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  1. IFT46 plays crucial roles in craniofacial and cilia development.

    PubMed

    Park, Inji; Lee, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Chowon; Ismail, Tayaba; Kim, Yoo-Kyung; Park, Jeen-Woo; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Dong-Seok; Park, Tae-Joo; Park, Mae-Ja; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Lee, Hyun-Shik

    2016-08-26

    The intraflagellar transport (IFT) system is essential for bidirectional movement of ciliary components from the basal body to the tip beneath the ciliary sheath and is conserved for cilia and flagella formation in most vertebrates. IFT complex A is involved in anterograde trafficking, whereas complex B is involved in retrograde trafficking. IFT46 is well known as a crucial component of IFT complex B, however, its developmental functions are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the novel functions of IFT46 during vertebrate development, especially, ciliogenesis and neurogenesis, because IFT46 is strongly expressed in both multiciliated cells of epithelial and neural tissues. Knockdown of IFT46 using morpholino microinjections caused shortening of the body axis as well as the formation of fewer and shorter cilia. Furthermore, loss of IFT46 down-regulated the expression of the neural plate and neural tube markers, thus may influence Wnt/planar cell polarity and the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway during neurogenesis. In addition, loss of IFT46 caused craniofacial defects by interfering with cartilage formation. In conclusion, our results depict that IFT46 plays important roles in cilia as well as in neural and craniofacial development. PMID:27320864

  2. PDGFRα plays a crucial role in connective tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Shinjiro; Ishii, Yoko; Hamashima, Takeru; Yamamoto, Seiji; Mori, Hisashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Shen, Jie; Inoue, Ran; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Majima, Masataka; Abraham, David; Miyawaki, Toshio; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-12-07

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) plays a pivotal role in the remodeling of connective tissues. Emerging data indicate the distinctive role of PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα) in this process. In the present study, the Pdgfra gene was systemically inactivated in adult mouse (α-KO mouse), and the role of PDGFRα was examined in the subcutaneously implanted sponge matrices. PDGFRα expressed in the fibroblasts of Pdgfra-preserving control mice (Flox mice), was significantly reduced in the sponges in α-KO mice. Neovascularized areas were largely suppressed in the α-KO mice than in the Flox mice, whereas the other parameters related to the blood vessels and endothelial cells were similar. The deposition of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of collagen 1a1 and 3a1 genes were significantly reduced in α-KO mice. There was a significantly decrease in the number and dividing fibroblasts in the α-KO mice, and those of macrophages were similar between the two genotypes. Hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) gene expression was suppressed in Pdgfra-inactivated fibroblasts and connective tissue. The findings implicate the role of PDGFRα-dependent ECM and HGF production in fibroblasts that promotes the remodeling of connective tissue and suggest that PDGFRα may be a relevant target to regulate connective tissue remodeling.

  3. Abscisic acid uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferases play a crucial role in abscisic acid homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ting; Xu, Zheng-Yi; Park, Youngmin; Kim, Dae Heon; Lee, Yongjik; Hwang, Inhwan

    2014-05-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is crucial for plant growth and adaptive responses to various stress conditions. Plants continuously adjust the ABA level to meet physiological needs, but how ABA homeostasis occurs is not fully understood. This study provides evidence that UGT71B6, an ABA uridine diphosphate glucosyltransferase (UGT), and its two closely related homologs, UGT71B7 and UGT71B8, play crucial roles in ABA homeostasis and in adaptation to dehydration, osmotic stress, and high-salinity stresses in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). UGT RNA interference plants that had low levels of these three UGT transcripts displayed hypersensitivity to exogenous ABA and high-salt conditions during germination and exhibited a defect in plant growth. However, the ectopic expression of UGT71B6 in the atbg1 (for β-glucosidase) mutant background aggravated the ABA-deficient phenotype of atbg1 mutant plants. In addition, modulation of the expression of the three UGTs affects the expression of CYP707A1 to CYP707A4, which encode ABA 8'-hydroxylases; four CYP707As were expressed at higher levels in the UGT RNA interference plants but at lower levels in the UGT71B6:GFP-overexpressing plants. Based on these data, this study proposes that UGT71B6 and its two homologs play a critical role in ABA homeostasis by converting active ABA to an inactive form (abscisic acid-glucose ester) depending on intrinsic cellular and environmental conditions in plants. PMID:24676855

  4. Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase in Arabidopsis Leaves Plays a Crucial Role in Carbon and Nitrogen Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianghua; Yi, Keke; Liu, Yu; Xie, Li; Zhou, Zhongjing; Chen, Yue; Hu, Zhanghua; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Renhu; Chen, Yunlong; Chen, Jinqing

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) is a crucial enzyme that catalyzes an irreversible primary metabolic reaction in plants. Previous studies have used transgenic plants expressing ectopic PEPC forms with diminished feedback inhibition to examine the role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. To date, the in vivo role of PEPC in carbon and nitrogen metabolism has not been analyzed in plants. In this study, we examined the role of PEPC in plants, demonstrating that PPC1 and PPC2 were highly expressed genes encoding PEPC in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves and that PPC1 and PPC2 accounted for approximately 93% of total PEPC activity in the leaves. A double mutant, ppc1/ppc2, was constructed that exhibited a severe growth-arrest phenotype. The ppc1/ppc2 mutant accumulated more starch and sucrose than wild-type plants when seedlings were grown under normal conditions. Physiological and metabolic analysis revealed that decreased PEPC activity in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant greatly reduced the synthesis of malate and citrate and severely suppressed ammonium assimilation. Furthermore, nitrate levels in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant were significantly lower than those in wild-type plants due to the suppression of ammonium assimilation. Interestingly, starch and sucrose accumulation could be prevented and nitrate levels could be maintained by supplying the ppc1/ppc2 mutant with exogenous malate and glutamate, suggesting that low nitrogen status resulted in the alteration of carbon metabolism and prompted the accumulation of starch and sucrose in the ppc1/ppc2 mutant. Our results demonstrate that PEPC in leaves plays a crucial role in modulating the balance of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in Arabidopsis. PMID:25588735

  5. ING2 (inhibitor of growth protein-2) plays a crucial role in preimplantation development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lin; Wang, Pei; Zhang, Juanjuan; Heng, Boon Chin; Tong, Guo Qing

    2016-02-01

    ING2 (inhibitor of growth protein-2) is a member of the ING-gene family and participates in diverse cellular processes involving tumor suppression, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, and cellular senescence. As a subunit of the Sin3 histone deacetylase complex co-repressor complex, ING2 binds to H3K4me3 to regulate chromatin modification and gene expression. Additionally, ING2 recruits histone methyltransferase (HMT) activity for gene repression, which is independent of the HDAC class I or II pathway. However, the physiological function of ING2 in mouse preimplantation embryo development has not yet been characterized previously. The expression, localization and function of ING2 during preimplantation development were investigated in this study. We showed increasing expression of ING2 within the nucleus from the 4-cell embryo stage onwards; and that down-regulation of ING2 expression by endoribonuclease-prepared small interfering RNA (esiRNA) microinjection results in developmental arrest during the morula to blastocyst transition. Embryonic cells microinjected with ING2-specific esiRNA exhibited decreased blastulation rate compared to the negative control. Further investigation of the underlying mechanism indicated that down-regulation of ING2 significantly increased expression of p21, whilst decreasing expression of HDAC1. These results suggest that ING2 may play a crucial role in the process of preimplantation embryo development through chromatin regulation.

  6. Reversible Aggregation Plays a Crucial Role on the Folding Landscape of p53 Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Daniella; Lima, Luis M. T. R.; Maia, Lenize F.; Lopez, Priscila M.; Ano Bom, Ana P.; Valente, Ana P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2004-01-01

    The role of tumor suppressor protein p53 in cell cycle control depends on its flexible and partially unstructured conformation, which makes it crucial to understand its folding landscape. Here we report an intermediate structure of the core domain of the tumor suppressor protein p53 (p53C) during equilibrium and kinetic folding/unfolding transitions induced by guanidinium chloride. This partially folded structure was undetectable when investigated by intrinsic fluorescence. Indeed, the fluorescence data showed a simple two-state transition. On the other hand, analysis of far ultraviolet circular dichroism in 1.0 M guanidinium chloride demonstrated a high content of secondary structure, and the use of an extrinsic fluorescent probe, 4,4′-dianilino-1,1′ binaphthyl-5,5′-disulfonic acid, indicated an increase in exposure of the hydrophobic core at 1 M guanidinium chloride. This partially folded conformation of p53C was plagued by aggregation, as suggested by one-dimensional NMR and demonstrated by light-scattering and gel-filtration chromatography. Dissociation by high pressure of these aggregates reveals the reversibility of the process and that the aggregates have water-excluded cavities. Kinetic measurements show that the intermediate formed in a parallel reaction between unfolded and folded structures and that it is under fine energetic control. They are not only crucial to the folding pathway of p53C but may explain as well the vulnerability of p53C to undergo departure of the native to an inactive state, which makes the cell susceptible to malignant transformation. PMID:15298872

  7. Trichoderma viride Laccase Plays a Crucial Role in Defense Mechanism against Antagonistic Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Divya, Lakshmanan; Sadasivan, C.

    2016-01-01

    Fungal laccases are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as delignification, morphogenesis, and parasitism. In addition to these functions, we suggest that fungal laccases are involved in defense mechanisms. When the laccase secreting Trichoderma viride was grown in the presence of a range of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi, laccase secretion was enhanced in response to antagonistic organisms alone. In addition, growth of antagonistic microbes was restricted by the secreting fungi. Besides, our study for the first time shows the inability of the secreting fungi (T. viride) to compete with antagonistic organism when laccase activity is inhibited, further emphasizing its involvement in rendering a survival advantage to the secreting organism. When laccase inhibitor was added to the media, the zone of inhibition exerted by the antagonist organism was more pronounced and consequently growth of T. viride was significantly restricted. Based on these observations we accentuate that, laccase plays an important role in defense mechanism and provides endurance to the organism when encountered with an antagonistic organism in its surrounding. PMID:27242756

  8. Galactose Metabolism Plays a Crucial Role in Biofilm Formation by Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Yunrong; Beauregard, Pascale B.; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Galactose is a common monosaccharide that can be utilized by all living organisms via the activities of three main enzymes that make up the Leloir pathway: GalK, GalT, and GalE. In Bacillus subtilis, the absence of GalE causes sensitivity to exogenous galactose, leading to rapid cell lysis. This effect can be attributed to the accumulation of toxic galactose metabolites, since the galE mutant is blocked in the final step of galactose catabolism. In a screen for suppressor mutants restoring viability to a galE null mutant in the presence of galactose, we identified mutations in sinR, which is the major biofilm repressor gene. These mutations caused an increase in the production of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) component of the biofilm matrix. We propose that UDP-galactose is the toxic galactose metabolite and that it is used in the synthesis of EPS. Thus, EPS production can function as a shunt mechanism for this toxic molecule. Additionally, we demonstrated that galactose metabolism genes play an essential role in B. subtilis biofilm formation and that the expressions of both the gal and eps genes are interrelated. Finally, we propose that B. subtilis and other members of the Bacillus genus may have evolved to utilize naturally occurring polymers of galactose, such as galactan, as carbon sources. PMID:22893383

  9. Trichoderma viride Laccase Plays a Crucial Role in Defense Mechanism against Antagonistic Organisms.

    PubMed

    Divya, Lakshmanan; Sadasivan, C

    2016-01-01

    Fungal laccases are involved in a variety of physiological functions such as delignification, morphogenesis, and parasitism. In addition to these functions, we suggest that fungal laccases are involved in defense mechanisms. When the laccase secreting Trichoderma viride was grown in the presence of a range of microorganisms including bacteria and fungi, laccase secretion was enhanced in response to antagonistic organisms alone. In addition, growth of antagonistic microbes was restricted by the secreting fungi. Besides, our study for the first time shows the inability of the secreting fungi (T. viride) to compete with antagonistic organism when laccase activity is inhibited, further emphasizing its involvement in rendering a survival advantage to the secreting organism. When laccase inhibitor was added to the media, the zone of inhibition exerted by the antagonist organism was more pronounced and consequently growth of T. viride was significantly restricted. Based on these observations we accentuate that, laccase plays an important role in defense mechanism and provides endurance to the organism when encountered with an antagonistic organism in its surrounding. PMID:27242756

  10. CTE Plays a Crucial Role in Health Care for the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2007-01-01

    The health care skill gap is expected to worsen, but Career and Technical Education (CTE) is playing an integral part in preparing the next generation of workers. This article discusses the efforts of Greentree Health Science Academy in addressing the need to develop the next generation of health care professionals. In collaboration with…

  11. The cell membrane plays a crucial role in survival of bacteria and archaea in extreme environments.

    PubMed

    Konings, Wil N; Albers, Sonja-Verena; Koning, Sonja; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2002-08-01

    The cytoplasmic membrane of bacteria and archaea determine to a large extent the composition of the cytoplasm. Since the ion and in particular the proton and/or the sodium ion electrochemical gradients across the membranes are crucial for the bioenergetic conditions of these microorganisms, strategies are needed to restrict the permeation of these ions across their cytoplasmic membrane. The proton and sodium permeabilities of all biological membranes increase with the temperature. Psychrophilic and mesophilic bacteria, and mesophilic, (hyper)thermophilic and halophilic archaea are capable of adjusting the lipid composition of their membranes in such a way that the proton permeability at the respective growth temperature remains low and constant (homeo-proton permeability). Thermophilic bacteria, however, have more difficulties to restrict the proton permeation across their membrane at high temperatures and these organisms have to rely on the less permeable sodium ions for maintaining a high sodium-motive force for driving their energy requiring membrane-bound processes. Transport of solutes across the bacterial and archaeal membrane is mainly catalyzed by primary ATP driven transport systems or by proton or sodium motive force driven secondary transport systems. Unlike most bacteria, hyperthermophilic bacteria and archaea prefer primary ATP-driven uptake systems for their carbon and energy sources. Several high-affinity ABC transporters for sugars from hyperthermophiles have been identified and characterized. The activities of these ABC transporters allow these organisms to thrive in their nutrient-poor environments.

  12. Understanding 'what' others do: mirror mechanisms play a crucial role in action perception.

    PubMed

    Avenanti, Alessio; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2011-06-01

    Neurophysiological and imaging studies suggest that the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) implements a mechanism that matches perceived actions to one's motor representation of similar actions (mirror mechanism) and recent lesion studies have also established that IFC is critical for action perception. However, to date causative evidence that action perception requires activation within the same populations of IFC neurons involved in action execution is lacking. In this issue, Cattaneo and colleagues provide the first direct evidence that mirror mechanisms in IFC influence action perception. We discuss the implications of these findings for the understanding of the functional role of mirror mechanisms. PMID:21653637

  13. Understanding ‘what’ others do: mirror mechanisms play a crucial role in action perception

    PubMed Central

    Avenanti, Alessio; Urgesi, Cosimo

    2011-01-01

    Neurophysiological and imaging studies suggest that the inferior frontal cortex (IFC) implements a mechanism that matches perceived actions to one’s motor representation of similar actions (mirror mechanism) and recent lesion studies have also established that IFC is critical for action perception. However, to date causative evidence that action perception requires activation within the same populations of IFC neurons involved in action execution is lacking. In this issue, Cattaneo and colleagues provide the first direct evidence that mirror mechanisms in IFC influence action perception. We discuss the implications of these findings for the understanding of the functional role of mirror mechanisms. PMID:21653637

  14. The LINC complex component Sun4 plays a crucial role in sperm head formation and fertility

    PubMed Central

    Pasch, Elisabeth; Link, Jana; Beck, Carolin; Scheuerle, Stefanie; Alsheimer, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT LINC complexes are evolutionarily conserved nuclear envelope bridges, physically connecting the nucleus to the peripheral cytoskeleton. They are pivotal for dynamic cellular and developmental processes, like nuclear migration, anchoring and positioning, meiotic chromosome movements and maintenance of cell polarity and nuclear shape. Active nuclear reshaping is a hallmark of mammalian sperm development and, by transducing cytoskeletal forces to the nuclear envelope, LINC complexes could be vital for sperm head formation as well. We here analyzed in detail the behavior and function of Sun4, a bona fide testis-specific LINC component. We demonstrate that Sun4 is solely expressed in spermatids and there localizes to the posterior nuclear envelope, likely interacting with Sun3/Nesprin1 LINC components. Our study revealed that Sun4 deficiency severely impacts the nucleocytoplasmic junction, leads to mislocalization of other LINC components and interferes with the formation of the microtubule manchette, which finally culminates in a globozoospermia-like phenotype. Together, our study provides direct evidence for a critical role of LINC complexes in mammalian sperm head formation and male fertility. PMID:26621829

  15. The Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor SGEF Plays a Crucial Role in the Formation of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kroon, Jeffrey; Welch, Christopher; Bakker, Erik N.; Matlung, Hanke L.; van den Berg, Timo K.; Sharek, Lisa; Doerschuk, Claire; Hahn, Klaus; Burridge, Keith

    2013-01-01

    The passage of leukocytes across the endothelium and into arterial walls is a critical step in the development of atherosclerosis. Previously, we showed in vitro that the RhoG guanine nucleotide exchange factor SGEF (Arhgef26) contributes to the formation of ICAM-1-induced endothelial docking structures that facilitate leukocyte transendothelial migration. To further explore the in vivo role of this protein during inflammation, we generated SGEF-deficient mice. When crossed with ApoE null mice and fed a Western diet, mice lacking SGEF showed a significant decrease in the formation of atherosclerosis in multiple aortic areas. A fluorescent biosensor revealed local activation of RhoG around bead-clustered ICAM-1 in mouse aortic endothelial cells. Notably, this activation was decreased in cells from SGEF-deficient aortas compared to wild type. In addition, scanning electron microscopy of intimal surfaces of SGEF−/− mouse aortas revealed reduced docking structures around beads that were coated with ICAM-1 antibody. Similarly, under conditions of flow, these beads adhered less stably to the luminal surface of carotid arteries from SGEF−/− mice. Taken together, these results show for the first time that a Rho-GEF, namely SGEF, contributes to the formation of atherosclerosis by promoting endothelial docking structures and thereby retention of leukocytes at athero-prone sites of inflammation experiencing high shear flow. SGEF may therefore provide a novel therapeutic target for inhibiting the development of atherosclerosis. PMID:23372835

  16. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) plays a crucial role in experimental global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Eliana Cristina de Brito; Silva, Bruno Costa; Victoria, Edna Constaza Gómez; Cardoso, Ana Clara de Souza; Miranda, Aline Silva de; Sugimoto, Michelle Adriane; Sousa, Lirlândia Pires; Carvalho, Bárbara Andrade de; Kangussu, Lucas Miranda; Silva, Daniele Gonçalves da; Rodrigues, Flávia Guimarães; Barcelos, Lucíola da Silva; Vasconcelos, Anilton César; Amaral, Flávio Almeida; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antônio Lúcio; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga

    2016-06-01

    Stroke is one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide leading to a significant clinical and socioeconomic burden. Although different mechanisms are involved in the pathogenesis of stroke, inflammatory response occurs after ischemia and contributes to the expansion of brain injury. Platelet-activating factor receptor (PAF) plays crucial roles in both physiological and pathological conditions in the brain. PAF receptor (PAFR) may be expressed on cellular and nuclear membranes of various cell types, especially leukocytes, platelets, endothelial cells, neuronal cells and microglia. Herein, using mice lacking the PAFR receptor (PAFR(-/-)), we investigate a potential role for this receptor during experimental transient global cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (BCCAo). In PAFR deficiency, we observed a significant improvement in the neurological deficits, which were associated with a reduction of brain infarcted area as evaluated by triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC). Moreover, a decrease in the percentage of necrotic cavities areas and in the frequency of ischemic neurons was also found by employing histometric analysis. In addition, in PAFR(-/-) mice there was prevention of caspase-3 activation and decreased vascular permeability and brain edema. Decreased brain levels of the cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1) by ELISA were also detected in PAFR(-/-) BCCAo animals. Taken together, our results suggest that PAFR activation might be crucial for the global brain ischemia and reperfusion injury.

  17. WDR82, a key epigenetics-related factor, plays a crucial role in normal early embryonic development in mice.

    PubMed

    Bi, Ye; Lv, Zhuo; Wang, Ying; Hai, Tang; Huo, Ran; Zhou, Zuomin; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetic regulation is considered one of the most important mechanisms by which changes in gene expression occur without changes in the underlying DNA sequence. More and more studies have shown that this kind of regulation plays a very important role during the process of early embryonic development. Methylation of histones is a special process in epigenetic regulations that plays a dual role: some activate gene expression, while some inhibit it; trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 has been shown to be a marker of gene expression activation. Previous research has led us to focus on the role of WDR82, which has been shown to recognize a subunit in the methyltransferases complex that catalyzes H3K4me3 in early embryonic development. Although it has been shown that a defect in WDR82 causes dysfunction of SETD1A/SETD1B and results in loss of H3K4me3 in human cell lines, the exact role of WDR82 in the methyltransferases complex during early embryonic development is not clear. Our study has shown that a defect in WDR82 causes dysfunction of SETD1A/SETD1B and affects the normal H3K4me3 status in the transcription start region of POU5F1, which then causes the down-regulation of POU5F1 as well as its downstream factors STAT3/BIRC5, which are responsible for the extremely high apoptotic rates of blastocysts. Finally, the result of a blocked WDR82 consists of stunted embryonic development and death. Thus, WDR82 can be considered a key epigenetic regulation-related factor crucial in the normal growth and development of embryos. PMID:21123813

  18. Modification of PCNA by ISG15 plays a crucial role in termination of error-prone translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Mi; Yang, Seung Wook; Yu, Kyung Ryun; Ka, Seung Hyun; Lee, Seong Won; Seol, Jae Hong; Jeon, Young Joo; Chung, Chin Ha

    2014-05-22

    In response to DNA damage, PCNA is mono-ubiquitinated and triggers translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) by recruiting polymerase-η. However, it remained unknown how error-prone TLS is turned off after DNA lesion bypass to prevent mutagenesis. Here we showed that ISG15 modification (ISGylation) of PCNA plays a key role in TLS termination. Upon UV irradiation, EFP, an ISG15 E3 ligase, bound to mono-ubiquitinated PCNA and promoted its ISGylation. ISGylated PCNA then tethered USP10 for deubiquitination and in turn the release of polymerase-η from PCNA. Eventually, PCNA was deISGylated by UBP43 for reloading of replicative DNA polymerases and resuming normal DNA replication. However, ISGylation-defective Lys-to-Arg mutations in PCNA or knockdown of any of ISG15, EFP, or USP10 led to persistent recruitment of mono-ubiquitinated PCNA and polymerase-η to nuclear foci, causing an increase in mutation frequency. These findings establish a crucial role of PCNA ISGylation in termination of error-prone TLS for preventing excessive mutagenesis.

  19. α1-Tubulin FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and conidiation in Fusarium asiaticum.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weiqun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Zheng, Jingwu; Yin, Yanni; Ma, Zhonghua

    2015-04-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Fusarium asiaticum contains two homologous genes FaTUA1 and FaTUA2 encoding α-tubulins. In this study, we found that FaTUA2 was dispensable for vegetative growth and sporulation in F. asiaticum. The deletion of FaTUA1 however led to dramatically reduced mycelial growth, twisted hyphae and abnormal nuclei in apical cells of hyphae. The FaTUA1 deletion mutant (ΔFaTuA1-5) also showed a significant decrease in conidiation, and produced abnormal conidia. Pathogenicity assays showed that ΔFaTuA1-5 exhibited decreased virulence on wheat head. Unexpectedly, the deletion of FaTUA1 led to resistance to high temperatures. In addition, ΔFaTuA2 showed increased sensitivity to carbendazim. Furthermore, increased FaTUA2 expression in ΔFaTuA1-5 partially restored the defects of the mutant in mycelial growth, conidial production and virulence, vice versa, increased FaTUA1 expression in the FaTUA2 deletion mutant also partially relieved the defect of the mutant in the delay of conidial germination. Taken together, these results indicate that FaTuA1 plays crucial roles in vegetative growth and development, and the functions of FaTuA1 and FaTuA2 are partially interchangeable in F. asiaticum.

  20. Human S100A10 plays a crucial role in the acquisition of the endometrial receptivity phenotype.

    PubMed

    Bissonnette, Laurence; Drissennek, Loubna; Antoine, Yannick; Tiers, Laurent; Hirtz, Christophe; Lehmann, Sylvain; Perrochia, Hélène; Bissonnette, François; Kadoch, Isaac-Jacques; Haouzi, Delphine; Hamamah, Samir

    2016-05-01

    In assisted reproduction, about 30% of embryo implantation failures are related to inadequate endometrial receptivity. To identify molecules involved in endometrial receptivity acquisition, we investigated, using a SELDI-TOF approach, the protein expression profile of early-secretory and mid-secretory endometrium samples. Among the proteins upregulated in mid-secretory endometrium, we investigated the function of S100A10 in endometrial receptivity and implantation process. S100A10 was expressed in epithelial and stromal cells of the endometrium of fertile patients during the implantation windows. Conversely, it was downregulated in the mid-secretory endometrium of infertile patients diagnosed as non-receptive. Transcriptome analysis of human endometrial epithelial and stromal cells where S100A10 was silenced by shRNA revealed the deregulation of 37 and 256 genes, respectively, related to components of the extracellular matrix and intercellular connections. Functional annotations of these deregulated genes highlighted alterations of the leukocyte extravasation signaling and angiogenesis pathways that play a crucial role during implantation. S100A10 silencing also affected the migration of primary endometrial epithelial and stromal cells, decidualization and secretory transformation of primary endometrial stromal cells and epithelial cells respectively, and promoted apoptosis in serum-starved endometrial epithelial cells. Our findings identify S100A10 as a player in endometrial receptivity acquisition. PMID:26760977

  1. Natural allelic variations of TCS1 play a crucial role in caffeine biosynthesis of tea plant and its related species.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ji-Qiang; Yao, Ming-Zhe; Ma, Chun-Lei; Ma, Jian-Qiang; Chen, Liang

    2016-03-01

    Tea caffeine synthase 1 (TCS1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the methylation of N-3 and N-1 and considered to be the most critical enzyme in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway of tea plant. This study shows that TCS1 has six types of allelic variations, namely, TCS1a, TCS1b, TCS1c, TCS1d, TCS1e, and TCS1f, with a 252 bp insertion/deletion mutation in the 5'-untranslated region. Among tea plant and its related species, TCS1a is the predominant allele, and TCS1b-f are the rare alleles that mainly appear in few wild germplasms. The full-length cDNA sequences of three new alleles, namely, TCS1d, TCS1e, and TCS1f, were isolated from specific germplasms, and all of recombinant proteins have higher caffeine synthase (CS, EC 2.1.1.160) activity than theobromine synthase (TS, EC 2.1.1.159). Amino acid residue 269 is responsible for the difference in TCS activity and substrate recognition, which was demonstrated by using site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Furthermore, natural variations in TCS1 change the transcription levels. There are two molecular mechanisms controlling the caffeine biosynthesis in low-caffeine-accumulating tea germplasms, i.e., TCS1 allele with low transcription level or its encoded protein with only TS activity. Allelic variations of TCS1 play a crucial role in caffeine biosynthesis. Taken together, our work provides valuable foundation for a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of caffeine biosynthesis in section Thea plants and useful guidance for effective breeding.

  2. Gβ-Like CpcB Plays a Crucial Role for Growth and Development of Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing; Wang, Long; Liu, Zengran; Kwon, Nak-Jung; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2013-01-01

    Growth, development, virulence and secondary metabolism in fungi are governed by heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins). A Gβ-like protein called Gib2 has been shown to function as an atypical Gβ in Gpa1-cAMP signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans. We found that the previously reported CpcB (cross pathway control B) protein is the ortholog of Gib2 in Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus fumigatus. In this report, we further characterize the roles of CpcB in governing growth, development and toxigenesis in the two aspergilli. The deletion of cpcB results in severely impaired cellular growth, delayed spore germination, and defective asexual sporulation (conidiation) in both aspergilli. Moreover, CpcB is necessary for proper expression of the key developmental activator brlA during initiation and progression of conidiation in A. nidulans and A. fumigatus. Somewhat in accordance with the previous study, the absence of cpcB results in the formation of fewer, but not micro-, cleistothecia in A. nidulans in the presence of wild type veA, an essential activator of sexual development. However, the cpcB deletion mutant cleistothecia contain no ascospores, validating that CpcB is required for progression and completion of sexual fruiting including ascosporogenesis. Furthermore, unlike the canonical GβSfaD, CpcB is not needed for the biosynthesis of the mycotoxin sterigmatocystin (ST) as the cpcB null mutant produced reduced amount of ST with unaltered STC gene expression. However, in A. fumigatus, the deletion of cpcB results in the blockage of gliotoxin (GT) production. Further genetic analyses in A. nidulans indicate that CpcB may play a central role in vegetative growth, which might be independent of FadA- and GanB-mediated signaling. A speculative model summarizing the roles of CpcB in conjunction with SfaD in A. nidulans is presented. PMID:23936193

  3. Aquaporin7 plays a crucial role in tolerance to hyperosmotic stress and in the survival of oocytes during cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Ya-Jing; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Ding, Guo-Lian; Li, Rong; Wang, Li; Jin, Li; Lin, Xian-Hua; Gao, Ling; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress may induce apoptosis of different cells. However, oocytes show tolerance to osmotic stress during cryopreservation by vitrification, which is an assisted reproductive technique. The underlying mechanism is still not understood. Here, we demonstrated that hyperosmosis produced by high concentrations of cryoprotectants, including DMSO, ethylene glycol and sucrose, significantly upregulated the protein levels of aquaporin (AQP) 7, but not AQP3 and AQP9, in mouse oocytes. Knockdown of AQP7 expression by siRNA-injection significantly reduced the survival of oocytes after vitrification. In oocytes, AQP7 was shown to bind with F-actin, a protein involved in almost all biological events. Moreover, we found that hyperosmosis could upregulate the phosphorylation levels of CPE-binding protein (CPEB) and Aurora A. Inhibition of the PI3K and PKC pathways blocked the hyperosmosis-induced upregulation of AQP7 and the phosphorylation of CPEB and Aurora A in oocytes. In conclusion, hyperosmosis could upregulate the expression of AQP7 via Aurora A/CPEB phosphorylation mediated by the PI3K and PKC pathways, and upregulation of AQP7 plays an important role in improving of tolerance to hyperosmotic stress and survival of oocytes during cryopreservation by vitrification. PMID:26634435

  4. TolC plays a crucial role in immune protection conferred by Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Peng, Bo; Li, Hui; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2016-01-01

    Although vaccines developed from live organisms have better efficacy than those developed from dead organisms, the mechanisms underlying this differential efficacy remain unexplored. In this study, we combined sub-immunoproteomics with immune challenge to investigate the action of the outer membrane proteome in the immune protection conferred by four Edwardsiella tarda whole-cell vaccines prepared via different treatments and to identify protective immunogens that play a key role in this immune protection. Thirteen spots representing five outer membrane proteins and one cytoplasmic protein were identified, and it was found that their abundance was altered in relation with the immune protective abilities of the four vaccines. Among these proteins, TolC and OmpA were found to be the key immunogens conferring the first and second highest degrees of protection, respectively. TolC was detected in the two effective vaccines (live and inactivated-30-F). The total antiserum and anti-OmpA titers were higher for the two effective vaccines than for the two ineffective vaccines (inactivated-80-F and inactivated-100). Further evidence demonstrated that the live and inactivated-30-F vaccines demonstrated stronger abilities to induce CD8+ and CD4+ T cell differentiation than the other two evaluated vaccines. Our results indicate that the outer membrane proteome changes dramatically following different treatments, which contributes to the effectiveness of whole-cell vaccines. PMID:27406266

  5. Modification of BECN1 by ISG15 plays a crucial role in autophagy regulation by type I IFN/interferon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Daichao; Zhang, Tao; Xiao, Juan; Zhu, Kezhou; Wei, Ran; Wu, Zheming; Meng, Huyan; Li, Ying; Yuan, Junying

    2015-04-01

    ISG15 (ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier), a ubiquitin-like protein, is one of the major type I IFN (interferon) effector systems. ISG15 can be conjugated to target proteins (ISGylation) via the stepwise action of E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. Conjugated ISG15 can be removed (deISGylated) from target proteins by USP18 (ubiquitin-specific peptidase 18). Here we investigated the role of deISGylation by USP18 in regulating autophagy and EGFR degradation in cells treated with type I IFNs. We show that type I IFN induced expression of ISG15 leads to ISGylation of BECN1 at Lys117, as well as Lys263, Lys265, and Lys266 which competes with Lys63 ubiquitination of BECN1. We demonstrate that ISGylation of BECN1 at Lys117, as well as Lys263, Lys265, and Lys266 serve an important role in negative regulation of intracellular processes including autophagy and EGFR degradation that are critically dependent upon the activity of class III PtdIns 3-kinase. Our studies provide fundamental new mechanistic insights into the innate immunity response implemented by type I IFNs.

  6. Brome Mosaic Virus 1a Nucleoside Triphosphatase/Helicase Domain Plays Crucial Roles in Recruiting RNA Replication Templates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Lee, Wai-Ming; Watanabe, Tokiko; Schwartz, Michael; Janda, Michael; Ahlquist, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Positive-strand RNA virus RNA replication is invariably membrane associated and frequently involves viral proteins with nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase)/helicase motifs or activities. Brome mosaic virus (BMV) encodes two RNA replication factors: 1a has a C-terminal NTPase/helicase-like domain, and 2apol has a central polymerase domain. 1a accumulates on endoplasmic reticulum membranes, recruits 2apol, and induces 50- to 70-nm membrane invaginations (spherules) serving as RNA replication compartments. 1a also recruits BMV replication templates such as genomic RNA3. In the absence of 2apol, 1a dramatically stabilizes RNA3 by transferring RNA3 to a membrane-associated, nuclease-resistant state that appears to correspond to the interior of the 1a-induced spherules. Prior results show that the 1a NTPase/helicase-like domain contributes to RNA recruitment. Here, we tested mutations in the conserved helicase motifs of 1a to further define the roles of this domain in RNA template recruitment. All 1a helicase mutations tested showed normal 1a accumulation, localization to perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum membranes, and recruitment of 2apol. Most 1a helicase mutants also supported normal spherule formation. Nevertheless, these mutations severely inhibited RNA replication and 1a-induced stabilization of RNA3 in vivo. For such 1a mutants, the membrane-associated RNA3 pool was both reduced and highly susceptible to added nuclease. Thus, 1a recruitment of viral RNA templates to a membrane-associated, nuclease-resistant state requires additional functions beyond forming spherules and recruiting RNA to membranes, and these functions depend on the 1a helicase motifs. The possibility that, similar to some double-stranded RNA viruses, the 1a NTPase/helicase-like domain may be involved in importing viral RNAs into a preformed replication compartment is discussed. PMID:16227294

  7. The mammalian efferent vestibular system plays a crucial role in the high-frequency response and short-term adaptation of the vestibuloocular reflex.

    PubMed

    Hübner, Patrick P; Khan, Serajul I; Migliaccio, Americo A

    2015-12-01

    Although anatomically well described, the functional role of the mammalian efferent vestibular system (EVS) remains unclear. Unlike in fish and reptiles, the mammalian EVS does not seem to play a role in modulation of primary afferent activity in anticipation of active head movements. However, it could play a role in modulating long-term mechanisms requiring plasticity such as vestibular adaptation. We measured the efficacy of vestibuloocular reflex (VOR) adaptation in α9-knockout mice. These mice carry a missense mutation of the gene encoding the α9 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunit. The α9 nAChR subunit is expressed in the vestibular and auditory periphery, and its loss of function could compromise peripheral input from the predominantly cholinergic EVS. We measured the VOR gain (eye velocity/head velocity) in 26 α9-knockout mice and 27 cba129 control mice. Mice were randomly assigned to one of three groups: gain-increase adaptation (1.5×), gain-decrease adaptation (0.5×), or no adaptation (baseline, 1×). After adaptation training (horizontal rotations at 0.5 Hz with peak velocity 20°/s), we measured the sinusoidal (0.2-10 Hz, 20-100°/s) and transient (1,500-6,000°/s(2)) VOR in complete darkness. α9-Knockout mice had significantly lower baseline gains compared with control mice. This difference increased with stimulus frequency (∼ 5% <1 Hz to ∼ 25% >1 Hz). Moreover, vestibular adaptation (difference in VOR gain of gain-increase and gain-decrease adaptation groups as % of gain increase) was significantly reduced in α9-knockout mice (17%) compared with control mice (53%), a reduction of ∼ 70%. Our results show that the loss of α9 nAChRs moderately affects the VOR but severely affects VOR adaptation, suggesting that the EVS plays a crucial role in vestibular plasticity. PMID:26424577

  8. Analysis of self-association of West Nile virus capsid protein and the crucial role played by Trp 69 in homodimerization.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanakantham, Raghavan; Ng, Mah-Lee

    2005-04-01

    The understanding of capsid (C) protein interactions with itself would provide important data on how the core is organized in flaviviruses during assembly. In this study, West Nile (WN) virus C protein was shown to form homodimers using yeast two-hybrid analysis in conjunction with mammalian two-hybrid and in vivo co-immunoprecipitation assays. To delineate the region on the C protein which mediates C-C dimerization, truncation studies were carried out. The results obtained clearly showed that the internal hydrophobic segment flanked by helix I and helix III of WN virus C protein is essential for the self-association of C protein. The crucial role played by Trp 69 in stabilizing the self-association of C protein was also demonstrated by mutating Trp to Gly/Arg/Phe. Substitution of the Trp residue with Gly/Arg abolished the dimerization, whereas substitution with Phe decreased the self-association significantly. The results of this study pinpoint a critical residue in the C protein that potentially plays a role in stabilizing the homotypic interaction. PMID:15721300

  9. PDX-1 and MafA play a crucial role in pancreatic beta-cell differentiation and maintenance of mature beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Kawamori, Dan; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kato, Ken; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Katakami, Naoto; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Matsuoka, Taka-Aki

    2008-05-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and maintenance of mature beta-cell function. PDX-1 expression is maintained in pancreatic precursor cells during pancreas development but becomes restricted to beta-cells in mature pancreas. In mature beta-cells, PDX-1 transactivates the insulin and other genes involved in glucose sensing and metabolism such as GLUT2 and glucokinase. MafA is a recently isolated beta-cell-specific transcription factor which functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription. Furthermore, these transcription factors play an important role in induction of insulin-producing cells in various non-beta-cells and thus could be therapeutic targets for diabetes. On the other hand, under diabetic conditions, expression and/or activities of PDX-1 and MafA in beta-cells are reduced, which leads to suppression of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. It is likely that alteration of such transcription factors explains, at least in part, the molecular mechanism for beta-cell glucose toxicity found in diabetes.

  10. Comparative proteomics of primary and secondary lutoids reveals that chitinase and glucanase play a crucial combined role in rubber particle aggregation in Hevea brasiliensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Shi, Minjing; Wang, Dan; Chen, Yueyi; Cai, Fuge; Zhang, Shixin; Wang, Limin; Tong, Zheng; Tian, Wei-Min

    2013-11-01

    Lutoids are specific vacuole-based organelles within the latex-producing laticifers in rubber tree Hevea brasiliensis. Primary and secondary lutoids are found in the primary and secondary laticifers, respectively. Although both lutoid types perform similar roles in rubber particle aggregation (RPA) and latex coagulation, they vary greatly at the morphological and proteomic levels. To compare the differential proteins and determine the shared proteins of the two lutoid types, a proteomic analysis of lutoid membranes and inclusions was performed, revealing 169 proteins that were functionally classified into 14 families. Biological function analysis revealed that most of the proteins are involved in pathogen defense, chitin catabolism, and proton transport. Comparison of the gene and protein changed patterns and determination of the specific roles of several main lutoid proteins, such as glucanase, hevamine, and hevein, demonstrated that Chitinase and glucanase appeared to play crucial synergistic roles in RPA. Integrative analysis revealed a protein-based metabolic network mediating pH and ion homeostasis, defense response, and RPA in lutoids. From these findings, we developed a modified regulation model for lutoid-mediated RPA that will deepen our understanding of potential mechanisms involved in lutoid-mediated RPA and consequent latex coagulation. PMID:23991906

  11. L-type calcium channels play a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Li; Wang, Yu; Wang, Huan; Kong, Lingmin; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Xin; Ding, Yin

    2012-08-03

    results suggest that VDCC{sub L} plays a crucial role in the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of rMSCs.

  12. Increased methylation of the MOR gene proximal promoter in primary sensory neurons plays a crucial role in the decreased analgesic effect of opioids in neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The analgesic potency of opioids is reduced in neuropathic pain. However, the molecular mechanism is not well understood. Results The present study demonstrated that increased methylation of the Mu opioid receptor (MOR) gene proximal promoter (PP) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) plays a crucial role in the decreased morphine analgesia. Subcutaneous (s.c.), intrathecal (i.t.) and intraplantar (i.pl.), not intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of morphine, the potency of morphine analgesia was significantly reduced in nerve-injured mice compared with control sham-operated mice. After peripheral nerve injury, we observed a decreased expression of MOR protein and mRNA, accompanied by an increased methylation status of MOR gene PP, in DRG. However, peripheral nerve injury could not induce a decreased expression of MOR mRNA in the spinal cord. Treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), inhibited the increased methylation of MOR gene PP and prevented the decreased expression of MOR in DRG, thereby improved systemic, spinal and periphery morphine analgesia. Conclusions Altogether, our results demonstrate that increased methylation of the MOR gene PP in DRG is required for the decreased morphine analgesia in neuropathic pain. PMID:25118039

  13. Interactions between Transmembrane Helices within Monomers of the Aquaporin AtPIP2;1 Play a Crucial Role in Tetramer Formation.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Yun-Joo; Lee, Hyun Kyung; Han, Wonhee; Kim, Dae Heon; Lee, Myoung Hui; Jeon, Jouhyun; Lee, Dong Wook; Lee, Junho; Lee, Yongjik; Lee, Juhun; Kim, Jin Seok; Cho, Yunje; Han, Jin-Kwan; Hwang, Inhwan

    2016-07-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) is a water channel protein found in various subcellular membranes of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The physiological functions of AQPs have been elucidated in many organisms. However, understanding their biogenesis remains elusive, particularly regarding how they assemble into tetramers. Here, we investigated the amino acid residues involved in the tetramer formation of the Arabidopsis plasma membrane AQP AtPIP2;1 using extensive amino acid substitution mutagenesis. The mutant proteins V41A/E44A, F51A/L52A, F87A/I91A, F92A/I93A, V95A/Y96A, and H216A/L217A, harboring alanine substitutions in the transmembrane (TM) helices of AtPIP2;1 polymerized into multiple oligomeric complexes with a variable number of subunits greater than four. Moreover, these mutant proteins failed to traffic to the plasma membrane, instead of accumulating in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Structure-based modeling revealed that these residues are largely involved in interactions between TM helices within monomers. These results suggest that inter-TM interactions occurring both within and between monomers play crucial roles in tetramer formation in the AtPIP2;1 complex. Moreover, the assembly of AtPIP2;1 tetramers is critical for their trafficking from the ER to the plasma membrane, as well as water permeability. PMID:27142778

  14. A functional cyclic AMP response element plays a crucial role in neuroendocrine cell type-specific expression of the secretory granule protein chromogranin A.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Mahata, S K; Mahata, M; Webster, N J; Parmer, R J; O'Connor, D T

    1995-01-01

    specificity of the promoter. The functional activity of the CRE site was confirmed through studies of the endogenous chromogranin A gene. Northern mRNA analysis showed that expression of the endogenous chromogranin A gene was stimulated seven- to eightfold by cAMP in PC12 cells, whereas no induction occurred in the NIH3T3 cells. Similar cAMP induction was obtained with the transfected chromogranin A promoter in PC12 cells, and abolition of the CRE site (by deletion or point mutation) eliminated the induction. Thus, the CRE site in the chromogranin A proximal promoter is functional and plays a crucial, indeed indispensable, role in neuroendocrine-specific expression of the gene. These results also provide insight into transcriptional mechanisms governing acquisition of the neuroendocrine secretory phenotype. Images PMID:7615829

  15. Bovine papillomavirus type 2 infects the urinary bladder of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and plays a crucial role in bubaline urothelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Roperto, Sante; Russo, Valeria; Ozkul, Ayhan; Sepici-Dincel, Aylin; Maiolino, Paola; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Marcus, Ioan; Esposito, Iolanda; Riccardi, Marita Georgia; Roperto, Franco

    2013-02-01

    Bovine papillomavirus type 2 (BPV-2) has been shown to infect and play a role in urinary bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes grazed on pastures with ferns from the Marmara and Black Sea Regions of Turkey. BPV-2 DNA has been found in both neoplastic and non-neoplastic lesions of the urinary bladder. Furthermore, this virus may be a normal inhabitant of the urinary bladder since BPV-2 DNA has also been detected in clinically normal buffaloes. The viral activation by fern immunosuppressant or carcinogen may trigger the urothelial cell transformation. The E5 oncoprotein was solely detected in urothelial tumours and appeared to be co-localized with the overexpressed and phosphorylated platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptor in a double-colour immunofluorescence assay. Our results indicate that the E5-PDGF β receptor interaction also occurs in spontaneous tumours of the bubaline urinary bladder, revealing an additional role of BPV-2 in bladder carcinogenesis of buffaloes.

  16. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    PubMed

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:26995646

  17. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  18. β-Ketoacyl-acyl Carrier Protein Synthase I (KASI) Plays Crucial Roles in the Plant Growth and Fatty Acids Synthesis in Tobacco.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tianquan; Xu, Ronghua; Chen, Jianghua; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids serve many functions in plants, but the effects of some key genes involved in fatty acids biosynthesis on plants growth and development are not well understood yet. To understand the functions of 3-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier protein synthase I (KASI) in tobacco, we isolated two KASI homologs, which we have designated NtKASI-1 and NtKASI-2. Expression analysis showed that these two KASI genes were transcribed constitutively in all tissues examined. Over-expression of NtKASI-1 in tobacco changed the fatty acid content in leaves, whereas over-expressed lines of NtKASI-2 exhibited distinct phenotypic features such as slightly variegated leaves and reduction of the fatty acid content in leaves, similar to the silencing plants of NtKASI-1 gene. Interestingly, the silencing of NtKASI-2 gene had no discernibly altered phenotypes compared to wild type. The double silencing plants of these two genes enhanced the phenotypic changes during vegetative and reproductive growth compared to wild type. These results uncovered that these two KASI genes had the partially functional redundancy, and that the KASI genes played a key role in regulating fatty acids synthesis and in mediating plant growth and development in tobacco. PMID:27509494

  19. The N-terminal domain plays a crucial role in the structure of a full-length human mitochondrial Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Kereïche, Sami; Kováčik, Lubomír; Bednár, Jan; Pevala, Vladimír; Kunová, Nina; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Bauer, Jacob; Ambro, Ľuboš; Bellová, Jana; Kutejová, Eva; Raška, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Lon is an essential, multitasking AAA(+) protease regulating many cellular processes in species across all kingdoms of life. Altered expression levels of the human mitochondrial Lon protease (hLon) are linked to serious diseases including myopathies, paraplegia, and cancer. Here, we present the first 3D structure of full-length hLon using cryo-electron microscopy. hLon has a unique three-dimensional structure, in which the proteolytic and ATP-binding domains (AP-domain) form a hexameric chamber, while the N-terminal domain is arranged as a trimer of dimers. These two domains are linked by a narrow trimeric channel composed likely of coiled-coil helices. In the presence of AMP-PNP, the AP-domain has a closed-ring conformation and its N-terminal entry gate appears closed, but in ADP binding, it switches to a lock-washer conformation and its N-terminal gate opens, which is accompanied by a rearrangement of the N-terminal domain. We have also found that both the enzymatic activities and the 3D structure of a hLon mutant lacking the first 156 amino acids are severely disturbed, showing that hLon's N-terminal domains are crucial for the overall structure of the hLon, maintaining a conformation allowing its proper functioning. PMID:27632940

  20. The Thioredoxin GbNRX1 Plays a Crucial Role in Homeostasis of Apoplastic Reactive Oxygen Species in Response to Verticillium dahliae Infection in Cotton1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jie; Sun, Shu-Tao; Feng, De-Qin; Yang, Chun-Lin; Sun, Yong-Duo; Zhong, Nai-Qin

    2016-01-01

    Examining the proteins that plants secrete into the apoplast in response to pathogen attack provides crucial information for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant innate immunity. In this study, we analyzed the changes in the root apoplast secretome of the Verticillium wilt-resistant island cotton cv Hai 7124 (Gossypium barbadense) upon infection with Verticillium dahliae. Two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis identified 68 significantly altered spots, corresponding to 49 different proteins. Gene ontology annotation indicated that most of these proteins function in reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism and defense response. Of the ROS-related proteins identified, we further characterized a thioredoxin, GbNRX1, which increased in abundance in response to V. dahliae challenge, finding that GbNRX1 functions in apoplastic ROS scavenging after the ROS burst that occurs upon recognition of V. dahliae. Silencing of GbNRX1 resulted in defective dissipation of apoplastic ROS, which led to higher ROS accumulation in protoplasts. As a result, the GbNRX1-silenced plants showed reduced wilt resistance, indicating that the initial defense response in the root apoplast requires the antioxidant activity of GbNRX1. Together, our results demonstrate that apoplastic ROS generation and scavenging occur in tandem in response to pathogen attack; also, the rapid balancing of redox to maintain homeostasis after the ROS burst, which involves GbNRX1, is critical for the apoplastic immune response. PMID:26869704

  1. The N-terminal domain plays a crucial role in the structure of a full-length human mitochondrial Lon protease

    PubMed Central

    Kereïche, Sami; Kováčik, Lubomír; Bednár, Jan; Pevala, Vladimír; Kunová, Nina; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Bauer, Jacob; Ambro, Ľuboš; Bellová, Jana; Kutejová, Eva; Raška, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Lon is an essential, multitasking AAA+ protease regulating many cellular processes in species across all kingdoms of life. Altered expression levels of the human mitochondrial Lon protease (hLon) are linked to serious diseases including myopathies, paraplegia, and cancer. Here, we present the first 3D structure of full-length hLon using cryo-electron microscopy. hLon has a unique three-dimensional structure, in which the proteolytic and ATP-binding domains (AP-domain) form a hexameric chamber, while the N-terminal domain is arranged as a trimer of dimers. These two domains are linked by a narrow trimeric channel composed likely of coiled-coil helices. In the presence of AMP-PNP, the AP-domain has a closed-ring conformation and its N-terminal entry gate appears closed, but in ADP binding, it switches to a lock-washer conformation and its N-terminal gate opens, which is accompanied by a rearrangement of the N-terminal domain. We have also found that both the enzymatic activities and the 3D structure of a hLon mutant lacking the first 156 amino acids are severely disturbed, showing that hLon’s N-terminal domains are crucial for the overall structure of the hLon, maintaining a conformation allowing its proper functioning. PMID:27632940

  2. Amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region plays a crucial role in antibacterial activity of HMGB1

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Antibacterial activity is a novel function of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). However, the functional site for this new effect is presently unknown. Methods and Results In this study, recombinant human HMGB1 A box and B box (rHMGB1 A box, rHMGB1 B box), recombinant human HMGB1 (rHMGB1) and the truncated C-terminal acidic tail mutant (tHMGB1) were prepared by the prokaryotic expression system. The C-terminal acidic tail (C peptide) was synthesized, which was composed of 30 amino acid residues. Antibacterial assays showed that both the full length rHMGB1 and the synthetic C peptide alone could efficiently inhibit bacteria proliferation, but rHMGB1 A box and B box, and tHMGB1 lacking the C-terminal acidic tail had no antibacterial function. These results suggest that C-terminal acidic tail is the key region for the antibacterial activity of HMGB1. Furthermore, we prepared eleven different deleted mutants lacking several amino acid residues in C-terminal acidic tail of HMGB1. Antibacterial assays of these mutants demonstrate that the amino acid residues 201-205 in C-terminal acidic tail region is the core functional site for the antibacterial activity of the molecule. Conclusion In sum, these results define the key region and the crucial site in HMGB1 for its antibacterial function, which is helpful to illustrating the antibacterial mechanisms of HMGB1. PMID:19751520

  3. The N-terminal domain plays a crucial role in the structure of a full-length human mitochondrial Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Kereïche, Sami; Kováčik, Lubomír; Bednár, Jan; Pevala, Vladimír; Kunová, Nina; Ondrovičová, Gabriela; Bauer, Jacob; Ambro, Ľuboš; Bellová, Jana; Kutejová, Eva; Raška, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Lon is an essential, multitasking AAA(+) protease regulating many cellular processes in species across all kingdoms of life. Altered expression levels of the human mitochondrial Lon protease (hLon) are linked to serious diseases including myopathies, paraplegia, and cancer. Here, we present the first 3D structure of full-length hLon using cryo-electron microscopy. hLon has a unique three-dimensional structure, in which the proteolytic and ATP-binding domains (AP-domain) form a hexameric chamber, while the N-terminal domain is arranged as a trimer of dimers. These two domains are linked by a narrow trimeric channel composed likely of coiled-coil helices. In the presence of AMP-PNP, the AP-domain has a closed-ring conformation and its N-terminal entry gate appears closed, but in ADP binding, it switches to a lock-washer conformation and its N-terminal gate opens, which is accompanied by a rearrangement of the N-terminal domain. We have also found that both the enzymatic activities and the 3D structure of a hLon mutant lacking the first 156 amino acids are severely disturbed, showing that hLon's N-terminal domains are crucial for the overall structure of the hLon, maintaining a conformation allowing its proper functioning.

  4. Evidence for Emergency Vaccination Having Played a Crucial Role to Control the 1965/66 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Zingg, Dana; Häsler, Stephan; Schuepbach-Regula, Gertraud; Schwermer, Heinzpeter; Dürr, Salome

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease that caused several large outbreaks in Europe in the last century. The last important outbreak in Switzerland took place in 1965/66 and affected more than 900 premises and more than 50,000 animals were slaughtered. Large-scale emergency vaccination of the cattle and pig population has been applied to control the epidemic. In recent years, many studies have used infectious disease models to assess the impact of different disease control measures, including models developed for diseases exotic for the specific region of interest. Often, the absence of real outbreak data makes a validation of such models impossible. This study aimed to evaluate whether a spatial, stochastic simulation model (the Davis Animal Disease Simulation model) can predict the course of a Swiss FMD epidemic based on the available historic input data on population structure, contact rates, epidemiology of the virus, and quality of the vaccine. In addition, the potential outcome of the 1965/66 FMD epidemic without application of vaccination was investigated. Comparing the model outcomes to reality, only the largest 10% of the simulated outbreaks approximated the number of animals being culled. However, the simulation model highly overestimated the number of culled premises. While the outbreak duration could not be well reproduced by the model compared to the 1965/66 epidemic, it was able to accurately estimate the size of the area infected. Without application of vaccination, the model predicted a much higher mean number of culled animals than with vaccination, demonstrating that vaccination was likely crucial in disease control for the Swiss FMD outbreak in 1965/66. The study demonstrated the feasibility to analyze historical outbreak data with modern analytical tools. However, it also confirmed that predicted epidemics from a most carefully parameterized model cannot integrate all eventualities of a real epidemic. Therefore, decision

  5. Evidence for Emergency Vaccination Having Played a Crucial Role to Control the 1965/66 Foot-and-Mouth Disease Outbreak in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Zingg, Dana; Häsler, Stephan; Schuepbach-Regula, Gertraud; Schwermer, Heinzpeter; Dürr, Salome

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious disease that caused several large outbreaks in Europe in the last century. The last important outbreak in Switzerland took place in 1965/66 and affected more than 900 premises and more than 50,000 animals were slaughtered. Large-scale emergency vaccination of the cattle and pig population has been applied to control the epidemic. In recent years, many studies have used infectious disease models to assess the impact of different disease control measures, including models developed for diseases exotic for the specific region of interest. Often, the absence of real outbreak data makes a validation of such models impossible. This study aimed to evaluate whether a spatial, stochastic simulation model (the Davis Animal Disease Simulation model) can predict the course of a Swiss FMD epidemic based on the available historic input data on population structure, contact rates, epidemiology of the virus, and quality of the vaccine. In addition, the potential outcome of the 1965/66 FMD epidemic without application of vaccination was investigated. Comparing the model outcomes to reality, only the largest 10% of the simulated outbreaks approximated the number of animals being culled. However, the simulation model highly overestimated the number of culled premises. While the outbreak duration could not be well reproduced by the model compared to the 1965/66 epidemic, it was able to accurately estimate the size of the area infected. Without application of vaccination, the model predicted a much higher mean number of culled animals than with vaccination, demonstrating that vaccination was likely crucial in disease control for the Swiss FMD outbreak in 1965/66. The study demonstrated the feasibility to analyze historical outbreak data with modern analytical tools. However, it also confirmed that predicted epidemics from a most carefully parameterized model cannot integrate all eventualities of a real epidemic. Therefore, decision

  6. The Arabidopsis homolog of human minor spliceosomal protein U11-48K plays a crucial role in U12 intron splicing and plant development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tao; Kim, Bo Mi; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung

    2016-05-01

    The minor U12 introns are removed from precursor mRNAs by the U12 intron-specific minor spliceosome. Among the seven ribonucleoproteins unique to the minor spliceosome, denoted as U11/U12-20K, U11/U12-25K, U11/U12-31K, U11/U12-65K, U11-35K, U11-48K, and U11-59K, the roles of only U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K have been demonstrated in U12 intron splicing and plant development. Here, the functional role of the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K in U12 intron splicing and the development of Arabidopsis thaliana was examined using transgenic knockdown plants. The u11-48k mutants exhibited several defects in growth and development, such as severely arrested primary inflorescence stems, formation of serrated leaves, production of many rosette leaves after bolting, and delayed senescence. The splicing of most U12 introns analyzed was impaired in the u11-48k mutants. Comparative analysis of the splicing defects and phenotypes among the u11/u12-31k, u11-48k, and u11/12-65k mutants showed that the severity of abnormal development was closely correlated with the degree of impairment in U12 intron splicing. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K protein, as well as U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K proteins, is necessary for correct splicing of U12 introns and normal plant growth and development. PMID:27091878

  7. Intestinal microflora plays a crucial role in the genotoxicity of the cooked food mutagen 2-amino-3-methylimidazo [4,5-f]quinoline.

    PubMed

    Kassie, F; Rabot, S; Kundi, M; Chabicovsky, M; Qin, H M; Knasmüller, S

    2001-10-01

    We investigated the impact of the intestinal microflora on the genotoxicity of 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f] quinoline (IQ), a mutagenic/carcinogenic heterocyclic amine commonly found in fried meats and fish. In parallel, we also examined the effect of the microflora on the protective effect of glucotropaeolin (GT), a glucosinolate contained in cruciferous vegetables, towards IQ-induced genotoxic effect. Conventional (NF), human flora associated (HFA) and germ free (GF) rats were treated either with 90 mg/kg IQ alone, 150 mg/kg GT alone or a combination of the two by gavage and DNA damage was determined in liver and colon cells using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay. IQ caused a significant effect in both organs of all groups. However, DNA damage was most pronounced in NF animals. In colon cells, DNA migration was 6-fold more in IQ-exposed rats as compared with untreated controls. The effect measured with liver cells was similar. In comparison to NF rats, in HFA rats, tail length of the comets was 22 and 53% lower in liver and colon cells, respectively. Significantly weaker effects were seen in GF animals (66 and 75% lower damage in hepatocytes and colonocytes, respectively, than in NF animals). Pretreatment with GT led to a complete reduction of IQ-induced DNA damage regardless of the microbial status of the animals. In addition, a moderate decrease in spontaneous DNA damage was seen in animals that received GT alone. Our results show that the microflora has a strong impact on the genotoxic effects of IQ. We conclude that the alkaline SCGE assay with rats harbouring different flora opens new possibilities to investigate the role of intestinal bacteria on health risks caused by dietary carcinogens. PMID:11577015

  8. Modulation of Macrophage Polarization and HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 Cascade Plays a Crucial Role for Cardiac Remodeling in Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice.

    PubMed

    Karuppagounder, Vengadeshprabhu; Giridharan, Vijayasree V; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Palaniyandi, Suresh S; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna; Quevedo, Joao; Watanabe, Kenichi; Konishi, Tetsuya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of macrophage polarization in aging heart. Macrophage differentiation is pathogenically linked to many inflammatory and immune disorders. It is often preceded by myocardial inflammation, which is characterized by increased cardiac damage and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that senescence accelerated-prone (SAMP8) mice cardiac tissue would develop macrophage polarization compared with senescence-resistant control (SAMR1) mice. Both SAMP8 and SAMR1 mice were sacrificed when they became six month old. We evaluated, histo-pathological changes and modifications in protein expression by Western blotting and immuno-histochemical staining for M1 and M2 macrophage markers, high mobility group protein (HMG)B1 and its cascade proteins, pro-inflammatory factors and inflammatory cytokines in cardiac tissue. We observed significant upregulation of HMGB1, toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, nuclear factor (NF)κB p65, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, cyclooxygenase (COX)2, interferon (IFN)γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and M1 like macrophage specific marker cluster of differentiation (CD)68 expressions in SAMP8 heart. In contrast, M2 macrophage specific marker CD36, and IL-10 expressions were down-regulated in SAMP8 mice. The results from the study demonstrated that, HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 signaling cascade and induction of phenotypic switching to M1 macrophage polarization in SAMP8 mice heart would be one of the possible reasons behind the cardiac dysfunction and thus it could become an important therapeutic target to improve the age related cardiac dysfunction.

  9. Modulation of Macrophage Polarization and HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 Cascade Plays a Crucial Role for Cardiac Remodeling in Senescence-Accelerated Prone Mice

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Somasundaram; Sreedhar, Remya; Palaniyandi, Suresh S.; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna; Quevedo, Joao; Watanabe, Kenichi; Konishi, Tetsuya; Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of macrophage polarization in aging heart. Macrophage differentiation is pathogenically linked to many inflammatory and immune disorders. It is often preceded by myocardial inflammation, which is characterized by increased cardiac damage and pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. Therefore, we investigated the hypothesis that senescence accelerated-prone (SAMP8) mice cardiac tissue would develop macrophage polarization compared with senescence-resistant control (SAMR1) mice. Both SAMP8 and SAMR1 mice were sacrificed when they became six month old. We evaluated, histo-pathological changes and modifications in protein expression by Western blotting and immuno-histochemical staining for M1 and M2 macrophage markers, high mobility group protein (HMG)B1 and its cascade proteins, pro-inflammatory factors and inflammatory cytokines in cardiac tissue. We observed significant upregulation of HMGB1, toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4, nuclear factor (NF)κB p65, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, cyclooxygenase (COX)2, interferon (IFN)γ, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and M1 like macrophage specific marker cluster of differentiation (CD)68 expressions in SAMP8 heart. In contrast, M2 macrophage specific marker CD36, and IL-10 expressions were down-regulated in SAMP8 mice. The results from the study demonstrated that, HMGB1-TLR2/TLR4 signaling cascade and induction of phenotypic switching to M1 macrophage polarization in SAMP8 mice heart would be one of the possible reasons behind the cardiac dysfunction and thus it could become an important therapeutic target to improve the age related cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27070323

  10. Glucose-regulated protein 78 may play a crucial role in promoting the pulmonary microvascular remodeling in a rat model of hepatopulmonary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huiying; Lv, Minli; Zhao, Zhongfu; Jia, Jiantao; Zhang, Lili; Xiao, Peng; Wang, Limin; Li, Chen; Ji, Jingquan; Tian, Xiaoxia; Li, Xujiong; Fan, Yimin; Lai, Lina; Liu, Yan; Li, Baohong; Zhang, Cuiying; Liu, Mingshe; Guo, Jianhong; Han, Dewu; Ji, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study is to investigate the role of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) in the pulmonary microvascular remodeling during hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) development. Methods The rat models with liver cirrhosis and HPS were induced by multiple pathogenic factors for 4 to 8 wk. The concentrations of alanine transferase (ALT) and endotoxin in plasma were detected in the models, followed by the detection of GRP78 expression. RT-PCR, quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting were employed to assess the mRNA and protein expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), respectively. Immunohistochemistry staining was used to examine the expression of a specific vascular marker, factor VIII-related antigen (FVIII-RAg), and several cell proliferation- and apoptosis-related proteins, including CHOP/GADD153, caspase-12, Bcl-2 and nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Results The levels of endotoxin and ALT in plasma were gradually increased as the disease progressed, so did GRP78, which were in a positive correlation. The expression levels of VEGF (both mRNA and protein) and FVIII-RAg were significantly elevated in the HPS models, indicating active angiogenesis, which was also positively correlated with GRP78 expression. Furthermore, the expression levels of the pro-apoptotic proteins of CHOP/GADD153 and caspase-12 were dramatically decreased, while the anti-apoptotic proteins of Bcl-2 and NF-κB were significantly elevated, in the HPS models. There were also close correlations between these proteins and GRP78. Conclusions Over-expression of GRP78 in lungs may be the critical pathogenic factor for HPS. Through promoting cell proliferation and survival and inhibiting apoptosis, GRP78 may promote the pulmonary microvascular remodeling in HPS pathogenesis. Our results provide a potential therapeutic target for clinical prevention and treatment for HPS and related complications. PMID:24768185

  11. Monocytes play an IL-12-dependent crucial role in driving cord blood NK cells to produce IFN-g in response to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Guilmot, Aline; Bosse, Julie; Carlier, Yves; Truyens, Carine

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that foetuses congenitally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi, the agent of Chagas disease, mount an adult-like parasite-specific CD8(+) T-cell response, producing IFN-g, and present an altered NK cell phenotype, possibly reflecting a post-activation state supported by the ability of the parasite to trigger IFN-g synthesis by NK cells in vitro. We here extended our knowledge on NK cell activation by the parasite. We compared the ability of T. cruzi to activate cord blood and adult NK cells from healthy individuals. Twenty-four hours co-culture of cord blood mononuclear cells with T. cruzi trypomastigotes and IL-15 induced high accumulation of IFN-g transcripts and IFN-g release. TNF-a, but not IL-10, was also produced. This was associated with up-regulation of CD69 and CD54, and down-regulation of CD62L on NK cells. The CD56(bright) NK cell subset was the major IFN-g responding subset (up to 70% IFN-g-positive cells), while CD56(dim) NK cells produced IFN-g to a lesser extent. The response points to a synergy between parasites and IL-15. The neonatal response, observed in all newborns, remained however slightly inferior to that of adults. Activation of IL-15-sensitized cord blood NK cells by the parasite required contacts with live/intact parasites. In addition, it depended on the engagement of TLR-2 and 4 and involved IL-12 and cross-talk with monocytes but not with myeloid dendritic cells, as shown by the use of neutralizing antibodies and cell depletion. This work highlights the ability of T. cruzi to trigger a robust IFN-g response by IL-15-sensitized human neonatal NK cells and the important role of monocytes in it, which might perhaps partially compensate for the neonatal defects of DCs. It suggests that monocyte- and IL-12- dependent IFN-g release by NK cells is a potentially important innate immune response pathway allowing T. cruzi to favour a type 1 immune response in neonates.

  12. Colleges Play Crucial Role in Military's Restructuring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Across the U.S., colleges like Anne Arundel Community College (Maryland) are devising strategies and designing curricula to meet the demands created by the substantial troop shifts. They are adding degree and certificate programs and refashioning or expanding others, in areas as diverse as network security, procurement and contracting, and…

  13. Role-Playing Mitosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyn, Mark A.; Stegink, Steven J.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a role playing activity that actively engages students in the learning process of mitosis. Students play either chromosomes carrying information, or cells in the cell membrane. (Contains 11 references.) (Author/YDS)

  14. The crucial role of recess in school.

    PubMed

    Murray, Robert; Ramstetter, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting the optimal development of the whole child. A growing trend toward reallocating time in school to accentuate the more academic subjects has put this important facet of a child's school day at risk. Recess serves as a necessary break from the rigors of concentrated, academic challenges in the classroom. But equally important is the fact that safe and well-supervised recess offers cognitive, social, emotional, and physical benefits that may not be fully appreciated when a decision is made to diminish it. Recess is unique from, and a complement to, physical education--not a substitute for it. The American Academy of Pediatrics believes that recess is a crucial and necessary component of a child's development and, as such, it should not be withheld for punitive or academic reasons.

  15. Role Playing and Skits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letwin, Robert, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    Explores non-scripted role playing, dialogue role playing, sociodrama, and skits as variations of simulation techniques. Provides step-by-step guidelines for conducting such sessions. Successful Meetings, Bill Communications, Inc., 1422 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 19102. Subscription Rates: yearly (US, Canada, Mexico) $14.00; elsewhere,…

  16. Arabidopsis GLUTATHIONE REDUCTASE1 plays a crucial role in leaf responses to intracellular hydrogen peroxide and in ensuring appropriate gene expression through both salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Mhamdi, Amna; Hager, Jutta; Chaouch, Sejir; Queval, Guillaume; Han, Yi; Taconnat, Ludivine; Saindrenan, Patrick; Gouia, Houda; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Noctor, Graham

    2010-07-01

    Glutathione is a major cellular thiol that is maintained in the reduced state by glutathione reductase (GR), which is encoded by two genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana; GR1 and GR2). This study addressed the role of GR1 in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) responses through a combined genetic, transcriptomic, and redox profiling approach. To identify the potential role of changes in glutathione status in H(2)O(2) signaling, gr1 mutants, which show a constitutive increase in oxidized glutathione (GSSG), were compared with a catalase-deficient background (cat2), in which GSSG accumulation is conditionally driven by H(2)O(2). Parallel transcriptomics analysis of gr1 and cat2 identified overlapping gene expression profiles that in both lines were dependent on growth daylength. Overlapping genes included phytohormone-associated genes, in particular implicating glutathione oxidation state in the regulation of jasmonic acid signaling. Direct analysis of H(2)O(2)-glutathione interactions in cat2 gr1 double mutants established that GR1-dependent glutathione status is required for multiple responses to increased H(2)O(2) availability, including limitation of lesion formation, accumulation of salicylic acid, induction of pathogenesis-related genes, and signaling through jasmonic acid pathways. Modulation of these responses in cat2 gr1 was linked to dramatic GSSG accumulation and modified expression of specific glutaredoxins and glutathione S-transferases, but there is little or no evidence of generalized oxidative stress or changes in thioredoxin-associated gene expression. We conclude that GR1 plays a crucial role in daylength-dependent redox signaling and that this function cannot be replaced by the second Arabidopsis GR gene or by thiol systems such as the thioredoxin system.

  17. Pentatricopeptide repeat motifs in the processing enzyme PRORP1 in Arabidopsis thaliana play a crucial role in recognition of nucleotide bases at TψC loop in precursor tRNAs.

    PubMed

    Imai, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Maeda, Taku; Nakayama, Kaoru; Gao, Xuzhu; Nakashima, Takashi; Kakuta, Yoshimitsu; Kimura, Makoto

    2014-08-01

    Proteinaceous RNase P (PRORP1) in Arabidopsis thaliana is an endoribonuclease that catalyzes hydrolysis to remove the 5'-leader sequence of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). PRORP1 is composed of pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motifs, a central linker region, and a metal nuclease domain, the NYN domain. The PPR motifs are single-stranded RNA-binding motifs that recognize bases in a modular fashion. To obtain insight into the mechanism by which the PPR motifs in PRORP1 recognize a target sequence in catalysis, N-terminal successive deletion mutants were overproduced in Escherichia coli, and the resulting proteins were characterized in terms of enzymatic activity using chloroplast pre-tRNA(Phe) as a substrate. Although Δ89, in which all PPR motifs are present, retained the pre-tRNA cleavage activity, Δ129 devoid of the first PPR motif (PPR1) had significantly reduced cleavage activity. Likewise, deletions of the second (PPR2) or third PPR (PPR3) motif abolished the cleavage activity, suggesting that PPR motifs play a crucial role in catalysis. A proposed recognition code for PPR motifs predicted that PPR2-PPR5 in PRORP1 recognize C, A/U, A, and U, respectively, whose sequence is in good agreement with C56-A57-A58-A59 in the TψC loop in pre-tRNA(Phe). Mutational analyses of nucleotide residues in the TψC loop as well as nucleotide-specifying residues (NSRs) in PPR motifs further suggested that PPR2 and PPR3 in PRORP1 favorably recognize nucleotide bases C56 and A57 at the TψC loop in pre-tRNA(Phe), respectively. This prediction and previous biochemical data were combined to construct a fitting model of tRNA onto PRORP1, showing that the mechanism by which PRORP1 recognizes pre-tRNAs appears to be distinct from that by bacterial RNase P.

  18. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  19. Antimicrobial peptide LL-37 along with peptidoglycan drive monocyte polarization toward CD14(high)CD16(+) subset and may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis guttata.

    PubMed

    Qian, Lei; Chen, Wei; Sun, Wen; Li, Ming; Zheng, Renshan; Qian, Qing; Lv, Lianzheng

    2015-01-01

    The human cathelicidin LL-37 peptide is overexpressed in psoriasis and has been demonstrated to be a multifunctional modulator of innate immune response elements, including monocytes. Monocytes, categorized into three populations based on the cell surface expression of CD14 and CD16, are activated in psoriasis guttate and are commonly triggered by streptococcal infections. Peptidoglycan (PGN) is a major cell-wall component of streptococcus, and an increasing number of PGN-containing cells have been detected in psoriasis. Since there are independent reports of both PGN and LL-37 influencing monocytes, we tried to evaluate the effect of human LL-37 on PGN-induced monocyte activity and differentiation and subsequently studied their correlation with the pathogenesis of psoriasis guttate. The results revealed that monocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy individuals resulted in their polarization toward the CD14(high)CD16(+) subset, when cultured with PGN in the presence of the LL-37 peptide. This peptide further induced PGN-driven differentiated monocytes into immature dendritic cells (iDC), as evident by the increased expression of CD1a, CD86, and HLA-DR markers, resulting in the induction of T cell proliferation and Th17 polarization. Furthermore, our data suggested that psoriasis guttata patients have significantly higher percentages of CD14(high)CD16(+) monocytes as well as circulating levels of LL-37, soluble form of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (sTREM-1) levels, and anti-streptolysin O (ASO) levels, as compared to healthy controls. Psoriasis guttata patients also showed a positive correlation between the percentage of CD14(high)CD16(+) monocytes and the serum levels of sTREM-1 as well as the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores. Therefore, we concluded that LL-37 in synergy with PGN directs monocyte polarization and differentiation into a proinflammatory phenotype, which might play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  20. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    PubMed

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin. PMID:26883595

  1. The RNA-Binding Chaperone Hfq Is an Important Global Regulator of Gene Expression in Pasteurella multocida and Plays a Crucial Role in Production of a Number of Virulence Factors, Including Hyaluronic Acid Capsule.

    PubMed

    Mégroz, Marianne; Kleifeld, Oded; Wright, Amy; Powell, David; Harrison, Paul; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D

    2016-05-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pasteurella multocida is the causative agent of a number of economically important animal diseases, including avian fowl cholera. Numerous P. multocida virulence factors have been identified, including capsule, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and filamentous hemagglutinin, but little is known about how the expression of these virulence factors is regulated. Hfq is an RNA-binding protein that facilitates riboregulation via interaction with small noncoding RNA (sRNA) molecules and their mRNA targets. Here, we show that a P. multocida hfq mutant produces significantly less hyaluronic acid capsule during all growth phases and displays reduced in vivo fitness. Transcriptional and proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during mid-exponential-phase growth revealed altered transcript levels for 128 genes and altered protein levels for 78 proteins. Further proteomic analyses of the hfq mutant during the early exponential growth phase identified 106 proteins that were produced at altered levels. Both the transcript and protein levels for genes/proteins involved in capsule biosynthesis were reduced in the hfq mutant, as were the levels of the filamentous hemagglutinin protein PfhB2 and its secretion partner LspB2. In contrast, there were increased expression levels of three LPS biosynthesis genes, encoding proteins involved in phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine addition to LPS, suggesting that these genes are negatively regulated by Hfq-dependent mechanisms. Taken together, these data provide the first evidence that Hfq plays a crucial role in regulating the global expression of P. multocida genes, including the regulation of key P. multocida virulence factors, capsule, LPS, and filamentous hemagglutinin.

  2. The EC night-time repressor plays a crucial role in modulating circadian clock transcriptional circuitry by conservatively double-checking both warm-night and night-time-light signals in a synergistic manner in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Takeshi; Kitayama, Miki; Oka, Haruka; Tsubouchi, Mayuka; Takayama, Chieko; Nomoto, Yuji; Yamashino, Takafumi

    2014-12-01

    During the last decade, significant research progress has been made in Arabidopsis thaliana in defining the molecular mechanisms behind the plant circadian clock. The circadian clock must have the ability to integrate both external light and ambient temperature signals into its transcriptional circuitry to regulate its function properly. We previously showed that transcription of a set of clock genes including LUX (LUX ARRHYTHMO), GI (GIGANTEA), LNK1 (NIGHT LIGHT-INDUCIBLE AND CLOCK-REGULATED GENE 1), PRR9 (PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATOR 9) and PRR7 is commonly regulated through the evening complex (EC) night-time repressor in response to both moderate changes in temperature (Δ6°C) and differences in steady-state growth-compatible temperature (16-28°C). Here, we further show that a night-time-light signal also feeds into the circadian clock transcriptional circuitry through the EC night-time repressor, so that the same set of EC target genes is up-regulated in response to a night-time-light pulse. This light-induced event is dependent on phytochromes, but not cryptochromes. Interestingly, both the warm-night and night-time-light signals negatively modulate the activity of the EC night-time repressor in a synergistic manner. In other words, an exponential burst of transcription of the EC target genes is observed only when these signals are simultaneously fed into the repressor. Taken together, we propose that the EC night-time repressor plays a crucial role in modulating the clock transcriptional circuitry to keep track properly of seasonal changes in photo- and thermal cycles by conservatively double-checking the external light and ambient temperature signals.

  3. The Crucial Role of Recess in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramstetter, Catherine L.; Murray, Robert; Garner, Andrew S.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Recess is at the heart of a vigorous debate over the role of schools in promoting optimal child development and well-being. Reallocating time to accentuate academic concerns is a growing trend and has put recess at risk. Conversely, pressure to increase activity in school has come from efforts to combat childhood obesity. The purpose…

  4. The Arabidopsis U11/U12-65K is an indispensible component of minor spliceosome and plays a crucial role in U12 intron splicing and plant development.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung

    2014-06-01

    The U12-dependent introns have been identified in a wide range of eukaryotes and are removed from precursor-mRNAs by U12 intron-specific minor spliceosome. Although several proteins unique to minor spliceosome have been identified, the nature of their effect on U12 intron splicing as well as plant growth and development remain largely unknown. Here, we characterized the functional role of an U12-type spliceosomal protein, U11/U12-65K in Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic knockdown plants generated by artificial miRNA-mediated silencing strategy exhibited severe defect in growth and development, such as severely arrested primary inflorescence stems, serrated leaves, and the formation of many rosette leaves after bolting. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that splicing of 198 out of the 234 previously predicted U12 intron-containing genes and 32 previously unidentified U12 introns was impaired in u11/u12-65k mutant. Moreover, the U11/U12-65K mutation affected alternative splicing, as well as U12 intron splicing, of many introns. Microarray analysis revealed that the genes involved in cell wall biogenesis and function, plant development, and metabolic processes are differentially expressed in the mutant plants. U11/U12-65K protein bound specifically to U12 small nuclear RNA (snRNA), which is necessary for branch-point site recognition. Taken together, these results provide clear evidence that U11/U12-65K is an indispensible component of minor spliceosome and involved in U12 intron splicing and alternative splicing of many introns, which is crucial for plant development.

  5. The Second Extracellular Loop of Pore-Forming Subunits of ATP-Binding Cassette Transporters for Basic Amino Acids Plays a Crucial Role in Interaction with the Cognate Solute Binding Protein(s)▿

    PubMed Central

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-01-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)2 complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP2 of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P2 variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  6. The second extracellular loop of pore-forming subunits of ATP-binding cassette transporters for basic amino acids plays a crucial role in interaction with the cognate solute binding protein(s).

    PubMed

    Eckey, Viola; Weidlich, Daniela; Landmesser, Heidi; Bergmann, Ulf; Schneider, Erwin

    2010-04-01

    In the thermophile Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the uptake of basic amino acids is mediated by an ABC transporter composed of the substrate binding protein (receptor) ArtJ and a homodimer each of the pore-forming subunit, ArtM, and the nucleotide-binding subunit, ArtP. We recently identified two putative binding sites in ArtJ that might interact with the Art(MP)(2) complex, thereby initiating the transport cycle (A. Vahedi-Faridi et al., J. Mol. Biol. 375:448-459, 2008). Here we investigated the contribution of charged amino acid residues in the second extracellular loop of ArtM to contact with ArtJ. Our results demonstrate a crucial role for residues K177, R185, and E188, since mutations to oppositely charged amino acids or glutamine led to a complete loss of ArtJ-stimulated ATPase activity of the complex variants in proteoliposomes. The defects could not be suppressed by ArtJ variants carrying mutations in site I (K39E and K152E) or II (E163K and D170K), suggesting a more complex interplay than that by a single salt bridge. These findings were supported by cross-linking assays demonstrating physical proximity between ArtJ(N166C) and ArtM(E182C). The importance of positively charged residues for receptor-transporter interaction was underscored by mutational analysis of the closely related transporter HisJ/LAO-HisQMP(2) of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. While transporter variants with mutated positively charged residues in HisQ displayed residual ATPase activities, corresponding mutants of HisM could no longer be stimulated by HisJ/LAO. Interestingly, the ATPase activity of the HisQM(K187E)P(2) variant was inhibited by l- and d-histidine in detergent, suggesting a role of the residue in preventing free histidine from gaining access to the substrate binding site within HisQM. PMID:20154136

  7. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D’s central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported. PMID:27258303

  8. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K

    2016-06-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D's central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported.

  9. Crucial Role of Vitamin D in the Musculoskeletal System.

    PubMed

    Wintermeyer, Elke; Ihle, Christoph; Ehnert, Sabrina; Stöckle, Ulrich; Ochs, Gunnar; de Zwart, Peter; Flesch, Ingo; Bahrs, Christian; Nussler, Andreas K

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is well known to exert multiple functions in bone biology, autoimmune diseases, cell growth, inflammation or neuromuscular and other immune functions. It is a fat-soluble vitamin present in many foods. It can be endogenously produced by ultraviolet rays from sunlight when the skin is exposed to initiate vitamin D synthesis. However, since vitamin D is biologically inert when obtained from sun exposure or diet, it must first be activated in human beings before functioning. The kidney and the liver play here a crucial role by hydroxylation of vitamin D to 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the liver and to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in the kidney. In the past decades, it has been proven that vitamin D deficiency is involved in many diseases. Due to vitamin D's central role in the musculoskeletal system and consequently the strong negative impact on bone health in cases of vitamin D deficiency, our aim was to underline its importance in bone physiology by summarizing recent findings on the correlation of vitamin D status and rickets, osteomalacia, osteopenia, primary and secondary osteoporosis as well as sarcopenia and musculoskeletal pain. While these diseases all positively correlate with a vitamin D deficiency, there is a great controversy regarding the appropriate vitamin D supplementation as both positive and negative effects on bone mineral density, musculoskeletal pain and incidence of falls are reported. PMID:27258303

  10. Red clover HCT2, a hydroxycinnamoyl-coenzyme A:malate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase, plays a crucial role in biosynthesis of phaselic acid and other hydroxycinnamoyl-malate esters in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In red clover (Trifolium pratense) leaves, phaselic acid (2-O-caffeoyl-L-malate) accumulates to several mmol kg-1 fresh weight and is a crucial component of a natural system that prevents protein breakdown during harvest and storage of this forage crop. Previously, we identified HCT2, a red clover g...

  11. A crucial role for spatial distribution in bacterial quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Zheng, Huizhen; Ren, Ying; Lou, Ruyun; Wu, Fan; Yu, Weiting; Liu, Xiudong; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules, and then makes a population of bacteria to regulate gene expression collectively and control behavior on a community-wide scale. Theoretical studies of efficiency sensing have suggested that both mass-transfer performance in the local environment and the spatial distribution of cells are key factors affecting QS. Here, an experimental model based on hydrogel microcapsules with a three-dimensional structure was established to investigate the influence of the spatial distribution of cells on bacterial QS. Vibrio harveyi cells formed different spatial distributions in the microcapsules, i.e., they formed cell aggregates with different structures and sizes. The cell aggregates displayed stronger QS than did unaggregated cells even when equal numbers of cells were present. Large aggregates (LA) of cells, with a size of approximately 25 μm, restricted many more autoinducers (AIs) than did small aggregates (SA), with a size of approximately 10 μm, thus demonstrating that aggregate size significantly affects QS. These findings provide a powerful demonstration of the fact that the spatial distribution of cells plays a crucial role in bacterial QS. PMID:27698391

  12. Dielectric boundary force and its crucial role in gramicidin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadler, Boaz; Hollerbach, Uwe; Eisenberg, R. S.

    2003-08-01

    In an electrostatic problem with nonuniform geometry, a charge Q in one region induces surface charges [called dielectric boundary charges (DBC)] at boundaries between different dielectrics. These induced surface charges, in return, exert a force [called dielectric boundary force (DBF)] on the charge Q that induced them. The DBF is often overlooked. It is not present in standard continuum theories of (point) ions in or near membranes and proteins, such as Gouy-Chapman, Debye-Huckel, Poisson-Boltzmann or Poisson-Nernst- Planck. The DBF is important when a charge Q is near dielectric interfaces, for example, when ions permeate through protein channels embedded in biological membranes. In this paper, we define the DBF and calculate it explicitly for a planar dielectric wall and for a tunnel geometry resembling the ionic channel gramicidin. In general, we formulate the DBF in a form useful for continuum theories, namely, as a solution of a partial differential equation with boundary conditions. The DBF plays a crucial role in the permeation of ions through the gramicidin channel. A positive ion in the channel produces a DBF of opposite sign to that of the fixed charge force (FCF) produced by the permanent charge of the gramicidin polypeptide, and so the net force on the positive ion is reduced. A negative ion creates a DBF of the same sign as the FCF and so the net (repulsive) force on the negative ion is increased. Thus, a positive ion can permeate the channel, while a negative ion is excluded from it. In gramicidin, it is this balance between the FCF and DBF that allows only singly charged positive ions to move into and through the channel. The DBF is not directly responsible, however, for selectivity between the alkali metal ions (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+): we prove that the DBF on a mobile spherical ion is independent of the ion’s radius.

  13. Psychiatrists' Perceptions of Role-Playing Games.

    PubMed

    Lis, Eric; Chiniara, Carl; Biskin, Robert; Montoro, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The literature has seen a surge in research on the mental health impacts of technologies such as Facebook, video games, and massively-multiplayer online role-playing games such as World of Warcraft, but little is known regarding the mental health impact of non-video role-playing games, such as Dungeons & Dragons. The present study examines how psychiatrists' perceive role-playing games and whether they play them. Psychiatrists at a tertiary care centre in Canada completed a questionnaire assessing history of playing role-playing games and whether they associate them with psychopathology. Forty-eight psychiatrists responded. Twenty-three percent have played a role-playing game over their lifetimes. Twenty-two percent believed there was an association between psychopathology and role-playing games. A majority of psychiatrists who responded do not associate role-playing games with psychopathology. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed. PMID:25589035

  14. Psychiatrists' Perceptions of Role-Playing Games.

    PubMed

    Lis, Eric; Chiniara, Carl; Biskin, Robert; Montoro, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The literature has seen a surge in research on the mental health impacts of technologies such as Facebook, video games, and massively-multiplayer online role-playing games such as World of Warcraft, but little is known regarding the mental health impact of non-video role-playing games, such as Dungeons & Dragons. The present study examines how psychiatrists' perceive role-playing games and whether they play them. Psychiatrists at a tertiary care centre in Canada completed a questionnaire assessing history of playing role-playing games and whether they associate them with psychopathology. Forty-eight psychiatrists responded. Twenty-three percent have played a role-playing game over their lifetimes. Twenty-two percent believed there was an association between psychopathology and role-playing games. A majority of psychiatrists who responded do not associate role-playing games with psychopathology. Implications for clinical practice and future research are discussed.

  15. The On-Going Role-Play in Suggestopedia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mateva, Galya

    1997-01-01

    Defines continuous role playing in foreign language teaching suggestopedia (as practiced in Bulgaria); discusses how to achieve and sustain it; and considers its advantages, disadvantages and relevance. The article notes that the balancing role of the teacher is crucial to the techniques employed in the classroom dialogs. (10 references) (CK)

  16. Role Playing as a Group Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabral, Rebecca J.

    1987-01-01

    Supports role playing as an effective intervention technique that has been broadly adapted for academic research and applied settings. Presents a classification scheme for organizing these diverse role-playing uses, in terms of intraindividual and intact group change. Suggests that research and implementation of role playing would be best served…

  17. Restaurant Role-Play in Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borya, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Research methods is perceived as a technical and difficult topic by some students. Using role-play to teach it can make it more accessible, meaningful and engaging. Role-playing the familiar roles of customer and waiting staff at a restaurant and discussing the variables that may affect the size of tips can help students to learn some of the key…

  18. Crucial role of macrophage selenoproteins in experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaushal, Naveen; Kudva, Avinash K.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Chiaro, Christopher; Kennett, Mary J.; Desai, Dhimant; Amin, Shantu; Carlson, Bradley A.; Cantorna, Margherita T.; Prabhu, K. Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a hallmark of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that involves macrophages. Given the inverse link between selenium (Se) status and IBD-induced inflammation, our objective was to demonstrate that selenoproteins in macrophages were essential to suppress pro-inflammatory mediators, in part, by the modulation of arachidonic acid metabolism. Acute colitis was induced using 4% DSS in wild type mice maintained on Se-deficient (<0.01 ppm Se), Se-adequate (0.1 ppm; sodium selenite), and two supraphysiological levels in the form of Se-supplemented (0.4 ppm; sodium selenite) and high Se (1.0 ppm; sodium selenite) diets. Transfer RNASec (tRNA[sec]) knockout mice (Trspfl/flLysMCre) were used to examine the role of selenoproteins in macrophages on disease progression and severity using histopathological evaluation, expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory genes, and modulation of prostaglandin (PG) metabolites in urine and plasma. While Se-deficient and Se-adequate mice showed increased colitis and exhibited poor survival, Se supplementation at 0.4 and 1.0 ppm increased survival of mice and decreased colitis-associated inflammation with an up-regulation of expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory genes. Metabolomic profiling of urine suggested increased oxidation of PGE2 at supraphysiological levels of Se that also correlated well with Se-dependent upregulation of 15-hydroxy-PG dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) in macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of 15-PGDH, lack of selenoprotein expression in macrophages, and depletion of infiltrating macrophages indicated that macrophage-specific selenoproteins and upregulation of 15-PGDH expression were key for Se-dependent anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving effects. Selenoproteins in macrophages protect mice from DSS-colitis by enhancing 15-PGDH-dependent oxidation of PGE2 to alleviate inflammation, suggesting a therapeutic role for Se in IBD. PMID:25187657

  19. Using Role Play to Debate Animal Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agell, Laia; Soria, Vanessa; Carrió, Mar

    2015-01-01

    The use of animals in biomedical research is a socio-scientific issue in which decision-making is complicated. In this article, we describe an experience involving a role play activity performed during school visits to the Barcelona Biomedical Research Park (PRBB) to debate animal testing. Role playing games require students to defend different…

  20. Role-Playing in Counselor Student Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Debra; Costas, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how role-plays impacted 27 counseling students' overall skills as measured by instructor ratings and self-ratings during practice triads in a microskills course. A Mann-Whitney U nonparametric test revealed no significant difference for scripted versus personal concerns role-plays. Students indicated a strong belief that…

  1. Role-Playing Methods in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesler, Mark; Fox, Robert

    This book, one of three Teacher Resource Booklets on Classroom Social Relations and Learning developed at the Center for Research on Utilization of Scientific Knowledge at the University of Michigan, discusses the theoretical background of role playing and gives a step-by-step discussion of how to use role playing in the classroom. There are…

  2. Role-Play in Foreign Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raz, Hana

    1985-01-01

    Describes practical conclusion of a study carried out in Israel which investigated the potential effects of role play on communicative competence, motivation and underachieving foreign language learners. The discussion focuses on a suggested procedure, prerequisites and limitations, the positive effects of role play, and its educational value and…

  3. Simulating Intercultural Communication through Role-Playing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Edward C.; And Others

    This report describes the design and development of training to increase cultural awareness. Significant aspects of intercultural interaction were simulated in a series of role playing exercises. Typical American values and assumptions were demonstrably elicited from a trainee as he interacted with a "foreign" auxiliary. The auxiliary was trained…

  4. Role Playing: Rehearsal for Language Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Lee

    1970-01-01

    Argues that in teaching standard English to groups which, like Eskimos and speakers of Hawaiian Pidgin, are quite removed from mainstream American culture, role playing, as natural human behavior, can provide the bridge between classroom drill and real-life utilization of new language patterns. (FB)

  5. Role-Play in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worch, Eric A.; Scheuermann, Amy M.; Haney, Jodi J.

    2009-01-01

    The activity shared here is an animal role-playing lesson developed, field-tested, and refined for "Nature's Neighborhood", a newly designed children's education facility at the Toledo Zoo. The activity is targeted at students in kindergarten through second grade, but it can be adapted for use in grades three and four as well. Through students'…

  6. A Role-Play Rorschach Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricklin, Barry

    1975-01-01

    Three subjects were used in a role playing study based on the subject's own Rorschach responses. The results proved to be valuable as an aspect of therapeutic involvement. Results also help to expand and clarify the psychological meaning of Rorschach images. (Author/DEP)

  7. Role Play and Foreign Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Christina

    Classroom use of role-playing in English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) instruction in Japan is described. The purpose is to improve students' verbal and nonverbal communication skills and to link and use previously built schema, in both structured and improvised situations. Units designed around a short listening passage, a short reading passage, and…

  8. Crucial roles of the Arp2/3 complex during mammalian corticogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pei-Shan; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Ramachandran, Sreekumar; Xia, Sheng; Chen, Huei-Ying; Guo, Fengli; Suraneni, Praveen; Maher, Brady J.

    2016-01-01

    The polarity and organization of radial glial cells (RGCs), which serve as both stem cells and scaffolds for neuronal migration, are crucial for cortical development. However, the cytoskeletal mechanisms that drive radial glial outgrowth and maintain RGC polarity remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the Arp2/3 complex – the unique actin nucleator that produces branched actin networks – plays essential roles in RGC polarity and morphogenesis. Disruption of the Arp2/3 complex in murine RGCs retards process outgrowth toward the basal surface and impairs apical polarity and adherens junctions. Whereas the former is correlated with an abnormal actin-based leading edge, the latter is consistent with blockage in membrane trafficking. These defects result in altered cell fate, disrupted cortical lamination and abnormal angiogenesis. In addition, we present evidence that the Arp2/3 complex is a cell-autonomous regulator of neuronal migration. Our data suggest that Arp2/3-mediated actin assembly might be particularly important for neuronal cell motility in a soft or poorly adhesive matrix environment. PMID:27385014

  9. The possible crucial role of iron accumulation combined with low tryptophan, zinc and manganese in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S

    2001-11-01

    Iron can react with citric acid, interfering with the Krebs cycle, hence with oxidative phosphorylation. Free iron (Fe) can cause considerable oxidative damage both through Fenton reactions and by activating xanthine oxidase, which produces both superoxide (O(2-)) and uric acid (abundant in many cancers). It can also react with lactic acid, reducing its elimination and increasing the acidity of the cytoplasm. Fe can also wreak havoc by reacting with tryptophan, the least abundant and most delicate essential amino acid, which is necessary for the production of serotonin and other substances required by the immune system to fight cancer. On the other hand, in the presence of iron, the tryptophan metabolite quinolinate causes intense lipid peroxidation. Similarly, several other carcinogenic metabolites of tryptophan are particularly dangerous in the presence of Fe. Excess Fe may also interfere with manganese superoxide dismutase and impair the initiation of apoptosis by the mitochondrion, rendering the cells impervious to all the signals to undergo apoptosis from without and from within the cell. Moreover, Fe may also play a crucial role on telomere repair, by activating telomerase. Therefore, by inhibiting apoptosis and enhancing chromosome repair, Fe may bestow immortality upon the cancer cell. Furthermore, Fe is one of the triggers for mitosis. Therefore, increased Fe levels may be essential for the rapid growth characteristic of many malignancies. In turn, the rapid growth further depletes resources from the healthy tissues, exacerbating the deficiencies of the other elements and reducing the ability to fight the malignancy. PMID:11735307

  10. Psychodrama: group psychotherapy through role playing.

    PubMed

    Kipper, D A

    1992-10-01

    The theory and the therapeutic procedure of classical psychodrama are described along with brief illustrations. Classical psychodrama and sociodrama stemmed from role theory, enactments, "tele," the reciprocity of choices, and the theory of spontaneity-robopathy and creativity. The discussion focuses on key concepts such as the therapeutic team, the structure of the session, transference and reality, countertransference, the here-and-now and the encounter, the group-as-a-whole, resistance and difficult clients, and affect and cognition. Also described are the neoclassical approaches of psychodrama, action methods, and clinical role playing, and the significance of the concept of behavioral simulation in group psychotherapy.

  11. Towards Smaller Families: The Crucial Role of the Private Sector. Draper Fund Report Number 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Sharon L., Ed.; And Others

    The Draper Fund was established within the Population Crisis Committee (PCC) in 1975. Contributions to the fund are used by the PCC to encourage and expand those activities which promise the greatest impact in slowing world population growth. Seven papers written around that theme are included in this report: "The Crucial Role of the Private…

  12. Crucial role of PDX-1 in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and induction of surrogate beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Kaneto, Hideaki; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Yamamoto, Kaoru; Kato, Ken; Fujitani, Yoshio; Matsuoka, Taka-aki

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX-1) plays a crucial role in pancreas development, beta-cell differentiation, and maintaining mature beta-cell function. At an early stage of embryonic development, PDX-1 is initially expressed in the gut region when the foregut endoderm becomes committed to common pancreatic precursor cells. During pancreas development, PDX-1 expression is maintained in precursor cells, and later it becomes restricted to beta-cells. In mature beta-cells, PDX-1 transactivates the insulin gene and other genes involved in glucose sensing and metabolism, such as GLUT2 and glucokinase. MafA is a recently isolated beta-cell-specific transcription factor which functions as a potent activator of insulin gene transcription. During pancreas development, MafA expression is first detected at the beginning of the principal phase of insulin-producing cell production. Furthermore, these transcription factors play a crucial role in inducing surrogate beta-cells from non-beta-cells and thus could be therapeutic targets for diabetes.

  13. "Prey Play": Learning about Predators and Prey through an Interactive, Role-Play Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deaton, Cynthia C. M.; Dodd, Kristen; Drennon, Katherine; Nagle, Jack

    2012-01-01

    "Prey Play" is an interactive role-play activity that provides fifth-grade students with opportunities to examine predator-prey interactions. This four-part, role-play activity allows students to take on the role of a predator and prey as they reflect on the behaviors animals exhibit as they collect food and interact with one another, as well as…

  14. Identifying the role that animals play in their social networks.

    PubMed Central

    Lusseau, David; Newman, M E J

    2004-01-01

    Techniques recently developed for the analysis of human social networks are applied to the social network of bottlenose dolphins living in Doubtful Sound, New Zealand. We identify communities and subcommunities within the dolphin population and present evidence that sex- and age-related homophily play a role in the formation of clusters of preferred companionship. We also identify brokers who act as links between sub-communities and who appear to be crucial to the social cohesion of the population as a whole. The network is found to be similar to human social networks in some respects but different in some others, such as the level of assortative mixing by degree within the population. This difference elucidates some of the means by which the network forms and evolves. PMID:15801609

  15. Dual roles of Incenp crucial to the assembly of the acentrosomal metaphase spindle in female meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Colombié, Nathalie; Cullen, C. Fiona; Brittle, Amy L.; Jang, Janet K.; Earnshaw, William C.; Carmena, Mar; McKim, Kim; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Spindle formation in female meiosis differs from mitosis in many animals, as it takes place independently from centrosomes, and the molecular requirements of this pathway remain to be understood. Here we report two crucial roles of Incenp, an essential subunit of the chromosomal passenger complex (the Aurora B complex), in centrosome-independent spindle formation in Drosophila female meiosis. Firstly, the initial assembly of spindle microtubules is drastically delayed in an incenp mutant. This clearly demonstrates, for the first time, a crucial role for Incenp in chromosome-driven spindle microtubule assembly in living oocytes. Additionally, Incenp is necessary to stabilise the equatorial region of the metaphase I spindle, in contrast to mitosis, where the equivalent function becomes prominent after anaphase onset. Our analysis suggests that Subito, a kinesin-6 protein, cooperates with Incenp for this latter function, but not microtubule assembly. We propose that the two functions of Incenp are part of the mechanisms that compensate for the lack of centrosomes during meiotic spindle formation. PMID:18755775

  16. TESL: The Crucial Role of Formal and Explicit Instruction and Learners' Prior Knowledge--An Example in Learners of Chinese Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, May Xiu-qin

    This paper argues that formal and explicit instruction and learners' prior knowledge play a crucial role in teaching and learning English as a second language (ESL), and that a pure communicative approach is inadequate in achieving optimum results. The discussion is presented in two parts. The first outlines the issues under consideration,…

  17. Use of dyadic role-playing to increase student participation.

    PubMed

    Christiaens, Glenda; Baldwin, Joan H

    2002-01-01

    Dyadic role-playing is a way to combine role-playing and dyad work in class to increase student participation. The instructor can use warm-up exercises to help students reduce their stress, and to recognize the value of role-playing in their journeys toward becoming professional nurses. The advantages, limitations, and practical considerations regarding dyadic role-playing are also highlighted.

  18. Virtual Playgrounds? Assessing the Playfulness of Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Kerrie Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Millions of children and adults devote much of their leisure time to playing massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). Most observers commonly categorize computer games as a play activity, but this article asks whether MMORPGs contain activities that might not be play. The author examines the phenomenon of online gaming and…

  19. Designing and Evaluating an Online Role Play in Conflict Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hrastinski, Stefan; Watson, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to identify, through a literature review, key issues regarding how online role plays can be designed and to apply them when designing a role play on conflict management. Design/methodology/approach: By drawing on the key issues identified in the literature review, a role play on conflict management was designed and…

  20. From Text to Context: Spontaneous Group Role Playing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marinelli, Patti

    A familiar and effective way to provide classroom practice of foreign language skills in a meaningful context is role-playing. One variation, spontaneous group role-playing, offers a bridge between textbook dialogues and real-world dialogues. Especially appropriate for beginning and intermediate students, simultaneous group role-playing is a…

  1. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR Bmsage PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN SILK GLAND GENERATION IN SILKWORM, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hu-hu; Zhang, Deng-pan; Chen, Rui-ting; Cai, Zi-zheng; Lu, Yan; Liang, Shuang; Miao, Yun-gen

    2015-10-01

    Salivary gland secretion is altered in Drosophila embryos with loss of function of the sage gene. Saliva has a reduced volume and an increased electron density according to transmission electron microscopy, resulting in regions of tube dilation and constriction with intermittent tube closure. However, the precise functions of Bmsage in silkworm (Bombyx mori) are unknown, although its sequence had been deposited in SilkDB. From this, Bmsage is inferred to be a transcription factor that regulates the synthesis of silk fibroin and interacts with another silk gland-specific transcription factor, namely, silk gland factor-1. In this study, we introduced a germline mutation of Bmsage using the Cas9/sgRNA system, a genome-editing technology, resulting in deletion of Bmsage from the genome of B. mori. Of the 15 tested samples, seven displayed alterations at the target site. The mutagenesis efficiency was about 46.7% and there were no obvious off-target effects. In the screened homozygous mutants, silk glands developed poorly and the middle and posterior silk glands (MSG and PSG) were absent, which was significantly different from the wild type. The offspring of G0 mosaic silkworms had indel mutations causing 2- or 9-bp deletions at the target site, but exhibited the same abnormal silk gland structure. Mutant larvae containing different open-reading frames of Bmsage had the same silk gland phenotype. This illustrated that the mutant phenotype was due to Bmsage knockout. We conclude that Bmsage participates in embryonic development of the silk gland.

  2. TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR Bmsage PLAYS A CRUCIAL ROLE IN SILK GLAND GENERATION IN SILKWORM, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Xin, Hu-hu; Zhang, Deng-pan; Chen, Rui-ting; Cai, Zi-zheng; Lu, Yan; Liang, Shuang; Miao, Yun-gen

    2015-10-01

    Salivary gland secretion is altered in Drosophila embryos with loss of function of the sage gene. Saliva has a reduced volume and an increased electron density according to transmission electron microscopy, resulting in regions of tube dilation and constriction with intermittent tube closure. However, the precise functions of Bmsage in silkworm (Bombyx mori) are unknown, although its sequence had been deposited in SilkDB. From this, Bmsage is inferred to be a transcription factor that regulates the synthesis of silk fibroin and interacts with another silk gland-specific transcription factor, namely, silk gland factor-1. In this study, we introduced a germline mutation of Bmsage using the Cas9/sgRNA system, a genome-editing technology, resulting in deletion of Bmsage from the genome of B. mori. Of the 15 tested samples, seven displayed alterations at the target site. The mutagenesis efficiency was about 46.7% and there were no obvious off-target effects. In the screened homozygous mutants, silk glands developed poorly and the middle and posterior silk glands (MSG and PSG) were absent, which was significantly different from the wild type. The offspring of G0 mosaic silkworms had indel mutations causing 2- or 9-bp deletions at the target site, but exhibited the same abnormal silk gland structure. Mutant larvae containing different open-reading frames of Bmsage had the same silk gland phenotype. This illustrated that the mutant phenotype was due to Bmsage knockout. We conclude that Bmsage participates in embryonic development of the silk gland. PMID:25917878

  3. TLR4 plays a crucial role in MSC-induced inhibition of NK cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ying; Liu, Jin; Liu, Yang; Qin, Yaru; Luo, Qun; Wang, Quanli; Duan, Haifeng

    2015-08-21

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a kind of stromal cell within the tumor microenvironment. In our research, MSC derived from acute myeloid leukemia patients' bone marrow (AML-MSC) and lung cancer tissues (LC-MSC) as well as normal bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) cultured in conditioned medium of HeLa cells were found to have higher expressions of Toll-like receptor (TLR4) mRNA compared with BM-MSC. The sorted TLR4-positive MSC (TLR4+ MSC) differed in cytokine (interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) secretion from those of unsorted MSC. MSC was reported to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell proliferation and function. In this research, we confirmed that TLR4+ MSC aggravate this suppression. Furthermore, when TLR4 in the sorted cells were stimulated by LPS or following blocked by antibody, the suppression on NK cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were more intensive or recovered respectively. Compared to unsorted MSC, NKG2D receptor expression on NK cells were also inhibited by TLR4+ MSC. These findings suggest that activation of TLR4 pathway is important for TLR4+ MSC and MSC to obstruct anti-tumor immunity by inhibiting NK cell function, which may provide a potential stroma-targeted tumor therapy. - Highlights: • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NK cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. • TLR4+ MSC inhibit NKG2D expression on NK cells and NK cell cytotoxicity. • The distinguished cytokine expression of TLR4+ MSC may contribute to the inhibition on NK cell function.

  4. Calcium-Sensing Receptors of Human Neural Cells Play Crucial Roles in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chiarini, Anna; Armato, Ubaldo; Liu, Daisong; Dal Prà, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    In aged subjects, late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) starts in the lateral entorhinal allocortex where a failure of clearance mechanisms triggers an accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid-β42 oligomers (Aβ42-os). In neurons and astrocytes, Aβ42-os enhance the transcription of Aβ precursor protein (APP) and β-secretase/BACE1 genes. Thus, by acting together with γ-secretase, the surpluses of APP and BACE1 amplify the endogenous production of Aβ42-os which pile up, damage mitochondria, and are oversecreted. At the plasmalemma, exogenous Aβ42-os bind neurons' and astrocytes' calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) activating a set of intracellular signaling pathways which upkeep Aβ42-os intracellular accumulation and oversecretion by hindering Aβ42-os proteolysis. In addition, Aβ42-os accumulating in the extracellular milieu spread and reach mounting numbers of adjacent and remoter teams of neurons and astrocytes which in turn are recruited, again via Aβ42-os•CaSR-governed mechanisms, to produce and release additional Aβ42-os amounts. This relentless self-sustaining mechanism drives AD progression toward upper cortical areas. Later on accumulating Aβ42-os elicit the advent of hyperphosphorylated (p)-Tau oligomers which acting together with Aβ42-os and other glial neurotoxins cooperatively destroy wider and wider cognition-related cortical areas. In parallel, Aβ42-os•CaSR signals also elicit an excess production and secretion of nitric oxide and vascular endothelial growth factor-A from astrocytes, of Aβ42-os and myelin basic protein from oligodendrocytes, and of proinflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide and (likely) Aβ42-os from microglia. Activated astrocytes and microglia survive the toxic onslaught, whereas neurons and oligodendrocytes increasingly die. However, we have shown that highly selective allosteric CaSR antagonists (calcilytics), like NPS 2143 and NPS 89626, efficiently suppress all the neurotoxic effects Aβ42-os•CaSR signaling drives in cultured cortical untransformed human neurons and astrocytes. In fact, calcilytics increase Aβ42 proteolysis and discontinue the oversecretion of Aβ42-os, nitric oxide, and vascular endothelial growth factor-A from both astrocytes and neurons. Seemingly, calcilytics would also benefit the other types of glial cells and cerebrovascular cells otherwise damaged by the effects of Aβ42-os•CaSR signaling. Thus, given at amnestic minor cognitive impairment (aMCI) or initial symptomatic stages, calcilytics could prevent or terminate the propagation of LOAD neuropathology and preserve human neurons' viability and hence patients' cognitive abilities. PMID:27199760

  5. Arabinosylation Plays a Crucial Role in Extensin Cross-linking In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuning; Dong, Wen; Tan, Li; Held, Michael A; Kieliszewski, Marcia J

    2015-01-01

    Extensins (EXTs) are hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins (HRGPs) that are structural components of the plant primary cell wall. They are basic proteins and are highly glycosylated with carbohydrate accounting for >50% of their dry weight. Carbohydrate occurs as monogalactosyl serine and arabinosyl hydroxyproline, with arabinosides ranging in size from ~1 to 4 or 5 residues. Proposed functions of EXT arabinosylation include stabilizing the polyproline II helix structure and facilitating EXT cross-linking. Here, the involvement of arabinosylation in EXT cross-linking was investigated by assaying the initial cross-linking rate and degree of cross-linking of partially or fully de-arabinosylated EXTs using an in vitro cross-linking assay followed by gel permeation chromatography. Our results indicate that EXT arabinosylation is required for EXT cross-linking in vitro and the fourth arabinosyl residue in the tetraarabinoside chain, which is uniquely α-linked, may determine the initial cross-linking rate. Our results also confirm the conserved structure of the oligoarabinosides across species, indicating an evolutionary significance for EXT arabinosylation. PMID:26568683

  6. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  7. Does Instructional Approach Matter? How Elaboration Plays a Crucial Role in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysink, Tessa H. S.; de Jong, Ton

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the affordances of 4 multimedia learning environments for specific learning processes. The environments covered the same domain but used different instructional approaches: (a) hypermedia learning, (b) observational learning, (c) self-explanation-based learning, and (d) inquiry learning. Although they all promote an active…

  8. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, S; Basu, S; Paul, R

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed. PMID:26565279

  9. Five Roles I Play in Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headley, Scot

    2005-01-01

    Scot Headley outlines five roles that online instructors can use to increase the sense of community and depth of learning in their courses; they are space planner, pacesetter, host, connector, and mirror. These roles underscore the importance of strong relationships between teacher and student, particularly in an online setting. Headley provides…

  10. Rethinking Role Play in the Reception Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Sue; Evans, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Background: In 2000 the so-called "Reception" class was re-conceived (in curricular terms, at least) as the second and final year of the Foundation Stage, a distinctive educational phase for children aged 3 until entry to key stage 1 at 5 or 6 years old. The "Curriculum guidance for the Foundation Stage" endorses a play-based, informal curriculum…

  11. Reality and Second-Language Role-Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piper, David; Piper, Terry

    1983-01-01

    Although role playing is a well-established and useful method of second language instruction, its success is often undermined by assignment of roles alien to the students' needs and experience. Redefinition of role playing to include the roles an individual assumes in everyday life will help the teacher plan more appropriate activities. (MSE)

  12. Opening and closing mechanisms of the leatherback sea turtle larynx: a crucial role for the tongue.

    PubMed

    Fraher, John; Davenport, John; Fitzgerald, Edward; McLaughlin, Patrick; Doyle, Tom; Harman, Luke; Cuffe, Tracy

    2010-12-15

    A combination of dissection and computed tomography scanning has provided significant novel insights into the structure and function of the Dermochelys coriacea larynx and its associated muscles. Several previously unknown features of the laryngeal aditus (glottis) are described and their functional significance in its opening and closure are considered. The tongue plays an essential part in producing and maintaining closure during dives and feeding bouts. Closure is brought about by compression of the glottis under the action of the two hyoglossus muscles. The tongue thus plays the role of the epiglottis of mammals, sealing the entrance to the larynx. As is already clear, opening is brought about by abduction of the arytenoid cartilages. In addition, there is a powerful mechanism for maintaining the larynx in close apposition to the hyoid plate during feeding and neck flexion, thereby enhancing the efficiency of feeding. PMID:21112993

  13. Crucial role of vinexin for keratinocyte migration in vitro and epidermal wound healing in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kioka, Noriyuki; Ito, Takuya; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Uekawa, Natsuko; Umemoto, Tsutomu; Motoyoshi, Soh; Imai, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Kenzo; Watanabe, Hideto; Yamada, Masayasu; Ueda, Kazumitsu

    2010-06-10

    In the process of tissue injury and repair, epithelial cells rapidly migrate and form epithelial sheets. Vinexin is a cytoplasmic molecule of the integrin-containing cell adhesion complex localized at focal contacts in vitro. Here, we investigated the roles of vinexin in keratinocyte migration in vitro and wound healing in vivo. Vinexin knockdown using siRNA delayed migration of both HaCaT human keratinocytes and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells in scratch assay but did not affect cell proliferation. Induction of cell migration by scratching the confluent monolayer culture of these cells activated both EGFR and ERK, and their inhibitors AG1478 and U0126 substantially suppressed scratch-induced keratinocyte migration. Vinexin knockdown in these cells inhibited the scratch-induced activation of EGFR, but not that of ERK, suggesting that vinexin promotes cell migration via activation of EGFR. We further generated vinexin (-/-) mice and isolated their keratinocytes. They similarly showed slow migration in scratch assay. Furthermore, vinexin (-/-) mice exhibited a delay in cutaneous wound healing in both the back skin and tail without affecting the proliferation of keratinocytes. Together, these results strongly suggest a crucial role of vinexin in keratinocyte migration in vitro and cutaneous wound healing in vivo.

  14. Role-playing for more realistic technical skills training.

    PubMed

    Nikendei, C; Zeuch, A; Dieckmann, P; Roth, C; Schäfer, S; Völkl, M; Schellberg, D; Herzog, W; Jünger, J

    2005-03-01

    Clinical skills are an important and necessary part of clinical competence. Simulation plays an important role in many fields of medical education. Although role-playing is common in communication training, there are no reports about the use of student role-plays in the training of technical clinical skills. This article describes an educational intervention with analysis of pre- and post-intervention self-selected student survey evaluations. After one term of skills training, a thorough evaluation showed that the skills-lab training did not seem very realistic nor was it very demanding for trainees. To create a more realistic training situation and to enhance students' involvement, case studies and role-plays with defined roles for students (i.e. intern, senior consultant) were introduced into half of the sessions. Results of the evaluation in the second term showed that sessions with role-playing were rated significantly higher than sessions without role-playing.

  15. TLR3 Plays Significant Roles against HBV-Associated HCC

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-lan; Xu, Yu-yin; Chen, Li; Wang, Gui-lan; Shen, Yin

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) is a pattern-recognizing receptor that is involved in immune signaling and plays a crucial role in survival by being able to recognize various viral components including double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The role of TLR3 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections is not well understood. To investigate the ability of TLR3 in regulating HBV replication in HCC, 80 cases of human HCC were collected and their tissue microarray was made. In HCC cells, the expression and location of TLR3, hepatitis-associated virus, and interstitial immunoreactive cells were assayed with immunohistochemical staining. The apoptosis of tumor cells was also detected by TUNEL stain. Correlations between TLR3 expression and HBV infection, interstitial immunoreactive cells, and cells apoptosis in HCC were investigated. In addition, we explored whether TLR3 agonist dsRNA can inhibit HepG2.2.15 cells secreting HBV. We found that the cytoplasmic expression of TLR3 in HCC is positively related to HBsAg infection and HCC with cirrhosis and promotes interstitial immunoreactive cells infiltration and cancer cells apoptosis. In HepG2.2.15 cells, dsRNA inhibited the secretion of HBV and induced apoptosis. These results indicate that TLR3 signaling activity may be involved in immune responses against HBV in HCC. PMID:25983748

  16. Teaching clinical interviewing skills using role-playing: conveying empathy to performing a suicide assessment: a primer for individual role-playing and scripted group role-playing.

    PubMed

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Barney, Christine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a useful introduction to the art of role-playing in both the individual format and the group format using scripted group role-playing (SGRP). Role-playing can provide powerful learning opportunities, but to do so it must be done well. This article imparts guidance toward this goal. SGRP may greatly enhance the acquisition of critical complex interviewing skills, such as suicide assessment and uncovering domestic violence, in health care providers across all disciplines, an educational goal that has not been achievable to date. Although research is at an early stage of development, the hope represented by SGRP is tangible.

  17. Teaching clinical interviewing skills using role-playing: conveying empathy to performing a suicide assessment: a primer for individual role-playing and scripted group role-playing.

    PubMed

    Shea, Shawn Christopher; Barney, Christine

    2015-03-01

    This article provides a useful introduction to the art of role-playing in both the individual format and the group format using scripted group role-playing (SGRP). Role-playing can provide powerful learning opportunities, but to do so it must be done well. This article imparts guidance toward this goal. SGRP may greatly enhance the acquisition of critical complex interviewing skills, such as suicide assessment and uncovering domestic violence, in health care providers across all disciplines, an educational goal that has not been achievable to date. Although research is at an early stage of development, the hope represented by SGRP is tangible. PMID:25725575

  18. Online Role-Play Environments for Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Carol; Shepherd, John

    2010-01-01

    As online environments and tools have evolved over the last 15-20 years, their use for role-based learning has expanded. This analysis draws on work for an Australian project that has been sharing and developing knowledge about the use of online role-plays in higher education. We describe the learning needs that online role-play can meet, and give…

  19. A Role Play for Revising Style and Applying Management Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griggs, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Role-playing is a well regarded learning activity. By participating in this activity, students can apply their knowledge through their assigned roles in a realistic but risk-free situation. The role play stimulates class discussion, dramatizes rhetorical principles about purpose, shows how to adapt a text to an audience of employees in a…

  20. Crucial role of extracellular polysaccharides in desiccation and freezing tolerance in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune.

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Yoshiyuki; Takani, Yayoi; Yoshida, Takayuki; Sakamoto, Toshio

    2005-11-01

    The cyanobacterium Nostoc commune is adapted to the terrestrial environment and has a cosmopolitan distribution. In this study, the role of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) in the desiccation tolerance of photosynthesis in N. commune was examined. Although photosynthetic O2 evolution was not detected in desiccated colonies, the ability of the cells to evolve O2 rapidly recovered after rehydration. The air-dried colonies contained approximately 10% (wt/wt) water, and field-isolated, natural colonies with EPS were highly water absorbent and were rapidly hydrated by atmospheric moisture. The cells embedded in EPS in Nostoc colonies were highly desiccation tolerant, and O2 evolution was not damaged by air drying. Although N. commune was determined to be a mesophilic cyanobacterium, the cells with EPS were heat tolerant in a desiccated state. EPS could be removed from cells by homogenizing colonies with a blender and filtering with coarse filter paper. This treatment to remove EPS did not damage Nostoc cells or their ability to evolve O2, but O2 evolution was significantly damaged by desiccation treatment of the EPS-depleted cells. Similar to the EPS-depleted cells, the laboratory culture strain KU002 had only small amount of EPS and was highly sensitive to desiccation. In the EPS-depleted cells, O2 evolution was also sensitive to freeze-thaw treatment. These results strongly suggest that EPS of N. commune is crucial for the stress tolerance of photosynthesis during desiccation and during freezing and thawing.

  1. The role-playing: the art to catch the eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Lanza, Tiziana

    2015-04-01

    We present some interactive, immersive, authentic role-plays simulation designed to teach to different public: tertiary, secondary and primary students and an experience with a teachers group, after April 6 2009 L'Aquila Earthquake. We will discuss about the basics of the role-play and its applications to the geosciences in outreach projects. Role-play is a powerful method to educate to risk mitigation with particular we will discuss our experience regarding seismic risk. Finally, we will present some data on the effectiveness of the role-play in different settings in which we used it.

  2. Crucial role of anions on arrangement of Cu₂S nanocrystal superstructures.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yansong; Deng, Ke; Jia, Yuying; He, Liangcan; Chang, Lin; Zhi, Linjie; Tang, Zhiyong

    2014-04-24

    Both of the arrays of Cu₂S nanowires and the superlattices of Cu₂S nanoparticles are obtained by the solventless thermolysis of copper thiolate in the presence of laurate. For the first time, the types of anions in the reaction system, which are generally neglected in previous studies, are found to determine the structure of the final assembly products. Furthermore, experimental results shows in the presence of Cl⁻ ions, Cl⁻ ions participate in the self-assembly process and promote the formation of Cu₂S nanowire arrays. Finally, the content of Cl⁻ ions is gradually decreased with assembly reaction proceeding. Therefore, duiring the process, Cl⁻ ions play a role of 'catassembly' in the formation of Cu₂S nanocrystal superstructures.

  3. Rim Sim: A Role-Play Simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Robert C.; Frew, Suzanne L.; Howell, David G.; Karl, Herman A.; Rudin, Emily B.

    2003-01-01

    Rim Sim is a 6-hour, eight-party negotiation that focuses on creating a framework for the long-term disaster-recovery efforts. It involves a range of players from five countries affected by two natural disasters: a typhoon about a year ago and an earthquake about 6 months ago. The players are members of an International Disaster Working Group (IDWG) that has been created by an international commission. The IDWG has been charged with drawing up a framework for managing two issues: the reconstruction of regionally significant infrastructure and the design of a mechanism for allocating funding to each country for reconstruction of local infrastructure and ongoing humanitarian needs. The first issue will involve making choices among five options (two harbor options, two airport options, and one rail-line option), each of which will have three levels at which to rebuild. The second issue will involve five starting-point options. Participants are encouraged to invent other options for both issues. The goal of Rim Sim is to raise questions about traditional approaches to disaster-preparedness planning and reconstruction efforts in an international setting, in this case the Pacific Rim. Players must confront the reverberating effects of disasters and the problems of using science and technical information in decisionmaking, and are introduced to a consensus-building approach emphasizing face-to-face dialog and multinational cooperation in dealing with humanitarian concerns, as well as long-term efforts to reconstruct local and regional infrastructure. The Rim Sim simulation raises four key points: ripple effects of disasters, role of science, multiparty negotiation, and building personal relationships.

  4. A crucial role of Flagellin in the induction of airway mucus production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Ben Mohamed, Fatima; Mohamed, Fatima Ben; Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Medina, Mathieu; Balloy, Viviane; Chignard, Michel; Ramphal, Reuben; Touqui, Lhousseine

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen involved in nosocomial infections. Flagellin is a P. aeruginosa virulence factor involved in host response to this pathogen. We examined the role of flagellin in P. aeruginosa-induced mucus secretion. Using a mouse model of pulmonary infection we showed that PAK, a wild type strain of P. aeruginosa, induced airway mucus secretion and mucin muc5ac expression at higher levels than its flagellin-deficient mutant (ΔFliC). PAK induced expression of MUC5AC and MUC2 in both human airway epithelial NCI-H292 cell line and in primary epithelial cells. In contrast, ΔFliC infection had lower to no effect on MUC5AC and MUC2 expressions. A purified P. aeruginosa flagellin induced MUC5AC expression in parallel to IL-8 secretion in NCI-H292 cells. Accordingly, ΔFliC mutant stimulated IL-8 secretion at significantly lower levels compared to PAK. Incubation of NCI-H292 cells with exogenous IL-8 induced MUC5AC expression and pre-incubation of these cells with an anti-IL-8 antibody abrogated flagellin-mediated MUC5AC expression. Silencing of TLR5 and Naip, siRNA inhibited both flagellin-induced MUC5AC expression and IL-8 secretion. Finally, inhibition of ERK abolished the expression of both PAK- and flagellin-induced MUC5AC. We conclude that: (i) flagellin is crucial in P. aeruginosa-induced mucus hyper-secretion through TLR5 and Naip pathways; (ii) this process is mediated by ERK and amplified by IL-8. Our findings help understand the mechanisms involved in mucus secretion during pulmonary infectious disease induced by P. aeruginosa, such as in cystic fibrosis. PMID:22768318

  5. Crucial Role of Elovl6 in Chondrocyte Growth and Differentiation during Growth Plate Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kikuchi, Manami; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Ishii, Kiyoaki; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Takayanagi, Misa; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    ELOVL family member 6, elongation of very long chain fatty acids (Elovl6) is a microsomal enzyme, which regulates the elongation of C12-16 saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. Elovl6 has been shown to be associated with various pathophysiologies including insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. To investigate a potential role of Elovl6 during bone development, we here examined a skeletal phenotype of Elovl6 knockout (Elovl6-/-) mice. The Elovl6-/- skeleton was smaller than that of controls, but exhibited no obvious patterning defects. Histological analysis revealed a reduced length of proliferating and an elongated length of hypertrophic chondrocyte layer, and decreased trabecular bone in Elovl6-/- mice compared with controls. These results were presumably due to a modest decrease in chondrocyte proliferation and accelerated differentiation of cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Consistent with the increased length of the hypertrophic chondrocyte layer in Elovl6-/- mice, Collagen10α1 was identified as one of the most affected genes by ablation of Elovl6 in chondrocytes. Furthermore, this elevated expression of Collagen10α1 of Elovl6-null chondrocytes was likely associated with increased levels of Foxa2/a3 and Mef2c mRNA expression. Relative increases in protein levels of nuclear Foxa2 and cytoplasmic histone deacethylase 4/5/7 were also observed in Elovl6 knockdown cells of the chondrocyte lineage. Collectively, our data suggest that Elovl6 plays a critical role for proper development of embryonic growth plate. PMID:27467521

  6. Approximate Bayesian Computation Reveals the Crucial Role of Oceanic Islands for the Assembly of Continental Biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Patiño, Jairo; Carine, Mark; Mardulyn, Patrick; Devos, Nicolas; Mateo, Rubén G; González-Mancebo, Juana M; Shaw, A Jonathan; Vanderpoorten, Alain

    2015-07-01

    The perceived low levels of genetic diversity, poor interspecific competitive and defensive ability, and loss of dispersal capacities of insular lineages have driven the view that oceanic islands are evolutionary dead ends. Focusing on the Atlantic bryophyte flora distributed across the archipelagos of the Azores, Madeira, the Canary Islands, Western Europe, and northwestern Africa, we used an integrative approach with species distribution modeling and population genetic analyses based on approximate Bayesian computation to determine whether this view applies to organisms with inherent high dispersal capacities. Genetic diversity was found to be higher in island than in continental populations, contributing to mounting evidence that, contrary to theoretical expectations, island populations are not necessarily genetically depauperate. Patterns of genetic variation among island and continental populations consistently fitted those simulated under a scenario of de novo foundation of continental populations from insular ancestors better than those expected if islands would represent a sink or a refugium of continental biodiversity. We, suggest that the northeastern Atlantic archipelagos have played a key role as a stepping stone for transoceanic migrants. Our results challenge the traditional notion that oceanic islands are the end of the colonization road and illustrate the significant role of oceanic islands as reservoirs of novel biodiversity for the assembly of continental floras.

  7. The Role of Pretend Play in Children's Cognitive Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris

    2002-01-01

    Noting that there is a growing body of evidence supporting the many connections between cognitive competence and high-quality pretend play, this article defines the cluster of concepts related to pretend play and cognition, and briefly synthesizes the latest research on the role of such play in children's cognitive, social, and academic…

  8. Role Voicing, Gender, and Age in Preschool Play Discourse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes play discourse participation frameworks in groups of different gender and age compositions, focusing on different ways that children "voice" a pretend play role. Uses a preschool classroom for an observational study. Finds significant differences in voicing used by older and younger play groups. Discusses results with respect to the…

  9. Museum Superheroes: The Role of Play in Young Children's Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krakowski, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the role of play in an art museum. Reflecting upon a kindergarten field trip to the Warhol Museum in which children's play was the centerpiece of the museum experience, the author examines what early childhood theorists have written about the value of play in young children's lives. She shows how the Warhol's program for…

  10. Foreign Ludicity in Online Role-Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Mei-Ya

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on an explorative case study which, in the first place, aimed to ascertain different types of foreign language play in online role-playing in "Second Life," and which, secondly aimed to describe how various sources of contextual support can explain this foreign language play. Students' written conversation was analyzed and…

  11. The Use of Role Play To Teach Communication Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Nancy; Shaver, Lisa

    Role play (a dramatic technique in which individuals improvise behaviors that illustrate acts expected of persons involved in defined situations) has several advantages for the classroom. Role play: (1) involves little or no additional instructional costs; (2) allows students to practice behaviors and skills; (3) closes the gap between training…

  12. Building Intelligent Concern for Others Through Role-Playing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaftel, Fannie R.; Shaftel, George

    This booklet on the educational techniques of role playing describes a method designed to help children become decision-makers by providing a life-related way to help them learn to solve problems between people. Part 1 describes the role-playing method in which children act out the ending of an unfinished "problem story" which stops with a dilemma…

  13. Role-Playing for Inhibited Students in Paternal Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Saadat, Abdullah I.; Afifi, Elhami A.

    1997-01-01

    Highlights classroom role playing in Saudi Arabian classrooms as a psychological aid that fosters self-confidence in inhibited, timid, hesitant, and passive students and relieves them of their paternal communicative limitations. Proposes an overall strategy for role-playing as an effective communicative activity that teachers can exploit to help…

  14. A Historical Journey in Science Education through Role Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guha, Smita

    2013-01-01

    In order to avoid a routine classroom environment, teachers often employ the use of role-plays. This is an effective strategy because it is essential for teachers to engage their students with information through various methods. Role-playing provides the children with the opportunity to incorporate multiple senses into a knowledge-based, fun…

  15. Table-Top Role Playing Game and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Tsui-shan

    2013-01-01

    The current study aims to observe whether individuals who engaged in table-top role playing game (TRPG) were more creative. Participants total 170 (52 TRPG players, 54 electronic role playing game (ERPG) players and 64 Non-players) aged from 19 to 63. In the current study, an online questionnaire is used, adopting the verbal subtests of…

  16. Role-Playing and Religion: Using Games to Educate Millennials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Adam L.

    2008-01-01

    I have been experimenting with using role-playing and games in my religion classes for several years and have found that students respond well to these pedagogical tools and methods. After reviewing my experiences, I explore the reasons for students' positive response. I argue that role-playing games capitalize on our students' educational…

  17. Role Playing: Applications in Hostage and Crisis Negotiation Skills Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hasselt, Vincent B.; Romano, Stephen J.; Vecchi, Gregory M.

    2008-01-01

    Role playing has been a mainstay of behavioral assessment for decades. In recent years, however, this analogue strategy has also enjoyed widespread application in the field of law enforcement. Most notably, role-play procedures have become an integral component of assessment and training efforts in hostage and crisis negotiation, which attempts to…

  18. Master's Students' Experiences in a Multicultural Counseling Role-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapisarda, Clarrice; Jencius, Marty; McGlothlin, Jason

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the experiences of master's students in regard to their participation in a multicultural role-play and review process (Jencius "et al." 2004). Whereas the literature has supported the use of role-plays as a multicultural training technique (Alvarez and Miville 2003; Vazquez and Garcia-Vazquez 2003), there is a distinct lack of…

  19. Using Role-Playing Games to Teach Astronomy: An Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since 1998, I've been experimenting with the use of role-playing games to teach astronomy. Students play the role of competing teams of researchers, racing to solve some astrophysical mystery. In this article, I review what has been learned from using these games around the world over the last eight years. The most common problem encountered is a…

  20. Blended Learning Using Role-Plays, Wikis and Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruyters, Michele; Douglas, Kathy; Law, Siew Fang

    2011-01-01

    Student learning about legal skills in legal education is increasingly seen as important. These legal skills include advocacy and negotiation. These skills are often taught through role-play. This article discusses the combination of role-plays with online tools, including wikis and blogs, to assist students to master legal skills. The article…

  1. Role playing: applications in hostage and crisis negotiation skills training.

    PubMed

    Van Hasselt, Vincent B; Romano, Stephen J; Vecchi, Gregory M

    2008-03-01

    Role playing has been a mainstay of behavioral assessment for decades. In recent years, however, this analogue strategy has also enjoyed widespread application in the field of law enforcement. Most notably, role-play procedures have become an integral component of assessment and training efforts in hostage and crisis negotiation, which attempts to resolve high-risk and often volatile situations in a peaceful, nonviolent manner when possible. The purpose of this paper is to (a) describe development and validation of a role-play test specifically geared toward law enforcement negotiators, (b) present different role-play formats that have been incorporated in law enforcement negotiation training, and (c) discuss limitations and considerations in use of these instruments. Suggestions for directions that future efforts in this area might take are offered. The heuristic value of role playing in crisis management, counterterrorism, and emergency and mass casualty disaster training exercises is also underscored.

  2. The Play's the Thing: Teachers' Roles in Children's Play. Early Childhood Education Series. 2nd Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Gretchen

    2011-01-01

    Responding to current debates on the place of play in schools, the authors have extensively revised their groundbreaking book. They explain how and why play is a critical part of children's development, as well as the central role adults have to promote it. This classic textbook and popular practitioner resource offers systematic descriptions and…

  3. Grammar J, as in Jazzing Around: The Roles "Play" Plays in Style.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrom, Hans

    This paper asks what role "play" plays in writing and how it can help a writer, whatever dread, boredom, skill, or ethnicity he/she brings to writing. Some of the ideas in the paper come from Africa, courtesy of Robert Farris Thompson. In his "philosophy of discourse" discussed in the paper, Thompson speaks of the "big picture," a culture's deep…

  4. Time perspective as a predictor of massive multiplayer online role-playing game playing.

    PubMed

    Lukavska, Katerina

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the relationship between the time perspective (TP) personality trait and massive multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) playing. We investigate the question of frequency of playing. The TP was measured with Zimbardo's TP Inventory (ZTPI), which includes five factors-past negative, past positive, present hedonistic, present fatalistic, and future. The study used data from 154 MMORPG players. We demonstrated that TP partially explained differences within a group of players with respect to the frequency of playing. Significant positive correlations were found between present factors and the amount of time spent playing MMORPGs, and significant negative correlation was found between the future factor and the time spent playing MMORPGs. Our study also revealed the influence of future-present balance on playing time. Players who scored lower in future-present balance variables (their present score was relatively high compared with their future score) reported higher values in playing time. In contrast to referential studies on TP and drug abuse and gambling, present fatalistic TP was demonstrated to be a stronger predictor of extensive playing than present hedonistic TP, which opened the question of motivation for playing. The advantage of our study compared with other personality-based studies lies in the fact that TP is a stable but malleable personality trait with a direct link to playing behavior. Therefore, TP is a promising conceptual resource for excessive playing therapy.

  5. Crucial Roles of Abscisic Acid Biogenesis in Virulence of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Carla A.; Lakshmanan, Venkatachalam; Donofrio, Nicole; Bais, Harsh P.

    2015-01-01

    Rice suffers dramatic yield losses due to blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. Pseudomonas chlororaphis EA105, a bacterium that was isolated from the rice rhizosphere, inhibits M. oryzae. It was shown previously that pre-treatment of rice with EA105 reduced the size of blast lesions through jasmonic acid (JA)- and ethylene (ETH)-mediated ISR. Abscisic acid (ABA) acts antagonistically toward salicylic acid (SA), JA, and ETH signaling, to impede plant defense responses. EA105 may be reducing the virulence of M. oryzae by preventing the pathogen from up-regulating the key ABA biosynthetic gene NCED3 in rice roots, as well as a β-glucosidase likely involved in activating conjugated inactive forms of ABA. However, changes in total ABA concentrations were not apparent, provoking the question of whether ABA concentration is an indicator of ABA signaling and response. In the rice-M. oryzae interaction, ABA plays a dual role in disease severity by increasing plant susceptibility and accelerating pathogenesis in the fungus itself. ABA is biosynthesized by M. oryzae. Further, exogenous ABA increased spore germination and appressoria formation, distinct from other plant growth regulators. EA105, which inhibits appressoria formation, counteracted the virulence-promoting effects of ABA on M. oryzae. The role of endogenous fungal ABA in blast disease was confirmed through the inability of a knockout mutant impaired in ABA biosynthesis to form lesions on rice. Therefore, it appears that EA105 is invoking multiple strategies in its protection of rice from blast including direct mechanisms as well as those mediated through plant signaling. ABA is a molecule that is likely implicated in both tactics. PMID:26648962

  6. Gene Targeting Reveals a Crucial Role for MTG8 in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Calabi, Franco; Pannell, Richard; Pavloska, Gordana

    2001-01-01

    The MTG8 (ETO) locus is involved in a reciprocal exchange with runx1 in the t(8;21) of acute myeloid leukemia. It is a member of a small gene family encoding transcriptional regulators that interact with corepressors and histone deacetylase. However, the physiologic cellular processes controlled by MTG8 are not known. In order to gain an insight into the latter, we have generated mutant mice with an insertional inactivation at the locus, which disrupts transcription of exon 2. The postnatal viability of homozygous mutants was greatly reduced. In approximately 25% the midgut was missing, whereas practically all pups surviving past the first 2 days showed severe growth impairment, which was likely due to a gross disruption of the gut architecture. The latter phenotype could be traced back to late embryonic development. No difference in gut cell differentiation or proliferation was found compared to wild-type littermates. Levels of factors known to be involved in gut morphogenesis were also unchanged. MTG8 is expressed in the outermost layers of the developing gut from at least E9.5. Thus, MTG8 plays a novel, essential role in the gastrointestinal system. PMID:11463846

  7. Resonant tectorial membrane motion in the inner ear: its crucial role in frequency tuning.

    PubMed Central

    Gummer, A W; Hemmert, W; Zenner, H P

    1996-01-01

    The tectorial membrane has long been postulated as playing a role in the exquisite sensitivity of the cochlea. In particular, it has been proposed that the tectorial membrane provides a second resonant system, in addition to that of the basilar membrane, which contributes to the amplification of the motion of the cochlear partition. Until now, technical difficulties had prevented vibration measurements of the tectorial membrane and, therefore, precluded direct evidence of a mechanical resonance. In the study reported here, the vibration of the tectorial membrane was measured in two orthogonal directions by using a novel method of combining laser interferometry with a photodiode technique. It is shown experimentally that the motion of the tectorial membrane is resonant at a frequency of 0.5 octave (oct) below the resonant frequency of the basilar membrane and polarized parallel to the reticular lamina. It is concluded that the resonant motion of the tectorial membrane is due to a parallel resonance between the mass of the tectorial membrane and the compliance of the stereocilia of the outer hair cells. Moreover, in combination with the contractile force of outer hair cells, it is proposed that inertial motion of the tectorial membrane provides the necessary conditions to allow positive feedback of mechanical energy into the cochlear partition, thereby amplifying and tuning the cochlear response. PMID:8710939

  8. Crucial roles of the pentatricopeptide repeat protein SOAR1 in Arabidopsis response to drought, salt and cold stresses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Mei, Chao; Liang, Shan; Yu, Yong-Tao; Lu, Kai; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2015-07-01

    Whereas several mitochondrial/chloroplast pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins have been reported to regulate plant responses to abiotic stresses, no nucleus-localized PPR protein has been found to play role in these processes. In the present experiment, we provide evidence that a cytosol-nucleus dual-localized PPR protein SOAR1, functioning to negatively regulate abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in seed germination and postgermination growth, is a crucial, positive regulator of plant response to abiotic stresses. Downregulation of SOAR1 expression reduces, but upregulation of SOAR1 expression enhances, ABA sensitivity in ABA-induced promotion of stomatal closure and inhibition of stomatal opening, and plant tolerance to multiple, major abiotic stresses including drought, high salinity and low temperature. Interestingly and importantly, the SOAR1-overexpression lines display strong abilities to tolerate drought, salt and cold stresses, with surprisingly high resistance to salt stress in germination and postgermination growth of seeds that are able to potentially germinate in seawater, while no negative effect on plant growth and development was observed. So, the SOAR1 gene is likely useful for improvement of crops by transgenic manipulation to enhance crop productivity in stressful conditions. Further experimental data suggest that SOAR1 likely regulates plant stress responses at least partly by integrating ABA-dependent and independent signaling pathways, which is different from the ABI2/ABI1 type 2C protein phosphatase-mediated ABA signaling. These findings help to understand highly complicated stress and ABA signalling network. PMID:26093896

  9. Crucial role of insulin in leptin maintenance: profound decrease in serum leptin by octreotide acetate in insulinoma subjects.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Nagasaka, S; Ishikawa, S; Nonaka, M; Fujibayashi, K; Saito, T; Kusaka, I; Higashiyama, M; Saito, T

    2000-06-01

    To further clarify the relationship between insulin and leptin, time course changes in plasma glucose, serum insulin and leptin levels were analyzed after subcutaneous administration of 100 microg octreotide acetate in two insulinoma subjects. Octreotide acetate induced a prompt decrease in serum insulin level, accompanied with an increase in plasma glucose in both patients. Following the decrease in serum insulin level, serum leptin concentrations were profoundly decreased by 66% and 44%, 8-12 hrs after octreotide injection; that is, the concentrations decreased from 41.1 to 13.8 ng/ml in patient 1, and from 17.5 to 9.8 ng/ml in patient 2. Daily profiles of plasma glucose, serum insulin and leptin without octreotide administration did not show such alterations in these indexes in patient 1. These data show that circulating leptin may be susceptible to decline dependent on the decrease in serum insulin, suggesting that insulin plays a crucial role in the maintenance of leptin secretion in humans.

  10. The crucial protective role of glutathione against tienilic acid hepatotoxicity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiya, Takayoshi Mori, Kazuhiko Hattori, Chiharu Kai, Kiyonori Kataoka, Hiroko Masubuchi, Noriko Jindo, Toshimasa Manabe, Sunao

    2008-10-15

    To investigate the hepatotoxic potential of tienilic acid in vivo, we administered a single oral dose of tienilic acid to Sprague-Dawley rats and performed general clinicopathological examinations and hepatic gene expression analysis using Affymetrix microarrays. No change in the serum transaminases was noted at up to 1000 mg/kg, although slight elevation of the serum bile acid and bilirubin, and very mild hepatotoxic changes in morphology were observed. In contrast to the marginal clinicopathological changes, marked upregulation of the genes involved in glutathione biosynthesis [glutathione synthetase and glutamate-cysteine ligase (Gcl)], oxidative stress response [heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase quinone 1] and phase II drug metabolism (glutathione S-transferase and UDP glycosyltransferase 1A6) were noted after 3 or 6 h post-dosing. The hepatic reduced glutathione level decreased at 3-6 h, and then increased at 24 or 48 h, indicating that the upregulation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated gene and the late increase in hepatic glutathione are protective responses against the oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses caused by tienilic acid. In a subsequent experiment, tienilic acid in combination with L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of Gcl caused marked elevation of serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) with extensive centrilobular hepatocyte necrosis, whereas BSO alone showed no hepatotoxicity. The elevation of ALT by this combination was observed at the same dose levels of tienilic acid as the upregulation of the Nrf2-regulated genes by tienilic acid alone. In conclusion, these results suggest that the impairment of glutathione biosynthesis may play a critical role in the development of tienilic acid hepatotoxicity through extensive oxidative and/or electrophilic stresses.

  11. Quantifying GHG Emissions From Terrestrial Ecosystems In Africa - The Crucial Role Of Livestock Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterbach-Bahl, K.; Pelster, D.; Goopy, J.

    2015-12-01

    Knowledge on GHG fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems in Africa remains limited. Published field trials on soil GHG fluxes are summarized in approx. 10 research papers. Emissions related to livestock production, which are dominating most current estimates, rely on modelling work. Thus, uncertainties for African GHG fluxes are likely the highest at continental scale. Even though total GHG fluxes from agricultural soils seem to be low (insufficient fertilizer use/ soil degradation) the opposite might be true for livestock systems. Emissions per kg edible milk protein in SSA are a magnitude higher as for Europe (>100 kg CO2eq kg-1). Differences are related to feed intake, quality and availability, species and breeds, etc. Besides, handling of animal wastes is often less sophisticated, resulting in high nutrient losses and GHG fluxes. Estimates remain unconstrained, since in-situ measurements are missing and emission factors, developed elsewhere, are applied without verification to the African situation. To support African countries to improve emission reporting, to improve productivity of the agricultural sector while minimizing GHG fluxes and to allow them to play a vital role in emission trading, , requires to build in-continent research capacity. The International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), has recently established a state-of-the art GHG laboratory in East Africa, which is envisioned to build a knowledge hub for environmental research. First measurement results indicate that EF for excreta applications to rangelands might be largely overestimated, mainly due to its rather low N concentrations. On the other hand, EF for ruminant CH4 emissions might be strongly underestimated, since those do not consider that livestock is often held at sub-maintenance levels. Thus, an international initiative is needed to support African countries to learn about land based GHG fluxes and to build research capacity. When do we start?

  12. Effects of Videotaped Role Playing on Nurses' Therapeutic Communication Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Kay F.; Kroth, Jerome A.

    1976-01-01

    Research determining the effectiveness of videotape recorded (VTR) role playing as a teaching technique was conducted on nurses attending continuing education classes in verbal and nonverbal therapeutic communication skills. VTR appears to be an effective technique. (LH)

  13. What Role Does Obstetrical Care Play in Childbirth?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications What role does obstetrical care play in childbirth? Skip sharing on ... has ruptured (the woman’s water breaks), but labor does not start within 24 to 48 hours When ...

  14. Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Fred; Sharapan, Hedda

    1993-01-01

    Contends that, in childhood, work and play seem to come together. Says that for young children their play is their work, and the more adults encourage children to play, the more they emphasize important lifelong resource. Examines some uses of children's play, making and building, artwork, dramatic play, monsters and superheroes, gun play, and…

  15. Representation of Cultural Role-Play for Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santarelli, Thomas; Pepe, Aaron; Rosenzweiz, Larry; Paulus, John; Yi, Ahn Na

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Defense (000) has successfully applied a number of methods for cultural familiarization training ranging from stand-up classroom training, to face-to-face live role-play, to so-called smart-cards. Recent interest has turned to the use of single and mUlti-player gaming technologies to augment these traditional methods of cultural familiarization. One such system, termed CulturePad, has been designed as a game-based role-play environment suitable for use in training and experimentation involving cultural roleplay scenarios. This paper describes the initial CulturePad effort focused on a literature review regarding the use of role-play for cultural training and a feasibility assessment of using a game-mediated environment for role-play. A small-scale pilot involving cultural experts was conducted to collect qualitative behavioral data comparing live role-play to game-mediated role-play in a multiplayer gaming engine.

  16. Crucial role of Toll-like receptors in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tsou, Tsui-Chun; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Yeh, Szu-Ching; Tsai, Feng-Yuan; Chao, How-Ran

    2013-12-15

    Our previous studies indicated that zinc induced inflammatory response in both vascular endothelial cells and promonocytes. Here, we asked if other metals could cause the similar effect on vascular endothelial cells and tried to determine its underlying mechanism. Following screening of fifteen metals, zinc and nickel were identified with a marked proinflammatory effect, as determined by ICAM-1 and IL-8 induction, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Inhibiting protein expression of myeloid differentiation primary response protein-88 (MyD88), a Toll-like receptor (TLR) adaptor acting as a TLR-signaling transducer, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, suggesting the critical roles of TLRs in the inflammatory response. Blockage of TLR-4 signaling by CLI-095, a TLR-4 inhibitor, completely inhibited the nickel-induced ICAM-1 and IL-8 expression and NFκB activation. The same CLI-095 treatment significantly blocked the zinc-induced IL-8 expression, however with no significant effect on the ICAM-1 expression and a minor inhibitory effect on the NFκB activation. The finding demonstrated the differential role of TLR-4 in regulation of the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response, where TLR-4 played a dominant role in NFκB activation by nickel, but not by zinc. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB by adenovirus-mediated IκBα expression and Bay 11-7025, an inhibitor of cytokine-induced IκB-α phosphorylation, significantly attenuated the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory responses, indicating the critical of NFκB in the process. The study demonstrates the crucial role of TLRs in the zinc/nickel-induced inflammatory response in vascular endothelial cells and herein deciphers a potential important difference in NFκB activation via TLRs. The study provides a molecular basis for linkage between zinc/nickel exposure and pathogenesis of the metal-related inflammatory vascular disease. - Highlights: • Both zinc and nickel cause

  17. The Role of Play in Children's Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Sue; Downing, Julia; Shemilt, Rise

    2014-10-01

    Play is the universal language of childhood and the time and opportunity to play is every child's right. The role of play as a vehicle for communication, a tool for distraction and its value in the holistic development of a normal child is without dispute. The role and value of play increase proportionately when a child is made more vulnerable through illness or disability. Despite this, providing time and opportunities to play can be overlooked or considered to be of little importance or relevance when the focus of the adult carers is the amelioration of clinical symptoms of the illness and on lessening the psychological impact the illness may have on the child. This paper outlines the role and the value of play as an integral component in the provision of palliative care for children with chronic, life-threatening and life-limiting conditions. It will show how providing appropriate equipment, sufficient time and relevant play opportunities not only improves the very sick child's psychological wellbeing, but also allows the child to cast aside the confines and restrictions imposed upon them by their illness and for a few golden moments to be nothing more than a child at play.

  18. The Role of Play in Children’s Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Sue; Downing, Julia; Shemilt, Rise

    2014-01-01

    Play is the universal language of childhood and the time and opportunity to play is every child’s right. The role of play as a vehicle for communication, a tool for distraction and its value in the holistic development of a normal child is without dispute. The role and value of play increases proportionately when a child is made more vulnerable through illness or disability. Despite this, providing time and opportunities to play can be overlooked or considered to be of little importance or relevance when the focus of the adult carers is the amelioration of clinical symptoms of the illness and on lessening the psychological impact the illness may have on the child. This paper outlines the role and the value of play as an integral component in the provision of palliative care for children with chronic, life-threatening and life-limiting conditions. It will show how providing appropriate equipment, sufficient time and relevant play opportunities not only improves the very sick child’s psychological wellbeing, but also allows the child to cast aside the confines and restrictions imposed upon them by their illness and for a few golden moments to be nothing more than a child at play. PMID:27417481

  19. Crucial role of strategy updating for coexistence of strategies in interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianlei; Zhang, Chunyan; Cao, Ming; Weissing, Franz J

    2015-04-01

    Network models are useful tools for studying the dynamics of social interactions in a structured population. After a round of interactions with the players in their local neighborhood, players update their strategy based on the comparison of their own payoff with the payoff of one of their neighbors. Here we show that the assumptions made on strategy updating are of crucial importance for the strategy dynamics. In the first step, we demonstrate that seemingly small deviations from the standard assumptions on updating have major implications for the evolutionary outcome of two cooperation games: cooperation can more easily persist in a Prisoner's Dilemma game, while it can go more easily extinct in a Snowdrift game. To explain these outcomes, we develop a general model for the updating of states in a network that allows us to derive conditions for the steady-state coexistence of states (or strategies). The analysis reveals that coexistence crucially depends on the number of agents consulted for updating. We conclude that updating rules are as important for evolution on a network as network structure and the nature of the interaction. PMID:25974434

  20. Crucial role of strategy updating for coexistence of strategies in interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianlei; Zhang, Chunyan; Cao, Ming; Weissing, Franz J.

    2015-04-01

    Network models are useful tools for studying the dynamics of social interactions in a structured population. After a round of interactions with the players in their local neighborhood, players update their strategy based on the comparison of their own payoff with the payoff of one of their neighbors. Here we show that the assumptions made on strategy updating are of crucial importance for the strategy dynamics. In the first step, we demonstrate that seemingly small deviations from the standard assumptions on updating have major implications for the evolutionary outcome of two cooperation games: cooperation can more easily persist in a Prisoner's Dilemma game, while it can go more easily extinct in a Snowdrift game. To explain these outcomes, we develop a general model for the updating of states in a network that allows us to derive conditions for the steady-state coexistence of states (or strategies). The analysis reveals that coexistence crucially depends on the number of agents consulted for updating. We conclude that updating rules are as important for evolution on a network as network structure and the nature of the interaction.

  1. Role Play in Nutrition Education for the Young Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marbach, Ellen S.; Yawkey, Thomas Daniels

    The Curry and Arnaud model for role playing is described and discussed as it relates to nutrition education for young children. The components of the model are: (1) developing the role, (2) using thematic content, (3) displaying feelings (in socially acceptable ways), (4) distinguishing between reality and fantasy, and (5) forming interpersonal…

  2. "Free Vote": Role-Playing Parliament in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Lynn

    1977-01-01

    A Canadian political role-playing sequence helps secondary students understand the workings of Parliament and clarify their own values. The issue under debate is abolition or retention of capital punishment. Article describes rationale, teacher's instructions, roles, related legislature, rules of Parliamentary debate, public opinion polls, news…

  3. Role Playing: Uses and Abuses in Teaching Sociology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Jerry

    Teaching sociology through role playing involves students in acting out roles learned in the socialization process. The content of the game is the simulation of an area of social reality, either simple or complex. Participation in this activity presents students with alternative world views, develops problem solving and behavioral skills, and…

  4. Empathic Features and Absorption in Fantasy Role-Playing.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Anissa; Wickramasekera, Ian E; Pekala, Ronald J; Rivers, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the levels of empathy and absorption of individuals who regularly play fantasy and science fiction role-playing games. A hypothesis was developed that higher levels of empathy would be found in individuals who fantasy role-play based upon previous research in hypnosis such as J. R. Hilgard's (1970) imaginative involvement hypothesis, research into the "fantasy prone" personality type (Wilson & Barber, 1981), and the empathic involvement hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003). The participants in the current study were 127 fantasy role-players who volunteered and completed the Davis Interpersonal Reactivity Index (empathy) and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (absorption). The results demonstrated that those who play fantasy role-playing games scored significantly higher than the comparison group on the IRI scale of empathy, confirming the hypothesis that fantasy role-players report experiencing higher levels of empathic involvement with others. Correlational analysis between the measures demonstrated a significant positive correlation between empathy and absorption (r = .43, p < .001). These results collectively suggest that fantasy role-players have a uniquely empathically-imaginative style. The results also confirm and extend previous findings on the relationship between empathy and absorption as predicted by the Empathic Involvement Hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003).

  5. (Role) Playing Politics in an Environmental Chemistry Lecture Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smythe, A. Meredith; Higgins, Daniel A.

    2007-02-01

    Mock congressional hearings are described as an active learning, role-playing activity for the environmental chemistry lecture course. Each student plays dual roles in this activity, alternately serving as a witness and committee member on hearing topics selected by the class. As witnesses, the students assume the roles of scientists, politicians, industrial representatives, and environmental group representatives and present both written and oral arguments for or against a particular issue. At other times, they play the role of congressional committee members and question the witnesses. Hearings are held on topics related to renewable and nonrenewable energy; hazardous waste; water, soil, and air pollution; water quality; and genetic engineering. This activity greatly enriches the educational experience for the students by allowing them to become actively engaged in learning and debating specific issues related to course materials.

  6. May "mitochondrial eve" and mitochondrial haplogroups play a role in neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease?

    PubMed

    Ienco, Elena Caldarazzo; Simoncini, Costanza; Orsucci, Daniele; Petrucci, Loredana; Filosto, Massimiliano; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele

    2011-02-22

    Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, play a critical role in several metabolic processes and apoptotic pathways. Multiple evidences suggest that mitochondria may be crucial in ageing-related neurodegenerative diseases. Moreover, mitochondrial haplogroups have been linked to multiple area of medicine, from normal ageing to diseases, including neurodegeneration. Polymorphisms within the mitochondrial genome might lead to impaired energy generation and to increased amount of reactive oxygen species, having either susceptibility or protective role in several diseases. Here, we highlight the role of the mitochondrial haplogroups in the pathogenetic cascade leading to diseases, with special attention to Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Qualitative Evaluation of a Role Play Bullying Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Gordon L.; Brown, Kathryn; Grubb, Paula; Shay, Amy; Montoya, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Bullying against nurses is becoming a pervasive problem. In this article, a role play simulation designed for undergraduate nursing students is described. In addition, the evaluation findings from a subsample of students who participated in a role play simulation addressing bullying behaviors are reported. Focus group sessions were completed with a subset of eight students who participated in the intervention. Sessions were audiorecorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using Colaizzi’s procedural steps for qualitative analysis. Themes derived from the data were “The Experience of Being Bullied”, “Implementation of the Program”, “Desired Outcome of the Program”, and “Context of Bullying in the Nursing Profession”. Role play simulation was an effective and active learning strategy to diffuse education on bullying in nursing practice. Bullying in nursing was identified as a problem worthy of incorporation into the undergraduate nursing curriculum. To further enhance the learning experience with role play simulation, adequate briefing instructions, opportunity to opt out of the role play, and comprehensive debriefing are essential. PMID:26504502

  8. Crucial role for the Nalp3 inflammasome in the immunostimulatory properties of aluminium adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Eisenbarth, Stephanie C; Colegio, Oscar R; O'Connor, William; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S; Flavell, Richard A

    2008-06-19

    Aluminium adjuvants, typically referred to as 'alum', are the most commonly used adjuvants in human and animal vaccines worldwide, yet the mechanism underlying the stimulation of the immune system by alum remains unknown. Toll-like receptors are critical in sensing infections and are therefore common targets of various adjuvants used in immunological studies. Although alum is known to induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines in vitro, it has been repeatedly demonstrated that alum does not require intact Toll-like receptor signalling to activate the immune system. Here we show that aluminium adjuvants activate an intracellular innate immune response system called the Nalp3 (also known as cryopyrin, CIAS1 or NLRP3) inflammasome. Production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18 by macrophages in response to alum in vitro required intact inflammasome signalling. Furthermore, in vivo, mice deficient in Nalp3, ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain) or caspase-1 failed to mount a significant antibody response to an antigen administered with aluminium adjuvants, whereas the response to complete Freund's adjuvant remained intact. We identify the Nalp3 inflammasome as a crucial element in the adjuvant effect of aluminium adjuvants; in addition, we show that the innate inflammasome pathway can direct a humoral adaptive immune response. This is likely to affect how we design effective, but safe, adjuvants in the future.

  9. Crucial role of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses in HRA

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T.G.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.

    1992-10-01

    This paper addresses one major cause for large uncertainties in human reliability analysis (HRA) results, that is, an absence of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses. All too often this crucial step in the HRA process is done in a cursory fashion using word of mouth or written procedures which themselves may incompletely or inaccurately represent the human action sequences and human error vulnerabilities being analyzed. The paper examines the potential contributions these detailed analyses can make in achieving quantitative and qualitative HRA results which are: (1) creditable, that is, minimize uncertainty, (2) auditable, that is, systematically linking quantitative results and qualitative information from which the results are derived, (3) capable of supporting root cause analyses on human reliability factors determined to be major contributors to risk, and (4) capable of repeated measures and being combined with similar results from other analyses to examine HRA issues transcending individual systems and facilities. Based on experience analyzing test and commercial nuclear reactors, and medical applications of nuclear technology, an iterative process is suggested for doing detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses using documentation reviews, open-ended and structured interviews, direct observations, and group techniques. Finally, the paper concludes that detailed analyses done in this manner by knowledgeable human factors practitioners, can contribute significantly to the credibility, auditability, causal factor analysis, and combining goals of the HRA.

  10. Role-Playing in Analytical Chemistry: The Alumni Speak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Paul T.; Walters, John P.

    2000-08-01

    Cooperative learning constructs take a variety of forms. Over the last 15 years, one such pedagogical structure, role-playing, has been used in the analytical chemistry curriculum at St. Olaf College. A long-term assessment of this teaching method was conducted through use of a survey distributed to alumni graduating between 1987 and 1997. The graduates overwhelmingly indicated that the use of role-playing had a positive impact on their careers as well as their lives. Furthermore, many non-achievement learning outcomes attributed to cooperative learning experiences were reinforced through the survey response. Role-playing created an effective environment in which to develop communication and collaborative skills in addition to the technical skills that are essential to analytical chemistry. These results support continued evolutionary development of this teaching method.

  11. p63 steps into the limelight: crucial roles in the suppression of tumorigenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaohua; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Flores, Elsa R.

    2014-01-01

    The role of p63 in cancer has been an area of intense debate and controversy. Is TP63 (which encodes p63) a tumour suppressor gene or an oncogene? This debate is partly due to the complexity of the gene. There are several p63 isoforms — some with tumour suppressive functions and others with oncogenic functions. In this Opinion article, we focus on the recent advances in understanding p63 biology and its roles in cancer. In this regard, we discuss the role of p63 in multiple stem cell compartments, ageing, in the response to DNA damage and in DNA repair. Finally, we highlight the importance of understanding the interactions between all three p53 family members and the potential impact of this knowledge on cancer therapy and regenerative medicine. PMID:23344544

  12. Role-playing in the problem-based learning class.

    PubMed

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2012-01-01

    Learning and teaching have been conceptualized and executed in many styles, such as self-learning, peer learning, and interaction between the learner and mentor. Today, openness to alternative ideas and embracing innovative approaches in nursing education are encouraged in order to meet students' learning interests and needs, and to address ever-changing healthcare requests. Problem-based learning has been widely adopted in nursing education, with various positive effects on students' learning, such as motivated learning, team work, problem-solving skills and critical thinking. Role-plays have been demonstrated as an effective learning strategy that includes an active and experiential feature that facilitates students' autonomy in their health-related learning. However, there is a lack of discussion of whether and how role-play can be used in problem-based learning (PBL). This paper shows the development of a classroom-based innovation using role-play in the PBL class for higher diploma year-one nurse students (a total of 20 students, five per group). This paper consists of five sections: a) the literature on PBL and nurse education, and role-plays as the innovation; b) the PBL case scenario with the illustration of the two role-play scripts, c) student evaluation on role-play in the PBL class; d) discussions on both achievements and limitations of this innovation, and e) the conclusion. It is hoped that this paper will be an example to other nurse educators who are keen on exploring interactive and student-driven learning and teaching strategies in the PBL class.

  13. The Crucial Role of School Nurses: Ensuring Immunization Compliance, Education, and Documentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dychkowski, Linda

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the current status of immunizations, the latest immunization recommendations, and the important role of school nurses in ensuring that all students are properly immunized with the correct immunizations at the correct time. An alphabetical listing of immunizations provides specific details. The paper also discusses myths versus facts…

  14. Environmental consequences of shale gas exploitation and the crucial role of rock microfracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Francois

    2015-04-01

    The growing exploitation of unconventional gas and oil resources has dramatically changed the international market of hydrocarbons in the past ten years. However, several environmental concerns have also been identified such as the increased microseismicity, the leakage of gas into freshwater aquifers, and the enhanced water-rock interactions inducing the release of heavy metals and other toxic elements in the produced water. In all these processes, fluids are transported into a network of fracture, ranging from nanoscale microcracks at the interface between minerals and the kerogen of the source rock, to well-developed fractures at the meter scale. Characterizing the fracture network and the mechanisms of its formation remains a crucial goal. A major difficulty when analyzing fractures from core samples drilled at depth is that some of them are produced by the coring process, while some other are produced naturally at depth by the coupling between geochemical and mechanical forces. Here, I present new results of high resolution synchrotron 3D X-ray microtomography imaging of shale samples, at different resolutions, to characterize their microfractures and their mechanisms of formation. The heterogeneities of rock microstructure are also imaged, as they create local stress concentrations where cracks may nucleate or along which they propagate. The main results are that microcracks form preferentially along kerogen-mineral interfaces and propagate along initial heterogeneities according to the local stress direction, connecting to increase the total volume of fractured rock. Their lifetime is also an important parameter because they may seal by fluid circulation, fluid-rock interactions, and precipitation of a cement. Understanding the multi-scale processes of fracture network development in shales and the coupling with fluid circulation represents a key challenge for future research directions.

  15. Modeling plasma-based CO2 conversion: crucial role of the dissociation cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Wang, Weizong; Berthelot, Antonin; Guerra, Vasco

    2016-10-01

    Plasma-based CO2 conversion is gaining increasing interest worldwide. A large research effort is devoted to improving the energy efficiency. For this purpose, it is very important to understand the underlying mechanisms of the CO2 conversion. The latter can be obtained by computer modeling, describing in detail the behavior of the various plasma species and all relevant chemical processes. However, the accuracy of the modeling results critically depends on the accuracy of the assumed input data, like cross sections. This is especially true for the cross section of electron impact dissociation, as the latter process is believed to proceed through electron impact excitation, but it is not clear from the literature which excitation channels effectively lead to dissociation. Therefore, the present paper discusses the effect of different electron impact dissociation cross sections reported in the literature on the calculated CO2 conversion, for a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) and a microwave (MW) plasma. Comparison is made to experimental data for the DBD case, to elucidate which cross section might be the most realistic. This comparison reveals that the cross sections proposed by Itikawa and by Polak and Slovetsky both seem to underestimate the CO2 conversion. The cross sections recommended by Phelps with thresholds of 7 eV and 10.5 eV yield a CO2 conversion only slightly lower than the experimental data, but the sum of both cross sections overestimates the values, indicating that these cross sections represent dissociation, but most probably also include other (pure excitation) channels. Our calculations indicate that the choice of the electron impact dissociation cross section is crucial for the DBD, where this process is the dominant mechanism for CO2 conversion. In the MW plasma, it is only significant at pressures up to 100 mbar, while it is of minor importance for higher pressures, when dissociation proceeds mainly through collisions of CO2 with heavy

  16. Patient care simulations: role playing to enhance clinical understanding.

    PubMed

    Comer, Shirley K

    2005-01-01

    Role-play techniques can serve as an effective substitute for, and supplement to, simulation technology when teaching clinical nursing skills. They provide risk-free opportunities to practice clinical skills and develop clinical judgment. A two-phase patient care simulation, performed in real time, is described. Students are presented with a scenario and work cooperatively in role-playing appropriate care, with one student using a prepared script to assume the role of patient. The class functions as a resource for four students who assume the nursing role. Students reported increased understanding of course material as a result of participation in the clinical simulation scenario. Faculty observed a decreased failure rate on the corresponding course examination.

  17. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation

    PubMed Central

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant’s response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27213330

  18. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-05-18

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant's response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis.

  19. Legume NADPH Oxidases Have Crucial Roles at Different Stages of Nodulation.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Jesús; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Cárdenas, Luis; Quinto, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Plant NADPH oxidases, formerly known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues (RBOHs), are plasma membrane enzymes dedicated to reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These oxidases are implicated in a wide variety of processes, ranging from tissue and organ growth and development to signaling pathways in response to abiotic and biotic stimuli. Research on the roles of RBOHs in the plant's response to biotic stresses has mainly focused on plant-pathogen interactions; nonetheless, recent findings have shown that these oxidases are also involved in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. The legume-rhizobia symbiosis leads to the formation of the root nodule, where rhizobia reduce atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia. A complex signaling and developmental pathway in the legume root hair and root facilitate rhizobial entrance and nodule organogenesis, respectively. Interestingly, several reports demonstrate that RBOH-mediated ROS production displays versatile roles at different stages of nodulation. The evidence collected to date indicates that ROS act as signaling molecules that regulate rhizobial invasion and also function in nodule senescence. This review summarizes discoveries that support the key and versatile roles of various RBOH members in the legume-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27213330

  20. Biography and Role Playing: Fostering Empathy in Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poorman, Paula B.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses a means for increasing undergraduate and graduate students' level of empathy. Assigned students to write about and role play a character that they create who suffers from a psychological disorder. Explains that after quantitative and qualitative analyses it was demonstrated that students' empathy increased. (CMK)

  1. The Role Play: More than Make-Believe.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Martin

    At the University of Akron's Community and Technical College, the major student project for "Principles of Advertising" is the development of ad campaigns for an assigned product. Two groups of students, playing the role of advertising agencies, compete with each other while the remaining students in the class act as the clients. Among the…

  2. A Role Play on Export Decisions and the Exchange Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotterell, Ann

    1987-01-01

    Explains that the goal of this exercise is to encourage an understanding of the effects of exchange rate changes and the use of forward rates. Provides a role play that involves students working in groups to decide whether to export a consignment of golf trollies to Italy and shortbread to Canada. (BSR)

  3. A Recruiting and Hiring Role-Play: An Experiential Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newberry, Robert; Collins, Marianne K.

    2012-01-01

    Creating experiential learning opportunities that engage students, meet marketing curricula objectives, and fit the application in a traditional semester course is extremely challenging. This paper describes a role-playing simulation offered concurrently to the professional selling and sales management classes in which the selling students act as…

  4. Role Playing and Mind Mapping Issues on Nitrate Contamination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, W. L.

    1996-01-01

    Presents mind-mapping and role-playing exercises designed to guide students in the exploration, expression, and integration of varying viewpoints and opinions of a controversial topic (nitrate contamination of water supply); illustrate the importance of applying soil fertility principles to environmental and agronomic management; and encourage…

  5. Try This: Role-Play Party: Talking about Jobs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benucci, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a stand-alone language-learning activity emphasizing speaking. Specifically, students will participate in role plays to describe occupations and job-related duties. The level of the activity is upper beginner or low intermediate and the time required is 45-60 minutes. The goals are: (1) to ask and answer small-talk questions…

  6. The Ecology of Role Play: Intentionality and Cultural Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papadopoulou, Marianna

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the evolutionary function of children's pretence. The everyday, cultural environment that children engage with is of a highly complex structure. Human adaptation, thus, becomes, by analogy, an equally complex process that requires the development of life skills. Whilst in role play children engage in "mimesis" and recreate the…

  7. Script Recognition, Articulation and Expansion in Children's Role Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corsaro, William A.

    1983-01-01

    Suggests that children's use of social scripts for the production of sustained dialog in peer interaction depends on the nature of role play and that their attempts at script expansion are precursors to adults' recognition of the potential of conversation for self-expression. (FL)

  8. A Forensic Psychology Exercise: Role Playing and the Insanity Defense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fass, Michael E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents a role playing exercise that provides students with an introduction to forensic psychology and the insanity defense. Reports that 87% of the students found this exercise to be an enjoyable teaching technique and useful in providing an understanding of the insanity defense. Concludes that the exercise increases student interest and…

  9. Using Online Role Play to Teach Internet Safety Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wishart, J. M.; Oades, C. E.; Morris, M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of Net-Detectives, a creative online role play activity aimed at 9-12 year olds. Net-Detectives forms part of Kidsmart, an Internet awareness programme aimed at school children. It was evaluated through a multiple method data collection using questionnaire surveys, follow up telephone interviews with teachers…

  10. Confronting Prejudiced Comments: Effectiveness of a Role-Playing Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Timothy J.; McDonough, Tracy A.; Bodle, James H.

    2010-01-01

    We examined whether a role-playing exercise, similar to that developed by Plous (2000), increases students' ability to generate effective responses to prejudiced comments. We assessed social psychology students' (n = 23) ability to respond to prejudiced comments before and after the exercise, and compared their performance to that of 2 other…

  11. Reusable, Lifelike Virtual Humans for Mentoring and Role-Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Edward M.

    2007-01-01

    Lifelike, interactive digital characters, serving as mentors and role-playing actors, have been shown to significantly improve learner motivation and retention. However, the cost of modeling such characters, authoring and editing their interactions, and delivering them over limited-bandwidth connections can be prohibitive. This paper describes a…

  12. Elicited Role-Play of Commands and Requests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strage, Amy; And Others

    Children's ability to understand the implied messages in indirect speech was investigated using a role play elicitation task. Subjects were asked to complete story endings using puppets for several scenerios involving a mother and her four children. In each of the stories the mother gives an indirect directive which is supposed to get the children…

  13. Black Blizzard: Designing Role-Play Simulations for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linser, Roni; Ree-Lindstad, Nina; Vold, Tone

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines and analyses some key design issues we encountered in the process of creating an online role-play simulation (RPS) for a course targeting personnel involved in crisis management. Titled "Black Blizzard" the RPS aims to enable an exploration of typical issues and problems that arise in cross and multi-cultural international…

  14. From MMORPG to a Classroom Multiplayer Presential Role Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Susaeta, Heinz; Jimenez, Felipe; Nussbaum, Miguel; Gajardo, Ignacio; Andreu, Juan Jose; Villalta, Marco

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) has grown enormously, with communities of players reaching into the millions. Their fantasy narratives present multiple challenges created by the virtual environment and/or other players. The games' potential for education stems from the fact that players are immersed in a…

  15. Role Play and Simulation: Returning to Teaching for Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clapper, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how simulation and role play can be important learning strategies that will create long-lasting understanding. Simulation involves participating in a very real learning experience that closely resembles an actual setting. These actual settings may be replicated by either employing models or mannequins or in the case of role…

  16. Interdisciplinary Role Play between Social Work and Theater Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennison, Susan T.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching BSW and MSW students beginning interviewing and relationship-building skills is essential in order to prepare them for practice with clients. In social work methods courses, role plays are commonly-used instructional strategies for helping foundation-level students acquire these initial practice skills. Despite the popularity of this…

  17. Exploring the Concept of Sustainable Development through Role-Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchs, Arnaud; Blanchard, Odile

    2011-01-01

    The concept of sustainable development is used in everyday life by the general public, alongside researchers, institutions, and private companies. Nevertheless, its definition is far from being unequivocal. Clarifying the outline of the concept seems necessary. We have created a role-play for this purpose. Our article aims at depicting its main…

  18. The Korean War: A Role-Play to Remember

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krebs, Marjori M.

    2009-01-01

    The Korean War is often given a cursory glance, if that, in U.S. foreign relations today. This article provides all the information necessary to conduct a role-play in one class period to help students understand the events of the war. Introductory and follow-up questions are also included to stimulate discussion and to connect the events of a war…

  19. Role-Playing as a Method of Teaching Civilization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbin, Diane H.

    This paper describes how role-playing was used in a French culture and civilization class at Eastern Washington State College. The class was conducted entirely in French, and each class member read the same material for each day. L. Wylie's "Les Francais" was used as the class text, and "Comment vivent les Francais" by Girod and Grand-Clement was…

  20. Role-playing in nursing theory: engaging online students.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Cheryle; Adelman, Deborah S

    2010-04-01

    The teaching and learning of nursing theory, at all program levels, is challenging due to the complexity and abstract nature of its content, the dry nature in which the study of theory often is approached, a perception of disconnect from practice, and faculty discomfort and avoidance of the subject matter. Adapting creative educational strategies to the online environment is an ongoing challenge for educators. Role-play relates well to the constructivist basis of creating personal meaning based on the individual's experiences. This article examines the use of role-play as an educational strategy for teaching nursing theory in an online baccalaureate program. In a core professional issues course, students adopt the persona of a specific nursing theorist, interacting with other "nursing theorists" played by their peers. Student engagement and active learning reflect excitement and interest, and course evaluations have been extremely positive for this content and method.

  1. The Crucial Role of Zona Pellucida in Cryopreservation of Oocytes by Vitrification

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung Kyu; Yue, Tao; Huang, Haishui; Zhao, Gang; Zhang, Mingjun; He, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes have a proteinaceous hydrogel-like outer shell known as the zona pellucida (ZP) that semi-encloses their plasma membrane and cytoplasm. In this study, we cryopreserved mouse oocytes either with or without ZP by vitrification. Our results show that the presence of an intact ZP could significantly improve the post-vitrification survival of oocytes to 92.1% from 13.3% for oocytes without ZP. Moreover, there was no significant difference in embryonic development between fresh and cryopreserved oocytes with ZP after in vitro fertilization (IVF). Further atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis showed that the intact oocytes with ZP have an elastic modulus that is more than 85 times higher than that of oocytes without ZP. This may partially explain the important role of ZP in protecting the oocytes by resisting the mechanical stress due to possible ice formation during cryopreservation by vitrification. Collectively, this study reveals a new biophysical role of ZP during vitrification of oocytes and suggests microencapsulation of the many mammalian cells without a ZP in ZP-like hydrogel is an effective strategy to improve their survival post cryopreservation by vitrification. PMID:26297946

  2. Brain stimulation reveals crucial role of overcoming self-centeredness in self-control

    PubMed Central

    Soutschek, Alexander; Ruff, Christian C.; Strombach, Tina; Kalenscher, Tobias; Tobler, Philippe N.

    2016-01-01

    Neurobiological models of self-control predominantly focus on the role of prefrontal brain mechanisms involved in emotion regulation and impulse control. We provide evidence for an entirely different neural mechanism that promotes self-control by overcoming bias for the present self, a mechanism previously thought to be mainly important for interpersonal decision-making. In two separate studies, we show that disruptive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the temporo-parietal junction—a brain region involved in overcoming one’s self-centered perspective—increases the discounting of delayed and prosocial rewards. This effect of TMS on temporal and social discounting is accompanied by deficits in perspective-taking and does not reflect altered spatial reorienting and number recognition. Our findings substantiate a fundamental commonality between the domains of self-control and social decision-making and highlight a novel aspect of the neurocognitive processes involved in self-control. PMID:27774513

  3. Not just inductive: a crucial mechanical role for the endoderm during heart tube assembly

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Taber, Larry A.

    2012-01-01

    The heart is the first functioning organ to form during development. During gastrulation, the cardiac progenitors reside in the lateral plate mesoderm but maintain close contact with the underlying endoderm. In amniotes, these bilateral heart fields are initially organized as a pair of flat epithelia that move towards the embryonic midline and fuse above the anterior intestinal portal (AIP) to form the heart tube. This medial motion is typically attributed to active mesodermal migration over the underlying endoderm. In this model, the role of the endoderm is twofold: to serve as a mechanically passive substrate for the crawling mesoderm and to secrete various growth factors necessary for cardiac specification and differentiation. Here, using computational modeling and experiments on chick embryos, we present evidence supporting an active mechanical role for the endoderm during heart tube assembly. Label-tracking experiments suggest that active endodermal shortening around the AIP accounts for most of the heart field motion towards the midline. Results indicate that this shortening is driven by cytoskeletal contraction, as exposure to the myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin arrested any shortening and also decreased both tissue stiffness (measured by microindentation) and mechanical tension (measured by cutting experiments). In addition, blebbistatin treatment often resulted in cardia bifida and abnormal foregut morphogenesis. Moreover, finite element simulations of our cutting experiments suggest that the endoderm (not the mesoderm) is the primary contractile tissue layer during this process. Taken together, these results indicate that contraction of the endoderm actively pulls the heart fields towards the embryonic midline, where they fuse to form the heart tube. PMID:22492358

  4. The crucial role of nomothetic and idiographic conceptions of time: interdisciplinary collaboration in nuclear waste management.

    PubMed

    Moser, Corinne; Stauffacher, Michael; Krütli, Pius; Scholz, Roland W

    2012-01-01

    The disposal of nuclear waste involves extensive time scales. Technical experts consider up to 1 million years for the disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in their safety assessment. Yet nuclear waste is not only a technical but also a so-called sociotechnical problem and, therefore, requires interdisciplinary collaboration between technical, natural, social sciences, and the humanities in its management. Given that these disciplines differ in their language, epistemics, and interests, such collaboration might be problematic. Based on evidence from cognitive psychology, we suggest that, in particular, a concept like time is presumably critical and can be understood differently. This study explores how different scientific disciplines understand extensive time scales in general and then focuses on nuclear waste. Eighteen qualitative exploratory interviews were conducted with experts for time-related phenomena of different disciplines, among them experts working in nuclear waste management. Analyses revealed two distinct conceptions of time corresponding to idiographic and nomothetic research approaches: scientists from the humanities and social sciences tend to have a more open, undetermined conception of time, whereas natural scientists tend to focus on a more determined conception that includes some undetermined aspects. Our analyses lead to reflections on potential difficulties for interdisciplinary teams in nuclear waste management. We focus on the understanding of the safety assessment, on potential implications for communication between experts from different disciplines (e.g., between experts from the humanities and engineering for risk assessment and risk communication), and we reflect on the roles of different disciplines in nuclear waste management.

  5. The crucial role of posterior frontal regions in modality specific components of the spelling process.

    PubMed

    Hillis, Argye E; Chang, Shannon; Breese, Elisabeth; Heidler, Jennifer

    2004-04-01

    Although it is commonly assumed that posterior temporo-parietal regions are the regions of the brain essential for accessing orthographic representations for written output, patients with lesions in these areas also have reading and/or naming impairments at least early after stroke onset. This observation raises the possibility that these regions are important for components of spelling that are not specific to written output. The goal of the present study was to identify any regions of the brain that, when damaged, result in selective impairment in accessing orthographic representations for written output. We studied 54 consecutive right-handed patients with acute, left hemisphere ischemic stroke, who were barely able to perform the motor aspects of writing with the right hand and had at least 10th grade education, on a battery of lexical tasks designed to identify impaired and spared cognitive processes underlying spelling and with advanced magnetic resonance imaging. Only five patients had pure agraphia, and had evidence of impaired access to lexical-orthographic representations for output; and all five had infarct or ischemia in Brodmann's area 44 and 45. Analysis of performance across tasks of three of these patients, whose performance has not been previously reported, provides evidence for additional impairment in converting graphemes to letter shapes or letter-specific motor programs. These three patients, unlike previously reported patients with lexical-orthographic impairment and compromised function in Brodmann's area 44 and 45, also had infarcts in Brodmann's area 6. On the basis of these cases, and those in the literature, we propose a network of brain regions involved in writing words, each with a separate function. This proposal emphasizes the role of the left posterior frontal regions in modality-specific output processes. PMID:15788255

  6. Modeling infectious diseases dissemination through online role-playing games.

    PubMed

    Balicer, Ran D

    2007-03-01

    As mathematical modeling of infectious diseases becomes increasingly important for developing public health policies, a novel platform for such studies might be considered. Millions of people worldwide play interactive online role-playing games, forming complex and rich networks among their virtual characters. An unexpected outbreak of an infective communicable disease (unplanned by the game creators) recently occurred in this virtual world. This outbreak holds surprising similarities to real-world epidemics. It is possible that these virtual environments could serve as a platform for studying the dissemination of infectious diseases, and as a testing ground for novel interventions to control emerging communicable diseases.

  7. Play a Starring Role in Your Textbook: A Digital Web Platform with an Embedded Role-Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielvogel, Laura; Spielvogel, Christian

    2014-01-01

    In this report, we introduce our digital e-textbook web platform with an integrated role-playing game, which has been created for "introduction to anthropology" courses. We believe that textbooks have the potential to do more to motivate students' pursuit of learning if their material (topically organised chapters supported by…

  8. Social interactions in massively multiplayer online role-playing gamers.

    PubMed

    Cole, Helena; Griffiths, Mark D

    2007-08-01

    To date, most research into massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) has examined the demographics of play. This study explored the social interactions that occur both within and outside of MMORPGs. The sample consisted of 912 self-selected MMORPG players from 45 countries. MMORPGs were found to be highly socially interactive environments providing the opportunity to create strong friendships and emotional relationships. The study demonstrated that the social interactions in online gaming form a considerable element in the enjoyment of playing. The study showed MMORPGs can be extremely social games, with high percentages of gamers making life-long friends and partners. It was concluded that virtual gaming may allow players to express themselves in ways they may not feel comfortable doing in real life because of their appearance, gender, sexuality, and/or age. MMORPGs also offer a place where teamwork, encouragement, and fun can be experienced.

  9. GeoQuest an Interactive Role Playing game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraffi, Sabina; Sacerdoti, Francesco; Scamardella, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    The acquisition of knowledge and enhancing skills at actual time requires different approaches, involving students as much as possible, taking advantage of informal learning strengths and opportunities of formal learning. In this perspective, the game seems to be a perfect vehicle, not a single student's playing but a cooperative one. The GeoQuest project consists of an interactive role-playing game which involves all students using a patented system: the "teaching projector". This system allows the interaction of the class group through the use of smartphones and tablets, and it shows in real-time the game progress to the whole class. Our role-playing game is based on three routes at different degrees. The students, divided into several categories (physicist, chemists, disseminators, technicians, historians) have to follow a geological trail in order to discover the present and the past of the Earth. During the path, students have to pass some doors in teamwork; they allow assessment and represent the main sharing/disclosure moment. The doors allow to modulate the activities according to single lesson, teaching unit, module. Main Objectives: Working on PC by themselves, students could be even more alone: it needs a best fitting between ICT and cooperative learning. Role-playing helps students to reach their goals easily through cooperation; this in order to avoid the risk of loneliness of Inquiry Based Science Education, preserving entirely the educational value. Science Research now is based on field expert interaction: the role-playing game categories reflect the necessary team to get their goal. The several roles allow everyone to enhance their own skills. the "teaching projector" allows students to comment and to evaluate the groups activities and route them, providing real-time corrections to everybody. The playing categories represent all the aspects of the research areas: from scientists (physicists, chemists), to technicians, to disseminators and

  10. Character selecting advisor for a role-playing game

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redfield, Carol L.; Berlanga, Felicia

    1994-01-01

    Role-playing games have been a source of much pleasure and merriment for people of all ages. The process of developing a character for a role-playing game is usually very, very time consuming, delaying what many players consider the most entertaining part of the game. An expert system has been written to assist a player in creating a character by guiding the player through a series of questions. This paper discusses the selection of this topic, the knowledge engineering, the software development, and the resulting program that cuts the time of character development from about 4 hours to 30 minutes. The program was written on a PC and an Apollo in CLIPS 4.3 and currently runs on the Apollo.

  11. Using Role-Playing Games to Teach Astronomy: An Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Paul

    Since 1998, I've been experimenting with the use of role-playing games to teach astronomy. Students play the role of competing teams of researchers, racing to solve some astrophysical mystery. In this article, I review what has been learned from using these games around the world over the last eight years. The most common problem encountered is a tendency for students to become overly political. An unexpected benefit of these games is the boost that they give to student self- confidence. Overall, they seem to work well with a wide range of students, ranging from ninth grade to graduate school, and students exposed to this game comment repeatedly on how the games changed their attitudes toward the scientific process.

  12. Strength of hydrogen bond network takes crucial roles in the dissociation process of inhibitors from the HIV-1 protease binding pocket.

    PubMed

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Huang, Yonggang

    2011-01-01

    To understand the underlying mechanisms of significant differences in dissociation rate constant among different inhibitors for HIV-1 protease, we performed steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to analyze the entire dissociation processes of inhibitors from the binding pocket of protease at atomistic details. We found that the strength of hydrogen bond network between inhibitor and the protease takes crucial roles in the dissociation process. We showed that the hydrogen bond network in the cyclic urea inhibitors AHA001/XK263 is less stable than that of the approved inhibitor ABT538 because of their large differences in the structures of the networks. In the cyclic urea inhibitor bound complex, the hydrogen bonds often distribute at the flap tips and the active site. In contrast, there are additional accessorial hydrogen bonds formed at the lateral sides of the flaps and the active site in the ABT538 bound complex, which take crucial roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network. In addition, the water molecule W301 also plays important roles in stabilizing the hydrogen bond network through its flexible movement by acting as a collision buffer and helping the rebinding of hydrogen bonds at the flap tips. Because of its high stability, the hydrogen bond network of ABT538 complex can work together with the hydrophobic clusters to resist the dissociation, resulting in much lower dissociation rate constant than those of cyclic urea inhibitor complexes. This study may provide useful guidelines for design of novel potent inhibitors with optimized interactions.

  13. Rockin' Role Plays. A Collection of the Finest for Mediation Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Barbara A.; Corley, Sarah V.

    This guide offers suggestions for implementing role plays to teach conflict resolution skills and provides a variety of role plays useful in different settings. It describes how to effectively prepare for role plays, how to implement role play strategies, and how to debrief and provide feedback to role play participants. Potential problems are…

  14. The crucial role of vitamin C and its transporter (SVCT2) in bone marrow stromal cell autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Rajnikumar; Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Pathania, Rajneesh; Ahmad, Saif; Kutiyanawalla, Ammar; Kolhe, Ravindra; Bhattacharyya, Maryka H.; Chutkan, Norman; Hunter, Monte; Hill, William D.; Hamrick, Mark; Isales, Carlos; Fulzele, Sadanand

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin C is an antioxidant that plays a vital role in various biological processes including bone formation. Previously, we reported that vitamin C is transported into bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) through the sodium dependent Vitamin C Transporter 2 (SVCT2) and this transporter plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, this transporter is regulated by oxidative stress. To date, however, the exact role of vitamin C and its transporter (SVCT2) in ROS regulated autophagy and apoptosis in BMSCs is poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that oxidative stress decreased survival of BMSCs in a dose-dependent manner and induced growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. These effects were accompanied by the induction of autophagy, confirmed by P62 and LC3B protein level and punctate GFP–LC3B distribution. The supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress by regulating autophagy. Knockdown of the SVCT2 transporter in BMSCs synergistically decreased cell survival even under low oxidative stress conditions. Also, supplementing vitamin C failed to rescue cells from stress. Our results reveal that the SVCT2 transporter plays a vital role in the mechanism of BMSC survival under stress conditions. Altogether, this study has given new insight into the role of the SVCT2 transporter in oxidative stress related autophagy and apoptosis in BMSCs. PMID:26210298

  15. Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harteveld, Casper

    Designing a game with a serious purpose involves considering the worlds of Reality and Meaning yet it is undeniably impossible to create a game without a third world, one that is specifically concerned with what makes a game a game: the play elements. This third world, the world of people like designers and artists, and disciplines as computer science and game design, I call the world of Play and this level is devoted to it. The level starts off with some of the misperceptions people have of play. Unlike some may think, we play all the time, even when we grow old—this was also very noticeable in designing the game Levee Patroller as the team exhibited very playful behavior at many occasions. From there, I go into the aspects that characterize this world. The first concerns the goal of the game. This relates to the objectives people have to achieve within the game. This is constituted by the second aspect: the gameplay. Taking actions and facing challenges is subsequently constituted by a gameworld, which concerns the third aspect. And all of it is not possible without the fourth and final aspect, the type of technology that creates and facilitates the game. The four aspects together make up a “game concept” and from this world such a concept can be judged on the basis of three closely interrelated criteria: engagement, immersion, and fun.

  16. On whether mirror neurons play a significant role in processing affective prosody.

    PubMed

    Ramachandra, Vijayachandra

    2009-02-01

    Several behavioral and neuroimaging studies have indicated that both right and left cortical structures and a few subcortical ones are involved in processing affective prosody. Recent investigations have shown that the mirror neuron system plays a crucial role in several higher-level functions such as empathy, theory of mind, language, etc., but no studies so far link the mirror neuron system with affective prosody. In this paper is a speculation that the mirror neuron system, which serves as a common neural substrate for different higher-level functions, may play a significant role in processing affective prosody via its connections with the limbic lobe. Actual research must apply electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques to assess whether the mirror neuron systems underly affective prosody in humans.

  17. Roles and Relationships in Student Teaching: A Role-Play Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Jeewa R.

    This role-play activity is designed for use by teacher educators in a general or content area methods class to help education majors become knowledgeable of role expectations in the student teaching experience and build good interpersonal role relationships. Students conduct library research and interviews concerning role expectations, use the…

  18. A Novel Ras Effector Pathway Found to Play Significant Role in Tumor Suppression | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Nancy Parrish, Staff Writer; photo by Richard Frederickson, Staff Photographer Normal cells have mechanisms to prevent the development of cancer. Among these is a type of tumor suppressor mechanism known as oncogene-induced senescence, or OIS, which halts the uncontrolled growth of cells caused by mutations in oncogenes. The oncogene Ras plays a crucial role in inducing OIS through a specific cascade of proteins, as reported in a recent article in Molecular and Cellular Biology by Jacqueline Salotti, Ph.D., and colleagues in the Eukaryotic Transcriptional Regulation Section of the Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, Center for Cancer Research (CCR).

  19. Drama and Role Playing in Teaching Practice: The Role of Group Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Çerkez, Yagmur; Altinay, Zehra; Altinay, Fahriye; Bashirova, Elnara

    2012-01-01

    The research study aims to explore the essence of group work in drama and role playing for teaching practice inline with the nature of collaborative learning process. This research study has qualitative nature by capturing experiences of volunteer ninety pre-service teachers about group works, gained skills from drama and role playing in their…

  20. Online gaming addiction? Motives predict addictive play behavior in massively multiplayer online role-playing games.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Daria J; Louws, Jorik; Wiers, Reinout W

    2012-09-01

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about excessive online gaming. Playing Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) appears to be particularly problematic, because these games require a high degree of commitment and time investment from the players to the detriment of occupational, social, and other recreational activities and relations. A number of gaming motives have been linked to excessive online gaming in adolescents and young adults. We assessed 175 current MMORPG players and 90 nonplayers using a Web-based questionnaire regarding their gaming behavior, problems as consequences of gaming, and game motivations and tested their statistical associations. Results indicated that (a) MMORPG players are significantly more likely to experience gaming-related problems relative to nonplayers, and that (b) the gaming motivations escapism and mechanics significantly predicted excessive gaming and appeared as stronger predictors than time investment in game. The findings support the necessity of using measures that distinguish between different types of online games. In addition, this study proves useful regarding the current discussion on establishing (online) gaming addiction as a diagnosis in future categorizations of psychopathology.

  1. Online gaming addiction? Motives predict addictive play behavior in massively multiplayer online role-playing games.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Daria J; Louws, Jorik; Wiers, Reinout W

    2012-09-01

    Recently, there have been growing concerns about excessive online gaming. Playing Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) appears to be particularly problematic, because these games require a high degree of commitment and time investment from the players to the detriment of occupational, social, and other recreational activities and relations. A number of gaming motives have been linked to excessive online gaming in adolescents and young adults. We assessed 175 current MMORPG players and 90 nonplayers using a Web-based questionnaire regarding their gaming behavior, problems as consequences of gaming, and game motivations and tested their statistical associations. Results indicated that (a) MMORPG players are significantly more likely to experience gaming-related problems relative to nonplayers, and that (b) the gaming motivations escapism and mechanics significantly predicted excessive gaming and appeared as stronger predictors than time investment in game. The findings support the necessity of using measures that distinguish between different types of online games. In addition, this study proves useful regarding the current discussion on establishing (online) gaming addiction as a diagnosis in future categorizations of psychopathology. PMID:22974351

  2. [Does Helicobacter pylori infection play a role in extragastric diseases?].

    PubMed

    de Korwin, Jean-Dominique

    2008-03-01

    Since the discovery of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), numerous studies have considered the possibility that it plays a role in different extragastric diseases. Most of these studies may be classified as epidemiological studies or investigations of H. pylori eradication, but there are also case reports and in vitro studies. This review reveals the limitations common to most of them. Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura is the disease for which the strongest association with H. pylori infection has been shown. Data are also accumulating about the role of H. pylori infection in idiopathic iron deficiency anemia and chronic idiopathic urticaria. Interesting results show that H. pylori infection affects atherosclerosis and is weakly associated with ischemic heart disease and stroke. Moreover, CagA-positive H. pylori strains may play a role in the natural history of atherosclerotic stroke. Recent studies suggest a link between H. pylori and Parkinson's disease. Preliminary data indicate that H. pylori infection impairs gastric ghrelin production and may influence nutritional status. The association between H. pylori infection and other extragastric diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection may cause extragastric manifestations directly or indirectly, by various mechanisms including atrophic gastritis, the release of inflammatory mediators, molecular mimicry, and systemic immune response. Evidence suggests that anti-H. pylori therapy improves idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (significant increase of platelet count in half of the cases), iron-deficiency anemia, and chronic urticaria (30% remission rate), but the data from randomized controlled trials are insufficient to confirm these positive effects.

  3. Mitophagy plays a central role in mitochondrial ageing.

    PubMed

    Diot, Alan; Morten, Karl; Poulton, Joanna

    2016-08-01

    The mechanisms underlying ageing have been discussed for decades, and advances in molecular and cell biology of the last three decades have accelerated research in this area. Over this period, it has become clear that mitochondrial function, which plays a major role in many cellular pathways from ATP production to nuclear gene expression and epigenetics alterations, declines with age. The emerging concepts suggest novel mechanisms, involving mtDNA quality, mitochondrial dynamics or mitochondrial quality control. In this review, we discuss the impact of mitochondria in the ageing process, the role of mitochondria in reactive oxygen species production, in nuclear gene expression, the accumulation of mtDNA damage and the importance of mitochondrial dynamics and recycling. Declining mitophagy (mitochondrial quality control) may be an important component of human ageing. PMID:27352213

  4. Cerebellar vermis plays a causal role in visual motion discrimination.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Renzi, Chiara; Casali, Stefano; Silvanto, Juha; Vecchi, Tomaso; Papagno, Costanza; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2014-09-01

    Cerebellar patients have been found to show deficits in visual motion discrimination, suggesting that the cerebellum may play a role in visual sensory processing beyond mediating motor control. Here we show that triple-pulse online transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over cerebellar vermis but not over the cerebellar hemispheres significantly impaired motion discrimination. Critically, the interference caused by vermis TMS on motion discrimination did not depend on an indirect effect of TMS over nearby visual areas, as demonstrated by a control experiment in which TMS over V1 but not over cerebellar vermis significantly impaired orientation discrimination. These findings demonstrate the causal role of the cerebellar vermis in visual motion processing in neurologically normal participants.

  5. Antibiotic production by myxobacteria plays a role in predation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yao; Wei, Xueming; Ebright, Richard; Wall, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    Myxobacteria are predatory and are prolific producers of secondary metabolites. Here, we tested a hypothesized role that secondary metabolite antibiotics function as weapons in predation. To test this, a Myxococcus xanthus Δta1 mutant, blocked in antibiotic TA (myxovirescin) production, was constructed. This TA(-) mutant was defective in producing a zone of inhibition (ZOI) against Escherichia coli. This shows that TA is the major M. xanthus-diffusible antibacterial agent against E. coli. Correspondingly, the TA(-) mutant was defective in E. coli killing. Separately, an engineered E. coli strain resistant to TA was shown to be resistant toward predation. Exogenous addition of spectinomycin, a bacteriostatic antibiotic, rescued the predation defect of the TA(-) mutant. In contrast, against Micrococcus luteus the TA(-) mutant exhibited no defect in ZOI or killing. Thus, TA plays a selective role on prey species. To extend these studies to other myxobacteria, the role of antibiotic corallopyronin production in predation was tested and also found to be required for Corallococcus coralloides killing on E. coli. Next, a role of TA production in myxobacterial fitness was assessed by measuring swarm expansion. Here, the TA(-) mutant had a specific swarm rate reduction on prey lawns, and thus reduced fitness, compared to an isogenic TA(+) strain. Based on these observations, we conclude that myxobacterial antibiotic production can function as a predatory weapon. To our knowledge, this is the first report to directly show a link between secondary metabolite production and predation.

  6. Cysteine homeostasis plays an essential role in plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Consolación; Bermúdez, M Ángeles; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia; García, Irene

    2012-01-01

    • Cysteine is the metabolic precursor of essential biomolecules such as vitamins, cofactors, antioxidants and many defense compounds. The last step of cysteine metabolism is catalysed by O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase (OASTL), which incorporates reduced sulfur into O-acetylserine to produce cysteine. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the main OASTL isoform OAS-A1 and the cytosolic desulfhydrase DES1, which degrades cysteine, contribute to the cytosolic cysteine homeostasis. • Meta-analysis of the transcriptomes of knockout plants for OAS-A1 and for DES1 show a high correlation with the biotic stress series in both cases. • The study of the response of knockout mutants to plant pathogens shows that des1 mutants behave as constitutive systemic acquired resistance mutants, with high resistance to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens, salicylic acid accumulation and WRKY54 and PR1 induction, while oas-a1 knockout mutants are more sensitive to biotrophic and necrotrophic pathogens. However, oas-a1 knockout mutants lack the hypersensitive response associated with the effector-triggered immunity elicited by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 avrRpm1. • Our results highlight the role of cysteine as a crucial metabolite in the plant immune response.

  7. New families of adhesion molecules play a vital role in platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, S; Kaplan, C; Catimel, B; McGregor, J L

    1990-07-01

    Adhesion molecules play a crucial part in cell-matrix and in cell-cell interactions. These interactions, which are essential to the body's defense processes, involve adhesion molecules belonging to different families: integrins, immunoglobulins and selectins. Integrins are expressed by a large number of tissues, whereas other adhesion molecule families are restricted to a small number of cell types. A recent symposium dealt with the recruitment of circulating platelets at specific sites, their adhesion to extracellular matrix components and their activation by agonists leading to aggregation or attachment to other cells. These events, supporting hemostasis and thrombosis, involve integrins, selectins and other adhesion molecules. This report focuses on newly reported integrins (GPIa, GPIc, GPIIa), selectins (GMP-140) and GPIIIb, previously known as 'minor' surface oriented platelet glycoproteins. Major membrane glycoproteins such as GPIIb-IIIa (an integrin) and GPIb, which also play a vital role in platelet functions, have been extensively reviewed elsewhere.

  8. Mutational dissection of the S/T-kinase StkP reveals crucial roles in cell division of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fleurie, Aurore; Cluzel, Caroline; Guiral, Sébastien; Freton, Céline; Galisson, Frédéric; Zanella-Cleon, Isabelle; Di Guilmi, Anne-Marie; Grangeasse, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    Eukaryotic-like serine/threonine-kinases are involved in the regulation of a variety of physiological processes in bacteria. In Streptococcus pneumoniae, deletion of the single serine/threonine-kinase gene stkP results in an aberrant cell morphology suggesting that StkP participates in pneumococcus cell division. To understand the function of StkP, we have engineered various pneumococcus strains expressing truncated or kinase-dead forms of StkP. We show that StkP kinase activity, but also its extracellular and cytoplasmic domains per se, are required for pneumococcus cell division. Indeed, we observe that mutant cells show round or elongated shapes with non-functional septa and a chain phenotype, delocalized sites of peptidoglycan synthesis and diffused membrane StkP localization. To gain understanding of the underlying StkP-mediated regulatory mechanism, we show that StkP specifically phosphorylates in vivo the cell division protein DivIVA on threonine 201. Pneumococcus cells expressing non-phosphorylatable DivIVA-T201A possess an elongated shape with a polar bulge and aberrant spatial organization of nascent peptidoglycan. This brings the first evidence of the importance of StkP in relationship to the phosphorylation of one of its substrates in cell division. It is concluded that StkP is a multifunctional protein that plays crucial functions in pneumococcus cell shape and division.

  9. Does genomic imprinting play a role in autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Camprubí, Cristina; Monk, David

    2011-01-01

    In the 19th century Gregor Mendel defined the laws of genetic inheritance by crossing different types of peas. From these results arose his principle of equivalence: the gene will have the same behaviour whether it is inherited from the mother or the father. Today, several key exceptions to this principle are known, for example sex-linked traits and genes in the mitochondrial genome, whose inheritance patterns are referred to as 'non mendelian'. A third, important exception in mammals is that of genomic imprinting, where transcripts are expressed in a monoallelic fashion from only the maternal or the paternal chromosome. In this chapter, we discuss how parent-of-origin effects and genomic imprinting may play a role in autoimmunity and speculate how imprinted miRNAs may influence the expression of many target autoimmune associated genes. PMID:21627045

  10. The role thermal physiology plays in species invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Amanda L.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of physiological phenotypes that may play a part in the establishment of non-native species can broaden our understanding about the ecology of species invasion. Here, an assessment was carried out by comparing the responses of invasive and native species to thermal stress. The goal was to identify physiological patterns that facilitate invasion success and to investigate whether these traits are widespread among invasive ectotherms. Four hypotheses were generated and tested using a review of the literature to determine whether they could be supported across taxonomically diverse invasive organisms. The four hypotheses are as follows: (i) broad geographical temperature tolerances (thermal width) confer a higher upper thermal tolerance threshold for invasive rather than native species; (ii) the upper thermal extreme experienced in nature is more highly correlated with upper thermal tolerance threshold for invasive vs. native animals; (iii) protein chaperone expression—a cellular mechanism that underlies an organism's thermal tolerance threshold—is greater in invasive organisms than in native ones; and (iv) acclimation to higher temperatures can promote a greater range of thermal tolerance for invasive compared with native species. Each hypothesis was supported by a meta-analysis of the invasive/thermal physiology literature, providing further evidence that physiology plays a substantial role in the establishment of invasive ectotherms. PMID:27293666

  11. Malate plays a crucial role in starch metabolism, ripening, and soluble solid content of tomato fruit and affects postharvest softening.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Danilo C; Osorio, Sonia; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bertolo, Ana L F; Carneiro, Raphael T; Araújo, Wagner L; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Michalska, Justyna; Rohrmann, Johannes; Geigenberger, Peter; Oliver, Sandra N; Stitt, Mark; Carrari, Fernando; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the organic acid content of a fruit is regarded as one of its most commercially important quality traits when assessed by the consumer, relatively little is known concerning the physiological importance of organic acid metabolism for the fruit itself. Here, we evaluate the effect of modifying malate metabolism in a fruit-specific manner, by reduction of the activities of either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase, via targeted antisense approaches in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). While these genetic perturbations had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield, they had dramatic consequences for fruit metabolism, as well as unanticipated changes in postharvest shelf life and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Detailed characterization suggested that the rate of ripening was essentially unaltered but that lines containing higher malate were characterized by lower levels of transitory starch and a lower soluble sugars content at harvest, whereas those with lower malate contained higher levels of these carbohydrates. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase revealed that it correlated with the accumulation of transitory starch. Taken together with the altered activation state of the plastidial malate dehydrogenase and the modified pigment biosynthesis of the transgenic lines, these results suggest that the phenotypes are due to an altered cellular redox status. The combined data reveal the importance of malate metabolism in tomato fruit metabolism and development and confirm the importance of transitory starch in the determination of agronomic yield in this species.

  12. Myosin II and the Gal-GalNAc lectin play a crucial role in tissue invasion by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Coudrier, Evelyne; Amblard, François; Zimmer, Christophe; Roux, Pascal; Olivo-Marin, Jean-Christophe; Rigothier, Marie-Christine; Guillén, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the human parasite responsible of amoebiasis, during which highly motile trophozoites invade the intestinal epithelium leading to amoebic colitis, and disseminate via the blood circulation causing liver abscesses. The invasive process, central to the pathogenesis, is known to be driven by parasites motility. To investigate molecules responsible for in vivo motion, we performed a high resolution dynamic imaging analysis using two-photon laser scanning microscopy. Image analysis of the parasites during invasion of Caco-2 cell monolayers, an enterocyte-like model, and hamster liver shows that E. histolytica undergoes non-Brownian motion. However, studies of movements of parasite strains dominant negative for myosin II, a central component of the cytoskeleton, and for Gal-GalNAc lectin, a major adhesion molecule, indicate that myosin II is essential for E. histolytica intercellular motility through intestinal cell monolayers and for its motility in liver. In contrast, the Gal-GalNAc lectin exclusively triggers invasion of the liver. These observations are in agreement with emerging studies that highlight marked differences in the way that cells migrate in vitro in two dimensions versus in vivo in three dimensions. The approach that we have developed should be powerful to identify adhesive complexes required for in vivo cell migration in normal and pathogenic situations and may, thereby, lead to new therapeutic drug, for pathologies based on cell motility and adhesion.

  13. RAD51 plays a crucial role in halting cell death program induced by ionizing radiation in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kujjo, Loro L; Ronningen, Reg; Ross, Pablo; Pereira, Ricardo J G; Rodriguez, Ramon; Beyhan, Zeki; Goissis, Marcelo D; Baumann, Thomas; Kagawa, Wataru; Camsari, Cagri; Smith, George W; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Cibelli, Jose B; Perez, Gloria I

    2012-03-01

    Reproductive health of humans and animals exposed to daily irradiants from solar/cosmic particles remains largely understudied. We evaluated the sensitivities of bovine and mouse oocytes to bombardment by krypton-78 (1 Gy) or ultraviolet B (UV-B; 100 microjoules). Mouse oocytes responded to irradiation by undergoing massive activation of caspases, rapid loss of energy without cytochrome-c release, and subsequent necrotic death. In contrast, bovine oocytes became positive for annexin-V, exhibited cytochrome-c release, and displayed mild activation of caspases and downstream DNAses but with the absence of a complete cell death program; therefore, cytoplasmic fragmentation was never observed. However, massive cytoplasmic fragmentation and increased DNA damage were induced experimentally by both inhibiting RAD51 and increasing caspase 3 activity before irradiation. Microinjection of recombinant human RAD51 prior to irradiation markedly decreased both cytoplasmic fragmentation and DNA damage in both bovine and mouse oocytes. RAD51 response to damaged DNA occurred faster in bovine oocytes than in mouse oocytes. Therefore, we conclude that upon exposure to irradiation, bovine oocytes create a physiologically indeterminate state of partial cell death, attributed to rapid induction of DNA repair and low activation of caspases. The persistence of these damaged cells may represent an adaptive mechanism with potential implications for livestock productivity and long-term health risks associated with human activity in space. PMID:22190703

  14. LytM Proteins Play a Crucial Role in Cell Separation, Outer Membrane Composition, and Pathogenesis in Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Ercoli, Giuseppe; Tani, Chiara; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Vacca, Irene; Martinelli, Manuele; Pecetta, Simone; Petracca, Roberto; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Soriani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT LytM proteins belong to a family of bacterial metalloproteases. In Gram-negative bacteria, LytM factors are mainly reported to have a direct effect on cell division by influencing cleavage and remodeling of peptidoglycan. In this study, mining nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) genomes, three highly conserved open reading frames (ORFs) containing a LytM domain were identified, and the proteins encoded by the ORFs were named YebA, EnvC, and NlpD on the basis of their homology with the Escherichia coli proteins. Immunoblotting and confocal analysis showed that while NTHI NlpD is exposed on the bacterial surface, YebA and EnvC reside in the periplasm. NTHI ΔyebA and ΔnlpD deletion mutants revealed an aberrant division phenotype characterized by an altered cell architecture and extensive membrane blebbing. The morphology of the ΔenvC deletion mutant was identical to that of the wild-type strain, but it showed a drastic reduction of periplasmic proteins, including the chaperones HtrA, SurA, and Skp, and an accumulation of β-barrel-containing outer membrane proteins comprising the autotransporters Hap, IgA serine protease, and HMW2A, as observed by proteomic analysis. These data suggest that EnvC may influence the bacterial surface protein repertoire by facilitating the passage of the periplasmic chaperones through the peptidoglycan layer to the close vicinity of the inner face of the outer membrane. This hypothesis was further corroborated by the fact that an NTHI envC defective strain had an impaired capacity to adhere to epithelial cells and to form biofilm. Notably, this strain also showed a reduced serum resistance. These results suggest that LytM factors are not only important components of cell division but they may also influence NTHI physiology and pathogenesis by affecting membrane composition. PMID:25714719

  15. RAD51 plays a crucial role in halting cell death program induced by ionizing radiation in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kujjo, Loro L; Ronningen, Reg; Ross, Pablo; Pereira, Ricardo J G; Rodriguez, Ramon; Beyhan, Zeki; Goissis, Marcelo D; Baumann, Thomas; Kagawa, Wataru; Camsari, Cagri; Smith, George W; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Cibelli, Jose B; Perez, Gloria I

    2012-03-01

    Reproductive health of humans and animals exposed to daily irradiants from solar/cosmic particles remains largely understudied. We evaluated the sensitivities of bovine and mouse oocytes to bombardment by krypton-78 (1 Gy) or ultraviolet B (UV-B; 100 microjoules). Mouse oocytes responded to irradiation by undergoing massive activation of caspases, rapid loss of energy without cytochrome-c release, and subsequent necrotic death. In contrast, bovine oocytes became positive for annexin-V, exhibited cytochrome-c release, and displayed mild activation of caspases and downstream DNAses but with the absence of a complete cell death program; therefore, cytoplasmic fragmentation was never observed. However, massive cytoplasmic fragmentation and increased DNA damage were induced experimentally by both inhibiting RAD51 and increasing caspase 3 activity before irradiation. Microinjection of recombinant human RAD51 prior to irradiation markedly decreased both cytoplasmic fragmentation and DNA damage in both bovine and mouse oocytes. RAD51 response to damaged DNA occurred faster in bovine oocytes than in mouse oocytes. Therefore, we conclude that upon exposure to irradiation, bovine oocytes create a physiologically indeterminate state of partial cell death, attributed to rapid induction of DNA repair and low activation of caspases. The persistence of these damaged cells may represent an adaptive mechanism with potential implications for livestock productivity and long-term health risks associated with human activity in space.

  16. Vulnerability in early life to changes in the rearing environment plays a crucial role in the aetiopathology of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Minae; Matsumoto, Yurie; Mouri, Akihiro; Ozaki, Norio; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2011-05-01

    Adverse events early in life, including maternal separation and social isolation, profoundly affect brain development and adult behaviour and may contribute to the occurrence of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and mood disorders in genetically predisposed individuals. The molecular mechanisms underlying these environmentally induced developmental adaptations are unclear and best evaluated in animal paradigms with translational salience. In this study, we examined the effects in mice of maternal separation and/or social isolation for 6 h/d between postnatal days 15 and 21 on performance during adulthood in the open-field, social interaction, elevated plus-maze, forced swimming, Y-maze, novel object recognition, conditioned fear-learning, prepulse inhibition, and locomotor activity tests, to investigate whether this animal model could show the phenotypes for schizophrenia and mood disorders. The stress of maternal separation and isolation led to adult behavioural deficits, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and decreases in the levels of norepinephrine and dopamine in the frontal cortex and metabolites of dopamine and serotonin in the amygdala, showing the involvement of endocrine and neuronal risk in behavioural deficits. The results suggest that the frontal cortex and amygdala undergo structural remodelling induced by the stress of maternal separation and isolation, which alters behavioural and physiological responses in adulthood, including anxiety, memory and other cognitive processes. Further, social isolation enhanced the behavioural dysfunctions induced by maternal separation. These findings indicate that maternal separation and social isolation early in life can lead to long-lasting abnormal behaviour and pathophysiological impairments including schizophrenia and mood disorders.

  17. Autoinducer-2 Plays a Crucial Role in Gut Colonization and Probiotic Functionality of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003

    PubMed Central

    Bottacini, Francesca; Lanigan, Noreen; Casey, Pat G.; Huys, Geert; Nelis, Hans J.; van Sinderen, Douwe; Coenye, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we show that luxS of Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003 is involved in the production of the interspecies signaling molecule autoinducer-2 (AI-2), and that this gene is essential for gastrointestinal colonization of a murine host, while it is also involved in providing protection against Salmonella infection in Caenorhabditis elegans. We demonstrate that a B. breve luxS-insertion mutant is significantly more susceptible to iron chelators than the WT strain and that this sensitivity can be partially reverted in the presence of the AI-2 precursor DPD. Furthermore, we show that several genes of an iron starvation-induced gene cluster, which are downregulated in the luxS-insertion mutant and which encodes a presumed iron-uptake system, are transcriptionally upregulated under in vivo conditions. Mutation of two genes of this cluster in B. breve UCC2003 renders the derived mutant strains sensitive to iron chelators while deficient in their ability to confer gut pathogen protection to Salmonella-infected nematodes. Since a functional luxS gene is present in all tested members of the genus Bifidobacterium, we conclude that bifidobacteria operate a LuxS-mediated system for gut colonization and pathogen protection that is correlated with iron acquisition. PMID:24871429

  18. Keratinocyte expression of inflammatory mediators plays a crucial role in substance P-induced acute and chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tzuping; Guo, Tian-Zhi; Li, Wen-Wu; Hou, Saiyun; Kingery, Wade S; Clark, John David

    2012-01-01

    Tibia fracture in rats followed by cast immobilization leads to nociceptive, trophic, vascular and bone-related changes similar to those seen in Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS). Substance P (SP) mediated neurogenic inflammation may be responsible for some of the signs of CRPS in humans. We therefore hypothesized that SP acting through the SP receptor (NK1) leads to the CRPS-like changes found in the rat model. In the present study, we intradermally injected rats with SP and monitored hindpaw mechanical allodynia, temperature, and thickness as well as tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and nerve growth factor-β (NGF) for 72 h. Anti-NGF antibody was utilized to block the effects of SP-induced NGF up-regulation. Fracture rats treated with the selective NK1 receptor antagonist LY303870 prior to cast removal were assessed for BrdU, a DNA synthesis marker, incorporation in skin cells to examine cellular proliferation. Bone microarchitecture was measured using micro computed tomography (μCT). We observed that: (1) SP intraplantar injection induced mechanical allodynia, warmth and edema as well as the expression of nociceptive mediators in the hindpaw skin of normal rats, (2) LY303870 administered intraperitoneally after fracture attenuated allodynia, hindpaw unweighting, warmth, and edema, as well as cytokine and NGF expression, (3) LY303870 blocked fracture-induced epidermal thickening and BrdU incorporation after fracture, (4) anti-NGF antibody blocked SP-induced allodynia but not warmth or edema, and (5) LY303870 had no effect on bone microarchitecture. Collectively our data indicate that SP acting through NK1 receptors supports the nociceptive and vascular components of CRPS, but not the bone-related changes. PMID:22824437

  19. Microbiota Plays a Role in Oral Immune Priming in Tribolium castaneum

    PubMed Central

    Futo, Momir; Armitage, Sophie A. O.; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Animals are inhabited by a diverse community of microorganisms. The relevance of such microbiota is increasingly being recognized across a broad spectrum of species, ranging from sponges to primates, revealing various beneficial roles that microbes can play. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum represents a well-established experimental model organism for studying questions in ecology and evolution, however, the relevance of its microbial community is still largely unknown. T. castaneum larvae orally exposed to bacterial components of the entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis showed increased survival upon a subsequent challenge with spores of this bacterium. To investigate whether T. castaneum microbiota plays a role in this phenomenon, we established a protocol for raising microbe-free larvae and subsequently tested whether they differ in their ability to mount such a priming response. Here we demonstrate that larvae with significantly lowered microbial loads, show decreased survival upon secondary challenge with B. thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis spores, compared to animals that were allowed to regain their microbiota before priming. Although the exact mechanism of oral immune priming is unclear, we here suggest that microbiota plays a crucial role in oral immune priming in this species. PMID:26779124

  20. Microbiota Plays a Role in Oral Immune Priming in Tribolium castaneum.

    PubMed

    Futo, Momir; Armitage, Sophie A O; Kurtz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Animals are inhabited by a diverse community of microorganisms. The relevance of such microbiota is increasingly being recognized across a broad spectrum of species, ranging from sponges to primates, revealing various beneficial roles that microbes can play. The red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum represents a well-established experimental model organism for studying questions in ecology and evolution, however, the relevance of its microbial community is still largely unknown. T. castaneum larvae orally exposed to bacterial components of the entomopathogen Bacillus thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis showed increased survival upon a subsequent challenge with spores of this bacterium. To investigate whether T. castaneum microbiota plays a role in this phenomenon, we established a protocol for raising microbe-free larvae and subsequently tested whether they differ in their ability to mount such a priming response. Here we demonstrate that larvae with significantly lowered microbial loads, show decreased survival upon secondary challenge with B. thuringiensis bv. tenebrionis spores, compared to animals that were allowed to regain their microbiota before priming. Although the exact mechanism of oral immune priming is unclear, we here suggest that microbiota plays a crucial role in oral immune priming in this species. PMID:26779124

  1. Auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is crucial for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles.

    PubMed

    Grones, Peter; Chen, Xu; Simon, Sibu; Kaufmann, Walter A; De Rycke, Riet; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2015-08-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Auxin levels are sensed and interpreted by distinct receptor systems that activate a broad range of cellular responses. The Auxin-Binding Protein1 (ABP1) that has been identified based on its ability to bind auxin with high affinity is a prime candidate for the extracellular receptor responsible for mediating a range of auxin effects, in particular, the fast non-transcriptional ones. Contradictory genetic studies suggested prominent or no importance of ABP1 in many developmental processes. However, how crucial the role of auxin binding to ABP1 is for its functions has not been addressed. Here, we show that the auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is essential for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles. In total, 16 different abp1 mutants were prepared that possessed substitutions in the metal core or in the hydrophobic amino acids of the auxin-binding pocket as well as neutral mutations. Their analysis revealed that an intact auxin-binding pocket is a prerequisite for ABP1 to activate downstream components of the ABP1 signalling pathway, such as Rho of Plants (ROPs) and to mediate the clathrin association with membranes for endocytosis regulation. In planta analyses demonstrated the importance of the auxin binding pocket for all known ABP1-mediated postembryonic developmental processes, including morphology of leaf epidermal cells, root growth and root meristem activity, and vascular tissue differentiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that auxin binding to ABP1 is central to its function, supporting the role of ABP1 as auxin receptor.

  2. Parliamentarians play key role in linking population and social development.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    Mr. Hirofunti Ando, Deputy Executive Director of the UNFPA, delivered the statement of Dr. Nafis Sadik, Executive Director of the UNFPA at the International Meeting of Parliamentarians on Population and Social Development. The International Conference of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (ICPPD) in Cairo in September 1994 made a significant impact on the attitudes and support of parliamentarians regarding population issues. The Asian Forum of Parliamentarians on Population and Development (AFPPD) brought together a group of parliamentarians from all over the world to discuss population issues and social development. The World Summit included in its deliberations the accumulated experiences of earlier international conferences dealing with social economic issues. The ICPD Program of Action addressed concerns relevant to the agenda of the Social Summit: the crucial contribution that early population stabilization will make towards the attainment of sustainable development; the significant role of integrated policies on population and development in creating employment; the importance of population policies and programs in alleviating poverty; the contributions of reproductive health policies, including high-quality family planning services, to the enhancement of the status of women and to the achievement of gender equality; the synergy between education, family planning, and the general improvement of the human condition; and the relationship between population pressures, poverty, and environmental degradation. The ICPD Program of Action also identified critically important population and development objectives, such as ensuring access to education, especially of girls; reducing infant, child, and maternal mortality; and providing universal access to reproductive health and family planning services. Now the challenge is to mobilize the necessary resources for the Social Summit. PMID:12289910

  3. Doublecortin May Play a Role in Defining Chondrocyte Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dongxia; Zhang, Qing-Song; Zabaleta, Jovanny; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Reiser, Brendan; Bunnell, Bruce A.; Braun, Stephen E.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Savoie, Felix H.; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic development of articular cartilage has not been well understood and the role of doublecortin (DCX) in determination of chondrocyte phenotype is unknown. Here, we use a DCX promoter-driven eGFP reporter mouse model to study the dynamic gene expression profiles in mouse embryonic handplates at E12.5 to E13.5 when the condensed mesenchymal cells differentiate into either endochondral chondrocytes or joint interzone cells. Illumina microarray analysis identified a variety of genes that were expressed differentially in the different regions of mouse handplate. The unique expression patterns of many genes were revealed. Cytl1 and 3110032G18RIK were highly expressed in the proximal region of E12.5 handplate and the carpal region of E13.5 handplate, whereas Olfr538, Kctd15, and Cited1 were highly expressed in the distal region of E12.5 and the metacarpal region of E13.5 handplates. There was an increasing gradient of Hrc expression in the proximal to distal direction in E13.5 handplate. Furthermore, when human DCX protein was expressed in human adipose stem cells, collagen II was decreased while aggrecan, matrilin 2, and GDF5 were increased during the 14-day pellet culture. These findings suggest that DCX may play a role in defining chondrocyte phenotype. PMID:24758934

  4. Genome-wide siRNA Screening at Biosafety Level 4 Reveals a Crucial Role for Fibrillarin in Henipavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Chwan Hong; Rootes, Christina L.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Grusovin, Julian; Monaghan, Paul; Lo, Michael K.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Adams, Timothy E.; Lowenthal, John W.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Stewart, Cameron R.; Bean, Andrew G. D.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses (genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae) are highly pathogenic bat-borne viruses. The need for high biocontainment when studying henipaviruses has hindered the development of therapeutics and knowledge of the viral infection cycle. We have performed a genome-wide siRNA screen at biosafety level 4 that identified 585 human proteins required for henipavirus infection. The host protein with the largest impact was fibrillarin, a nucleolar methyltransferase that was also required by measles, mumps and respiratory syncytial viruses for infection. While not required for cell entry, henipavirus RNA and protein syntheses were greatly impaired in cells lacking fibrillarin, indicating a crucial role in the RNA replication phase of infection. During infection, the Hendra virus matrix protein co-localized with fibrillarin in cell nucleoli, and co-associated as a complex in pulldown studies, while its nuclear import was unaffected in fibrillarin-depleted cells. Mutagenesis studies showed that the methyltransferase activity of fibrillarin was required for henipavirus infection, suggesting that this enzyme could be targeted therapeutically to combat henipavirus infections. PMID:27010548

  5. Crucial role of the Rap G protein signal in Notch activation and leukemogenicity of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Doi, Keiko; Imai, Takahiko; Kressler, Christopher; Yagita, Hideo; Agata, Yasutoshi; Vooijs, Marc; Hamazaki, Yoko; Inoue, Joe; Minato, Nagahiro

    2015-01-23

    The Rap G protein signal regulates Notch activation in early thymic progenitor cells, and deregulated Rap activation (Rap(high)) results in the development of Notch-dependent T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). We demonstrate that the Rap signal is required for the proliferation and leukemogenesis of established Notch-dependent T-ALL cell lines. Attenuation of the Rap signal by the expression of a dominant-negative Rap1A17 or Rap1GAP, Sipa1, in a T-ALL cell line resulted in the reduced Notch processing at site 2 due to impaired maturation of Adam10. Inhibition of the Rap1 prenylation with a geranylgeranyl transferase inhibitor abrogated its membrane-anchoring to Golgi-network and caused reduced proprotein convertase activity required for Adam10 maturation. Exogenous expression of a mature form of Adam10 overcame the Sipa1-induced inhibition of T-ALL cell proliferation. T-ALL cell lines expressed Notch ligands in a Notch-signal dependent manner, which contributed to the cell-autonomous Notch activation. Although the initial thymic blast cells barely expressed Notch ligands during the T-ALL development from Rap(high) hematopoietic progenitors in vivo, the ligands were clearly expressed in the T-ALL cells invading extrathymic vital organs. These results reveal a crucial role of the Rap signal in the Notch-dependent T-ALL development and the progression.

  6. Gestational exposure to cadmium alters crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities: the role of cadmium-free lactation.

    PubMed

    Liapi, Charis; Stolakis, Vasileios; Zarros, Apostolos; Zissis, Konstantinos M; Botis, John; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2013-11-01

    The present study aimed to shed more light on the effects of gestational (in utero) exposure to cadmium (Cd) on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, as well as to assess the potential protective/restorative role that a Cd-free lactation might have on these effects. In contrast to earlier findings of ours regarding the pattern of effects that adult-onset exposure to Cd has on brain AChE, Na(+),K(+)- and Mg(2+)-ATPase activities, as well as in contrast to similar experimental approaches implementing the sacrificing mode of anaesthesia, in utero exposure to Cd-chloride results in increased AChE and Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activities in the newborn rat brain homogenates that were ameliorated through a Cd-free lactation (as assessed in the brain of 21-day-old offspring). Mg(2+)-ATPase activity was not found to be significantly modified under the examined experimental conditions. These findings could provide the basis for a further evaluation of the herein discussed neurotoxic effects of in utero exposure to Cd, in a brain region-specific manner.

  7. The physiatrists' crucial role in the development and implementation of a longitudinal musculoskeletal physical examination curriculum in a medical school.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Karen L; Laskowski, Edward R; Grande, Joseph P; Dyrbye, Liselotte N

    2013-01-01

    The musculoskeletal physical examination (MSK PE) is a critical clinical skill that should be mastered by all medical students. The authors believe that physiatrists should have a crucial role in undergraduate musculoskeletal education. This article outlines the successful integration of an MSK PE curriculum taught by physiatrists into the first 2 yrs of medical school. During year 1, a basic MSK PE is taught concomitantly with the human anatomy course and focuses on anatomical correlation with physical examination maneuvers. In year 2, the MSK PE is taught concomitantly with the musculoskeletal didactic block. Special musculoskeletal tests, basic neurologic evaluation, and case correlation are also added to expand on the examination skills learned in the first year. At the end of the second year and before beginning third-year clinical rotations, students take a practical test to demonstrate their competency in the MSK PE. The authors believe that an important component of their MSK PE educational sessions is a low student-to-instructor ratio (4:1), with ample hands-on supervision of physical examination skills practice. Residents in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation assist with the teaching. With their intensive training and clinical experience in musculoskeletal medicine, physiatric staff and residents are ideal faculty for teaching the MSK PE. The authors are hopeful that this article encourages other physiatrists to construct similar programs aimed to develop MSK PE skills in medical students.

  8. Active Learning in the Classroom: The Use of Group Role Plays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitzerow, Phyllis

    1990-01-01

    Describes group role-playing activities that have been used to teach about education, criminology, and sex roles. Suggests that role play helps students to absorb and retain many of the insights about the issues involved. (DB)

  9. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 α has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of DSS-induced colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosengarten, Marina; Hadad, Nurit; Solomonov, Yulia; Lamprecht, Sergio; Levy, Rachel

    2016-02-01

    Colitis, an inflammation of the colon, is a well-characterized massive tissue injury. Cytosolic phospholipase A2 α (cPLA2 α) upregulation plays an important role in the development of several inflammatory diseases. The aim of the present study was to define the role of cPLA2 α upregulation in the development of colitis. We used a mouse model of dextran sulfate sodium induced colitis. Immunoblotting analysis showed that cPLA2 α and NF-κB were upregulated and activated in the colon from day 2 of colitis induction. This molecular event preceded the development of the disease, as determined by Disease Activity Index score, body weight, colon length, and the expression of colonic inflammatory markers, including neutrophil infiltration detected by myeloperoxidase and by NIMP-R14, ICAM-1, COX-2, iNOS upregulation and LTB4 and TNF-α secretion. Prevention of cPLA2 α upregulation and activity in the colon by i.v. administration of specific antisense oligonucleotides against cPLA2 α 1 day prior and every day of exposure to dextran sulfate sodium significantly impeded the development of the disease and prevented NF-κB activation, neutrophils infiltration into the colonic mucosa, and expression of proinflammatory proteins in the colon. Our results demonstrate a critical role of cPLA2 α upregulation in inflammation and development of murine colitis.

  10. [Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?].

    PubMed

    Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Andreozzi, Paola; Chiriac, Iulia Maria; Ettorre, Evaristo; Vulcano, Achiropita; Servello, Adriana; Marigliano, Benedetta; Marigliano, Vincenzo

    2011-06-01

    Vascular depression in the elderly. Does inflammation play a role?Depression is the most common comorbidity in the elderly, and it is a major determinant of disability. The late-onset depression in highly associated to cardiovascular disease. Depressive symptoms may follow vascular brain damage, especially when mood regulating areas are affected. However depression is strongly associated to vascular disease even when there is no manifest brain damage. Recently great attention has been given to chronic inflammation, both related to depression and vascular disease. Both experimental and clinical evidence shows that a rise in the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids in depressed patients is associated with defect in serotonergic function. Chronic inflammation may underlie many forms of depression associated with vascular disease and metabolic syndrome. The importance of the inflammation hypothesis of depression lies is that psychotropic drugs may have central anti-inflammatory action, and that new generation of central anti-inflammatory drugs may be useful in depression treatment. PMID:21779108

  11. CGRP may play a causative role in migraine.

    PubMed

    Lassen, L H; Haderslev, P A; Jacobsen, V B; Iversen, H K; Sperling, B; Olesen, J

    2002-02-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been detected in increased amounts in external jugular venous blood during migraine attacks. However, it is unknown whether this is secondary to migraine or whether CGRP may cause headache. In a double-blind crossover study, the effect of human alphaCGRP (2 microg/min) or placebo infused intravenously for 20 min was studied in 12 patients suffering from migraine without aura. Headache intensity was scored on a scale from 0 to 10. Two patients were excluded due to severe hypotension and one because she had an infection. In the first hour median peak headache score was 1.0 in the halphaCGRP group vs. 0 in the placebo group (P < 0.01). During the following 11 h all patients experienced headaches after halphaCGRP vs. one patient after placebo (P = 0.0004). The median maximal headache score was 4 after CGRP and 0 after placebo (P = 0.006). In three patients after halphaCGRP, but in no patients after placebo, the delayed headache fulfilled the IHS criteria for migraine without aura. As intravenous administration of halphaCGRP causes headache and migraine in migraineurs, our study suggests that the increase in CGRP observed during spontaneous migraine attacks may play a causative role.

  12. Negative ratings play a positive role in information filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wei; Zhu, Yu-Xiao; Lü, Linyuan; Zhou, Tao

    2011-11-01

    The explosive growth of information asks for advanced information filtering techniques to solve the so-called information overload problem. A promising way is the recommender system which analyzes the historical records of users’ activities and accordingly provides personalized recommendations. Most recommender systems can be represented by user-object bipartite networks where users can evaluate and vote for objects, and ratings such as “dislike” and “I hate it” are treated straightforwardly as negative factors or are completely ignored in traditional approaches. Applying a local diffusion algorithm on three benchmark data sets, MovieLens, Netflix and Amazon, our study arrives at a very surprising result, namely the negative ratings may play a positive role especially for very sparse data sets. In-depth analysis at the microscopic level indicates that the negative ratings from less active users to less popular objects could probably have positive impacts on the recommendations, while the ones connecting active users and popular objects mostly should be treated negatively. We finally outline the significant relevance of our results to the two long-term challenges in information filtering: the sparsity problem and the cold-start problem.

  13. The entorhinal cortex plays a role in extinction.

    PubMed

    Bevilaqua, Lia R; Bonini, Juliana S; Rossato, Janine I; Izquierdo, Luciana A; Cammarota, Martín; Izquierdo, Iván

    2006-03-01

    In this study, we analyzed the participation of the entorhinal cortex in extinction of a learned aversive response. Rats with infusion cannulae aimed to the entorhinal cortex were trained in a one-trial step-down inhibitory avoidance task (IA) and submitted to four consecutive daily test sessions without the footshock, a procedure that induced extinction of the conditioned response in control animals. When infused into the entorhinal cortex immediately after the first extinction session at doses able to block consolidation of IA memory, the NMDA receptor antagonist, AP5 (25 nmol/side), the inhibitor of protein synthesis anisomycin (300 nmol/side) and the inhibitor of CaMKII, KN-93 (10 nmol/side), but not the MEK1/2 inhibitor PD-98059 (5 nmol/side) hindered extinction of the IA response. The same results were obtained when the interval between the first and second test session was 48 instead of 24h. The data indicate that normal functionality of the NMDA receptors, together with CaMKII activity and protein synthesis are necessary in the entorhinal cortex at the time of the first test session to generate extinction. Our results also suggest that the ERK1/2 pathway does not play a role in this process.

  14. Significant roles played by IL-10 in Chlamydia infections.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Hamid; Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Zainodini, Nahid; Assar, Shokrollah; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi

    2014-06-01

    Chlamydia species are obligate intracellular parasites which cause usually asymptomatic genital tract infections and also are associated with several complications. Previous studies demonstrated that immune responses to Chlamydia species are different and the diseases will be limited to some cases. Additionally, Chlamydia species are able to modulate immune responses via regulating expression of some immune system molecules including cytokines. IL-10, as the main anti-inflammatory cytokine, plays important roles in the induction of immune-tolerance against self-antigen and also immune-homeostasis after microbe elimination. Furthermore, it has been documented that ectopic expression of IL-10 is associated with several chronic infectious diseases. Therefore, it can be hypothesized that changes in the regulation of this cytokine can be associated with infection with several species of Chlamydia and their associated complications. This review collected the recent information regarding the association and relationship of IL-10 with Chlamydia infections. Another aim of this review article is to address recent data regarding the association of genetic variations (polymorphisms) of IL-10 and Chlamydia infections.

  15. Crucial role for the LSP1-myosin1e bimolecular complex in the regulation of Fcγ receptor-driven phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Maxeiner, Sebastian; Shi, Nian; Schalla, Carmen; Aydin, Guelcan; Hoss, Mareike; Vogel, Simon; Zenke, Martin; Sechi, Antonio S

    2015-05-01

    Actin cytoskeleton remodeling is fundamental for Fcγ receptor-driven phagocytosis. In this study, we find that the leukocyte-specific protein 1 (LSP1) localizes to nascent phagocytic cups during Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis, where it displays the same spatial and temporal distribution as the actin cytoskeleton. Down-regulation of LSP1 severely reduces the phagocytic activity of macrophages, clearly demonstrating a crucial role for this protein in Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis. We also find that LSP1 binds to the class I molecular motor myosin1e. LSP1 interacts with the SH3 domain of myosin1e, and the localization and dynamics of both proteins in nascent phagocytic cups mirror those of actin. Furthermore, inhibition of LSP1-myosin1e and LSP1-actin interactions profoundly impairs pseudopodial formation around opsonized targets and their subsequent internalization. Thus the LSP1-myosin1e bimolecular complex plays a pivotal role in the regulation of actin cytoskeleton remodeling during Fcγ receptor-driven phagocytosis.

  16. Drosophila Patj plays a supporting role in apical-basal polarity but is essential for viability.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenke; Hong, Yang

    2012-08-01

    Patj has been characterized as one of the so-called polarity proteins that play essential and conserved roles in regulating cell polarity in many different cell types. Studies of Drosophila and mammalian cells suggest that Patj is required for the apical polarity protein complex Crumbs-Stardust (Pals1 or Mpp5 in mammalian cells) to establish apical-basal polarity. However, owing to the lack of suitable genetic mutants, the exact in vivo function of Patj in regulating apical-basal polarity and development remains to be elucidated. Here, we generated molecularly defined null mutants of Drosophila Patj (dPatj). Our data show conclusively that dPatj only plays supporting and non-essential roles in regulating apical-basal polarity, although such a supporting role may become crucial in cells such as photoreceptors that undergo complex cellular morphogenesis. In addition, our results confirm that dPatj possesses an as yet unidentified function that is essential for pupal development.

  17. A crucial role for macrophages in the pathology of K/B x N serum-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Samuel; Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Jeisy-Walder, Elvira; Snapper, Scott B; Illges, Harald

    2005-10-01

    Autoantibodies in the form of immune complexes are known to be crucial mediators in initiating inflammation in a variety of autoimmune diseases. This has been well documented in the anti-collagen II antibody-induced arthritis animal model for a long time now. Recently, in the K/B x N mouse model (the F1 of the TCR-transgenic KRN and the diabetic NOD mice), anti-glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) autoantibodies have been shown to induce arthritis. Experimental work in the K/B x N model demonstrated key roles of autoantigenic immune complexes activating the alternative pathway of complement, the subsequent association with C5aR and Fc gammaRIII-mediated cell activation and production of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1 and TNF-alpha, finally leading to joint destruction. The presence of high amounts of inflammatory cytokines and matrix-degrading proteases at sites of inflammation obviously put the cytokine-producing macrophages as the next target for investigation in this model. Here, we show that mice depleted of macrophages by clodronate liposome treatment are completely resistant to K/B x N serum-induced arthritis. Reconstituting clodronate liposome-treated mice with macrophages from naive animals could reverse this resistance. Also, we found that deficiencies in the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and CD40, which are both implicated in macrophage activation, chemotaxis and phagocytosis, are not essential in serum-induced arthritis. Mast cell degranulation was seen in arthritogenic serum-treated mice even in the absence of macrophages, possibly suggesting that mast cell degranulation/activation acts hierarchically before macrophages in the inflammatory cascade of anti-GPI antibody-induced arthritis.

  18. Exploring the Potential of Role Play in Higher Education: Development of a Typology and Teacher Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Deepa; Stupans, Ieva

    2012-01-01

    Role-play, in which learners act out roles in case scenarios, appears to be used across a broad range of discipline areas to address learning across the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. This paper describes the development of a prospective typology of role-play learning opportunities derived from role-play scenarios used at one large…

  19. Playing with Fear: Children's Play and Its Role in Expressing Fears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heibeck, Tracy H.

    Preschool children's fears of animals and the dark were investigated in an effort to examine how preschoolers use play as a medium for expressing fearful emotions. A total of 48 children participated in the study. Interviews with parents were used to identify 12 preschoolers who were anxious about the dark and 12 who were anxious about dogs; 24…

  20. Hevin Plays a Pivotal Role in Corneal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Shyam S.; Perera, Promoda R.; Poh, Rebekah; Lim, Rayne R.; Wong, Tina T.; Mehta, Jodhbir S.

    2013-01-01

    administration of rhHevin. Thus, hevin plays a pivotal role in the corneal wound healing. PMID:24303054

  1. Tim Wirth: playing a leading role. Newsmaker interview.

    PubMed

    Pickett, S

    1995-01-01

    An interview with Timothy Wirth, who has been Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs, is presented. The US played a new role as a partner at several recent UN conferences that focused on a multiplicity of issues that harbinger the 21st century. The 4th World Conference on Women in Beijing in September 1995 underscored the importance of women as agents of change, confirmed the importance of nongovernmental organizations in affecting global change in governance, and revealed the strength of women's groups in developing countries. The US made some pledges at the 1994 UN Population and Development Conference in Cairo as laid down in the program of action. US financial commitment to population stabilization increased as did the commitment from Japan and other developed countries. Egypt, Indonesia, Tunisia, and Mexico with effective family planning programs are also sharing their experiences with other developing countries. The US has an interest in investing in foreign assistance in view of runaway population growth in countries like Haiti. Haiti's excess population would be heading for Florida. The President's Council on Sustainable Development's task force on population and consumption concluded that the US should commit itself to population stabilization because of the high consumption rate of the average American, the number of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies, and the problem of teenage pregnancies. Consumption rather than investment should taxed, subsidies should be removed from the use of natural resources and agriculture, and environmental degradation should be priced properly. Poverty is at the root of economic deprivation and environmental destruction. Micro-enterprises have been successful in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, which experiences could be used by the US as well. The broader empowerment of women could also encourage political change, which, in turn could bring about full access to family planning and support to women and their families.

  2. Tim Wirth: playing a leading role. Newsmaker interview.

    PubMed

    Pickett, S

    1995-01-01

    An interview with Timothy Wirth, who has been Under Secretary of State for Global Affairs, is presented. The US played a new role as a partner at several recent UN conferences that focused on a multiplicity of issues that harbinger the 21st century. The 4th World Conference on Women in Beijing in September 1995 underscored the importance of women as agents of change, confirmed the importance of nongovernmental organizations in affecting global change in governance, and revealed the strength of women's groups in developing countries. The US made some pledges at the 1994 UN Population and Development Conference in Cairo as laid down in the program of action. US financial commitment to population stabilization increased as did the commitment from Japan and other developed countries. Egypt, Indonesia, Tunisia, and Mexico with effective family planning programs are also sharing their experiences with other developing countries. The US has an interest in investing in foreign assistance in view of runaway population growth in countries like Haiti. Haiti's excess population would be heading for Florida. The President's Council on Sustainable Development's task force on population and consumption concluded that the US should commit itself to population stabilization because of the high consumption rate of the average American, the number of unplanned and unwanted pregnancies, and the problem of teenage pregnancies. Consumption rather than investment should taxed, subsidies should be removed from the use of natural resources and agriculture, and environmental degradation should be priced properly. Poverty is at the root of economic deprivation and environmental destruction. Micro-enterprises have been successful in Asia, Africa, and Latin America, which experiences could be used by the US as well. The broader empowerment of women could also encourage political change, which, in turn could bring about full access to family planning and support to women and their families

  3. Water Tectonics: Evidence That Hydration Plays a Role in Tectonism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, A. R.; Schutt, D.; Perez-Gussinye, M.; Buehler, J. S.; Berry, M. A.; Ma, X.; Ravat, D.

    2015-12-01

    Several new observations provide evidence that water may play a more important role in tectonism than previously realized. Among these, • Thermodynamical modeling suggests that hydration promotes crustal mineral assemblages with lowered vP/vS and decreased density. This sheds new light on the significance of low crustal vP/vS measured in the western U.S. Cordillera from joint inversion of EarthScope USArray receiver functions and gravity. vP/vS, previously interpreted in terms of quartz abundance, is strikingly low throughout the highest-elevation regions of the western Cordillera. • Rheological modeling of flexural rigidity measurements also can be used to map water variations, primarily in the uppermost mantle. Mantle hydration estimated from flexural rigidity exhibits very similar spatial distribution to crustal hydration inferred from vP/vS, with the notable exception that the Wyoming craton has dry mantle lithosphere but a hydrous crust. • In hydrated lithosphere of the high-elevation western U.S. Cordillera, Moho temperatures estimated from Pn velocities are systematically colder than predictions by simple geothermal models of surface heat flow. These differences can only be reconciled by invoking a previously unrecognized advective term in the deep thermal transfer. • New and improved estimates of magnetic bottom are much deeper than the depth of the magnetite Curie temperature in some apparently hydrous lithosphere (notably, east of the Siletzia accreted terrane). This may indicate exotic magnetic mineralogies thought to occur only under hydrous conditions. Lithospheric hydration may be driven either by dehydration of subducted slab or by entrainment of water into upwellings passing through the mantle transition zone. Conceptualizing hydration as a large-scale process accompanied by increased buoyancy and decreased ductile strength, coupled with widespread changes in mineralogy, mass and energy transfer may help to illuminate many otherwise

  4. Thin film lubrication of hexadecane confined by iron and iron oxide surfaces: A crucial role of surface structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ta, D. T.; Tieu, A. K.; Zhu, H. T. Kosasih, B.

    2015-10-28

    A comparative analysis of thin film lubrication of hexadecane between different iron and its oxide surfaces has been carried out using classical molecular dynamic simulation. An ab initio force-field, COMPASS, was applied for n-hexadecane using explicit atom model. An effective potential derived from density functional theory calculation was utilized for the interfacial interaction between hexadecane and the tribo-surfaces. A quantitative surface parameterization was introduced to investigate the influence of surface properties on the structure, rheological properties, and tribological performance of the lubricant. The results show that although the wall-fluid attraction of hexadecane on pure iron surfaces is significantly stronger than its oxides, there is a considerable reduction of shear stress of confined n-hexadecane film between Fe(100) and Fe(110) surfaces compared with FeO(110), FeO(111), Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001), and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(012). It was found that, in thin film lubrication of hexadecane between smooth iron and iron oxide surfaces, the surface corrugation plays a role more important than the wall-fluid adhesion strength.

  5. Roles of linear ubiquitinylation, a crucial regulator of NF-κB and cell death, in the immune system.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Linear ubiquitinylation, a newly identified post-translational modification, is catalyzed by the linear ubiquitin assembly complex (LUBAC), which is composed of three different subunits, HOIL-1L (heme-oxidized IRP2 ligase 1L), HOIP (HOIL-1 interacting protein), and SHARPIN (SHANK-associated RH domain-interacting protein). LUBAC plays a critical role in the activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling triggered by a variety of stimuli, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and pathogen-derived components, and in the protection from cell death. Loss of function of SHARPIN in mice triggers chronic inflammation in multiple organs including the skin, as well as immunodeficiency. In humans, mutations in the gene encoding HOIL-1L cause chronic hyperinflammation and immunodeficiency, which are both associated with decreased levels of LUBAC. The linear ubiquitinylation activity of LUBAC is indispensable for B-cell function in mice, and hyperactivation of LUBAC is associated with oncogenesis in certain forms of B-cell lymphoma. In this review, the current understanding of the biochemistry of LUBAC-mediated linear ubiquitinylation and its involvement in the immune system are discussed.

  6. Platinum nanoparticles: the crucial role of crystal face and colloid stabilizer in the diastereoselective hydrogenation of cinchonidine.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Erik; Kleist, Wolfgang; Krumeich, Frank; Mallat, Tamas; Baiker, Alfons

    2010-02-15

    The preparation of stable metal nanoparticles requires a strong interaction between the (organic) stabilizer and the metal surface that might alter the catalytic properties. This behavior has been described as "poisoning" since the stabilizer normally decreases the catalytic activity due to site blocking. Here we show a striking influence of the stabilizer on the selectivity in the hydrogenation of cinchonidine (CD) over poly(acrylic acid) (PAA)-stabilized Pt nanoparticles with well-defined shape distributions. In the hydrogenation of the heteroaromatic ring of cinchonidine in toluene, the diastereomeric excess of the (S)-hexahydrocinchonidine increased upon increasing Pt{111}/Pt{100} ratio, but this distinct shape selectivity was observed only after the oxidative removal of PAA at 473 K. The use of the as-prepared nanoparticles inverted the major diastereomer to R, and this isomer was formed also in acetic acid. This striking change in the diastereoselectivity indicates that poly(acrylic acid), which remains on the Pt surface after preparation, interacts with CD during hydrogenation almost as strongly as the solvent acetic acid. The PAA stabilizer plays a dual role: it allows one to control the size and shape of the nanoparticles during their synthesis, and it affects the rate and diastereoselectivity of the hydrogenation of CD probably through a "surface-localized acidification".

  7. Importance of pH Homeostasis in Metabolic Health and Diseases: Crucial Role of Membrane Proton Transport

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin) and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis. PMID:25302301

  8. Identification of the silkworm quail gene reveals a crucial role of a receptor guanylyl cyclase in larval pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Yuasa, Masashi; Kiuchi, Takashi; Banno, Yutaka; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Diverse color patterns on the integument of lepidopteran larvae play important roles in their survival through camouflage, mimicry, sexual signaling, and aposematism. In the silkworm Bombyx mori, many color pattern variations have been preserved in inbred strains making them a good model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms that underlie color pattern formation. In this study, we focused on the silkworm quail (q) mutant, which exhibits abnormalities in multiple pigment biosynthesis pathways. Positional cloning of the q gene revealed that disruption of a guanylyl cyclase gene, BmGC-I, is responsible for its abnormal pigmentation. In q mutants, we identified a 16-bp deletion in the BmGC-I transcript, resulting in the production of a premature stop codon. Knockout of the BmGC-I gene resulted in the q-like abnormal pigmentation, thereby demonstrating that the BmGC-I gene is involved in the pigment biosynthesis pathway in the integument. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction showed that BmGC-I was strongly expressed in the fourth instar on day 2. Our results suggest that BmGC-I deficiency affects the pigment biosynthesis pathway, which supports the involvement of guanylyl cyclase in larval coloration.

  9. Predicting procedural pain after ureteroscopy: does hydrodistention play a role?

    PubMed Central

    Gul, Zeynep; Alazem, Kareem; Li, Ina; Monga, Manoj

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify perioperative predictors of immediate pain after ureteroscopy, specifically evaluating the impact of hydrodistention from irrigation on pain. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively identified patients who underwent ureteroscopy for the treatment of calculi. Data recorded for these patients included their maximum pain score in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), average flow rate of irrigant used during the procedure, patient and stone characteristics, operative procedure, and details of patients' immediate, post-operative course. Spearman's rho was used to determine the relationship between non-parametric, continuous variables. Then, a linear regression was performed to assess which variables could predict the peak pain score. Results: A total of 131 patients were included in the study. A non-parametric correlation analysis revealed that maximum pain score was negatively correlated with being male (r = −0.18, p=0.04), age (r = −0.34, p<0.001), and post-op foley placement (r = −0.20, p=0.02) but positively correlated with the preoperative pain score (r = 0.41, p<0.001), time in the PACU (r = 0.19, p = 0.03), and the morphine equivalent dose (MED) of narcotics administered in the PACU (r = 0.67, p<0.001). On linear regression, the significant variables were age, preoperative pain score, and stent placement. For every ten-year increase in age post-operative pain score decreased by 4/10 of a point (p = 0.03). For every 1 point increase in preoperative pain score there was a 3/10 of a point increase in the maximum pain score (p = 0.01), and leaving a stent in place post-operatively was associated with a 1.6 point increase in the maximum pain score. Conclusions: Hydrodistention does not play a role in post-ureteroscopy pain. Patients who are younger, have higher preoperative pain scores, or who are stented will experience more post-operative pain after ureteroscopy. PMID:27564284

  10. Do Diacritical Marks Play a Role at the Early Stages of Word Recognition in Arabic?

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Manuel; Abu Mallouh, Reem; Mohammed, Ahmed; Khalifa, Batoul; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A crucial question in the domain of visual word recognition is whether letter similarity plays a role in the early stages of visual word processing. Here we focused on Arabic because in this language there are various groups of letters that share the same basic shape and only differ in the number/location of diacritical points. We conducted a masked priming lexical decision experiment in which a target word was preceded by: (i) an identity prime; (ii) a prime in which the critical letter was replaced by a letter with the same shape that differed in the number of diacritics (e.g., ); or (iii) a prime in which the critical letter was replaced by a letter with different shape (e.g., ). Results showed a sizable advantage of the identity condition over the two substituted-letter priming conditions (i.e., diacritical information is rapidly processed). Thus, diacritical marks play an essential role in the “feature letter” level of models of visual word recognition in Arabic. PMID:27597838

  11. Do Diacritical Marks Play a Role at the Early Stages of Word Recognition in Arabic?

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Manuel; Abu Mallouh, Reem; Mohammed, Ahmed; Khalifa, Batoul; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A crucial question in the domain of visual word recognition is whether letter similarity plays a role in the early stages of visual word processing. Here we focused on Arabic because in this language there are various groups of letters that share the same basic shape and only differ in the number/location of diacritical points. We conducted a masked priming lexical decision experiment in which a target word was preceded by: (i) an identity prime; (ii) a prime in which the critical letter was replaced by a letter with the same shape that differed in the number of diacritics (e.g., ); or (iii) a prime in which the critical letter was replaced by a letter with different shape (e.g., ). Results showed a sizable advantage of the identity condition over the two substituted-letter priming conditions (i.e., diacritical information is rapidly processed). Thus, diacritical marks play an essential role in the “feature letter” level of models of visual word recognition in Arabic.

  12. Does black hole spin play a key role in the FSRQ/BL Lac dichotomy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Debbijoy; Sreekumar, Parameswaran; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Tomar, Ishan

    2016-04-01

    Blazars are characterized by large intensity and spectral variations across the electromagnetic spectrum It is believed that jets emerging from them are almost aligned with the line-of-sight. The majority of identified extragalactic sources in γ-ray catalogs of EGRET and Fermi are blazars. Observationally, blazars can be divided into two classes: flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and BL Lacs. BL Lacs usually exhibit lower γ-ray luminosity and harder power law spectra at γ-ray energies than FSRQs. We attempt to explain the high energy properties of FSRQs and BL Lacs from Fermi γ-ray space telescope observations. It was argued previously that the difference in accretion rates is mainly responsible for the large mismatch in observed luminosity in γ-ray. However, when intrinsic luminosities are derived by correcting for beaming effects, this difference in γ-ray luminosity between the two classes is significantly reduced. In order to explain this difference in intrinsic luminosities, we propose that spin plays an important role in the luminosity distribution dichotomy of BL Lacs and FSRQs. As the outflow power of a blazar increases with increasing spin of a central black hole, we suggest that the spin plays a crucial role in making BL Lac sources low luminous and slow rotators compared to FSRQ sources.

  13. Do Diacritical Marks Play a Role at the Early Stages of Word Recognition in Arabic?

    PubMed

    Perea, Manuel; Abu Mallouh, Reem; Mohammed, Ahmed; Khalifa, Batoul; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A crucial question in the domain of visual word recognition is whether letter similarity plays a role in the early stages of visual word processing. Here we focused on Arabic because in this language there are various groups of letters that share the same basic shape and only differ in the number/location of diacritical points. We conducted a masked priming lexical decision experiment in which a target word was preceded by: (i) an identity prime; (ii) a prime in which the critical letter was replaced by a letter with the same shape that differed in the number of diacritics (e.g., ); or (iii) a prime in which the critical letter was replaced by a letter with different shape (e.g., ). Results showed a sizable advantage of the identity condition over the two substituted-letter priming conditions (i.e., diacritical information is rapidly processed). Thus, diacritical marks play an essential role in the "feature letter" level of models of visual word recognition in Arabic. PMID:27597838

  14. Turing's theory of morphogenesis of 1952 and the subsequent discovery of the crucial role of local self-enhancement and long-range inhibition.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Hans

    2012-08-01

    In his pioneering work, Alan Turing showed that de novo pattern formation is possible if two substances interact that differ in their diffusion range. Since then, we have shown that pattern formation is possible if, and only if, a self-enhancing reaction is coupled with an antagonistic process of longer range. Knowing this crucial condition has enabled us to include nonlinear interactions, which are required to design molecularly realistic interactions. Different reaction schemes and their relation to Turing's proposal are discussed and compared with more recent observations on the molecular-genetic level. The antagonistic reaction may be accomplished by an inhibitor that is produced in the activated region or by a depletion of a component that is used up during the self-enhancing reaction. The autocatalysis may be realized by an inhibition of an inhibition. Activating molecules can be processed into molecules that have an inhibiting function; patterning of the Wnt pathway is proposed to depend on such a mechanism. Three-component systems, as discussed in Turing's paper, are shown to play a major role in the generation of highly dynamic patterns that never reach a stable state.

  15. Turing's theory of morphogenesis of 1952 and the subsequent discovery of the crucial role of local self-enhancement and long-range inhibition.

    PubMed

    Meinhardt, Hans

    2012-08-01

    In his pioneering work, Alan Turing showed that de novo pattern formation is possible if two substances interact that differ in their diffusion range. Since then, we have shown that pattern formation is possible if, and only if, a self-enhancing reaction is coupled with an antagonistic process of longer range. Knowing this crucial condition has enabled us to include nonlinear interactions, which are required to design molecularly realistic interactions. Different reaction schemes and their relation to Turing's proposal are discussed and compared with more recent observations on the molecular-genetic level. The antagonistic reaction may be accomplished by an inhibitor that is produced in the activated region or by a depletion of a component that is used up during the self-enhancing reaction. The autocatalysis may be realized by an inhibition of an inhibition. Activating molecules can be processed into molecules that have an inhibiting function; patterning of the Wnt pathway is proposed to depend on such a mechanism. Three-component systems, as discussed in Turing's paper, are shown to play a major role in the generation of highly dynamic patterns that never reach a stable state. PMID:23919125

  16. Using Role-Play for Expert Science Communication with Professional Stakeholders in Flood Risk Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Lindsey; Stokes, Alison; Crowley, Kate; Roberts, Carolyn

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores role-play pedagogies in learning and communicating about cutting-edge flood science by flood risk management professionals in local government. It outlines role-play process/structure and evaluates participant perceptions of their learning experiences. Issues were impacts of prior role-play experience on attitudes brought to…

  17. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients…

  18. Attacking the Personal Fable: Role-Play and Its Effect on Teen Attitudes toward Sexual Abstinence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saltz, Eli; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examines role playing as a tool for changing teenagers' attitudes about sex behavior and the consequences of teen pregnancy. A sample of 267 ninth-grade students attending a high-risk urban school participated. Role playing and watching videos of friends' role playing significantly increased favorable attitudes toward abstinence in girls but not…

  19. Oh, Garbage! Decisions about Waste Disposal. Creative Role-Playing Exercises in Science and Technology Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisi, Lynn; Pearson, Janice

    This document is one of a series of role plays that focus on science-related social issues of concern in contemporary public policy formation. The role plays are designed to help students develop information-processing and decision making skills needed to deal effectively with such issues. The role plays guide students in analyzing science related…

  20. Could borate have played a role in the RNA World?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grew, E. S.; Bada, J. L.; Hazen, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Two scenarios have been proposed for boron to play a critical role in the stabilization of ribose and other sugars in the ribonucleic acid (RNA) World, >3.8 Ga ago. One scenario envisages oligomeric RNA being synthesized in subaerial intermountane desert valleys in which groundwater was enriched in borate from breakdown of tourmaline (Benner et al. 2012 doi: 10.1021/ar200332w). In the alternative scenario, borates are enriched in hydrothermal environments (<150°C) in oceanic crust where ferromagnesian minerals are altered to brucite, serpentine and other minerals that can extract borate from the circulating seawater (Holm et al. 2006 doi:10.1186/1467-4866-7-7). Both scenarios presume that (1) B concentrations in non-marine water or sea water were about the same at >3.8 Ma as they are today and (2) plate tectonics was the prevailing regime. The postulated non-marine borate deposits would have been associated with continental collision and subduction with volcanism releasing B, whereas in the second scenario, ocean floor caught up in an early phase of subduction is considered a favorable site for borate formation. Because borate deposits are typically ephemeral and poorly preserved, the lack of evidence in the geologic record for these scenarios does not invalidate them. For example, the oldest reported non-marine borate deposits analogous to the type postulated in first scenario are only 20 Ma, but metamorphosed borates of Precambrian age have been interpreted to have non-marine evaporite precursors, the oldest being 2.4-2.1 Ga in the Liaoning-Jilin area, China. The first B minerals so far reported in the geologic record are metamorphic dravite-schorl tourmalines in the 3.7-3.8 Ga Isua supracrustal belt (southern West Greenland), where there is good evidence for seafloor spreading and subduction. The precursors to the Isua tourmalines are reported to include B-bearing marine clay minerals and detrital tourmaline. The relatively high Li contents in zircon from Jack

  1. Broca's Area Plays a Causal Role in Morphosyntactic Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carreiras, Manuel; Pattamadilok, Chotiga; Meseguer, Enrique; Barber, Horacio; Devlin, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    Although there is strong evidence that Broca's area is important for syntax, this may simply be a by-product of greater working memory and/or cognitive control demands for more complex syntactic structures. Here we report an experiment with event-related transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to investigate whether Broca's area plays a causal…

  2. Common arterial trunk and ventricular non-compaction in Lrp2 knockout mice indicate a crucial role of LRP2 in cardiac development

    PubMed Central

    Baardman, Maria E.; Zwier, Mathijs V.; Wisse, Lambertus J.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, Wilhelmina S.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Jurdzinski, Angelika; Hierck, Beerend P.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Plösch, Torsten; DeRuiter, Marco C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lipoprotein-related receptor protein 2 (LRP2) is important for development of the embryonic neural crest and brain in both mice and humans. Although a role in cardiovascular development can be expected, the hearts of Lrp2 knockout (KO) mice have not yet been investigated. We studied the cardiovascular development of Lrp2 KO mice between embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) and E15.5, applying morphometry and immunohistochemistry, using antibodies against Tfap2α (neural crest cells), Nkx2.5 (second heart field), WT1 (epicardium derived cells), tropomyosin (myocardium) and LRP2. The Lrp2 KO mice display a range of severe cardiovascular abnormalities, including aortic arch anomalies, common arterial trunk (persistent truncus arteriosus) with coronary artery anomalies, ventricular septal defects, overriding of the tricuspid valve and marked thinning of the ventricular myocardium. Both the neural crest cells and second heart field, which are essential for the lengthening and growth of the right ventricular outflow tract, are abnormally positioned in the Lrp2 KO. This explains the absence of the aorto-pulmonary septum, which leads to common arterial trunk and ventricular septal defects. Severe blebbing of the epicardial cells covering the ventricles is seen. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition does occur; however, there are fewer WT1-positive epicardium-derived cells in the ventricular wall as compared to normal, coinciding with the myocardial thinning and deep intertrabecular spaces. LRP2 plays a crucial role in cardiovascular development in mice. This corroborates findings of cardiac anomalies in humans with LRP2 mutations. Future studies should reveal the underlying signaling mechanisms in which LRP2 is involved during cardiogenesis. PMID:26822476

  3. Playing in "Trelis Weyr": Investigating Collaborative Practices in a "Dragons of Pern" Role-Play-Game Forum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alley, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive case study examined adolescents' and emerging adults' literate and social practices within the context of a role-play-game (RPG) forum, investigating the ways participants read and collaboratively composed within this space. As a researcher, I was interested in how this space functioned and how the interactions between…

  4. Factors influencing player preferences for heroic roles in role-playing games.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang Hwa; Kao, Ching-Han; Wu, Muh-Cherng

    2007-04-01

    Two studies were conducted to investigate whether player personality or social cognition influence preferences for heroic roles in role-playing games (RPG). In Study 1, 149 teenager subjects were categorized into five groups according to the Guilford Personality Inventory. Heroes were clustered into three types based on their attributes. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) results indicated that each personality group did not display distinctive preference for any particular heroic type. However, of the three heroic types teenagers most strongly preferred, Justice Warrior was followed, in order of preference, by Visionary Leader and Saint. In Study 2, the influence of three player social cognition factors (similarity, proximity, and familiarity) on player preference for heroic roles was studied. Multiple regression analysis results indicated that similarity and familiarity predicted player preferences for heroic roles.

  5. Deletion of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals its crucial role in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass

    DOE PAGES

    Young, Jenna; Chung, Daehwan; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2014-10-09

    sugar release on Avicel compared with the parent and wild-type strains. In conclusion: The exoglucanase activity of the GH48 domain of CelA plays a major role in biomass degradation within the suite of C. bescii biomass-degrading enzymes.« less

  6. Deletion of Caldicellulosiruptor bescii CelA reveals its crucial role in the deconstruction of lignocellulosic biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Jenna; Chung, Daehwan; Bomble, Yannick J.; Himmel, Michael E.; Westpheling, Janet

    2014-10-09

    release on Avicel compared with the parent and wild-type strains. In conclusion: The exoglucanase activity of the GH48 domain of CelA plays a major role in biomass degradation within the suite of C. bescii biomass-degrading enzymes.

  7. Crucial roles of the CHRNB3–CHRNA6 gene cluster on chromosome 8 in nicotine dependence: update and subjects for future research

    PubMed Central

    Wen, L; Yang, Z; Cui, W; Li, M D

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a leading cause of preventable death throughout the world. Nicotine, the primary addictive compound in tobacco, plays a vital role in the initiation and maintenance of its use. Nicotine exerts its pharmacological roles through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which are ligand-gated ion channels consisting of five membrane-spanning subunits. Besides the CHRNA4, CHRNB2 and CHRNA5/A3/B4 cluster on chromosome 15, which has been investigated intensively, recent evidence from both genome-wide association studies and candidate gene-based association studies has revealed the crucial roles of the CHRNB3–CHRNA6 gene cluster on chromosome 8 in nicotine dependence (ND). These studies demonstrate two distinct loci within this region. The first one is tagged by rs13277254, upstream of the CHRNB3 gene, and the other is tagged by rs4952, a coding single nucleotide polymorphism in exon 5 of that gene. Functional studies by genetic manipulation in mice have shown that α6*-nAChRs, located in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), are of great importance in controlling nicotine self-administration. However, when the α6 subunit is selectively re-expressed in the VTA of the α6−/− mouse by a lentiviral vector, the reinforcing property of nicotine is restored. To further determine the role of α6*-nAChRs in the process of nicotine-induced reward and withdrawal, genetic knock-in strains have been examined, which showed that replacement of Leu with Ser in the 9′ residue in the M2 domain of α6 produces nicotine-hypersensitive mice (α6 L9′S) with enhanced dopamine release. Moreover, nicotine-induced upregulation may be another ingredient in the pathology of nicotine addiction although the effect of chronic nicotine exposure on the expression of α6-containing receptors is controversial. To gain a better understanding of the pathological processes underlying ND and ND-related behaviors and to promote the development of effective smoking cessation

  8. The Role of Structural Characteristics in Problematic Video Game Play: An Empirical Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Daniel L.; Delfabbro, Paul H.; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    The research literature suggests that the structural characteristics of video games may play a considerable role in the initiation, development and maintenance of problematic video game playing. The present study investigated the role of structural characteristics in video game playing behaviour within a sample of 421 video game players aged…

  9. Epigenetics and Chromatin Remodeling Play a Role in Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mortaz, Esmaeil; Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Barnes, Peter J

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as heritable changes that affect gene expression without altering the DNA sequence. Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is facilitated through different mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications and RNA-associated silencing by small non-coding RNAs. All these mechanisms are crucial for normal development, differentiation and tissue-specific gene expression. These three systems interact and stabilize one another and can initiate and sustain epigenetic silencing, thus determining heritable changes in gene expression. Histone acetylation regulates diverse cellular functions including inflammatory gene expression, DNA repair and cell proliferation. Transcriptional coactivators possess intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activity and this activity drives inflammatory gene expression. Eleven classical histone deacetylases (HDACs) act to regulate the expression of distinct subsets of inflammatory/immune genes. Thus, loss of HDAC activity or the presence of HDAC inhibitors can further enhance inflammatory gene expression by producing a gene-specific change in HAT activity. For example, HDAC2 expression and activity are reduced in lung macrophages, biopsy specimens, and blood cells from patients with severe asthma and smoking asthmatics, as well as in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This may account, at least in part, for the enhanced inflammation and reduced steroid responsiveness seen in these patients. Other proteins, particularly transcription factors, are also acetylated and are targets for deacetylation by HDACs and sirtuins, a related family of 7 predominantly protein deacetylases. Thus the acetylation/deacetylation status of NF-κB and the glucocorticoid receptor can also affect the overall expression pattern of inflammatory genes and regulate the inflammatory response. Understanding and targeting specific enzymes involved in this process might lead to new therapeutic agents, particularly in

  10. Student feedback about the use of role plays in Sparshanam, a medical humanities module

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, P Ravi

    2012-01-01

    Background: At KIST Medical College, Lalitpur, Nepal, a Medical Humanities module for first year medical students has been conducted. Role plays are used to explore social, medical and sexual issues in the Nepalese context. The present study obtained student feedback about the role plays used in the module, the difficulties faced, and obtained suggestions for further improvement. Method: The module was conducted from January to August 2011 using a total of 15 role plays. Student feedback was obtained using a semi-structured questionnaire. Informal discussions were held and a questionnaire was circulated among the first year students who had participated in the module. Results: Ninety-eight of the 100 students in the module participated in the study. The overall opinion regarding the role plays was positive. Students stated role plays helped to make module objectives concrete and interesting, made students identify with the problem being investigated and improved communication skills. Role plays were designed to address important health issues in Nepal and prepare students for addressing these issues in future practice. A lack of sufficient time for preparing the role plays and initial problems with group dynamics were mentioned by the respondents during the study. Conclusions: Student feedback about the use of role plays during the module was positive. Role plays helped in making module objectives more concrete and interesting, improved communication skills and addressed important health issues in Nepal. Role plays are not resource intensive and can be considered for use in medical schools in developing nations. PMID:24358816

  11. Beyond self-selection in video game play: an experimental examination of the consequences of massively multiplayer online role-playing game play.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Joshua M

    2007-10-01

    There is burgeoning interest in the study of video games. Existing work is limited by the use of correlational designs and is thus unable to make causal inferences or remove self-selection biases from observed results. The recent development of online, socially integrated video games (massively multiplayer online role-playing games [MMORPGs]) has created a new experience for gamers. This randomized, longitudinal study examined the effects of being assigned to play different video game types on game usage, health, well-being, sleep, socializing, and academics. One hundred 18- to 20-year-old participants (73% male; 68% Caucasian) were randomly assigned to play arcade, console, solo computer, or MMORPG games for 1 month. The MMORPG group differed significantly from other groups after 1 month, reporting more hours spent playing, worse health, worse sleep quality, and greater interference in "real-life" socializing and academic work. In contrast, this group also reported greater enjoyment in playing, greater interest in continuing to play, and greater acquisition of new friendships. MMORPGs represent a different gaming experience with different consequences than other types of video games and appear to pose both unique risks and benefits from their use.

  12. Some personal notes on role plays as an excellent teaching tool : commentary on "using and developing role plays in teaching aimed at preparing for social responsibility".

    PubMed

    Hunger, Iris

    2013-12-01

    Role plays are extremely valuable tools to address different aspects of teaching social responsibility, because they allow students to "live through" complex ethical decision making dilemmas. While role plays are getting high marks from students because their entertainment value is high, their educational value depends on their closeness to students' work experience and the skills of the teacher in helping students comprehend the lessons they are meant to convey.

  13. Some personal notes on role plays as an excellent teaching tool : commentary on "using and developing role plays in teaching aimed at preparing for social responsibility".

    PubMed

    Hunger, Iris

    2013-12-01

    Role plays are extremely valuable tools to address different aspects of teaching social responsibility, because they allow students to "live through" complex ethical decision making dilemmas. While role plays are getting high marks from students because their entertainment value is high, their educational value depends on their closeness to students' work experience and the skills of the teacher in helping students comprehend the lessons they are meant to convey. PMID:24101438

  14. What Roles Can Scientists Play in Public Discourse?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    2011-04-01

    What is a useful and proper role for scientists in the public arena? How can we best discriminate where the boundary lies between expert knowledge and values or political opinion, and how can we properly honor that line? What can we expect in the way of reception for our interventions, and how can we increase their efficacy? Involvement in public policy debates is a common and accepted role for scientists in many disciplines. In the sciences related to public health, it is taken for granted that experts will talk about the implications of their research for public policy, whether in regard to smoking, diet, or disease spread. There is also a remarkable track record of geoscientists taking a lead role in the public arena and actually affecting public policy—F. Sherwood Rowland and Mario Molina collaborated on ozone depletion research at the Department of Chemistry at University of California, Irvine and then went on to make outstanding public contributions, as have James Hansen (at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies); Robert Watson (first at NASA, then at the University of East Anglia); and, of course, the late Stephen Schneider (first at the U.S. National Center for Atmospheric Research, then Stanford) on climate. Some “public” geoscientists have restricted their activities to interpreting science for the wider public, while others have endorsed specific policy initiatives (see Figure 1). I firmly believe that the quality of public discourse and the information reaching policy makers were better for their interventions.

  15. Modulating serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT) expression and activity unveils a crucial role in lipid-induced insulin resistance in rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Maria L; Coghlan, Matthew; Hundal, Harinder S

    2009-02-01

    Saturated fatty acids, such as palmitate, promote accumulation of ceramide, which impairs activation and signalling of PKB (protein kinase B; also known as Akt) to important end points such as glucose transport. SPT (serine palmitoyl transferase) is a key enzyme regulating ceramide synthesis from palmitate and represents a potential molecular target in curbing lipid-induced insulin resistance. In the present study we explore the effects of palmitate upon insulin action in L6 muscle cells in which SPT expression/activity has been decreased by shRNA (small-hairpin RNA) or sustained incubation with myriocin, an SPT inhibitor. Incubation of L6 myotubes with palmitate (for 16 h) increases intramyocellular ceramide and reduces insulin-stimulated PKB activation and glucose uptake. PKB inhibition was not associated with impaired IRS (insulin receptor substrate) signalling and was ameliorated by short-term treatment with myriocin. Silencing SPT expression (approximately 90%) by shRNA or chronic cell incubation with myriocin (for 7 days) markedly suppressed SPT activity and palmitate-driven ceramide synthesis; however, challenging these muscle cells with palmitate still inhibited the hormonal activation of PKB. This inhibition was associated with reduced IRS1/p85-PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) coupling that arises from diverting palmitate towards greater DAG (diacylglycerol) synthesis, which elevates IRS1 serine phosphorylation via activation of DAG-sensitive PKCs (protein kinase Cs). Treatment of SPT-shRNA cells or those treated chronically with myriocin with PKC inhibitors antagonized palmitate-induced loss in insulin signalling. The findings of the present study indicate that SPT plays a crucial role in desensitizing muscle cells to insulin in response to incubation with palmitate. While short-term inhibition of SPT ameliorates palmitate/ceramide-induced insulin resistance, sustained loss/reduction in SPT expression/activity promotes greater partitioning of palmitate

  16. Motivation within Role-Playing as a Means to Intensify College Students' Educational Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burenkova, Olga Mikhailovna; Arkhipova, Irina Vladimirovna; Semenov, Sergei Aleksandrovich; Samarenkina, Saniya Zakirzyanovna

    2015-01-01

    This article covers college students' educational activity issues while studying a foreign language; analyzes special aspects of motivation introduction, their specific features. It also defines role and structure of role-playing. The authors come to the conclusion that introduction of role-playing in an educational process will bring it closer to…

  17. Promyelocytic Leukemia (PML) Protein Plays Important Roles in Regulating Cell Adhesion, Morphology, Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Mei Kuen; Liang, Yong Jia; Chan, John Yeuk Hon; Wong, Sing Wan; Chen, Elve; Yao, Yao; Gan, Jingyi; Xiao, Lihai; Leung, Hin Cheung; Kung, Hsiang Fu; Wang, Hua; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho

    2013-01-01

    PML protein plays important roles in regulating cellular homeostasis. It forms PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) that act like nuclear relay stations and participate in many cellular functions. In this study, we have examined the proteome of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from normal (PML+/+) and PML knockout (PML−/−) mice. The aim was to identify proteins that were differentially expressed when MEFs were incapable of producing PML. Using comparative proteomics, total protein were extracted from PML−/− and PML+/+ MEFs, resolved by two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels and the differentially expressed proteins identified by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Nine proteins (PML, NDRG1, CACYBP, CFL1, RSU1, TRIO, CTRO, ANXA4 and UBE2M) were determined to be down-regulated in PML−/− MEFs. In contrast, ten proteins (CIAPIN1, FAM50A, SUMO2 HSPB1 NSFL1C, PCBP2, YWHAG, STMN1, TPD52L2 and PDAP1) were found up-regulated. Many of these differentially expressed proteins play crucial roles in cell adhesion, migration, morphology and cytokinesis. The protein profiles explain why PML−/− and PML+/+ MEFs were morphologically different. In addition, we demonstrated PML−/− MEFs were less adhesive, proliferated more extensively and migrated significantly slower than PML+/+ MEFs. NDRG1, a protein that was down-regulated in PML−/− MEFs, was selected for further investigation. We determined that silencing NDRG1expression in PML+/+ MEFs increased cell proliferation and inhibited PML expression. Since NDRG expression was suppressed in PML−/− MEFs, this may explain why these cells proliferate more extensively than PML+/+ MEFs. Furthermore, silencing NDRG1expression also impaired TGF-β1 signaling by inhibiting SMAD3 phosphorylation. PMID:23555679

  18. ASXL1 plays an important role in erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hui; Yamamoto, Shohei; Sheng, Mengyao; Bai, Jie; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Runze; Chen, Shi; Shi, Lihong; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Xu, Mingjiang; Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Feng-Chun

    2016-01-01

    ASXL1 mutations are found in a spectrum of myeloid malignancies with poor prognosis. Recently, we reported that Asxl1+/− mice develop myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or MDS and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) overlapping diseases (MDS/MPN). Although defective erythroid maturation and anemia are associated with the prognosis of patients with MDS or MDS/MPN, the role of ASXL1 in erythropoiesis remains unclear. Here, we showed that chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML) patients with ASXL1 mutations exhibited more severe anemia with a significantly increased proportion of bone marrow (BM) early stage erythroblasts and reduced enucleated erythrocytes compared to CMML patients with WT ASXL1. Knockdown of ASXL1 in cord blood CD34+ cells reduced erythropoiesis and impaired erythrocyte enucleation. Consistently, the BM and spleens of VavCre+;Asxl1f/f (Asxl1∆/∆) mice had less numbers of erythroid progenitors than Asxl1f/f controls. Asxl1∆/∆ mice also had an increased percentage of erythroblasts and a reduced erythrocyte enucleation in their BM compared to littermate controls. Furthermore, Asxl1∆/∆ erythroblasts revealed altered expression of genes involved in erythroid development and homeostasis, which was associated with lower levels of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3. Our study unveils a key role for ASXL1 in erythropoiesis and indicates that ASXL1 loss hinders erythroid development/maturation, which could be of prognostic value for MDS/MPN patients. PMID:27352931

  19. Role-play and the Industrial Revolution: an STS approach to the teaching of steam engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabka, Diego; Pereira de Pereira, Alexsandro; Lima Junior, Paulo

    2016-11-01

    Role-play is an interesting, although underexplored, way of teaching physics in high school. This paper presents a science-technology-society (STS) approach to the teaching of heat engines based on a role-play of the Industrial Revolution. Enacting the role-play, students are presented not only to scientific concepts, but also to the social and technological controversies of industrial development.

  20. Skeletal tissue regeneration: where can hydrogels play a role?

    PubMed

    Moreira Teixeira, Liliana S; Patterson, Jennifer; Luyten, Frank P

    2014-09-01

    The emerging field of tissue engineering reveals promising approaches for the repair and regeneration of skeletal tissues including the articular cartilage, bone, and the entire joint. Amongst the myriad of biomaterials available to support this strategy, hydrogels are highly tissue mimicking substitutes and thus of great potential for the regeneration of functional tissues. This review comprises an overview of the novel and most promising hydrogels for articular cartilage, osteochondral and bone defect repair. Chondro- and osteo-conductive and -instructive hydrogels are presented, highlighting successful combinations with inductive signals and cell sources. Moreover, advantages, drawbacks, and future perspectives of the role of hydrogels in skeletal regeneration are addressed, pointing out the current state of this rising approach. PMID:24968789

  1. NADPH oxidase 2 plays a role in experimental corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Chan, Elsa C; van Wijngaarden, Peter; Chan, Elsie; Ngo, Darleen; Wang, Jiang-Hui; Peshavariya, Hitesh M; Dusting, Gregory J; Liu, Guei-Sheung

    2016-05-01

    Corneal neovascularization, the growth of new blood vessels in the cornea, is a leading cause of vision impairment after corneal injury. Neovascularization typically occurs in response to corneal injury such as that caused by infection, physical trauma, chemical burns or in the setting of corneal transplant rejection. The NADPH oxidase enzyme complex is involved in cell signalling for wound-healing angiogenesis, but its role in corneal neovascularization has not been studied. We have now analysed the role of the Nox2 isoform of NADPH oxidase in corneal neovascularization in mice following chemical injury. C57BL/6 mice aged 8-14 weeks were cauterized with an applicator coated with 75% silver nitrate and 25% potassium nitrate for 8 s. Neovascularization extending radially from limbal vessels was observed in corneal whole-mounts from cauterized wild type mice and CD31+ vessels were identified in cauterized corneal sections at day 7. In contrast, in Nox2 knockout (Nox2 KO) mice vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A), Flt1 mRNA expression, and the extent of corneal neovascularization were all markedly reduced compared with their wild type controls. The accumulation of Iba-1+ microglia and macrophages in the cornea was significantly less in Nox2 KO than in wild type mice. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that Nox2 is implicated in the inflammatory and neovascular response to corneal chemical injury in mice and clearly VEGF is a mediator of this effect. This work raises the possibility that therapies targeting Nox2 may have potential for suppressing corneal neovascularization and inflammation in humans. PMID:26814205

  2. [Role playing as an essential element of simulation procedures in medicine].

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, Peter; Rall, Marcus; Eich, Christoph; Schnabel, Kai; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Role playing is an important element of virtually all simulation-based procedures. An improved understanding for methodological aspects facilitates its goal-oriented use in education and training, research and examinations. In the present paper we describe how different forms of role play are used in different simulation-based procedures. We describe a plausibility study from skills labs demonstrating that the introduction of role-playing can increase perceived realism. Finally we derive practical suggestions for the conduction of role plays in medical simulation.

  3. Role-playing as a tool for hiring, training, and supervising peer providers.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hans; Solomon, Phyllis

    2014-04-01

    This article presents role-playing as an activity that can help managers in hiring, evaluating, and supervising peer providers. With the increasing employment of peers in mental health care systems, supervisors have had to face dilemmas related to peer employment more frequently and with little guidance and direction. In response, this article presents role-playing as a practical tool to hire, train, and supervise peer providers. The effectiveness of role-playing depends largely on context and execution, and so this article also offers direction on how to maximize the utility and benefits of role-playing to enhance the performance of peer providers.

  4. Comparative transcriptome analysis highlights the crucial roles of photosynthetic system in drought stress adaptation in upland rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng-Feng; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Xiao, Ben-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the major adverse environmental factors reducing plant growth. With the aim to elucidate the underlying molecular basis of rice response to drought stress, comparative transcriptome analysis was conducted between drought susceptible rice cultivar Zhenshan97 and tolerant cultivar IRAT109 at the seedling stage. 436 genes showed differential expression and mainly enriched in the Gene Ontology (GO) terms of stress defence. A large number of variations exist between these two genotypes including 2564 high-quality insertion and deletions (INDELs) and 70,264 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs). 1041 orthologous gene pairs show the ratio of nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rate to synonymous nucleotide substitutions rate (Ka/Ks) larger than 1.5, indicating the rapid adaptation to different environments during domestication. GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) enrichment analysis of positive selection genes suggested that photosynthesis represents the most significant category. The collocation of positively selected genes with the QTLs of photosynthesis and the different photosynthesis performance of these two cultivars further illuminate the crucial function of photosynthesis in rice adaptation to drought stress. Our results also provide fruitful functional markers and candidate genes for future genetic research and improvement of drought tolerance in rice. PMID:26777777

  5. The RSC chromatin remodeling complex has a crucial role in the complete remodeler set for yeast PHO5 promoter opening.

    PubMed

    Musladin, Sanja; Krietenstein, Nils; Korber, Philipp; Barbaric, Slobodan

    2014-04-01

    Although yeast PHO5 promoter chromatin opening is a founding model for chromatin remodeling, the complete set of involved remodelers remained unknown for a long time. The SWI/SNF and INO80 remodelers cooperate here, but nonessentially, and none of the many tested single or combined remodeler gene mutations could prevent PHO5 promoter opening. RSC, the most abundant and only remodeler essential for viability, was a controversial candidate for the unrecognized remodeling activity but unassessed in vivo. Now we show that remodels the structure of chromatin (RSC) is crucially involved in PHO5 promoter opening. Further, the isw1 chd1 double deletion also delayed chromatin remodeling. Strikingly, combined absence of RSC and Isw1/Chd1 or Snf2 abolished for the first time promoter opening on otherwise sufficient induction in vivo. Together with previous findings, we recognize now a surprisingly complex network of five remodelers (RSC, SWI/SNF, INO80, Isw1 and Chd1) from four subfamilies (SWI/SNF, INO80, ISWI and CHD) as involved in PHO5 promoter chromatin remodeling. This is likely the first described complete remodeler set for a physiological chromatin transition. RSC was hardly involved at the coregulated PHO8 or PHO84 promoters despite cofactor recruitment by the same transactivator and RSC's presence at all three promoters. Therefore, promoter-specific chromatin rather than transactivators determine remodeler requirements.

  6. Crucial role of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses in HRA. [Human Reliability Analysis (HRA)

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T.G.; Haney, L.N.; Ostrom, L.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses one major cause for large uncertainties in human reliability analysis (HRA) results, that is, an absence of detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses. All too often this crucial step in the HRA process is done in a cursory fashion using word of mouth or written procedures which themselves may incompletely or inaccurately represent the human action sequences and human error vulnerabilities being analyzed. The paper examines the potential contributions these detailed analyses can make in achieving quantitative and qualitative HRA results which are: (1) creditable, that is, minimize uncertainty, (2) auditable, that is, systematically linking quantitative results and qualitative information from which the results are derived, (3) capable of supporting root cause analyses on human reliability factors determined to be major contributors to risk, and (4) capable of repeated measures and being combined with similar results from other analyses to examine HRA issues transcending individual systems and facilities. Based on experience analyzing test and commercial nuclear reactors, and medical applications of nuclear technology, an iterative process is suggested for doing detailed function, task, timeline, link and human vulnerability analyses using documentation reviews, open-ended and structured interviews, direct observations, and group techniques. Finally, the paper concludes that detailed analyses done in this manner by knowledgeable human factors practitioners, can contribute significantly to the credibility, auditability, causal factor analysis, and combining goals of the HRA.

  7. Ponticulin plays a role in the positional stabilization of pseudopods

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Ponticulin is a 17-kD glycoprotein that represents a major high affinity link between the plasma membrane and the cortical actin network of Dictyostelium. To assess the role of ponticulin in pseudopod extension and retraction, the motile behavior of two independently generated mutants lacking ponticulin was analyzed using computer- assisted two- and three-dimensional motion analysis systems. More than half of the lateral pseudopods formed off the substratum by ponticulin- minus cells slipped relative to the substratum during extension and retraction. In contrast, all pseudopods formed off the substratum by wild-type cells were positionally fixed in relation to the substratum. Ponticulin-minus cells also formed a greater proportion of both anterior and lateral pseudopods off the substratum and absorbed a greater proportion of lateral pseudopods into the uropod than wild-type cells. In a spatial gradient of cAMP, ponticulin-minus cells were less efficient in tracking the source of chemoattractant. Since ponticulin- minus cells extend and retract pseudopods with the same time course as wild-type cells, these behavioral defects in ponticulin-minus cells appear to be the consequence of pseudopod slippage. These results demonstrate that pseudopods formed off the substratum by wild-type cells are positionally fixed in relation to the substratum, that ponticulin is required for positional stabilization, and that the loss of ponticulin and the concomitant loss of positional stability of pseudopods correlate with a decrease in the efficiency of chemotaxis. PMID:8522606

  8. DNABII proteins play a central role in UPEC biofilm structure

    PubMed Central

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Justice, Sheryl S.; Bakaletz, Lauren O.; Goodman, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Most chronic and recurrent bacterial infections involve a biofilm component, the foundation of which is the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a conserved and key component of the EPS of pathogenic biofilms. The DNABII protein family includes integration host factor (IHF) and Histone-like protein (HU); both are present in the extracellular milieu. We have shown previously that the DNABII proteins are often found in association with eDNA and are critical for the structural integrity of bacterial communities that utilize eDNA as a matrix component. Here, we demonstrated that Uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strain UTI89 incorporates eDNA within its biofilm matrix and that the DNABII proteins are not only important for biofilm growth, but are limiting; exogenous addition of these proteins promotes biofilm formation that is dependent on eDNA. In addition, we show that both subunits of IHF, yet only one subunit of HU (HupB), are critical for UPEC biofilm development. We discuss the roles of these proteins in context of the UPEC EPS. PMID:25757804

  9. IFT46 plays an essential role in cilia development.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mi-Sun; Hwang, Kyu-Seok; Oh, Hyun-Woo; Ji-Ae, Kim; Kim, Hyun-Taek; Cho, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Ju; Yeong Ko, Je; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Jeong, Yun-Mi; You, Kwan-Hee; Kim, Joon; Park, Doo-Sang; Nam, Ki-Hoan; Aizawa, Shinichi; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Park, Jong-Hoon; Zhou, Weibin; Kim, Nam-Soon; Kim, Cheol-Hee

    2015-04-15

    Cilia are microtubule-based structures that project into the extracellular space. Ciliary defects are associated with several human diseases, including polycystic kidney disease, primary ciliary dyskinesia, left-right axis patterning, hydrocephalus and retinal degeneration. However, the genetic and cellular biological control of ciliogenesis remains poorly understood. The IFT46 is one of the highly conserved intraflagellar transport complex B proteins. In zebrafish, ift46 is expressed in various ciliated tissues such as Kupffer׳s vesicle, pronephric ducts, ears and spinal cord. We show that ift46 is localized to the basal body. Knockdown of ift46 gene results in multiple phenotypes associated with various ciliopathies including kidney cysts, pericardial edema and ventral axis curvature. In ift46 morphants, cilia in kidney and spinal canal are shortened and abnormal. Similar ciliary defects are observed in otic vesicles, lateral line hair cells, olfactory pits, but not in Kupffer׳s vesicle. To explore the functions of Ift46 during mouse development, we have generated Ift46 knock-out mice. The Ift46 mutants have developmental defects in brain, neural tube and heart. In particular Ift46(-/-) homozygotes displays randomization of the embryo heart looping, which is a hallmark of defective left-right (L/R) axis patterning. Taken together, our results demonstrated that IFT46 has an essential role in vertebrate ciliary development.

  10. DNABII proteins play a central role in UPEC biofilm structure.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Aishwarya; Justice, Sheryl S; Bakaletz, Lauren O; Goodman, Steven D

    2015-06-01

    Most chronic and recurrent bacterial infections involve a biofilm component, the foundation of which is the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). Extracellular DNA (eDNA) is a conserved and key component of the EPS of pathogenic biofilms. The DNABII protein family includes integration host factor (IHF) and histone-like protein (HU); both are present in the extracellular milieu. We have shown previously that the DNABII proteins are often found in association with eDNA and are critical for the structural integrity of bacterial communities that utilize eDNA as a matrix component. Here, we demonstrate that uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strain UTI89 incorporates eDNA within its biofilm matrix and that the DNABII proteins are not only important for biofilm growth, but are limiting; exogenous addition of these proteins promotes biofilm formation that is dependent on eDNA. In addition, we show that both subunits of IHF, yet only one subunit of HU (HupB), are critical for UPEC biofilm development. We discuss the roles of these proteins in context of the UPEC EPS.

  11. Acid-induced molten globule state of a prion protein: crucial role of Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment.

    PubMed

    Honda, Ryo P; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2014-10-31

    The conversion of a cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) to its pathogenic isoform (PrP(Sc)) is a critical event in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Pathogenic conversion is usually associated with the oligomerization process; therefore, the conformational characteristics of the pre-oligomer state may provide insights into the conversion process. Previous studies indicate that PrP(C) is prone to oligomer formation at low pH, but the conformation of the pre-oligomer state remains unknown. In this study, we systematically analyzed the acid-induced conformational changes of PrP(C) and discovered a unique acid-induced molten globule state at pH 2.0 termed the "A-state." We characterized the structure of the A-state using far/near-UV CD, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate fluorescence, size exclusion chromatography, and NMR. Deuterium exchange experiments with NMR detection revealed its first unique structure ever reported thus far; i.e. the Strand 1-Helix 1-Strand 2 segment at the N terminus was preferentially unfolded, whereas the Helix 2-Helix 3 segment at the C terminus remained marginally stable. This conformational change could be triggered by the protonation of Asp(144), Asp(147), and Glu(196), followed by disruption of key salt bridges in PrP(C). Moreover, the initial population of the A-state at low pH (pH 2.0-5.0) was well correlated with the rate of the β-rich oligomer formation, suggesting that the A-state is the pre-oligomer state. Thus, the specific conformation of the A-state would provide crucial insights into the mechanisms of oligomerization and further pathogenic conversion as well as facilitating the design of novel medical chaperones for treating prion diseases. PMID:25217639

  12. Liver plays a central role in asymmetric dimethylarginine-mediated organ injury.

    PubMed

    Ferrigno, Andrea; Di Pasqua, Laura G; Berardo, Clarissa; Richelmi, Plinio; Vairetti, Mariapia

    2015-05-01

    Asymmetric-dimethylarginine (ADMA) competes with L-arginine for each of the three isoforms of nitric oxide synthase: endothelial; neuronal; inducible. ADMA is synthesized by protein methyltransferases followed by proteolytic degradation. ADMA is metabolized to citrulline and dimethylamine, by dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH) and enters cells through cationic amino-acid transporters extensively expressed in the liver. The liver plays a crucial role in ADMA metabolism by DDAH-1 and, as has been recently demonstrated, it is also responsible for ADMA biliary excretion. A correlation has been demonstrated between plasma ADMA levels and the degree of hepatic dysfunction in patients suffering from liver diseases with varying aetiologies: plasma ADMA levels are increased in patients with liver cirrhosis, alcoholic hepatitis and acute liver failure. The mechanism by which liver dysfunction results in raised ADMA concentrations is probably due to impaired activity of DDAH due to severe inflammation, oxidative stress, and direct damage to DDAH. High plasma ADMA levels are also relevant as they are associated with the onset of multi-organ failure (MOF). Increased plasma concentration of ADMA was identified as an independent risk factor for MOF in critically-ill patients causing enhanced Intensive Care Unit mortality: a significant reduction in nitric oxide synthesis, leading to malperfusion in various organs, eventually culminating in multi organs dysfunction.

  13. Actin filaments and microtubules play different roles during bristle elongation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Tilney, L G; Connelly, P S; Vranich, K A; Shaw, M K; Guild, G M

    2000-04-01

    Developing bristles in Drosophila pupae contain 7-11 bundles of crosslinked actin filaments and a large population of microtubules. During bristle growth the rate of cell elongation increases with bristle length. Thin section EM shows that bundle size is correlated with the amount of cytoplasm at all points along the bristle. Thus, as the bristle elongates and tapers, fewer actin filaments are used. To ensure penetration of inhibitors we isolated thoraces and cultured them in vitro; bristles elongate at rates identical to bristles growing in situ. Interestingly, inhibitors of actin filament assembly (cytochalasin D and latrunculin A) dramatically curtailed bristle elongation while a filament stabilizer (jasplakinolide) accelerated elongation. In contrast, inhibitors of microtubule dynamics (nocodazole, vinblastine, colchicine and taxol) did not affect bristle elongation. Surprisingly, the bristle microtubules are stable and do not turn over. Furthermore, the density of microtubules decreases as the bristle elongates. These two facts coupled with calculations and kinetics of elongation and the fact that the microtubules are short indicate that the microtubules are assembled early in development and then transported distally as the bristle grows. We conclude that actin assembly is crucial for bristle cell elongation and that microtubules must furnish other functions such as to provide bulk to the bristle cytoplasm as well as playing a role in vesicle transport.

  14. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane.

  15. Mitochondrial OXA Translocase Plays a Major Role in Biogenesis of Inner-Membrane Proteins.

    PubMed

    Stiller, Sebastian B; Höpker, Jan; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Schütze, Conny; Schrempp, Sandra G; Vent-Schmidt, Jens; Horvath, Susanne E; Frazier, Ann E; Gebert, Natalia; van der Laan, Martin; Bohnert, Maria; Warscheid, Bettina; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Wiedemann, Nils

    2016-05-10

    The mitochondrial inner membrane harbors three protein translocases. Presequence translocase and carrier translocase are essential for importing nuclear-encoded proteins. The oxidase assembly (OXA) translocase is required for exporting mitochondrial-encoded proteins; however, different views exist about its relevance for nuclear-encoded proteins. We report that OXA plays a dual role in the biogenesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. First, a systematic analysis of OXA-deficient mitochondria led to an unexpected expansion of the spectrum of OXA substrates imported via the presequence pathway. Second, biogenesis of numerous metabolite carriers depends on OXA, although they are not imported by the presequence pathway. We show that OXA is crucial for the biogenesis of the Tim18-Sdh3 module of the carrier translocase. The export translocase OXA is thus required for the import of metabolite carriers by promoting assembly of the carrier translocase. We conclude that OXA is of central importance for the biogenesis of the mitochondrial inner membrane. PMID:27166948

  16. Online-offline activities and game-playing behaviors of avatars in a massive multiplayer online role-playing game

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Tan, Qun-Zhao

    2009-11-01

    Massive multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are very popular in China, which provides a potential platform for scientific research. We study the online-offline activities of avatars in an MMORPG to understand their game-playing behavior. The statistical analysis unveils that the active avatars can be classified into three types. The avatars of the first type are owned by game cheaters who go online and offline in preset time intervals with the online duration distributions dominated by pulses. The second type of avatars is characterized by a Weibull distribution in the online durations, which is confirmed by statistical tests. The distributions of online durations of the remaining individual avatars differ from the above two types and cannot be described by a simple form. These findings have potential applications in the game industry.

  17. Canadian Early Childhood Educators' Perceptions of Young Children's Gender-Role Play and Cultural Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servos, Jennifer E.; Dewar, Brandy A.; Bosacki, Sandra L.; Coplan, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates early childhood educators' perceptions of children's gender-role play and the impact their cultural background plays in their gender identity and play behaviors. Through qualitative in-depth interviews, early childhood educators in Canada (n = 40) were asked questions relating to their experiences with children from…

  18. Survival following a vertical free fall from 300 feet: the crucial role of body position to impact surface.

    PubMed

    Weckbach, Sebastian; Flierl, Michael A; Blei, Michael; Burlew, Clay Cothren; Moore, Ernest E; Stahel, Philip F

    2011-10-25

    We report the case of a 28-year old rock climber who survived an "unsurvivable" injury consisting of a vertical free fall from 300 feet onto a solid rock surface. The trauma mechanism and injury kinetics are analyzed, with a particular focus on the relevance of body positioning to ground surface at the time of impact. The role of early patient transfer to a level 1 trauma center, and "damage control" management protocols for avoiding delayed morbidity and mortality in this critically injured patient are discussed.

  19. Mars Colony: Using Role-Play as a Pedagogical Approach to Teaching Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolenc, Nathan; Wood, Aja; Soldan, Katie; Tai, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss role-play as a pedagogical strategy to engage kindergarten and first-grade students in science and engineering. They present a five-part Mars colony lesson that they developed for a blended class, during which students role-play a space-exploration story that enables them to gain a firsthand perspective of what…

  20. Breathing Life into History: Using Role-Playing to Engage Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz, Barbara C.; Murthy, Shalini A.

    2006-01-01

    Alternately referred to as historical role-playing, dramatic improvisation, sociodrama, or first-person characterization, role playing is a teaching strategy that often uses official accounts, personal narratives, and diaries to recreate a particular time period, specific event, or breathe life into a character from history. Historical…

  1. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  2. Using Role-Play and Case Studies to Improve Preservice Teacher Attitudes toward Classroom Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudolph, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Classroom management is a concern for preservice teachers (Charles, 2008). Teacher educators struggle to find the most effective ways to teach preservice teachers classroom management. Role-playing, combined with classroom management content, may offer a productive approach. As such, this study focused on the use of role-play with case studies to…

  3. The Strategic Micro-Firm: A Role Play In Management Training for Dynamic Businesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnabe, Federico; Busco, Cristiano; Davidsen, Pal I.; Lambri, Maurizio; Zatta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the main characteristics of the role-playing game "Strategic Micro-Firm" which aims to reproduce the fundamental features of a complex supply chain. Design/methodology/approach: A specific role-playing game is presented, in which a Balanced Scorecard is used as the reporting device and is…

  4. Online Role-Plays: Combining Situational and Interactional Authenticity in Foreign Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia Martins, Maria de Lurdes; Moreira, Gillian; Moreira, António

    2013-01-01

    Role-plays have been almost ubiquitous in foreign language classes and their potential has been widely recognised. In the last decade, the dissemination of Web 2.0 has created a wide range of possibilities for this type of activity, including conducting online role-plays between institutions, the opportunity to combine synchronous and asynchronous…

  5. Role Playing: The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggleston, Noel C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes how a role playing exercise can be used to teach students in a college level history course about the use of the atomic bomb in World War II. Information is presented on general use of role playing in history courses, objectives, questions to consider about use of the atomic bomb, and course evaluation. For journal availability, see so…

  6. The Evaluation of Role-Playing in the Context of Teaching Climate Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belova, Nadja; Eilks, Ingo; Feierabend, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Role-plays are a common pedagogical tool in the Social Sciences. As an imitation of societal practices, role-plays are thought to support the development of argumentation and decision-making skills among learners. However, argumentation and decision making are also goals in science education in general and in socioscientific issues-oriented…

  7. Fostering Argumentative Knowledge Construction through Enactive Role Play in "Second Life"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jamaludin, Azilawati; Chee, Yam San; Ho, Caroline Mei Lin

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how pre-university students shared and constructed knowledge in the context of GP (general paper) by interacting through individual virtual characters across five cycles of enactive role play sessions. Contextualized scenarios on the topic of euthanasia were developed in "Second Life". Role-playing the virtual characters…

  8. Receiving and Discovering Information: Two Role-Playing Simulations of the World War I Conscription Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarlane, John

    1999-01-01

    Proposes two approaches to using role-playing in the history classroom: (1) providing factual information to the students; and (2) allowing them to discover the experiences of historical actors. Expounds that the recommended role-playing simulations help students discover why Canadians were divided over the conscription issue in World War I. (CMK)

  9. Teacher's Guide to Canal. The Middlesex Canal: A Role Playing Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Cary W.; Tedesco, Paul H.

    The document consists of a role-playing game and related teacher's guide designed to illustrate decision-making processes leading to the building of the Middlesex Canal in Massachusetts in 1793. The primary educational objective is to involve students in the decision-making process through role play. The game is designed to facilitate…

  10. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients provide similar opportunities for skill demonstration. This study examined the correspondence of treatment adherence and competence ratings obtained in real client and role-played sessions for 91 clinicians trained in Motivational Interviewing (MI), using data from a multi-site trial examining three methods of clinician training (Martino et al., 2011). Results indicated overall poor integrity rating correspondence across the two session types, as indicated by weak correlations (r = .05–.27). Clinicians were rated significantly more MI adherent overall and specifically used more advanced MI strategies in role-played than real client sessions at several assessment time points (d = 0.36, 0.42). Real clients, in comparison to the role-play actor, demonstrated greater motivation at the beginning of the session (d = 1.09), discussion of unrelated topics (d = 0.70), and alliance with the clinician (d = 0.72). These findings suggest that MI integrity rating data obtained from real client and role-played sessions may not be interchangeable. More research is needed to improve the procedures and psychometric strength of treatment integrity assessment based on role-played sessions. PMID:23205626

  11. A Role-Playing Exercise for Development and International Economics Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, Yana van der Meulen

    1996-01-01

    Describes an exercise where students play the roles of various ministers advising the president in the resolution of macroeconomic problems that arise with a natural resource boon. Provides a framework for role playing that has applications beyond this issue. Includes results of students' evaluation of the exercise. (MJP)

  12. Role-Playing in Science Education: An Effective Strategy for Developing Multiple Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Elaine V.; Cruz, Barbara C.

    2009-01-01

    Role-playing can be an engaging and creative strategy to use in the college classroom. Using official accounts, personal narratives, and diaries to recreate a particular time period, event, or personality, the instructional strategy alternately referred to as role-playing, dramatic improvisation, or first-person characterization can be an…

  13. What Students Need: Exploring Teachers' Views via Imagined Role-Playing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zazkis, Rina; Nejad, Masomeh Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Role-playing is an unscripted dramatic technique that encourages participants to improvise behaviors that illustrate expected actions of persons involved in defined situations. However, among various uses in developing professionals, the use of role-playing in teacher education is rather rare. To give all students the opportunity to participate in…

  14. Comparing Role-Playing Activities in Second Life and Face-to-Face Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Fei; Noh, Jeongmin J.; Koehler, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared student performances in role-playing activities in both a face-to-face (FTF) environment and a virtual 3D environment, Second Life (SL). We found that students produced a similar amount of communication in the two environments, but the communication styles were different. In SL role-playing activities, students took more…

  15. Role Playing in Physical Education to Teach in the Affective Domain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samalot-Rivera, Amaury

    2014-01-01

    Using role playing during physical education provides limitless opportunities for intervention and for the demonstration of personal and social qualities. The purpose of this article is to provide easy steps for implementing role playing as a strategy to teach social skills to students in the physical education setting.

  16. Development of an Electronic Role-Play Assessment Initiative in Bioscience for Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Judy; Ainscough, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Devising authentic assessments for subjects with large enrolments is a challenge. This study describes an electronic role-play assessment for approximately 600 first-year nursing students to learn and apply pathophysiology (bioscience) concepts to nursing practice. Students used Microsoft Office PowerPoint[R] to prepare electronic role-plays both…

  17. Crucial roles of XCR1-expressing dendritic cells and the XCR1-XCL1 chemokine axis in intestinal immune homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, Tomokazu; Sugiyama, Masanaka; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Yamazaki, Chihiro; Okura, Soichiro; Sasaki, Izumi; Fukuda, Yuri; Orimo, Takashi; Ishii, Ken J.; Hoshino, Katsuaki; Ginhoux, Florent; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal immune homeostasis requires dynamic crosstalk between innate and adaptive immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) exist as multiple phenotypically and functionally distinct sub-populations within tissues, where they initiate immune responses and promote homeostasis. In the gut, there exists a minor DC subset defined as CD103+CD11b− that also expresses the chemokine receptor XCR1. In other tissues, XCR1+ DCs cross-present antigen and contribute to immunity against viruses and cancer, however the roles of XCR1+ DCs and XCR1 in the intestine are unknown. We showed that mice lacking XCR1+ DCs are specifically deficient in intraepithelial and lamina propria (LP) T cell populations, with remaining T cells exhibiting an atypical phenotype and being prone to death, and are also more susceptible to chemically-induced colitis. Mice deficient in either XCR1 or its ligand, XCL1, similarly possess diminished intestinal T cell populations, and an accumulation of XCR1+ DCs in the gut. Combined with transcriptome and surface marker expression analysis, these observations lead us to hypothesise that T cell-derived XCL1 facilitates intestinal XCR1+ DC activation and migration, and that XCR1+ DCs in turn provide support for T cell survival and function. Thus XCR1+ DCs and the XCR1/XCL1 chemokine axis have previously-unappreciated roles in intestinal immune homeostasis. PMID:27005831

  18. Rules out of Roles: Differences in Play Language and Their Developmental Significance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Yongho; Kellogg, David

    2007-01-01

    Using a discourse analytic approach from the work of Hoey (1991) and a dual processing model from Wray (2000), this paper compares the language produced by the same classes of children when they are engaged in role-play and when they are playing rule-based games. We find that role-play tends to be richer in "frozen" pair parts, where the responses…

  19. Using and developing role plays in teaching aimed at preparing for social responsibility.

    PubMed

    Doorn, Neelke; Kroesen, J Otto

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we discuss the use of role plays in ethics education for engineering students. After presenting a rough taxonomy of different objectives, we illustrate how role plays can be used to broaden students' perspectives. We do this on the basis of our experiences with a newly developed role play about a Dutch political controversy concerning pig transport. The role play is special in that the discussion is about setting up an institutional framework for responsible action that goes beyond individual action. In that sense, the role play serves a double purpose. It not only aims at teaching students to become aware of the different dimensions in decision making, it also encourages students to think about what such an institutional framework for responsible action might possibly look like.

  20. Role-play for medical students learning about communication: Guidelines for maximising benefits

    PubMed Central

    Nestel, Debra; Tierney, Tanya

    2007-01-01

    Background Role-play is widely used as an educational method for learning about communication in medical education. Although educational theory provides a sound rationale for using this form of simulation, there is little published evidence for its effectiveness. Students' prior experiences of role-play may influence the way in which they engage in this method. This paper explores students' experiences with the aim of producing guidelines for maximising the benefits of role-play within this learning context. Methods First-year undergraduate medical students participated in a role-play session as part of their communication programme. Before and after the session, students completed questionnaires. In the pre-session questionnaire, students were asked about their experiences of role-play and asked to identify helpful and unhelpful elements. Immediately after the session, students answered similar questions in relation to the role-play activity they had just completed. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data and qualitative data was thematically analysed. Results 284 students completed evaluation forms. Although 63 (22.2%) had prior unhelpful experiences, most students (n = 274; 96.5%) found this experience helpful. Summary findings were that students reported the key aspects of helpful role-play were opportunities for observation, rehearsal and discussion, realistic roles and alignment of roles with other aspects of the curriculum. Unhelpful aspects were those that evoked strong negative emotional responses and factors that contributed to a lack of realism. Conclusion Role-play was valued by students in the acquisition of communication skills even though some had prior unhelpful experiences. Guidelines for effective role-play include adequate preparation, alignment of roles and tasks with level of practice, structured feedback guidelines and acknowledgment of the importance of social interactions for learning. PMID:17335561

  1. Crucial role of HMGA1 in the self-renewal and drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Kyoung; Seo, Eun Jin; Choi, Eun J; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Seong-Jang, Kim; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cancer cells characterized by self-renewal ability, tumorigenesis and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HMGA1, a chromatin remodeling factor abundantly expressed in many different cancers, in the regulation of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer. Spheroid-forming cancer stem cells were isolated from A2780, SKOV3 and PA1 ovarian cancer cells by three-dimensional spheroid culture. Elevated expression of HMGA1 was observed in spheroid cells along with increased expression of stemness-related genes, such as SOX2, KLF4, ALDH, ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, spheroid A2780 cells, compared with adherent cells, showed higher resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. HMGA1 knockdown in spheroid cells reduced the proliferative advantage and spheroid-forming efficiency of the cells and the expression of stemness-related genes. HMGA1 overexpression in adherent A2780 cells increased cancer stem cell properties, including proliferation, spheroid-forming efficiency and the expression of stemness-related genes. In addition, HMGA1 regulated ABCG2 promoter activity through HMGA1-binding sites. Knockdown of HMGA1 in spheroid cells reduced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the overexpression of HMGA1 in adherent ovarian cancer cells increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Furthermore, HMGA1-overexpressing A2780 cells showed a significant survival advantage after chemotherapeutic agent treatment in a xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Together, our results provide novel insights regarding the critical role of HMGA1 in the regulation of the cancer stem cell characteristics of ovarian cancer cells, thus suggesting that HMGA1 may be an important target in the development of therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27561949

  2. Crucial role of HMGA1 in the self-renewal and drug resistance of ovarian cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Kyoung; Seo, Eun Jin; Choi, Eun J; Lee, Su In; Kwon, Yang Woo; Jang, Il Ho; Kim, Seung-Chul; Kim, Ki-Hyung; Suh, Dong-Soo; Seong-Jang, Kim; Lee, Sang Chul; Kim, Jae Ho

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cancer cells characterized by self-renewal ability, tumorigenesis and drug resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of HMGA1, a chromatin remodeling factor abundantly expressed in many different cancers, in the regulation of cancer stem cells in ovarian cancer. Spheroid-forming cancer stem cells were isolated from A2780, SKOV3 and PA1 ovarian cancer cells by three-dimensional spheroid culture. Elevated expression of HMGA1 was observed in spheroid cells along with increased expression of stemness-related genes, such as SOX2, KLF4, ALDH, ABCB1 and ABCG2. Furthermore, spheroid A2780 cells, compared with adherent cells, showed higher resistance to chemotherapeutic agents such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin. HMGA1 knockdown in spheroid cells reduced the proliferative advantage and spheroid-forming efficiency of the cells and the expression of stemness-related genes. HMGA1 overexpression in adherent A2780 cells increased cancer stem cell properties, including proliferation, spheroid-forming efficiency and the expression of stemness-related genes. In addition, HMGA1 regulated ABCG2 promoter activity through HMGA1-binding sites. Knockdown of HMGA1 in spheroid cells reduced resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, whereas the overexpression of HMGA1 in adherent ovarian cancer cells increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. Furthermore, HMGA1-overexpressing A2780 cells showed a significant survival advantage after chemotherapeutic agent treatment in a xenograft tumorigenicity assay. Together, our results provide novel insights regarding the critical role of HMGA1 in the regulation of the cancer stem cell characteristics of ovarian cancer cells, thus suggesting that HMGA1 may be an important target in the development of therapeutics for ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27561949

  3. Wind Energy's New Role in Supplying the World's Energy: What Role Will Structural Health Monitoring Play?

    SciTech Connect

    Butterfield, S.; Sheng, S.; Oyague, F.

    2009-12-01

    Wind energy installations are leading all other forms of new energy installations in the United States and Europe. In Europe, large wind plants are supplying as much as 25% of Denmark's energy needs and 8% of the electric needs for Germany and Spain, who have more ambitious goals on the horizon. Although wind energy only produces about 2% of the current electricity demand in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy, in collaboration with wind industry experts, has drafted a plan that would bring the U.S. installed wind capacity up to 20% of the nation's total electrical supply. To meet these expectations, wind energy must be extremely reliable. Structural health monitoring will play a critical role in making this goal successful.

  4. Focused screening of mitochondrial metabolism reveals a crucial role for a tumor suppressor Hbp1 in ovarian reserve

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Z; Huang, M; Liu, Z; Xie, P; Dong, Y; Wu, X; Qu, Z; Shen, B; Huang, X; Zhang, T; Li, J; Liu, J; Yanase, T; Zhou, C; Xu, Y

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cells (GCs) are tightly associated with fertility and the fate of ovarian follicles. Mitochondria are the central executers of apoptosis. However, the genetic basis underlying mitochondrial modulation in GCs during the ovarian development is poorly understood. Here, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic screening was used to identify genes conferring mitochondrial metabolism in human GCs. The results uncovered roles for several tumor suppressors, including HBP1, in the augmentation of mitochondrial function. Focused analysis revealed that high-mobility group (HMG)-box transcription factor 1 (Hbp1) levels regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, which is associated with global changes in transcription including Tfam. The systemic or granulosa-specific but not oocyte-specific ablation of Hbp1 promoted follicle growth and oocyte production, and is associated with the reduced apoptotic signals in mouse GCs. Consistent with increased mitochondrial function and attenuated GC apoptosis, the regulation of Hbp1 conferred substantial protection of ovarian reserve. Thus, the results of the present study provide a critical target to understand the control of the reproductive lifespan. PMID:27206316

  5. A deep look into the spray coating process in real-time—the crucial role of x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Stephan V.

    2016-10-01

    Tailoring functional thin films and coating by rapid solvent-based processes is the basis for the fabrication of large scale high-end applications in nanotechnology. Due to solvent loss of the solution or dispersion inherent in the installation of functional thin films and multilayers the spraying and drying processes are strongly governed by non-equilibrium kinetics, often passing through transient states, until the final structure is installed. Therefore, the challenge is to observe the structural build-up during these coating processes in a spatially and time-resolved manner on multiple time and length scales, from the nanostructure to macroscopic length scales. During installation, the interaction of solid-fluid interfaces and between the different layers, the flow and evaporation themselves determine the structure of the coating. Advanced x-ray scattering methods open a powerful pathway for observing the involved processes in situ, from the spray to the coating, and allow for gaining deep insight in the nanostructuring processes. This review first provides an overview over these rapidly evolving methods, with main focus on functional coatings, organic photovoltaics and organic electronics. Secondly the role and decisive advantage of x-rays is outlined. Thirdly, focusing on spray deposition as a rapidly emerging method, recent advances in investigations of spray deposition of functional materials and devices via advanced x-ray scattering methods are presented.

  6. A deep look into the spray coating process in real-time-the crucial role of x-rays.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephan V

    2016-10-12

    Tailoring functional thin films and coating by rapid solvent-based processes is the basis for the fabrication of large scale high-end applications in nanotechnology. Due to solvent loss of the solution or dispersion inherent in the installation of functional thin films and multilayers the spraying and drying processes are strongly governed by non-equilibrium kinetics, often passing through transient states, until the final structure is installed. Therefore, the challenge is to observe the structural build-up during these coating processes in a spatially and time-resolved manner on multiple time and length scales, from the nanostructure to macroscopic length scales. During installation, the interaction of solid-fluid interfaces and between the different layers, the flow and evaporation themselves determine the structure of the coating. Advanced x-ray scattering methods open a powerful pathway for observing the involved processes in situ, from the spray to the coating, and allow for gaining deep insight in the nanostructuring processes. This review first provides an overview over these rapidly evolving methods, with main focus on functional coatings, organic photovoltaics and organic electronics. Secondly the role and decisive advantage of x-rays is outlined. Thirdly, focusing on spray deposition as a rapidly emerging method, recent advances in investigations of spray deposition of functional materials and devices via advanced x-ray scattering methods are presented.

  7. A deep look into the spray coating process in real-time-the crucial role of x-rays.

    PubMed

    Roth, Stephan V

    2016-10-12

    Tailoring functional thin films and coating by rapid solvent-based processes is the basis for the fabrication of large scale high-end applications in nanotechnology. Due to solvent loss of the solution or dispersion inherent in the installation of functional thin films and multilayers the spraying and drying processes are strongly governed by non-equilibrium kinetics, often passing through transient states, until the final structure is installed. Therefore, the challenge is to observe the structural build-up during these coating processes in a spatially and time-resolved manner on multiple time and length scales, from the nanostructure to macroscopic length scales. During installation, the interaction of solid-fluid interfaces and between the different layers, the flow and evaporation themselves determine the structure of the coating. Advanced x-ray scattering methods open a powerful pathway for observing the involved processes in situ, from the spray to the coating, and allow for gaining deep insight in the nanostructuring processes. This review first provides an overview over these rapidly evolving methods, with main focus on functional coatings, organic photovoltaics and organic electronics. Secondly the role and decisive advantage of x-rays is outlined. Thirdly, focusing on spray deposition as a rapidly emerging method, recent advances in investigations of spray deposition of functional materials and devices via advanced x-ray scattering methods are presented. PMID:27537198

  8. Crucial role of molecular planarity on the second order nonlinear optical property of pyridine based chalcone single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezes, Anthoni Praveen; Jayarama, A.; Ng, Seik Weng

    2015-05-01

    An efficient nonlinear optical material 2E-3-(4-bromophenyl)-1-(pyridin-3-yl) prop-2-en-1-one (BPP) was synthesized and single crystals were grown using slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. Grown crystal had prismatic morphology and its structure was confirmed by various spectroscopic studies, elemental analysis, and single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. The single crystal XRD of the crystal showed that BPP crystallizes in monoclinic system with noncentrosymmetric space group P21 and the cell parameters are a = 5.6428(7) Å, b = 3.8637(6) Å, c = 26.411(2) Å, β = 97.568(11) deg and v = 575.82(12) Å3. The UV-Visible spectrum reveals that the crystal is optically transparent and has high optical energy band gap of 3.1 eV. The powder second harmonic generation efficiency (SHG) of BPP is 6.8 times that of KDP. From thermal analysis it is found that the crystal melts at 139 °C and decomposes at 264 °C. High optical transparency down to blue region, higher powder SHG efficiency and better thermal stability than that of urea makes this chalcone derivative a promising candidate for SHG applications. Furthermore, effect of molecular planarity on SHG efficiency and role of pyridine ring adjacent to carbonyl group in forming noncentrosymmetric crystal systems of chalcone family is also discussed.

  9. Regulation of Macrophage Motility by the Water Channel Aquaporin-1: Crucial Role of M0/M2 Phenotype Switch

    PubMed Central

    Tyteca, Donatienne; Nishino, Tomoya; Debaix, Huguette; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N'Kuli, Francisca; Hoffmann, Delia; Cnops, Yvette; Rabolli, Virginie; van Loo, Geert; Beyaert, Rudi; Huaux, François; Devuyst, Olivier; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2015-01-01

    The water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) promotes migration of many cell types. Although AQP1 is expressed in macrophages, its potential role in macrophage motility, particularly in relation with phenotype polarization, remains unknown. We here addressed these issues in peritoneal macrophages isolated from AQP1-deficient mice, either undifferentiated (M0) or stimulated with LPS to orientate towards pro-inflammatory phenotype (classical macrophage activation; M1). In non-stimulated macrophages, ablation of AQP1 (like inhibition by HgCl2) increased by 2–3 fold spontaneous migration in a Src/PI3K/Rac-dependent manner. This correlated with cell elongation and formation of lamellipodia/ruffles, resulting in membrane lipid and F4/80 recruitment to the leading edge. This indicated that AQP1 normally suppresses migration of resting macrophages, as opposed to other cell types. Resting Aqp1-/- macrophages exhibited CD206 redistribution into ruffles and increased arginase activity like IL4/IL13 (alternative macrophage activation; M2), indicating a M0-M2 shift. In contrast, upon M1 orientation by LPS in vitro or peritoneal inflammation in vivo, migration of Aqp1-/- macrophages was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that AQP1 oppositely regulates macrophage migration, depending on stimulation or not by LPS, and that macrophage phenotypic and migratory changes may be regulated independently of external cues. PMID:25719758

  10. Crucial role of interleukin-1beta and nitric oxide synthase in silica-induced inflammation and apoptosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kamal D; Rom, William N; Jagirdar, Jaishree; Yie, Ting-An; Gordon, Terry; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng

    2002-02-15

    Crystalline silica stimulates macrophages in vitro to release interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and nitric oxide (NO) and induces apoptosis of macrophages. Because the fibrogenic potential of a particulate paralleled its ability to induce apoptosis in macrophages, we investigated the underlying mechanisms by which IL-1beta and NO mediate apoptosis and inflammation in murine silicosis. First, we demonstrated that silica induced NO production and apoptosis in vitro using the IC-21 macrophage cell line. Both NO release and apoptosis could be inhibited by neutralizing anti-IL-1beta antibody or the NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), demonstrating the requirement for IL-1beta-mediated NO release in silica-induced apoptosis. We exposed IL-1beta knockout (IL-1beta(-/-)) mice, inducible NOS knockout (iNOS(-/-)) mice, and wild-type mice to 250 mg/m(3) silica for 5 h/d for 10 d using an inhalation chamber. Exposure of wild-type mice to silica resulted in lung inflammation, apoptosis, and significantly larger and more numerous silicotic lesions than in IL-1beta(-/-) mice over a 12-wk course. We also exposed iNOS(-/-) mice via inhalation in the same protocol and compared with wild-type mice and demonstrated that iNOS(-/-) mice had significantly reduced apoptosis and inflammation. These results demonstrated an association between apoptosis and inflammation in murine silicosis and support a potential role for IL-1beta-dependent NO-mediated apoptosis in the evolution of silicosis. PMID:11850347

  11. Drosophila 14-3-3ε has a crucial role in anti-microbial peptide secretion and innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Shandala, Tetyana; Woodcock, Joanna M; Ng, Yeap; Biggs, Lisa; Skoulakis, Efthimios M C; Brooks, Doug A; Lopez, Angel F

    2011-07-01

    The secretion of anti-microbial peptides is recognised as an essential step in innate immunity, but there is limited knowledge of the molecular mechanism controlling the release of these effectors from immune response cells. Here, we report that Drosophila 14-3-3ε mutants exhibit reduced survival when infected with either Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria, indicating a functional role for 14-3-3ε in innate immunity. In 14-3-3ε mutants, there was a reduced release of the anti-microbial peptide Drosomycin into the haemolymph, which correlated with an accumulation of Drosomycin-containing vesicles near the plasma membrane of cells isolated from immune response tissues. Drosomycin appeared to be delivered towards the plasma membrane in Rab4- and Rab11-positive vesicles and smaller Rab11-positive vesicles. RNAi silencing of Rab11 and Rab4 significantly blocked the anterograde delivery of Drosomycin from the perinuclear region to the plasma membrane. However, in 14-3-3ε mutants there was an accumulation of small Rab11-positive vesicles near the plasma membrane. This vesicular phenotype was similar to that observed in response to the depletion of the vesicular Syntaxin protein Syx1a. In wild-type Drosophila immune tissue, 14-3-3ε was detected adjacent to Rab11, and partially overlapping with Syx1a, on vesicles near the plasma membrane. We conclude that 14-3-3ε is required for Rab11-positive vesicle function, which in turn enables antimicrobial peptide secretion during an innate immune response.

  12. Plasmin-induced procoagulant effects in the blood coagulation: a crucial role of coagulation factors V and VIII.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Kenichi; Nogami, Keiji; Nishiya, Katsumi; Shima, Midori

    2010-09-01

    Plasminogen activators provide effective treatment for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, paradoxical elevation of thrombin activity associated with failure of clot lysis and recurrent thrombosis has been reported. Generation of thrombin in these circumstances appears to be owing to plasmin (Plm)-induced activation of factor (F) XII. Plm catalyzes proteolysis of several coagulant factors, but the roles of these factors on Plm-mediated procoagulant activity remain to be determined. Recently developed global coagulation assays were used in this investigation. Rotational thromboelastometry using whole blood, clot waveform analysis and thrombin generation tests using plasma, showed that Plm (> or =125 nmol/l) shortened the clotting times in similar dose-dependent manners. In particular, the thrombin generation test, which was unaffected by products of fibrinolysis, revealed the enhanced coagulation with an approximately two-fold increase of peak level of thrombin generation. Studies using alpha2-antiplasmin-deficient plasma revealed that much lower dose of Plm (> or =16 nmol/l) actually contributed to enhancing thrombin generation. The shortening of clotting time could be observed even in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor, supporting that Plm exerted the procoagulant activity independently of FXII. In addition, using specific coagulation-deficient plasmas, the clot waveform analysis showed that Plm did not shorten the clotting time in only FV-deficient or FVIII-deficient plasma in prothrombin time-based or activated partial thromboplastin time-based assay, respectively. Our results indicated that Plm did possess procoagulant activity in the blood coagulation, and this effect was likely attributed by multicoagulation factors, dependent on FV and/or FVIII.

  13. The crucial roles of apolipoproteins E and C-III in apoB lipoprotein metabolism in normolipidemia and hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe the roles of apolipoprotein C-III (apoC-III) and apoE in VLDL and LDL metabolism Recent findings ApoC-III can block clearance from the circulation of apolipoprotein B (apoB) lipoproteins, whereas apoE mediates their clearance. Normolipidemia is sustained by hepatic secretion of VLDL and IDL subspecies that contain both apoE and apoC-III (VLDL E+C-III+). Most of this VLDL E+C-III+ is speedily lipolyzed, reduced in apoC-III content, and cleared from the circulation as apoE containing dense VLDL, IDL, and light LDL. In contrast, in hypertriglyceridemia, most VLDL is secreted with apoC-III but without apoE, and so it is not cleared until it loses apoC-III during lipolysis to dense LDL. In normolipidemia, the liver also secretes IDL and large and medium-size LDL, whereas in hypertriglyceridemia, the liver secretes more dense LDL with and without apoC-III. These pathways establish the hypertriglyceridemic phenotype and link it metabolically to dense LDL. Dietary carbohydrate compared with unsaturated fat suppresses metabolic pathways mediated by apoE that are qualitatively similar to those suppressed in hypertriglyceridemia. Summary The opposing actions of apoC-III and apoE on subspecies of VLDL and LDL, and the direct secretion of LDL in several sizes, establish much of the basic structure of human apoB lipoprotein metabolism in normal and hypertriglyceridemic humans. PMID:25551803

  14. Crucial Roles of Systemic and Tissue Lipid Peroxidation Levels and Anti-Oxidant Defences Following Contrast Agent Application

    PubMed Central

    Sitar, Gungor; Kucuk, Mehmet; Erinc Sitar, Mustafa; Yasar, Ozgur; Aydin, Seval; Yanar, Karolin; Cakatay, Ufuk; Buyukpınarbasili, Nur

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the most important side effects of contrast pharmaceutical agents, which are used very common in routine radiology practice, is contrast induced nephropathy. Even ischemia, oxidative stress and osmolality related cytotoxic effects are considered, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology have not been identified completely yet. Objectives The aim of the current study was to reveal the role of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymatic defence mechanisms in the aetiopathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy. We also studied possible alleviating effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, to obtain extra information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Materials and Methods This is an clinical-experimental study, This study was conducted of Istanbul/Turkey between September 15, 2012 and April 15, 2013. Three groups of male rats were randomly set up as a control group (C), a 100 mg/kg intraperitoneal NAC + 7 mL/kg contrast agent group (N + CIN) and a 7 mL/kg intraperitoneal contrast agent group (CIN). They were placed in individual metabolic cages 48 hours after agent administration to obtain 24-hour urine samples. Renal function tests (albumin, urea, creatinine, total protein) were conducted, oxidative stress parameters (Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase activity - Cu, Zn-SOD; advanced oxidation protein products - AOPP; protein carbonyls - PCO; total thiol groups - T-SH; and lipid hydroperoxides -LHP) were measured and tissues were analysed histopathologically. Results Compared with the control group, groups CIN and N + CIN had significantly higher urea and LHP levels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively) and significantly lower Cu, Zn-SOD activity and creatinine clearance (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in PCO or AOPP levels despite differences in descriptive statistics. Conclusions Contrast-agent-induced nephropathic changes are more closely related to

  15. Crucial Roles of Systemic and Tissue Lipid Peroxidation Levels and Anti-Oxidant Defences Following Contrast Agent Application

    PubMed Central

    Sitar, Gungor; Kucuk, Mehmet; Erinc Sitar, Mustafa; Yasar, Ozgur; Aydin, Seval; Yanar, Karolin; Cakatay, Ufuk; Buyukpınarbasili, Nur

    2016-01-01

    Background One of the most important side effects of contrast pharmaceutical agents, which are used very common in routine radiology practice, is contrast induced nephropathy. Even ischemia, oxidative stress and osmolality related cytotoxic effects are considered, the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology have not been identified completely yet. Objectives The aim of the current study was to reveal the role of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymatic defence mechanisms in the aetiopathogenesis of contrast-induced nephropathy. We also studied possible alleviating effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a potent antioxidant, to obtain extra information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Materials and Methods This is an clinical-experimental study, This study was conducted of Istanbul/Turkey between September 15, 2012 and April 15, 2013. Three groups of male rats were randomly set up as a control group (C), a 100 mg/kg intraperitoneal NAC + 7 mL/kg contrast agent group (N + CIN) and a 7 mL/kg intraperitoneal contrast agent group (CIN). They were placed in individual metabolic cages 48 hours after agent administration to obtain 24-hour urine samples. Renal function tests (albumin, urea, creatinine, total protein) were conducted, oxidative stress parameters (Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase activity - Cu, Zn-SOD; advanced oxidation protein products - AOPP; protein carbonyls - PCO; total thiol groups - T-SH; and lipid hydroperoxides -LHP) were measured and tissues were analysed histopathologically. Results Compared with the control group, groups CIN and N + CIN had significantly higher urea and LHP levels (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively) and significantly lower Cu, Zn-SOD activity and creatinine clearance (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the groups in PCO or AOPP levels despite differences in descriptive statistics. Conclusions Contrast-agent-induced nephropathic changes are more closely related to

  16. Pore helices play a dynamic role as integrators of domain motion during Kv11.1 channel inactivation gating.

    PubMed

    Perry, Matthew D; Ng, Chai Ann; Vandenberg, Jamie I

    2013-04-19

    Proteins that form ion-selective pores in the membrane of cells are integral to many rapid signaling processes, including regulating the rhythm of the heartbeat. In potassium channels, the selectivity filter is critical for both endowing an exquisite selectivity for potassium ions, as well as for controlling the flow of ions through the pore. Subtle rearrangements in the complex hydrogen-bond network that link the selectivity filter to the surrounding pore helices differentiate conducting (open) from nonconducting (inactivated) conformations of the channel. Recent studies suggest that beyond the selectivity filter, inactivation involves widespread rearrangements of the channel protein. Here, we use rate equilibrium free energy relationship analysis to probe the structural changes that occur during selectivity filter gating in Kv11.1 channels, at near atomic resolution. We show that the pore helix plays a crucial dynamic role as a bidirectional interface during selectivity filter gating. We also define the molecular bases of the energetic coupling between the pore helix and outer helix of the pore domain that occurs early in the transition from open to inactivated states, as well as the coupling between the pore helix and inner helix late in the transition. Our data demonstrate that the pore helices are more than just static structural elements supporting the integrity of the selectivity filter; instead they play a crucial dynamic role during selectivity filter gating.

  17. Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1α Plays a Crucial Role Based on Neuroprotective Role in Neonatal Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Miki; Matsubara, Keiichi; Matsubara, Yuko; Uchikura, Yuka; Hashimoto, Hisashi; Fujioka, Toru; Matsumoto, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Owing to progress in perinatal medicine, the survival of preterm newborns has markedly increased. However, the incidence of cerebral palsy has risen in association with increased preterm birth. Cerebral palsy is largely caused by cerebral hypoxic ischemia (HI), for which there are no effective medical treatments. We evaluated the effects of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) on neonatal brain damage in rats. Left common carotid (LCC) arteries of seven-day-old Wistar rat pups were ligated, and animals were exposed to hypoxic gas to cause cerebral HI. Behavioral tests revealed that the memory and spatial perception abilities were disturbed in HI animals, and that SDF-1α treatment improved these cognitive functions. Motor coordination was also impaired after HI but was unimproved by SDF-1α treatment. SDF-1α reduced intracranial inflammation and induced cerebral remyelination, as indicated by the immunohistochemistry results. These data suggest that SDF-1α specifically influences spatial perception abilities in neonatal HI encephalopathy. PMID:26251894

  18. The Academic Librarian: Buying Into, Playing Out, and Resisting the Teacher Role in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Trevor; Bhandol, Janine

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a small-scale study in a UK university. The research investigated how academic librarians experienced the processes of becoming a teacher. As more librarians are drawn into a teaching role, understanding these developments becomes crucial. A narrative approach revealed the challenges faced as they participated…

  19. A comparative test of the developmental, role-playing, and defensive explanations of offspring identification.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, J L; Minns, D R

    1978-01-01

    Following Mussen and Distler (1959) and Bandura, Ross and Ross (1963), the developmental, defensive, and role-playing theories of identification are tested on high school seniors. Previous tests have supported the developmental and role-playing hypotheses about equally, while the defensive hypothesis lacks consistent empirical support. Questions are raised, however, about the merit of these tests. Data are presented on seniors in an Eastern suburban school and a Midwestern small town school which support the developmental (warmth) hypothesis but which are inconsistent with the defensive and role-playing hypotheses. Parental behavior is measured by the Bronfenbrenner Parent Behavior Questionnaire and identification is measured by the semantic differential.

  20. Cultural scripts, memories of childhood abuse, and multiple identities: a study of role-played enactments.

    PubMed

    Stafford, Jane; Lynn, Steven Jay

    2002-01-01

    This study compared the reports of satanic, sexual, and physical abuse of persons instructed to role-play either dissociative identity disorder (DID) (n = 33), major depression (n = 33), or a college student who experienced minor adjustment problems ("normal") (n = 33) across a number of trials that included role-played hypnosis. As hypothesized, more of the participants who were asked to role-play DID reported at least one instance of satanic ritual abuse and sexual abuse compared with those who role-played depression or a college student with minor adjustment problems. DID role-players reported more incidents of sexual abuse and more severe physical and sexual abuse than did the major depression role-players. Further, the DID role-players differed from the normal role-players on all the measures of frequency and severity of physical and sexual abuse. Participants in all groups reported more frequent and severe incidents of physical abuse after role-played hypnosis than they did prior to it.

  1. The Many Roles We Play: Perceptions of the Role of Psychology Lecturers According to Staff and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyne, Sarah M.

    2007-01-01

    Lecturers in psychology have many different roles that they must play. It is often very difficult to know what roles are the most important and which to focus on. This study assessed the perceived importance of seven different roles lecturers undertake according to psychology lecturers and students. Results indicated that assessor, course planner,…

  2. Annexin5 Plays a Vital Role in Arabidopsis Pollen Development via Ca2+-Dependent Membrane Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jingen; Wu, Xiaorong; Yuan, Shunjie; Qian, Dong; Nan, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of pollen development and pollen tube growth is a complicated biological process that is crucial for sexual reproduction in flowering plants. Annexins are widely distributed from protists to higher eukaryotes and play multiple roles in numerous cellular events by acting as a putative “linker” between Ca2+ signaling, the actin cytoskeleton and the membrane, which are required for pollen development and pollen tube growth. Our recent report suggested that downregulation of the function of Arabidopsis annexin 5 (Ann5) in transgenic Ann5-RNAi lines caused severely sterile pollen grains. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of the function of Ann5 in pollen. This study demonstrated that Ann5 associates with phospholipid membrane and this association is stimulated by Ca2+ in vitro. Brefeldin A (BFA) interferes with endomembrane trafficking and inhibits pollen germination and pollen tube growth. Both pollen germination and pollen tube growth of Ann5-overexpressing plants showed increased resistance to BFA treatment, and this effect was regulated by calcium. Overexpression of Ann5 promoted Ca2+-dependent cytoplasmic streaming in pollen tubes in vivo in response to BFA. Lactrunculin (LatB) significantly prohibited pollen germination and tube growth by binding with high affinity to monomeric actin and preferentially targeting dynamic actin filament arrays and preventing actin polymerization. Overexpression of Ann5 did not affect pollen germination or pollen tube growth in response to LatB compared with wild-type, although Ann5 interacts with actin filaments in a manner similar to some animal annexins. In addition, the sterile pollen phenotype could be only partially rescued by Ann5 mutants at Ca2+-binding sites when compared to the complete recovery by wild-type Ann5. These data demonstrated that Ann5 is involved in pollen development, germination and pollen tube growth through the promotion of endomembrane trafficking modulated by

  3. Heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide pathway inhibition plays a role in ameliorating fibrosis following splenectomy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiu-Ming; Duan, Zhi-Jun; Du, Jian-Ling; Guo, Shi-Bin; Sun, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Zhen

    2013-05-01

    Splenectomy is a recognized therapy for liver cirrhosis with splenomegaly, since it decreases free iron concentration that accompanies the destruction of red blood cells. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and its by-products, iron and carbon monoxide (CO), play crucial roles in hepatic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to determine whether splenectomy in cirrhotic rats induced by bile duct ligation (BDL), through the HO/CO pathway, could slow down the development of liver fibrosis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into the sham, BDL, splenectomy, Fe, zinc protoporphyrin (Znpp) and cobalt protoporphyrin (Copp) treatment groups, for inhibiting and inducing HO-1 expression. The level of HO-1 was detected by western blot analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Serum carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), iron and portal vein pressure (PVP) were also quantified. Liver iron was measured by atomic absorption spectrometry with acetylene-air flame atomization. HO-1 and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were localized by immunohistochemistry. Liver and spleen iron were visualized by Perls' Prussian blue staining. Hepatic fibrosis was assessed using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect serum transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). The results showed that liver, spleen and serum levels of HO-1, COHb and iron were greatly enhanced in the BDL group compared with the sham group; they were reduced following splenectomy and Znpp treatment, but were elevated in the Copp and Fe groups. Hydroxyproline, TGF-β1, α-SMA, PVP and malonaldehyde levels were lower in the splenectomy and Znpp groups compared to BDL, while higher levels were observed in the Copp and Fe-treated groups. Our study shows that splenectomy reduces iron and CO levels in part by reducing HO-1 expression, and it decreases portal pressure and slightly decreases hepatic fibroproliferation. PMID:23525258

  4. Annexin5 plays a vital role in Arabidopsis pollen development via Ca2+-dependent membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingen; Wu, Xiaorong; Yuan, Shunjie; Qian, Dong; Nan, Qiong; An, Lizhe; Xiang, Yun

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of pollen development and pollen tube growth is a complicated biological process that is crucial for sexual reproduction in flowering plants. Annexins are widely distributed from protists to higher eukaryotes and play multiple roles in numerous cellular events by acting as a putative "linker" between Ca2+ signaling, the actin cytoskeleton and the membrane, which are required for pollen development and pollen tube growth. Our recent report suggested that downregulation of the function of Arabidopsis annexin 5 (Ann5) in transgenic Ann5-RNAi lines caused severely sterile pollen grains. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of the function of Ann5 in pollen. This study demonstrated that Ann5 associates with phospholipid membrane and this association is stimulated by Ca2+ in vitro. Brefeldin A (BFA) interferes with endomembrane trafficking and inhibits pollen germination and pollen tube growth. Both pollen germination and pollen tube growth of Ann5-overexpressing plants showed increased resistance to BFA treatment, and this effect was regulated by calcium. Overexpression of Ann5 promoted Ca2+-dependent cytoplasmic streaming in pollen tubes in vivo in response to BFA. Lactrunculin (LatB) significantly prohibited pollen germination and tube growth by binding with high affinity to monomeric actin and preferentially targeting dynamic actin filament arrays and preventing actin polymerization. Overexpression of Ann5 did not affect pollen germination or pollen tube growth in response to LatB compared with wild-type, although Ann5 interacts with actin filaments in a manner similar to some animal annexins. In addition, the sterile pollen phenotype could be only partially rescued by Ann5 mutants at Ca2+-binding sites when compared to the complete recovery by wild-type Ann5. These data demonstrated that Ann5 is involved in pollen development, germination and pollen tube growth through the promotion of endomembrane trafficking modulated by calcium

  5. Evaluating the impact of role-playing simulations on global competency in an online transnational engineering course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, Kari

    Successfully interacting with those from different cultures is essential to excel in any field, particularly when global, transnational collaborations in the workplace are increasingly common. However, many higher education students in engineering are not explicitly taught how to display the global competency skills desired by future employers. To display global competency skills means students must be able to visibly respect and recognize differences among those from different cultures. Global competency also means students must be able to show they can adjust their behaviors and integrate others' ideas when working with those with cultural backgrounds other than their own. While these skills are now deemed essential for future engineers, many institutions are struggling with determining which strategies and activities are universally effective to allow students to practice the global competency skills now crucial for success. Immersing engineering students in interactive role-playing simulations in transnational environments is one way institutions are encouraging students to illustrate and develop global competency skills. Role-playing simulations in transnational education provide environments where students adopt roles, interact with other students, and together explore and address realistic global problems. However, no studies have addressed whether or how role-playing simulations can help develop global competency in transnational engineering courses, students' perceptions regarding whether they change their abilities to display global competency in those environments, and their perspectives the effectiveness of using role-playing simulations for this purpose. To address this gap, this study assesses the impact of two subsequent role-playing simulations involving nuclear energy policy in a transnational course involving engineering students from the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia, and from Technische Universitat Dortmund in Dortmund

  6. Exercise and Drinking May Play a Role in Vision Impairment Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Exercise and Drinking May Play a Role in Vision Impairment Risk Mar. 20, 2014 In 2020, the ... 477–85. Related Stories Age-Related Macular Degeneration Vision Simulator Mar 01, 2016 What Is Optical Coherence ...

  7. Charting the Experiential Territory: Clarifying Definitions and Uses of Computer Simulation, Games, and Role Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Andrew Hale; Mann, Stuart; Corsun, David L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a classification scheme for computer simulation, role playing, and educational games. Discusses outcomes of each when applied in business and management education and training. (Contains 52 references.) (SK)

  8. Parents Can Play Key Role in Setting Healthy Habits for Kids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Play Key Role in Setting Healthy Habits for Kids Shut down the iPads and lead by example, ... FRIDAY, Sept. 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Encouraging your kids to eat right, exercise and limit screen time ...

  9. Bringing the U.S. Senate to Your Classroom: A Role Play Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Ken

    1989-01-01

    Advocates role playing for teaching a unit on the legislative branch of government. Students were divided into political parties, sat on committees, and produced legislation. Concludes that experiencing the governmental process enhances citizen participation. (GG)

  10. Neucrin, a novel secreted antagonist of canonical Wnt signaling, plays roles in developing neural tissues in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayumi; Nihno, Satoka; Murakoshi, Yuino; Satsuka, Ayano; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Wnt signaling plays crucial roles in neural development. We previously identified Neucrin, a neural-specific secreted antagonist of canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling, in humans and mice. Neucrin has one cysteine-rich domain, in which the positions of 10 cysteine residues are similar to those in the second cysteine-rich domain of Dickkopfs, secreted Wnt antagonists. Here, we have identified zebrafish neucrin to understand its roles in vivo. Zebrafish Neucrin also has one cysteine-rich domain, which is significantly similar to that of mouse Neucrin. Zebrafish neucrin was also predominantly expressed in developing neural tissues. To examine roles of neucrin in neural development, we analyzed neucrin knockdown embryos. Neural development in zebrafish embryos was impaired by the knockdown of neucrin. The knockdown of neucrin caused increased expression of the Wnt/β-catenin target genes. In contrast, overexpression of neucrin reduced the expression of the Wnt/β-catenin target genes. The knockdown of neucrin affected specification of dorsal region in the midbrain and hindbrain. The knockdown of neucrin also suppressed neuronal differentiation and caused increased cell proliferation and apoptosis in developing neural tissues. Neucrin is a unique secreted Wnt antagonist that is predominantly expressed in developing neural tissues and plays roles in neural development in zebrafish.

  11. Problematic usage among highly-engaged players of massively multiplayer online role playing games.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christopher S; Malesky, L Alvin

    2008-08-01

    One popular facet of Internet gaming is the massively multiplayer online role playing game (MMORPG). Some individuals spend so much time playing these games that it creates problems in their lives. This study focused on players of World of Warcraft. Factor analysis revealed one factor related to problematic usage, which was correlated with amount of time played, and personality characteristics of agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and extraversion.

  12. An animal model of oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia reveals a crucial role for Nav1.6 in peripheral pain pathways

    PubMed Central

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Zimmermann, Katharina; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Possani, Lourival D; Cabot, Peter J; Lewis, Richard J; Vetter, Irina

    2013-01-01

    Cold allodynia, pain in response to cooling, occurs during or within hours of oxaliplatin infusion and is thought to arise from a direct effect of oxaliplatin on peripheral sensory neurons. To characterize the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying acute oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia, we established a new intraplantar oxaliplatin mouse model that rapidly developed long-lasting cold allodynia mediated entirely through tetrodotoxin-sensitive Nav pathways. Using selective inhibitors and knockout animals, we found that Nav1.6 was the key isoform involved, while thermosensitive transient receptor potential channels were not involved. Consistent with a crucial role for delayed-rectifier potassium channels in excitability in response to cold, intraplantar administration of the K+-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine mimicked oxaliplatin-induced cold allodynia and was also inhibited by Navl.6 blockers. Intraplantar injection of the Nav1.6-activator Cn2 elicited spontaneous pain, mechanical allodynia and enhanced 4-aminopyridine-induced cold allodynia. These findings provide behavioural evidence for a crucial role of Nav1.6 in multiple peripheral pain pathways including cold allodynia. PMID:23711479

  13. What Can Students Learn in an Extended Role-Play Simulation on Technology and Society?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loui, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    In a small course on technology and society, students participated in an extended role-play simulation for two weeks. Each student played a different adult character in a fictional community, which faces technological decisions in three scenarios set in the near future. The three scenarios involved stem cell research, nanotechnology, and privacy.…

  14. Exploring Kindergarten Teachers' Views and Roles Regarding Children's Outdoor Play Environments in Oman

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ihmeideh, Fathi M.; Al-Qaryouti, Ibrahim A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore kindergarten teachers' views and roles regarding outdoor play environments in Omani kindergartens. Thirty kindergarten teachers from 15 private kindergartens were observed and interviewed. The results indicated that teachers recognize the importance of outdoor play in children's development and learning.…

  15. FtsH11 Proteases play a critical role in high temperature stress tolerance in plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FtsHs (Filamentous temperature sensitive H), ATP-dependent zinc metalloproteases of the AAA-superfamily, play essential roles in the turn over of thylakoid proteins damaged by high light stress during photosynthesis. Here, we show that FtsH11, one of the 12 FtsH members in Arabidopsis, plays critic...

  16. Learner Interaction in a Massively Multiplayer Online Role Playing Game (MMORPG): A Sociocultural Discourse Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the linguistic and social interaction of four intermediate EFL learners during game play in a massively multiplayer online role playing game (MMORPG). Twelve illustrative episodes drawn from the participants' text chat, collected in four 70-minute sessions held over a one-month period, are analyzed from a…

  17. Using Analogy Role-Play Activity in an Undergraduate Biology Classroom to Show Central Dogma Revision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takemura, Masaharu; Kurabayashi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    For the study of biology in an undergraduate classroom, a classroom exercise was developed: an analogy role-play to learn mechanisms of gene transcription and protein translation (central dogma). To develop the central dogma role-play exercise, we made DNA and mRNA using paper sheets, tRNA using a wire dress hanger, and amino acids using Lego®…

  18. NEUTROPHILS PLAY A CRITICAL ROLE IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF LPS-INDUCED AIRWAY DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    ETD-02-045 (GAVETT) GPRA # 10108

    Neutrophils Play a Critical Role in the Development of LPS-Induced Airway Disease.
    Jordan D. Savov, Stephen H. Gavett*, David M. Brass, Daniel L. Costa*, and David A. Schwartz

    ABSTRACT
    We investigated the role of neutrophils...

  19. The ULT trxG Fatcors play a role in Arabidopsis Fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trithorax group (trxG) and Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic modifiers that play key roles in eukaryotic development by promoting active or repressive gene expression states, respectively. Although PcG proteins have well-defined roles in controlling developmental transitions, cell fate de...

  20. Reflecting on Role Play in Geographic Education: The Case of the Banana War

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Hilda E.

    2004-01-01

    Debates over the nature and extent of globalization raise many issues to be addressed in a geographic education. In this paper, I briefly review case method instruction and role-play as teaching strategies suitable for material on globalization and other geographic subject matter, and then sketch an overview of an undergraduate geography role-play…

  1. 25 CFR 900.229 - What role will the awarding official play during an appeal?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What role will the awarding official play during an appeal? 900.229 Section 900.229 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN... EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Post-Award Contract Disputes § 900.229 What role will the awarding official...

  2. Psychometric Characteristics of Role-Play Assessments of Social Skill in Schizophrenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellack, Alan S.; Brown, Clayton H.; Thomas-Lohrman, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    There is an extensive literature documenting that people with schizophrenia have marked impairments in social role functioning and social skill. One of the most widely employed strategies for assessing social skill has been role-play tests: simulated social interactions that are videotaped for subsequent behavioral coding. There has been…

  3. The art of effectively teaching clinical interviewing skills using role-playing: a primer.

    PubMed

    Barney, Christine; Shea, Shawn Christopher

    2007-06-01

    Time pressure on trainees and supervisors alike places a premium on efficiency in training students to master clinical skills. Through role-playing, a supervisor can create multiple iterations of the desired skill until competence is obtained. The skill training can be advanced in intensity and complexity until the trainer and trainee are confident that the interviewing skill is accessible on demand and that the trainee is comfortable with its use. This article focuses on practical methods of creating believable roles for role-playing and how to use them to teach specific interviewing skills strategically.

  4. Toy-playing behavior, sex-role orientation, spatial ability, and science achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, Dyanne M.

    The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the possible relationships among children's extracurricular toy-playing habits, sex-role orientations, spatial abilities, and science achievement. Data were gathered from 282 midwestern, suburban, fifth-grade students. It was found that boys had significantly higher spatial skills than girls. No significant differences in spatial ability were found among students with different sex-role orientations. No significant differences in science achievement were found between girls and boys, or among students with the four different sex-role orientations. Students who had high spatial ability also had significantly higher science achievement scores than students with low spatial ability. Femininely oriented boys who reported low playing in the two-dimensional, gross-body-movement, and proportional-arrangement toy categories scored significantly higher on the test of science achievement than girls with the same sex-role and toy-playing behavior.

  5. Role-Play Experience Facilitates Reading the Mind of Individuals with Different Perception

    PubMed Central

    Furumi, Fumikazu; Koyasu, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined effects of role-play experience on reading the mind of people with different perception. It is normally difficult but very important in daily life to understand people with different characteristics, including those with restricted color vision. We explored the mechanisms of reading the mind of people with different perception. Forty university students were introduced to a communication task in which the use of mindreading was essential. During each trial, participants viewed a shelf, presented on a laptop computer, which contained several familiar objects, and they were instructed to touch an object on the shelf following an instruction issued by a partner who stood at the opposite side of the shelf. There were two partners: one was a monkey with normal color vision and the other was a dog with restricted color vision. The monkey could see all the objects in the same colors as the participants, whereas the dog saw some objects in different colors (e.g., he saw as yellow objects that the participants saw as red). Participants were required to respond according to the partner's instruction. In the restricted color vision condition, the dog saw the colors of objects differently; thus, participants had to work out his intentions (i.e., mind read), according to his different perspective. In the normal color vision condition, all objects were in the same colors as those seen by the monkey. Before the test phase, the role-play group had a role-play experience in which participants assumed the role of people with restricted color vision. No-role-play participants made significantly more errors in the restricted color vision condition than in the normal color vision condition, whereas among role-play participants, there was no difference between conditions. These results suggest that role-play experience facilitates reading the mind of people with perceptual experiences different from our own. PMID:24023966

  6. The Pepper Lipoxygenase CaLOX1 Plays a Role in Osmotic, Drought and High Salinity Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Han, Sang-Wook; Hwang, In Sun; Kim, Dae Sung; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-05-01

    In plants, lipoxygenases (LOXs) are involved in various physiological processes, including defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Our previous study had shown that the pepper 9-LOX gene, CaLOX1, plays a crucial role in cell death due to pathogen infection. Here, the function of CaLOX1 in response to osmotic, drought and high salinity stress was examined using CaLOX1-overexpressing (CaLOX1-OX) Arabidopsis plants. Changes in the temporal expression pattern of the CaLOX1 gene were observed when pepper leaves were treated with drought and high salinity, but not when treated with ABA, the primary hormone in response to drought stress. During seed germination and seedling development, CaLOX1-OX plants were more tolerant to ABA, mannitol and high salinity than wild-type plants. In contrast, expression of the ABA-responsive marker genes RAB18 and RD29B was higher in CaLOX1-OX Arabidopsis plants than in wild-type plants. In response to high salinity, CaLOX1-OX plants exhibited enhanced tolerance, compared with the wild type, which was accompanied by decreased accumulation of H2O2 and high levels of RD20, RD29A, RD29B and P5CS gene expression. Similarly, CaLOX1-OX plants were also more tolerant than wild-type plants to severe drought stress. H2O2 production and the relative increase in lipid peroxidation were lower, and the expression of COR15A, DREB2A, RD20, RD29A and RD29B was higher in CaLOX1-OX plants, relative to wild-type plants. Taken together, our results indicate that CaLOX1 plays a crucial role in plant stress responses by modulating the expression of ABA- and stress-responsive marker genes, lipid peroxidation and H2O2 production.

  7. Crucial role of the biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in controlling the translocation and toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiuli; Li, Yinxia; Li, Yiping; Zhao, Yunli; Ge, Ling; Wang, Haifang; Wang, Dayong

    2013-10-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be translocated into the targeted organs of organisms. We employed a model organism of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the role of a biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. A prolonged exposure to MWCNTs at predicted environmental relevant concentrations caused adverse effects associated with both the primary and secondary targeted organs on nematodes. The function of PEGylated modification in reducing MWCNTs toxicity might be mainly due to the suppression of their translocation into secondary targeted organs through the primary targeted organs. A biological barrier at the primary targeted organs contributed greatly to the control of MWCNTs translocation into secondary targeted organs, as indicated by functions of Mn-SODs required for prevention of oxidative stress in the primary targeted organs. Over-expression of Mn-SODs in primary targeted organs effectively suppressed the translocation and toxicity of MWCNTs. Our work highlights the crucial role of the biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. Our data also shed light on the future development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) with improved biocompatibility and design of prevention strategies against ENMs toxicity.Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be translocated into the targeted organs of organisms. We employed a model organism of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the role of a biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. A prolonged exposure to MWCNTs at predicted environmental relevant concentrations caused adverse effects associated with both the primary and secondary targeted organs on nematodes. The function of PEGylated modification in reducing MWCNTs toxicity might be mainly due to the suppression

  8. Analyzing Members' Motivations to Participate in Role-Playing and Self-Expression Based Virtual Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Eun; Saharia, Aditya

    With the rapid growth of computer mediated communication technologies in the last two decades, various types of virtual communities have emerged. Some communities provide a role playing arena, enabled by avatars, while others provide an arena for expressing and promoting detailed personal profiles to enhance their offline social networks. Due to different focus of these virtual communities, different factors motivate members to participate in these communities. In this study, we examine differences in members’ motivations to participate in role-playing versus self-expression based virtual communities. To achieve this goal, we apply the Wang and Fesenmaier (2004) framework, which explains members’ participation in terms of their functional, social, psychological, and hedonic needs. The primary contributions of this study are two folds: First, it demonstrates differences between role-playing and self-expression based communities. Second, it provides a comprehensive framework describing members’ motivation to participate in virtual communities.

  9. Using virtual worlds for role play simulation in child and adolescent psychiatry: an evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Vallance, Aaron K.; Hemani, Ashish; Fernandez, Victoria; Livingstone, Daniel; McCusker, Kerri; Toro-Troconis, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Aims and method To develop and evaluate a novel teaching session on clinical assessment using role play simulation. Teaching and research sessions occurred sequentially in computer laboratories. Ten medical students were divided into two online small-group teaching sessions. Students role-played as clinician avatars and the teacher played a suicidal adolescent avatar. Questionnaire and focus-group methodology evaluated participants’ attitudes to the learning experience. Quantitative data were analysed using SPSS, qualitative data through nominal-group and thematic analyses. Results Participants reported improvements in psychiatric skills/knowledge, expressing less anxiety and more enjoyment than role-playing face to face. Data demonstrated a positive relationship between simulator fidelity and perceived utility. Some participants expressed concern about added value over other learning methods and non-verbal communication. Clinical implications The study shows that virtual worlds can successfully host role play simulation, valued by students as a useful learning method. The potential for distance learning would allow delivery irrespective of geographical distance and boundaries. PMID:25285217

  10. The nucleolar GTPase nucleostemin-like 1 plays a role in plant growth and senescence by modulating ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young; Park, Yong-Joon; Cho, Hui Kyung; Jung, Hyun Ju; Ahn, Tae-Kyu; Kang, Hunseung; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Nucleostemin is a nucleolar GTP-binding protein that is involved in stem cell proliferation, embryonic development, and ribosome biogenesis in mammals. Plant nucleostemin-like 1 (NSN1) plays a role in embryogenesis, and apical and floral meristem development. In this study, a nucleolar function of NSN1 in the regulation of ribosome biogenesis was identified. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused NSN1 localized to the nucleolus, which was primarily determined by its N-terminal domain. Recombinant NSN1 and its N-terminal domain (NSN1-N) bound to RNA in vitro. Recombinant NSN1 expressed GTPase activity in vitro. NSN1 silencing in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana led to growth retardation and premature senescence. NSN1 interacted with Pescadillo and EBNA1 binding protein 2 (EBP2), which are nucleolar proteins involved in ribosome biogenesis, and with several ribosomal proteins. NSN1, NSN1-N, and EBP2 co-fractionated primarily with the 60S ribosomal large subunit in vivo. Depletion of NSN1 delayed 25S rRNA maturation and biogenesis of the 60S ribosome subunit, and repressed global translation. NSN1-deficient plants exhibited premature leaf senescence, excessive accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and senescence-related gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest that NSN1 plays a crucial role in plant growth and senescence by modulating ribosome biogenesis. PMID:26163696

  11. Vitamin D signaling pathway plays an important role in the development of heart failure after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soochan; Singh, Sylvia S; Yu, Hyeon; Lee, Ji Yoo; Cho, Byung Ryul; Kang, Peter M

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that vitamin D deficiency plays a crucial role in heart failure. However, whether vitamin D signaling itself plays an important role in cardioprotection is poorly understood. In this study, we examined the mechanism of modulating vitamin D signaling on progression to heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI) in mice. Vitamin D signaling was activated by administration of paricalcitol (PC), an activated vitamin D analog. Wild-type (WT) mice underwent sham or MI surgery and then were treated with either vehicle or PC. Compared with vehicle group, PC attenuated development of heart failure after MI associated with decreases in biomarkers, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. There was also improvement of cardiac function with PC treatment after MI. Furthermore, vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA and protein levels were restored by PC treatment. Next, to explore whether defective vitamin D signaling exhibited deleterious responses after MI, WT and VDR knockout (KO) mice underwent sham or MI surgery and were analyzed 4 wk after MI. VDR KO mice displayed a significant decline in survival rate and cardiac function compared with WT mice after MI. VDR KO mice also demonstrated a significant increase in heart failure biomarkers, apoptosis, inflammation, and fibrosis. Vitamin D signaling promotes cardioprotection after MI through anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic and antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  12. Virtual firm as a role-playing tool for biomedical education.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonov, Oleg; Soto-Romero, Georges; Guyon, Florent; Courjal, Nadège; Euphrasie, Sebatien; Yahiaoui, Reda; Butterlin, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes design of a role-playing tool based on the experience of the practice firm which allows participants to obtain relevant and practical on-the-job experience. The students played the roles of the employees and the applicants for vacant positions at the virtual firm - a small business specialized in biomedical sector - founded to design the demonstration vehicle for a biomedical device. We found that this innovative concept may be used to improve the young engineers performance and to facilitate their post-graduate integration.

  13. Third Year Medical School Students’ Experiences of Revealing Patients’ Stories through Role Playing

    PubMed Central

    Cansever, Zeliha; Avsar, Zeynep; Tastan, Kenan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Studying medicine is hard and it takes longer time compared to other majors. In addition, medical students find medical education boring. It is now necessary to turn medical education into an enjoyable and interesting way. The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of an educational program related to how to learn taking medical history and how an effective patient-doctor interview should be. The program is structured in various scenarios, on the students learning skills, by the “role playing” method. Materials and Methods: A scenario prepared by the lecturer was employed in this study. While one of the students acted in a doctor role, the other one played in the role of patient’s relative. The lecturer always played in the role of patient. After performing the role playing, students’ written and oral feedbacks were gathered. Data were analysed by using SPSS 20.0 program. Results: A total of 470 feedbacks (51.3% were given by the female students) were taken from the students. Thirty-three volunteer students, nineteen of them were male, took part in the role playing. In the patient-doctor interview, the field that students were best were greeting the patients and dealing only with patients during the examination. The mean scores were 3.81±0.95 and 3.79±0.94 respectively. The ability to “summarize” and to “address the patient with his/her name” had the lowest scores; the mean scores of the students in these areas were 2.94±1.11 and 2.70±1.31, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education is a long and tough process. Therefore, it should be interesting, attention getting and cheerful. Role playing can be effective in meeting that need. PMID:25745342

  14. Crucial role of the biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in controlling the translocation and toxicity of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuli; Li, Yinxia; Li, Yiping; Zhao, Yunli; Ge, Ling; Wang, Haifang; Wang, Dayong

    2013-11-21

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) can be translocated into the targeted organs of organisms. We employed a model organism of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to investigate the role of a biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. A prolonged exposure to MWCNTs at predicted environmental relevant concentrations caused adverse effects associated with both the primary and secondary targeted organs on nematodes. The function of PEGylated modification in reducing MWCNTs toxicity might be mainly due to the suppression of their translocation into secondary targeted organs through the primary targeted organs. A biological barrier at the primary targeted organs contributed greatly to the control of MWCNTs translocation into secondary targeted organs, as indicated by functions of Mn-SODs required for prevention of oxidative stress in the primary targeted organs. Over-expression of Mn-SODs in primary targeted organs effectively suppressed the translocation and toxicity of MWCNTs. Our work highlights the crucial role of the biological barrier at the primary targeted organs in regulating the translocation and toxicity formation of MWCNTs. Our data also shed light on the future development of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) with improved biocompatibility and design of prevention strategies against ENMs toxicity.

  15. Skills Development Using Role-Play in a First-Year Pharmacy Practice Course

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate the usefulness of a role-play model in developing students’ patient-care skills in a first-year undergraduate pharmacy practice course. Design. A role-play model was developed and implemented in workshops across 2 semesters of a year-long course. Students performed different roles, including that of a pharmacist and a patient, and documented case notes in a single interaction. Assessment. Student perceptions of the usefulness of the approach in acquiring skills were measured by surveying students during both semesters. All student assessments (N=130 in semester1; N=129 in semester 2) also were analyzed for skills in verbal communication, information gathering, counselling and making recommendations, and accurately documenting information. A majority of students found the approach useful in developing skills. An analysis of student assessments revealed that role-playing was not as effective in building skills related to accurate documentation as it was in other areas of patient care. Conclusions. Role play is useful for developing patient-care skills in communication and information gathering but not for documentation of case notes. PMID:21829258

  16. Experiencing the Elicitation of User Requirements and Recording Them in Use Case Diagrams through Role-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costain, Gay; McKenna, Brad

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a role-play exercise used in a second-year tertiary Systems Analysis and Design course, and the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the students' responses to a survey that solicited their perceptions of that role-play experience. The role-play involved students in eliciting user requirements from customers during a Joint…

  17. Exploring the Impact of Role-Playing on Peer Feedback in an Online Case-Based Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ching, Yu-Hui

    2014-01-01

    This study explored the impact of role-playing on the quality of peer feedback and learners' perception of this strategy in a case-based learning activity with VoiceThread in an online course. The findings revealed potential positive impact of role-playing on learners' generation of constructive feedback as role-playing was associated…

  18. From board to bedside – training the communication competences of medical students with role plays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Role plays and standardized patients are often used in medical education and have proven to be effective tools for enhancing the communication skills of medical students. Most course concepts need additional time and teaching staff, and there are only a few studies about role plays in the preclinical segment. Methods We developed a highly consolidated concept for the curricular course of 2nd-year medical students, including ten role plays about five subjects: anamnesis, shared decision making, prevention, breaking bad news, and so-called “difficult interactions”. Before the course, all students were asked about their expectations and attitudes toward the course. After the course, all students rated the course, their individual learning progress, whether their expectations had been fulfilled, and re-evaluated their attitudes. Questionnaires were self-report measures and had a quantitative and a short qualitative section and were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Group differences (sex, age, role played) were evaluated with t tests at a Bonferonni-corrected significance level of p = .03 and the non-parametric U-tests. Results Implementing this practical course concept is possible without incurring additional costs. This paper not only shows how that can be done but also provides 5 examples of role scripts for different training subjects. The course concept was highly appreciated by the students. More than 75% felt that they had learned important communication techniques and would be better able to handle difficult situations. Playing the doctor’s role was felt to be more useful than playing the patient’s role. Women admitted a higher degree of shyness in the beginning and gave higher ratings to their learning progress than men. Students’ most frequent wish in the qualitative analysis was to be able to play the doctor’s role at least once. The students’ answers showed a differentiated pattern, thus suggesting that the influence of

  19. The crucial role of Φ- and K-segments in the in vitro functionality of Vitis vinifera dehydrin DHN1a.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Raquel; Romero, Irene; Escribano, Ma Isabel; Merodio, Carmen; Sanchez-Ballesta, Ma Teresa

    2014-12-01

    Dehydrins (DHNs), group II LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) proteins, are among the most commonly observed proteins which accumulate in plants in response to cold and any other environmental factors, causing the dehydration of cells. In previous studies, we isolated a YSK2-type VvcDHN1a gene from table grapes (Vitis vinifera cv. Cardinal) which presented two spliced variants (the spliced, DHN1a_s and the unspliced, DHN1a_u). Their expression was induced by low temperature storage and CO2, although with different accumulation patterns. DHN1a_u codifies for a truncated YS protein lacking Ф- and K-segments, which might affect its functionality. In this work, we expressed both DHN1a_s and DHN1a_u recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. We carried out a number of in vitro assays to analyze the implications that Ф- and K-segments have in the protective role of VvcDHN1 against different abiotic stresses and their antifungal activity against the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Our results showed that unlike DHN1a_u, DHN1a_s has a potent cryoprotective effect on lactate dehydrogenase activity, protects malate dehydrogenase against dehydration and partially inhibits B. cinerea growth. Moreover, the DHN1a promoter presented cis-regulatory elements related to cold and drought, as well as biotic stress-related elements. We also observed that both spliced variants interact weakly with DNA, suggesting that K-segments are not involved in DNA binding. Overall, this work highlights the crucial role of Ф- and K-segments in DHNs function in plant response to abiotic stress showing for the first time, the potential role of the V. vinifera DHN1a_s in the protection against freezing and dehydration as well as inhibiting B. cinerea growth. PMID:25457499

  20. Student Voices about the Role Feedback Plays in the Enhancement of Their Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plank, Christine; Dixon, Helen; Ward, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    If feedback is to be framed as purposeful dialogue then both students and teachers have significant roles to play. Students must be willing and able to provide feedback to teachers not only about their learning needs but also about the teaching they experience. In turn, teachers must create the conditions that support active student learning and…

  1. Using Role-Play to Enhance Foodborne Illness Crisis Management Capacity in the Produce Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreske, Audrey; Ducharme, Diane; Gunter, Chris; Phister, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne illness outbreaks have measurable public health effects and often lead to negative produce industry impacts. Reducing loss following a crisis event requires a management plan, although many fresh produce industry members don't have one. Evidence-based workshops using a role-play simulated outbreak were delivered to impact crisis…

  2. A Role-Play to Illustrate the Energy Changes Occurring in an Exothermic Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyas, Toby; Cabot, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes a role-play activity designed to help students understand the energy changes involved in an exothermic reaction by modeling the concepts of bond-breaking takes in energy, activation energy, temperature rise, and bond breaking gives out energy. (WRM)

  3. Developing Adolescents' Resistance to Sexual Coercion through Role-Playing Activities in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGinn, Marion; Arnedillo-Sánchez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the use of a three dimensional virtual world (3-DVW) to delivery assertiveness training to young adolescents. The case study aims to understand how a sense of presence in VWs facilitates and affect the performance of students role-playing activities to enhance their ability to resist sexual coercion. The results indicate that a…

  4. Teacher's Skill Improvement by Role-Play and Simulations on Collaborative Educational Virtual Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorenzo, Carlos-Miguel

    2014-01-01

    This study looked at teachers' role-play and simulations in order to increase teachers' skills in psycho-pedagogical support on educational virtual worlds. We put forward a proposal to encourage the use of 3D scenarios where teachers can improve their skills for situations of cultural and ethical concerns that require a high level…

  5. Describing Roles that Gay-Straight Alliances Play in Schools: From Individual Support to School Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Pat; Lee, Camille; Waugh, Jeffrey; Beyer, Chad

    2004-01-01

    Based on a broader qualitative study of organizational level changes in schools participating in Massachusetts' Safe Schools Program, the authors describe four roles that GSAs played in the twenty-two schools: counseling and support; "safe" space; primary vehicle for raising awareness, increasing visibility, and educating about LGBT issues in…

  6. Personality Correlates of Self-Report, Role-Playing, and In Vivo Measures of Assertiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Samuel B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Undergraduates completed self-report inventories of assertiveness, participated in behavior role-playing tasks and in vivo measures of assertiveness, and completed the Personality Research Form E (PRF-E). Of 22 PRF-E scales, 11 had at least one significant correlation with assertiveness measures. Some composites of PRF-E scales were related to…

  7. Experiential Learning through Interactive Drama: An Alternative to Student Role Plays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boggs, James G.; Mickel, Amy E.; Holtom, Brooks C.

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces interactive drama as an alternative to student role-plays. Interactive drama increases student engagement and explores complex issues in management. It features scenes from organizational life being performed live by trained actors before a student audience, stopping at pivotal points so the audience can interact with the…

  8. The Ethanol Project: Exploring Alternative Energy with Role-Play and Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Julia

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a project that includes a two-week series of researching, essay writing, and speaking lessons exploring the broader implications of using ethanol as a fuel. The author, a chemistry teacher, describes how she uses a senate hearing discussion of ethanol fuel subsidies as the forum for a role-play. The four components of the…

  9. The Role the Collegiate American Marketing Association Plays in Professional and Entrepreneurial Skill Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltier, James W.; Scovotti, Carol; Pointer, Lucille

    2008-01-01

    Professional student organizations offer members a wide range of learning opportunities for applied marketing experiences. Little research exists in the marketing education literature on the role student organizations play in preparing their members for life beyond school. Understanding what students seek as members of such organizations and how…

  10. Teaching Conflict Resolution Skills to Middle and High School Students through Interactive Drama and Role Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Kelly N.; Frabutt, James M.; Vigliano, Debra

    2007-01-01

    In response to the rising levels of school conflict, the present study investigated a new approach to conflict resolution for middle and high school students using interactive drama and role play called the Win-Win Resolutions program. The standardized curriculum delivered within the school setting includes strategies for self-control and anger…

  11. Does Gender Play a Role in the Assessment of Oral Proficiency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motallebzadeh, Khalil; Nematizadeh, Shaahin

    2011-01-01

    Gender has been a controversial issue which affects the language learning process. McNamara (1996) has proposed that there are some variables affecting second language performance one of which is sex. In much the same way, it has been reported that gender plays a role in the area of language testing (Brown, 2003; Lumley & O'Sullivan, 2005;…

  12. Role-Play Game-Enhanced English for a Specific-Purpose Vocabulary-Acquisition Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Fang-Chen; Chang, Ben

    2016-01-01

    With the advantages of an engaged and authentic role-play game (RPG), this study aims to develop an RPG-enhanced English for specific purposes (ESP) vocabulary-acquisition framework, providing teachers and students a systematic way to incorporate RPG into ESP learning. The framework is composed of five parts: goal, three-level vocabulary sets, RPG…

  13. Mother and Peer Influences on Children's Sex-Role Play Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, A. Chris; Langlois, Judith H.

    One of a series of studies originating in Austin, Texas examining the relative contribution of the primary socializing agents on the child's sex-role development, their study was designed to determine whether mother and peers of nursery school children differentially reward or punish play with sex-appropriate or sex-inappropriate toys. The study…

  14. Parenting Talent: A Qualitative Investigation of the Roles Parents Play in Talent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Amanda L.; Kiewra, Kenneth A.; Kasson, Sarah C.; Perry, Kyle R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has linked talent development to four factors--early experience, coaching, practice, and motivation. In addition to these factors, contemporary talent experts suggest that parents play a critical role in talent development. The purpose of the present study was to uncover parents' in-time perspectives on the talent development…

  15. Trading Spaces: An Educator's Ethnographic Exploration of Adolescents' Digital Role-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes-Moore, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the author examines a digital role-play in which participants composed an alternate version of "The Hunger Games" (Collins, 2008). Participants imagined characters and posted more than 400 scenes in the online collaboration. The author draws upon ethnographic methods (Merriam, 2009) to describe her participant-observer…

  16. A Role-Play Game to Facilitate the Development of Students' Reflective Internet Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Admiraal, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Although adolescents are currently the most frequent users of the Internet, many youngsters still have difficulties with a critical, reflective, and responsible use of the Internet. A study was carried out on teaching with a digital role-play game to increase students' reflective Internet skills. In this game, students had to promote a fictional…

  17. Sustainability and Science Learning: Perceptions from 8th Grade Students Involved with a Role Playing Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freire, Sofia; Baptista, Mónica; Freire, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Raising awareness about sustainability is an urgent need and as such education for sustainability has gained relevancy for the last decades. It is acknowledged that science education can work as an important context for educating for sustainability. The goal of the present paper is to describe a role-playing activity about the construction of a…

  18. Simulation Games and Role Playing. Social Studies for the Elementary School. Proficiency Module #6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Earl G.; Pierfy, David A.

    Designed as part of a series to develop teaching strategies for the elementary curriculum, this module focuses on simulation games and role playing as two important teaching devices. The first part describes games and simulation; and factors that should be considered in selecting, using, and debriefing games in the classroom. Exercises to test…

  19. E-Drama: Facilitating Online Role-Play Using an AI Actor and Emotionally Expressive Characters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Li; Gillies, Marco; Dhaliwal, Kulwant; Gower, Amanda; Robertson, Dale; Crabtree, Barry

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a multi-user role-playing environment, referred to as "e-drama", which enables groups of people to converse online, in scenario driven virtual environments. The starting point of this research, is an existing application known as "edrama", a 2D graphical environment in which users are represented by static cartoon figures.…

  20. Female Superintendents in California and the Role That Mentoring and Networking Have Played in Their Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudek, Vicky

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the role that mentoring, formal networking, and informal networking have played in the lives of women who have obtained the position of superintendent in the state of California. The researcher explored the access that female administrators had to mentors and networks, followed by the perceived benefits they received when they…

  1. Teaching Constitutional Law and Related Courses Through Problem-Solving and Role-Playing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidow, Robert P.

    1984-01-01

    Problem-solving and role-playing can be used successfully even in the second semester of law school, serving as a bridge between traditional analytical and doctrinal education and the more realistic simulation and clinical experiences of the third year. Students can gain sufficient experience to perform proficiently in more advanced courses. (MSE)

  2. Researching Travel Behavior and Adaptability: Using a Virtual Reality Role-Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watcharasukarn, Montira; Krumdieck, Susan; Green, Richard; Dantas, Andre

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a virtual reality role-playing game that was developed as a survey tool to collect travel behavior data and explore and monitor travel behavior adaptation. The Advanced Energy and Material Systems Laboratory has designed, developed a prototype, and tested such a game platform survey tool, called Travel Activity Constraint…

  3. Unsavory Problems at Tasty's: A Role-Play about Whistle-Blowing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, Debra R.; Vega, Gina

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a role-play exercise to make the topic of whistle-blowing personally salient to undergraduates. Students identify with the prospective whistle-blower, whose decision affects several stakeholders. The protagonist merely suspects her manager of stealing, until she hears concrete evidence of his thefts from her assistant…

  4. General Federation of Women's Clubs: A Role Playing Exercise for Studying the Progressive Era.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Sherman

    1986-01-01

    Provides an example of a role-playing exercise which takes place as a result of an imaginary caucus of women's groups meeting in the fall of 1912. The purpose of the caucus is to determine which of four presidential candidates--Woodrow Wilson, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Eugene Debs--will receive the endorsement of the women's…

  5. Computer-Based Simulation Systems and Role-Playing: An Effective Combination for Fostering Conditional Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shlechter, Theodore M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examines the effectiveness of SIMNET (Simulation Networking), a virtual reality training simulation system, combined with a program of role-playing activities for helping Army classes to master the conditional knowledge needed for successful field performance. The value of active forms of learning for promoting higher order cognitive thinking is…

  6. Informal Workplace Communication--What Roles Can Microblogging Play in It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Dejin

    2012-01-01

    Informal communication, e.g., unplanned "water-cooler" conversations, has been suggested to play important roles in collaborative work and organizational innovation. It provides opportunities among employees for exchanging work-relevant information, initiating potential collaboration, maintaining awareness of workplace context; and…

  7. Playing the Role of an Outsider Within: Teaching Intercultural Communication through an Ethnographic Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yueh, Hsin-I Sydney

    2015-01-01

    One of the methods used to enhance students' ability not only to identify different cultures but also to describe their own cultures with proper analytical vocabulary is to teach students how to play the role of an outsider of their culture and de-familiarize their everyday practice so that they can distinguish cultural patterns and…

  8. Understanding Bullying: Using Role-Play with 12-Year-Old Boys in Cyprus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaloyirou, Chrystalla; Lindsay, Geoff

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the use of role-play in order to investigate bullies' intentions, feelings and perceptions through identification and projection. The study was conducted with nine 12-year-old boys that presented high levels of bullying behaviour, according to their teachers and peers, from three state primary schools in Nicosia, Cyprus,…

  9. Role-Playing Simulation as a Communication Tool in Community Dialogue: Karkonosze Mountains Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krolikowska, Karolina; Kronenberg, Jakub; Maliszewska, Karolina; Sendzimir, Jan; Magnuszewski, Piotr; Dunajski, Andrzej; Slodka, Anna

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a process of role-playing simulation (RPS) as it was used during an educational exercise in community dialogue in the Karkonosze Mountains region of southwest Poland. Over the past decade Karkonosze National Park, a regional tourist magnet, has provided an excellent example of environmental conflict emerging from the…

  10. Choices and Chances: The Sociology Role-Playing Game--The Sociological Imagination in Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Joseph M.; Elias, Vicky L.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a sociology role-playing game (RPG) used to demonstrate the broad range of social forces, institutions, and structures in a semester-long series of in-class and homework assignments. RPGs and other simulation games have been frequently suggested as a useful teaching methodology because of their unique ability to allow…

  11. How to Develop Creative Imagination? Assumptions, Aims and Effectiveness of Role Play Training in Creativity (RPTC)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karwowski, Maciej; Soszynski, Marcin

    2008-01-01

    There are hundreds of ways to develop creativity among children, youths and adults. Developing new ideas and ways of teaching creativity should also incorporate youth's interests and hobbies. The article presents the main information about the new way of developing creative abilities, especially creative imagination, the Role Play Training in…

  12. Exploring Game Experiences and Game Leadership in Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jang, YeiBeech; Ryu, SeoungHo

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the in-game experiences of massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG) players focusing on game leadership and offline leadership. MMORPGs have enormous potential to provide gameplayers with rich social experiences through various interactions along with social activities such as joining a game community, team play…

  13. Fathers' Role in Play: Enhancing Early Language and Literacy of Children with Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockall, Nancy; Dennis, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Fathers and paternal role models make a unique contribution to children's development. There is some research to suggest that the types of play males engage in with children is typically more active and thus offers unique possibilities for embedding activities for language and literacy development. In this article, we offer suggestions for how…

  14. "Try Walking in Our Shoes": Teaching Acculturation and Related Cultural Adjustment Processes through Role-Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamboanga, Byron L.; Ham, Lindsay S.; Tomaso, Cara C.; Audley, Shannon; Pole, Nnamdi

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we describe several role-playing exercises on acculturation and relevant cultural adjustment processes that we incorporated into Tomcho and Foel's classroom activity on acculturation, and we report data that examine subsequent changes in students' responses on pretest and posttest measures shortly after the activity and present…

  15. Student Perceptions of a Role-Playing Simulation in an Introductory International Relations Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giovanello, Sean P.; Kirk, Jason A.; Kromer, Mileah K.

    2013-01-01

    An emerging assumption in undergraduate political science education is that role-playing simulations are an effective teaching tool. While previous studies have addressed the pedagogical advantages of simulations as compared to more traditional teaching techniques, less attention has been paid to student perceptions of these simulations. This…

  16. Designing After-School Learning Using the Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Digital games have become popular for engaging students in a range of learning goals, both in the classroom and the after-school space. In this article, I discuss a specific genre of video game, the massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMO), which has been identified as a dynamic environment for encountering 21st-century workplace…

  17. Understanding Collectivism and Female Genital Cutting through a Family Role-Playing Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Carol

    2014-01-01

    This study is a test of the effectiveness of a classroom role-playing exercise used to increase the understanding of cultural practices with which many Midwestern college students are uncomfortable. I employed a pre-test/post-test comparison group design. Students enrolled in two sections of a general education global issues course (N = 56) were…

  18. 'Club Dread': Applying and Refining an Issues-Based Role Play on Environment, Economy, and Culture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutler, Cecile; Hay, Iain

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the purpose, design, implementation, and value of an issues-based role play exercise in a first year Australian university undergraduate topic. Explains that the exercise requires students to consider implications for environment, economy, and culture of a large-scale tourist development on Rarotonga (Cook Islands). (CMK)

  19. Using Role-Play to Foster Transformational and Social Action Multiculturalism in the ESL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the use of role-play as an effective strategy for enhancing the quality of multicultural curricula in the English as a second language (ESL) classroom. The author critiques the use of the simplistic additive approach to multicultural instruction and furthers the work of those theorists who advocate the use of the more…

  20. The Role of Imaging in Determining Return to Play.

    PubMed

    Casagranda, Bethany U; Thurlow, Peter C

    2016-09-01

    Return-to-play (RTP) predictions focus on how long it takes an athlete to return to their full athletic activity after sustaining an injury. This article focuses on the role of imaging and the radiologist in RTP predictions for the most common and controversial injuries affecting athletes. PMID:27545432

  1. Use of an Empathy Algorithm with a Role-Played Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Warren F.; Hasegawa, Carol S.

    1984-01-01

    Presented an empathy algorithm, a procedure for deciding whether to use an interchangeable or an additive empathy response and instructions for the construction of each response, to a randomly chosen group of novice counselors (N=23). The experimental group performed significantly better in counseling a role-played client than did controls.…

  2. Using analogy role-play activity in an undergraduate biology classroom to show central dogma revision.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Masaharu; Kurabayashi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    For the study of biology in an undergraduate classroom, a classroom exercise was developed: an analogy role-play to learn mechanisms of gene transcription and protein translation (central dogma). To develop the central dogma role-play exercise, we made DNA and mRNA using paper sheets, tRNA using a wire dress hanger, and amino acids using Lego® blocks (Lego System A/S, Denmark). Students were studying in the course of mathematics, physics, or chemistry, so biology was not among their usual studies. In this exercise, students perform the central dogma role-play and respectively act out nuclear matrix proteins, a transcription factor, an RNA polymerase II, an mRNA transport protein, nuclear pore proteins, a large ribosomal subunit, a small ribosomal subunit, and several amino-acyl tRNA synthetases. Questionnaire results obtained after the activity show that this central dogma role-play analogy holds student interest in the practical molecular biological processes of transcription and translation.

  3. Use of Role-playing Exercises in Teaching Undergraduate Astronomy and Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Paul J.; Byrne, Aidan P.

    1999-08-01

    The use of role-playing exercises in the teaching of university astronomy and physics can enliven lectures, deepen student understanding and dramatically increase the level of classroom interaction. A series of case studies is presented, illustrating the nature of this technique, its advantages and some of its pitfalls. Several ready-to-run exercises are included.

  4. Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games as Arenas for Second Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates contemporary research on the use of massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) in language education. The development and key features of these games are explored. This is followed by an examination of the theories proposed as a basis for game-based learning, and the claims made regarding the value of…

  5. Excessive Use of Massively Multi-Player Online Role-Playing Games: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussain, Zaheer; Griffiths, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are one of the most interesting innovations in the area of online computer gaming. This pilot study set out to examine the psychological and social effects of online gaming using an online questionnaire with particular reference to excessive and "dependent" online gaming. A self-selecting…

  6. The Roles That Librarians and Libraries Play in Distance Education Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Amanda; Brown, Abbie

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the literature that focuses on the various roles librarians and libraries play in distance education settings. Learners visit libraries either in person or via networked computing technology to ask for help with their online courses. Questions range from how to upload a document with a learning management system, to how to…

  7. Enhancing Information Systems Auditing Knowledge with Role-Playing Game: An Experimental Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wongpinunwatana, Nitaya

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the use and effect of a role-playing game on learners' ability in information systems audit. The study is based on experimental research. Information systems control and audit case study and video had been developed. A total of 75 graduate students undertaking a Master's degree in accounting participated in the experiment. The…

  8. Role-Playing Games for Capacity Building in Water and Land Management: Some Brazilian Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camargo, Maria Eugenia; Jacobi, Pedro Roberto; Ducrot, Raphaele

    2007-01-01

    Role-playing games in natural resource management are currently being tested as research, training, and intervention tools all over the world. Various studies point out their potential to deal with complex issues and to contribute to training processes. The objective of this contribution is to analyze the limits and potentialities of this tool for…

  9. Students as "Humans Chromosomes" in Role-Playing Mitosis and Meiosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinnici, Joseph P.; Yue, Joyce W.; Torres, Kieron M.

    2004-01-01

    Students often find it challenging to understand mitosis and meiosis and determine their processes. To develop an easier way to understand these terms, students are asked to role-play mitosis and meiosis and students themselves act as human chromosomes, which help students to learn differences between mitosis and meiosis.

  10. Enhance Learning on Software Project Management through a Role-Play Game in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maratou, Vicky; Chatzidaki, Eleni; Xenos, Michalis

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a role-play game for software project management (SPM) in a three-dimensional online multiuser virtual world. The Opensimulator platform is used for the creation of an immersive virtual environment that facilitates students' collaboration and realistic interaction, in order to manage unexpected events occurring during the…

  11. What Do Students Learn from a Role-Play Simulation of an International Negotiation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnurr, Matthew A.; De Santo, Elizabeth M.; Green, Amanda D.

    2014-01-01

    This article uses pre- and post-surveys to assess learning outcomes associated with a role-play simulation set within a fictionalized extension of the Convention on Biological Diversity. Quantitative and qualitative data suggest that the simulation increased student appreciation of the complexity of international negotiation, but decreased student…

  12. Building Fictional Ethos: Analysing the Rhetorical Strategies of Persona Design for Online Role Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerr-Stevens, Candance

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a qualitative case study that uses discourse and social semiotic analysis methods in order to examine the rhetorical construction of fictional personas within an online role play used for learning in the college classroom. Of special focus are the differing patterns of semiotic resource use (for example, language and…

  13. Can Pesticide Delivery Methods Play a Role in Sustainable Pest Management?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Conventional insecticides continue to play an important role in greenhouse pest management programs. Penetrating a dense plant canopy can be difficult with a handgun, and there is some evidence that boom sprayers or broadcast applications result in a more uniform deposition than handguns. A large-...

  14. Understanding Our Environment: Challenge. Clear Water Challenge: A Role Play Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieblich, Suzanne, Ed.

    Part of the Understanding Our Environment project that is designed to engage students in investigating specific environmental problems through concrete activity and direct experience, this unit contains a role-play activity in the form of a public inquiry into the cause of a fish kill on a river that runs through the fictional town of Oakwood. A…

  15. Teachers' Roles in Infants' Play and Its Changing Nature in a Dynamic Group Care Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jeesun

    2013-01-01

    Using a qualitative research approach, this article explores teachers' roles in infants' play and its changing nature in an infant group care setting. Three infant teachers in a child care center were followed over three months. Observations, interviews, ongoing conversations, emails, and reflective notes were used as data sources. Findings…

  16. Using a Role-Play Video to Convey Expectations about Academic Integrity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, Lisa G.; Melvin, Adam T.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed an instructional video that uses role-play to illustrate the differences between acceptable behavior and cheating on assignments. Since we began showing it in an introductory chemical engineering course, the average number of confirmed instances of cheating decreased slightly, but the average percentage of students who were…

  17. Achieving the Essential Goals of Technical Writing--Role Playing Won't Do It!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebeaux, Elizabeth

    1978-01-01

    Although role-playing is an effective way to create the atmosphere of "real" business situations, technical writing teachers should continue to concentrate primarily on student writing problems and the development of such composition skills as brevity and audience awareness. (RL)

  18. Sixth Graders' Conflict Resolution in Role Plays with a Peer, Parent, and Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borbely, Christina J.; Graber, Julia A.; Nichols, Tracy; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Botvin, Gilbert J.

    2005-01-01

    This study used conflict resolution role play vignettes and self-report surveys of 450 New York City 6th graders to examine associations between adolescents' conflict resolution efficacy and social skills. Vignettes covered 3 social contexts, conflict with a peer (disagreement over activities), with a parent (raise in allowance), and with a…

  19. Analysis of ATP6 sequence diversity in the Triticum-Aegilops species group reveals the crucial role of rearrangement in mitochondrial genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Ali; Ghavami, Farhad; Mergoum, Mohamed; Hegstad, Justin; Noyszewski, Andrzej; Meinhardt, Steven; Kianian, Shahryar F

    2014-05-01

    Mutation and chromosomal rearrangements are the two main forces of increasing genetic diversity for natural selection to act upon, and ultimately drive the evolutionary process. Although genome evolution is a function of both forces, simultaneously, the ratio of each can be varied among different genomes and genomic regions. It is believed that in plant mitochondrial genome, rearrangements play a more important role than point mutations, but relatively few studies have directly addressed this phenomenon. To address this issue, we isolated and sequenced the ATP6-1 and ATP6-2 genes from 46 different euplasmic and alloplasmic wheat lines. Four different ATP6-1 orthologs were detected, two of them reported for the first time. Expression analysis revealed that all four orthologs are transcriptionally active. Results also indicated that both point mutation and genomic rearrangement are involved in the evolution of ATP6. However, rearrangement is the predominant force that triggers drastic variation. Data also indicated that speciation of domesticated wheat cultivars were simultaneous with the duplication of this gene. These results directly support the notion that rearrangement plays a significant role in driving plant mitochondrial genome evolution.

  20. Interaction with the game and motivation among players of massively multiplayer online role-playing games.

    PubMed

    Fuster, Héctor; Carbonell, Xavier; Chamarro, Andrés; Oberst, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about users interacting with Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPG) is fundamental in order to prevent their potential negative effects on behavior. For this reason, the present study analyzed the relationship between styles of play and motivations. An online questionnaire asking for socio-demographic details, playing style, characteristics of the game played and motivations for playing, was answered by 430 Spanish-speaking MMORPG players (45.1% males). The identified profile for players, far away from the stereotype of an adolescent, consisted in a person who mainly plays on PvP (Player versus Player) servers, choosing the type of game according to his experience. Regarding motivations, they were interested in relating with other players through the game (Socialization), in discovering the game's possibilities and development of its adventures (Exploration), to a lesser extent in leadership and prestige (Achievement) and, lastly, identification with an avatar and escape from reality (Dissociation). Although part of the reason for playing was escapism and/or stress relief, the main motivation had a social nature. We conclude that MMORPG offer an attractive environment for a broad spectrum of people, and we have not been able to confirm the stereotype of a loner avoiding reality, taking refuge in games. PMID:23866239

  1. Interaction with the game and motivation among players of massively multiplayer online role-playing games.

    PubMed

    Fuster, Héctor; Carbonell, Xavier; Chamarro, Andrés; Oberst, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge about users interacting with Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPG) is fundamental in order to prevent their potential negative effects on behavior. For this reason, the present study analyzed the relationship between styles of play and motivations. An online questionnaire asking for socio-demographic details, playing style, characteristics of the game played and motivations for playing, was answered by 430 Spanish-speaking MMORPG players (45.1% males). The identified profile for players, far away from the stereotype of an adolescent, consisted in a person who mainly plays on PvP (Player versus Player) servers, choosing the type of game according to his experience. Regarding motivations, they were interested in relating with other players through the game (Socialization), in discovering the game's possibilities and development of its adventures (Exploration), to a lesser extent in leadership and prestige (Achievement) and, lastly, identification with an avatar and escape from reality (Dissociation). Although part of the reason for playing was escapism and/or stress relief, the main motivation had a social nature. We conclude that MMORPG offer an attractive environment for a broad spectrum of people, and we have not been able to confirm the stereotype of a loner avoiding reality, taking refuge in games.

  2. Competence of medical students in communicating drug therapy: Value of role-play demonstrations

    PubMed Central

    Tayem, Yasin I.; Altabtabaei, Abdulaziz S.; Mohamed, Mohamed W.; Arrfedi, Mansour M.; Aljawder, Hasan S.; Aldebous, Fahad A.; James, Henry; Al Khaja, Khalid A. J.; Sequeira, Reginald P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study used role-play demonstrations to train medical students to communicate drug therapy and evaluated the perceptions on this instructional approach. Materials and Methods: The second-year medical students who attended a prescription writing session (n = 133), participated in this study. Prescription communication was introduced by using role-play demonstrations. Participant's perceptions were explored by a self-administered questionnaire and focus group discussion. The academic achievement of attendees and nonattendees was compared with an objective structured performance evaluation (OSPE) station that tested students’ competence in this skill. Results: Most attendees responded to the questionnaire (81.2%). Almost all respondents expressed their desire to have similar demonstrations in other units. A large proportion of participants reported that role-play demonstrations helped them develop their communication skills, in general, confidence to communicate drug-related information in a prescription, and the ability to explain the aim of drug therapy to patients. Most trainees thought also that they developed skills to communicate instructions on drug use including drug dose, frequency of administration, duration of therapy, adverse drug reactions, and warnings. During the focus group interviews, students thought that role-play was useful but would be more beneficial if conducted frequently in small group as part of the curriculum implementation. The majority of students also reported improved competence in writing a complete prescription. Analysis of attendees and nonattendees grades in the OSPE showed that the former scored higher than the latter group (P = 0.016). Conclusions: Role-play demonstrations were well accepted by medical students and led to the development of their competence in communicating drug therapy to patients. PMID:26997720

  3. Developing Children's Views of the Nature of Science Through Role Play

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cakici, Yilmaz; Bayir, Eylem

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of using role play (portraying a scientist's life story) on the children's views of the nature of science (NOS). The study was carried out at the Children's University of Trakya in Turkey during the summer of 2010. The participants consisted of 18 children, aged 10-11. They met for 10 days for approximately 3 h per day. All children completed the pre- and post-tests including 16 open-ended questions in order to reveal changes in their views of the NOS prior to and at the completion of the role-play activities. The results revealed that the children had more informed views of the target NOS aspects in comparison with their views prior to the role-play activities. A large majority of the children (around 80-85%) started out with naive conceptions of the target NOS aspects. Following the role-play activities portraying scientists' lives, there was a 40-45% positive change in children's views of the tentative, empirical and creative/imaginative aspect of the NOS, and a 50-60% positive change in their views regarding the subjective/theory-laden and social-cultural embeddedness of science. The most substantial change occurred in their views concerning scientific method, with a shift of 72%. The percentage of informed views on images of scientists showed diversity. Overall results indicate that role-play/drama-oriented activities portraying scientist's life stories could be used as one of the exciting, informative and constructive ways of developing understanding of the NOS among children.

  4. ARGININE DEIMINASE PLAYS MULTIPLE REGULATORY ROLES IN THE BIOLOGY OF GIARDIA LAMBLIA

    PubMed Central

    Touz, Maria Carolina; Ropolo, Andrea Silvana; Rivero, Maria Romina; Vranych, Cecilia Veronica; Conrad, John Thomas; Svard, Staffan Gunnar; Nash, Theodore Elliot

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia utilizes arginine deiminase (gADI) to produce energy from free L-arginine under anaerobic conditions. In this work, we demonstrate that in addition to its known role as a metabolic enzyme, it also functions as a pepidtyl-arginine deiminase converting protein-bound arginine into citrulline. gADI specifically binds to and citrullinates the arginine in the conserved CRGKA tail of variant-specific surface proteins (VSPs) affecting both antigenic switching and antibody mediated cell death. During encystation gADI translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and appear to play a regulatory role in the expression of encystation specific genes. gADI is also sumoylated, which may modulate its activity. Our findings reveal a dual role played by gADI and define novel regulatory pathways used by Giardia for survival. PMID:18697833

  5. Social Roles, Role-Playing, and Education: On the High School as Prison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Craig; Zimbardo, Philip G.

    1973-01-01

    A description and discussion of an experiment which placed normal college males into a prison-like environment related the term "prison" to any environment restricting human freedom, and explored the control of behavior by situations and roles with reference to educational settings, specifically the high school. (Author/KM)

  6. CREB-mediated synaptogenesis and neurogenesis is crucial for the role of 5-HT1a receptors in modulating anxiety behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Li-Juan; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1a-receptor (5-HT1aR) has been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety. However, the mechanism underlying the role of 5-HT1aR in anxiety remains poorly understood. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus functions as an effector of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. We generated recombinant lentivirus LV-CREB133-GFP expressing a dominant negative CREB which could not be phosphorylated at Ser133 to specifically reduce CREB activity, and LV-VP16-CREB-GFP expressing a constitutively active fusion protein VP16-CREB which could be phosphorylated by itself to specifically enhance CREB activity. LV-CREB133-GFP neutralized 5-HT1aR agonist-induced up-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis, and the expression of synapsin and spinophilin, two well-characterized synaptic proteins, and abolished the anxiolytic effect of 5-HT1aR agonist; whereas LV-VP16-CREB-GFP rescued the 5-HT1aR antagonist-induced down-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis and synapsin and spinophilin expression, and reversed the anxiogenic effect of 5-HT1aR antagonist. The deletion of neurogenesis by irradiation or the diminution of synaptogenesis by knockdown of synapsin expression abolished the anxiolytic effects of both CREB and 5-HT1aR activation. These findings suggest that CREB-mediated hippoacampus structural plasticity is crucial for the role of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:27404655

  7. CREB-mediated synaptogenesis and neurogenesis is crucial for the role of 5-HT1a receptors in modulating anxiety behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Cai, Cheng-Yun; Wu, Hai-Yin; Zhu, Li-Juan; Luo, Chun-Xia; Zhu, Dong-Ya

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin 1a-receptor (5-HT1aR) has been specifically implicated in the pathogenesis of anxiety. However, the mechanism underlying the role of 5-HT1aR in anxiety remains poorly understood. Here we show in mice that the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus functions as an effector of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. We generated recombinant lentivirus LV-CREB133-GFP expressing a dominant negative CREB which could not be phosphorylated at Ser133 to specifically reduce CREB activity, and LV-VP16-CREB-GFP expressing a constitutively active fusion protein VP16-CREB which could be phosphorylated by itself to specifically enhance CREB activity. LV-CREB133-GFP neutralized 5-HT1aR agonist-induced up-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis, and the expression of synapsin and spinophilin, two well-characterized synaptic proteins, and abolished the anxiolytic effect of 5-HT1aR agonist; whereas LV-VP16-CREB-GFP rescued the 5-HT1aR antagonist-induced down-regulation of synapse density, spine density, dendrite complexity, neurogenesis and synapsin and spinophilin expression, and reversed the anxiogenic effect of 5-HT1aR antagonist. The deletion of neurogenesis by irradiation or the diminution of synaptogenesis by knockdown of synapsin expression abolished the anxiolytic effects of both CREB and 5-HT1aR activation. These findings suggest that CREB-mediated hippoacampus structural plasticity is crucial for the role of 5-HT1aR in modulating anxiety-related behaviors. PMID:27404655

  8. Do advanced glycation end-products play a role in malaria susceptibility?

    PubMed

    Traoré, Karim; Arama, Charles; Médebielle, Maurice; Doumbo, Ogobara; Picot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    There are growing data supporting the differences in susceptibility to malaria described between sympatric populations with different lifestyles. Evidence has also been growing for some time that nutritional status and the host's metabolism are part of the complex mechanisms underlying these differences. The role of dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in the modulation of immune responses (innate and adaptive responses) and chronic oxidative stress has been established. But less is known about AGE implication in naturally acquired immunity and susceptibility to malaria. Since inflammatory immune responses and oxidative events have been demonstrated as the hallmark of malaria infection, it seems crucial to investigate the role of AGE in susceptibility or resistance to malaria. This review provides new insight into the relationship between nutrition, metabolic disorders, and infections, and how this may influence the mechanisms of susceptibility or resistance to malaria in endemic areas.

  9. Do advanced glycation end-products play a role in malaria susceptibility?

    PubMed Central

    Traoré, Karim; Arama, Charles; Médebielle, Maurice; Doumbo, Ogobara; Picot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    There are growing data supporting the differences in susceptibility to malaria described between sympatric populations with different lifestyles. Evidence has also been growing for some time that nutritional status and the host’s metabolism are part of the complex mechanisms underlying these differences. The role of dietary advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in the modulation of immune responses (innate and adaptive responses) and chronic oxidative stress has been established. But less is known about AGE implication in naturally acquired immunity and susceptibility to malaria. Since inflammatory immune responses and oxidative events have been demonstrated as the hallmark of malaria infection, it seems crucial to investigate the role of AGE in susceptibility or resistance to malaria. This review provides new insight into the relationship between nutrition, metabolic disorders, and infections, and how this may influence the mechanisms of susceptibility or resistance to malaria in endemic areas. PMID:27012162

  10. Computer-supported games and role plays in teaching water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2012-02-01

    There is an increasing demand for an interdisciplinary approach in teaching water management. Computer-supported games and role plays offer the potential of creating an environment in which different disciplines come together and in which students are challenged to develop integrated understanding. Two examples are discussed. The River Basin Game is a common-pool resource game in which participants experience the risk of over-abstractions of water in a river basin and learn how this risk relates to the complexity of the system, the conflict between individual and group optimum and the difficulty to come to good cooperation. The Globalization of Water Role Play makes participants familiar with the global dimension of water management by letting them experience how national governments can integrate considerations of water scarcity and domestic water productivities into decisions on international trade in commodities like food, cotton and bio-energy. The two examples illustrate that plays inspire participants to think about the functioning of systems as a whole and to develop good cooperative courses of action, whereby both uncertainties about the system and the presence of different values and perspectives among participants play a role.

  11. Computer-supported games and role plays in teaching water management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2012-08-01

    There is an increasing demand for an interdisciplinary approach in teaching water management. Computer-supported games and role plays offer the potential of creating an environment in which different disciplines come together and in which students are challenged to develop integrated understanding. Two examples are discussed. The River Basin Game is a common-pool resource game in which participants experience the risk of over-abstractions of water in a river basin and learn how this risk relates to the complexity of the system, the conflict between individual and group optimums and the difficulty in achieving good cooperation. The Globalization of Water Role Play makes participants familiar with the global dimension of water management by letting them experience how national governments can integrate considerations of water scarcity and domestic water productivities into decisions on international trade in commodities like food, cotton and bio-energy. The two examples illustrate that play sessions inspire participants to think about the functioning of systems as a whole and to develop good cooperative courses of action, whereby both uncertainties about the system and the presence of different values and perspectives among participants play a role.

  12. Polarization of IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) to the plant-soil interface plays crucial role in metal homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barberon, Marie; Dubeaux, Guillaume; Kolb, Cornelia; Isono, Erika; Zelazny, Enric; Vert, Grégory

    2014-06-01

    In plants, the controlled absorption of soil nutrients by root epidermal cells is critical for growth and development. IRON-REGULATED TRANSPORTER 1 (IRT1) is the main root transporter taking up iron from the soil and is also the main entry route in plants for potentially toxic metals such as manganese, zinc, cobalt, and cadmium. Previous work demonstrated that the IRT1 protein localizes to early endosomes/trans-Golgi network (EE/TGN) and is constitutively endocytosed through a monoubiquitin- and clathrin-dependent mechanism. Here, we show that the availability of secondary non-iron metal substrates of IRT1 (Zn, Mn, and Co) controls the localization of IRT1 between the outer polar domain of the plasma membrane and EE/TGN in root epidermal cells. We also identify FYVE1, a phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate-binding protein recruited to late endosomes, as an important regulator of IRT1-dependent metal transport and metal homeostasis in plants. FYVE1 controls IRT1 recycling to the plasma membrane and impacts the polar delivery of this transporter to the outer plasma membrane domain. This work establishes a functional link between the dynamics and the lateral polarity of IRT1 and the transport of its substrates, and identifies a molecular mechanism driving polar localization of a cell surface protein in plants.

  13. Malate Plays a Crucial Role in Starch Metabolism, Ripening, and Soluble Solid Content of Tomato Fruit and Affects Postharvest Softening[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Danilo C.; Osorio, Sonia; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bertolo, Ana L.F.; Carneiro, Raphael T.; Araújo, Wagner L.; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Michalska, Justyna; Rohrmann, Johannes; Geigenberger, Peter; Oliver, Sandra N.; Stitt, Mark; Carrari, Fernando; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the organic acid content of a fruit is regarded as one of its most commercially important quality traits when assessed by the consumer, relatively little is known concerning the physiological importance of organic acid metabolism for the fruit itself. Here, we evaluate the effect of modifying malate metabolism in a fruit-specific manner, by reduction of the activities of either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase, via targeted antisense approaches in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). While these genetic perturbations had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield, they had dramatic consequences for fruit metabolism, as well as unanticipated changes in postharvest shelf life and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Detailed characterization suggested that the rate of ripening was essentially unaltered but that lines containing higher malate were characterized by lower levels of transitory starch and a lower soluble sugars content at harvest, whereas those with lower malate contained higher levels of these carbohydrates. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase revealed that it correlated with the accumulation of transitory starch. Taken together with the altered activation state of the plastidial malate dehydrogenase and the modified pigment biosynthesis of the transgenic lines, these results suggest that the phenotypes are due to an altered cellular redox status. The combined data reveal the importance of malate metabolism in tomato fruit metabolism and development and confirm the importance of transitory starch in the determination of agronomic yield in this species. PMID:21239646

  14. The plasma membrane NADPH oxidase OsRbohA plays a crucial role in developmental regulation and drought-stress response in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Mao-Mao; Wang, Ya-Jing; Gao, Yin-Tao; Li, Ri; Wang, Gang-Feng; Li, Wen-Qiang; Liu, Wen-Ting; Chen, Kun-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Plasma membrane NADPH oxidases are major producers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells under normal growth and stress conditions. In the present study the total activity of rice NADPH oxidases and the transcription of OsRbohA, which encodes an Oryza sativa plasma membrane NADPH oxidase, were stimulated by drought. OsRbohA was expressed in all tissues examined throughout development. Its mRNA was upregulated by a number of factors, including heat, drought, salt, oxidative stress and methyl jasmonate treatment. Compared with wild-type (WT), the OsRbohA-knockout mutant osrbohA exhibited upregulated expression of other respiratory burst oxidase homolog genes and multiple abnormal agronomic traits, including reduced biomass, low germination rate and decreased pollen viability and seed fertility. However, OsRbohA-overexpressing transgenic plants showed no differences in these traits compared with WT. Although osrbohA leaves and roots produced more ROS than WT, the mutant had lesser intracellular ROS. In contrast, OsRbohA-overexpressing transgenic plants exhibited higher ROS production at the intracellular level and in tissues. Ablation of OsRbohA impaired the tolerance of plants to various water stresses, whereas its overexpression enhanced the tolerance. In addition, a number of genes related to energy supply, substrate transport, stress response and transcriptional regulation were differentially expressed in osrbohA plants even under normal growth conditions, suggesting that OsRbohA has fundamental and broad functions in rice. These results indicate that OsRbohA-mediated processes are governed by complex signaling pathways that function during the developmental regulation and drought-stress response in rice. PMID:26400148

  15. Human rpL3 plays a crucial role in cell response to nucleolar stress induced by 5-FU and L-OHP.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Davide; Crescenzi, Elvira; Sagar, Vinay; Loreni, Fabrizio; Russo, Annapina; Russo, Giulia

    2014-11-30

    Recent evidence showed that a variety of DNA damaging agents including 5-FU and L-OHP impairs ribosomal biogenesis activating a ribosomal stress pathway. Here, we demonstrate that in lung and colon cancer cell lines devoid of p53, the efficacy of 5-FU and L-OHP chemotherapy depends on rpL3 status. Specifically, we demonstrate that ribosomal stress induced by 5-FU and L-OHP is associated to up-regulation of rpL3 and its accumulation as ribosome-free form. We show that rpL3 participates in the cell response to chemotherapy acting as a critical regulator of cell cycle, apoptosis and DNA repair, by modulating p21 expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that rpL3 is able to control DNA repair also independently from p21 status of cell. It is noteworthy that silencing of rpL3 abolishes the cytotoxic effects of 5-FU and L-OH indicating that the loss of rpL3 makes chemotherapy drugs ineffective. Taking together our results shed light on 5-FU and L-OHP mechanism of action and contribute to more effective clinical use of these drugs in cancer therapy. PMID:25473889

  16. A Quantitative Content Analysis of Leveled Vocabulary Embedded within Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    This content analysis examined levels of vocabulary within massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs). A total of six MMORPGs were studied; three were pay-to-play (P2P), and three were free-to-play (F2P). Sixty hours of game play (10 hours per game) provided the researcher with 50,240 embedded vocabulary words. Each MMORPG was…

  17. Neutrophils play an important role in protective immunity against Coxiella burnetii infection.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Alexandra; Schoenlaub, Laura; Freches, Danielle; Mitchell, William; Zhang, Guoquan

    2015-08-01

    Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium that causes the zoonotic disease Q fever. Although Q fever is mainly transmitted by aerosol infection, study of the immune responses in the lung following pulmonary C. burnetii infection is lacking. Neutrophils are considered the first immune cell to migrate into the lung and play an important role in host defense against aerosol infection with microbial pathogens. However, the role of neutrophils in the host defense against C. burnetii infection remains unclear. To determine the role of neutrophils in protective immunity against C. burnetii infection, the RB6-8C5 antibody was used to deplete neutrophils in mice before intranasal infection with C. burnetii. The results indicated that neutrophil-depleted mice developed more severe disease than their wild-type counterparts, suggesting that neutrophils play an important role in host defense against C. burnetii pulmonary infection. We also found that neither CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) nor interleukin-17 (IL-17) receptor (IL-17R) deficiency changed the severity of disease following intranasal C. burnetii challenge, suggesting that keratinocyte-derived chemokine and IL-17 may not play essential roles in the response to C. burnetii infection. However, significantly higher C. burnetii genome copy numbers were detected in the lungs of IL-1R(-/-) mice at 14 days postinfection. This indicates that IL-1 may be important for the clearance of C. burnetii from the lungs following intranasal infection. Our results also suggest that neutrophils are involved in protecting vaccinated mice from C. burnetii challenge-induced disease. This is the first study to demonstrate an important role for neutrophils in protective immunity against C. burnetii infection.

  18. NCP1/AtMOB1A Plays Key Roles in Auxin-Mediated Arabidopsis Development

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lizhen; Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Youfa

    2016-01-01

    MOB1 protein is a core component of the Hippo signaling pathway in animals where it is involved in controlling tissue growth and tumor suppression. Plant MOB1 proteins display high sequence homology to animal MOB1 proteins, but little is known regarding their role in plant growth and development. Herein we report the critical roles of Arabidopsis MOB1 (AtMOB1A) in auxin-mediated development in Arabidopsis. We found that loss-of-function mutations in AtMOB1A completely eliminated the formation of cotyledons when combined with mutations in PINOID (PID), which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase that participates in auxin signaling and transport. We showed that atmob1a was fully rescued by its Drosophila counterpart, suggesting functional conservation. The atmob1a pid double mutants phenocopied several well-characterized mutant combinations that are defective in auxin biosynthesis or transport. Moreover, we demonstrated that atmob1a greatly enhanced several other known auxin mutants, suggesting that AtMOB1A plays a key role in auxin-mediated plant development. The atmob1a single mutant displayed defects in early embryogenesis and had shorter root and smaller flowers than wild type plants. AtMOB1A is uniformly expressed in embryos and suspensor cells during embryogenesis, consistent with its role in embryo development. AtMOB1A protein is localized to nucleus, cytoplasm, and associated to plasma membrane, suggesting that it plays roles in these subcellular localizations. Furthermore, we showed that disruption of AtMOB1A led to a reduced sensitivity to exogenous auxin. Our results demonstrated that AtMOB1A plays an important role in Arabidopsis development by promoting auxin signaling. PMID:26942722

  19. NCP1/AtMOB1A Plays Key Roles in Auxin-Mediated Arabidopsis Development.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaona; Guo, Zhiai; Song, Lizhen; Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Youfa

    2016-03-01

    MOB1 protein is a core component of the Hippo signaling pathway in animals where it is involved in controlling tissue growth and tumor suppression. Plant MOB1 proteins display high sequence homology to animal MOB1 proteins, but little is known regarding their role in plant growth and development. Herein we report the critical roles of Arabidopsis MOB1 (AtMOB1A) in auxin-mediated development in Arabidopsis. We found that loss-of-function mutations in AtMOB1A completely eliminated the formation of cotyledons when combined with mutations in PINOID (PID), which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase that participates in auxin signaling and transport. We showed that atmob1a was fully rescued by its Drosophila counterpart, suggesting functional conservation. The atmob1a pid double mutants phenocopied several well-characterized mutant combinations that are defective in auxin biosynthesis or transport. Moreover, we demonstrated that atmob1a greatly enhanced several other known auxin mutants, suggesting that AtMOB1A plays a key role in auxin-mediated plant development. The atmob1a single mutant displayed defects in early embryogenesis and had shorter root and smaller flowers than wild type plants. AtMOB1A is uniformly expressed in embryos and suspensor cells during embryogenesis, consistent with its role in embryo development. AtMOB1A protein is localized to nucleus, cytoplasm, and associated to plasma membrane, suggesting that it plays roles in these subcellular localizations. Furthermore, we showed that disruption of AtMOB1A led to a reduced sensitivity to exogenous auxin. Our results demonstrated that AtMOB1A plays an important role in Arabidopsis development by promoting auxin signaling.

  20. OSCAR-collagen signaling in monocytes plays a proinflammatory role and may contribute to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Heidi S; Guo, Li; Keller, Pernille; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Sun, Mingyi; Guo, Wei; Ma, Chunyan; Hamilton, John A; Bjørkdahl, Olle; Berchtold, Martin W; Panina, Svetlana

    2016-04-01

    Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) is an activating receptor expressed by human myeloid cells. Collagen type I (ColI) and collagen type II (ColII) serve as ligands for OSCAR. OSCAR-collagen interaction stimulates RANK-dependent osteoclastogenesis. We have recently reported that OSCAR promotes functional maturation of monocyte-derived dendritic cells. OSCAR is upregulated on monocytes from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients with active disease, and these monocytes show an increased proosteoclastogenic potential. In the current study, we have addressed a functional role for an OSCAR-collagen interaction on monocytes. We show that OSCAR-ColII signaling promoted the survival of monocytes. Moreover, ColII stimulated the release of proinflammatory cytokines by monocytes from healthy donors, which could be completely blocked by an anti-OSCAR monoclonal antibody. Mononuclear cells from the synovial fluid of RA patients plated on ColII secreted TNF-α and IL-8 in an OSCAR-dependent manner. Global RNA profiling showed that components of multiple signaling pathways relevant to RA pathogenesis are regulated at the transcriptional level by OSCAR in monocytes. Thus, OSCAR can play a proinflammatory role in monocyte-derived cells and may contribute crucially on multiple levels to RA pathogenesis. PMID:26786702

  1. Peer review role-playing as a method of teaching senior undergraduate science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie

    2008-11-01

    We present a case study of the use of role-playing as a method of enhancing course delivery in senior undergraduate science courses. Specifically we examine the use of simulating peer review of scientific proposals for time on major international telescopes in a third year astrophysics course at the University of Tasmania. We find that 90% of participating students found the experience to be both enjoyable and a good method for learning and that 100% of students felt that the exercise had aided their understanding of the course material. Furthermore 80% of students felt that the role-playing had enhanced their understanding of scientific decision making while 70% believed that they had learnt to apply principles from the course in new situations.

  2. The role of conserved Cys residues in Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase: Cys139 is crucial for the enzyme activity and Cys320 regulates enzyme stability.

    PubMed

    Smolko, Ana; Šupljika, Filip; Martinčić, Jelena; Jajčanin-Jozić, Nina; Grabar-Branilović, Marina; Tomić, Sanja; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Piantanida, Ivo; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase (BrILL2) participates in the homeostasis of the plant hormones auxins by hydrolyzing the amino acid conjugates of auxins, thereby releasing the free active form of hormones. Herein, the potential role of the two conserved Cys residues of BrILL2 (at sequence positions 139 and 320) has been investigated by using interdisciplinary approaches and methods of molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and molecular modelling. The obtained results show that both Cys residues participate in the regulation of enzyme activity. Cys320 located in the satellite domain of the enzyme is mainly responsible for protein stability and regulation of enzyme activity through polymer formation, as has been revealed by enzyme kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the BrILL2 wild type and mutants C320S and C139S. Cys139 positioned in the active site of the catalytic domain is involved in the coordination of one Mn(2+) ion of the bimetal center and is crucial for the enzymatic activity. Although the point mutation Cys139 to Ser causes the loss of enzyme activity, it does not affect the metal binding to the BrILL2 enzyme, as has been shown by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and differential scanning calorimetry data. MD simulations (200 ns) revealed a different active site architecture of the BrILL2C139S mutant in comparison to the wild type enzyme. Additional possible reasons for the inactivity of the BrILL2C139S mutant have been discussed based on MD simulations and MM-PBSA free energy calculations of BrILL2 enzyme complexes (wt and C139S mutant) with IPA-Ala as a substrate.

  3. Two nucleus-localized CDK-like kinases with crucial roles for malaria parasite erythrocytic replication are involved in phosphorylation of splicing factor.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shruti; Kern, Selina; Halbert, Jean; Przyborski, Jude M; Baumeister, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas; Doerig, Christian; Pradel, Gabriele

    2011-05-01

    The kinome of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum comprises representatives of most eukaryotic protein kinase groups, including kinases which regulate proliferation and differentiation processes. Despite extensive research on most plasmodial enzymes, little information is available regarding the four identified members of the cyclin-dependent kinase-like kinase (CLK) family. In other eukaryotes, CLKs regulate mRNA splicing through phosphorylation of Serine/Arginine-rich proteins. Here, we investigate two of the PfCLKs, the Lammer kinase homolog PfCLK-1, and PfCLK-2. Both PfCLKs show homology with the yeast Serine/Arginine protein kinase Sky1p and are transcribed throughout the asexual blood stages and in gametocytes. PfCLK-1/Lammer possesses two nuclear localization signal sites and PfCLK-2 possesses one of these signal sites upstream of the C-terminal catalytic domains. Indirect immunofluorescence, Western blot, and electron microscopy data confirm that the kinases are primarily localized in the parasite nucleus, and PfCLK-2 is further present in the cytoplasm. The two kinases are important for completion of the asexual replication cycle of P. falciparum, as demonstrated by reverse genetics approaches. In vitro kinase assays show substrate phosphorylation by the PfCLKs, including the Sky1p substrate, splicing factor Npl3p, and the plasmodial alternative splicing factor PfASF-1. Mass spectrometric analysis of co-immunoprecipitated proteins indicates assembly of the two PfCLKs with proteins with predicted nuclease, phosphatase, or helicase functions. Our data indicate a crucial role of PfCLKs for malaria blood stage parasites, presumably by participating in gene regulation through the post-transcriptional modification of mRNA.

  4. The role of conserved Cys residues in Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase: Cys139 is crucial for the enzyme activity and Cys320 regulates enzyme stability.

    PubMed

    Smolko, Ana; Šupljika, Filip; Martinčić, Jelena; Jajčanin-Jozić, Nina; Grabar-Branilović, Marina; Tomić, Sanja; Ludwig-Müller, Jutta; Piantanida, Ivo; Salopek-Sondi, Branka

    2016-04-01

    Brassica rapa auxin amidohydrolase (BrILL2) participates in the homeostasis of the plant hormones auxins by hydrolyzing the amino acid conjugates of auxins, thereby releasing the free active form of hormones. Herein, the potential role of the two conserved Cys residues of BrILL2 (at sequence positions 139 and 320) has been investigated by using interdisciplinary approaches and methods of molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics and molecular modelling. The obtained results show that both Cys residues participate in the regulation of enzyme activity. Cys320 located in the satellite domain of the enzyme is mainly responsible for protein stability and regulation of enzyme activity through polymer formation, as has been revealed by enzyme kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry analysis of the BrILL2 wild type and mutants C320S and C139S. Cys139 positioned in the active site of the catalytic domain is involved in the coordination of one Mn(2+) ion of the bimetal center and is crucial for the enzymatic activity. Although the point mutation Cys139 to Ser causes the loss of enzyme activity, it does not affect the metal binding to the BrILL2 enzyme, as has been shown by isothermal titration calorimetry, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry and differential scanning calorimetry data. MD simulations (200 ns) revealed a different active site architecture of the BrILL2C139S mutant in comparison to the wild type enzyme. Additional possible reasons for the inactivity of the BrILL2C139S mutant have been discussed based on MD simulations and MM-PBSA free energy calculations of BrILL2 enzyme complexes (wt and C139S mutant) with IPA-Ala as a substrate. PMID:26959939

  5. SLA-PGN-primed dendritic cell-based vaccination induces Th17-mediated protective immunity against experimental visceral leishmaniasis: a crucial role of PKCβ.

    PubMed

    Jawed, Junaid Jibran; Majumder, Saikat; Bandyopadhyay, Syamdas; Biswas, Satabdi; Parveen, Shabina; Majumdar, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Emergence of drug resistance during visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a major obstacle imposed during successful therapy. An effective vaccine strategy against this disease is therefore necessary. Our present study exploited the SLA (soluble leishmanial antigen) and PGN (peptidoglycan) stimulated bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) as a suitable vaccine candidate during experimental VL. SLA-PGN-stimulated DCs showed a significant decrease in hepatic and splenic parasite burden, which were associated with increased production of nitric oxide and pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-12, IFN-γ and IL-17. Elevated level of IL-17 was accompanied with the generation of more Th17 cells. Further studies on DC provided the evidence that these SLA-PGN-stimulated DCs played an important role in providing necessary cytokines such as IL-6, IL-23 and TGF-β for the generation of Th17 cells. Interestingly, inhibition of protein kinase C-β (PKCβ) in DCs led to decreased production of Th17 polarizing cytokines, causing reduction of the Th17 population size. Altogether, our finding highlighted the important role of DC-based PKCβ in regulation of the function and generation of Th17 cells.

  6. Playable Stories: Making Programming and 3D Role-Playing Game Design Personally and Socially Relevant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingram-Goble, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This is an exploratory design study of a novel system for learning programming and 3D role-playing game design as tools for social change. This study was conducted at two sites. Participants in the study were ages 9-14 and worked for up to 15 hours with the platform to learn how to program and design video games with personally or socially…

  7. The relief of a caregiver's burden through guided imagery, role-playing, humor, and paradoxical intervention.

    PubMed

    Yip, Kam-Shing

    2003-01-01

    Caregiving by relatives to a person with mental illness is demanding and overwhelming. This paper describes how to use guided imagery, role-playing, humor, and paradoxical intervention to help the wife of a man with mental illness in easing her worry, anxiety, and frustration engendered by caregiving. The intervention made the wife feel normal and relaxed in facing the "symptoms" of her husband's mental illness. It also revived the wife's patience, hope, and strength in the process of rehabilitation.

  8. Facebook Role Play Addiction - A Comorbidity with Multiple Compulsive-Impulsive Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Deeepa; Shukla, Lekhansh; Kandasamy, Arun; Benegal, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Background Problematic Internet use (PIU) is an emerging entity with varied contents. Behavioral addictions have high comorbidity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders. Social networking site (SNS) addiction and role playing game (RPG) addiction are traditionally studied as separate entities. We present a case with excessive Internet use, with a particular focus on phenomenology and psychiatric comorbidities. Case presentation Fifteen-year-old girl with childhood onset attention deficit disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, adolescent onset trichotillomania, and disturbed family environment presented with excessive Facebook use. Main online activity was creating profiles in names of mainstream fictional characters and assuming their identity (background, linguistic attributes, etc.). This was a group activity with significant socialization in the virtual world. Craving, salience, withdrawal, mood modification, and conflict were clearly elucidated and significant social and occupational dysfunction was evident. Discussion This case highlights various vulnerability and sociofamilial factors contributing to behavioral addiction. It also highlights the presence of untreated comorbidities in such cases. The difference from contemporary RPGs and uniqueness of role playing on SNS is discussed. SNS role playing as a separate genre of PIU and its potential to reach epidemic proportions are discussed. Conclusions Individuals with temperamental vulnerability are likely to develop behavioral addictions. Identification and management of comorbid conditions are important. The content of PIU continues to evolve and needs further study. PMID:27156380

  9. Role-play simulations for climate change adaptation education and engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumore, Danya; Schenk, Todd; Susskind, Lawrence

    2016-08-01

    In order to effectively adapt to climate change, public officials and other stakeholders need to rapidly enhance their understanding of local risks and their ability to collaboratively and adaptively respond to them. We argue that science-based role-play simulation exercises -- a type of 'serious game' involving face-to-face mock decision-making -- have considerable potential as education and engagement tools for enhancing readiness to adapt. Prior research suggests role-play simulations and other serious games can foster public learning and encourage collective action in public policy-making contexts. However, the effectiveness of such exercises in the context of climate change adaptation education and engagement has heretofore been underexplored. We share results from two research projects that demonstrate the effectiveness of role-play simulations in cultivating climate change adaptation literacy, enhancing collaborative capacity and facilitating social learning. Based on our findings, we suggest such exercises should be more widely embraced as part of adaptation professionals' education and engagement toolkits.

  10. Use of interactive theater and role play to develop medical students' skills in breaking bad news.

    PubMed

    Skye, Eric P; Wagenschutz, Heather; Steiger, Jeffrey A; Kumagai, Arno K

    2014-12-01

    Creative arts have been increasingly implemented in medical education. This study investigated the use of interactive theater and role play with professional actors in teaching breaking bad news to medical students. The objectives were to explore the contexts, approaches, experiences, and reactions in giving and receiving bad news. Second-year medical students participated in a required educational session that utilized interactive theater which helps students learn about the issues of breaking bad news to a patient with cancer. Following the interactive theater piece, professional actors provided students role play experiences in small groups with breaking bad news. Anonymous evaluation surveys were given out to all second-year medical students at the conclusion of the breaking bad news session. Surveys contained quantitative and qualitative responses. Three years of evaluations were analyzed. A total of 451 (88 %) students completed the evaluations. Comments were thematically analyzed. Ninety-four percent agreed that the theater piece prompted reflection on patient-provider communications, and 89 % agreed that it stimulated discussion on complex issues with breaking bad news. The two most common themes in student comments concerned the importance of realism in the theater piece, and the value of experiencing multiple perspectives. Use of professional actors during the role play exercises enhances the realism and pushed the students out of their own "comfort zones" in ways that may more closely approximate real life clinical situations. Interactive theater can be a potentially powerful tool to teach breaking bad news during medical school. PMID:24683056

  11. Teaching communication skills using role-play: an experience-based guide for educators.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Vicki A; Back, Anthony L

    2011-06-01

    Teaching advanced communication skills requires educators who are not only excellent communicators themselves but have the ability to deconstruct the components of the interaction and develop a cognitive approach that can be used across a variety of learners, diverse content, and under different time constraints while helping the learner develop the skill of self-reflection in a 'safe' and effective learning environment. The use of role-play in small groups is an important method to help learners cultivate the skills required to engage in nuanced, often difficult conversations with seriously ill patients. To be effective, educators utilizing role-play must help learners set realistic goals and know when and how to provide feedback to the learners in a way that allows a deepening of skills and a promotion of self-awareness. The challenge is to do this in a manner that does not cause too much anxiety for the learner. In this article we outline an approach to teaching communication skills to advanced learners through the use of different types of role-play, feedback, and debriefing.

  12. Use of interactive theater and role play to develop medical students' skills in breaking bad news.

    PubMed

    Skye, Eric P; Wagenschutz, Heather; Steiger, Jeffrey A; Kumagai, Arno K

    2014-12-01

    Creative arts have been increasingly implemented in medical education. This study investigated the use of interactive theater and role play with professional actors in teaching breaking bad news to medical students. The objectives were to explore the contexts, approaches, experiences, and reactions in giving and receiving bad news. Second-year medical students participated in a required educational session that utilized interactive theater which helps students learn about the issues of breaking bad news to a patient with cancer. Following the interactive theater piece, professional actors provided students role play experiences in small groups with breaking bad news. Anonymous evaluation surveys were given out to all second-year medical students at the conclusion of the breaking bad news session. Surveys contained quantitative and qualitative responses. Three years of evaluations were analyzed. A total of 451 (88 %) students completed the evaluations. Comments were thematically analyzed. Ninety-four percent agreed that the theater piece prompted reflection on patient-provider communications, and 89 % agreed that it stimulated discussion on complex issues with breaking bad news. The two most common themes in student comments concerned the importance of realism in the theater piece, and the value of experiencing multiple perspectives. Use of professional actors during the role play exercises enhances the realism and pushed the students out of their own "comfort zones" in ways that may more closely approximate real life clinical situations. Interactive theater can be a potentially powerful tool to teach breaking bad news during medical school.

  13. Developing Pharmacy Student Communication Skills through Role-Playing and Active Learning

    PubMed Central

    Zeszotarski, Paula; Ma, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact on pharmacy students of a communication course, which used role-playing to develop active-learning skills. Design. Students role-playing pharmacists in patient care scenarios were critiqued by students and pharmacist faculty members. Grading was performed using the rubric inspired by Bruce Berger’s Communication Skills for Pharmacists. Written skills were evaluated using student written critique questionnaires. Students completed precourse and postcourse self-assessment surveys. Preceptor evaluations were analyzed for course impact. Assessment. Students demonstrated improvement in oral skills based on role-play scores (45.87/50) after practice sessions. The average score based on the student questionnaire was 9.31/10. Gain was demonstrated in all defined course objectives. Impact on introductory pharmacy practice experience (IPPE) communication objectives was insignificant. Student evaluations for course and teaching strategy reflected a high average. Conclusion. Study results demonstrated improvement in oral and written communication skills that may help improve interprofessional teamwork between pharmacists and other health care providers. PMID:25995519

  14. Teaching Communication Skills Using Role-Play: An Experience-Based Guide for Educators

    PubMed Central

    Back, Anthony L.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Teaching advanced communication skills requires educators who are not only excellent communicators themselves but have the ability to deconstruct the components of the interaction and develop a cognitive approach that can be used across a variety of learners, diverse content, and under different time constraints while helping the learner develop the skill of self-reflection in a ‘safe’ and effective learning environment. The use of role-play in small groups is an important method to help learners cultivate the skills required to engage in nuanced, often difficult conversations with seriously ill patients. To be effective, educators utilizing role-play must help learners set realistic goals and know when and how to provide feedback to the learners in a way that allows a deepening of skills and a promotion of self-awareness. The challenge is to do this in a manner that does not cause too much anxiety for the learner. In this article we outline an approach to teaching communication skills to advanced learners through the use of different types of role-play, feedback, and debriefing. PMID:21651366

  15. Facebook Role Play Addiction - A Comorbidity with Multiple Compulsive-Impulsive Spectrum Disorders.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Deeepa; Shukla, Lekhansh; Kandasamy, Arun; Benegal, Vivek

    2016-06-01

    Background Problematic Internet use (PIU) is an emerging entity with varied contents. Behavioral addictions have high comorbidity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive spectrum disorders. Social networking site (SNS) addiction and role playing game (RPG) addiction are traditionally studied as separate entities. We present a case with excessive Internet use, with a particular focus on phenomenology and psychiatric comorbidities. Case presentation Fifteen-year-old girl with childhood onset attention deficit disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, adolescent onset trichotillomania, and disturbed family environment presented with excessive Facebook use. Main online activity was creating profiles in names of mainstream fictional characters and assuming their identity (background, linguistic attributes, etc.). This was a group activity with significant socialization in the virtual world. Craving, salience, withdrawal, mood modification, and conflict were clearly elucidated and significant social and occupational dysfunction was evident. Discussion This case highlights various vulnerability and sociofamilial factors contributing to behavioral addiction. It also highlights the presence of untreated comorbidities in such cases. The difference from contemporary RPGs and uniqueness of role playing on SNS is discussed. SNS role playing as a separate genre of PIU and its potential to reach epidemic proportions are discussed. Conclusions Individuals with temperamental vulnerability are likely to develop behavioral addictions. Identification and management of comorbid conditions are important. The content of PIU continues to evolve and needs further study.

  16. Smyd5 plays pivotal roles in both primitive and definitive hematopoiesis during zebrafish embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tomoaki; Tsunesumi, Shin-ichiro; Sagara, Hiroshi; Munakata, Miyo; Hisaki, Yoshihiro; Sekiya, Takao; Furukawa, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Sumiko

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of histone tails plays a pivotal role in the regulation of a wide range of biological processes. SET and MYND domain-containing protein (SMYD) is a methyltransferase, five family members of which have been identified in humans. SMYD1, SMYD2, SMYD3, and SMYD4 have been found to play critical roles in carcinogenesis and/or the development of heart and skeletal muscle. However, the physiological functions of SMYD5 remain unknown. To investigate the function of Smyd5 in vivo, zebrafish were utilised as a model system. We first examined smyd5 expression patterns in developing zebrafish embryos. Smyd5 transcripts were abundantly expressed at early developmental stages and then gradually decreased. Smyd5 was expressed in all adult tissues examined. Loss-of-function analysis of Smyd5 was then performed in zebrafish embryos using smyd5 morpholino oligonucleotide (MO). Embryos injected with smyd5-MO showed normal gross morphological development, including of heart and skeletal muscle. However, increased expression of both primitive and definitive hematopoietic markers, including pu.1, mpx, l-plastin, and cmyb, were observed. These phenotypes of smyd5-MO zebrafish embryos were also observed when we introduced mutations in smyd5 gene with the CRISPR/Cas9 system. As the expression of myeloid markers was elevated in smyd5 loss-of-function zebrafish, we propose that Smyd5 plays critical roles in hematopoiesis. PMID:27377701

  17. Recruitment of Gβγ controls the basal activity of G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels: crucial role of distal C terminus of GIRK1.

    PubMed

    Kahanovitch, Uri; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Berlin, Shai; Rubinstein, Moran; Styr, Boaz; Castel, Ruth; Peleg, Sagit; Tabak, Galit; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ivanina, Tatiana; Dascal, Nathan

    2014-12-15

    The G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK, or Kir3) channels are important mediators of inhibitory neurotransmission via activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GIRK channels are tetramers comprising combinations of subunits (GIRK1-4), activated by direct binding of the Gβγ subunit of Gi/o proteins. Heterologously expressed GIRK1/2 exhibit high, Gβγ-dependent basal currents (Ibasal) and a modest activation by GPCR or coexpressed Gβγ. Inversely, the GIRK2 homotetramers exhibit low Ibasal and strong activation by Gβγ. The high Ibasal of GIRK1 seems to be associated with its unique distal C terminus (G1-dCT), which is not present in the other subunits. We investigated the role of G1-dCT using electrophysiological and fluorescence assays in Xenopus laevis oocytes and protein interaction assays. We show that expression of GIRK1/2 increases the plasma membrane level of coexpressed Gβγ (a phenomenon we term 'Gβγ recruitment') but not of coexpressed Gαi3. All GIRK1-containing channels, but not GIRK2 homomers, recruited Gβγ to the plasma membrane. In biochemical assays, truncation of G1-dCT reduces the binding between the cytosolic parts of GIRK1 and Gβγ, but not Gαi3. Nevertheless, the truncation of G1-dCT does not impair activation by Gβγ. In fluorescently labelled homotetrameric GIRK1 channels and in the heterotetrameric GIRK1/2 channel, the truncation of G1-dCT abolishes Gβγ recruitment and decreases Ibasal. Thus, we conclude that G1-dCT carries an essential role in Gβγ recruitment by GIRK1 and, consequently, in determining its high basal activity. Our results indicate that G1-dCT is a crucial part of a Gβγ anchoring site of GIRK1-containing channels, spatially and functionally distinct from the site of channel activation by Gβγ.

  18. Recruitment of Gβγ controls the basal activity of G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channels: crucial role of distal C terminus of GIRK1

    PubMed Central

    Kahanovitch, Uri; Tsemakhovich, Vladimir; Berlin, Shai; Rubinstein, Moran; Styr, Boaz; Castel, Ruth; Peleg, Sagit; Tabak, Galit; Dessauer, Carmen W; Ivanina, Tatiana; Dascal, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    The G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK, or Kir3) channels are important mediators of inhibitory neurotransmission via activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). GIRK channels are tetramers comprising combinations of subunits (GIRK1–4), activated by direct binding of the Gβγ subunit of Gi/o proteins. Heterologously expressed GIRK1/2 exhibit high, Gβγ-dependent basal currents (Ibasal) and a modest activation by GPCR or coexpressed Gβγ. Inversely, the GIRK2 homotetramers exhibit low Ibasal and strong activation by Gβγ. The high Ibasal of GIRK1 seems to be associated with its unique distal C terminus (G1-dCT), which is not present in the other subunits. We investigated the role of G1-dCT using electrophysiological and fluorescence assays in Xenopus laevis oocytes and protein interaction assays. We show that expression of GIRK1/2 increases the plasma membrane level of coexpressed Gβγ (a phenomenon we term ‘Gβγ recruitment’) but not of coexpressed Gαi3. All GIRK1-containing channels, but not GIRK2 homomers, recruited Gβγ to the plasma membrane. In biochemical assays, truncation of G1-dCT reduces the binding between the cytosolic parts of GIRK1 and Gβγ, but not Gαi3. Nevertheless, the truncation of G1-dCT does not impair activation by Gβγ. In fluorescently labelled homotetrameric GIRK1 channels and in the heterotetrameric GIRK1/2 channel, the truncation of G1-dCT abolishes Gβγ recruitment and decreases Ibasal. Thus, we conclude that G1-dCT carries an essential role in Gβγ recruitment by GIRK1 and, consequently, in determining its high basal activity. Our results indicate that G1-dCT is a crucial part of a Gβγ anchoring site of GIRK1-containing channels, spatially and functionally distinct from the site of channel activation by Gβγ. PMID:25384780

  19. Designing Online Role Plays with a Focus on Story Development to Support Engagement and Critical Learning for Higher Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dracup, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Online role plays, as they are designed for use in higher education in Australia and internationally, are active and authentic learning activities (Wills, Leigh & Ip, 2011). In online role plays, students take a character role in developing a story that serves as a metaphor for real-life experience in order to develop a potentially wide range of…

  20. Disseminated intravascular coagulation does not play a major role in the pathogenesis of classical swine fever.

    PubMed

    Blome, Sandra; Meindl-Böhmer, Alexandra; Nowak, Götz; Moennig, Volker

    2013-03-23

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is a multi-systemic disease that can be accompanied by severe haemorrhagic lesions. The underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are still far from being understood, though disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) was discussed as a major factor. In the presented study, the direct thrombin inhibitor hirudin was used in an attempt to elucidate the role of the coagulation system in the pathogenesis of CSF-induced haemorrhagic lesions. Two groups of piglets (n=5) were infected with highly virulent CSF virus (CSFV) strain CSF0634. One group underwent daily treatment with hirudin, the other served as untreated challenge infection control. Assessment of clinical signs using a clinical score system, coagulation tests, and blood counts were performed daily. Both groups developed acute-lethal CSF with haemorrhagic lesions. Although changes in the coagulation system were seen in the late stages of CSFV infection, our results strongly suggest that DIC does not present the crucial event in the pathogenesis of haemorrhagic lesions.