinga, Hilde E.

    2014-01-01

    Participants learned foreign vocabulary by means of the paired-associates learning procedure in three conditions: (a) in silence, (b) with vocal music with lyrics in a familiar language playing in the background, or (c) with vocal music with lyrics in an unfamiliar language playing in the background. The vocabulary to learn varied in concreteness…

  17. Outdoor Play and Play Equipment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naylor, Heather

    1985-01-01

    Discusses aspects of the play environment and its effect on children's play behavior. Indoor and outdoor play spaces are considered along with factors affecting the use of outdoor environments for play. Children's preferences for different outdoor play environments and for various play structures are explored. Guides for choosing play equipment…

  18. Gender Choreography and Micro-Structures--Early Childhood Professionals' Understanding of Gender Roles and Gender Patterns in Outdoor Play and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arlemalm-Hagser, Eva

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to illustrate how pre-school professionals understand the notion of gender-equity work in a Swedish context, in particular play and learning in the pre-school playground. The study draws on socio-cultural and gender theories. Of the four participating pre-schools, three of them have programs that focus especially on…

  19. Effects of Type of Exploratory Strategy and Prior Knowledge on Middle School Students' Learning of Chemical Formulas from a 3D Role-Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ming-Puu; Wong, Yu-Ting; Wang, Li-Chun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the type of exploratory strategy and level of prior knowledge on middle school students' performance and motivation in learning chemical formulas via a 3D role-playing game (RPG). Two types of exploratory strategies-RPG exploratory with worked-example and RPG exploratory without…

  20. Simulating the Dynamics of Subsistence Fishing Communities: REEFGAME as a Learning and Data-Gathering Computer-Assisted Role-Play Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleland, Deborah; Dray, Anne; Perez, Pascal; Cruz-Trinidad, Annabelle; Geronimo, Rollan

    2012-01-01

    REEFGAME is a computer-assisted role-playing game that explores the interactions among management strategies, livelihood options, and ecological degradation in subsistence fishing communities. The tool has been successfully used in the Philippines and a variety of student workshops. In the field, REEFGAME operated as a two-way learning tool,…

  1. Factors Influencing Provision of Play and Learning Materials among Children with Physical Challenges. A Case Study of Joytown Special School, Kiambu County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muthoni, Kamau Joyce

    2016-01-01

    In Kenya there is still a high population of children either born with or who develop physical challenges. These children are often neglected and most do not join school at the expected age. In joining school they encounter several difficulties in their play and learning activities. These children with physical challenges have developmental needs…

  2. Fostering Professional Communication Skills of Future Physicians and Teachers: Effects of E-Learning with Video Cases and Role-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gartmeier, Martin; Bauer, Johannes; Fischer, Martin R.; Hoppe-Seyler, Tobias; Karsten, Gudrun; Kiessling, Claudia; Möller, Grit E.; Wiesbeck, Anne; Prenzel, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of three different versions of a training programme on physician-patient and teacher-parent conversations for medical students and student teachers. The research questions concerned the differential effects of e-learning featuring contrastive video cases, role-play including video feedback and their…

  3. Learning Strategies in Play during Basic Training for Medal of Honor and Call of Duty Video Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziaeehezarjeribi, Yadi

    2010-01-01

    This study, based on experiential play methodology was used to explore student engagement while playing "Medal of Honor (2002)" and "Call of Duty (2003)". It identifies some of the key issues related to the use of video games and simulations during the training phase of game play. Research into the effects of gaming in education has been extremely…

  4. The Excellence of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyles, Janet R., Ed.

    Recognizing that for young children, play is a tool for learning, this book compiles contributions by different authors, reflecting both up-to-date research and current classroom practice as they relate to children's play. Part 1 of the book explores the value of play as a cross-cultural concept as well as one rooted in the Western world. Gender…

  5. Between Learning and Playing? Exploring Learners' Perceptions of Corrective Feedback in an Immersive Game for English Pragmatics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornillie, Frederik; Clarebout, Geraldine; Desmet, Piet

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a rationale for the utility of corrective feedback (CF) in digital games designed for language learning, with specific reference to learners' perceptions. Explicit and elaborate CF has the potential to increase learners' understanding of language, but might not be found useful in a game-based learning environment where…

  6. Playful Gaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Alexander

    A philosophical analysis of play and games is undertaken in this paper. Playful gaming, which is shown to be a synthesis of play and games, is utilized as a category for undertaking the examination of play and games. The significance of playful gaming to education is demonstrated through analyses of Plato's, Dewey's, Sartre's, and Marcuse's…

  7. Affective Teaching for Effective Learning: A Deleuzian Pedagogy for the (Corporate Era and) Chinese Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleming, David H.

    2014-01-01

    In this article I explore the pedagogical value of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari's philosophical concepts for helping make an "event" of thought, with a view towards fostering deep learning in Chinese students' learning theory and criticism in a second language. Paying attention to the qualitative role of bodies, humour and…

  8. Peer Play Interactions and Learning for Low-Income Preschool Children: The Moderating Role of Classroom Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca J.; Bell, Elizabeth R.; Carter, Tracy M.; Dietrich, Sandy L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study examined the degree to which the association between interactive peer play and academic skills was dependent upon the level of classroom quality for a representative sample of culturally and linguistically diverse urban Head Start children (N = 304 children across 53 classrooms). Peer play interactions within…

  9. Play in Practice: Case Studies in Young Children's Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Cheryl Render, Ed.; Marchant, Catherine, Ed.

    This book uses a collection of stories, or "cases," as a basis for reflection, discussion, and learning about the many roles "play" has in children's lives. Each of the 12 cases addresses an issue of play from one of three categories--the role of adults in play, the cultural meanings of play, and the issues related to play in…

  10. Play It, Learn It, Make It Last: Developing an Online Game to Create Self-Sufficient Library Information Users.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Lindsay M

    2016-01-01

    Library orientation at an academic health sciences library consisted of a five-minute overview within new student orientation. Past experience indicated this brief presentation was insufficient for students to learn about library resources. In 2014, an effort was made to supplement orientation by developing an online game aimed at enabling students to become self-sufficient through hands-on learning. A gaming model was chosen with expectations that competition and rewards would motivate students. Although the pilots suffered from low participation rates, the experience merits further research into the potential of a broader model of online library instruction in the health sciences environment.

  11. Characterization of the human aqueous humour proteome: A comparison of the genders.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Natarajan; Manicam, Caroline; Steinicke, Matthias; Funke, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H

    2017-01-01

    Aqueous humour (AH) is an important biologic fluid that maintains normal intraocular pressure and contains proteins that regulate the homeostasis of ocular tissues. Any alterations in the protein compositions are correlated to the pathogenesis of various ocular disorders. In recent years, gender-based medicine has emerged as an important research focus considering the prevalence of certain diseases, which are higher in a particular sex. Nevertheless, the inter-gender variations in the AH proteome are unknown. Therefore, this study endeavoured to characterize the AH proteome to assess the differences between genders. Thirty AH samples of patients who underwent cataract surgery were categorized according to their gender. Label-free quantitative discovery mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy was employed to characterize the AH proteome. A total of 147 proteins were identified with a false discovery rate of less than 1% and only the top 10 major AH proteins make up almost 90% of the total identified proteins. A large number of proteins identified were correlated to defence, immune and inflammatory mechanisms, and response to wounding. Four proteins were found to be differentially abundant between the genders, comprising SERPINF1, SERPINA3, SERPING1 and PTGDS. The findings emerging from our study provide the first insight into the gender-based proteome differences in the AH and also highlight the importance in considering potential sex-dependent changes in the proteome of ocular pathologies in future studies employing the AH.

  12. Characterization of the human aqueous humour proteome: A comparison of the genders

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Natarajan; Manicam, Caroline; Steinicke, Matthias; Funke, Sebastian; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Grus, Franz H.

    2017-01-01

    Aqueous humour (AH) is an important biologic fluid that maintains normal intraocular pressure and contains proteins that regulate the homeostasis of ocular tissues. Any alterations in the protein compositions are correlated to the pathogenesis of various ocular disorders. In recent years, gender-based medicine has emerged as an important research focus considering the prevalence of certain diseases, which are higher in a particular sex. Nevertheless, the inter-gender variations in the AH proteome are unknown. Therefore, this study endeavoured to characterize the AH proteome to assess the differences between genders. Thirty AH samples of patients who underwent cataract surgery were categorized according to their gender. Label-free quantitative discovery mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy was employed to characterize the AH proteome. A total of 147 proteins were identified with a false discovery rate of less than 1% and only the top 10 major AH proteins make up almost 90% of the total identified proteins. A large number of proteins identified were correlated to defence, immune and inflammatory mechanisms, and response to wounding. Four proteins were found to be differentially abundant between the genders, comprising SERPINF1, SERPINA3, SERPING1 and PTGDS. The findings emerging from our study provide the first insight into the gender-based proteome differences in the AH and also highlight the importance in considering potential sex-dependent changes in the proteome of ocular pathologies in future studies employing the AH. PMID:28273097

  13. Determination of memantine in plasma and vitreous humour by HPLC with precolumn derivatization and fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Puente, Belen; Hernandez, Esther; Perez, Susana; Pablo, Luis; Prieto, Esther; Garcia, Maria Angeles; Bregante, Miguel Angel

    2011-01-01

    A new HPLC procedure with precolumn derivatization and rimantadine as the internal standard for determining memantine, a candidate agent for the treatment of glaucoma in plasma and vitreous humour, has been developed and validated. Precolumn derivatization was performed with 9-fluorenylmethyl-chloroformate-chloride (FMOC-Cl) as the derivatization reagent and followed by a liquid-liquid extraction with n-hexane. Optimal conditions for derivatization were an FMOC-Cl concentration of 1.5 mM, a reaction time of 20 min, the temperature at 30°C, the borate buffer pH 8.5, and a borate buffer-acetonitrile ratio of 1:1. The derivatives were analyzed by isocratic HPLC with the fluorescence detector λex 260 nm λem 315 nm on a Novapack C(18) reversed-phase column with a mobile phase of acetonitrile-water (73:27, v/v), 40°C, and a flow rate of 1.2 mL/min. The linear range was 10-1000 ng/mL with a quantification limit of ∼ 10 ng/mL for both types of samples. This analytical method may be suitable for using in ocular availability studies.

  14. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Ritesh

    2010-01-01

    Play therapy represents a unique form of treatment that is not only geared toward young children, but is translated into a language children can comprehend and utilize—the language of play. For the referring provider or practitioner, questions may remain regarding the nature, course, and efficacy of play therapy. This article reviews the theoretical underpinnings of play therapy, some practical considerations, and finally a summary of the current state of research in regard to play therapy. The authors present the practicing psychiatrist with a road map for referring a patient to play therapy or initiating it in appropriate cases. PMID:21103141

  15. Bilateral intraocular pressure elevation and decrease of facility of aqueous humour outflow as a consequence of regional lymphoedema of head and neck.

    PubMed

    Holló, G

    1993-06-01

    Aqueous humour drainage to the deep cervical lymphatics has been proven in animal experiments, but there have been no observations of changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) or aqueous humour drainage as a consequence of lymph drainage dysfunction. The history of a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, who underwent a left-sided radical neck dissection in January 1991, is reported. From the end of 1991 lymphoedema of the head and neck, predominantly on the right side, developed without venous stasis but with significant bilateral IOP elevation and aqueous humour outflow reduction, refract to conventional treatment. Two days after cytostatic treatment the lymphoedema disappeared, and IOP and aqueous humour outflow became normal. Four days later the patient died because of an acute bronchopneumonia. The pathological examination revealed an intact internal jugular venous system, enlarged lymph nodes and, as a consequence of previous irradiation, cicatrization in the right side of the neck. On the left side, there was absence of the internal jugular vein and jugular lymphatic trunk due to previous radical neck dissection. Our case suggests that regional lymphatic stasis and the absence of the collateral drainage to the contralateral side significantly reduces the aqueous humour outflow and leads to a bilateral, secondary IOP elevation.

  16. Work Ethic, Motivation, and Parental Influences in Chinese and North American Children Learning to Play the Piano

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeau, Gilles; Huta, Veronika; Liu, YiFei

    2015-01-01

    This study compared 50 Chinese and 100 North American Caucasian children aged 6 to 17 who were learning piano, in terms of their work ethic, motivation, and parental influences. Compared to North American Caucasians, Chinese children and parents believed more strongly that musical ability requires hard work, and Chinese children were more…

  17. Are We Having Fun Yet? Institutional Resistance and the Introduction of Play and Experimentation into Learning Innovation through Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Peter; Coombs, Antony; Pazio, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Recognising and responding to behaviours and patterns of resistance is critical to the successful implementation of technology-enhanced learning strategies at higher education institutions. At institutional, academic and student levels, resistance manifests itself in a variety of forms, at best supporting a critical culture and at worst creating…

  18. Middle school students' learning of the impact of methamphetamine abuse on the brain through serious game play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    In response to the solicitation of the National Institute on Drug Use (NIDA) (NIDA, 2006) for the Development of a Virtual Reality Environment for Teaching about the Impact of Drug Abuse on the Brain, a virtual brain exhibit was developed by the joint venture of Entertainment Science, Inc. and Virtual Heroes, Inc.. This exhibit included a virtual reality learning environment combined with a video game, aiming at improving the neuroscience literacy of the general public, conveying knowledge about the impacts of methamphetamine abuse on the brain to the population, and establishing a stronger concept of drug use prevention among children. This study investigated the effectiveness of this interactive exhibit on middle school students' understanding and attitudes toward drug use. Three main research questions are addressed: (1) What do students learn about basic concepts of neuroscience and the impact of methamphetamine abuse on the brain via the exhibit? (2) How are students' attitudes toward methamphetamine use changed after exposure to the exhibit? (3) What are students' experiences and perceptions of using the exhibit to learn the impact of methamphetamine abuse on the brain? A mixed-method design, including pre/post/delayed-post test instruments, interviews, and video recordings, was conducted for 98 middle school students ranging from sixth to eighth grades to investigate these questions. The results show that students' understanding of the impact of methamphetamine abuse on the brain significantly improved after exposure to the exhibit regardless of grade or gender. Their pre-existing knowledge and their understanding after the exhibit indicated a tendency of progression. Most of the students consistently expressed negative attitudes toward general methamphetamine use regardless of whether it was before or after exposure to the exhibit. However, this exhibit gave them a better reason and made them feel more confident to refuse drugs. Finally, student learning

  19. Theories of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peller, Lili E.

    1996-01-01

    Discusses several theories of play advanced before the development of psychoanalysis, including the theories of surplus energy, recreation, and practice. Examines the psychoanalytical view advanced by Freud and others, which focuses on the emotional release of play and its role in discovery and learning. (MDM)

  20. Central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in the enhancing effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Shima; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas A; Akhavan, Maziar M

    2010-03-17

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the role of the beta-adrenergic system in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the beta-adrenergic receptors, the animals were received propranolol (a beta-blocker), or nadolol (a peripherally acting beta-blocker) before each night of five consecutive nights of exercise. Then their learning and memory were tested on the water maze task using a two-trials-per-day for 5 consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that propranolol, but not nadolol reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat. Our findings indicate that central beta-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mediating the beneficial effects of voluntary exercise on learning and memory.

  1. City Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dargan, Amanda; Zeitlin, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Today, fewer city blocks preserve the confidence of lifestyle and urban geography that sustain traditional games and outdoor play. Large groups of children choosing sides and organizing Red Rover games are no longer commonplace. Teachers must encourage free play; urban planners must build cities that are safe play havens. (MLH)

  2. Asian and Euro-American Parents' Ethnotheories of Play and Learning: Effects on Preschool Children's Home Routines and School Behaviour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmar, Parminder; Harkness, Sara; Super, Charles M.

    2004-01-01

    Asian and Euro-American parents of preschool-aged children were interviewed concerning their beliefs about the nature and purpose of play; they also completed two questionnaires and a diary of their children's daily activities. The children's teachers were interviewed and provided information about the behaviour of the children in preschool. The…

  3. Keeping It Real: Exploring an Interdisciplinary Breaking Bad News Role-Play as an Integrative Learning Opportunity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeney, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Eleanor; McCarthy, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is a complex area of healthcare best delivered by an interdisciplinary team approach. Breaking bad news is an inherent part of caring for people with life-limiting conditions. This study aims to explore an interdisciplinary breaking bad news role-play in a palliative care module. Participants were undergraduate medical and nursing…

  4. Negative Experiences as Learning Trigger: A Play Experience Empirical Research on a Game for Social Change Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariani, Ilaria; Gandolfi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    This study shows the results gathered from 141 subjects playing the persuasive urban game "A Hostile World" via a post-game-experience quantitative questionnaire. The aim is to problematize and deepen the role of negative emotions (e.g., frustration, rage)--explicitly fostered by "A Hostile World" to increase empathy toward…

  5. Playing by the Rules: Researching, Teaching and Learning Sexual Ethics with Young Men in the Australian National Rugby League

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albury, Kath; Carmody, Moira; Evers, Clifton; Lumby, Catharine

    2011-01-01

    In 2004, the Australian National Rugby League (NRL) commissioned the Playing By The Rules research project in response to allegations of sexual assault by members of a professional rugby league team. This article offers an overview of the theoretical and methodological approaches adopted by the team, and the subsequent workplace education…

  6. Examining a Massive Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game as a Digital Game-Based Learning Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Min Lun; Richards, Kari; Saw, Guan Kung

    2014-01-01

    A concurrent triangulation mixed-method research design was used to investigate 19 casual gamers' or non-gamers' use of a popular massive multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG), Everquest 2, as an alternative pedagogical tool to support communicative use of the English language. This study poses that MMORPGs could serve as a virtually rich…

  7. Bringing meteorology ``alive`` through the use of immersion-based learning activities that emphasize role playing and problem solving

    SciTech Connect

    Glantz, C.S.; Estes, J.C.; Andrews, G.L.

    1993-07-01

    Current research and emerging standards in teaching and learning say that students learning best when information is presented in a meaningful context and when the students are involved in things they care about. At the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), science education programs have been developed that incorporate these concepts. To help students and teachers understand the process of ``doing`` science, we provide immersion-based programs in such technical areas as meteorology, marine sciences, wetland ecology, groundwater hydrology, robotics, lasers materials science, biology, and archaeology. This paper focuses on a meteorology program the authors developed in recent years to support this immersion experience approach. We will discuss how we link meteorology with other subject matter, how we show the relevance of meteorology to real-world problems, and how we immerse student`s and teachers in activities that help them understand how scientists uncover knowledge and solve problems.

  8. Play Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lawver, Timothy; Blankenship, Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Play therapy is a treatment modality in which the therapist engages in play with the child. Its use has been documented in a variety of settings and with a variety of diagnoses. Treating within the context of play brings the therapist and the therapy to the level of the child. By way of an introduction to this approach, a case is presented of a six-year-old boy with oppositional defiant disorder. The presentation focuses on the events and interactions of a typical session with an established patient. The primary issues of the session are aggression, self worth, and self efficacy. These themes manifest themselves through the content of the child’s play and narration of his actions. The therapist then reflects these back to the child while gently encouraging the child toward more positive play. Though the example is one of nondirective play therapy, a wide range of variation exists under the heading of play therapy. PMID:19724720

  9. Play Sheets. Let's Play! Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Buffalo. Center for Assistive Technology.

    This collection of play sheets for parents and early intervention personnel was developed by the "Let's Play! Project," a 3-year federally supported project that worked to promote play in infants and toddlers with disabilities through the use of "low-tech" assistive technology. Each single page guide provides guidance to…

  10. Distribution of opiates in femoral blood and vitreous humour in heroin/morphine-related deaths.

    PubMed

    Rees, Kelly A; Pounder, Derrick J; Osselton, M David

    2013-03-10

    The distribution of free morphine (FM), codeine and 6-acetylmorphine (6AM) in vitreous humour (VH) and femoral blood (FB) was measured in 70 cases involving heroin/morphine. The relationship between tissue drug concentrations was assessed with respect to case circumstances. Total morphine (TM) concentrations in FB are also reported. The relative concentrations of FM in VH and FB were influenced by survival time. In rapid deaths (<3h after drug intake; n=34) the median FM concentration in VH (0.13 mg/L) was significantly lower than the corresponding result for FB (0.25mg/L; p<.01). In delayed deaths (>3h; n=12) the VH concentration (median 0.15 mg/L) was higher than in FB (0.092 mg/L; p>.05). Free morphine VH/FB ratios were significantly higher in delayed (median 1.3) compared to rapid deaths (0.64). Although these findings indicate a lag in the distribution of morphine into the VH, overlaps were observed in the VH/FB ratio in rapid and delayed death groups which limits the interpretive use of VH/FB ratios. Codeine and 6AM appeared to distribute more rapidly into the VH. Despite the observation that all opiate analytes were correlated between FB and VH (r ≥ 61; p<.01), our results indicate that in the absence of a blood sample, blood concentrations cannot be reliably inferred from that measured in the VH. In the absence of additional toxicological evidence, the use of FM to TM ratios in blood as an indicator of survival time is not advised.

  11. Playing My Heart Out: Original Play as Adventure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, O. Fred

    1999-01-01

    "Original" play denotes play that is pre-cultural--before conceptualizations and learned responses. Four anecdotes about play with an infant with Down's syndrome, a child with leukemia, a lioness, and a dying woman illustrate the connections between beings and between the ordinary and the sacred during trusting, fearless, playful encounters. (SV)

  12. Why Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weininger, O.

    This paper draws together briefly theories and knowledge from research in morphology and cognitive psychology, as well as some hypothetical information from traditional psychiatry, to show the ramifications of play in children's development. Play is defined as any of a wide variety of behaviors through which an individual attempts to discover what…

  13. Playful Gaming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makedon, Alex

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the concept of playful gaming (an idea not expressed fully by either term alone) and uses it as an analytical tool to study the playfulness of games in the context of several social phenomena; i.e., social change, socialization, utopian systems, and educational gaming. An extensive reference list is provided. (MBR)

  14. Playing Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashian, Kathleen Ryniker

    1993-01-01

    Describes a yearlong project at 12 Catholic middle schools in the Diocese of Arlington, Virginia, to incorporate the plays of William Shakespeare into the curriculum. Teachers attended university lectures and directed students in performances of the plays. Concludes that Shakespeare can be understood and enjoyed by middle school students. (BCY)

  15. Shadow Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Hilson, Margilee P.

    2012-01-01

    A bunny rabbit playfully hops across the wall. Then hands realign and fingers shift to make a hawk soar toward the ceiling. Most children have enjoyed the delightful experience of playing with shadow puppets. The authors build on this natural curiosity to help students link shadows to complex astronomical concepts such as seasons. The…

  16. Do Teachers Make All Their Students Play the Same Learning Games? A Comparative Study of Learning Games in Biology and English as a Second Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruson, Brigitte; Marlot, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    This article, based upon the field of comparative didactics, seeks to contribute to the identification of generic and specific features in the teaching and learning process. More particularly, its aim was to examine, through the study of two different school subjects: biology and English as a second language, how "passive didactic…

  17. Play and Positive Group Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Pam; White, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Play is an important part of a child's life and essential to learning and development (Vygotsky, 1978). It is vital that students participate in play and that play be conducted in a restorative manner. Play allows a variety of group dynamics to emerge. Irvin Yalom (1995) identifies 11 curative factors of the group experience. These factors include…

  18. Play: Children's Context for Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Tovah P.; Wirth, Daniele; Linas, Keri

    2003-01-01

    Defines the elements of play, illuminating its central role in young children's learning and development. Focuses on how play experiences contribute to children's independence in negotiating, its role in keeping children involved, and the play-reality distinction. Offers suggestions to teachers for facilitating and supporting children's play,…

  19. Learning English Speaking through Mobile-Based Role-Plays: The Exploration of a Mobile English Language Learning App Called Engage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Bowen; Zhou, Shijun; Ju, Weijie

    2013-01-01

    Engage is a new form of mobile application that connects students studying English with teachers in real-time via their smartphones. Students receive target language through preparation dialogues, and then apply it to a role-play with a teacher. The conceptualization and development of Engage follows the user-centred design approach; and the…

  20. Learning to play it safe (or not): stable and evolving neural responses during adolescent risky decision-making.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Lauren E; Peake, Shannon J; Dishion, Thomas J; Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Pfeifer, Jennifer H

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent decision-making is a topic of great public and scientific interest. However, much of the neuroimaging research in this area contrasts only one facet of decision-making (e.g., neural responses to anticipation or receipt of monetary rewards). Few studies have directly examined the processes that occur immediately before making a decision between two options that have varied and unpredictable potential rewards and penalties. Understanding adolescent decision-making from this vantage point may prove critical to ameliorating risky behavior and improving developmental outcomes. In this study, participants aged 14-16 years engaged in a driving simulation game while undergoing fMRI. Results indicated activity in ventral striatum preceded risky decisions and activity in right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) preceded safe decisions. Furthermore, participants who reported higher sensation-seeking and sensitivity to reward and punishment demonstrated lower rIFG activity during safe decisions. Finally, over successive games, rIFG activity preceding risky decisions decreased, whereas thalamus and caudate activity increased during positive feedback (taking a risk without crashing). These results indicate that regions traditionally associated with reward processing and inhibition not only drive risky decision-making in the moment but also contribute to learning about risk tradeoffs during adolescence.

  1. Proteomic analysis of human cataract aqueous humour: Comparison of one-dimensional gel LCMS with two-dimensional LCMS of unlabelled and iTRAQ®-labelled specimens.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Keiryn L; Funk, Marion; Tschernutter, Marion; Breitwieser, Florian P; Planyavsky, Melanie; Ubaida Mohien, Ceereena; Müller, André; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we report a comparative and quantitative analysis by mass spectrometry of the protein content of aqueous humour from cataract (control) patients. In addition to protein profiling, the approach is layered with quantitative proteomics using the iTRAQ® methodology. Aqueous humour from ten clinically-matched patients was collected and depleted of albumin and immunoglobulin G. Pairs of patient material were pooled and divided into three aliquots for subsequent analysis by alternative proteomic approaches. Excluding keratin, trypsin, residual albumin and immunoglobulins, a total of 198 protein groups were identified across the entire study. Relative protein quantitation with iTRAQ® revealed that 88% of the proteins had a maximal ±2-fold differential regulation between 3 of the 4 labelled samples, indicating minimal variation. The identified proteins were categorised by gene ontology and one third of the proteins were annotated as extracellular. The major molecular functions of the proteins in aqueous humour are binding (protein, metal ion, heparin, and DNA) and inhibition of proteolytic activity. Complementary to molecular function, the predominant biological processes for the proteins in aqueous humour are assigned to inflammatory and immune responses, and transport.

  2. Capillary zone electrophoresis and artificial neural networks for estimation of the post-mortem interval (PMI) using electrolytes measurements in human vitreous humour.

    PubMed

    Bocaz-Beneventi, G; Tagliaro, F; Bortolotti, F; Manetto, G; Havel, J

    2002-02-01

    Determination of electrolyte concentrations (mainly potassium) in vitreous humour has long been considered an important tool in human death investigations for the estimation of the post-mortem interval (PMI). On the basis of its well known potential in ion analysis, capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) has recently been applied to achieve a rapid and simultaneous determination of inorganic ions in this extracellular fluid. In the present work, artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied for modelling of the relationship of multicomponent CZE analysis of K+, NH4+, Na+, and Ba2+ ions in vitreous humour with PMI. In a study based on 61 cases with different causes of death and a known PMI ranging from 3 to 144 h, the use of ANNs considering all inorganic ion data from the human vitreous humour, achieved a substantial improvement of post-mortem interval prediction. Good linear correlation was observed (r2 = 0.98) and in comparison to the traditional linear least squares (LLS) method applied only to K+ levels in the vitreous humour, the prediction of PMI with ANN was improved by a factor of 5 from approximately +/- 15 h to less than 3 h.

  3. Playing Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Juan E.

    The acceptance of animation technologies is increasing. Video games, such as Sony PlayStation (SONY, 2002), have become part of the culture for young people from kindergarten through undergraduate school. Animation technologies have been implemented into educational systems in the form of animated pedagogical agents (Johnson, 2000). The research…

  4. Sweet Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Shuk-kwan S.; Lo, Jane-Jane

    2010-01-01

    This article features Sweet play math, a "math by the month" activity that involves decorating and making sugar cubes. Teachers may want to substitute straws, paper squares, alphabet blocks, or such commercially made manipulatives as Unifix[R] cubes for the real sweets. Given no allergy concerns, teachers and students alike would enjoy some sweet…

  5. Bureaucratic Politics and Decision Making under Uncertainty in a National Security Crisis: Assessing the Effects of International Relations Theory and the Learning Impact of Role-Playing Simulation at the U.S. Naval Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biziouras, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    Using a pre-/posttest research design, this article measures the learning impact of active-learning techniques such as role-playing simulations in an international relations course. Using the students' different responses to the pre- and postsimulation surveys in a quasi-experimental design whereby two sections that were taught by the same…

  6. Play's Importance in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette; Heden, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute knowledge on and gain an understanding of elementary school teachers' perspectives on the function of play in children's learning processes. The study is qualitative with a hermeneutical approach and has George Herbert Mead as a theoretical frame of reference. Interviews have been carried out with seven…

  7. Playing with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieyra, Rebecca; Edwards, Teon; Rowe, Elizabeth; Asbell-Clarke, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Gaming is becoming an effective form of learning and assessment and shouldn't be overlooked in an increasingly technological world. The games described in this article ("Impulse," "Quantum Spectre," and "Ravenous"), entertaining enough to be played by the general public, are also appropriate and useful in a classroom…

  8. The Values of Outdoor Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes outdoor play as a solid foundation and a central vehicle of knowledge about the real world. Outdoor play is important to all age levels, but particularly in early childhood and the elementary years. Children's outdoor play is not a luxury. It is critical in children's ability to learn about the world, others, and themselves.…

  9. Numerical model of heat transfer in the human eye with consideration of fluid dynamics of the aqueous humour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Samaras, Theodoros

    2010-10-01

    In this work we present a new 3D numerical model for heat transfer in the human eye, which takes into account the aqueous humour flow in the anterior chamber. We show that consideration of this phenomenon in the calculations alters the temperature distribution on the corneal and lens surfaces, without, however, noticeably changing their absolute values. The most notable effect is that the coolest area of the cornea moves at a point of 2 mm inferior to its geometric centre. The maximum velocity of the fluid in the anterior chamber was found to be 3.36 × 10-4 m s-1. The effect of the flow on displacing the cool area of the corneal surface temperature is counterbalanced by assuming anisotropic thermal conductivity. The model was implemented in the case of an artificial intraocular lens to show the resulting temperature variations.

  10. Learning, Play, and Your Newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... their backs to reduce the risk of SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome) . Talk to your baby. Keep in mind ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) Movement, Coordination, and Your Newborn Your ...

  11. Let's Play: Teaching Play Skills to Young Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutot, E. Amanda; Guenther, Tracee; Crozier, Shannon

    2005-01-01

    Watch any young child and you will likely see him or her engaged in some form of play. Play is an integral part of early childhood development in which typically developing children learn social and language skills, as well as appropriate behaviors, problem solving, and a variety of other cognitive skills. By its very definition, autism is a…

  12. The Importance of Play: Why Children Need to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodrova, Elena; Leong, Deborah J.

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the important role of dramatic ("pretend") play in early childhood with increasing emphasis at school on developing academic skills in children at younger and younger ages. Play is especially beneficial to children's learning when it reaches a certain degree of sophistication. In other words, "unproductive"…

  13. Reducing Stress in the Foreign Language Classroom: Teaching Descriptive Adjectives through Humour.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maceri, Domenico

    1995-01-01

    Discusses techniques for teaching descriptive adjectives in second-language classrooms that rely on humor to help relieve the stress of learning situations. Specific examples of Spanish adjectives and humorous phrases are provided. (contains two references) (MDM)

  14. A Constraints-Led Perspective to Understanding Skill Acquisition and Game Play: A Basis for Integration of Motor Learning Theory and Physical Education Praxis?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renshaw, Ian; Chow, Jia Yi; Davids, Keith; Hammond, John

    2010-01-01

    Background: In order to design appropriate environments for performance and learning of movement skills, physical educators need a sound theoretical model of the learner and of processes of learning. In physical education, this type of modelling informs the organisation of learning environments and effective and efficient use of practice time. An…

  15. Outdoor Play: Combating Sedentary Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thigpen, Betsy

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly sedentary lifestyles are contributing to overweight and other health concerns as children spend less and less time outside engaged in active play. Outdoor play provides important opportunities to explore the natural world, interact with peers, engage in vigorous physical activity, and learn about our environment. However, outdoor…

  16. Transmedia Play: Literacy across Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alper, Meryl; Herr-Stephenson, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Transmedia play is a new way to understand how children develop critical media literacy and new media literacies through their interactions with contemporary media that links stories and structures across platforms. This essay highlights five characteristics of transmedia play that make it particularly useful for learning:…

  17. Making Play Work for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisberg, Deena Skolnick; Kittredge, Audrey K.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Klahr, David

    2015-01-01

    Children, especially in the preschool years, learn a tremendous amount through play. Research on guided play demonstrates how schools can couple a curriculum-centered preschool program with a developmentally appropriate pedagogical approach to classroom teaching. However, to fully test this claim, we need a clear definition of the term…

  18. Playground Play: Educational and Inclusive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    It is easy to understand that fun is one of the key ingredients to any playground activity. But what one may not realize is that play systems--including slides, tunnels, activity panels, and more--encourage a lot more than just fun: there is learning at work in playground play, as well as the opportunity to include children of all abilities in…

  19. Learning Astronomy by Playing in a Park. (Spanish Title: Aprender AstronoMía Jugando en Una Plaza.) Aprender Astronomia Brincando em Uma Praça

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camino, Néstor

    2012-12-01

    Some public-square games are presented in this paper, considered as didactic modules to help children imagine astronomical processes, based on the concept that learning in Astronomy should be developed to strengthen the relationship of our body with three-dimensional space and time, much in the same way we experience when observing the actual sky, holding a permanent "dialogue" between the actual world and what is to be learned. The games presented (merry-go-rounds and slides) were designed to work on the astronomical concepts related to the translation of the Earth around the Sun, the phases of the Moon and gravity, and on what is perceived by an observer about those phenomena. The description of each game, their physical and astronomical foundations, and a critical comment about their didactical importance are the key parts of the paper. Finally, a recommendation is given about the role teachers should play to be essential partners in the process of learning Astronomy by means of the interaction with these games. Se presentan en este trabajo algunos juegos de plaza, considerados como módulos didácticos para imaginar procesos astronómicos, a partir de la concepción de que el aprendizaje en Astronomía debe desarrollarse fortaleciendo la relación del propio cuerpo con el espacio tridimensional y con el tiempo, tal como se vive al observar el cielo, construyendo un "diálogo" entre el mundo real y los aprendizajes a construir. Los juegos presentados (calesitas y toboganes) fueron diseñados para trabajar sobre la traslación de la Tierra en torno al Sol, las fases de la Luna y la gravedad, y sobre lo que un observador percibe de los mismos. Se da la descripción de cada juego, se discuten sus fundamentos físicos y astronómicos, y se desarrolla una crítica didáctica de los mismos. Finalmente, se comenta el rol que deberían tener los docentes en el acompañamiento a los aprendices en el proceso de interacción con los juegos presentados. Apresentam-se neste

  20. Helping Children Actively Design How They Learn about Health and Wellness: The Institute of Play Tests an Online Social Networking Tool within a Game-Based School Curriculum. Program Results Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Youth rarely receive opportunities to craft their own strategies around health and wellness within contexts relevant to them. From 2009 to 2010, the Institute of Play, based in New York, developed Being Me, a social networking site, to enable sixth-graders at the Quest to Learn public school to explore, discover and document a range of ideas…

  1. Children's Representations of Cultural Scripts in Play: Facilitating Transition from Home to Preschool in an Intercultural Early Learning Program for Refugee Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirova, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the role of play as a cultural activity in refugee children's transition from home to preschool. The "culture-free" view of play as a means for development of a "universal" child was challenged and an alternative view presented of play as a culturally leading activity in the development of a culturally situated child based…

  2. A single reversed-phase UPLC method for quantification of levofloxacin in aqueous humour and pharmaceutical dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Himanshu; Aqil, M; Khar, R K; Ali, Asgar; Chander, Prakash

    2010-07-01

    An attempt was made to develop a single, rapid, specific, and sensitive gradient reversed-phase ultra-performance liquid chromatographic method for quantitative analysis of levofloxacin. The single method thus developed is applied for the quantification of levofloxacin both in aqueous humour as well as pharmaceutical dosage forms (i.e., tablets and eye drops). The newly developed method is applicable for pharmacokinetic studies of eye formulations. The chromatographic separation of levofloxacin was achieved on a Waters Acquity HSS T-3 column (100 x 2.1 mm, 1.8 microm) within a short run-time of 5 min. The method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to system suitability, linearity, limit of quantitation and detection, precision, accuracy, robustness, and specificity. Forced degradation studies were also performed in levofloxacin bulk drug samples to demonstrate the stability-indicating power of the developed ultra-performance liquid chromatography method. The developed method was then successfully applied for the ocular pharmacokinetic study of levofloxacin eye formulations and assay of levofloxacin pharmaceutical dosage form.

  3. 'Here's the Weavery Looming Up': Verbal Humour in a Woman with High-Functioning Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werth, Abigail; Perkins, Michael; Boucher, Jill

    2001-01-01

    A case study of a 29-year-old woman with high functioning autism is presented. Examples of her use of puns, jokes, neologisms, "portmanteau" words, irreverent humor, irony, sarcasm, and word play based on her obsessional interests are provided and discussed in relation to current theories of autism and of normal humor. (Contains references.)…

  4. e-Motional Learning in Primary Schools: FearNot! An Anti-Bullying Intervention Based on Virtual Role-Play with Intelligent Synthetic Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enz, Sibylle; Zoll, Carsten; Vannini, Natalie; Schneider, Wolfgang; Hall, Lynne; Paiva, Ana; Aylett, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    Addressing the problems of bullying in schools, this paper presents a novel and highly innovative pedagogical approach, building on the immersive power of virtual role-play. Educational role-play is widely accepted as a powerful instrument to change attitudes and behaviour, but faces some difficulties and disadvantages when applied to sensitive…

  5. Play and Social Interaction in Middle Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris; Fromberg, Doris Pronin

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses traditional and contemporary definitions of middle childhood play, the value of such play for children's development and learning, the implications of home, school, and societal practices that have resulted in changing the play scenario of middle childhood, and suggestions for assuring that play's value will be maintained…

  6. How the Brain Makes Play Fun

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vanderschuren, Louk J. M. J.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the empirical studies that have investigated whether play (mostly social play) is rewarding. He then discusses the brain circuits and neurotransmitters that underlie the pleasurable aspects of play. He concludes that the pleasure of play has the ability to reinforce learning activities and that the brain's…

  7. Children's Spontaneous Play in Writer's Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lysaker, Judith T.; Wheat, Jennifer; Benson, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Research on the relationship between literacy and play has a rich history. Yet few studies have examined children's use of spontaneous play during literacy events as children are learning to read and write. This case study examines the use of play and the quality of playfulness in a kindergarten/first grade multiage classroom during Writer's…

  8. Hippocampal angiotensin II receptors play an important role in mediating the effect of voluntary exercise on learning and memory in rat.

    PubMed

    Akhavan, Maziar M; Emami-Abarghoie, Mitra; Sadighi-Moghaddam, Bizhan; Safari, Manouchehr; Yousefi, Yasaman; Rashidy-Pour, Ali

    2008-09-26

    The beneficial effects of physical activity and exercise on brain functions such as improvement in learning and memory are well documented. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of hippocampal angiotensin II receptors in voluntary exercise-induced enhancement of learning and memory in rat. In order to block the hippocampal angiotension II receptors, the animals received a single injection of latex microbeads for delivery of [Sar1 Thr8]-Angiotensin II into the hippocampus. The animals were exposed to five consecutive nights of exercise and then their learning and memory were tested on the Morris water maze (MWM) task using a two-trial-per-day for five consecutive days. A probe trial was performed 2 days after the last training day. Our results showed that hippocampal angiotensin II receptor blockade reversed the exercise-induced improvement in learning and memory in rat.

  9. The Sydney Multisite Intervention of LaughterBosses and ElderClowns (SMILE) study: cluster randomised trial of humour therapy in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    Low, Lee-Fay; Brodaty, Henry; Goodenough, Belinda; Spitzer, Peter; Bell, Jean-Paul; Fleming, Richard; Casey, Anne-Nicole; Liu, Zhixin; Chenoweth, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether humour therapy reduces depression (primary outcome), agitation and behavioural disturbances and improves social engagement and quality-of-life in nursing home residents. Design The Sydney Multisite Intervention of LaughterBosses and ElderClowns study was a single-blind cluster randomised controlled trial of humour therapy. Setting 35 Sydney nursing homes. Participants All eligible residents within geographically defined areas within each nursing home were invited to participate. Intervention Professional ‘ElderClowns’ provided 9–12 weekly humour therapy sessions, augmented by resident engagement by trained staff ‘LaughterBosses’. Controls received usual care. Measurements Depression scores on the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, agitation scores on the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, behavioural disturbance scores on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, social engagement scores on the withdrawal subscale of Multidimensional Observation Scale for Elderly Subjects, and self-rated and proxy-rated quality-of-life scores on a health-related quality-of-life tool for dementia, the DEMQOL. All outcomes were measured at the participant level by researchers blind to group assignment. Randomisation Sites were stratified by size and level of care then assigned to group using a random number generator. Results Seventeen nursing homes (189 residents) received the intervention and 18 homes (209 residents) received usual care. Groups did not differ significantly over time on the primary outcome of depression, or on behavioural disturbances other than agitation, social engagement and quality of life. The secondary outcome of agitation was significantly reduced in the intervention group compared with controls over 26 weeks (time by group interaction adjusted for covariates: p=0.011). The mean difference in change from baseline to 26 weeks in Blom-transformed agitation scores after adjustment for covariates was 0.17 (95% CI 0

  10. Spontaneous Play: An Avenue for Intellectual Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almy, Millie

    1966-01-01

    It is generally conceded that there is much for a child to learn while attending nursery school, but the teacher is often unsure as to what type of curriculum or program will best assure such learning. Specifically, although play has been part of all nursery school programs, it is questioned whether spontaneous play (that is, relatively…

  11. It's Time to Stop Defending Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Rosemary

    2011-01-01

    Children learn through play. Talk to early childhood educators and they will say this is the core of what they know about how children learn best. Talk to many parents and they say that allowing children to simply play all day is not teaching kids anything. This is the signature argument that has defined the early childhood field. The author…

  12. Student perceptions of the use of presentations as a method of learning endocrine and gastrointestinal pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Higgins-Opitz, Susan B; Tufts, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Second-year medical students at the Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine (Durban, South Africa) were given a brief to prepare oral presentations on topics related to disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and endocrine system in the form of "patient-doctor" role play and to submit written documents about their topics. This initiative was introduced to assist medical students in their application and understanding of physiology to clinical situations. The aims of the student presentations were to improve the understanding of the physiological basis of diseases; promote independent research, active, and group-based learning; encourage social interactions; and develop presentation and peer review skills. Students rose to the challenge, producing a variety of presentations reflecting a wealth of creativity, humour, sensitivity to local cultural issues, and analytic thinking skills. The quality of the supporting posters and computer-generated slides was outstanding. Numerous "fun" prizes for specific individual and group performances were given based on peer and staff evaluations. This exercise ran over a 5-yr period before the introduction of a problem-based learning medical curriculum. Student feedback obtained over these years is reported here. Students were asked to complete semistructured questionnaires, which elicited feedback on various aspects of the learning exercise, including whether it should be continued and how it could be improved upon, especially if they were in groups that did not function well. The feedback obtained revealed that most students perceived the presentations to be fun, informative, creative/innovative, and, most importantly, beneficial to their learning. The majority of students felt that this exercise improved their understanding of pathophysiology, taught them to research independently, and encouraged better class interactions and group learning. The inclusion of such initiatives is beneficial not only to students' understanding and

  13. An Exploratory Study of the Effectiveness of a Play-Based Center Approach for Learning Chemistry in an Early Childhood Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norman, John T.; Taddonio, Thomas E.

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of seven chemistry learning centers for use in an ongoing preschool education program. The seven centers piloted were: (1) Observing Color Changes; (2) Making Bubbles; (3) Using a Thermometer; (4) Balancing; (5) Classifying Colors; (6) Cooking; and (7) Sink or Float. All of the centers…

  14. Bridging Realty to Virtual Reality: Investigating Gender Effect and Student Engagement on Learning through Video Game Play in an Elementary School Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annetta, Leonard; Mangrum, Jennifer; Holmes, Shawn; Collazo, Kimberly; Cheng, Meng-Tzu

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine students' learning of simple machines, a fifth-grade (ages 10-11) forces and motion unit, and student engagement using a teacher-created Multiplayer Educational Gaming Application. This mixed-method study collected pre-test/post-test results to determine student knowledge about simple machines. A survey…

  15. A Multilevel Analysis of Diverse Learners Playing Life Science Video Games: Interactions between Game Content, Learning Disability Status, Reading Proficiency, and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Israel, Maya; Wang, Shuai; Marino, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Extant research reports differential effects related to the efficacy of video games as a means to enhance science instruction. However, there are very few studies examining differences in learning outcomes across student-level independent variables. This study used multilevel modeling to examine the effects of three video game-enhanced life…

  16. Teaching Technical Skills through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gullion, Laurie

    The value of light-hearted play in teaching technical recreational sport skills is immense. Children as well as adults can learn more quickly and completely with a games-oriented approach. Often without realizing the hidden goal of excellent skiing or paddling, participants respond to intriguing tasks in a game, immerse themselves in good…

  17. Play Orientation in Physics Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Aufshnaiter, Stefan; Schwedes, Hannelore

    1989-01-01

    Described is a curriculum project developed in Germany. The importance of playing and gaming for the acquisition of cognitive and social capacities, the relationships among acting, reasoning, and learning in physics instruction, and the spheres of subjective experience are discussed. The framework and evaluation of the curriculum are outlined. (YP)

  18. Block Play: Practical Suggestions for Common Dilemmas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunks, Karyn Wellhousen

    2009-01-01

    Learning materials and teaching methods used in early childhood classrooms have fluctuated greatly over the past century. However, one learning tool has stood the test of time: Wood building blocks, often called unit blocks, continue to be a source of pleasure and learning for young children at play. Wood blocks have the unique capacity to engage…

  19. To Play or Not to Play: Diverse Motives for Latino and Euro-American Parent-Child Play in a Children's Museum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBianca Fasoli, Allison

    2014-01-01

    A popular social discourse in the United States is that play is important for children's learning and that parental involvement maximizes play's learning potential. Past research has concluded that parents who hold this view of play are more likely to play with their children than those who do not. This study investigated the prevalence…

  20. The Association of Music Experience, Pattern of Practice and Performance Anxiety with Playing-Related Musculoskeletal Problems (PRMP) in Children Learning Instrumental Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranelli, Sonia; Smith, Anne; Straker, Leon

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence supporting the social and cognitive benefits of music education. However aspects of music practice, such as an increase in frequency and intensity of practice, are associated with playing-related musculoskeletal problems in adult musicians, though with limited evidence in children. The aim of this study was to describe the music…

  1. Development and validation of an ESI-LC-MS/MS method for simultaneous identification and quantification of 24 analytes of forensic relevance in vitreous humour, whole blood and plasma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Beauty; Velpandian, Thirumurthy; Saxena, Rohit; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Dogra, T D; Ghose, Supriyo

    2016-01-01

    Detection and quantification of drugs from various biological matrices are of immense importance in forensic toxicological analysis. Despite the various reported methods, development of a new method for the detection and quantification of drugs is still an active area of research. However, every method and biological matrix has its own limitation, which further encourage forensic toxicologists to develop new methods and to explore new matrices for the analysis of drugs. In this study, an electrospray ionization-liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-LC-MS/MS) method is developed and validated for simultaneous identification and quantification of 24 drugs of forensic relevance in various body fluids, namely, whole blood, plasma and vitreous humour. The newly developed method has been validated for intra-day and inter-day accuracy, precision, selectivity and sensitivity. Absolute recovery shows a mean of 84.5, 86.2, and 103% in the vitreous humour, whole blood and plasma respectively, which is suitable for the screening procedure. Further, the absolute matrix effect (AME) shows a mean of 105, 96.5, and 109% in the vitreous humour, whole blood and plasma, respectively. In addition, to examine the practical utility of this method, it has been applied for screening of drugs in post-mortem samples of the vitreous humour, whole blood and plasma collected at autopsy from ten cadavers. Experimental results show that the newly developed method is well applicable for screening of analytes in all the three matrices.

  2. Cyclic GMP, sodium nitroprusside and sodium azide reduce aqueous humour formation in the isolated arterially perfused pig eye.

    PubMed

    Shahidullah, Mohammad; Yap, Maurice; To, Chi-Ho

    2005-05-01

    The effect of nitric oxide (NO) on aqueous humour formation (AHF) and intraocular pressure (IOP) was studied using NO donors, sodium azide (AZ) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Using the porcine arterially perfused eye preparation, drug effects on AHF and IOP were measured by fluorescein dilution and manometry, respectively. Perfusion pressure of the ocular vasculature was also monitored using digital pressure transducer and pen recorder. L-Arginine (1.0 mM), a precursor of NO, but not D-arginine (1.0 mM), the inactive analogue, produced a significant reduction in AHF (28.5%) and IOP (21.1%). L-NAME (L-nitro-L-arginine) (10-100 microM), an NO synthase inhibitor, had no effect on AHF and IOP. However, L-NAME (100 microM) completely reversed L-arginine's effect. AZ and SNP reduced the AHF and IOP dose-dependently. AZ at 100 nM, 1 and 10 microM reduced AHF by 26.0, 39.7 and 51.7% and IOP by 10.8, 17.3 and 24.0%, respectively. SNP at 1, 10 and 100 microM reduced the AHF by 6.0, 24.2 and 35.4% and IOP by 3.5, 9.5 and 15.5%, respectively. 8-pCPT-cGMP (8-para-chlorophenyl-thioguanosine-3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate, 10 microM), a cGMP analogue, also reduced the AHF (34.9%) and IOP (15.9%). The effects of AZ and SNP on the AHF and IOP were blocked by a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ (10 microM), whereas ODQ alone or combined with 8-pCPT-cGMP had no effect on the AHF and IOP. None of the drugs had any significant effect on ocular vasculature. The reduction of the AHF and IOP in the arterially perfused pig eye by nitrovasodilators is likely to involve the NO-cGMP pathway.

  3. Play Therapy: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Maggie L.; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Jessee, Peggy

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the current issues in play therapy and its implications for play therapists. A brief history of play therapy is provided along with the current play therapy approaches and techniques. This article also touches on current issues or problems that play therapists may face, such as interpreting children's play, implementing…

  4. Making the Case for Play Policy: Research-Based Reasons to Support Play-Based Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stegelin, Dolores A.

    2005-01-01

    This article can help teachers and directors become eloquent and effective advocates of play-based early learning environments. It defines play and play policy and discusses distinct research areas that support play policy and practice for physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development within diverse early childhood settings. Also…

  5. Perceptions of Older Adults with Heart Failure on Playing an Interactive Digital e-Health Game (IDEG) for Learning About Heart Failure (HF): Prototype Development and Usability Testing.

    PubMed

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Toprac, Paul; O'Hair, Matt; Bias, Randolph; Mackert, Mike; Xie, Bo; Kim, Miyong; Bradley, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Effective self-management can decrease up to 50% of heart failure (HF) hospitalizations. However, self-management by patients with HF remains poor. We describe the development and usability testing of an interactive digital e-health game (IDEG) for older patients with HF in Central Texas, USA. Majority of the participants (5 out of 6) who participated in the usability testing found the game interesting, enjoyable and helpful to play. Developing an IDEG that is satisfying and acceptable to older adults with HF is feasible.

  6. The Denial of Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    Well meaning parents and teachers often use children's play for the purposes of literacy and socialization. Yet, these attempts may deny play to children by subordinating play to some other concept. Evidence shows that even when parents play with their very young children they generally play games like shopping, cooking, and eating; whereas when…

  7. Children's Play and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Discusses adverse effects of FCC deregulation of children's television programming on children's play behavior. Discusses the difference between play and imitation, the role of high quality dramatic play in healthy child development, the popularity of war play, and use of toys to increase dramatic play. Considers ways to help children gain control…

  8. What Play Means to Us: Exploring Children's Perspectives on Play in an English Year 1 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Opportunities for play and self-initiated activity, considered to be an important part of children's learning in early childhood settings, diminish as children progress into school. Previous studies suggest that losing time for play/self-initiated activity can impact negatively on children's attitudes to school learning. This article discusses the…

  9. Two people playing together: some thoughts on play, playing, and playfulness in psychoanalytic work.

    PubMed

    Vliegen, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Children's play and the playfulness of adolescents and adults are important indicators of personal growth and development. When a child is not able to play, or an adolescent/adult is not able to be playful with thoughts and ideas, psychotherapy can help to find a more playful and creative stance. Elaborating Winnicott's (1968, p. 591) statement that "psychotherapy has to do with two people playing together," three perspectives on play in psychotherapy are discussed. In the first point of view, the child gets in touch with and can work through aspects of his or her inner world, while playing in the presence of the therapist. The power of play is then rooted in the playful communication with the self In a second perspective, in play the child is communicating aspects of his or her inner world to the therapist as a significant other. In a third view, in "playing together" child and therapist are coconstructing new meanings. These three perspectives on play are valid at different moments of a therapy process or for different children, depending on the complex vicissitudes of the child's constitution, life experiences, development, and psychic structure. Concerning these three perspectives, a parallel can be drawn between the therapist's attitude toward the child's play and the way the therapist responds to the verbal play of an adolescent or adult. We illustrate this with the case of Jacob, a late adolescent hardly able to play with ideas.

  10. The Play of Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  11. Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glaser, Robert

    A report on learning psychology and its relationship to the study of school learning emphasizes the increasing interaction between theorists and educational practitioners, particularly in attempting to learn which variables influence the instructional process and to find an appropriate methodology to measure and evaluate learning. "Learning…

  12. Responsive Play: Exploring Play as Reader Response in a First Grade Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flint, Tori K.

    2016-01-01

    Play in the school setting is a highly contested issue in today's restrictive academic environment. Although many early childhood educators advocate the use of play in their classrooms and emphasize the importance of play for children's learning and development, children beyond the preschool and kindergarten years are not often afforded…

  13. More Play, Please: The Perspective of Kindergarten Teachers on Play in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    ?The past decade has seen an increase in research documenting the benefi?ts of children learning through play. However, the amount of play in American kindergarten classes remains on a steady decline. ?This article compares the ?findings from a netnographic study of seventy-eight kindergarten teachers' message board discussions about play in…

  14. Pigs, Planes, and Play-Doh: Children's Perspectives on Play as Revealed through Their Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Pauline Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Play, an elusive concept despite the extensive literature on the subject, remains especially problematic for research focused on the perspective of children. The author discusses her study on children's perspectives about play, exploring drawing as a method for learning how young children conceptualize play within a social-semiotic framework. Her…

  15. Ordinal Position in Role Play Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Sharon E.; Cabianca, William A.

    Although the effectiveness of role play and its vicarious learning experiences for counselor training is well documented, little research has focused on the impact of the order of playing the roles on skill development. To investigate the effect of ordinal position, 36 beginning counseling students, 24 female and 12 male, with a median age of 30,…

  16. The Excellence of Play. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyles, Janet, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This second edition of "The Excellence of Play" encapsulates all of the many changes that have taken place in early childhood in the last decade. It examines the vital importance of play as a tool for learning and teaching for children and practitioners, supporting all those who work in early childhood education and care in developing and…

  17. Preschool Teacher's Conceptions of Computers and Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette

    2002-01-01

    There are many dimensions of play and play's significance for children's development and learning is often emphasized, but how do preschool teachers see children's use of computers in preschool? A qualitative study was done with 13 Swedish preschool teachers that had experience working with computers in preschool. The overall aim of this study was…

  18. Role-Playing Methods in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesler, Mark; Fox, Robert

    This book, one of three Teacher Resource Booklets on Classroom Social Relations and Learning developed at the Center for Research on Utilization of Scientific Knowledge at the University of Michigan, discusses the theoretical background of role playing and gives a step-by-step discussion of how to use role playing in the classroom. There are…

  19. Restaurant Role-Play in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borya, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Research methods is perceived as a technical and difficult topic by some students. Using role-play to teach it can make it more accessible, meaningful and engaging. Role-playing the familiar roles of customer and waiting staff at a restaurant and discussing the variables that may affect the size of tips can help students to learn some of the key…

  20. Work and Play: Are They Really Opposites?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosberg, Merilee A.

    Noting that current discussion of the best way to accomplish the goal of "No Child Left Behind" has focused on the value of play versus a structured program for early education, this paper uses science education as a model for examining how children learn and the problems arising when artificial lines are drawn between work and play. The paper…

  1. Playing It Right

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tooley, Kay

    1973-01-01

    Described is one technique, referred to as "playing it right," to aid the therapist in the treatment of borderline children. "Playing it right" is based on the introduction of reality rules into the fantasy world of the borderline child. (CS)

  2. Outdoor Creative Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Guidelines are given for the development of outdoor play areas on school sites to provide children with natural areas and simple facilities for creative play. Site selection, analysis, and development are discussed. Natural, topographical features of the environment and natural play equipment are suggested. Illustrations are also presented to aid…

  3. Life! Through Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Anne, Nancy

    This speech presents a review of research concerning the nature of play. Some of the formal characteristics of play are: (a) it is distinct from ordinary life in its "temporariness" and its limitless location; (b) there is an element of tension in play that leads to uncertainty concerning the outcome but at the same time provides the opportunity…

  4. The Pedagogy of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesbrecht, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    Play is important. Environmental educators Sobel and Louv write about the relationship between children and outside play and suggest that early transcendental experiences within nature allow children to develop empathetic orientations towards the natural world. Children who play out-of-doors develop an appreciation for the environment and…

  5. African oil plays

    SciTech Connect

    Clifford, A.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

  6. Tinkering Is Serious Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bevan, Bronwyn; Petrich, Mike; Wilkinson, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Are makerspaces--where children can create gas-powered Roman chariots, singing greeting cards, or playdough circuit boards--just the site for a slightly wacky explosion of inventiveness? Or can these maker activities be channeled to support deep STEM learning? Bronwyn Bevan, director of the Exploratorium Institute for Research and Learning in San…

  7. Play as a Means for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Donna

    2005-01-01

    Spurred on by recent research findings, the popular press has been bombarding the country about the obesity crisis facing our nation. Issues surrounding the obesity problem for children include (a) a reduction of daily physical activity as a result of some schools eliminating recess and physical education; (b) the change in society from farming…

  8. Two-Years-Old Play and Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adcock, Don; Segal, Marilyn

    This guide for parents discusses social competence in 2-year-old children, drawing upon anecdotal data to provide a sampling of 2-year-old children's social behavior and their parents' child rearing techniques. The data were collected from questionnaires, telephone interviews, and home visits in a 12-month study of the interactions of 86…

  9. Learning, Change, and the Utopia of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulthrop, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    This article looks at some of the rhetoric surrounding video games and other forms of interactive software as additions or alternatives to school curricula. It focuses particularly on the need to articulate ways to "read" videogames in order to achieve significant cultural impact. Noting that reading, even as metaphor, tends to invoke…

  10. The Role Consumerism Plays in Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Laura M.; Risler, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In nations facing austerity measures, students risk diminished quality in their higher education experiences. Universities function increasingly like corporations as they struggle to compensate for budget shortfalls caused by declining public support. As a result, students become positioned as consumers of a private commodity that exists to…

  11. Return to Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Call it physical activity, call it games, or call it play. Whatever its name, it's a place we all need to return to. In the physical education, recreation, and dance professions, we need to redesign programs to address the need for and want of play that is inherent in all of us.

  12. The Fear of Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almon, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Real play--play that is initiated and directed by children and that bubbles up from within the child rather than being imposed by adults--has largely disappeared from the landscape of childhood in the United States. There are many reasons for this, such as the long hours spent in front of screens each day or in activities organized by adults. In…

  13. Clinical Intuition at Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2014-01-01

    A clinical psychologist and consulting psychotherapist discusses how elements of play, inherent in the intuition required in analysis, can provide a cornerstone for serious therapeutic work. She argues that many aspects of play--its key roles in human development, individual growth, and personal creativity, among others--can help therapists and…

  14. Play, Policy & Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klugman, Edgar, Ed.

    In 1992, the U.S.-Israel Binational Science Foundation (BSF), in conjunction with Wheelock College (Boston), sponsored its second workshop on children's play, entitled "Play and Cognitive Ability: The Cultural Context." This volume reflects the presentations and discussions held at the workshop, offering perspectives on children's play…

  15. An Invitation to Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lange, Jenny; Zieher, Connie

    The manual is intended to provide suggestions for play to parents of young children with exceptional educational needs. Nineteen types of activities are described and pictured, including make believe with boxes, dress-up activities, kitchen play, bubbles, small motor activities using beans and buttons, use of throw-away materials, painting,…

  16. Role Playing and Skits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letwin, Robert, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Explores non-scripted role playing, dialogue role playing, sociodrama, and skits as variations of simulation techniques. Provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting such sessions. Successful Meetings, Bill Communications, Inc., 1422 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Subscription Rates: yearly (US, Canada, Mexico) $14.00; elsewhere,…

  17. Growing Up with Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Many adults are afraid of boys' play today, believing that the aggression that is so common in boys' fantasies is dangerous and might make them become violent men. This personal reflection describes the importance of multiage play in showing little boys how to become big boys while encouraging empathy and emotional growth in older boys. The author…

  18. Play and Digital Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James E.; Christie, James F.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines how play is affected by computers and digital toys. Research indicates that when computer software targeted at children is problem-solving oriented and open-ended, children tend to engage in creative play and interact with peers in a positive manner. On the other hand, drill-and-practice programs can be quite boring and limit…

  19. Let's Just Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Children have a right to play. The idea is so simple it seems self-evident. But a stroll through any toy superstore, or any half-hour of so-called "children's" programming on commercial TV, makes it clear that violence, not play, dominates what's being sold. In this article, the author discusses how teachers and parents share the responsibility in…

  20. Play, Toys and Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brougere, Gilles

    In Western societies, television has transformed the life, culture, and points of reference of the child. Its particular sphere of influence is the child's play culture. This play culture is not hermetic: it is very oriented toward manipulation; has a symbolic role as a representational medium; evolves along with the child; has a certain amount of…

  1. Malaria in pregnant women living in areas of low transmission on the southeast Brazilian Coast: molecular diagnosis and humoural immunity profile

    PubMed Central

    Hristov, Angélica Domingues; Sanchez, Maria Carmen Arroyo; Ferreira, José Jarbas Bittencourt; Lima, Giselle Fernandes Maciel de Castro; Inoue, Juliana; Costa-Nascimento, Maria de Jesus; Sanchez, Arianni Rondelli; Ramos-Sanchez, Eduardo Milton; Santi, Silvia Maria Di

    2014-01-01

    Studies on autochthonous malaria in low-transmission areas in Brazil have acquired epidemiological relevance because they suggest continued transmission in what remains of the Atlantic Forest. In the southeastern portion of the state of São Paulo, outbreaks in the municipality of Juquitiba have been the focus of studies on the prevalence of Plasmodium, including asymptomatic cases. Data on the occurrence of the disease or the presence of antiplasmodial antibodies in pregnant women from this region have not previously been described. Although Plasmodium falciparum in pregnant women has been widely addressed in the literature, the interaction of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium malariae with this cohort has been poorly explored to date. We monitored the circulation of Plasmodium in pregnant women in health facilities located in Juquitiba using thick blood film and molecular protocols, as well as immunological assays, to evaluate humoural immune parameters. Through real-time and nested polymerase chain reaction, P. vivax and P. malariae were detected for the first time in pregnant women, with a positivity of 5.6%. Immunoassays revealed the presence of IgG antibodies: 44% for ELISA-Pv, 38.4% for SD-Bioline-Pv and 18.4% for indirect immunofluorescence assay-Pm. The high prevalence of antibodies showed significant exposure of this population to Plasmodium. In regions with similar profiles, testing for a malaria diagnosis might be indicated in prenatal care. PMID:25494466

  2. Taking Play Seriously in the Pre-Primary English Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mourão, Sandie

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on experience and the emerging results of a research project, this article examines the role of play, in particular child-initiated play, when learning languages in pre-primary settings. It begins by characterizing play and highlights the importance of a balanced relationship between adult-led and child-initiated play activities. It…

  3. Sex and Violence: Words at Play in the Shakespeare Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paquette, Maryellen G.

    2007-01-01

    Maryellen G. Paquette reveals the excitement and learning that can occur when high school students are presented with multiple opportunities to play. Activities that employ playful language and the whole body allow students to embody, name, and identify with complicated emotions and situations in Shakespeare's plays. In addition, play can be…

  4. Cautionary Tales on Interrupting Children's Play: A Study from Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weldemariam, Kassahun Tigistu

    2014-01-01

    Play is a natural and significant aspect of children's learning and development. Adults can be important to children's play, as they act as "play agents." Their involvement significantly influences the quality of the play activities in which children engage. The author briefly reviews the theoretical assumptions about adults' role in…

  5. The Scottish Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheat, Chris

    1999-01-01

    Recounts an episode when, as young schoolboys, Prince Charles and classmates presented "Macbeth" as an end-of-term-play. Traces the events at school that took on different meanings when viewed from maturity. (NH)

  6. Block Play: It's Not Just for Boys Anymore--Strategies for Encouraging Girls' Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokarz, Barb

    2008-01-01

    While block play is essential for both boys' and girls' social, cognitive, language, and motor development, girls do not engage in block play as frequently as boys. This situation can be attributed to the socialization process--children learn societal expectations for behavior and materials for both boys and girls--lack of experience for girls…

  7. Playing with Klee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder-Wyse, Jhan

    2008-01-01

    Young children are experts at make-believe and delight in listening to tales of fantasy and wonder. When the author learned that the second-grade students in her school were studying fairy tales and legends, she took advantage of their natural interests and classroom experiences and introduced them to the magical, dreamlike paintings of Swiss…

  8. Playing the Cell Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madrazo, Gerry M., Jr.; Wood, Carol A.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses the use of games to facilitate learning scientific concepts and principles. Describes the Cell Game, which simulates plant and animal cells; the Energy Quest, which requires players to buy property that generates largest amounts of electricity; the Blood Flow Game, which illustrates circulation of blood through the human body. (CS)

  9. Playing with History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Gwen

    1986-01-01

    Discusses types of software most useful in social studies classes--games, simulations, and word processing, database, spreadsheets, and graphing--and introduces applications software through descriptions of four learning activities from different parts of the social studies curriculum: introducing databases, writing historical journals, tracking…

  10. Games Learners Will Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyce, Byrl N.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    Clark Abt's book Serious Games" describes how games can enable children (and adults) to learn the abstract concepts that are required to deal with a world that is becoming increasingly complex. His book is here reviewed by three members of the University of Connecticut's Center for Real Estate and Urban Economics Studies. (Author)

  11. Playful Invention and Exploration. Final Evaluation Report: Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. John; Mark; Carroll, Becky; Helms, Jen; Smith, Anita

    2008-01-01

    PIE (Playful Invention and Exploration) is a unique approach to learning that centers on the use of technology and design challenges to create powerful learning experiences in informal education settings. The Playful Invention and Exploration (PIE) Institute project was funded in 2005 by the National Science Foundation (NSF). Overall, 150…

  12. Online Role-Play Environments for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carol; Shepherd, John

    2010-01-01

    As online environments and tools have evolved over the last 15-20 years, their use for role-based learning has expanded. This analysis draws on work for an Australian project that has been sharing and developing knowledge about the use of online role-plays in higher education. We describe the learning needs that online role-play can meet, and give…

  13. Year 4 Term 1: Plays. National Literacy Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department for Education and Skills, London (England).

    In this unit of work, the children will continue to learn about the features of playscripts, through reading and analyzing a play and writing a play based on a narrative. In the course of learning how to interpret and write stage directions, the children will apply their knowledge of adverbs. In the discrete work on vocabulary and spelling, the…

  14. Sharing the Power of Play with Parents. Policies & Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilford, Sara

    2005-01-01

    Play is a powerful avenue for a young child's learning. Child-development and brain-research experts agree that children are active meaning-makers from birth. Babies arrive in this world with the capacity to respond, imitate, initiate, explore, and eventually engage in symbolic processes. Play is young children's natural learning mechanism. Play…

  15. Constructing Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents guidelines for constructing group learning activities, describes group learning methods (discussion, gaming, role play, simulation, projects), and provides tips for facilitating group activities. (SK)

  16. Creative Outdoor Play Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Peggy L.

    Considering the creation of proper play areas for children (school sites, municipal and mini parks, private homes and backyards, shopping centers, apartment complexes, recreational areas, roadside parks, nursery schools, churches, summer camps, and drive-in theaters) as one of today's major challenges, the author recommends that professional…

  17. "Playing" with Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dave

    2012-01-01

    When faced with a multitude of tasks, any opportunity to "kill two birds with one stone" is welcome. Drama has always excited the author: as a child performing in plays, later as a student and now as a teacher directing performances and improvising within lessons. The author was lucky enough to have inspirational teachers during his…

  18. Integrated Play Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glovak, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    As an occupational therapist running social play groups with sensory integration for children on the autism spectrum, the author frequently doubted the wisdom of combining several children on the spectrum into a group. In fact, as the owner of a clinic she said, "No more!" The groups seemed like a waste of parents' time and money, and she refused…

  19. Abstraction through Game Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avraamidou, Antri; Monaghan, John; Walker, Aisha

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the computer game play of an 11-year-old boy. In the course of building a virtual house he developed and used, without assistance, an artefact and an accompanying strategy to ensure that his house was symmetric. We argue that the creation and use of this artefact-strategy is a mathematical abstraction. The discussion…

  20. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  1. Odaminodaa Ojibwemong!! = Let's Play in Ojibwe!!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, James L.

    The booklet contains directions for designing six word games to provide motivation, reinforcement, and review for students of all ages, from children to adults, as they learn the Ojibwe language. Step-by-step instructions are provided for making and playing Quiz Board, Tic-Tac-Toe, Concentration, Lottery, Lingo (Bingo), and Incocomp. Suggestions…

  2. Enhancing Outdoor Play with an Obstacle Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Christina; Rinn, Brad

    1998-01-01

    Discusses building an outdoor obstacle course with found materials to enhance static playground equipment and promote developmentally appropriate play activity for 3- to 8-year olds. Discusses developmental and learning goals of obstacle courses; includes photographs of building equipment and sample layouts. Encourages enlisting children to help…

  3. The Playful and Reflective Game Designer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majgaard, Gunver

    2014-01-01

    A group of first-semester engineering students participated in a game design course. The aim of the course was to learn how to design computer games and programming skills by creating their own games, thereby applying their game-playing experiences to gain knowledge about game design. The aim was for students to develop a more critically…

  4. World History Plays, Puzzles and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Lawrence

    This instructional resource, for grades 7-10, includes a collection of 10 plays with related learning activities. Units of study include: (1) "Alexander the Great and the Greeks"; (2) "The Black Death and the End of the Middle Ages"; (3) "Robert Clive and Imperialism"; (4) "Christopher Columbus and the Age of…

  5. Children Noticing Their Own and Others' Mathematics in Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Amber; Perry, Bob; Dockett, Sue; MacDonald, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Much is known about preschool children's mathematics learning and the role of play in that learning. Many early childhood educators are quite adept at observing and documenting the mathematics learning of the children in their settings. These teachers "notice" the children's mathematics but they are not the only ones to…

  6. Developing Competencies by Playing Digital Sports-Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kretschmann, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The idea of digital game-based learning (DGBL) is that students (or players) learn something by playing a computer or video game and that an educator can employ digital games to assist and boost both formal and informal learning. There is game software that is not specifically produced for educational use but which is nonetheless regularly…

  7. Playing tricks to ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibfried, Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    Ted Hänsch's career is defined by breaking new ground in experimental physics. Curiosity, vivid imagination, deep understanding, patience and tenacity are part of the winning formula, but perhaps an equally important ingredient may be Ted's favorite past-time of exploring new tricks in his "Spiellabor" (play-lab), that often resurfaced as key ingredients in rather serious experiments later. On the occasion of Ted's 75th birthday, a few past and potential future experiments with trapped ions are playfully surveyed here. Some of these tricks are already part of the trade, some are currently emerging and a few are mostly speculation today. Maybe some of the latter will be realized and even prove useful in the future.

  8. Viewpoints: The High School Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbison, Lawrence; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Presents opinions of professionals on the current state of the high school play. Participants include a playwright, play supplier, high school theater instructor, workshop leader, and play publisher. Discusses selection, production, and performance of plays. (JMF)

  9. Does Play Promote Self-Regulation in Children?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savina, Elena

    2014-01-01

    This theoretical paper discusses the role of pretend play and games with rules in fostering children's self-regulation. It proposes several pathways through which play facilitates self-regulation processes. First, in play, children learn to inhibit their impulsive behaviour and follow rules which transform their behaviour from impulsive and…

  10. Famous Americans: 22 Short Plays for the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Liza, Comp.

    Suggesting that reading plays aloud is an effective way to promote literacy and history in the grade 4-8 classroom, this book presents 22 short, readers' theater plays about extraordinary American men and women. The plays in the book are designed to enrich classroom learning by building oral literacy, fostering a knowledge of American heritage,…

  11. The Effects of Playing Educational Video Games on Kindergarten Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Din, Feng S.; Calao, Josephine

    2001-01-01

    Investigated whether kindergarten students who played Sony PlayStation educational video games for 40 minutes daily for 11 weeks learned better than peers who did not play such games. Found that the experimental group gained significantly more than the control group in spelling and decoding on the Wide Range Achievement Test-R3. Found no…

  12. Play and Learn: Potentials of Game-Based Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivec, Maja

    2008-01-01

    Learners are encouraged to combine knowledge from different areas to choose a solution or to make a decision at acertain point. Learners can test how the outcome of the game changes based on their decisions and actions. Learners are encouraged to contact other team members and discuss and negotiate subsequent steps, thus improving their social skills.

  13. Active play exercise intervention in children with asthma: a PILOT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Westergren, Thomas; Fegran, Liv; Nilsen, Tonje; Haraldstad, Kristin; Kittang, Ole Bjørn; Berntsen, Sveinung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Increased physical activity (PA) may be beneficial for children with asthma. Knowledge about how to intervene and encourage children with asthma to be physically active is required. In the present study, we aimed to pilot a 6-week exercise intervention designed as active play and examine attendance rate, exercise intensity and children's perceptions of participating. Methods 6 children with asthma (4 boys, 2 girls) aged 10–12 years, participated in 60 min of active play exercise twice weekly. A mixed-methods design was applied. The data analysed included attendance rate, exercise intensity assessed by heart rate (HR) monitoring during exercise sessions, registration and description of the active play exercise programme, 3 semistructured focus groups, field observations of 5 exercise sessions, and preintervention and postintervention testing. Findings The average attendance rate was 90%. Intensity ≥80% of maximal HR (HRmax) was recorded for a median (IQR) time of 22 (8) out of 60 min per session. Median (IQR) HR during the sessions was 146 (9; 74% of HRmax) bpm. Children reported increased health-related quality of life (HRQoL) post-test compared with baseline. Children enjoyed participating and reported no limitations by asthma or serious asthma attacks. Instead, they perceived that their asthma and fitness had improved after the programme. The instructors created an inclusive atmosphere that was characterised by easy-to-master games, fair competition, humour and mutual participation. Conclusions The exercise intervention pilot focusing on active play had a high attendance rate, relatively high exercise intensity, and satisfaction; the children perceived that their fitness and asthma had improved, and reported increased HRQoL. A randomised controlled trial of active play exercise including children with asthma should be conducted to evaluate effect on PA level, physical fitness, asthma control and HRQoL. PMID:26733570

  14. The Computer and the Pre-School Child; The Written Language and Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naymark, J.; Plaisant, C.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a Centre Mondial Informatique et Resources Humaines (CIMRH) investigation of kindergarten children's written language learning and links between play and learning. Computer software was used by students for language learning, and observations centered on student computer use, learning of written language and play, and computer…

  15. Children's play provisions: time for change.

    PubMed

    Sharma, A; Khosla, R

    1992-01-01

    An overview is provided of essential features of play environments for children which enhance their creative development: play space, play environments, equipment for play, safe equipment, creative adult input, and time factors. Safety measures are described along with a list of do's and don'ts. Management of play areas and the training of educators were also discussed. Arguments are given as support for creative play provisions, but the conclusion is that the trend is to restrict children's expression, to limit their freedom, to impose limits to action and thought, to encourage normative behavior, and to inhibit creative thinking. Space requirements are that the area be ample. In rural and tribal areas, space is unlimited; in cities, creative use of space may involve use of terraces, enclosed courtyards, dead end road areas free of traffic, or a large open area away from traffic. In spite of space limitations, children tend to adapt to the space available. For instance, a pipe sticking out of a wall could be a bar to swing on. Effective use of space is dependent on organization and structuring. In rural areas, children learn by their own discoveries, and many are denied the exposure to educators who can organize their play or play objects to foster creativity. Play is divorced from work and learning, when it can also be structured to offer opportunities for development of cognitive skills. Stimulating play environments may include a mound of earth that separates one part of an open space from another; children find looking to see what is on the other side intriguing. Children can run up and down the hill. A sand pit with building and digging instruments can provide hours of fascination. A water hole with stones could provide a place to jump across and foster imaginative games. A tunnel could be carved out of the hill to provide a place of dramatic play. A low tree with a twisted trunk is inviting for climbing, swinging, jumping, or playing hide and seek. Play

  16. Playing at School: An Inquiry Approach to Using an Experiential Play Lab in an Early Childhood Teacher Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kemple, Kristen M.; Oh, Ji Hyun; Porter, Daniella

    2015-01-01

    Play is considered an important activity of the early childhood years. Research supports the contribution of play to children's development, learning, and well-being. In spite of this, time for play is being pushed out in many early childhood programs by greater time allotted to formal instruction in narrow academic skills to be tested eventually…

  17. Learning to Play and Playing to Learn: Organized Sports and Educational Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosewater, Ann

    2009-01-01

    High-quality organized sports are a gateway to academic achievement, better grades, improved chances of attending college, and success in the labor market--and these benefits are especially important for low-income youth. The author's report analyzes several distinct strands of research on the effects on youth of participation in organized sports.…

  18. Farm Hall: The Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, David C.

    2013-03-01

    It's July 1945. Germany is in defeat and the atomic bombs are on their way to Japan. Under the direction of Samuel Goudsmit, the Allies are holding some of the top German nuclear scientists-among them Heisenberg, Hahn, and Gerlach-captive in Farm Hall, an English country manor near Cambridge, England. As secret microphones record their conversations, the scientists are unaware of why they are being held or for how long. Thinking themselves far ahead of the Allies, how will they react to the news of the atomic bombs? How will these famous scientists explain to themselves and to the world their failure to achieve even a chain reaction? How will they come to terms with the horror of the Third Reich, their work for such a regime, and their behavior during that period? This one-act play is based upon the transcripts of their conversations as well as the author's historical work on the subject.

  19. Teachers' roles in supporting children's literacy development through play.

    PubMed

    Saracho, Olivia N

    2002-04-01

    This study focused on the roles five kindergarten teachers assumed to promote literacy. Data were collected through systematic videotaped observations during the children's play periods. Saracho's analysis of the transcriptions in identifying the roles of the teachers suggested teachers' roles in the children's literacy-play include director of instructions (instructing students to follow directions and learn concepts), transition director (directing students to make smooth transitions), supporter of learning (acknowledging and praising students' work to promote learning), storyteller (reading or telling a story and encouraging children to respond), and instructional guide (providing instructional guidance for learning).

  20. Imagination, Playfulness, and Creativity in Children's Play with Different Toys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mo????ller, Signe?? Juhl?

    2015-01-01

    Based on a four-month experimental study of preschool children's play with creative-construction and social-fantasy toys, the author examines the in?uence of both types of toys on the play of preschool children. Her comparative analysis considers the impact of transformative play on the development of imagination during play activities and…

  1. Playing by the Rules: Instruction and Acculturation in Role-Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuenschwander, Bryn

    2008-01-01

    The open-ended, informal, and socially negotiated nature of role-playing games creates a distinct learning challenge for newcomers to the hobby. The explicit rules of the game provide only an incomplete framework for structuring the actions of players, and the expectations and mores of a given group will add other, unspoken rules that discourage…

  2. Children's Pastimes and Play in Sixteen Nations: Is Free-Play Declining?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Dorothy G.; Singer, Jerome L.; D'Agnostino, Heidi; DeLong, Raeka

    2009-01-01

    This article is based on a study of the role of play and experiential-learning activities beyond formal schooling in sixteen nations. The study, supported by Unilever PLC, gathered information from the mothers of twenty-four hundred children in countries in North America, South America, Africa, Europe, and Asia who described and rated their…

  3. Rough and Tumble Play 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Frances

    2009-01-01

    Many people fear that play-fighting or rough and tumble play is the same as real fighting. There is also a fear that this rough play will become real fighting if allowed to continue. Most of all, parents and teachers fear that during the course of rough and tumble play a child may be hurt. To provide for and allow children to play rough without…

  4. Solar Power at Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    For the very first time, astronomers have witnessed the speeding up of an asteroid's rotation, and have shown that it is due to a theoretical effect predicted but never seen before. The international team of scientists used an armada of telescopes to discover that the asteroid's rotation period currently decreases by 1 millisecond every year, as a consequence of the heating of the asteroid's surface by the Sun. Eventually it may spin faster than any known asteroid in the solar system and even break apart. ESO PR Photo 11a/07 ESO PR Photo 11a/07 Asteroid 2000 PH5 "The Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect is believed to alter the way small bodies in the Solar System rotate," said Stephen Lowry (Queens University Belfast, UK), lead-author of one of the two companion papers in which this work is reported [1, 2]. "The warming caused by sunlight hitting the surfaces of asteroids and meteoroids leads to a gentle recoil effect as the heat is released," he added. "By analogy, if one were to shine light on a propeller over a long enough period, it would start spinning." Although this is an almost immeasurably weak force, its effect over millions of years is far from negligible. Astronomers believe the YORP effect may be responsible for spinning some asteroids up so fast that they break apart, perhaps leading to the formation of double asteroids. Others may be slowed down so that they take many days to complete a full turn. The YORP effect also plays an important role in changing the orbits of asteroids between Mars and Jupiter, including their delivery to planet-crossing orbits, such as those of near-Earth asteroids. Despite its importance, the effect has never been seen acting on a solar system body, until now. Using extensive optical and radar imaging from powerful Earth-based observatories, astronomers have directly observed the YORP effect in action on a small near-Earth asteroid, known as (54509) 2000 PH5. Shortly after its discovery in 2000, it was

  5. Dolls, Blocks, and Puzzles: Playing with Mathematical Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenhauer, Mary Jane; Feikes, David

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a learning experience designed for teachers of children in primary classrooms (K-3) who are taking graduate courses. The learning experience offers new insights into the different ways young children encounter math in their natural, playful environment. Through a hands-on workshop approach, the students engaged in firsthand…

  6. Straw Castles: A Role-Play in Group Dynamics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barron, Jennie

    1993-01-01

    Describes a learning activity that allows participants to role play both dysfunctional and constructive roles during a group task, illustrating how group success depends on the attitudes and actions of its members. Includes instructions for the learning activity, questions for debriefing, and follow-up activities. (LP)

  7. Finger Forces in Clarinet Playing

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Alex; Goebl, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Clarinettists close and open multiple tone holes to alter the pitch of the tones. Their fingering technique must be fast, precise, and coordinated with the tongue articulation. In this empirical study, finger force profiles and tongue techniques of clarinet students (N = 17) and professional clarinettists (N = 6) were investigated under controlled performance conditions. First, in an expressive-performance task, eight selected excerpts from the first Weber Concerto were performed. These excerpts were chosen to fit in a 2 × 2 × 2 design (register: low–high; tempo: slow–fast, dynamics: soft–loud). There was an additional condition controlled by the experimenter, which determined the expression levels (low–high) of the performers. Second, a technical-exercise task, an isochronous 23-tone melody was designed that required different effectors to produce the sequence (finger-only, tongue-only, combined tongue-finger actions). The melody was performed in three tempo conditions (slow, medium, fast) in a synchronization-continuation paradigm. Participants played on a sensor-equipped Viennese clarinet, which tracked finger forces and reed oscillations simultaneously. From the data, average finger force (Fmean) and peak force (Fmax) were calculated. The overall finger forces were low (Fmean = 1.17 N, Fmax = 3.05 N) compared to those on other musical instruments (e.g., guitar). Participants applied the largest finger forces during the high expression level performance conditions (Fmean = 1.21 N). For the technical exercise task, timing and articulation information were extracted from the reed signal. Here, the timing precision of the fingers deteriorated the timing precision of the tongue for combined tongue-finger actions, especially for faster tempi. Although individual finger force profiles were overlapping, the group of professional players applied less finger force overall (Fmean = 0.54 N). Such sensor instruments provide useful insights into player

  8. Play technique in psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yanof, Judith A

    2013-04-01

    Imaginary play is often a child's best way of communicating affects, fantasies, and internal states. In play children are freer to express their forbidden and conflicted thoughts. Consequently, one of the best ways for the therapist to enter the child's world is to do so from within the displacement of the play process. For children who cannot play, the therapist's goal is to teach the child to use play as a means of communication and to create meaning. This article present clinical examples to illustrate how the author uses play in the clinical situation.

  9. The Role That Socioaffective Practices Play in Third Graders' Autonomous Learning (El papel de las prácticas socioafectivas en el aprendizaje autónomo de estudiantes de tercer grado)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perdomo Toro, Jhonatan; Rico González, Ángela Milena; Huepa Salcedo, Nury Catherine

    2011-01-01

    In this article we describe and analyze how autonomous learning emerges in third graders' socioaffective practices as reconstructed in written narratives. Results were obtained by analyzing and reflecting on classroom observation, interviews and written narratives done by the students which let us appreciate different behaviors and reactions the…

  10. Using Role-Playing Games to Teach Astronomy: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since 1998, I've been experimenting with the use of role-playing games to teach astronomy. Students play the role of competing teams of researchers, racing to solve some astrophysical mystery. In this article, I review what has been learned from using these games around the world over the last eight years. The most common problem encountered is a…

  11. The Secret of Play: Birth to 12 Months

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Ann Pleshette

    2009-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "The Secret of Play: How to Raise Smart, Healthy, Caring Kids From Birth to Age 12" (2008, DK Publishing) by parenting expert Ann Pleshette Murphy. The author draws on child development research to help parents understand how play helps children learn at each stage of development and offers practical suggestions for…

  12. The Changing World of Toys and Toy Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the changing world of toys and toy play. Children learn about themselves and their world from their play with toys. Over the past half century there has been a remarkable transformation of the toy world of children. Toys have changed in quantity, quality, and level of technology. Mass production has made…

  13. Gaining Ground in Understanding the Play-Literacy Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roskos, Kathleen A.; Christie, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Many in the field of early literacy development and learning believe strongly that play and literacy share common ground, but they have found the idea difficult to prove. While some primary research indicates a positive relationship, the impact of play seems to occur at different levels of development, which complicates how researchers view its…

  14. A Role Play for Revising Style and Applying Management Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Role-playing is a well regarded learning activity. By participating in this activity, students can apply their knowledge through their assigned roles in a realistic but risk-free situation. The role play stimulates class discussion, dramatizes rhetorical principles about purpose, shows how to adapt a text to an audience of employees in a…

  15. Playing With Conflict: Teaching Conflict Resolution through Simulations and Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Richard B.; Kirkpatrick, Kat

    2013-01-01

    Playing With Conflict is a weekend course for graduate students in Portland State University's Conflict Resolution program and undergraduates in all majors. Students participate in simulations, games, and experiential exercises to learn and practice conflict resolution skills. Graduate students create a guided role-play of a conflict. In addition…

  16. The Epic inside Us: Using Intuitive Play to Teach Beowulf

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menzies, J. Beth Haase

    2004-01-01

    The element of play is underutilized in the secondary classroom in spite of the fact that play produces unique opportunities for meaningful learning. The ways in which the elements of epic poetry, Beowulf, and the Old English diction differed from the modern usage is discussed.

  17. Engineering Play: A Cultural History of Children's Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ito, Mizuko

    2009-01-01

    Today, computers are part of kids' everyday lives, used both for play and for learning. We envy children's natural affinity for computers, the ease with which they click in and out of digital worlds. Thirty years ago, however, the computer belonged almost exclusively to business, the military, and academia. In "Engineering Play," Mizuko Ito…

  18. Problematic game play: the diagnostic value of playing motives, passion, and playing time in men.

    PubMed

    Kneer, Julia; Rieger, Diana

    2015-04-30

    Internet gaming disorder is currently listed in the DSM-not in order to diagnose such a disorder but to encourage research to investigate this phenomenon. Even whether it is still questionable if Internet Gaming Disorder exists and can be judged as a form of addiction, problematic game play is already very well researched to cause problems in daily life. Approaches trying to predict problematic tendencies in digital game play have mainly focused on playing time as a diagnostic criterion. However, motives to engage in digital game play and obsessive passion for game play have also been found to predict problematic game play but have not yet been investigated together. The present study aims at (1) analyzing if obsessive passion can be distinguished from problematic game play as separate concepts, and (2) testing motives of game play, passion, and playing time for their predictive values for problematic tendencies. We found (N = 99 males, Age: M = 22.80, SD = 3.81) that obsessive passion can be conceptually separated from problematic game play. In addition, the results suggest that compared to solely playing time immersion as playing motive and obsessive passion have added predictive value for problematic game play. The implications focus on broadening the criteria in order to diagnose problematic playing.

  19. Problematic Game Play: The Diagnostic Value of Playing Motives, Passion, and Playing Time in Men

    PubMed Central

    Kneer, Julia; Rieger, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Internet gaming disorder is currently listed in the DSM—not in order to diagnose such a disorder but to encourage research to investigate this phenomenon. Even whether it is still questionable if Internet Gaming Disorder exists and can be judged as a form of addiction, problematic game play is already very well researched to cause problems in daily life. Approaches trying to predict problematic tendencies in digital game play have mainly focused on playing time as a diagnostic criterion. However, motives to engage in digital game play and obsessive passion for game play have also been found to predict problematic game play but have not yet been investigated together. The present study aims at (1) analyzing if obsessive passion can be distinguished from problematic game play as separate concepts, and (2) testing motives of game play, passion, and playing time for their predictive values for problematic tendencies. We found (N = 99 males, Age: M = 22.80, SD = 3.81) that obsessive passion can be conceptually separated from problematic game play. In addition, the results suggest that compared to solely playing time immersion as playing motive and obsessive passion have added predictive value for problematic game play. The implications focus on broadening the criteria in order to diagnose problematic playing. PMID:25942516

  20. An Action Research Study Investigating Children's Use of an iPad during Free Play in a Kindergarten Classroom: An Exploration of Teaching Pedagogy and Children's Learning, Social Interactions, and Digital Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds-Blankenship, Tara

    2013-01-01

    As part of human development, technology plays an important role in many children's lives. As digital technologies continue to permeate aspects of many children's everyday lives, educators are integrating digital technologies into classroom practices and, as such, have created a need to examine the ways in which children use technologies in their…

  1. The Relations between a "Push-Down" and "Push-Up" Curriculum: A Cultural-Historical Study of Home-Play Pedagogy in the Context of Structured Learning in International Schools in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Megan; Fleer, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Historically, "free play" in many European heritage communities has been a valued practice. However, political imperatives have challenged these beliefs and necessitated a more academic curriculum to raise standards, resulting in a "push-down" curriculum. By contrast, many Asia-Pacific communities have increasingly included…

  2. Pretend Play and Creative Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russ, Sandra W.; Wallace, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    The authors contend that many cognitive abilities and affective processes important in creativity also occur in pretend play and that pretend play in childhood affects the development of creativity in adulthood. They discuss a variety of theories and observations that attempt to explain the importance of pretend play to creativity. They argue that…

  3. Play Memories and Place Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandberg, Anette

    2003-01-01

    This retrospective study examined play memories from childhood to adulthood of 478 university students between ages 20 and 62 as exhibited in drawings of play memories and questionnaire responses. The study focused on the role of the physical environment and place identity in play memories and individual identity development. Findings showed that…

  4. Play in Evolution and Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrini, Anthony D.; Dupuis, Danielle; Smith, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we examine the role of play in human ontogeny and phylogeny, following Surplus Resource Theory. We consider how juveniles use play to sample their environment in order to develop adaptive behaviors. We speculate about how innovative behaviors developed in play in response to environmental novelty may influence subsequent evolutionary…

  5. Piaget, Play and Cognition, Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton-Smith, Brian

    Piaget's early contribution to theorizing about play is discussed critically with reference to three major interrelated problems. These are: (1) that despite their equipotentiality in Piaget's theory of intelligence, imitation and play are not conceptualized as making an equal contribution to cognition, play taking a subordinate role; (2) that…

  6. Meanings of Play among Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Nicole M.; Knight, Camilla J.; Holt, Nicholas L.; Spence, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine meanings of play among children. Thirty-eight students aged 7-9 years from a suburban public school in Western Canada participated in focus groups. Data analysis revealed participants saw almost anything as an opportunity for play and would play almost anywhere with anyone. However, they perceived parents…

  7. Play Therapy in School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trice-Black, Shannon; Bailey, Carrie Lynn; Kiper Riechel, Morgan E.

    2013-01-01

    Play therapy is an empirically supported intervention used to address a number of developmental issues faced in childhood. Through the natural language of play, children and adolescents communicate feelings, thoughts, and experiences. Schools provide an ideal setting for play therapy in many ways; however, several challenges exist in implementing…

  8. Embodied Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolz, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that psychological discourse fails miserably to provide an account of learning that can explain how humans come to understand, particularly understanding that has been grasped meaningfully. Part of the problem with psychological approaches to learning is that they are disconnected from the integral role embodiment plays in how…

  9. Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Thomas G., Ed.; Wright, Benjamin E., Ed.

    The focus of the 16 essays in this book is the physical environment of learning, specifically the man-made or built environment. The authors contend that educators have tended to overlook the influence of built environments on the learning process--a process not confined to schools, but involving play areas, tree houses, and the city itself. The…

  10. Sticky to Dry; Red to Purple: Exploring Transformation with Play Dough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldhaber, Jeanne

    1992-01-01

    Play dough is the perfect medium for creating, observing, and thinking about change. Whether the use of play dough is seen as play or a demonstration of physics, through its use children learn about transformations of consistency, color, and identity; and teachers observe how young children learn. (LB)

  11. Using Role-Play for Expert Science Communication with Professional Stakeholders in Flood Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Lindsey; Stokes, Alison; Crowley, Kate; Roberts, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores role-play pedagogies in learning and communicating about cutting-edge flood science by flood risk management professionals in local government. It outlines role-play process/structure and evaluates participant perceptions of their learning experiences. Issues were impacts of prior role-play experience on attitudes brought to…

  12. Exploring the Potential of Role Play in Higher Education: Development of a Typology and Teacher Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Deepa; Stupans, Ieva

    2012-01-01

    Role-play, in which learners act out roles in case scenarios, appears to be used across a broad range of discipline areas to address learning across the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. This paper describes the development of a prospective typology of role-play learning opportunities derived from role-play scenarios used at one large…

  13. Changelings and Shape Shifters? Identity Play and Pedagogical Positioning of Staff in Immersive Virtual Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a study that used narrative inquiry to explore staff experiences of learning and teaching in immersive worlds. The findings introduced issues relating to identity play, the relationship between pedagogy and play and the ways in which learning, play and fun were managed (or not). At the same time there was a sense of imposed or…

  14. The Power of Musical Play: The Value of Play-Based, Child-Centered Curriculum in Early Childhood Music Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niland, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Young children learn through play. This has long been acknowledged in the writings of educational theorists dating back as far as Rousseau, Pestalozzi, and Froebel and is strongly supported by current early childhood research. Play is at the heart of contemporary early childhood pedagogy, and this has led to a strong belief in the importance of an…

  15. Building a Play Research Agenda: What Do We Know about Play? What New Questions Do We Need to Ask?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Susan J.; Klugman, Edgar

    2007-01-01

    Today's research about children's play exists in the context of deep societal concern about children's learning and development. Teachers may understand why play is a key contributor to healthy child development, but the pressure of national and state standards, the focus on early literacy, and the introduction of Head Start academic outcomes and…

  16. Play, behaviour, language and social skills: the comparison of a play and a non-play intervention within a specialist school setting.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Chloe; Stagnitti, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the play, behaviour, language and social skills of children aged 5-8 years participating in a play intervention (based on the 'Learn to Play' program) compared to a group of children participating in traditional classroom activities within a specialist school over a six month period. Thirty-five children participated in the study, 19 participated in the play intervention group and 16 participated in the comparison group. Fourteen staff members at the special school were involved. A quasi-experimental design was used with pre and post data collection. Children in the play intervention and the comparison group were assessed using the Child-Initiated Pretend Play Assessment (play), Goal Attainment Scaling (behaviour), the Preschool Language Scale (language) and the Penn Interactive Peer Play Scale (social skills) at baseline and at follow up. Findings revealed that children participating in the play intervention showed a significant decrease in play deficits, became less socially disruptive and more socially connected with their peers. Both groups improved in their overall language skills and significantly improved in their goal attainment. This study supports the use of a play intervention in improving a child's play, behaviour, language and social skills.

  17. Thinking about Children's Play: Play Is Not Work, Nor Is Work Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkind, David

    2001-01-01

    Addresses the concept of "play as a child's work," from the viewpoints of Montessori, Freud, and Piaget. Contends that children's play: (1) like adult play, may be individual or social; (2) has immediate value for the child as a way of expressing feelings; and (3) is a healthy counterpoise to work. (SD)

  18. Teachers' Perceptions of Boys' and Girls' Shared Activities in the School Context: Towards a Theory of Collaborative Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyvonen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    The Finnish educational system and curricula lay emphasis on play, collaboration and equality. Modern educational practices allow the learning environment to be enlarged from indoor classrooms to outdoor playful learning environments (PLEs). PLEs have been constructed in schoolyards in Finland with the goal of increasing learning through play in…

  19. Behavioral approaches to promoting play.

    PubMed

    Stahmer, Aubyn C; Ingersoll, Brooke; Carter, Cynthia

    2003-12-01

    A variety of techniques grounded in behavioral psychology, and more specifically in applied behavior analysis, have been established to increase and improve play skills in children with autistic spectrum disorders. This article introduces a set of efficacious methods, which range from highly structured techniques to more naturalistic strategies. It focuses on object play as other authors in the issue discuss social play in greater depth. Behavioral techniques that are reviewed include: discrete trial training, use of stereotyped behaviors to increase play skills, pivotal response training, reciprocal imitation training, differential reinforcement of appropriate behavior, in vivo modeling and play scripts, and video modeling. A discussion of expanding behavior techniques to teach more complex play as well as training in varied environments is also presented. References are provided to allow the reader to obtain more in-depth information about each technique.

  20. The Influence of Play Material on Discourse during Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burroughs, Elizabeth I.; Murray, Sharon E.

    1992-01-01

    Evaluation of the conversational behavior of 36 children (ages 48-59 months) playing in dyads with 3 different materials (modeling dough, a farm set, and animal puppets) found that each toy elicited the same amount of talking, though there were differences in discourse structure attributable to play materials. (DB)