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Sample records for pleiotropic regulatory locus

  1. Pleiotropic regulatory locus 2 exhibits unequal genetic redundancy with its homolog PRL1.

    PubMed

    Weihmann, Tabea; Palma, Kristoffer; Nitta, Yukino; Li, Xin

    2012-09-01

    In plants, signaling leading to resistance against biotrophic pathogens is complex. Perception of pathogenic microbes by resistance (R) proteins is relayed though successive activities of downstream components, in a network that is not well understood. PLEIOTROPIC REGULATORY LOCUS 1 (PRL1) and >20 other proteins are members of the MOS4-associated complex (MAC), a regulatory node in defense signaling. Of all characterized MAC members, mutations in PRL1 cause the most severe susceptibility towards both virulent and avirulent microbial pathogens. Genetic suppressors of prl1 represent new signaling elements and may aid in further unraveling of defense mechanisms. Our identification and characterization of a dominant suppressor of prl1 revealed a regulatory, gain-of-function mutation in PLEIOTROPIC REGULATORY LOCUS 2 (PRL2), a close homolog of PRL1. Loss-of-function mutants of PRL2 do not exhibit altered phenotypes; however, prl1 prl2 double mutants exhibit enhanced morphological defects consistent with unequal genetic redundancy between the homologs. Up-regulated gene expression mediated by the dominant prl2-1D allele completely suppresses disease susceptibility in the prl1 mutant background and also restores wild-type appearance, further supporting functional equivalence between the two PRL proteins. PMID:22813545

  2. Pleiotropic locus for emotion recognition and amygdala volume identified using univariate and bivariate linkage

    PubMed Central

    Knowles, Emma E. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Kent, Jack W.; Sprooten, Emma; Carless, Melanie A.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Almeida, Marcio A. A.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Olvera, Rene; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter; Almasy, Laura; Blangero, John; Glahn, David. C.

    2014-01-01

    The role of the amygdala in emotion recognition is well established and separately each trait has been shown to be highly heritable, but the potential role of common genetic influences on both traits has not been explored. Here we present an investigation of the pleiotropic influences of amygdala and emotion recognition in a sample of randomly selected, extended pedigrees (N = 858). Using a combination of univariate and bivariate linkage we found a pleiotropic region for amygdala and emotion recognition on 4q26 (LOD = 4.34). Association analysis conducted in the region underlying the bivariate linkage peak revealed a variant meeting the corrected significance level (pBonferroni = 5.01×10−05) within an intron of PDE5A (rs2622497, Χ2 =16.67, p = 4.4×10−05) as being jointly influential on both traits. PDE5A has been implicated previously in recognition-memory deficits and is expressed in subcortical structures that are thought to underlie memory ability including the amygdala. The present paper extends our understanding of the shared etiology between amygdala and emotion recognition by showing that the overlap between the two traits is due, at least in part, to common genetic influences. Moreover, the present paper identifies a pleiotropic locus for the two traits and an associated variant, which localizes the genetic signal even more precisely. These results, when taken in the context of previous research, highlight the potential utility of PDE5-inhibitors for ameliorating emotion-recognition deficits in populations including, but not exclusively, those individuals suffering from mental or neurodegenerative illness. PMID:25322361

  3. Regulatory organization of the staphylococcal sae locus.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Rajan P; Novick, Richard P

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes an investigation of the complex internal regulatory circuitry of the staphylococcal sae locus and the impact of modifying this circuitry on the expression of external genes in the sae regulon. The sae locus contains four genes, the saeR and S two-component signalling module (TCS), and saeP and Q, two upstream genes of hitherto unknown function. It is expressed from two promoters, P(A)sae, which transcribes only the TCS, and P(C)sae, which transcribes the entire locus. A bursa aurealis (bursa) transposon insertion in saeP in a derivative of Staphylococcus aureus NCTC 8325 has a profound effect on sae function. It modifies the activity of the TCS, changing the expression of many genes in the sae regulon, even though transcription of the TCS (from P(A)sae) is not interrupted. Moreover, these effects are not due to disruption of saeP since an in-frame deletion in saeP has essentially no phenotype. The phenotype of S. aureus strain Newman is remarkably similar to that of the saeP : : bursa and this similarity is explained by an amino acid substitution in the Newman saeS gene that is predicted to modify profoundly the signalling function of the protein. This concurrence suggests that the saeP : : bursa insertion affects the signalling function of saeS, a suggestion that is supported by the ability of an saeQR clone, but not an saeR clone, to complement the effects of the saeP : : bursa insertion.

  4. Evolution of branched regulatory genetic pathways: directional selection on pleiotropic loci accelerates developmental system drift.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Norman A; Porter, Adam H

    2007-01-01

    Developmental systems are regulated by a web of interacting loci. One common and useful approach in studying the evolution of development is to focus on classes of interacting elements within these systems. Here, we use individual-based simulations to study the evolution of traits controlled by branched developmental pathways involving three loci, where one locus regulates two different traits. We examined the system under a variety of selective regimes. In the case where one branch was under stabilizing selection and the other under directional selection, we observed "developmental system drift": the trait under stabilizing selection showed little phenotypic change even though the loci underlying that trait showed considerable evolutionary divergence. This occurs because the pleiotropic locus responds to directional selection and compensatory mutants are then favored in the pathway under stabilizing selection. Though developmental system drift may be caused by other mechanisms, it seems likely that it is accelerated by the same underlying genetic mechanism as that producing the Dobzhansky-Muller incompatibilities that lead to speciation in both linear and branched pathways. We also discuss predictions of our model for developmental system drift and how different selective regimes affect probabilities of speciation in the branched pathway system.

  5. Pleiotropic Properties and Genetic Organization of the tolA, B Locus of Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Alan; Rolfe, Barry; Onodera, Kazukiyo

    1972-01-01

    Colicin-tolerant mutants of Escherichia coli K-12, which map near gal at 17 min (tolA, B mutants), have been isolated and characterized. These mutants exhibited a very broad spectrum of phenotypic changes consistent with the interpretation that they are cell surface mutants. In addition to being colicintolerant and sensitive to deoxycholate and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, tolA, B mutants are sensitive to vancomycin, bacitracin, and dodecyl sulfate. The tolA, B mutants from most strains also formed mucoid colonies at 30 C on nutrient agar plates and had a greatly increased plating efficiency for lysisdefective S mutants of bacteriophage λ. Complementation analysis showed that the four phenotypic groups of tol mutants that map near gal fall into three complementation groups: tolP, tolA, and tolB. Recombination analysis by three-factor crosses established the order of the three groups as tolP-tolA-tolB—gal. Because of the wide variety of phenotypic changes that accompanies mutation to colicin tolerance, revertants were isolated to test whether single or multiple mutations were involved. The reversion analysis, as well as other genetic criteria, confirmed that only single mutations were involved, suggesting that these pleiotropic changes are a consequence of a single change in the E. coli cell surface. Images PMID:4627928

  6. Arabidopsis CPR5 is a senescence-regulatory gene with pleiotropic functions as predicted by the evolutionary theory of senescence.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Anderson, Lisa; Sturre, Marcel J G; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary theories of senescence predict that genes with pleiotropic functions are important for senescence regulation. In plants there is no direct molecular genetic test for the existence of such senescence-regulatory genes. Arabidopsis cpr5 mutants exhibit multiple phenotypes including hypersensitivity to various signalling molecules, constitutive expression of pathogen-related genes, abnormal trichome development, spontaneous lesion formation, and accelerated leaf senescence. These indicate that CPR5 is a beneficial gene which controls multiple facets of the Arabidopsis life cycle. Ectopic expression of CPR5 restored all the mutant phenotypes. However, in transgenic plants with increased CPR5 transcripts, accelerated leaf senescence was observed in detached leaves and at late development around 50 d after germination, as illustrated by the earlier onset of senescence-associated physiological and molecular markers. Thus, CPR5 has early-life beneficial effects by repressing cell death and insuring normal plant development, but late-life deleterious effects by promoting developmental senescence. As such, CPR5 appears to function as a typical senescence-regulatory gene as predicted by the evolutionary theories of senescence.

  7. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Beesley, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J; Li, Qiyuan; Delgado, Melissa K; Lee, Janet M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Bandera, Elisa V; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Canniotto, Rikki; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cook, Linda S; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel W; Cross, Simon S; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Engel, Christoph; Lee, Eunjung; Evans, D Gareth; Fasching, Peter A; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fridley, Brooke L; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gambino, Gaetana; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harrington, Patricia A; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Heitz, Florian; Herzog, Josef; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hulick, Peter J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Allan; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Kwong, Ava; de la Hoya, Miguel; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Le, Nhu; De Leeneer, Kim; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Milne, Roger L; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ness, Roberta B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olswold, Curtis; O'Malley, David; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Risch, Harvey A; Rodriguez, Gus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Salvesen, Helga B; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sellers, Thomas A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Slager, Susan; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Kathryn L; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S; Vachon, Celine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Doorn, Helena C; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Van't Veer, Laura J; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Vergote, Ignace; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Khanna, Kum Kum; Simard, Jacques; Monteiro, Alvaro N; French, Juliet D; Couch, Fergus J; Freedman, Matthew L; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D; Edwards, Stacey L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Gayther, Simon A

    2016-09-07

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10(-13)), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10(-16)) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10(-5)). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10(-3)) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10(-3)). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3'-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk.

  8. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast–ovarian cancer susceptibility locus

    PubMed Central

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Beesley, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J.; Li, Qiyuan; Delgado, Melissa K.; Lee, Janet M.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K.; Arver, Brita; Bandera, Elisa V.; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Benitez, Javier; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S.; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Canniotto, Rikki; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B. M.; Collonge-Rame, Marie- Agnès; Damette, Alexandre; Barouk-Simonet, Emmanuelle; Bonnet, Françoise; Bubien, Virginie; Sevenet, Nicolas; Longy, Michel; Berthet, Pascaline; Vaur, Dominique; Castera, Laurent; Ferrer, Sandra Fert; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy; Coron, Fanny; Faivre, Laurence; Baurand, Amandine; Jacquot, Caroline; Bertolone, Geoffrey; Lizard, Sarab; Leroux, Dominique; Dreyfus, Hélène; Rebischung, Christine; Peysselon, Magalie; Peyrat, Jean-Philippe; Fournier, Joëlle; Révillion, Françoise; Adenis, Claude; Vénat-Bouvet, Laurence; Léone, Mélanie; Boutry-Kryza, Nadia; Calender, Alain; Giraud, Sophie; Verny-Pierre, Carole; Lasset, Christine; Bonadona, Valérie; Barjhoux, Laure; Sobol, Hagay; Bourdon, Violaine; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Remenieras, Audrey; Coupier, Isabelle; Pujol, Pascal; Sokolowska, Johanna; Bronner, Myriam; Delnatte, Capucine; Bézieau, Stéphane; Mari, Véronique; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Buecher, Bruno; Rouleau, Etienne; Golmard, Lisa; Moncoutier, Virginie; Belotti, Muriel; de Pauw, Antoine; Elan, Camille; Fourme, Emmanuelle; Birot, Anne-Marie; Saule, Claire; Laurent, Maïté; Houdayer, Claude; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mebirouk, Noura; Coulet, Florence; Colas, Chrystelle; Soubrier, Florent; Warcoin, Mathilde; Prieur, Fabienne; Lebrun, Marine; Kientz, Caroline; Muller, Danièle; Fricker, Jean-Pierre; Toulas, Christine; Guimbaud, Rosine; Gladieff, Laurence; Feillel, Viviane; Mortemousque, Isabelle; Bressac-de-Paillerets, Brigitte; Caron, Olivier; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Cook, Linda S.; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cross, Simon S.; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B.; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Domchek, Susan M.; Dorfling, Cecilia M.; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Gregory, Helen; Miedzybrodzka, Zosia; Morrison, Patrick J.; Donaldson, Alan; Rogers, Mark T.; Kennedy, M. John; Porteous, Mary E.; Brady, Angela; Barwell, Julian; Foo, Claire; Lalloo, Fiona; Side, Lucy E.; Eason, Jacqueline; Henderson, Alex; Walker, Lisa; Cook, Jackie; Snape, Katie; Murray, Alex; McCann, Emma; Engel, Christoph; Lee, Eunjung; Evans, D. Gareth; Fasching, Peter A.; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gambino, Gaetana; Ganz, Patricia A.; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Godwin, Andrew K.; Goldberg, Mark S.; Goldgar, David E.; González-Neira, Anna; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Greene, Mark H.; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V. O.; Harrington, Patricia A.; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Rookus, M. A.; van Leeuwen, F. E.; van der Kolk, L. E.; Schmidt, M. K.; Russell, N. S.; de Lange, J. L.; Wijnands, R.; Collée, J. M.; Hooning, M. J.; Seynaeve, C.; van Deurzen, C. H. M.; Obdeijn, I. M.; van Asperen, C. J.; Tollenaar, R. A. E. M.; van Cronenburg, T. C. T. E. F.; Kets, C. M.; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; van der Pol, C. C.; van Os, T. A. M.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H. E. J.; Gómez-Garcia, E. B.; Oosterwijk, J. C.; Mourits, M. J.; de Bock, G. H.; Vasen, H. F.; Siesling, S.; Verloop, J.; Overbeek, L. I. H.; Heitz, Florian; Herzog, Josef; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L.; Hulick, Peter J.; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N.; Fox, Stephen; Kirk, Judy; Lindeman, Geoff; Price, Melanie; Bowtell, David; deFazio, Anna; Webb, Penny; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Allan; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; Karlan, Beth Y.; Khan, Sofia; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Knight, Julia A.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Kwong, Ava; de la Hoya, Miguel; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Le, Nhu; De Leeneer, Kim; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Loud, Jennifer T.; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Massuger, Leon F. A. G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R.; Milne, Roger L.; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Ness, Roberta B.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L.; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Olson, Janet E.; Olswold, Curtis; O'Malley, David; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Pearce, Celeste L.; Pejovic, Tanja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Risch, Harvey A.; Rodriguez, Gus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Salvesen, Helga B.; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Singer, Christian F.; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Slager, Susan; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C.; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R.; Teo, Soo H.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Vachon, Celine; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; van Doorn, Helena C.; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Vergote, Ignace; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Khanna, Kum Kum; Simard, Jacques; Monteiro, Alvaro N.; French, Juliet D.; Couch, Fergus J.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Easton, Douglas F.; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D.; Edwards, Stacey L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Gayther, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10−20), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10−13), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10−16) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10−5). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10−3) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10−3). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3′-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk. PMID:27601076

  9. Functional mechanisms underlying pleiotropic risk alleles at the 19p13.1 breast-ovarian cancer susceptibility locus.

    PubMed

    Lawrenson, Kate; Kar, Siddhartha; McCue, Karen; Kuchenbaeker, Karoline; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan; Beesley, Jonathan; Ramus, Susan J; Li, Qiyuan; Delgado, Melissa K; Lee, Janet M; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Bandera, Elisa V; Barile, Monica; Barkardottir, Rosa B; Barrowdale, Daniel; Beckmann, Matthias W; Benitez, Javier; Berchuck, Andrew; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William; Bogdanova, Natalia; Bojesen, Anders; Bojesen, Stig E; Bolla, Manjeet K; Bonanni, Bernardo; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bruinsma, Fiona; Brunet, Joan; Buhari, Shaik Ahmad; Burwinkel, Barbara; Butzow, Ralf; Buys, Saundra S; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Canniotto, Rikki; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B M; Cook, Linda S; Cox, Angela; Cramer, Daniel W; Cross, Simon S; Cybulski, Cezary; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; Damiola, Francesca; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Darabi, Hatef; Dennis, Joe; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Doherty, Jennifer A; Domchek, Susan M; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Ehrencrona, Hans; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Engel, Christoph; Lee, Eunjung; Evans, D Gareth; Fasching, Peter A; Feliubadalo, Lidia; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Foretova, Lenka; Fostira, Florentia; Foulkes, William D; Fridley, Brooke L; Friedman, Eitan; Frost, Debra; Gambino, Gaetana; Ganz, Patricia A; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ghoussaini, Maya; Giles, Graham G; Glasspool, Rosalind; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldberg, Mark S; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Goode, Ellen L; Goodman, Marc T; Greene, Mark H; Gronwald, Jacek; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hall, Per; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Harrington, Patricia A; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Heitz, Florian; Herzog, Josef; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hopper, John L; Hulick, Peter J; Huzarski, Tomasz; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jensen, Allan; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Kapuscinski, Miroslav; Karlan, Beth Y; Khan, Sofia; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kjaer, Susanne Kruger; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kristensen, Vessela; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Kwong, Ava; de la Hoya, Miguel; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Le, Nhu; De Leeneer, Kim; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Long, Jirong; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Loud, Jennifer T; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Le Marchand, Loic; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Massuger, Leon F A G; Matsuo, Keitaro; Mazoyer, Sylvie; McGuffog, Lesley; McLean, Catriona; McNeish, Iain; Meindl, Alfons; Menon, Usha; Mensenkamp, Arjen R; Milne, Roger L; Montagna, Marco; Moysich, Kirsten B; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Ness, Roberta B; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L; Odunsi, Kunle; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olson, Janet E; Olswold, Curtis; O'Malley, David; Orlow, Irene; Orr, Nick; Osorio, Ana; Park, Sue Kyung; Pearce, Celeste L; Pejovic, Tanja; Peterlongo, Paolo; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pylkäs, Katri; Radice, Paolo; Rantala, Johanna; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhenius, Valerie; Rhiem, Kerstin; Risch, Harvey A; Rodriguez, Gus; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rudolph, Anja; Salvesen, Helga B; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sellers, Thomas A; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shah, Mitul; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sieh, Weiva; Singer, Christian F; Sinilnikova, Olga M; Slager, Susan; Song, Honglin; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa C; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Sutter, Christian; Swerdlow, Anthony; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Kathryn L; Terry, Mary Beth; Thomassen, Mads; Tibiletti, Maria Grazia; Tihomirova, Laima; Tognazzo, Silvia; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Tung, Nadine; Tworoger, Shelley S; Vachon, Celine; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Doorn, Helena C; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Van't Veer, Laura J; Vanderstichele, Adriaan; Vergote, Ignace; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Qin; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S; Wildiers, Hans; Winqvist, Robert; Wu, Anna H; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yoon, Sook-Yee; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Zheng, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Khanna, Kum Kum; Simard, Jacques; Monteiro, Alvaro N; French, Juliet D; Couch, Fergus J; Freedman, Matthew L; Easton, Douglas F; Dunning, Alison M; Pharoah, Paul D; Edwards, Stacey L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Antoniou, Antonis C; Gayther, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    A locus at 19p13 is associated with breast cancer (BC) and ovarian cancer (OC) risk. Here we analyse 438 SNPs in this region in 46,451 BC and 15,438 OC cases, 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers and 73,444 controls and identify 13 candidate causal SNPs associated with serous OC (P=9.2 × 10(-20)), ER-negative BC (P=1.1 × 10(-13)), BRCA1-associated BC (P=7.7 × 10(-16)) and triple negative BC (P-diff=2 × 10(-5)). Genotype-gene expression associations are identified for candidate target genes ANKLE1 (P=2 × 10(-3)) and ABHD8 (P<2 × 10(-3)). Chromosome conformation capture identifies interactions between four candidate SNPs and ABHD8, and luciferase assays indicate six risk alleles increased transactivation of the ADHD8 promoter. Targeted deletion of a region containing risk SNP rs56069439 in a putative enhancer induces ANKLE1 downregulation; and mRNA stability assays indicate functional effects for an ANKLE1 3'-UTR SNP. Altogether, these data suggest that multiple SNPs at 19p13 regulate ABHD8 and perhaps ANKLE1 expression, and indicate common mechanisms underlying breast and ovarian cancer risk. PMID:27601076

  10. Pleiotropic effects of heterozygosity at the mating-type locus of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on repair, recombination and transformation.

    PubMed

    Durand, J; Birdsell, J; Wills, C

    1993-12-01

    Sexual (MAT a/alpha) and asexual (MAT a/a) strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are completely isogenic except at the MAT locus, were compared in their response to ultraviolet radiation. The effects of UV on survival, mitotic intragenic recombination, photoreactivation, and transformation efficiency with UV-irradiated plasmid DNA were examined. The sexual strain had enhanced survival and higher rates of mitotic intragenic recombination compared with the asexual strain. Exposure to visible light subsequent to irradiation increased the survival of both sexual and asexual strains, and decreased their rates of mitotic intragenic recombination. Similar results were obtained by Haladus and Zuk (1980) in their examination of sexual strains homozygous for rad6-1, and wild-type sexuals. Our sexual strain was also consistently more proficient at transforming plasmid DNA, whether that DNA had been irradiated or not. When pre-irradiated with 25 J/m2 of UV, MAT a/alpha cells transformed more efficiently than MAT a/a cells. When subsequently exposed to light, the ability of these pre-irradiated cells to transform decreased for both strains with increasing irradiation of the plasmid. A smaller decrease in transformation efficiency occurred when cells of both strains were kept in the dark. When pre-irradiated with 100 J/m2, the MAT a/alpha cells showed a 2-fold increase in their transformation efficiency of both irradiated and unirradiated plasmids by up to 2-fold, a phenomenon not seen in the MAT a/a cells even when pre-irradiated with much higher doses of UV. This increase in transformation efficiency was not, however, seen in the MAT a/alpha cells when they were exposed to visible light after UV irradiation. These results suggest that cells with the MAT a/alpha genotype have a UV-inducible system that increases the efficiency of transformation in the absence of visible light. This increase in transformation is not an induced increase in the repair of plasmid DNA

  11. Pleiotropic Mutations at the TUP1 Locus That Affect the Expression of Mating-Type-Dependent Functions in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE.

    PubMed

    Lemontt, J F; Fugit, D R; Mackay, V L

    1980-04-01

    The umr7-1 mutation, previously identified in a set of mutants that had been selected for defective UV-induced mutagenesis at CAN1, affects other cellular functions, including many of those regulated by the mating-type locus (MAT) in heterothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recessive umr7-1 allele, mapping approximately 20 cM distal to thr4 on chromosome III, causes clumpy growth in both a and alpha cells and has no apparent effect on a mating functions. However, alpha umr7 meiotic segregants fail to express several alpha-specific functions (e.g., high-frequency conjugation with a strains, secretion of the hormone alpha-factor and response to the hormone a-factor). In addition, alpha umr7 cells exhibit some a-specific characteristics, such as the barrier phenotype (Bar(+)) that prevents diffusion of alpha-factor and an increased mating frequency with alpha strains. The most striking property of alpha umr7 strains is their altered morphology, in which mitotic cells develop an asymmetric pear shape, like that of normal a cells induced to form "shmoos" by interaction with alpha-factor. Some a/alpha-specific diploid functions are also affected by umr7; instead of polar budding patterns, a/alpha umr7/umr7 diploids have medial budding like a/a, alpha/alpha and haploid strains. Moreover, a/alpha umr7/umr7 diploids have lost the ability to sporulate and are Bar(+) like a or a/a strains. Revertant studies indicate that umr7-1 is a single point mutation. The umr7 mutant fails to complement mutants of both tup1 (selected for deoxythymidine monophosphate utilization) and cyc9 (selected for high iso-2-cytochrome c levels), and all three isolates have similar genetic and phenotypic properties. It is suggested that the product of this gene plays some common central role in the complex regulation of the expression of both MAT-dependent and MAT-independent functions.

  12. Analysis of pleiotropism at the dominant white-spotting (W) locus of the house mouse: a description of ten new W alleles

    SciTech Connect

    Geissler, E.N.; McFarland, E.C.; Russell, E.S.

    1981-02-01

    Characterization of the pleiotropic effects of ten new putative W locus mutations, nine co-isogenic and one highly cogenic with the C57BL/6J strain, reveals a wide variety of influences upon pigmentation, blood formation and gametogenesis. None of the putative alleles, each of which is closely linked to Ph, a gene 0.1 cM from W, gave evidence of complementation with W/sup 39/, a new allele previously shown to be allelic to W/sup v/. All W*/W/sup 39/ genotypes resulted in black-eyed-white anemics with reduced gametogenic activity. Homozygotes for seven of these mutations are lethal during perinatal life; anemic embryos for seven of these mutations are lethal during perinatal life; anemic embryos have been identified in litters produced by intercross matings involving each of these alleles. Phenotypes of mice of several mutant genotypes provide exceptions to the frequent observation that a double dose of dominant W alleles (e.g., W/W/sup v/ or W/W) results in defects of corresponding severity in each of the three affected tissues. One viable homozygote has little or no defect in blood formation, and another appears to have normal fertility. The phenotypes of these homozygotes support the conclusion that the three tissue defects are not dependent on each other for their appearance and probably do not result from a single physiological disturbance during the development of the embryo. Although homozygosity for members of this series results in a wide range of phenotypes, the absence of complementation of any allele with W/sup 39/, the close proximity of each mutant to Ph, and the fact that all alleles produce detectable (though sometimes marginal) defects in the same tissues affected by W and W/sup v/, support the hypothesis that each new mutant gene is a W allele.

  13. Nucleotide sequence and cloning in Bacillus subtilis of the Bacillus stearothermophilus pleiotropic regulatory gene degT.

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, M; Takada, H; Imanaka, T

    1990-01-01

    The regulatory gene (degT) from Bacillus stearothermophilus NCA1503 which enhanced production of extracellular alkaline protease (Apr) was cloned in Bacillus subtilis with pTB53 as a vector. When B. subtilis MT-2 (Npr- [deficiency of neutral protease] Apr+) was transformed with the recombinant plasmid, pDT145, the plasmid carrier produced about three times more alkaline protease than did the wild-type strain. In contrast, when B. subtilis DB104 (Npr- Apr-) was used as a host, the transformant with pDT145 could not exhibit any protease activity. After construction of the deletion plasmids, DNA sequencing was done. A large open reading frame was found, and nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the degT gene was composed of 1,116 bases (372 amino acid residues, molecular weight of 41,244). A Shine-Dalgarno sequence was found nine bases upstream from the open reading frame. A B. subtilis strain carrying degT showed the following pleiotropic phenomena: (i) enhancement of production of extracellular enzymes such as alkaline protease and levansucrase, (ii) repression of autolysin activity, (iii) decrease of transformation efficiency for B. subtilis (competent cell procedure), (iv) altered control of sporulation, (v) loss of flagella, and (vi) abnormal cell division. When B. stearothermophilus SIC1 was transformed with the recombinant plasmid carrying degT, the transformants exhibited abnormal cell division. These phenomena are similar to those of the phenotypes of degSU(Hy) (hyperproduction), degQ(Hy), and degR mutants of B. subtilis. However, the amino acid sequence of the degT product (DegT) is different from those of the reported gene products. Furthermore, DegT includes a hydrophobic core region in the N-terminal portion (amino acid numbers 50 to 160), a consensus sequence for a DNA binding region (amino acid numbers 160 to 179), and a region homologous to transcription activator proteins (amino acid numbers 351 to 366). We discuss the possibility that the membrane

  14. afsR is a pleiotropic but conditionally required regulatory gene for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2).

    PubMed

    Floriano, B; Bibb, M

    1996-07-01

    The N-terminal region of AfsR, a putative pleiotropic regulatory protein for antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2), is homologous to RedD and Actil-ORF4, pathway-specific regulatory proteins required for the production of the antibiotics undecylprodigiosin (Red) and actinorhodin (Act), respectively. The recent identification of afsS, which lies immediately 3' of afsR and which stimulates antibiotic production when cloned at high copy number, questioned whether afsR was a pleiotropic regulatory gene. In this study we demonstrate that multiple copies of afsR can stimulate both Act and Red production and that, despite its homology, it cannot substitute for the pathway-specific regulatory genes. Moreover, an in-frame deletion that removed most of the afsR coding sequence resulted in loss of Act and Red production, and a marked reduction in the synthesis of the calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA), but only under some (non-permissive) nutritional conditions. Although additional copies of afsR resulted in elevated levels of the actII-ORF4 and redD transcripts, transcription of the pathway-specific regulatory genes under non-permissive conditions was unaffected by deletion of afsR. While afsR may operate independently of the pathway-specific regulatory proteins to influence antibiotic production, the activity of ActII-ORF4 and of RedD under non-permissive conditions could depend on interaction with, or modification by, AfsR.

  15. The IgH locus 3' regulatory region: pulling the strings from behind.

    PubMed

    Pinaud, Eric; Marquet, Marie; Fiancette, Rémi; Péron, Sophie; Vincent-Fabert, Christelle; Denizot, Yves; Cogné, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Antigen receptor gene loci are among the most complex in mammals. The IgH locus, encoding the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) in B-lineage cells, undergoes major transcription-dependent DNA remodeling events, namely V(D)J recombination, Ig class-switch recombination (CSR), and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Various cis-regulatory elements (encompassing promoters, enhancers, and chromatin insulators) recruit multiple nuclear factors in order to ensure IgH locus regulation by tightly orchestrated physical and/or functional interactions. Among major IgH cis-acting regions, the large 3' regulatory region (3'RR) located at the 3' boundary of the locus includes several enhancers and harbors an intriguing quasi-palindromic structure. In this review, we report progress insights made over the past decade in order to describe in more details the structure and functions of IgH 3'RRs in mouse and human. Generation of multiple cellular, transgenic and knock-out models helped out to decipher the function of the IgH 3' regulatory elements in the context of normal and pathologic B cells. Beside its interest in physiology, the challenge of elucidating the locus-wide cross talk between distant cis-regulatory elements might provide useful insights into the mechanisms that mediate oncogene deregulation after chromosomal translocations onto the IgH locus.

  16. Scrutinizing the FTO locus: compelling evidence for a complex, long-range regulatory context.

    PubMed

    Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Almén, Markus Sällman; Schiöth, Helgi B

    2015-11-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a genetic region including the first two introns of the gene encoding FTO have consistently been shown to be the strongest genetic factors influencing body mass index (BMI). However, this same also contains several regulatory DNA elements that affect the expression of IRX3 and IRX5, which respectively, are located approximately 500 kb and 1.2 Mbp downstream from the BMI-associated FTO locus. Through these affected regulatory elements, genetic variation at the FTO locus influences adipocyte development leading to decreased thermogenesis and increased lipid storage. These findings provide a genomic model for the functional implications of genetic variations at this locus, and also demonstrate the importance of accounting for chromatin-chromatin interactions when constructing hypotheses for the mechanisms of trait and disease-associated common genetic variants. Several consortia have generated genome-wide datasets describing different aspects of chromatin biology which can be utilized to predict functionality and propose biologically relevant descriptions of specific DNA regions. Here, we review some of the publically available data resources on genome function and organization that can be used to gain an overview of genetic regions of interest and to generate testable hypotheses for future studies. We use the BMI- and obesity-associated FTO locus as a subject as it poses an illustrative example on the value of these resources. We find that public databases strongly support long-range interactions between regulatory elements in the FTO locus with the IRXB cluster genes IRX3 and IRX5. Chromatin configuration capture data also support interactions across a large region stretching across from the RPGRIP1L gene, FTO and the IRXB gene cluster. PMID:26340902

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3′ Regulatory Region

    PubMed Central

    Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3′ of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3′ RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3′ RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3′ RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3′ RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus. PMID:24795714

  18. Epigenetic Regulation of Individual Modules of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus 3' Regulatory Region.

    PubMed

    Birshtein, Barbara K

    2014-01-01

    The Igh locus undergoes an amazing array of DNA rearrangements and modifications during B cell development. During early stages, the variable region gene is constructed from constituent variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments (VDJ joining). B cells that successfully express an antibody can be activated, leading to somatic hypermutation (SHM) focused on the variable region, and class switch recombination (CSR), which substitutes downstream constant region genes for the originally used Cμ constant region gene. Many investigators, ourselves included, have sought to understand how these processes specifically target the Igh locus and avoid other loci and potential deleterious consequences of malignant transformation. Our laboratory has concentrated on a complex regulatory region (RR) that is located downstream of Cα, the most 3' of the Igh constant region genes. The ~40 kb 3' RR, which is predicted to serve as a downstream major regulator of the Igh locus, contains two distinct segments: an ~28 kb region comprising four enhancers, and an adjacent ~12 kb region containing multiple CTCF and Pax5 binding sites. Analysis of targeted mutations in mice by a number of investigators has concluded that the entire 3' RR enhancer region is essential for SHM and CSR (but not for VDJ joining) and for high levels of expression of multiple isotypes. The CTCF/Pax5 binding region is a candidate for influencing VDJ joining early in B cell development and serving as a potential insulator of the Igh locus. Components of the 3' RR are subject to a variety of epigenetic changes during B cell development, i.e., DNAse I hypersensitivity, histone modifications, and DNA methylation, in association with transcription factor binding. I propose that these changes provide a foundation by which regulatory elements in modules of the 3' RR function by interacting with each other and with target sequences of the Igh locus.

  19. Molecular basis of the pleiotropic phenotype of mice carrying the hypervariable yellow (A{sup hvy}) mutation at the agouti locus

    SciTech Connect

    Argeson, A.C.; Nelson, K.K.; Siracusa, L.D.

    1996-02-01

    The murine agouti locus regulates a switch in pigment synthesis between eumelanin (black/brown pigment) and phaeomelanin (yellow/red pigment) by hair bulb melanocytes. We recently described a spontaneous mutation, hypervariable yellow (A{sup hvy}) and demonstrated that A{sup hvy} is responsible for the largest range of phenotypes yet identified at the agouti locus, producing mice that are obese with yellow coats to mice that are of normal weight with black coats. Here, we show that agouti expression is altered both temporally and spatially in A{sup hvy} mutants. Agouti expression levels are positively correlated with the degree of yellow pigmentation in individual A{sup hvy} mice, consistent with results from other dominant yellow agouti mutations. Sequencing of 5{prime} RACE and genomic PCR products revealed that A{sup hvy} resulted from the integration of an intracisternal A particle (IAP) in an antisense orientation within the 5{prime} untranslated agouti exon 1C. This retrovirus-like element is responsible for deregulating agouti expression in A{sup hvy} mice; agouti expression is correlated with the methylation state of CpG residues in the IAP long terminal repeat as well as in host genomic DNA. In addition, the data suggest that the variable phenotype of A{sup hvy} offspring is influenced in part by the phenotype of their A{sup hvy} female parent. 42 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Fine-mapping analysis revealed complex pleiotropic effect and tissue-specific regulatory mechanism of TNFSF15 in primary biliary cholangitis, Crohn's disease and leprosy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yonghu; Irwanto, Astrid; Toyo-Oka, Licht; Hong, Myunghee; Liu, Hong; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Choi, Hyunchul; Hitomi, Yuki; Yu, Gongqi; Yu, Yongxiang; Bao, Fangfang; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Xian; Yue, Zhenhua; Wang, Honglei; Zhang, Huimin; Kawashima, Minae; Kojima, Kaname; Nagasaki, Masao; Nakamura, Minoru; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Denise, Yosua; Rotzschke, Olaf; Song, Kyuyoung; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Zhang, Furen; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism within the 9q32 locus is linked with increased risk of several diseases, including Crohn's disease (CD), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and leprosy. The most likely disease-causing gene within 9q32 is TNFSF15, which encodes the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF super-family member 15, but it was unknown whether these disparate diseases were associated with the same genetic variance in 9q32, and how variance within this locus might contribute to pathology. Using genetic data from published studies on CD, PBC and leprosy we revealed that bearing a T allele at rs6478108/rs6478109 (r(2) = 1) or rs4979462 was significantly associated with increased risk of CD and decreased risk of leprosy, while the T allele at rs4979462 was associated with significantly increased risk of PBC. In vitro analyses showed that the rs6478109 genotype significantly affected TNFSF15 expression in cells from whole blood of controls, while functional annotation using publicly-available data revealed the broad cell type/tissue-specific regulatory potential of variance at rs6478109 or rs4979462. In summary, we provide evidence that variance within TNFSF15 has the potential to affect cytokine expression across a range of tissues and thereby contribute to protection from infectious diseases such as leprosy, while increasing the risk of immune-mediated diseases including CD and PBC. PMID:27507062

  1. Fine-mapping analysis revealed complex pleiotropic effect and tissue-specific regulatory mechanism of TNFSF15 in primary biliary cholangitis, Crohn’s disease and leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yonghu; Irwanto, Astrid; Toyo-oka, Licht; Hong, Myunghee; Liu, Hong; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Choi, Hyunchul; Hitomi, Yuki; Yu, Gongqi; Yu, Yongxiang; Bao, Fangfang; Wang, Chuan; Fu, Xian; Yue, Zhenhua; Wang, Honglei; Zhang, Huimin; Kawashima, Minae; Kojima, Kaname; Nagasaki, Masao; Nakamura, Minoru; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Ye, Byong Duk; Denise, Yosua; Rotzschke, Olaf; Song, Kyuyoung; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Zhang, Furen; Liu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Genetic polymorphism within the 9q32 locus is linked with increased risk of several diseases, including Crohn’s disease (CD), primary biliary cholangitis (PBC) and leprosy. The most likely disease-causing gene within 9q32 is TNFSF15, which encodes the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF super-family member 15, but it was unknown whether these disparate diseases were associated with the same genetic variance in 9q32, and how variance within this locus might contribute to pathology. Using genetic data from published studies on CD, PBC and leprosy we revealed that bearing a T allele at rs6478108/rs6478109 (r2 = 1) or rs4979462 was significantly associated with increased risk of CD and decreased risk of leprosy, while the T allele at rs4979462 was associated with significantly increased risk of PBC. In vitro analyses showed that the rs6478109 genotype significantly affected TNFSF15 expression in cells from whole blood of controls, while functional annotation using publicly-available data revealed the broad cell type/tissue-specific regulatory potential of variance at rs6478109 or rs4979462. In summary, we provide evidence that variance within TNFSF15 has the potential to affect cytokine expression across a range of tissues and thereby contribute to protection from infectious diseases such as leprosy, while increasing the risk of immune-mediated diseases including CD and PBC. PMID:27507062

  2. Epigenetic allelic states of a maize transcriptional regulatory locus exhibit overdominant gene action.

    PubMed Central

    Hollick, J B; Chandler, V L

    1998-01-01

    Using alleles of the maize purple plant locus (pl), which encodes a transcriptional regulator of anthocyanin pigment synthesis, we describe a case of single-locus heterosis, or overdominance, where the heterozygote displays a phenotype that is greater than either homozygote. The Pl-Rhoades (Pl-Rh) allele is subject to epigenetic changes in gene expression, resulting in quantitatively distinct expression states. Allelic states with low-expression levels, designated Pl'-mahogany (Pl'-mah), are dominant to the high-expression state of Pl-Rh. Pl'-mah states retain low-expression levels in subsequent generations when homozygous or heterozygous with Pl-Rh. However, Pl'-mah alleles frequently exhibit higher expression levels when heterozygous with other pl alleles; illustrating an overdominant allelic relationship. Higher expression levels are also observed when Pl'-mah is hemizygous. These results suggest that persistent allelic interactions between Pl'-mah and Pl-Rh are required to maintain the low-expression state and that other pl alleles are missing sequences required for this interaction. The Pl-Rh state can be sexually transmitted from Pl'-mah/pl heterozygotes, but not from Pl'-mah hemizygotes, suggesting that fixation of the high-expression state may involve synapsis. The existence of such allele-dependent regulatory mechanisms implicates a novel importance of allele polymorphisms in the genesis and maintenance of genetic variation. PMID:9755217

  3. The 3’-Jα Region of the TCRα Locus Bears Gene Regulatory Activity in Thymic and Peripheral T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kučerová-Levisohn, Martina; Knirr, Stefan; Mejia, Rosa I.; Ortiz, Benjamin D.

    2015-01-01

    Much progress has been made in understanding the important cis-mediated controls on mouse TCRα gene function, including identification of the Eα enhancer and TCRα locus control region (LCR). Nevertheless, previous data have suggested that other cis-regulatory elements may reside in the locus outside of the Eα/LCR. Based on prior findings, we hypothesized the existence of gene regulatory elements in a 3.9-kb region 5’ of the Cα exons. Using DNase hypersensitivity assays and TCRα BAC reporter transgenes in mice, we detected gene regulatory activity within this 3.9-kb region. This region is active in both thymic and peripheral T cells, and selectively affects upstream, but not downstream, gene expression. Together, these data indicate the existence of a novel cis-acting regulatory complex that contributes to TCRα transgene expression in vivo. The active chromatin sites we discovered within this region would remain in the locus after TCRα gene rearrangement, and thus may contribute to endogenous TCRα gene activity, particularly in peripheral T cells, where the Eα element has been found to be inactive. PMID:26177549

  4. Locus-wide identification of EGR2/Krox20 regulatory targets in myelin genes

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung-Wook; Srinivasan, Rajini; Jones, Erin A.; Sun, Guannan; Keles, Sunduz; Krueger, Courtney; Chang, Li-Wei; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Svaren, John

    2011-01-01

    Myelination of peripheral nerves by Schwann cells depends upon a gene regulatory network controlled by Egr2/Krox20, which is specifically required for Schwann cells to initiate and maintain myelination. To elucidate the mechanism by which Egr2 regulates gene expression during myelination, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis on myelinating rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The resulting samples were applied to a tiled microarray consisting of a broad spectrum of genes that are activated or repressed in Egr2-deficient mice. The results show extensive binding within myelin-associated genes, as well as some genes that become repressed in myelinating Schwann cells. Many of the Egr2 peaks coincide with regions of open chromatin, which is a marker of enhancer regions. In addition, further analysis showed that there is substantial colocalization of Egr2 binding with Sox10, a transcription factor required for Schwann cell specification and other stages of Schwann cell development. Finally, we have found that Egr2 binds to promoters of several lipid biosynthetic genes, which is consistent with their dramatic upregulation during the formation of lipid-rich myelin. Overall, this analysis provides a locus-wide profile of Egr2 binding patterns in major myelin-associated genes using myelinating peripheral nerve. PMID:21044070

  5. Identification and Potential Regulatory Properties of Evolutionary Conserved Regions (ECRs) at the Schizophrenia-Associated MIR137 Locus.

    PubMed

    Gianfrancesco, Olympia; Griffiths, Daniel; Myers, Paul; Collier, David A; Bubb, Vivien J; Quinn, John P

    2016-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a region at chromosome 1p21.3, containing the microRNA MIR137, to be among the most significant associations for schizophrenia. However, the mechanism by which genetic variation at this locus increases risk of schizophrenia is unknown. Identifying key regulatory regions around MIR137 is crucial to understanding the potential role of this gene in the aetiology of psychiatric disorders. Through alignment of vertebrate genomes, we identified seven non-coding regions at the MIR137 locus with conservation comparable to exons (>70 %). Bioinformatic analysis using the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium GWAS dataset for schizophrenia showed five of the ECRs to have genome-wide significant SNPs in or adjacent to their sequence. Analysis of available datasets on chromatin marks and histone modification data showed that three of the ECRs were predicted to be functional in the human brain, and three in development. In vitro analysis of ECR activity using reporter gene assays showed that all seven of the selected ECRs displayed transcriptional regulatory activity in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. This data suggests a regulatory role in the developing and adult brain for these highly conserved regions at the MIR137 schizophrenia-associated locus and further that these domains could act individually or synergistically to regulate levels of MIR137 expression. PMID:27525637

  6. Molecular characterization of aflR, a regulatory locus for aflatoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Woloshuk, C P; Foutz, K R; Brewer, J F; Bhatnagar, D; Cleveland, T E; Payne, G A

    1994-01-01

    Aflatoxins belong to a family of decaketides that are produced as secondary metabolites by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. The aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway involves several enzymatic steps that appear to be regulated by the afl2 gene in A. flavus and the apa2 gene in A. parasiticus. Several lines of evidence indicate that these two genes are homologous. The DNA sequences of the two genes are highly similar, they both are involved in the regulation of aflatoxin biosynthesis, and apa2 can complement the afl2 mutation in A. flavus. Because of these similarities, we propose that these two genes are homologs, and because of the ability of these genes to regulate aflatoxin biosynthesis, we suggest that they be designated aflR. We report here the further characterization of aflR from A. flavus and show that aflR codes for a 2,078-bp transcript with an open reading frame of 1,311 nucleotides that codes for 437 amino acids and a putative protein of 46,679 daltons. Analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence indicated that the polypeptide contains a zinc cluster motif between amino acid positions 29 and 56. This region contains the consensus sequence Cys-Xaa2-Cys-Xaa6-Cys-Xaa6-Cys-Xaa2-Cys-Xaa6+ ++-Cys. This motif has been found in several fungal transcriptional regulatory proteins. DNA hybridization of the aflR gene with genomic digests of seven polyketide-producing fungi revealed similar sequences in three other species related to A. flavus: A. parasiticus, A. oryzae, and A. sojae. Finally, we present evidence for an antisense transcript (aflRas) derived from the opposite strand of aflR, suggesting that the aflR locus involves some form of antisense regulation. Images PMID:8074521

  7. Genomic position effects lead to an inefficient reorganization of nucleosomes in the 5'-regulatory region of the chicken lysozyme locus in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, M C; Krüger, G; Bonifer, C

    1996-01-01

    The chicken lysozyme locus is gradually activated during macrophage development exhibiting a specific chromatin structure with each differentiation state. Its small size and the extensive characterization of its cis-regulatory elements allows us to study even subtle changes in chromatin structure of the entire gene locus during transcriptional activation. Tissue-specific and position independent expression of the lysozyme locus in transgenic mice requires the cooperation of all cis-regulatory elements. In order to elucidate further the molecular basis of locus activation, we have determined nucleosome positions within the complete 5'-regulatory region of the chicken lysozyme locus in chicken myeloid cell lines and transgenic mice. Each cis-regulatory element develops its unique nucleosomal structure and each one remodels chromatin differently. The nucleosomal organization of the endogenous gene in chicken cell lines and the transgene in the mouse turned out to be identical, enabling us to study the influence of cis-regulatory deletions on the development of an active chromatin structure in transgenic mice. Transgenes with a deletion of an important cis-regulatory element show an impediment in nucleosome reorganization as compared with the complete lysozyme locus. We demonstrate that multicopy transgene-clusters in position dependently expressing mouse lines exhibit a heterogeneous chromatin organization. PMID:8628676

  8. Multiple Hepatic Regulatory Variants at the GALNT2 GWAS Locus Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Roman, Tamara S.; Marvelle, Amanda F.; Fogarty, Marie P.; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Gonzalez, Arlene J.; Buchkovich, Martin L.; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Jackson, Anne U.; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Sethupathy, Praveen; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S.; Laakso, Markku; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 150 loci associated with blood lipid and cholesterol levels; however, the functional and molecular mechanisms for many associations are unknown. We examined the functional regulatory effects of candidate variants at the GALNT2 locus associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Fine-mapping and conditional analyses in the METSIM study identified a single locus harboring 25 noncoding variants (r2 > 0.7 with the lead GWAS variants) strongly associated with total cholesterol in medium-sized HDL (e.g., rs17315646, p = 3.5 × 10−12). We used luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells to test all 25 variants for allelic differences in regulatory enhancer activity. rs2281721 showed allelic differences in transcriptional activity (75-fold [T] versus 27-fold [C] more than the empty-vector control), as did a separate 780-bp segment containing rs4846913, rs2144300, and rs6143660 (49-fold [AT– haplotype] versus 16-fold [CC+ haplotype] more). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we observed differential CEBPB binding to rs4846913, and we confirmed this binding in a native chromatin context by performing chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines of differing genotypes. Additionally, sequence reads in HepG2 DNase-I-hypersensitivity and CEBPB ChIP-seq signals spanning rs4846913 showed significant allelic imbalance. Allelic-expression-imbalance assays performed with RNA from primary human hepatocyte samples and expression-quantitative-trait-locus (eQTL) data in human subcutaneous adipose tissue samples confirmed that alleles associated with increased HDL-C are associated with a modest increase in GALNT2 expression. Together, these data suggest that at least rs4846913 and rs2281721 play key roles in influencing GALNT2 expression at this HDL-C locus. PMID:26637976

  9. Multiple Hepatic Regulatory Variants at the GALNT2 GWAS Locus Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Roman, Tamara S; Marvelle, Amanda F; Fogarty, Marie P; Vadlamudi, Swarooparani; Gonzalez, Arlene J; Buchkovich, Martin L; Huyghe, Jeroen R; Fuchsberger, Christian; Jackson, Anne U; Wu, Ying; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J; Gaulton, Kyle J; Sethupathy, Praveen; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S; Laakso, Markku; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L

    2015-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified more than 150 loci associated with blood lipid and cholesterol levels; however, the functional and molecular mechanisms for many associations are unknown. We examined the functional regulatory effects of candidate variants at the GALNT2 locus associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Fine-mapping and conditional analyses in the METSIM study identified a single locus harboring 25 noncoding variants (r(2) > 0.7 with the lead GWAS variants) strongly associated with total cholesterol in medium-sized HDL (e.g., rs17315646, p = 3.5 × 10(-12)). We used luciferase reporter assays in HepG2 cells to test all 25 variants for allelic differences in regulatory enhancer activity. rs2281721 showed allelic differences in transcriptional activity (75-fold [T] versus 27-fold [C] more than the empty-vector control), as did a separate 780-bp segment containing rs4846913, rs2144300, and rs6143660 (49-fold [AT(-) haplotype] versus 16-fold [CC(+) haplotype] more). Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we observed differential CEBPB binding to rs4846913, and we confirmed this binding in a native chromatin context by performing chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays in HepG2 and Huh-7 cell lines of differing genotypes. Additionally, sequence reads in HepG2 DNase-I-hypersensitivity and CEBPB ChIP-seq signals spanning rs4846913 showed significant allelic imbalance. Allelic-expression-imbalance assays performed with RNA from primary human hepatocyte samples and expression-quantitative-trait-locus (eQTL) data in human subcutaneous adipose tissue samples confirmed that alleles associated with increased HDL-C are associated with a modest increase in GALNT2 expression. Together, these data suggest that at least rs4846913 and rs2281721 play key roles in influencing GALNT2 expression at this HDL-C locus. PMID:26637976

  10. New cis-regulatory elements in the Rht-D1b locus region of wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifteen gene-containing BACs with accumulated length of 1.82-Mb from the Rht-D1b locus region weresequenced and compared in detail with the orthologous regions of rice, sorghum, and maize. Our results show that Rht-D1b represents a conserved genomic region as implied by high gene sequence identity...

  11. Differential contribution of cis-regulatory elements to higher order chromatin structure and expression of the CFTR locus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Kerschner, Jenny L.; Gosalia, Nehal; Neems, Daniel; Gorsic, Lidija K.; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Kosak, Steven T.; Leir, Shih-Hsing; Harris, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Higher order chromatin structure establishes domains that organize the genome and coordinate gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling transcription of individual loci within a topological domain (TAD) are not fully understood. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene provides a paradigm for investigating these mechanisms. CFTR occupies a TAD bordered by CTCF/cohesin binding sites within which are cell-type-selective cis-regulatory elements for the locus. We showed previously that intronic and extragenic enhancers, when occupied by specific transcription factors, are recruited to the CFTR promoter by a looping mechanism to drive gene expression. Here we use a combination of CRISPR/Cas9 editing of cis-regulatory elements and siRNA-mediated depletion of architectural proteins to determine the relative contribution of structural elements and enhancers to the higher order structure and expression of the CFTR locus. We found the boundaries of the CFTR TAD are conserved among diverse cell types and are dependent on CTCF and cohesin complex. Removal of an upstream CTCF-binding insulator alters the interaction profile, but has little effect on CFTR expression. Within the TAD, intronic enhancers recruit cell-type selective transcription factors and deletion of a pivotal enhancer element dramatically decreases CFTR expression, but has minor effect on its 3D structure. PMID:26673704

  12. Nucleotide sequence of the regulatory locus controlling expression of bacterial genes for bioluminescence.

    PubMed Central

    Engebrecht, J; Silverman, M

    1987-01-01

    Production of light by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and by recombinant hosts containing cloned lux genes is controlled by the density of the culture. Density-dependent regulation of lux gene expression has been shown to require a locus consisting of the luxR and luxI genes and two closely linked divergent promoters. As part of a genetic analysis to understand the regulation of bioluminescence, we have sequenced the region of DNA containing this control circuit. Open reading frames corresponding to luxR and luxI were identified; transcription start sites were defined by S1 nuclease mapping and sequences resembling promoter elements were located. Images PMID:3697093

  13. The HAP3 regulatory locus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes divergent overlapping transcripts.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, S; Pinkham, J; Wei, R; Miller, R; Guarente, L

    1988-01-01

    Activation of the CYC1 upstream activation site, UAS2, and transcription of several other genes encoding respiratory functions requires the product of the regulatory gene HAP2. We report here the isolation and characterization of a second UAS2 regulatory gene, HAP3. Like mutations in HAP2, a mutation in HAP3 abolishes the activity of UAS2 and prevents growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. The HAP3 gene was cloned and, surprisingly, was found to encode two divergently transcribed, overlapping transcripts: a 570-base RNA and a 3-kilobase (kb) RNA. Chromosomal disruption experiments defined the critical region for HAP3 function to a 1.3-kb segment in which the two transcripts overlap. Analysis of the HAP3 DNA sequence showed that the 570-base transcript could encode a protein of 144 amino acids. Synthesis of the 144-amino-acid protein under regulatory control in vivo demonstrated that this protein is essential for activity of UAS2 as well as for growth on nonfermentable carbon sources. The largest open reading frame in the critical region of the 3-kb transcript is only 86 amino acids. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the 86-amino-acid open reading frame was not involved in UAS2 activity. The possible role of this 3-kb antisense RNA in HAP3 expression or function is discussed. Images PMID:2832732

  14. Transposon tagging and molecular analysis of the maize regulatory locus opaque-2

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, R.J.; Burr, F.A.; Burr, B.

    1987-11-13

    Genetic analyses suggested that the opaque-2 (o2) locus in maize acts as a positive, transacting, transcriptional activator of the zein seed storage-protein genes. Because isolation of the gene is requisite to understanding the molecular details of this regulation, transposon mutagensis with the transposable element suppressor-mutator (Spm) was carried out, and three mutable o2 alleles were obtained. One of these alleles contained an 8.3-kilobase autonomous Spm, another a 6.8-kilobase nonautonomous Spm, and the third an unidentified transposon that is unrelated to Spm. A DNA sequence flanking the autonomous Spm insertion was verified to be o2-specific and provided a probe to clone a wild-type allele. Northern blots indicated that the gene is expressed in wild-type endosperm but not in leaf tissues or in endosperms homozygous for a mutant allele of the O2 gene. A transcript was detected in endosperms homozygous for mutations at opaque-7 and floury-2, an indication that O2 expression is independent of these two other putative regulators of zein synthesis.

  15. Regulatory elements necessary for termination of transcription within the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene locus

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, B.B.

    1992-01-01

    Previous experimentation demonstrated that regulation of the IgM only phenotype in both pre-B and immature B cells was primarily at the transcriptional level. Expression of IgD mRNA involves transcription of the entire 29 kilobase rearranged [mu]-[delta] locus. Mature B cells transcribe the [beta] exons at approximately half the level that they transcribe the [delta] gene. Early B cells however, transcribe the [mu] gene with approximately 90% more efficiency than they do the [delta] gene. Specifically, early B cells show a transcription termination event occurring within a 1 kilobase region of the [mu]-[delta] intron. This dissertation analyzes the sequence elements necessary to encode the transcription termination event within the [mu]-[delta] intron. This work shows that the termination motif consists of specific sequences within the [mu]m poly(A) site as well as a region of the [mu]-[delta] intron contained within a 1200 base pair fragment. The 1200 base pair fragment extends from the Pst I site within the intron and ends just prior to the C[delta]1 exon. This fragment contains a 162 base pair unique sequence inverted repeat (USIR). Furthermore, the [mu]m site is specifically required because the [mu]s site was unable to substitute, despite extensive usage. In addition, the USIR-containing intron functions in an orientation-dependent manner. Analysis of this termination motif in a variety of lymphoid and non-lymphoid cells suggests that this motif is an intrinsic polymerase II termination motif. This implies that transcription termination in early B cells is by a default model and that active regulation of this motif involves an anti-termination event in mature B cells.

  16. A survey of ancient conserved non-coding elements in the PAX6 locus reveals a landscape of interdigitated cis-regulatory archipelagos.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Shipra; Monahan, Jack; Ravi, Vydianathan; Gautier, Philippe; Murdoch, Emma; Brenner, Sydney; van Heyningen, Veronica; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Kleinjan, Dirk A

    2014-03-15

    Biological differences between cell types and developmental processes are characterised by differences in gene expression profiles. Gene-distal enhancers are key components of the regulatory networks that specify the tissue-specific expression patterns driving embryonic development and cell fate decisions, and variations in their sequences are a major contributor to genetic disease and disease susceptibility. Despite advances in the methods for discovery of putative cis-regulatory sequences, characterisation of their spatio-temporal enhancer activities in a mammalian model system remains a major bottle-neck. We employed a strategy that combines gnathostome sequence conservation with transgenic mouse and zebrafish reporter assays to survey the genomic locus of the developmental control gene PAX6 for the presence of novel cis-regulatory elements. Sequence comparison between human and the cartilaginous elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii) revealed several ancient gnathostome conserved non-coding elements (agCNEs) dispersed widely throughout the PAX6 locus, extending the range of the known PAX6 cis-regulatory landscape to contain the full upstream PAX6-RCN1 intergenic region. Our data indicates that ancient conserved regulatory sequences can be tested effectively in transgenic zebrafish even when not conserved in zebrafish themselves. The strategy also allows efficient dissection of compound regulatory regions previously assessed in transgenic mice. Remarkable overlap in expression patterns driven by sets of agCNEs indicates that PAX6 resides in a landscape of multiple tissue-specific regulatory archipelagos. PMID:24440152

  17. Pleiotropic functions of a conserved insect-specific Hox peptide motif.

    PubMed

    Hittinger, Chris Todd; Stern, David L; Carroll, Sean B

    2005-12-01

    The proteins that regulate developmental processes in animals have generally been well conserved during evolution. A few cases are known where protein activities have functionally evolved. These rare examples raise the issue of how highly conserved regulatory proteins with many roles evolve new functions while maintaining old functions. We have investigated this by analyzing the function of the ;QA' peptide motif of the Hox protein Ultrabithorax (Ubx), a motif that has been conserved throughout insect evolution since its establishment early in the lineage. We precisely deleted the QA motif at the endogenous locus via allelic replacement in Drosophila melanogaster. Although the QA motif was originally characterized as involved in the repression of limb formation, we have found that it is highly pleiotropic. Curiously, deleting the QA motif had strong effects in some tissues while barely affecting others, suggesting that QA function is preferentially required for a subset of Ubx target genes. QA deletion homozygotes had a normal complement of limbs, but, at reduced doses of Ubx and the abdominal-A (abd-A) Hox gene, ectopic limb primordia and adult abdominal limbs formed when the QA motif was absent. These results show that redundancy and the additive contributions of activity-regulating peptide motifs play important roles in moderating the phenotypic consequences of Hox protein evolution, and that pleiotropic peptide motifs that contribute quantitatively to several functions are subject to intense purifying selection.

  18. Cis-regulatory Changes at FLOWERING LOCUS T Mediate Natural Variation in Flowering Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Warthmann, Norman; Michael, Todd P.; Lempe, Janne; Sureshkumar, Sridevi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Maloof, Julin N.; Borevitz, Justin O.; Chory, Joanne; Weigel, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Flowering time, a critical adaptive trait, is modulated by several environmental cues. These external signals converge on a small set of genes that in turn mediate the flowering response. Mutant analysis and subsequent molecular studies have revealed that one of these integrator genes, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), responds to photoperiod and temperature cues, two environmental parameters that greatly influence flowering time. As the central player in the transition to flowering, the protein coding sequence of FT and its function are highly conserved across species. Using QTL mapping with a new advanced intercross-recombinant inbred line (AI-RIL) population, we show that a QTL tightly linked to FT contributes to natural variation in the flowering response to the combined effects of photoperiod and ambient temperature. Using heterogeneous inbred families (HIF) and introgression lines, we fine map the QTL to a 6.7 kb fragment in the FT promoter. We confirm by quantitative complementation that FT has differential activity in the two parental strains. Further support for FT underlying the QTL comes from a new approach, quantitative knockdown with artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Consistent with the causal sequence polymorphism being in the promoter, we find that the QTL affects FT expression. Taken together, these results indicate that allelic variation at pathway integrator genes such as FT can underlie phenotypic variability and that this may be achieved through cis-regulatory changes. PMID:19652183

  19. Identification of the Staphylococcus aureus vfrAB Operon, a Novel Virulence Factor Regulatory Locus

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Seth M.; Hall, Pamela R.; Bayles, Kenneth W.

    2014-01-01

    During a screen of the Nebraska Transposon Mutant Library, we identified 71 mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus genome that altered hemolysis on blood agar medium. Although many of these mutations disrupted genes known to affect the production of alpha-hemolysin, two of them were associated with an apparent operon, designated vfrAB, that had not been characterized previously. Interestingly, a ΔvfrB mutant exhibited only minor effects on the transcription of the hla gene, encoding alpha-hemolysin, when grown in broth, as well as on RNAIII, a posttranscriptional regulatory RNA important for alpha-hemolysin translation, suggesting that VfrB may function at the posttranscriptional level. Indeed, a ΔvfrB mutant had increased aur and sspAB protease expression under these conditions. However, disruption of the known secreted proteases in the ΔvfrB mutant did not restore hemolytic activity in the ΔvfrB mutant on blood agar. Further analysis revealed that, in contrast to the minor effects of VfrB on hla transcription when strains were cultured in liquid media, the level of hla transcription was decreased 50-fold in the absence of VfrB on solid media. These results demonstrate that while VfrB represses protease expression when strains are grown in broth, hla regulation is highly responsive to factors associated with growth on solid media. Intriguingly, the ΔvfrB mutant displayed increased pathogenesis in a model of S. aureus dermonecrosis, further highlighting the complexity of VfrB-dependent virulence regulation. The results of this study describe a phenotype associated with a class of highly conserved yet uncharacterized proteins found in Gram-positive bacteria, and they shed new light on the regulation of virulence factors necessary for S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:24549328

  20. Identification of the Staphylococcus aureus vfrAB operon, a novel virulence factor regulatory locus.

    PubMed

    Bose, Jeffrey L; Daly, Seth M; Hall, Pamela R; Bayles, Kenneth W

    2014-05-01

    During a screen of the Nebraska Transposon Mutant Library, we identified 71 mutations in the Staphylococcus aureus genome that altered hemolysis on blood agar medium. Although many of these mutations disrupted genes known to affect the production of alpha-hemolysin, two of them were associated with an apparent operon, designated vfrAB, that had not been characterized previously. Interestingly, a ΔvfrB mutant exhibited only minor effects on the transcription of the hla gene, encoding alpha-hemolysin, when grown in broth, as well as on RNAIII, a posttranscriptional regulatory RNA important for alpha-hemolysin translation, suggesting that VfrB may function at the posttranscriptional level. Indeed, a ΔvfrB mutant had increased aur and sspAB protease expression under these conditions. However, disruption of the known secreted proteases in the ΔvfrB mutant did not restore hemolytic activity in the ΔvfrB mutant on blood agar. Further analysis revealed that, in contrast to the minor effects of VfrB on hla transcription when strains were cultured in liquid media, the level of hla transcription was decreased 50-fold in the absence of VfrB on solid media. These results demonstrate that while VfrB represses protease expression when strains are grown in broth, hla regulation is highly responsive to factors associated with growth on solid media. Intriguingly, the ΔvfrB mutant displayed increased pathogenesis in a model of S. aureus dermonecrosis, further highlighting the complexity of VfrB-dependent virulence regulation. The results of this study describe a phenotype associated with a class of highly conserved yet uncharacterized proteins found in Gram-positive bacteria, and they shed new light on the regulation of virulence factors necessary for S. aureus pathogenesis. PMID:24549328

  1. DNA sequence and translational product of a new nodulation-regulatory locus: syrM has sequence similarity to NodD proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Barnett, M J; Long, S R

    1990-01-01

    Rhizobium meliloti nodulation (nod) genes are expressed when activated by trans-acting proteins in the NodD family. The nodD1 and nodD2 gene products activate nod promoters when cells are exposed to plant-synthesized signal molecules. Alternatively, the same nod promoters are activated by the nodD3 gene when nodD3 is carried in trans along with a closely linked global regulatory locus, syrM (symbiotic regulator) (J. T. Mulligan and S. R. Long, Genetics 122:7-18, 1989). In this article we report the nucleotide sequence of a 2.6-kilobase SphI fragment from R. meliloti SU47 containing syrM. Expression from this locus was confirmed by using in vitro transcription-translation assays. The open reading frame encoded a protein of either 33 or 36 kilodaltons whose sequence shows similarity to NodD regulatory proteins. Images PMID:2361944

  2. Flanking regulatory sequences of the locus encoding the murine GDNF receptor, c-ret, directs lac Z (beta-galactosidase) expression in developing somatosensory system.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, M; Waxman, S G; Wood, J N; Pachnis, V

    2001-11-01

    RET forms the catalytic component within the receptor complex that transmits signals from the GDNF family of neurotrophic factors. To study the mechanisms regulating the cell-type specific expression of this gene, we have cloned and characterised the murine c-ret locus. A cosmid contig comprising approximately 60 kb of the mouse genome encompassing the entire structural gene and flanking sequences have been isolated and the transcription initiation site identified and promoter characterised. The murine c-ret promoter lacks a TATA initiation motif and has GC enriched DNA sequences reminiscent of CpG islands. Analysis of transgenic mice lines bearing the Lac Z (beta-galactosidase) reporter gene under the control of 5' flanking sequences show modularity in the organisation of cis-regulatory domains within the locus. Cloned 5' flanking sequences comprise a distal regulatory domain directing Lac Z expression at the primitive streak, lateral mesoderm and facial ganglia and a proximal sensory neurones specific regulatory domain inducing Lac Z expression primarily within the developing somatosensory system. The spatial and temporal progression of transgene expression precisely recapitulates endogenous gene expression in developing sensory ganglia including its induction in postnatal Isolectin B4 binding nociceptive neurones. PMID:11747074

  3. Distribution, evolution, and diversity of retrotransposons at the flamenco locus reflect the regulatory properties of piRNA clusters.

    PubMed

    Zanni, Vanessa; Eymery, Angéline; Coiffet, Michael; Zytnicki, Matthias; Luyten, Isabelle; Quesneville, Hadi; Vaury, Chantal; Jensen, Silke

    2013-12-01

    Most of our understanding of Drosophila heterochromatin structure and evolution has come from the annotation of heterochromatin from the isogenic y; cn bw sp strain. However, almost nothing is known about the heterochromatin's structural dynamics and evolution. Here, we focus on a 180-kb heterochromatic locus producing Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNA cluster), the flamenco (flam) locus, known to be responsible for the control of at least three transposable elements (TEs). We report its detailed structure in three different Drosophila lines chosen according to their capacity to repress or not to repress the expression of two retrotransposons named ZAM and Idefix, and we show that they display high structural diversity. Numerous rearrangements due to homologous and nonhomologous recombination, deletions and segmental duplications, and loss and gain of TEs are diverse sources of active genomic variation at this locus. Notably, we evidence a correlation between the presence of ZAM and Idefix in this piRNA cluster and their silencing. They are absent from flam in the strain where they are derepressed. We show that, unexpectedly, more than half of the flam locus results from recent TE insertions and that most of the elements concerned are prone to horizontal transfer between species of the melanogaster subgroup. We build a model showing how such high and constant dynamics of a piRNA master locus open the way to continual emergence of new patterns of piRNA biogenesis leading to changes in the level of transposition control. PMID:24248389

  4. Functional and molecular characterization of the transcriptional regulatory region of Tcp-10bt, a testes-expressed gene from the t complex responder locus.

    PubMed

    Ewulonu, U K; Buratynski, T J; Schimenti, J C

    1993-01-01

    Mouse t haplotypes contain several mutant alleles that disrupt spermatogenesis. Their phenotypes include sterility, reduced fertility and transmission ratio distortion (TRD). The substantial genetic analyses of these mutant alleles, coupled with intensive physical characterization of the t complex, provides a fertile ground for identifying and understanding genes essential to male gametogenesis. The t complex responder (Tcr) locus plays a central role in this process, interacting with other t haplotype-encoded genes to mediate TRD. A candidate responder gene, Tcp-10bt, has been cloned and subjected to molecular characterization. Here, we define the transcriptional regulatory regions of this gene in transgenic mice. A 1.6 kb (but not 0.6 kb) DNA fragment upstream of the transcription start site contains all the regulatory signals for appropriate temporal and germ cell-specific expression of this gene. Two smaller fragments within this region bound specifically to nuclear factor(s) from germ cell protein extracts in gel shift assays. This work is a step towards understanding the mechanism of Tcp-10bt regulated expression and may ultimately help reveal a common regulatory pathway shared by other similarly expressed spermatogenic genes. PMID:8223262

  5. Phylogenetic divergence of CD47 interactions with human signal regulatory protein alpha reveals locus of species specificity. Implications for the binding site.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2007-01-19

    Cell-cell interactions between ubiquitously expressed integrin-associated protein (CD47) and its counterreceptor signal regulatory protein (SIRPalpha) on phagocytes regulate a wide range of adhesive signaling processes, including the inhibition of phagocytosis as documented in mice. We show that CD47-SIRPalpha binding interactions are different between mice and humans, and we exploit phylogenetic divergence to identify the species-specific binding locus on the immunoglobulin domain of human CD47. All of the studies are conducted in the physiological context of membrane protein display on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Novel quantitative flow cytometry analyses with CD47-green fluorescent protein and soluble human SIRPalpha as a probe show that neither human CD47 nor SIRPalpha requires glycosylation for interaction. Human CD47-expressing CHO cells spread rapidly on SIRPalpha-coated glass surfaces, correlating well with the spreading of primary human T cells. In contrast, CHO cells expressing mouse CD47 spread minimally and show equally weak binding to soluble human SIRPalpha. Further phylogenetic analyses and multisite substitutions of the CD47 Ig domain show that human to cow mutation of a cluster of seven residues on adjacent strands near the middle of the domain decreases the association constant for human SIRPalpha to about one-third that of human CD47. Direct tests of cell-cell adhesion between human monocytes and CD47-displaying CHO cells affirm the species specificity as well as the importance of the newly identified binding locus in cell-cell interactions.

  6. Crosstalk between bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells through a glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper/developmental endothelial locus-1-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Nianlan; Baban, Babak; Isales, Carlos M.; Shi, Xing-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow is a reservoir for regulatory T (Treg) cells, but how Treg cells are regulated in that environment remains poorly understood. We show that expression of glucocorticoid (GC)-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in bone marrow mesenchymal lineage cells or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) increases the production of Treg cells via a mechanism involving the up-regulation of developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), an endogenous leukocyte-endothelial adhesion inhibitor. We found that the expression of Del-1 is increased ∼4-fold in the bone tissues of GILZ transgenic (Tg) mice, and this increase is coupled with a significant increase in the production of IL-10 (2.80 vs. 0.83) and decrease in the production of IL-6 (0.80 vs. 2.33) and IL-12 (0.25 vs. 1.67). We also show that GILZ-expressing BMSCs present antigen in a way that favors Treg cells. These results indicate that GILZ plays a critical role mediating the crosstalk between BMSCs and Treg in the bone marrow microenvironment. These data, together with our previous findings that overexpression of GILZ in BMSCs antagonizes TNF-α-elicited inflammatory responses, suggest that GILZ plays important roles in bone-immune cell communication and BMSC immune suppressive functions.—Yang, N., Baban, B., Isales, C. M., Shi, X.-M. Crosstalk between bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory T cells through a glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper/developmental endothelial locus-1-dependent mechanism. PMID:26038125

  7. Germline deletion of Igh 3′ regulatory region elements hs5-7 affects B cell specific regulation, rearrangement and insulation of the Igh locus1

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Sabrina A.; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Hassan, Rabih; Ju, Zhongliang; Roa, Sergio; Chatterjee, Sanjukta; Werling, Uwe; Hou, Harry; Will, Britta; Steidl, Ulrich; Scharff, Matthew; Edelman, Winfried; Feeney, Ann J.; Birshtein, Barbara K.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory elements located within a ~28 kb region 3′ of the Igh gene cluster (3′ regulatory region, 3′ RR) are required for class switch recombination and for high levels of IgH expression in plasma cells. We previously defined novel DNase I hypersensitive (hs) sites, i.e. hs5-7, immediately downstream of this region. Hs5-7 contains a high density of binding sites for CTCF, a zinc finger protein associated with mammalian insulator activity and is an anchor for interactions with CTCF sites flanking the DH region. To test the function of hs5-7, we have generated mice with an 8 kb deletion encompassing all three hs elements. B cells from hs5-7 KO mice showed a modest increase in expression of the nearest downstream gene. In addition, Igh alleles in hs5-7 KO mice were in a less contracted configuration compared to WT Igh alleles and showed a two-fold increase in the usage of proximal VH7183 gene families. Hs5-7 KO mice were essentially indistinguishable from wild type mice in B cell development, allelic regulation, class switch recombination, and chromosomal looping. We conclude that hs5-7--a high-density CTCF binding region at the 3′ end of the Igh locus--impacts usage of VH regions as far as 500 kb away. PMID:22345664

  8. NF-κB and BRG1 bind a distal regulatory element in the IL-3/GM-CSF locus.

    PubMed

    Wurster, Andrea L; Precht, Patricia; Pazin, Michael J

    2011-09-01

    We investigated gene regulation at the IL-3/GM-CSF gene cluster. We found BRG1, a SWI/SNF remodeling ATPase, bound a distal element, CNSa. BRG1 binding was strongest in differentiated, stimulated T helper cells, paralleling IL-3 and GM-CSF expression. Depletion of BRG1 reduced IL-3 and GM-CSF transcription. BAF-specific SWI/SNF subunits bound to this locus and regulated IL-3 expression. CNSa was in closed chromatin in fibroblasts, open chromatin in differentiated T helper cells, and moderately open chromatin in naïve (undifferentiated) T helper cells; BRG1 was required for the most open state. CNSa increased transcription of a reporter in an episomal expression system, in a BRG1-dependent manner. The NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 bound CNSa in activated T helper cells. Inhibition of NF-κB blocked BRG1 binding to CNSa, chromatin opening at CNSa, and activation of IL-3 and GM-CSF. Together, these findings suggest CNSa is a distal enhancer that binds BRG1 and NF-κB.

  9. NF-κB and BRG1 bind a distal regulatory element in the IL-3/GM-CSF locus

    PubMed Central

    Wurster, Andrea L.; Precht, Patricia; Pazin, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated gene regulation at the IL-3/GM-CSF gene cluster. We found BRG1, a SWI/SNF remodeling ATPase, bound a distal element, CNSa. BRG1 binding was strongest in differentiated, stimulated T helper cells, paralleling IL-3 and GM-CSF expression. Depletion of BRG1 reduced IL-3 and GM-CSF transcription. BAF-specific SWI/SNF subunits bound to this locus and regulated IL-3 expression. CNSa was in closed chromatin in fibroblasts, open chromatin in differentiated T helper cells, and moderately open chromatin in naïve (undifferentiated) T helper cells; BRG1 was required for the most open state. CNSa increased transcription of a reporter in an episomal expression system, in a BRG1-dependent manner. The NF-κB subunit RelA/p65 bound CNSa in activated T helper cells. Inhibition of NF-κB blocked BRG1 binding to CNSa, chromatin opening at CNSa, and activation of IL-3 and GM-CSF. Together, these findings suggest CNSa is a distal enhancer that binds BRG1 and NF-κB. PMID:21831442

  10. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  11. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R.

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  12. Quantitative Trait Locus Based Virulence Determinant Mapping of the HSV-1 Genome in Murine Ocular Infection: Genes Involved in Viral Regulatory and Innate Immune Networks Contribute to Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Aaron W; Lee, Kyubin; Larsen, Inna; Craven, Mark; Brandt, Curtis R

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 causes mucocutaneous lesions, and is the leading cause of infectious blindness in the United States. Animal studies have shown that the severity of HSV-1 ocular disease is influenced by three main factors; innate immunity, host immune response and viral strain. We previously showed that mixed infection with two avirulent HSV-1 strains (OD4 and CJ994) resulted in recombinants that exhibit a range of disease phenotypes from severe to avirulent, suggesting epistatic interactions were involved. The goal of this study was to develop a quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis of HSV-1 ocular virulence determinants and to identify virulence associated SNPs. Blepharitis and stromal keratitis quantitative scores were characterized for 40 OD4:CJ994 recombinants. Viral titers in the eye were also measured. Virulence quantitative trait locus mapping (vQTLmap) was performed using the Lasso, Random Forest, and Ridge regression methods to identify significant phenotypically meaningful regions for each ocular disease parameter. The most predictive Ridge regression model identified several phenotypically meaningful SNPs for blepharitis and stromal keratitis. Notably, phenotypically meaningful nonsynonymous variations were detected in the UL24, UL29 (ICP8), UL41 (VHS), UL53 (gK), UL54 (ICP27), UL56, ICP4, US1 (ICP22), US3 and gG genes. Network analysis revealed that many of these variations were in HSV-1 regulatory networks and viral genes that affect innate immunity. Several genes previously implicated in virulence were identified, validating this approach, while other genes were novel. Several novel polymorphisms were also identified in these genes. This approach provides a framework that will be useful for identifying virulence genes in other pathogenic viruses, as well as epistatic effects that affect HSV-1 ocular virulence. PMID:26962864

  13. A role for HOX13 proteins in the regulatory switch between TADs at the HoxD locus

    PubMed Central

    Beccari, Leonardo; Yakushiji-Kaminatsui, Nayuta; Woltering, Joost M.; Necsulea, Anamaria; Lonfat, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Carballo, Eddie; Mascrez, Benedicte; Yamamoto, Shiori; Kuroiwa, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    During vertebrate limb development, Hoxd genes are regulated following a bimodal strategy involving two topologically associating domains (TADs) located on either side of the gene cluster. These regulatory landscapes alternatively control different subsets of Hoxd targets, first into the arm and subsequently into the digits. We studied the transition between these two global regulations, a switch that correlates with the positioning of the wrist, which articulates these two main limb segments. We show that the HOX13 proteins themselves help switch off the telomeric TAD, likely through a global repressive mechanism. At the same time, they directly interact with distal enhancers to sustain the activity of the centromeric TAD, thus explaining both the sequential and exclusive operating processes of these two regulatory domains. We propose a model in which the activation of Hox13 gene expression in distal limb cells both interrupts the proximal Hox gene regulation and re-enforces the distal regulation. In the absence of HOX13 proteins, a proximal limb structure grows without any sign of wrist articulation, likely related to an ancestral fish-like condition. PMID:27198226

  14. A role for HOX13 proteins in the regulatory switch between TADs at the HoxD locus.

    PubMed

    Beccari, Leonardo; Yakushiji-Kaminatsui, Nayuta; Woltering, Joost M; Necsulea, Anamaria; Lonfat, Nicolas; Rodríguez-Carballo, Eddie; Mascrez, Benedicte; Yamamoto, Shiori; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Duboule, Denis

    2016-05-15

    During vertebrate limb development, Hoxd genes are regulated following a bimodal strategy involving two topologically associating domains (TADs) located on either side of the gene cluster. These regulatory landscapes alternatively control different subsets of Hoxd targets, first into the arm and subsequently into the digits. We studied the transition between these two global regulations, a switch that correlates with the positioning of the wrist, which articulates these two main limb segments. We show that the HOX13 proteins themselves help switch off the telomeric TAD, likely through a global repressive mechanism. At the same time, they directly interact with distal enhancers to sustain the activity of the centromeric TAD, thus explaining both the sequential and exclusive operating processes of these two regulatory domains. We propose a model in which the activation of Hox13 gene expression in distal limb cells both interrupts the proximal Hox gene regulation and re-enforces the distal regulation. In the absence of HOX13 proteins, a proximal limb structure grows without any sign of wrist articulation, likely related to an ancestral fish-like condition. PMID:27198226

  15. The function of the conserved regulatory element within the second intron of the mammalian Csf1r locus.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Kristin A; Bouhlel, M Amine; O'Neal, Julie; Sester, David P; Tagoh, Hiromi; Ingram, Richard M; Pridans, Clare; Bonifer, Constanze; Hume, David A

    2013-01-01

    The gene encoding the receptor for macrophage colony-stimulating factor (CSF-1R) is expressed exclusively in cells of the myeloid lineages as well as trophoblasts. A conserved element in the second intron, Fms-Intronic Regulatory Element (FIRE), is essential for macrophage-specific transcription of the gene. However, the molecular details of how FIRE activity is regulated and how it impacts the Csf1r promoter have not been characterised. Here we show that agents that down-modulate Csf1r mRNA transcription regulated promoter activity altered the occupancy of key FIRE cis-acting elements including RUNX1, AP1, and Sp1 binding sites. We demonstrate that FIRE acts as an anti-sense promoter in macrophages and reversal of FIRE orientation within its native context greatly reduced enhancer activity in macrophages. Mutation of transcription initiation sites within FIRE also reduced transcription. These results demonstrate that FIRE is an orientation-specific transcribed enhancer element.

  16. Pleiotropic Analysis of Lung Cancer and Blood Triglycerides.

    PubMed

    Zuber, Verena; Marconett, Crystal N; Shi, Jianxin; Hua, Xing; Wheeler, William; Yang, Chenchen; Song, Lei; Dale, Anders M; Laplana, Marina; Risch, Angela; Witoelar, Aree; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J; Bettella, Francesco; Wang, Yunpeng; Djurovic, Srdjan; Zhou, Beiyun; Borok, Zea; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Swinkels, Dorine; Aben, Katja K; McKay, James; Hung, Rayjean J; Bikeböller, Heike; Stevens, Victoria L; Albanes, Demetrius; Caporaso, Neil E; Han, Younghun; Wei, Yongyue; Panadero, Maria Angeles; Mayordomo, Jose I; Christiani, David C; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Andreassen, Ole A; Houlston, Richard; Amos, Christopher I; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Laird-Offringa, Ite A; Mills, Ian G; Landi, Maria Teresa

    2016-12-01

    Epidemiologically related traits may share genetic risk factors, and pleiotropic analysis could identify individual loci associated with these traits. Because of their shared epidemiological associations, we conducted pleiotropic analysis of genome-wide association studies of lung cancer (12 160 lung cancer case patients and 16 838 control subjects) and cardiovascular disease risk factors (blood lipids from 188 577 subjects, type 2 diabetes from 148 821 subjects, body mass index from 123 865 subjects, and smoking phenotypes from 74 053 subjects). We found that 6p22.1 (rs6904596, ZNF184) was associated with both lung cancer (P = 5.50x10(-6)) and blood triglycerides (P = 1.39x10(-5)). We replicated the association in 6097 lung cancer case patients and 204 657 control subjects (P = 2.40 × 10(-4)) and in 71 113 subjects with triglycerides data (P = .01). rs6904596 reached genome-wide significance in lung cancer meta-analysis (odds ratio = 1.15, 95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 1.21 ,: Pcombined = 5.20x10(-9)). The large sample size provided by the lipid GWAS data and the shared genetic risk factors between the two traits contributed to the uncovering of a hitherto unidentified genetic locus for lung cancer. PMID:27565901

  17. Molecular architecture of the regulatory Locus sae of Staphylococcus aureus and its impact on expression of virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Steinhuber, Andrea; Goerke, Christiane; Bayer, Manfred G; Döring, Gerd; Wolz, Christiane

    2003-11-01

    We characterized the sae operon, a global regulator for virulence gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus. A Tn917 sae mutant was obtained by screening a Tn917 library of the agr mutant ISP479Mu for clones with altered hemolytic activity. Sequence analysis of the sae operon revealed two additional open reading frames (ORFs) (ORF3 and ORF4) upstream of the two-component regulatory genes saeR and saeS. Four overlapping sae-specific transcripts (T1 to T4) were detected by Northern blot analysis, and the transcriptional initiation points were mapped by primer extension analysis. The T1, T2, and T3 mRNAs are probably terminated at the same stem-loop sequence downstream of saeS. The T1 message (3.1 kb) initiates upstream of ORF4, T2 (2.4 kb) initiates upstream of ORF3, and T3 (2.0 kb) initiates in front of saeR. T4 (0.7 kb) represents a monocistronic mRNA encompassing ORF4 only. sae-specific transcripts were detectable in all of the 40 different clinical S. aureus isolates investigated. Transcript levels were at maximum during the post-exponential growth phase. The sae mutant showed a significantly reduced rate of invasion of human endothelial cells, consistent with diminished transcription and expression of fnbA. The expression of type 5 capsular polysaccharide is activated in the sae mutant of strain Newman, as shown by immunofluorescence and promoter-reporter fusion experiments. In summary, the sae operon constitutes a four-component regulator system which acts on virulence gene expression in S. aureus.

  18. New pleiotropic alkaline phosphatase-negative mutants of Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Heyde, M; Portalier, R

    1982-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutants showing reduced alkaline phosphatase activity were isolated as 5-fluorouracil-plus-adenosine-resistant derivatives of a upp pho (either phoS or phoT) strain. One class of these mutants displayed a temperature-sensitive alkaline phosphatase-negative phenotype, a pleiotropic defect for growth on some substrates, an increased sensitivity to toxic compounds (e.g., EDTA, mitomycin, and chloramphenicol), and alterations in the expression of some membrane proteins. It phenotypically differed from previously described mutants. The mutation was located at min 8.5 close to the phoA gene and defines a new genetic locus we called napA (for negative alkaline phosphatase pleiotropic phenotype). As these mutants have lost the ability to grow on lactose and galactose, Lac+ and Gal+ revertants were isolated that simultaneously recovered the parental phenotype. PMID:7047492

  19. Determining Which Phenotypes Underlie a Pleiotropic Signal.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Haldar, Tanushree; Witte, John S

    2016-07-01

    Discovering pleiotropic loci is important to understand the biological basis of seemingly distinct phenotypes. Most methods for assessing pleiotropy only test for the overall association between genetic variants and multiple phenotypes. To determine which specific traits are pleiotropic, we evaluate via simulation and application three different strategies. The first is model selection techniques based on the inverse regression of genotype on phenotypes. The second is a subset-based meta analysis ASSET [Bhattacharjee et al., ], which provides an optimal subset of nonnull traits. And the third is a modified Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) procedure of controlling the expected false discovery rate [Benjamini and Hochberg, ] in the framework of phenome-wide association study. From our simulations we see that an inverse regression-based approach MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., ] is more powerful than ASSET for detecting overall pleiotropic association, except for when all the phenotypes are associated and have genetic effects in the same direction. For determining which specific traits are pleiotropic, the modified B-H procedure performs consistently better than the other two methods. The inverse regression-based selection methods perform competitively with the modified B-H procedure only when the phenotypes are weakly correlated. The efficiency of ASSET is observed to lie below and in between the efficiency of the other two methods when the traits are weakly and strongly correlated, respectively. In our application to a large GWAS, we find that the modified B-H procedure also performs well, indicating that this may be an optimal approach for determining the traits underlying a pleiotropic signal.

  20. Determining which phenotypes underlie a pleiotropic signal

    PubMed Central

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Haldar, Tanushree; Witte, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Discovering pleiotropic loci is important to understand the biological basis of seemingly distinct phenotypes. Most methods for assessing pleiotropy only test for the overall association between genetic variants and multiple phenotypes. To determine which specific traits are pleiotropic, we evaluate via simulation and application three different strategies. The first is model selection techniques based on the inverse regression of genotype on phenotypes. The second is a subset-based meta-analysis ASSET [Bhattacharjee et al., 2012], which provides an optimal subset of non-null traits. And the third is a modified Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) procedure of controlling the expected false discovery rate [Benjamini and Hochberg, 1995] in the framework of phenome-wide association study. From our simulations we see that an inverse regression based approach MultiPhen [O’Reilly et al., 2012] is more powerful than ASSET for detecting overall pleiotropic association, except for when all the phenotypes are associated and have genetic effects in the same direction. For determining which specific traits are pleiotropic, the modified B-H procedure performs consistently better than the other two methods. The inverse regression based selection methods perform competitively with the modified B-H procedure only when the phenotypes are weakly correlated. The efficiency of ASSET is observed to lie below and in between the efficiency of the other two methods when the traits are weakly and strongly correlated, respectively. In our application to a large GWAS, we find that the modified B-H procedure also performs well, indicating that this may be an optimal approach for determining the traits underlying a pleiotropic signal. PMID:27238845

  1. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease. PMID:27494228

  2. Binding of estrogen receptors to switch sites and regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus of activated B cells suggests a direct influence of estrogen on antibody expression.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bart G; Penkert, Rhiannon R; Xu, Beisi; Fan, Yiping; Neale, Geoff; Gearhart, Patricia J; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-09-01

    Females and males differ in antibody isotype expression patterns and in immune responses to foreign- and self-antigens. For example, systemic lupus erythematosus is a condition that associates with the production of isotype-skewed anti-self antibodies, and exhibits a 9:1 female:male disease ratio. To explain differences between B cell responses in males and females, we sought to identify direct interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus. This effort was encouraged by our previous identification of estrogen response elements (ERE) in heavy chain switch (S) regions. We conducted a full-genome chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis (ChIP-seq) using DNA from LPS-activated B cells and an ERα-specific antibody. Results revealed ER binding to a wide region of DNA, spanning sequences from the JH cluster to Cδ, with peaks in Eμ and Sμ sites. Additional peaks of ERα binding were coincident with hs1,2 and hs4 sites in the 3' regulatory region (3'RR) of the heavy chain locus. This first demonstration of direct binding of ER to key regulatory elements in the immunoglobulin locus supports our hypothesis that estrogen and other nuclear hormone receptors and ligands may directly influence antibody expression and class switch recombination (CSR). Our hypothesis encourages the conduct of new experiments to evaluate the consequences of ER binding. A better understanding of ER:DNA interactions in the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus, and respective mechanisms, may ultimately translate to better control of antibody expression, better protection against pathogens, and prevention of pathologies caused by auto-immune disease.

  3. Pleiotropic effects of pigmentation genes in horses.

    PubMed

    Bellone, R R

    2010-12-01

    Horses are valued for the beauty and variety of colouration and coat patterning. To date, eleven different genes have been characterized that contribute to the variation observed in the horse. Unfortunately, mutations involving pigmentation often lead to deleterious effects in other systems, some of which have been described in the horse. This review focuses on six such pleiotropic effects or associations with pigmentation genes. These include neurological defects (lethal white foal syndrome and lavender foal syndrome), hearing defects, eye disorders (congenital stationary night blindness and multiple congenital ocular anomalies), as well as horse-specific melanoma. The pigmentation phenotype, disorder phenotype, mode of inheritance, genetic or genomic methods utilized to identify the genes involved and, if known, the causative mutations, molecular interactions and other susceptibility loci are discussed. As our understanding of pigmentation in the horse increases, through the use of novel genomic tools, we are likely to unravel yet unknown pleiotropic effects and determine additional interactions between previously discovered loci.

  4. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    PubMed

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR.

  5. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations.

    PubMed

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward L; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan K; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loïc; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M; Schmit, Stephanie L; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Woods, Michael O; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-09-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 controls) to identify pleiotropic loci. Findings were replicated in independent association studies (55,789 cases, 330,490 controls). We identified a novel pleiotropic association at 1q22 involving breast and lung squamous cell carcinoma, with eQTL analysis showing an association with ADAM15/THBS3 gene expression in lung. We also identified a known breast cancer locus CASP8/ALS2CR12 associated with prostate cancer, a known cancer locus at CDKN2B-AS1 with different variants associated with lung adenocarcinoma and prostate cancer, and confirmed the associations of a breast BRCA2 locus with lung and serous ovarian cancer. This is the largest study to date examining pleiotropy across multiple cancer-associated loci, identifying common mechanisms of cancer development and progression. Cancer Res; 76(17); 5103-14. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197191

  6. The pleiotropic effects of the seed germination inhibitor germostatin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yajin; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Seed dormancy and germination are the most important adaptive traits of seed plants, which control the germination in a proper space and time. Internal genetic factors together with environmental cues govern seed dormancy and germination. Abscisic acid (ABA), a key phytohormone induces seed dormancy and inhibits seed germination through its molecular genetic signaling network responding the seed inherent physiological and environmental factors. Recently, auxin has been shown to be another phytohormone that induces seed dormancy. We have recently shown that germonstatin (GS), a small synthetic molecule identified by high through-put chemical genetic screenings, inhibits seed germination through up-regulating auxin signaling and inducing auxin biosynthesis. GERMOSTATIN RESISTANCE LOCUS 1 (GSR1) encodes a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein and is responsible for GS seed germination inhibition. Its knockdown mutant gsr1 displays decreased dormancy. In this report, we show that GS is not an ABA analog and provided 2 other GS-resistant mutants related to the chemical's function in seed germination inhibition other than gsr1, suggesting that GS may have pleiotropic effects through targeting different pathway governing seed germination.

  7. The pleiotropic effects of the seed germination inhibitor germostatin.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yajin; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Seed dormancy and germination are the most important adaptive traits of seed plants, which control the germination in a proper space and time. Internal genetic factors together with environmental cues govern seed dormancy and germination. Abscisic acid (ABA), a key phytohormone induces seed dormancy and inhibits seed germination through its molecular genetic signaling network responding the seed inherent physiological and environmental factors. Recently, auxin has been shown to be another phytohormone that induces seed dormancy. We have recently shown that germonstatin (GS), a small synthetic molecule identified by high through-put chemical genetic screenings, inhibits seed germination through up-regulating auxin signaling and inducing auxin biosynthesis. GERMOSTATIN RESISTANCE LOCUS 1 (GSR1) encodes a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein and is responsible for GS seed germination inhibition. Its knockdown mutant gsr1 displays decreased dormancy. In this report, we show that GS is not an ABA analog and provided 2 other GS-resistant mutants related to the chemical's function in seed germination inhibition other than gsr1, suggesting that GS may have pleiotropic effects through targeting different pathway governing seed germination. PMID:26918467

  8. The pleiotropic effects of the seed germination inhibitor germostatin

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Yajin; Zhao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Seed dormancy and germination are the most important adaptive traits of seed plants, which control the germination in a proper space and time. Internal genetic factors together with environmental cues govern seed dormancy and germination. Abscisic acid (ABA), a key phytohormone induces seed dormancy and inhibits seed germination through its molecular genetic signaling network responding the seed inherent physiological and environmental factors. Recently, auxin has been shown to be another phytohormone that induces seed dormancy. We have recently shown that germonstatin (GS), a small synthetic molecule identified by high through-put chemical genetic screenings, inhibits seed germination through up-regulating auxin signaling and inducing auxin biosynthesis. GERMOSTATIN RESISTANCE LOCUS 1 (GSR1) encodes a plant homeodomain (PHD) finger protein and is responsible for GS seed germination inhibition. Its knockdown mutant gsr1 displays decreased dormancy. In this report, we show that GS is not an ABA analog and provided 2 other GS-resistant mutants related to the chemical's function in seed germination inhibition other than gsr1, suggesting that GS may have pleiotropic effects through targeting different pathway governing seed germination. PMID:26918467

  9. Homologous Elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3′ Regulatory Region of the Murine Immunoglobulin Heavy Chain (Igh) Locus Are Both Dispensable for Class-switch Recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R.; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K.; Eckhardt, Laurel A.

    2011-01-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3′ regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established “pairs” of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3′ regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  10. Homologous elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3' regulatory region of the murine immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus are both dispensable for class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K; Eckhardt, Laurel A

    2011-08-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3' regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established "pairs" of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3' regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR. PMID:21673112

  11. Homologous elements hs3a and hs3b in the 3' regulatory region of the murine immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus are both dispensable for class-switch recombination.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yi; Pieretti, Joyce; Ju, Zhongliang; Wei, Shiniu; Christin, John R; Bah, Fatmata; Birshtein, Barbara K; Eckhardt, Laurel A

    2011-08-01

    Immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) genes are formed, tested, and modified to yield diverse, specific, and high affinity antibody responses to antigen. The processes involved must be regulated, however, to avoid unintended damage to chromosomes. The 3' regulatory region of the Igh locus plays a major role in regulating class-switch recombination (CSR), the process by which antibody effector functions are modified during an immune response. Loss of all known enhancer-like elements in this region dramatically impairs CSR, but individual element deletions have no effect on this process. In the present study, we explored the hypothesis that an underlying functional redundancy in the homologous elements hs3a and hs3b was masking the importance of either element to CSR. Several transgenic mouse lines were generated, each carrying a bacterial artificial chromosome transgene that mimicked Igh locus structure but in which hs3a was missing and hs3b was flanked by loxP sites. Matings to Cyclization Recombination Enzyme-expressing mice established "pairs" of lines that differed only in the presence or absence of hs3b. Remarkably, CSR remained robust in the absence of both hs3a and hs3b, suggesting that the remaining two elements of the 3' regulatory region, hs1.2 and hs4, although individually dispensable for CSR, are, together, sufficient to support CSR.

  12. Pleiotropic effects of Trefoil Factor 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tomasetto, C; Rio, M-C

    2005-12-01

    Trefoil Factor 1 (TFF1), the first member of the trefoil factor family, is normally expressed in the stomach mucosa. Ectopic expression is also observed in various human pathological conditions, notably in numerous carcinomas and gastrointestinal acute inflammatory disorders. In vivo experimental data using TFF1-deficient mice highlight the pleiotropic functions of TFF1: (i) it is a gastric tumor suppressor gene involved in gastric ontogenesis and homeostasis; (ii) it protects gut mucosa from aggression; (iii) it participates in folding secreted proteins inside the endoplasmic reticulum. At the cellular level, it limits cell proliferation and apoptosis, and favors cell differentiation. Collectively, these data suggest that TFF1 may provide an alternative pharmacological tool for the prevention and treatment of human gastrointestinal diseases.

  13. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kraja, Aldi T; Chasman, Daniel I; North, Kari E; Reiner, Alexander P; Yanek, Lisa R; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Smith, Jennifer A; Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josée; Johnson, Andrew D; Feitosa, Mary F; Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Chu, Audrey Y; Nolte, Ilja M; Dastani, Zari; Morris, Andrew; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Sun, Yan V; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Vaez, Ahmad; Lin, Honghuang; Ligthart, Symen; Marullo, Letizia; Rohde, Rebecca; Shao, Yaming; Ziegler, Mark A; Im, Hae Kyung; Schnabel, Renate B; Jørgensen, Torben; Jørgensen, Marit E; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Stolk, Ronald P; Snieder, Harold; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Franco, Oscar H; Ikram, M Arfan; Richards, J Brent; Rotimi, Charles; Wilson, James G; Lange, Leslie; Ganesh, Santhi K; Nalls, Mike; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Pankow, James S; Coresh, Josef; Tang, Weihong; Linda Kao, W H; Boerwinkle, Eric; Morrison, Alanna C; Ridker, Paul M; Becker, Diane M; Rotter, Jerome I; Kardia, Sharon L R; Loos, Ruth J F; Larson, Martin G; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Province, Michael A; Tracy, Russell; Voight, Benjamin F; Vaidya, Dhananjay; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Benjamin, Emelia J; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Prokopenko, Inga; Meigs, James B; Borecki, Ingrid B

    2014-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors, genetic variants exist that influence MetS and inflammatory markers forming a predisposing MetS genetic network. To test this hypothesis a staged approach was undertaken. (a) We analyzed 17 metabolic and inflammatory traits in more than 85,500 participants from 14 large epidemiological studies within the Cross Consortia Pleiotropy Group. Individuals classified with MetS (NCEP definition), versus those without, showed on average significantly different levels for most inflammatory markers studied. (b) Paired average correlations between 8 metabolic traits and 9 inflammatory markers from the same studies as above, estimated with two methods, and factor analyses on large simulated data, helped in identifying 8 combinations of traits for follow-up in meta-analyses, out of 130,305 possible combinations between metabolic traits and inflammatory markers studied. (c) We performed correlated meta-analyses for 8 metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664, PDXDC1, FTO, MC4R and TOMM40. Based on large data evidence, we conclude that inflammation is a feature of MetS and several gene variants show pleiotropic genetic

  14. Pleiotropic effects of an allele producing white flowers in Ipomoea purpurea.

    PubMed

    Coberly, L Caitlin; Rausher, Mark D

    2008-05-01

    Although it is generally believed that pollinators are the primary selective agents driving flower-color evolution, it has recently been suggested that pleiotropic effects of mutations affecting flower color may serve as important constraints on floral evolution. We examined this hypothesis using white-flowered variants of the common morning glory, Ipomoea purpurea. Previous experiments indicate that the white-flowered a allele has a transmission advantage because of increased selfing and no detectable pollen discounting. We confirm this transmission advantage using a large field experiment in which both selfing rate and outcross success were measured for all three genotypes at the A locus. We also demonstrate that this transmission advantage is opposed by apparent pleiotropic effects in aa individuals manifested as reduced survival from germination to flowering. The magnitude of this effect, in combination with the known magnitude of inbreeding depression, more than compensates for the transmission advantage. Our results thus support the notion that deleterious pleiotropy may influence the evolutionary trajectory of flower-color mutants.

  15. Characterization of rco-1 of Neurospora crassa, a pleiotropic gene affecting growth and development that encodes a homolog of Tup1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashiro, C T; Ebbole, D J; Lee, B U; Brown, R E; Bourland, C; Madi, L; Yanofsky, C

    1996-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa undergoes a well-defined developmental program, conidiation, that culminates in the production of numerous asexual spores, conidia. Several cloned genes, including con-10, are expressed during conidiation but not during mycelial growth. Using a previously described selection strategy, we isolated mutants that express con-10 during mycelial growth. Selection was based on expression of an integrated DNA fragment containing the con-10 promoter-regulatory region followed by the initial segment of the con-10 open reading frame fused in frame with the bacterial hygromycin B phosphotransferase structural gene (con10'-'hph). Resistance to hygromycin results from mutational alterations that allow mycelial expression of the con-10'-'hph gene fusion. A set of drug-resistant mutants were isolated; several of these had abnormal conidiation phenotypes and were trans-acting, i.e., they allowed mycelial expression of the endogenous con-10 gene. Four of these had alterations at a single locus, designated rco-1 (regulation of conidiation). Strains with the rco-1 mutant alleles were aconidial, female sterile, had reduced growth rates, and formed hyphae that coiled in a counterclockwise direction, opposite that of the wild type. The four rco-1 mutants had distinct conidiation morphologies, suggesting that conidiation was blocked at different stages. Wild-type rco-1 was cloned by a novel procedure employing heterokaryon-assisted transformation and ligation-mediated PCR. The predicted RCO1 polypeptide is a homolog of Tup1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a multidomain protein that mediates transcriptional repression of genes concerned with a variety of processes. Like tup1 mutants, null mutants of rco-1 are viable and pleiotropic. A promoter element was identified that could be responsible for RCO1-mediated vegetative repression of con-10 and other conidiation genes. PMID:8887652

  16. Pleiotropic effects of ezetimibe: do they really exist?

    PubMed

    Kalogirou, Michalis; Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Elisaf, Moses

    2010-05-10

    Ezetimibe represents a new lipid lowering agent which inhibits cholesterol absorption. It effectively reduces low-density lipoprotein cholesterol when administered either alone or in combination with statins. However, its effect on cardiovascular mortality remains under question since it failed to demonstrate any significant changes in the primary endpoints of the recently published ENHANCE and SEAS studies. A possible explanation for this unsuccessful outcome is that ezetimibe lacks pleiotropic effects. This article aims to review the potential pleiotropic effects of the drug mainly on inflammation markers, lipoprotein subfractions and endothelial function. PMID:20152830

  17. Pleiotropic effects of statins: new therapeutic targets in drug design.

    PubMed

    Bedi, Onkar; Dhawan, Veena; Sharma, P L; Kumar, Puneet

    2016-07-01

    The HMG Co-enzyme inhibitors and new lipid-modifying agents expand their new therapeutic target options in the field of medical profession. Statins have been described as the most effective class of drugs to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Since the discovery of the first statin nearly 30 years ago, these drugs have become the main therapeutic approach to lower cholesterol levels. The present scientific research demonstrates numerous non-lipid modifiable effects of statins termed as pleiotropic effects of statins, which could be beneficial for the treatment of various devastating disorders. The most important positive effects of statins are anti-inflammatory, anti-proliferative, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, neuroprotective, anti-diabetes, and antithrombotic, improving endothelial dysfunction and attenuating vascular remodeling besides many others which are discussed under the scope of this review. In particular, inhibition of Rho and its downstream target, Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase (ROCK), and their agonistic action on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) can be viewed as the principle mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic effects of statins. With gradually increasing knowledge of new therapeutic targets of statins, their use has also been advocated in chronic inflammatory disorders for example rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In the scope of review, we highlight statins and their pleiotropic effects with reference to their harmful and beneficial effects as a novel approach for their use in the treatment of devastating disorders. Graphical abstract Pleiotropic effect of statins. PMID:27146293

  18. Pleiotropic and Sex-Specific Effects of Cancer GWAS SNPs on Melanoma Risk in the Population Architecture Using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) Study

    PubMed Central

    Kocarnik, Jonathan M.; Park, S. Lani; Han, Jiali; Dumitrescu, Logan; Cheng, Iona; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Kolonel, Laurence; Carlson, Chris S.; Crawford, Dana C.; Goodloe, Robert J.; Dilks, Holli H.; Baker, Paxton; Richardson, Danielle; Matise, Tara C.; Ambite, José Luis; Song, Fengju; Qureshi, Abrar A.; Zhang, Mingfeng; Duggan, David; Hutter, Carolyn; Hindorff, Lucia; Bush, William S.; Kooperberg, Charles; Le Marchand, Loic; Peters, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Background Several regions of the genome show pleiotropic associations with multiple cancers. We sought to evaluate whether 181 single-nucleotide polymorphisms previously associated with various cancers in genome-wide association studies were also associated with melanoma risk. Methods We evaluated 2,131 melanoma cases and 20,353 controls from three studies in the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study (EAGLE-BioVU, MEC, WHI) and two collaborating studies (HPFS, NHS). Overall and sex-stratified analyses were performed across studies. Results We observed statistically significant associations with melanoma for two lung cancer SNPs in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus (Bonferroni-corrected p<2.8x10-4), replicating known pleiotropic effects at this locus. In sex-stratified analyses, we also observed a potential male-specific association between prostate cancer risk variant rs12418451 and melanoma risk (OR=1.22, p=8.0x10-4). No other variants in our study were associated with melanoma after multiple comparisons adjustment (p>2.8e-4). Conclusions We provide confirmatory evidence of pleiotropic associations with melanoma for two SNPs previously associated with lung cancer, and provide suggestive evidence for a male-specific association with melanoma for prostate cancer variant rs12418451. This SNP is located near TPCN2, an ion transport gene containing SNPs which have been previously associated with hair pigmentation but not melanoma risk. Previous evidence provides biological plausibility for this association, and suggests a complex interplay between ion transport, pigmentation, and melanoma risk that may vary by sex. If confirmed, these pleiotropic relationships may help elucidate shared molecular pathways between cancers and related phenotypes. PMID:25789475

  19. Pleiotropic functions of catabolite control protein CcpA in Butanol-producing Clostridium acetobutylicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol in industry. Catabolite control protein A (CcpA), known to mediate carbon catabolite repression (CCR) in low GC gram-positive bacteria, has been identified and characterized in C. acetobutylicum by our previous work (Ren, C. et al. 2010, Metab Eng 12:446–54). To further dissect its regulatory function in C. acetobutylicum, CcpA was investigated using DNA microarray followed by phenotypic, genetic and biochemical validation. Results CcpA controls not only genes in carbon metabolism, but also those genes in solvent production and sporulation of the life cycle in C. acetobutylicum: i) CcpA directly repressed transcription of genes related to transport and metabolism of non-preferred carbon sources such as d-xylose and l-arabinose, and activated expression of genes responsible for d-glucose PTS system; ii) CcpA is involved in positive regulation of the key solventogenic operon sol (adhE1-ctfA-ctfB) and negative regulation of acidogenic gene bukII; and iii) transcriptional alterations were observed for several sporulation-related genes upon ccpA inactivation, which may account for the lower sporulation efficiency in the mutant, suggesting CcpA may be necessary for efficient sporulation of C. acetobutylicum, an important trait adversely affecting the solvent productivity. Conclusions This study provided insights to the pleiotropic functions that CcpA displayed in butanol-producing C. acetobutylicum. The information could be valuable for further dissecting its pleiotropic regulatory mechanism in C. acetobutylicum, and for genetic modification in order to obtain more effective butanol-producing Clostridium strains. PMID:22846451

  20. The sae locus of Staphylococcus aureus controls exoprotein synthesis at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, A T; Cheung, A L; Nagel, R

    1997-07-01

    Agr and sar are known regulatory loci of Staphylococcus aureus that control the production of several extracellular and cell-wall-associated proteins. A pleiotropic insertional mutation in S. aureus, designated sae, that leads to the production of drastically diminished levels of alpha- and beta-hemolysins and coagulase and slightly reduced levels of protein A has been described. The study of the expression of the genes coding for these exoproteins in the sae::Tn551 mutant (carried out in this work by Northern blot analyses) revealed that the genes for alpha- and beta-hemolysins (hla and hlb) and coagulase (coa) are not transcribed and that the gene for protein A (spa) is transcribed at a somewhat reduced level. These results indicate that the sae locus regulates these exoprotein genes at the transcriptional level. Northern blot analyses also show that the sae mutation does not affect the expression of agr or sar regulatory loci. An sae::Tn551 agr::tetM double mutant has been phenotypically characterized as producing reduced or null levels of alpha-, beta-, and delta-hemolysins, coagulase, and high levels of protein A. Northern blot analyses carried out in this work with the double mutant revealed that hla, hlb, hld, and coa genes are not transcribed, while spa is transcribed at high levels. The fact that coa is not expressed in the sae agr mutant, as in the sae parental strain, while spa is expressed at the high levels characteristic of the agr parental strain, suggests that sae and agr interact in a complex way in the control of the expression of the genes of several exoproteins.

  1. Pleiotropic effects of environment-specific adaptation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kover, P X; Rowntree, J K; Scarcelli, N; Savriama, Y; Eldridge, T; Schaal, B A

    2009-08-01

    Local adaptation may be important for the preservation of genetic diversity and the promotion of speciation. However, local adaptation may also constrain establishment in different environments. The consequences of local adaptation depend strongly on the pleiotropic effects of the genes involved in adaptation. Here, we investigated the pleiotropic effects of the genetic response to selection in outbred lines of Arabidopsis artificially selected to flower earlier under both winter- and spring-annual simulated conditions. The consequences of adaptation were evaluated by reciprocally transplanting selected and control lines between the two conditions. Selected lines always flower earlier than their controls, independent of growing conditions. However, selected lines, growing in the same condition in which they were selected, flower earlier than plants selected in the alternative environment. Plants selected to flower earlier in spring produce more fruits than controls when growing in the spring, and less fruits when growing in the winter; indicating that local adaptation has negative pleiotropic effects in another environment. Our results indicate that local adaptation can arise even when selection targets the same trait in the same direction. Furthermore, it suggests that adaptation under the two different environments can generate fitness trade-offs that can maintain genetic variation for flowering time.

  2. Image simulation using LOCUS

    SciTech Connect

    Strachan, J.D.; Roberts, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The LOCUS data base program has been used to simulate images and to solve simple equations. This has been accomplished by making each record (which normally would represent a data entry)represent sequenced or random number pairs.

  3. The Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2 pleiotropic regulator Pbr, is required for stress resistance and virulence.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Christian G; Sousa, Silvia A; Grilo, André M; Eberl, Leo; Leitão, Jorge H

    2010-05-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is one of the most virulent species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, a group of bacteria that emerged as important pathogens, especially to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In this study, we report the identification and characterization of a mutant strain derived form the CF isolate Burkholderia cenocepacia K56-2, carrying a plasposon insertion in a gene, located in a 3516 bp chromosomal region with an atypical G+C content, encoding a 80 amino acid putative regulatory protein named Pbr. Besides its inability to produce phenazines, the B. cenocepacia K56-2 pbr mutant exhibited a pleiotropic phenotype, including impaired survival to oxidative and osmotic stress, aromatic amino acid and prolonged nutrient starvation periods. In addition, the pbr mutant exhibited decreased virulence the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Altogether, our results demonstrate the involvement of Pbr on the regulation of phenazine biosynthesis, and an important role for this regulatory protein on several cellular processes related to stress resistance and virulence.

  4. An ancient yet flexible cis-regulatory architecture allows localized Hedgehog tuning by patched/Ptch1.

    PubMed

    Lorberbaum, David S; Ramos, Andrea I; Peterson, Kevin A; Carpenter, Brandon S; Parker, David S; De, Sandip; Hillers, Lauren E; Blake, Victoria M; Nishi, Yuichi; McFarlane, Matthew R; Chiang, Ason Cy; Kassis, Judith A; Allen, Benjamin L; McMahon, Andrew P; Barolo, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway is part of the ancient developmental-evolutionary animal toolkit. Frequently co-opted to pattern new structures, the pathway is conserved among eumetazoans yet flexible and pleiotropic in its effects. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, is transcriptionally activated by Hedgehog, providing essential negative feedback in all tissues. Our locus-wide dissections of the cis-regulatory landscapes of fly patched and mouse Ptch1 reveal abundant, diverse enhancers with stage- and tissue-specific expression patterns. The seemingly simple, constitutive Hedgehog response of patched/Ptch1 is driven by a complex regulatory architecture, with batteries of context-specific enhancers engaged in promoter-specific interactions to tune signaling individually in each tissue, without disturbing patterning elsewhere. This structure-one of the oldest cis-regulatory features discovered in animal genomes-explains how patched/Ptch1 can drive dramatic adaptations in animal morphology while maintaining its essential core function. It may also suggest a general model for the evolutionary flexibility of conserved regulators and pathways. PMID:27146892

  5. An ancient yet flexible cis-regulatory architecture allows localized Hedgehog tuning by patched/Ptch1

    PubMed Central

    Lorberbaum, David S; Ramos, Andrea I; Peterson, Kevin A; Carpenter, Brandon S; Parker, David S; De, Sandip; Hillers, Lauren E; Blake, Victoria M; Nishi, Yuichi; McFarlane, Matthew R; Chiang, Ason CY; Kassis, Judith A; Allen, Benjamin L; McMahon, Andrew P; Barolo, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The Hedgehog signaling pathway is part of the ancient developmental-evolutionary animal toolkit. Frequently co-opted to pattern new structures, the pathway is conserved among eumetazoans yet flexible and pleiotropic in its effects. The Hedgehog receptor, Patched, is transcriptionally activated by Hedgehog, providing essential negative feedback in all tissues. Our locus-wide dissections of the cis-regulatory landscapes of fly patched and mouse Ptch1 reveal abundant, diverse enhancers with stage- and tissue-specific expression patterns. The seemingly simple, constitutive Hedgehog response of patched/Ptch1 is driven by a complex regulatory architecture, with batteries of context-specific enhancers engaged in promoter-specific interactions to tune signaling individually in each tissue, without disturbing patterning elsewhere. This structure—one of the oldest cis-regulatory features discovered in animal genomes—explains how patched/Ptch1 can drive dramatic adaptations in animal morphology while maintaining its essential core function. It may also suggest a general model for the evolutionary flexibility of conserved regulators and pathways. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13550.001 PMID:27146892

  6. The pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol: Beyond bone-mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Egido, Jesús; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Bover, Jordi; Praga, Manuel; Torregrosa, José Vicente; Fernández-Giráldez, Elvira; Solozábal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is characterised by elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and a series of bone-mineral metabolism anomalies. In patients with SHPT, treatment with paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, has been shown to reduce PTH levels with minimal serum calcium and phosphorus variations. The classic effect of paricalcitol is that of a mediator in mineral and bone homeostasis. However, recent studies have suggested that the benefits of treatment with paricalcitol go beyond PTH reduction and, for instance, it has a positive effect on cardiovascular disease and survival. The objective of this study is to review the most significant studies on the so-called pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol treatment in patients with CKD. PMID:26705959

  7. The pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol: Beyond bone-mineral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Egido, Jesús; Martínez-Castelao, Alberto; Bover, Jordi; Praga, Manuel; Torregrosa, José Vicente; Fernández-Giráldez, Elvira; Solozábal, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) is a common complication in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) that is characterised by elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels and a series of bone-mineral metabolism anomalies. In patients with SHPT, treatment with paricalcitol, a selective vitamin D receptor activator, has been shown to reduce PTH levels with minimal serum calcium and phosphorus variations. The classic effect of paricalcitol is that of a mediator in mineral and bone homeostasis. However, recent studies have suggested that the benefits of treatment with paricalcitol go beyond PTH reduction and, for instance, it has a positive effect on cardiovascular disease and survival. The objective of this study is to review the most significant studies on the so-called pleiotropic effects of paricalcitol treatment in patients with CKD.

  8. Pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on intestinal mucosa: not just trefoil peptides.

    PubMed

    Assimakopoulos, Stelios-F; Scopa, Chrisoula-D; Nikolopoulou, Vassiliki-N; Vagianos, Constantine-E

    2008-06-14

    Bombesin and neurotensin are neuropeptides which exert a wide spectrum of biological actions on gastrointestinal tissues influencing intestinal growth and adaptation, intestinal motility, blood flow, secretion, nutrient absorption and immune response. Based mainly on their well-established potent enterotrophic effect, numerous experimental studies investigated their potential positive effect on the atrophic or injured intestinal mucosa. These peptides proved to be effective mucosa-healing factors, but the potential molecular and cellular mechanisms for this action remained unresolved. In a recently published study (World J Gastroenterol 2008; 14(8): 1222-1230), it was shown that their protective effect on the intestine in experimentally induced inflammatory bowel disease was related to anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and antiapoptotic actions. These results are in close agreement with our previous studies on jaundiced and hepatectomized rats that showed a regulatory effect of bombesin and neurotensin on critical cellular processes such as enterocyte' proliferation and death, oxidative stress and redox equilibrium, tight junctions' formation and function, and inflammatory response. The pleiotropic effects of bombesin and neurotensin on diverse types of intestinal injury may justify their consideration for clinical trials. PMID:18567096

  9. Pleiotropic Meta-Analyses of Longitudinal Studies Discover Novel Genetic Variants Associated with Age-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Liang; Kernogitski, Yelena; Kulminskaya, Irina; Loika, Yury; Arbeev, Konstantin G.; Loiko, Elena; Bagley, Olivia; Duan, Matt; Yashkin, Arseniy; Ukraintseva, Svetlana V.; Kovtun, Mikhail; Yashin, Anatoliy I.; Kulminski, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related diseases may result from shared biological mechanisms in intrinsic processes of aging. Genetic effects on age-related diseases are often modulated by environmental factors due to their little contribution to fitness or are mediated through certain endophenotypes. Identification of genetic variants with pleiotropic effects on both common complex diseases and endophenotypes may reveal potential conflicting evolutionary pressures and deliver new insights into shared genetic contribution to healthspan and lifespan. Here, we performed pleiotropic meta-analyses of genetic variants using five NIH-funded datasets by integrating univariate summary statistics for age-related diseases and endophenotypes. We investigated three groups of traits: (1) endophenotypes such as blood glucose, blood pressure, lipids, hematocrit, and body mass index, (2) time-to-event outcomes such as the age-at-onset of diabetes mellitus (DM), cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), and (3) both combined. In addition to replicating previous findings, we identify seven novel genome-wide significant loci (< 5e-08), out of which five are low-frequency variants. Specifically, from Group 2, we find rs7632505 on 3q21.1 in SEMA5B, rs460976 on 21q22.3 (1 kb from TMPRSS2) and rs12420422 on 11q24.1 predominantly associated with a variety of CVDs, rs4905014 in ITPK1 associated with stroke and heart failure, rs7081476 on 10p12.1 in ANKRD26 associated with multiple diseases including DM, CVDs, and NDs. From Group 3, we find rs8082812 on 18p11.22 and rs1869717 on 4q31.3 associated with both endophenotypes and CVDs. Our follow-up analyses show that rs7632505, rs4905014, and rs8082812 have age-dependent effects on coronary heart disease or stroke. Functional annotation suggests that most of these SNPs are within regulatory regions or DNase clusters and in linkage disequilibrium with expression quantitative trait loci, implying their potential regulatory influence on

  10. The Cnes2 locus on mouse chromosome 17 regulates host defense against cryptococcal infection through pleiotropic effects on host immunity.

    PubMed

    Shourian, Mitra; Flaczyk, Adam; Angers, Isabelle; Mindt, Barbara C; Fritz, Jörg H; Qureshi, Salman T

    2015-12-01

    The genetic basis of natural susceptibility to progressive Cryptococcus neoformans infection is not well understood. Using C57BL/6 and CBA/J inbred mice, we previously identified three chromosomal regions associated with C. neoformans susceptibility (Cnes1, Cnes2, and Cnes3). To validate and characterize the role of Cnes2 during the host response, we constructed a congenic strain on the C57BL/6 background (B6.CBA-Cnes2). Phenotypic analysis of B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice 35 days after C. neoformans infection showed a significant reduction of fungal burden in the lungs and spleen with higher pulmonary expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), lower expression of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and an absence of airway epithelial mucus production compared to that in C57BL/6 mice. Multiparameter flow cytometry of infected lungs also showed a significantly higher number of neutrophils, exudate macrophages, CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and CD4(+) cells in B6.CBA-Cnes2 than in C57BL/6 mice. The activation state of recruited macrophages and dendritic cells was also significantly increased in B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Cnes2 interval is a potent regulator of host defense, immune responsiveness, and differential Th1/Th2 polarization following C. neoformans infection.

  11. Pleiotropic effects of regulatory ros mutants of Agrobacterium radiobacter and their interaction with Fe and glucose.

    PubMed

    Brightwell, G; Hussain, H; Tiburtius, A; Yeoman, K H; Johnston, A W

    1995-01-01

    Four exo mutants of Agrobacterium radiobacter, defective in the synthesis of acidic exopolysaccharide were complemented by a gene from that species, which is similar to the transcriptional regulator, ros, of A. tumefaciens. It was confirmed that this A. radiobacter gene, which we term rosAR, like ros, repressed its own transcription as well as that of virC and virD, two loci involved in tumorigenesis. The sequence of RosAR suggested that it might bind to a transition metal and its repressor abilities were shown to require Fe in the medium; repression was also enhanced with increasing levels of glucose. Certain rosAR mutants, in which its 3' end was removed were dominant; i.e., when plasmids containing such mutant forms of the gene were introduced into wild-type A. radiobacter, the transconjugants were nonmucoid. Such effects were also seen in a wide range of bacteria, including Escherichia coli and Xanthomonas. Several mutants that were complementd by rosAR also accumulated protoporphyrin, suggesting a defect in haem synthesis.

  12. Why Pleiotropic Interventions are Needed for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Greg M.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves a complex pathological cascade thought to be initially triggered by the accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide aggregates or aberrant amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing. Much is known of the factors initiating the disease process decades prior to the onset of cognitive deficits, but an unclear understanding of events immediately preceding and precipitating cognitive decline is a major factor limiting the rapid development of adequate prevention and treatment strategies. Multiple pathways are known to contribute to cognitive deficits by disruption of neuronal signal transduction pathways involved in memory. These pathways are altered by aberrant signaling, inflammation, oxidative damage, tau pathology, neuron loss, and synapse loss. We need to develop stage-specific interventions that not only block causal events in pathogenesis (aberrant tau phosphorylation, Aβ production and accumulation, and oxidative damage), but also address damage from these pathways that will not be reversed by targeting prodromal pathways. This approach would not only focus on blocking early events in pathogenesis, but also adequately correct for loss of synapses, substrates for neuroprotective pathways (e.g., docosahexaenoic acid), defects in energy metabolism, and adverse consequences of inappropriate compensatory responses (aberrant sprouting). Monotherapy targeting early single steps in this complicated cascade may explain disappointments in trials with agents inhibiting production, clearance, or aggregation of the initiating Aβ peptide or its aggregates. Both plaque and tangle pathogenesis have already reached AD levels in the more vulnerable brain regions during the “prodromal” period prior to conversion to “mild cognitive impairment (MCI).” Furthermore, many of the pathological events are no longer proceeding in series, but are going on in parallel. By the MCI stage, we stand a greater chance of success by considering pleiotropic

  13. Congenic Strains Confirm the Pleiotropic Effect of Chromosome 4 QTL on Mouse Femoral Geometry and Biomechanical Performance

    PubMed Central

    Kristianto, Jasmin; Litscher, Suzanne J.; Johnson, Michael G.; Patel, Forum; Patel, Mital; Fisher, Jacqueline; Zastrow, Ryley K.; Radcliff, Abigail B.; Blank, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    A pleiotropic quantitative trait locus (QTL) for bone geometry and mechanical performance in mice was mapped to distal chromosome 4 via an intercross of recombinant congenic mice HcB-8 and HcB-23. To study the QTL in isolation, we have generated C3H.B10-(rs6355453-rs13478087) (C.B.4.3) and C3H.B10-(rs6369860-D4Mit170) (C.B.4.2) congenic strains that harbor ~20 Mb and ~3 Mb, respectively, of chromosome 4 overlapping segments from C57BL/10ScSnA (B10) within the locus on a C3H/DiSnA (C3H) background. Using 3-point bend testing and standard beam equations, we phenotyped these mice for femoral mid-diaphyseal geometry and biomechanical performance. We analyzed the results via 2-way ANOVA, using sex and genotype as factors. In the C.B.4.3 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 male mice had smaller cross sectional area (CSA) and reduced total displacement than homozygous C3H/C3H mice. Sex by genotype interaction was also observed for maximum load and stiffness for C3H/C3H and B10/B10 mice, respectively. In C.B.4.2 strain, we found that homozygous B10/B10 mice had lower total displacement, post-yield displacement (PYD), stiffness, yield load and maximum load than mice harboring C3H allele. Sex by genotype interaction was observed in B10/B10 mice for perimeter, outer minor axis (OMA) and CSA. There were no significant differences in tissue level mechanical performance, which suggest that the QTL acts primarily on circumferential bone size. These data confirm the prior QTL mapping data and support other work demonstrating the importance of chromosome 4 QTL on bone modeling and bone responses to mechanical loading. PMID:26849124

  14. [Mechanisms of action of statins and their pleiotropic effects].

    PubMed

    Davignon, J; Mabile, L

    2001-02-01

    This brief review and update considers a few aspects of the mechanisms of action of statins, especially those related to some of the pleiotropic effects that have clinical relevance. The beneficial effect on endothelial dysfunction is a class effect that is related not only to the lowering of plasma LDL-cholesterol but also to a direct effect on nitric oxide (NO) production. It is an early and sustained effect, linked to oxidative processes, that deserves particular attention since endothelial dysfunction is intimately linked to atherogenesis. Awareness of the anti-inflammatory effect came about following the observation that statin administration in humans reduces markers of inflammation in the circulation. The importance of these observations is ascribable to the fact that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease, that the inflammatory process in a coronary artery is now measurable in vivo in humans, that it contributes to the progression and the destabilization of the plaque, and also, because statins exert a number of effects that tend to stabilize it. Statins, and particularly lipophilic statins, in general inhibit cell proliferation, seemingly by multifaceted mechanisms. These include inhibition of cell cycle progression, induction of apoptosis, reduction of cyclooxygenase-2 activity and an enhancement of angiogenesis. At the center of these mechanisms stands the ability to inhibit G protein prenylation through a reduction of farnesylation and geranylgeranylation. This effect has been used to show that statins are anticarcinogenic in vitro and in animals. The clinical relevance of such a property remains to be proven but is supported by promising observations in animals and in humans which are detailed in this review. Finally, the ability of lipophilic statins to increase the production of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and to enhance osteogenesis in animals combined with the results of several clinical studies should stimulate physicians to

  15. The pleiotropic effects of metformin: time for prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Bromage, Daniel I; Yellon, Derek M

    2015-01-01

    The global prevalence of diabetes has risen to epidemic proportions and the trend is predicted to continue. The consequent burden of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is a major public health concern and new treatments are required to mitigate the deleterious effects of cardiovascular disease in diabetic patients. Ischaemia-reperfusion injury is well known to exacerbate the harmful effects of acute myocardial infarction and subsequent therapeutic reperfusion, and several mechanical and pharmacological approaches to mitigating this injury have been investigated. Metformin, which is cheap, relatively safe and widely used in type 2 diabetes, is one such pharmacotherapy with considerable pre-clinical evidence for cardioprotective utility beyond its glucose-lowering effect. However, despite convincing basic evidence its translation to clinical application has largely been limited to studies of cardiovascular risk. There are several barriers to prospective randomized assessment in the context of acute myocardial infarction, not least the accessibility and already widespread use of metformin among patients with type 2 diabetes at high risk of cardiovascular events. In the place of class 1 evidence, well-designed prospective cohort studies of the potential pleiotropic utility of metformin in cardiovascular disease, and particularly its benefit in ischaemia-reperfusion injury, are needed. Given the availability of metformin worldwide, this is particularly true in low- and middle-income countries where the optimal therapy for acute myocardial infarction, primary percutaneous coronary intervention, may not be available, and instead patients are managed with thrombolysis. As this is less effective, metformin as an adjunct to thrombolysis (or PPCI) could represent an effective, cheap means of cardioprotection with global relevance. PMID:26271457

  16. Pleiotropic mechanisms facilitated by resveratrol and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Calamini, Barbara; Ratia, Kiira; Malkowski, Michael G.; Cuendet, Muriel; Pezzuto, John M.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.

    2010-07-01

    Resveratrol has demonstrated cancer chemopreventive activity in animal models and some clinical trials are underway. In addition, resveratrol was shown to promote cell survival, increase lifespan and mimic caloric restriction, thereby improving health and survival of mice on high-calorie diet. All of these effects are potentially mediated by the pleiotropic interactions of resveratrol with different enzyme targets including COX-1 (cyclo-oxygenase-1) and COX-2, NAD{sup +}-dependent histone deacetylase SIRT1 (sirtuin 1) and QR2 (quinone reductase 2). Nonetheless, the health benefits elicited by resveratrol as a direct result of these interactions with molecular targets have been questioned, since it is rapidly and extensively metabolized to sulfate and glucuronide conjugates, resulting in low plasma concentrations. To help resolve these issues, we tested the ability of resveratrol and its metabolites to modulate the function of some known targets in vitro. In the present study, we have shown that COX-1, COX-2 and QR2 are potently inhibited by resveratrol, and that COX-1 and COX-2 are also inhibited by the resveratrol 4{prime}-O-sulfate metabolite. We determined the X-ray structure of resveratrol bound to COX-1 and demonstrate that it occupies the COX active site similar to other NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Finally, we have observed that resveratrol 3- and 4?-O-sulfate metabolites activate SIRT1 equipotently to resveratrol, but that activation is probably a substrate-dependent phenomenon with little in vivo relevance. Overall, the results of this study suggest that in vivo an interplay between resveratrol and its metabolites with different molecular targets may be responsible for the overall beneficial health effects previously attributed only to resveratrol itself.

  17. Pleiotropic actions of iron balance in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinhui; Fang, Xuexian; Wang, Fudi

    2015-03-01

    As an essential element, iron plays a central role in many physiological processes, including redox balance, inflammation, energy metabolism, and environment sensing. Perturbations in iron homeostasis are associated with several conditions, including hyperglycemia and diabetes, both of which have been studied in patients and animal models. To clarify the pleiotropic role of iron homeostasis in diabetes development, the early studies on diseases with iron-overload, studies on clinical iron depletion therapies, associations between iron-related genetic polymorphisms and diabetes, and etiological mechanisms underlying iron perturbations-impaired insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity were carefully reviewed and discussed. Hereditary hemochromatosis, transfusion-dependent thalassemia, and excess heme iron intake can increase the risk of developing diabetes. Genetically modified mice and mice fed a high-iron diet present with discrepant phenotypes due to differences in tissue iron distribution. Moreover, several genetic polymorphisms related to iron homeostasis have been associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Tightly controlled iron metabolism is essential for insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity, and iron overload in pancreatic islets alters reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, as well as hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) stability and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis, thereby impairing the function and viability of β-cells. Decreased levels of adiponectin, macrophage-mediated inflammation, and ROS-mediated liver kinase B1 (LKB1)/adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation can contribute to iron overload-induced insulin resistance, whereas iron deficiency could also participate in obesity-related inflammation, hypoxia, and insulin resistance. Because iron homeostasis is closely correlated with many metabolic processes, future studies are needed in order to elucidate the finely tuned network among iron

  18. A Pleiotropic Nonadditive Model of Variation in Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Caballero, A.; Keightley, P. D.

    1994-01-01

    A model of mutation-selection-drift balance incorporating pleiotropic and dominance effects of new mutations on quantitative traits and fitness is investigated and used to predict the amount and nature of genetic variation maintained in segregating populations. The model is based on recent information on the joint distribution of mutant effects on bristle traits and fitness in Drosophila melanogaster from experiments on the accumulation of spontaneous and P element-induced mutations. These experiments suggest a leptokurtic distribution of effects with an intermediate correlation between effects on the trait and fitness. Mutants of large effect tend to be partially recessive while those with smaller effect are on average additive, but apparently with very variable gene action. The model is parameterized with two different sets of information derived from P element insertion and spontaneous mutation data, though the latter are not fully known. They differ in the number of mutations per generation which is assumed to affect the trait. Predictions of the variance maintained for bristle number assuming parameters derived from effects of P element insertions, in which the proportion of mutations with an effect on the trait is small, fit reasonably well with experimental observations. The equilibrium genetic variance is nearly independent of the degree of dominance of new mutations. Heritabilities of between 0.4 and 0.6 are predicted with population sizes from 10(4) to 10(6), and most of the variance for the metric trait in segregating populations is due to a small proportion of mutations (about 1% of the total number) with neutral or nearly neutral effects on fitness and intermediate effects on the trait (0.1-0.5σ(P)). Much of the genetic variance is contributed by recessive or partially recessive mutants, but only a small proportion (about 10%) of the genetic variance is dominance variance. The amount of apparent selection on the trait itself generated by the model is

  19. The creatine kinase system and pleiotropic effects of creatine.

    PubMed

    Wallimann, Theo; Tokarska-Schlattner, Malgorzata; Schlattner, Uwe

    2011-05-01

    The pleiotropic effects of creatine (Cr) are based mostly on the functions of the enzyme creatine kinase (CK) and its high-energy product phosphocreatine (PCr). Multidisciplinary studies have established molecular, cellular, organ and somatic functions of the CK/PCr system, in particular for cells and tissues with high and intermittent energy fluctuations. These studies include tissue-specific expression and subcellular localization of CK isoforms, high-resolution molecular structures and structure-function relationships, transgenic CK abrogation and reverse genetic approaches. Three energy-related physiological principles emerge, namely that the CK/PCr systems functions as (a) an immediately available temporal energy buffer, (b) a spatial energy buffer or intracellular energy transport system (the CK/PCr energy shuttle or circuit) and (c) a metabolic regulator. The CK/PCr energy shuttle connects sites of ATP production (glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation) with subcellular sites of ATP utilization (ATPases). Thus, diffusion limitations of ADP and ATP are overcome by PCr/Cr shuttling, as most clearly seen in polar cells such as spermatozoa, retina photoreceptor cells and sensory hair bundles of the inner ear. The CK/PCr system relies on the close exchange of substrates and products between CK isoforms and ATP-generating or -consuming processes. Mitochondrial CK in the mitochondrial outer compartment, for example, is tightly coupled to ATP export via adenine nucleotide transporter or carrier (ANT) and thus ATP-synthesis and respiratory chain activity, releasing PCr into the cytosol. This coupling also reduces formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibits mitochondrial permeability transition, an early event in apoptosis. Cr itself may also act as a direct and/or indirect anti-oxidant, while PCr can interact with and protect cellular membranes. Collectively, these factors may well explain the beneficial effects of Cr supplementation. The

  20. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Goriaux, Coline; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  1. History of the discovery of a master locus producing piRNAs: the flamenco/COM locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Coline, Goriaux; Théron, Emmanuelle; Brasset, Emilie; Vaury, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of transposable elements (TEs) in the 1950s by B. McClintock implied the existence of cellular regulatory systems controlling TE activity. The discovery of flamenco (flam) an heterochromatic locus from Drosophila melanogaster and its ability to survey several TEs such as gypsy, ZAM, and Idefix contributed to peer deeply into the mechanisms of the genetic and epigenetic regulation of TEs. flam was the first cluster producing small RNAs to be discovered long before RNAi pathways were identified in 1998. As a result of the detailed genetic analyses performed by certain laboratories and of the sophisticated genetic tools they developed, this locus has played a major role in our understanding of piRNA mediated TE repression in animals. Here we review the first discovery of this locus and retrace decades of studies that led to our current understanding of the relationship between genomes and their TE targets. PMID:25136352

  2. The high grain protein content gene Gpc-B1 accelerates senescence and has pleiotropic effects on protein content in wheat.

    PubMed

    Uauy, Cristobal; Brevis, Juan Carlos; Dubcovsky, Jorge

    2006-01-01

    High grain protein content (GPC) is a frequent target of wheat breeding programmes because of its positive effect on bread and pasta quality. A wild wheat allele at the Gpc-B1 locus with a significant impact on this trait was identified previously. The precise mapping of several senescence-related traits in a set of tetraploid recombinant substitution lines (RSLs) segregating for Gpc-B1 is reported here. Flag leaf chlorophyll degradation, change in peduncle colour, and spike water content were completely linked to the Gpc-B1 locus and to the differences in GPC within a 0.3 cM interval corresponding to a physical distance of only 250 kb. The effect of Gpc-B1 was also examined in different environments and genetic backgrounds using a set of tetraploid and hexaploid pairs of isogenic lines. The results were consistent with those observed in the RSLs. The high GPC allele conferred a shorter duration of grain fill due to earlier flag leaf senescence and increased GPC in all four genetic backgrounds. The effect on grain size was more variable, depending on the genotype-environment combinations. These results are consistent with a model in which the wild-type allele of Gpc-B1 accelerates senescence in flag leaves producing pleiotropic effects on nitrogen remobilization, total GPC, and grain size. PMID:16831844

  3. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B.; Omholt, Stig W.

    2013-01-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network’s feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation. PMID:23997378

  4. Propagation of genetic variation in gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Plahte, Erik; Gjuvsland, Arne B; Omholt, Stig W

    2013-08-01

    A future quantitative genetics theory should link genetic variation to phenotypic variation in a causally cohesive way based on how genes actually work and interact. We provide a theoretical framework for predicting and understanding the manifestation of genetic variation in haploid and diploid regulatory networks with arbitrary feedback structures and intra-locus and inter-locus functional dependencies. Using results from network and graph theory, we define propagation functions describing how genetic variation in a locus is propagated through the network, and show how their derivatives are related to the network's feedback structure. Similarly, feedback functions describe the effect of genotypic variation of a locus on itself, either directly or mediated by the network. A simple sign rule relates the sign of the derivative of the feedback function of any locus to the feedback loops involving that particular locus. We show that the sign of the phenotypically manifested interaction between alleles at a diploid locus is equal to the sign of the dominant feedback loop involving that particular locus, in accordance with recent results for a single locus system. Our results provide tools by which one can use observable equilibrium concentrations of gene products to disclose structural properties of the network architecture. Our work is a step towards a theory capable of explaining the pleiotropy and epistasis features of genetic variation in complex regulatory networks as functions of regulatory anatomy and functional location of the genetic variation.

  5. Single locus affects embryonic segment polarity and multiple aspects of an adult evolutionary novelty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The characterization of the molecular changes that underlie the origin and diversification of morphological novelties is a key challenge in evolutionary developmental biology. The evolution of such traits is thought to rely largely on co-option of a toolkit of conserved developmental genes that typically perform multiple functions. Mutations that affect both a universal developmental process and the formation of a novelty might shed light onto the genetics of traits not represented in model systems. Here we describe three pleiotropic mutations with large effects on a novel trait, butterfly eyespots, and on a conserved stage of embryogenesis, segment polarity. Results We show that three mutations affecting eyespot size and/or colour composition in Bicyclus anynana butterflies occurred in the same locus, and that two of them are embryonic recessive lethal. Using surgical manipulations and analysis of gene expression patterns in developing wings, we demonstrate that the effects on eyespot morphology are due to changes in the epidermal response component of eyespot induction. Our analysis of morphology and of gene expression in mutant embryos shows that they have a typical segment polarity phenotype, consistent with the mutant locus encoding a negative regulator of Wingless signalling. Conclusions This study characterizes the segregation and developmental effects of alleles at a single locus that controls the morphology of a lineage-specific trait (butterfly eyespots) and a conserved process (embryonic segment polarity and, specifically, the regulation of Wingless signalling). Because no gene with such function was found in the orthologous, highly syntenic genomic regions of two other lepidopterans, we hypothesize that our locus is a yet undescribed, possibly lineage-specific, negative regulator of the conserved Wnt/Wg pathway. Moreover, the fact that this locus interferes with multiple aspects of eyespot morphology and maps to a genomic region containing

  6. Pleiotropic effects of genetic risk variants for other cancers on colorectal cancer risk: PAGE, GECCO, and CCFR Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Iona; Kocarnik, Jonathan M; Dumitrescu, Logan; Lindor, Noralane M; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Avery, Christy L.; Caberto, Christian P; Love, Shelly-Ann; Slattery, Martha L; Chan, Andrew T; Baron, John A; Hindorff, Lucia A; Park, Sungshim Lani; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Hoffmeister, Michael; Kraft, Peter; Butler, Anne; Duggan, David; Hou, Lifang; Carlson, Chris S; Monroe, Kristine R; Lin, Yi; Carty, Cara L; Mann, Sue; Ma, Jing; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S; Newcomb, Polly A; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Haile, Robert W; Conti, David V; Campbell, Peter T; Potter, John D; Caan, Bette J; Schoen, Robert E; Hayes, Richard B; Chanock, Stephen J; Berndt, Sonja I; Kury, Sebastien; Bezieau, Stephane; Ambite, Jose Luis; Kumaraguruparan, Gowri; Richardson, Danielle; Goodloe, Robert J; Dilks, Holli H; Baker, Paxton; Zanke, Brent W; Lemire, Mathieu; Gallinger, Steven; Hsu, Li; Jiao, Shuo; Harrison, Tabitha; Seminara, Daniela; Haiman, Christopher A; Kooperberg, Charles; Wilkens, Lynne R; Hutter, Carolyn M; White, Emily; Crawford, Dana C; Heiss, Gerardo; Hudson, Thomas J; Brenner, Hermann; Bush, William S; Casey, Graham; Marchand, Loic Le; Peters, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with a wide array of cancer sites. Several of these variants demonstrate associations with multiple cancers, suggesting pleiotropic effects and shared biological mechanisms across some cancers. We hypothesized that SNPs previously associated with other cancers may additionally be associated with colorectal cancer. In a large-scale study, we examined 171 SNPs previously associated with 18 different cancers for their associations with colorectal cancer. Design We examined 13,338 colorectal cancer cases and 40,967 controls from three consortia: Population Architecture using Genetics and Epidemiology (PAGE), Genetic Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer (GECCO), and the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR). Study-specific logistic regression results, adjusted for age, sex, principal components of genetic ancestry, and/or study specific factors (as relevant) were combined using fixed-effect meta-analyses to evaluate the association between each SNP and colorectal cancer risk. A Bonferroni-corrected p-value of 2.92×10−4 was used to determine statistical significance of the associations. Results Two correlated SNPs— rs10090154 and rs4242382—in Region 1 of chromosome 8q24, a prostate cancer susceptibility region, demonstrated statistically significant associations with colorectal cancer risk. The most significant association was observed with rs4242382 (meta-analysis OR=1.12; 95% CI: 1.07–1.18; P=1.74×10−5), which also demonstrated similar associations across racial/ethnic populations and anatomical sub-sites. Conclusion This is the first study to clearly demonstrate Region 1 of chromosome 8q24 as a susceptibility locus for colorectal cancer, thus adding colorectal cancer to the list of cancer sites linked to this particular multi-cancer risk region at 8q24. PMID:23935004

  7. Altered calmodulin activity in fluphenazine-resistant mutant strains. Pleiotropic effect on development and cellular organization in Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Kurn, N; Sela, B A

    1981-12-01

    Genetically altered calmodulin activity in spontaneously derived mutant strains, which were selected for resistance to the toxic effect of a specific inhibitor, the phenothiazine drug fluphenazine, is demonstrated. Partially purified calmodulin preparations from wild-type and fluphenazine-resistant strains of the multicellular alga Volvox carteri, were tested for the ability to activate Ca2+-ATPase of the erythrocyte membranes, and the inhibition of this stimulatory activity by fluphenazine. Unlike the preparation obtained from wild-type cells, mutant calmodulin is shown to be insensitive to fluphenazine inhibition, in one case, and calmodulin from another strain was found to be inactive in vitro, i.e. it did not activate Ca2+-ATPase. The pleiotropic phenotype of the spontaneously derived mutant strains involved aberrant multicellular organization and hormone-independent commitment of the multipotent asexual reproductive cells, gonodia, to sexual development. These results clearly implicate calmodulin in the control of development and morphogenesis in this simple multicellular eukaryote. In addition, intracellular inhibition of calmodulin in wild-type cells is shown to block the morphogenic process of embryo inversion and to arrest motility. The availability of mutant calmodulin will facilitate further investigation of the role of this ubiquitous regulatory protein in the control of development and differentiation in multicellular eukarytes, as well as the fine structure/function relationship with regard to calmodulin modulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. PMID:6459931

  8. Pleiotropic effect of thyroid hormones on gene expression in fish as exemplified from the blue bream Ballerus ballerus (Cyprinidae): Results of transcriptomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rastorguev, S M; Nedoluzhko, A V; Levina, M A; Prokhorchuk, E B; Skryabin, K G; Levin, B A

    2016-03-01

    A pronounced pleiotropic effect of thyroid hormones on the regulation of gene expression in fish in postembryogenesis was demonstrated for the first time using larvae and juveniles of the blue bream Ballerus ballerus as an example. Genome-wide transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) identified 1212 differentially expressed genes in the brain and liver of fish kept in triiodothyronine solution (0.25 ng/mL). Our data show that the regulation of gene expression by thyroid hormones is widespread in nature: it involves not only the structural genes but also the regulatory genes. A significant number of genes under the control of thyroid hormones are involved in the determination of morphological traits. PMID:27193715

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of sil Locus in Clinical Streptococcus pyogenes Strains

    PubMed Central

    Plainvert, Céline; Dinis, Márcia; Ravins, Miriam; Hanski, Emanuel; Touak, Gérald; Dmytruk, Nicolas; Fouet, Agnès

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus [GAS]) causes a wide variety of diseases, ranging from mild noninvasive to severe invasive infections. Mutations in regulatory components have been implicated in the switch from colonization to invasive phenotypes. The inactivation of the sil locus, composed of six genes encoding a quorum-sensing complex, gives rise to a highly invasive strain. However, studies conducted on limited collections of GAS strains suggested that sil prevalence is around 15%; furthermore, whereas a correlation between the presence of sil and the genetic background was suggested, no link between the presence of a functional sil locus and the invasive status was assessed. We established a collection of 637 nonredundant strains covering all emm genotypes present in France and of known clinical history; 68%, 22%, and 10% were from invasive infections, noninvasive infections, and asymptomatic carriage, respectively. Among the 637 strains, 206 were sil positive. The prevalence of the sil locus varied according to the emm genotype, being present in >85% of the emm4, emm18, emm32, emm60, emm87, and emm90 strains and absent from all emm1, emm28, and emm89 strains. A random selection based on 2009 French epidemiological data indicated that 16% of GAS strains are sil positive. Moreover, due to mutations leading to truncated proteins, only 9% of GAS strains harbor a predicted functional sil system. No correlation was observed between the presence or absence of a functional sil locus and the strain invasiveness status. PMID:24671796

  10. Vitamin D: Metabolism, Molecular Mechanism of Action, and Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Verlinden, Lieve; Carmeliet, Geert

    2016-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3] is the hormonally active form of vitamin D. The genomic mechanism of 1,25(OH)2D3 action involves the direct binding of the 1,25(OH)2D3 activated vitamin D receptor/retinoic X receptor (VDR/RXR) heterodimeric complex to specific DNA sequences. Numerous VDR co-regulatory proteins have been identified, and genome-wide studies have shown that the actions of 1,25(OH)2D3 involve regulation of gene activity at a range of locations many kilobases from the transcription start site. The structure of the liganded VDR/RXR complex was recently characterized using cryoelectron microscopy, X-ray scattering, and hydrogen deuterium exchange. These recent technological advances will result in a more complete understanding of VDR coactivator interactions, thus facilitating cell and gene specific clinical applications. Although the identification of mechanisms mediating VDR-regulated transcription has been one focus of recent research in the field, other topics of fundamental importance include the identification and functional significance of proteins involved in the metabolism of vitamin D. CYP2R1 has been identified as the most important 25-hydroxylase, and a critical role for CYP24A1 in humans was noted in studies showing that inactivating mutations in CYP24A1 are a probable cause of idiopathic infantile hypercalcemia. In addition, studies using knockout and transgenic mice have provided new insight on the physiological role of vitamin D in classical target tissues as well as evidence of extraskeletal effects of 1,25(OH)2D3 including inhibition of cancer progression, effects on the cardiovascular system, and immunomodulatory effects in certain autoimmune diseases. Some of the mechanistic findings in mouse models have also been observed in humans. The identification of similar pathways in humans could lead to the development of new therapies to prevent and treat disease. PMID:26681795

  11. Locus of control and obesity.

    PubMed

    Neymotin, Florence; Nemzer, Louis R

    2014-01-01

    In the developed world, the hazards associated with obesity have largely outstripped the risk of starvation. Obesity remains a difficult public health issue to address, due in large part to the many disciplines involved. A full understanding requires knowledge in the fields of genetics, endocrinology, psychology, sociology, economics, and public policy - among others. In this short review, which serves as an introduction to the Frontiers in Endocrinology research topic, we address one cross-disciplinary relationship: the interaction between the hunger/satiation neural circuitry, an individual's perceived locus of control, and the risk for obesity. Mammals have evolved a complex system for modulating energy intake. Overlaid on this, in humans, there exists a wide variation in "perceived locus of control" - that is, the extent to which an individual believes to be in charge of the events that affect them. Whether one has primarily an internal or external locus of control itself affects, and is affected by, external and physiological factors and has been correlated with the risk for obesity. Thus, the path from hunger and satiation to an individual's actual behavior may often be moderated by psychological factors, included among which is locus of control. PMID:25339940

  12. Detecting Functional Groups of Arabidopsis Mutants by Metabolic Profiling and Evaluation of Pleiotropic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Jörg; Börnke, Frederik; Schmiedl, Alfred; Kleine, Tatjana; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic profiles and fingerprints of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with various defects in plastidic sugar metabolism or photosynthesis were analyzed to elucidate if the genetic mutations can be traced by comparing their metabolic status. Using a platform of chromatographic and spectrometric tools data from untargeted full MS scans as well as from selected metabolites including major carbohydrates, phosphorylated intermediates, carboxylates, free amino acids, major antioxidants, and plastidic pigments were evaluated. Our key observations are that by multivariate statistical analysis each mutant can be separated by a unique metabolic signature. Closely related mutants come close. Thus metabolic profiles of sugar mutants are different but more similar than those of photosynthesis mutants. All mutants show pleiotropic responses mirrored in their metabolic status. These pleiotropic responses are typical and can be used for separating and grouping of the mutants. Our findings show that metabolite fingerprints can be taken to classify mutants and hence may be used to sort genes into functional groups. PMID:22639613

  13. Locus of Control and Status Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensman, Miriam Roza; Haller, Archibald O.

    Utilizing data derived from 277 rural, male respondents initially enrolled in Lenawee County, Michigan high schools, the Rotter's Internal-External Locus of Control Scale was employed to test the hypothesis that locus of control will have interactive rather than additive effects on the process of status attainment. Locus of control was defined as…

  14. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) Cattle Are Modulators of Growth.

    PubMed

    G T Pereira, Anirene; Utsunomiya, Yuri T; Milanesi, Marco; Torrecilha, Rafaela B P; Carmo, Adriana S; Neves, Haroldo H R; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Sonstegard, Tad S; Sölkner, Johann; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J; Garcia, José F

    2016-01-01

    Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS), were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV) for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1), IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2), GH1 (growth hormone 1), IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor) and GHR (growth hormone receptor), suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway. PMID:27410030

  15. Assessment of pleiotropic transcriptome perturbations in Arabidopsis engineered for indirect insect defence

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular characterization is an essential step of risk/safety assessment of genetically modified (GM) crops. Holistic approaches for molecular characterization using omics platforms can be used to confirm the intended impact of the genetic engineering, but can also reveal the unintended changes at the omics level as a first assessment of potential risks. The potential of omics platforms for risk assessment of GM crops has rarely been used for this purpose because of the lack of a consensus reference and statistical methods to judge the significance or importance of the pleiotropic changes in GM plants. Here we propose a meta data analysis approach to the analysis of GM plants, by measuring the transcriptome distance to untransformed wild-types. Results In the statistical analysis of the transcriptome distance between GM and wild-type plants, values are compared with naturally occurring transcriptome distances in non-GM counterparts obtained from a database. Using this approach we show that the pleiotropic effect of genes involved in indirect insect defence traits is substantially equivalent to the variation in gene expression occurring naturally in Arabidopsis. Conclusion Transcriptome distance is a useful screening method to obtain insight in the pleiotropic effects of genetic modification. PMID:24947327

  16. Pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in humans, mice and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Monika; Ludwig, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The characterisation of the pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in mammals illustrates that sensory organs and nerves are particularly affected by disorders because of the shared origin of melanocytes and neurocytes in the neural crest; e.g. the eye-colour is a valuable indicator of disorders in pigment production and eye dysfunctions. Disorders related to coat colour-associated alleles also occur in the skin (melanoma), reproductive tract and immune system. Additionally, the coat colour phenotype of an individual influences its general behaviour and fitness. Mutations in the same genes often produce similar coat colours and pleiotropic effects in different species (e.g., KIT [reproductive disorders, lethality], EDNRB [megacolon] and LYST [CHS]). Whereas similar disorders and similar-looking coat colour phenotypes sometimes have a different genetic background (e.g., deafness [EDN3/EDNRB, MITF, PAX and SNAI2] and visual diseases [OCA2, RAB38, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, TRPM1 and TYR]). The human predilection for fancy phenotypes that ignore disorders and genetic defects is a major driving force for the increase of pleiotropic effects in domestic species and laboratory subjects since domestication has commenced approximately 18,000 years ago.

  17. Pleiotropic effects of hemagglutinin amino acid substitutions of H5 influenza escape mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Rudneva, Irina A.; Timofeeva, Tatiana A.; Ignatieva, Anna V.; Shilov, Aleksandr A.; Krylov, Petr S.; Ilyushina, Natalia A.; Kaverin, Nikolai V.

    2013-12-15

    In the present study we assessed pleiotropic characteristics of the antibody-selected mutations. We examined pH optimum of fusion, temperatures of HA heat inactivation, and in vitro and in vivo replication kinetics of the previously obtained influenza H5 escape mutants. Our results showed that HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. Mutations of the escape mutants located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability (P<0.05). HA changes at positions 131, 144, 145, and 156 and substitutions at positions 131, 142, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 escape mutants in vitro and in vivo, respectively. Overall, a co-variation between antigenic specificity and different HA phenotypic properties has been demonstrated. We believe that the monitoring of pleiotropic effects of the HA mutations found in H5 escape mutants is essential for accurate prediction of mutants with pandemic potential. - Highlights: • HA1 N142K mutation significantly lowered the pH of fusion optimum. • Mutations located in the HA lateral loop significantly affected H5 HA thermostability. • HA changes at positions 131, 142, 144, 145, and 156 affected the replicative ability of H5 mutants. • Acquisition of glycosylation site could lead to the emergence of multiple pleiotropic effects.

  18. Pleiotropic Genes Affecting Carcass Traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) Cattle Are Modulators of Growth

    PubMed Central

    Milanesi, Marco; Torrecilha, Rafaela B. P.; Carmo, Adriana S.; Neves, Haroldo H. R.; Carvalheiro, Roberto; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Sölkner, Johann; Contreras-Castillo, Carmen J.; Garcia, José F.

    2016-01-01

    Two complementary methods, namely Multi-Trait Meta-Analysis and Versatile Gene-Based Test for Genome-wide Association Studies (VEGAS), were used to identify putative pleiotropic genes affecting carcass traits in Bos indicus (Nellore) cattle. The genotypic data comprised over 777,000 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers scored in 995 bulls, and the phenotypic data included deregressed breeding values (dEBV) for weight measurements at birth, weaning and yearling, as well visual scores taken at weaning and yearling for carcass finishing precocity, conformation and muscling. Both analyses pointed to the pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1) as a major pleiotropic gene. VEGAS analysis revealed 224 additional candidates. From these, 57 participated, together with PLAG1, in a network involved in the modulation of the function and expression of IGF1 (insulin like growth factor 1), IGF2 (insulin like growth factor 2), GH1 (growth hormone 1), IGF1R (insulin like growth factor 1 receptor) and GHR (growth hormone receptor), suggesting that those pleiotropic genes operate as satellite regulators of the growth pathway. PMID:27410030

  19. Pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in humans, mice and other mammals.

    PubMed

    Reissmann, Monika; Ludwig, Arne

    2013-01-01

    The characterisation of the pleiotropic effects of coat colour-associated mutations in mammals illustrates that sensory organs and nerves are particularly affected by disorders because of the shared origin of melanocytes and neurocytes in the neural crest; e.g. the eye-colour is a valuable indicator of disorders in pigment production and eye dysfunctions. Disorders related to coat colour-associated alleles also occur in the skin (melanoma), reproductive tract and immune system. Additionally, the coat colour phenotype of an individual influences its general behaviour and fitness. Mutations in the same genes often produce similar coat colours and pleiotropic effects in different species (e.g., KIT [reproductive disorders, lethality], EDNRB [megacolon] and LYST [CHS]). Whereas similar disorders and similar-looking coat colour phenotypes sometimes have a different genetic background (e.g., deafness [EDN3/EDNRB, MITF, PAX and SNAI2] and visual diseases [OCA2, RAB38, SLC24A5, SLC45A2, TRPM1 and TYR]). The human predilection for fancy phenotypes that ignore disorders and genetic defects is a major driving force for the increase of pleiotropic effects in domestic species and laboratory subjects since domestication has commenced approximately 18,000 years ago. PMID:23583561

  20. Pleiotropic Roles of the Msi1-Like Protein Msl1 in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dong-Hoon; Maeng, Shinae; Strain, Anna K.; Floyd, Anna; Nielsen, Kirsten; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Msi1-like (MSIL) proteins contain WD40 motifs and have a pleiotropic cellular function as negative regulators of the Ras/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway and components of chromatin assembly factor 1 (CAF-1), yet they have not been studied in fungal pathogens. Here we identified and characterized an MSIL protein, Msl1, in Cryptococcus neoformans, which causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis in humans. Notably, Msl1 plays pleiotropic roles in C. neoformans in both cAMP-dependent and -independent manners largely independent of Ras. Msl1 negatively controls antioxidant melanin production and sexual differentiation, and this was repressed by the inhibition of the cAMP-signaling pathway. In contrast, Msl1 controls thermotolerance, diverse stress responses, and antifungal drug resistance in a Ras/cAMP-independent manner. Cac2, which is the second CAF-1 component, appears to play both redundant and distinct functions compared to the functions of Msl1. Msl1 is required for the full virulence of C. neoformans. Transcriptome analysis identified a group of Msl1-regulated genes, which include stress-related genes such as HSP12 and HSP78. In conclusion, this study demonstrates pleiotropic roles of Msl1 in the human fungal pathogen C. neoformans, providing insight into a potential novel antifungal therapeutic target. PMID:23042129

  1. Malaria Parasite-Infected Erythrocytes Secrete PfCK1, the Plasmodium Homologue of the Pleiotropic Protein Kinase Casein Kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Demarta-Gatsi, Claudia; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Carvalho, Teresa Gil; Moniatte, Marc; Doerig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 (CK1) is a pleiotropic protein kinase implicated in several fundamental processes of eukaryotic cell biology. Plasmodium falciparum encodes a single CK1 isoform, PfCK1, that is expressed at all stages of the parasite's life cycle. We have previously shown that the pfck1 gene cannot be disrupted, but that the locus can be modified if no loss-of-function is incurred, suggesting an important role for this kinase in intra-erythrocytic asexual proliferation. Here, we report on the use of parasite lines expressing GFP- or His-tagged PfCK1 from the endogenous locus to investigate (i) the dynamics of PfCK1 localisation during the asexual cycle in red blood cells, and (ii) potential interactors of PfCK1, so as to gain insight into the involvement of the enzyme in specific cellular processes. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals a dynamic localisation of PfCK1, with evidence for a pool of the enzyme being directed to the membrane of the host erythrocyte in the early stages of infection, followed by a predominantly intra-parasite localisation in trophozoites and schizonts and association with micronemes in merozoites. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that a pool of enzymatically active PfCK1 is secreted into the culture supernatant, demonstrating that PfCK1 is an ectokinase. Our interactome experiments and ensuing kinase assays using recombinant PfCK1 to phosphorylate putative interactors in vitro suggest an involvement of PfCK1 in many cellular processes such as mRNA splicing, protein trafficking, ribosomal, and host cell invasion. PMID:26629826

  2. Malaria Parasite-Infected Erythrocytes Secrete PfCK1, the Plasmodium Homologue of the Pleiotropic Protein Kinase Casein Kinase 1

    PubMed Central

    Dorin-Semblat, Dominique; Demarta-Gatsi, Claudia; Hamelin, Romain; Armand, Florence; Carvalho, Teresa Gil; Moniatte, Marc; Doerig, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Casein kinase 1 (CK1) is a pleiotropic protein kinase implicated in several fundamental processes of eukaryotic cell biology. Plasmodium falciparum encodes a single CK1 isoform, PfCK1, that is expressed at all stages of the parasite’s life cycle. We have previously shown that the pfck1 gene cannot be disrupted, but that the locus can be modified if no loss-of-function is incurred, suggesting an important role for this kinase in intra-erythrocytic asexual proliferation. Here, we report on the use of parasite lines expressing GFP- or His-tagged PfCK1 from the endogenous locus to investigate (i) the dynamics of PfCK1 localisation during the asexual cycle in red blood cells, and (ii) potential interactors of PfCK1, so as to gain insight into the involvement of the enzyme in specific cellular processes. Immunofluorescence analysis reveals a dynamic localisation of PfCK1, with evidence for a pool of the enzyme being directed to the membrane of the host erythrocyte in the early stages of infection, followed by a predominantly intra-parasite localisation in trophozoites and schizonts and association with micronemes in merozoites. Furthermore, we present strong evidence that a pool of enzymatically active PfCK1 is secreted into the culture supernatant, demonstrating that PfCK1 is an ectokinase. Our interactome experiments and ensuing kinase assays using recombinant PfCK1 to phosphorylate putative interactors in vitro suggest an involvement of PfCK1 in many cellular processes such as mRNA splicing, protein trafficking, ribosomal, and host cell invasion. PMID:26629826

  3. Suppressors of a genetic regulatory mutation affecting isoleucine-valine biosynthesis in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, J E; Calhoun, D H

    1978-01-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 mutant PS187 carries a mutation, ilvA538, in the structural gene for the biosynthetic L-threonine deaminase that leads to a leucine-sensitive growth phenotype, an isoleucine- and leucine-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and pleiotropic effects resulting in abnormally low and invariant expression of some of the isoleucine-valine biosynthetic enzymes. Fifty-eight derivatives of strain PS187 were isolated as resistant to growth inhibition by leucine, by valine, or by valine plus glycly-valine and were biochemically, genetically, and physiologically characterized. All of these derivatives produced the feedback-hypersensitive L-threonine deaminase, and thus presumably possess the ilvA538 allele of the parent strain. Elevated synthesis of L-threonine deaminase was observed in 41 of the 58 isolates. Among 18 strains analyzed genetically, only those with mutations linked to the ilv gene clusters at 83 min produced elevated levels of L-threonine deaminase. One of the strains, MSR91, isolated as resistant to valine plus glycyl-valine, was chosen for more detailed study. The locus in strain MSR91 conferring resistance was located in four factor crosses between ilvE and rbs, and is in or near the ilvO gene postulated to be a site controlling the expression of the ilvEDA genes. Synthesis of the ilvEDA gene products in strain MSR91 is constitutive and derepressed approximately 200-fold relative to the parent strain, indicating that the genetic regulatory effects of the ilvA538 allele have been suppressed. Strain MSR91 should be suitable for use in purification of the ilvA538 gene product, since enzyme synthesis is fully derepressed and the suppressor mutation is clearly not located within the ilvA gene. PMID:361682

  4. Mutations in rpsL that confer streptomycin resistance show pleiotropic effects on virulence and the production of a carbapenem antibiotic in Erwinia carotovora.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Anne M L; Simpson, Natalie J L; Lilley, Kathryn S; Salmond, George P C

    2010-04-01

    Spontaneous streptomycin-resistant derivatives of Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora strain ATTn10 were isolated. Sequencing of the rpsL locus (encoding the ribosomal protein S12) showed that each mutant was missense, with a single base change, resulting in the substitution of the wild-type lysine by arginine, threonine or asparagine at codon 43. Phenotypic analyses showed that the rpsL mutants could be segregated into two groups: K43R mutants showed reduced production of the beta-lactam secondary metabolite 1-carbapen-2-em-3 carboxylic acid (Car), but little effect on exoenzyme production or virulence in potato tuber tests. By contrast, the K43N and K43T mutations were pleiotropic, resulting in reduced exoenzyme production and virulence, as well as diminished Car production. The effect on Car production was due to reduced transcription of the quorum-sensing-dependent car biosynthetic genes. The effects of K43N and K43T mutations on Car production were partially alleviated by provision of an excess of the quorum-sensing signalling molecule N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone. Finally, a proteomic analysis of the K43T mutant indicated that the abundance of a subset of intracellular proteins was affected by this rpsL mutation.

  5. Speaking rate effects on locus equation slope.

    PubMed

    Berry, Jeff; Weismer, Gary

    2013-11-01

    A locus equation describes a 1st order regression fit to a scatter of vowel steady-state frequency values predicting vowel onset frequency values. Locus equation coefficients are often interpreted as indices of coarticulation. Speaking rate variations with a constant consonant-vowel form are thought to induce changes in the degree of coarticulation. In the current work, the hypothesis that locus slope is a transparent index of coarticulation is examined through the analysis of acoustic samples of large-scale, nearly continuous variations in speaking rate. Following the methodological conventions for locus equation derivation, data pooled across ten vowels yield locus equation slopes that are mostly consistent with the hypothesis that locus equations vary systematically with coarticulation. Comparable analyses between different four-vowel pools reveal variations in the locus slope range and changes in locus slope sensitivity to rate change. Analyses across rate but within vowels are substantially less consistent with the locus hypothesis. Taken together, these findings suggest that the practice of vowel pooling exerts a non-negligible influence on locus outcomes. Results are discussed within the context of articulatory accounts of locus equations and the effects of speaking rate change.

  6. Impact of variation at the FTO locus on milk fat yield in Holstein dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Zielke, Lea G; Bortfeldt, Ralf H; Reissmann, Monika; Tetens, Jens; Thaller, Georg; Brockmann, Gudrun A

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the biological role of the Fat Mass and Obesity associated (FTO) gene locus on milk composition in German Holstein cattle. Since FTO controls energy homeostasis and expenditure and the FTO locus has repeatedly shown association with obesity in human studies, we tested FTO as a candidate gene in particular for milk fat yield, which represents a high amount of energy secreted during lactation. The study was performed on 2,402 bulls and 860 cows where dense milk composition data were available. Genetic information was taken from a 2 Mb region around FTO. Five SNPs and two haplotype blocks in a 725 kb region covering FTO and the neighboring genes RPGRIP1L, U6ATAC, and 5 S rRNA were associated with milk fat yield and also affected protein yield in the same direction. Interestingly, higher frequency SNP alleles and haplotypes within the FTO gene increased milk fat and protein yields by up to 2.8 and 2.2 kg per lactation, respectively, while the most frequent haplotype in the upstream block covering exon 1 of FTO to exon 15 of RPGRIP1L had opposite effects with lower fat and milk yield. Both haplotype blocks were also significant in cows. The loci accounted for about 1% of the corresponding trait variance in the population. The association signals not only provided evidence for at least two causative mutations in the FTO locus with a functional effect on milk but also milk protein yield. The pleiotropic effects suggest a biological function on the usage of energy resources and the control of energy balance rather than directly affecting fat and protein synthesis. The identified effect of the obesity gene locus on milk energy content suggests an impact on infant nutrition by breast feeding in humans.

  7. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus.

    PubMed

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K; Nederbragt, Alexander J; Jakobsen, Kjetill S; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  8. Genomic characterization of the Atlantic cod sex-locus

    PubMed Central

    Star, Bastiaan; Tørresen, Ole K.; Nederbragt, Alexander J.; Jakobsen, Kjetill S.; Pampoulie, Christophe; Jentoft, Sissel

    2016-01-01

    A variety of sex determination mechanisms can be observed in evolutionary divergent teleosts. Sex determination is genetic in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), however the genomic location or size of its sex-locus is unknown. Here, we characterize the sex-locus of Atlantic cod using whole genome sequence (WGS) data of 227 wild-caught specimens. Analyzing more than 55 million polymorphic loci, we identify 166 loci that are associated with sex. These loci are located in six distinct regions on five different linkage groups (LG) in the genome. The largest of these regions, an approximately 55 Kb region on LG11, contains the majority of genotypes that segregate closely according to a XX-XY system. Genotypes in this region can be used genetically determine sex, whereas those in the other regions are inconsistently sex-linked. The identified region on LG11 and its surrounding genes have no clear sequence homology with genes or regulatory elements associated with sex-determination or differentiation in other species. The functionality of this sex-locus therefore remains unknown. The WGS strategy used here proved adequate for detecting the small regions associated with sex in this species. Our results highlight the evolutionary flexibility in genomic architecture underlying teleost sex-determination and allow practical applications to genetically sex Atlantic cod. PMID:27499266

  9. EDARV370A associated facial characteristics in Uyghur population revealing further pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianqian; Li, Jinxi; Tan, Jingze; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Manfei; Wu, Sijie; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Qin, Pengfei; Guan, Yaqun; Jiao, Yi; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Sabeti, Pardis C; Tang, Kun; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive variant of human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, had undergone strong positive selection in East Asia. In mice and humans, EDARV370A was found to affect ectodermal-derived characteristics, including hair thickness, hair shape, active sweat gland density and teeth formation. Facial characteristics are also largely ectodermal derived. In this study, taking advantage of an admixed population of East Asian and European ancestry-the Uyghur, we aim to test whether EDARV370A is affecting facial characteristics and to investigate its pleiotropic nature and genetic model. In a sample of 1027 Uyghurs, we discover that EDARV370A is significantly associated with several facial characteristics, in particular shape of earlobe (P = 3.64 × 10 (-6) ) and type of chin (P = 9.23 × 10 (-5) ), with successful replication in other East Asian populations. Additionally, in this Uyghur population, we replicate previous association findings of incisors shoveling (P = 1.02 × 10 (-7) ), double incisors shoveling (P = 1.86 × 10 (-12) ) and hair straightness (P = 3.99 × 10 (-16) ), providing strong evidence supporting an additive model for the EDARV370A associations. Partial least square path model confirms EDARV370A systematically affect these weakly related ectodermal-derived characteristics, suggesting the pleiotropic effect of EDARV370A mainly plays roles in early embryo development. This study extends our knowledge about the pleiotropic nature of EDARV370A and provides potential clues to its adaptation fitness in human evolution.

  10. EDARV370A associated facial characteristics in Uyghur population revealing further pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianqian; Li, Jinxi; Tan, Jingze; Yang, Yajun; Zhang, Manfei; Wu, Sijie; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Juan; Qin, Pengfei; Guan, Yaqun; Jiao, Yi; Zhang, Zhaoxia; Sabeti, Pardis C; Tang, Kun; Xu, Shuhua; Jin, Li; Wang, Sijia

    2016-01-01

    An adaptive variant of human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, had undergone strong positive selection in East Asia. In mice and humans, EDARV370A was found to affect ectodermal-derived characteristics, including hair thickness, hair shape, active sweat gland density and teeth formation. Facial characteristics are also largely ectodermal derived. In this study, taking advantage of an admixed population of East Asian and European ancestry-the Uyghur, we aim to test whether EDARV370A is affecting facial characteristics and to investigate its pleiotropic nature and genetic model. In a sample of 1027 Uyghurs, we discover that EDARV370A is significantly associated with several facial characteristics, in particular shape of earlobe (P = 3.64 × 10 (-6) ) and type of chin (P = 9.23 × 10 (-5) ), with successful replication in other East Asian populations. Additionally, in this Uyghur population, we replicate previous association findings of incisors shoveling (P = 1.02 × 10 (-7) ), double incisors shoveling (P = 1.86 × 10 (-12) ) and hair straightness (P = 3.99 × 10 (-16) ), providing strong evidence supporting an additive model for the EDARV370A associations. Partial least square path model confirms EDARV370A systematically affect these weakly related ectodermal-derived characteristics, suggesting the pleiotropic effect of EDARV370A mainly plays roles in early embryo development. This study extends our knowledge about the pleiotropic nature of EDARV370A and provides potential clues to its adaptation fitness in human evolution. PMID:26603699

  11. Antibodies from combinatorial libraries use functional receptor pleiotropism to regulate cell fates.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Richard A; Grover, Rajesh K; Zhang, Hongkai; Xie, Jia; Han, Kyung Ho; Peng, Yingjie; Yea, Kyungmoo

    2015-11-01

    To date, most antibodies from combinatorial libraries have been selected purely on the basis of binding. However, new methods now allow selection on the basis of function in animal cells. These selected agonist antibodies have given new insights into the important problem of signal transduction. Remarkably, when some antibodies bind to a given receptor they induce a cell fate that is different than that induced by the natural agonist to the same receptor. The fact that receptors can be functionally pleiotropic may yield new insights into the important problem of signal transduction.

  12. Characterization of a Multipeptide Lantibiotic Locus in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Maricic, Natalie; Anderson, Erica S.; Opipari, AnneMarie E.; Yu, Emily A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterial communities are established through a combination of cooperative and antagonistic interactions between the inhabitants. Competitive interactions often involve the production of antimicrobial substances, including bacteriocins, which are small antimicrobial peptides that target other community members. Despite the nearly ubiquitous presence of bacteriocin-encoding loci, inhibitory activity has been attributed to only a small fraction of gene clusters. In this study, we characterized a novel locus (the pld locus) in the pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae that drives the production of a bacteriocin called pneumolancidin, which has broad antimicrobial activity. The locus encodes an unusual tandem array of four inhibitory peptides, three of which are absolutely required for antibacterial activity. The three peptide sequences are similar but appear to play distinct roles in regulation and inhibition. A modification enzyme typically found in loci encoding a class of highly modified bacteriocins called lantibiotics was required for inhibitory activity. The production of pneumolancidin is controlled by a two-component regulatory system that is activated by the accumulation of modified peptides. The locus is located on a mobile element that has been found in many pneumococcal lineages, although not all elements carry the pld genes. Intriguingly, a minimal region containing only the genes required for pneumolancidin immunity was found in several Streptococcus mitis strains. The pneumolancidin-producing strain can inhibit nearly all pneumococci tested to date and provided a competitive advantage in vivo. These peptides not only represent a unique strategy for bacterial competition but also are an important resource to guide the development of new antimicrobials. PMID:26814178

  13. Dissection of the locus control function located on the chicken lysozyme gene domain in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bonifer, C; Yannoutsos, N; Krüger, G; Grosveld, F; Sippel, A E

    1994-01-01

    The entire chicken lysozyme gene locus including all known cis-regulatory sequences and the 5' and 3' matrix attachment sites defining the borders of the DNase I sensitive chromatin domain, is expressed at a high level and independent of its chromosomal position in macrophages of transgenic mice. It was concluded that the lysozyme gene locus carries a locus control function. We analysed several cis-regulatory deletion mutants to investigate their influence on tissue specificity and level of expression. Position independent expression of the gene is lost whenever one of the upstream tissue specific enhancer regions is deleted, although tissue specific expression is usually retained. Deletion of the domain border fragments has no influence on copy number dependency of expression. However, without these regions an increased incidence of ectopic expression is observed. This suggests that the domain border fragments may help to suppress transgene expression in inappropriate tissues. We conclude, that position independent expression of the lysozyme gene is not controlled by a single specific region of the locus but is the result of the concerted action of several tissue specific upstream regulatory DNA elements with the promoter. Images PMID:7937146

  14. Heritability of floral volatiles and pleiotropic responses to artificial selection in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zu, Pengjuan; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Schiestl, Florian P

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of the vast diversity of floral volatiles is little understood, although they serve fundamental functions, such as pollinator attraction and herbivore deterrence. Floral volatiles are often species specific, yet highly variable and sensitive to environmental factors. To date, nothing is known about the heritability of floral volatiles, and whether individual compounds can evolve independently or solely in concert with the whole volatile bouquet. We conducted bi-directional artificial selection on four target floral volatiles to estimate heritability and correlated pleiotropic responses in the wild turnip (Brassica rapa). The realized heritability of the four target volatiles ranged from 20% to 45%. The average narrow-sense heritability of all 13 analyzed floral volatiles was 18% based on parent-offspring regressions. There were pleiotropic effects of the selected floral volatile compounds on other constituents of the floral scent bouquet, on flowering time and on some morphological traits. We found that the whole floral scent bouquet changed, even when there was selection only on single compounds, with the overall phenotypic covariance being unaffected. Our study demonstrates that floral scent can evolve rapidly under phenotypic selection, but with additional correlated responses in traits that are not direct targets of selection.

  15. Pleiotropic effects of type 2 diabetes management strategies on renal risk factors.

    PubMed

    Muskiet, Marcel H A; Tonneijck, Lennart; Smits, Mark M; Kramer, Mark H H; Heerspink, Hiddo J Lambers; van Raalte, Daniël H

    2015-05-01

    In parallel with the type 2 diabetes pandemic, diabetic kidney disease has become the leading cause of end-stage renal disease worldwide, and is associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. As established in landmark randomised trials and recommended in clinical guidelines, prevention and treatment of diabetic kidney disease focuses on control of the two main renal risk factors, hyperglycaemia and systemic hypertension. Treatment of systemic hypertension with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers is advocated because these drugs seem to exert specific renoprotective effects beyond blood pressure lowering. Emerging evidence shows that obesity, glomerular hyperfiltration, albuminuria, and dyslipidaemia might also adversely affect the kidney in diabetes. Control of these risk factors could have additional benefits on renal outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes. However, despite multifactorial treatment approaches, residual risk for the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease in patients with type 2 diabetes remains, and novel strategies or therapies to treat the disease are urgently needed. Several drugs used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes are associated with pleiotropic effects that could favourably or unfavourably change patients' renal risk profile. We review the risk factors and treatment of diabetic kidney disease, and describe the pleiotropic effects of widely used drugs in type 2 diabetes management on renal outcomes, with special emphasis on antihyperglycaemic drugs.

  16. Azilsartan as a Potent Antihypertensive Drug with Possible Pleiotropic Cardiometabolic Effects: A Review Study

    PubMed Central

    Georgiopoulos, Georgios; Katsi, Vasiliki; Oikonomou, Dimitrios; Vamvakou, Georgia; Koutli, Evangelia; Laina, Aggeliki; Tsioufis, Constantinos; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hypertension related cardiovascular (CV) complications could be amplified by the presence of metabolic co-morbidities. Azilsartan medoxomil (AZL-M) is the eighth approved member of angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), a drug class of high priority in the management of hypertensive subjects with diabetes mellitus type II (DMII). Methods: Under this prism, we performed a systematic review of the literature for all relevant articles in order to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and possible clinical role of AZL-M in hypertensive diabetic patients. Results: AZL-M was found to be more effective in terms of reducing indices of blood pressure over alternative ARBs or angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors with minimal side effects. Preclinical studies have established pleiotropic effects for AZL-M beyond its primary antihypertensive role through differential gene expression, up-regulation of membrane receptors and favorable effect on selective intracellular biochemical and pro-atherosclerotic pathways. Conclusion: Indirect but accumulating evidence from recent literature supports the efficacy and safety of AZL-M among diabetic patients. However, no clinical data exist to date that evince a beneficial role of AZL-M in patients with metabolic disorders on top of its antihypertensive effect. Further clinical studies are warranted to assess the pleiotropic cardiometabolic benefits of AZL-M that are derived from preclinical research. PMID:27536242

  17. Pleiotropic effects of a single gene on skeletal development and sensory system patterning in sticklebacks

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adaptation to a new environment can be facilitated by co-inheritance of a suite of phenotypes that are all advantageous in the new habitat. Although experimental evidence demonstrates that multiple phenotypes often map to the same genomic regions, it is challenging to determine whether phenotypes are associated due to pleiotropic effects of a single gene or to multiple tightly linked genes. In the threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus), multiple phenotypes are associated with a genomic region around the gene Ectodysplasin (Eda), but only the presence of bony lateral plates has been conclusively shown to be caused by Eda. Results Here, we ask whether pleiotropy or linkage is responsible for the association between lateral plates and the distribution of the neuromasts of the lateral line. We first identify a strong correlation between plate appearance and changes in the spatial distribution of neuromasts through development. We then use an Eda transgene to induce the formation of ectopic plates in low plated fish, which also results in alterations to neuromast distribution. Our results also show that other loci may modify the effects of Eda on plate formation and neuromast distribution. Conclusions Together, these results demonstrate that Eda has pleiotropic effects on at least two phenotypes, highlighting the role of pleiotropy in the genetic basis of adaptation. PMID:24499504

  18. Heritability of floral volatiles and pleiotropic responses to artificial selection in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Zu, Pengjuan; Blanckenhorn, Wolf U; Schiestl, Florian P

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of the vast diversity of floral volatiles is little understood, although they serve fundamental functions, such as pollinator attraction and herbivore deterrence. Floral volatiles are often species specific, yet highly variable and sensitive to environmental factors. To date, nothing is known about the heritability of floral volatiles, and whether individual compounds can evolve independently or solely in concert with the whole volatile bouquet. We conducted bi-directional artificial selection on four target floral volatiles to estimate heritability and correlated pleiotropic responses in the wild turnip (Brassica rapa). The realized heritability of the four target volatiles ranged from 20% to 45%. The average narrow-sense heritability of all 13 analyzed floral volatiles was 18% based on parent-offspring regressions. There were pleiotropic effects of the selected floral volatile compounds on other constituents of the floral scent bouquet, on flowering time and on some morphological traits. We found that the whole floral scent bouquet changed, even when there was selection only on single compounds, with the overall phenotypic covariance being unaffected. Our study demonstrates that floral scent can evolve rapidly under phenotypic selection, but with additional correlated responses in traits that are not direct targets of selection. PMID:26391626

  19. Identification of pleiotropic genes and gene sets underlying growth and immunity traits: a case study on Meishan pigs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Wang, Z; Yang, Y; Zhao, J; Chen, Q; Liao, R; Chen, Z; Zhang, X; Xue, M; Yang, H; Zheng, Y; Wang, Q; Pan, Y

    2016-04-01

    Both growth and immune capacity are important traits in animal breeding. The animal quantitative trait loci (QTL) database is a valuable resource and can be used for interpreting the genetic mechanisms that underlie growth and immune traits. However, QTL intervals often involve too many candidate genes to find the true causal genes. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide an effective annotation pipeline that can make full use of the information of Gene Ontology terms annotation, linkage gene blocks and pathways to further identify pleiotropic genes and gene sets in the overlapping intervals of growth-related and immunity-related QTLs. In total, 55 non-redundant QTL overlapping intervals were identified, 1893 growth-related genes and 713 immunity-related genes were further classified into overlapping intervals and 405 pleiotropic genes shared by the two gene sets were determined. In addition, 19 pleiotropic gene linkage blocks and 67 pathways related to immunity and growth traits were discovered. A total of 343 growth-related genes and 144 immunity-related genes involved in pleiotropic pathways were also identified, respectively. We also sequenced and genotyped 284 individuals from Chinese Meishan pigs and European pigs and mapped the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to the pleiotropic genes and gene sets that we identified. A total of 971 high-confidence SNPs were mapped to the pleiotropic genes and gene sets that we identified, and among them 743 SNPs were statistically significant in allele frequency between Meishan and European pigs. This study explores the relationship between growth and immunity traits from the view of QTL overlapping intervals and can be generalized to explore the relationships between other traits.

  20. Factors Determining Adolescent Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopera-Frye, Karen F.; And Others

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between locus of control in adolescence and a successful transition to adulthood. Having an external locus of control has been implicated as an important factor in adolescent behaviors such as teenage pregnancy and delinquency, and has been found to be negatively related to school achievement. This…

  1. Genetic characterization and regulation of the nadB locus of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, B T; Olivera, B M; Roth, J R

    1987-01-01

    The nadB locus encodes the first enzyme of NAD synthesis. It has been reported that this gene and nadA are regulated by a positive regulatory protein encoded in the nadB region. In pursuing this regulatory mechanism, we constructed a fine-structure genetic map of the nadB gene. The region appears to include a single complementation group; no evidence for a positive regulatory element was found. Several mutations causing resistance to the analog 6-aminonicotinamide mapped within the structural gene and probably cause resistance to feedback inhibition. Regulatory mutations for nadB were isolated. These mutants mapped far from nadB near the pnuA gene, which encodes a function required for nicotinamide mononucleotide transport. The regulatory mutations appear to affect a distinct function encoded in the same operon as pnuA. PMID:3305482

  2. TYK2 Protein-Coding Variants Protect against Rheumatoid Arthritis and Autoimmunity, with No Evidence of Major Pleiotropic Effects on Non-Autoimmune Complex Traits

    PubMed Central

    Diogo, Dorothée; Bastarache, Lisa; Liao, Katherine P.; Graham, Robert R.; Fulton, Robert S.; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Cui, Jing; Lee, Annette; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Kremer, Joel M.; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Franke, Barbara; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Mariette, Xavier; Richard-Miceli, Corrine; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Nurmohamed, Michael T.; Kurreeman, Fina; Mikuls, Ted R.; Okada, Yukinori; Stahl, Eli A.; Larson, David E.; Deluca, Tracie L.; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Kosoy, Roman; Ransom, Michael; Bhangale, Tushar R.; Ortmann, Ward; Cagan, Andrew; Gainer, Vivian; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Kohane, Isaac; Murphy, Shawn N.; Martin, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Worthington, Jane; Mardis, Elaine R.; Seldin, Michael F.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Behrens, Timothy; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Denny, Joshua C.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the success of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in detecting a large number of loci for complex phenotypes such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) susceptibility, the lack of information on the causal genes leaves important challenges to interpret GWAS results in the context of the disease biology. Here, we genetically fine-map the RA risk locus at 19p13 to define causal variants, and explore the pleiotropic effects of these same variants in other complex traits. First, we combined Immunochip dense genotyping (n = 23,092 case/control samples), Exomechip genotyping (n = 18,409 case/control samples) and targeted exon-sequencing (n = 2,236 case/controls samples) to demonstrate that three protein-coding variants in TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2) independently protect against RA: P1104A (rs34536443, OR = 0.66, P = 2.3x10-21), A928V (rs35018800, OR = 0.53, P = 1.2x10-9), and I684S (rs12720356, OR = 0.86, P = 4.6x10-7). Second, we show that the same three TYK2 variants protect against systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, Pomnibus = 6x10-18), and provide suggestive evidence that two of the TYK2 variants (P1104A and A928V) may also protect against inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Pomnibus = 0.005). Finally, in a phenome-wide association study (PheWAS) assessing >500 phenotypes using electronic medical records (EMR) in >29,000 subjects, we found no convincing evidence for association of P1104A and A928V with complex phenotypes other than autoimmune diseases such as RA, SLE and IBD. Together, our results demonstrate the role of TYK2 in the pathogenesis of RA, SLE and IBD, and provide supporting evidence for TYK2 as a promising drug target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25849893

  3. Prospective of curcumin, a pleiotropic signalling molecule from Curcuma longa in the treatment of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Lal, Neetika

    2016-02-15

    GBM (Glioblastoma) is the most malignant human brain tumor with median survival of one year. The treatment involves surgery, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy mostly with the alkylation agents such as temozolomide (TMZ). Dietary polyphenol curcumin, isolated from the rhizome of the Curcuma longa (turmeric), has emerged as remarkable anti-cancer agent in the treatment of various peripheral cancers such as blood, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, melanoma as well as skin, lung, prostate, breast, ovarian, bladder, liver, gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic and colorectal epithelial cancers with a pleiotropic mode of action and also showed promise in alleviation of GBM. In this review, the mechanism of anticancer effect of curcumin in GBM has been discussed extensively. The clinical safety and pharmacokinetics of curcumin has been scrutinized to combat the challenges for the treatment of GBM.

  4. Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thiago Melo Costa; Pimenta, Fabio Silva; Porto, Marcella Lima; Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Campagnaro, Bianca Prandi; Gava, Agata Lages; Meyrelles, Silvana Santos; Vasquez, Elisardo Corral

    2016-01-01

    Because diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial metabolic disease, its prevention and treatment has been a constant challenge for basic and clinical investigators focused on translating their discoveries into clinical treatment of this complex disorder. In this review, we highlight recent experimental and clinical evidences of potential coadjuvants in the management of DM, such as polyphenols (quercetin, resveratrol and silymarin), cultured probiotic microorganisms and drugs acting through direct/indirect or pleiotropic effects on glycemic control in DM. Among several options, we highlight new promising therapeutic coadjuvants, including chemical scavengers, the probiotic kefir and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, which besides the reduction of hyperglycemia and ameliorate insulin resistance, they reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vascular circulation. In the near future, experimental studies are expected to clear the intracellular pathways involving coadjuvants. The design of clinical trials may also contribute to new strategies with coadjuvants against the harmful effects of diabetic complications. PMID:27527163

  5. Prospective of curcumin, a pleiotropic signalling molecule from Curcuma longa in the treatment of Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Pratibha Mehta; Lal, Neetika

    2016-02-15

    GBM (Glioblastoma) is the most malignant human brain tumor with median survival of one year. The treatment involves surgery, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy mostly with the alkylation agents such as temozolomide (TMZ). Dietary polyphenol curcumin, isolated from the rhizome of the Curcuma longa (turmeric), has emerged as remarkable anti-cancer agent in the treatment of various peripheral cancers such as blood, lymphomas, multiple myeloma, melanoma as well as skin, lung, prostate, breast, ovarian, bladder, liver, gastrointestinal tract, pancreatic and colorectal epithelial cancers with a pleiotropic mode of action and also showed promise in alleviation of GBM. In this review, the mechanism of anticancer effect of curcumin in GBM has been discussed extensively. The clinical safety and pharmacokinetics of curcumin has been scrutinized to combat the challenges for the treatment of GBM. PMID:26748069

  6. Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Thiago Melo Costa; Pimenta, Fabio Silva; Porto, Marcella Lima; Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Campagnaro, Bianca Prandi; Gava, Agata Lages; Meyrelles, Silvana Santos; Vasquez, Elisardo Corral

    2016-01-01

    Because diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial metabolic disease, its prevention and treatment has been a constant challenge for basic and clinical investigators focused on translating their discoveries into clinical treatment of this complex disorder. In this review, we highlight recent experimental and clinical evidences of potential coadjuvants in the management of DM, such as polyphenols (quercetin, resveratrol and silymarin), cultured probiotic microorganisms and drugs acting through direct/indirect or pleiotropic effects on glycemic control in DM. Among several options, we highlight new promising therapeutic coadjuvants, including chemical scavengers, the probiotic kefir and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, which besides the reduction of hyperglycemia and ameliorate insulin resistance, they reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vascular circulation. In the near future, experimental studies are expected to clear the intracellular pathways involving coadjuvants. The design of clinical trials may also contribute to new strategies with coadjuvants against the harmful effects of diabetic complications.

  7. Resveratrol induces ordered domains formation in biomembranes: Implication for its pleiotropic action.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Rute; Nunes, Cláudia; Reis, Salette

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound with great value in cancer therapy, cardiovascular protection, and neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanism by which resveratrol exerts such pleiotropic effects is not yet clear and there is a huge need to understand the influence of this compound on the regulation of lipid domains formation on membrane structure. The aim of the present study was to reveal potential molecular interactions between resveratrol and lipid rafts found in cell membranes by means of Förster resonance energy transfer, DPH fluorescence quenching, and triton X-100 detergent resistance assay. Liposomes composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin were used as model membranes. The results revealed that resveratrol induces phase separation and formation of liquid-ordered domains in bilayer structures. The formation of such tightly packed lipid rafts is important for different signal transduction pathways, through the regulation of membrane-associating proteins, that can justify several pharmacological activities of this compound. PMID:26456556

  8. Coadjuvants in the Diabetic Complications: Nutraceuticals and Drugs with Pleiotropic Effects.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Thiago Melo Costa; Pimenta, Fabio Silva; Porto, Marcella Lima; Baldo, Marcelo Perim; Campagnaro, Bianca Prandi; Gava, Agata Lages; Meyrelles, Silvana Santos; Vasquez, Elisardo Corral

    2016-01-01

    Because diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multifactorial metabolic disease, its prevention and treatment has been a constant challenge for basic and clinical investigators focused on translating their discoveries into clinical treatment of this complex disorder. In this review, we highlight recent experimental and clinical evidences of potential coadjuvants in the management of DM, such as polyphenols (quercetin, resveratrol and silymarin), cultured probiotic microorganisms and drugs acting through direct/indirect or pleiotropic effects on glycemic control in DM. Among several options, we highlight new promising therapeutic coadjuvants, including chemical scavengers, the probiotic kefir and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, which besides the reduction of hyperglycemia and ameliorate insulin resistance, they reduce oxidative stress and improve endothelial dysfunction in the systemic vascular circulation. In the near future, experimental studies are expected to clear the intracellular pathways involving coadjuvants. The design of clinical trials may also contribute to new strategies with coadjuvants against the harmful effects of diabetic complications. PMID:27527163

  9. Determining the bistability parameter ranges of artificially induced lac operon using the root locus method.

    PubMed

    Avcu, N; Alyürük, H; Demir, G K; Pekergin, F; Cavas, L; Güzeliş, C

    2015-06-01

    This paper employs the root locus method to conduct a detailed investigation of the parameter regions that ensure bistability in a well-studied gene regulatory network namely, lac operon of Escherichia coli (E. coli). In contrast to previous works, the parametric bistability conditions observed in this study constitute a complete set of necessary and sufficient conditions. These conditions were derived by applying the root locus method to the polynomial equilibrium equation of the lac operon model to determine the parameter values yielding the multiple real roots necessary for bistability. The lac operon model used was defined as an ordinary differential equation system in a state equation form with a rational right hand side, and it was compatible with the Hill and Michaelis-Menten approaches of enzyme kinetics used to describe biochemical reactions that govern lactose metabolism. The developed root locus method can be used to study the steady-state behavior of any type of convergent biological system model based on mass action kinetics. This method provides a solution to the problem of analyzing gene regulatory networks under parameter uncertainties because the root locus method considers the model parameters as variable, rather than fixed. The obtained bistability ranges for the lac operon model parameters have the potential to elucidate the appearance of bistability for E. coli cells in in vivo experiments, and they could also be used to design robust hysteretic switches in synthetic biology. PMID:25864166

  10. Structure of the MHC A and B locus promoters in hominoids

    SciTech Connect

    Vallejo, A.N.; Pease, L.R.

    1995-04-15

    The expansion and contraction of mammalian class I multigene families raises the issue as to what determines the loss or retention of family members. We propose that accumulating changes in regulatory regions result in the loss of expression of the gene products during times critical to selection, leading to the extinction of misregulated genes. The structures of promoter regions of MHC class I genes in nonhuman primates support this view. The B promoters are more homogeneous and contain regulatory elements also found in the promoters of the homologous class I genes of more distant mammals, whereas the A locus promoters were significantly more heterogeneous, have fewer sequence motifs related to known transcription factor-binding sites and have accumulated nucleotide substitutions within one of the widely conserved class I promoter elements. These findings are consistent with the view that the more polymorphic B locus is the principal MHC locus encoding functional class I Ag-presenting molecules whereas the less polymorphic A locus is assuming a secondary role as a consequence of promoter defects. 50 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. [Similarities, differences and agonisms of pleiotropic effects of statins and omega-3 fatty acids].

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Maria E; Sánchez-Muniz, F J; Acín, Maria T; Vaquero, Maria P; Higueras, F J; Bastida, S

    2010-01-01

    This paper compares the pleiotropic effects of statins and omega-3 fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) in treating and preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and deals with the possible interactions of those compounds. Statins represent one of the most important discoveries to have been made in the field of cardiovascular medicine in recent decades. Their beneficial cardiovascular effects, which have reduced the number of fatal events in patients with atherosclerosis, encompass more than their ability to lower cholesterol levels. The pleiotropic effects of statins involve their anti-inflammatory and antiplatelet properties and their ability to normalize endothelial function. In addition, these drugs may display antiarrhythmic activity, improve insulin sensitivity and counteract hypertension and obesity. The low rate of coronary disease documented in Eskimos corroborates the cardioprotective effects of the n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids beyond their hypolipemic effects. The reduction of CVD-related deaths attributable to the action of α-linolenic fatty acid appears to be related to its strong antiarrhythmic properties. In addition, as a precursor of EPA and this last fatty acid of thromboxane A3, prostacyclin I3, serie-3 prostaglandines and serie 5-leukotrines and inhibitor/modulator of thromboxane A2, prostacyclin I2, serie-2 prostaglandines and serie 4-leukotrienes formation, the α-linolenic acid may reduce inflammation and thrombogenesis. As results of some studies suggest that the combined use of statins and n-3 PUFA improves cardiovascular protection and reduces the CVD-related mortality rate; the paper also reviews the possible synergism between both groups of compounds on CVD treatment and concludes that clear benefits may be obtained.

  12. Leveraging electronic health records to study pleiotropic effects on bipolar disorder and medical comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, M L; Ryu, E; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Nassan, M M; Cuellar-Barboza, A B; Pathak, J; McElroy, S L; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a high prevalence of comorbid medical illness. However, the mechanisms underlying these comorbidities with BD are not well known. Certain genetic variants may have pleiotropic effects, increasing the risk of BD and other medical illnesses simultaneously. In this study, we evaluated the association of BD-susceptibility genetic variants with various medical conditions that tend to co-exist with BD, using electronic health records (EHR) data linked to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Data from 7316 Caucasian subjects were used to test the association of 19 EHR-derived phenotypes with 34 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with BD. After Bonferroni multiple testing correction, P<7.7 × 10−5 was considered statistically significant. The top association findings suggested that the BD risk alleles at SNP rs4765913 in CACNA1C gene and rs7042161 in SVEP1 may be associated with increased risk of ‘cardiac dysrhythmias' (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P=3.4 × 10−3) and ‘essential hypertension' (OR=1.1, P=3.5 × 10−3), respectively. Although these associations are not statistically significant after multiple testing correction, both genes have been previously implicated with cardiovascular phenotypes. Moreover, we present additional evidence supporting these associations, particularly the association of the SVEP1 SNP with hypertension. This study shows the potential for EHR-based analyses of large cohorts to discover pleiotropic effects contributing to complex psychiatric traits and commonly co-occurring medical conditions. PMID:27529678

  13. Pleiotropic effects on subclasses of HDL, adiposity and glucose metabolism in adult Alaskan Eskimos

    PubMed Central

    Tejero, ME; Voruganti, VS; Cai, G; Cole, SA; Laston, S; Wenger, CR; MacCluer, JW; Dyke, B; Devereux, R; Ebbesson, SO; Fabsitz, RR; Howard, BV; Comuzzie, AG

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the heritability and the presence of pleiotropic effects on subfractions of high density lipoproteins (HDLs) as measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), parameters for adiposity and glucose metabolism in adult Alaskan Eskimos. The present family study included 1214 adult Alaskan Eskimos (537 male/677 female). Body weight, height, circumferences, selected skinfolds and blood pressure were measured in all participants. Blood samples were collected under fasting conditions for isolation of plasma. Glucose, insulin, subclasses and size of lipoproteins, triglycerides, total and HDL cholesterol and lipoprotein (a) were measured in plasma. HbA1c was measured in total blood. Univariate and bivariate quantitative genetic analyses were conducted between HDL subclasses and size and the anthropometric and biochemical measures using the variance decomposition approach. Variation in all the analyzed traits exhibits a significant genetic component. Heritabilities ranged between 0.18 ± 0.11 for LDL2 (intermediate) to 0.89 ± 0.07 for small HDL. No common genetic effects were found on the HDL subclasses (small, intermediate and large). Small HDL particles were genetically correlated with LDL particles and HbA1c. Negative genetic correlations were observed between intermediate and large HDL subfractions and HDL size and measures of adiposity, LDL and parameters for glucose metabolism (HbA1, insulin). These observations confirm the presence of possible pleiotropic effects on HDL, adiposity and cardiovascular risk factors and provide novel insight on the relationship between HDL subclasses, adiposity and glucose regulation. PMID:19950191

  14. Leveraging electronic health records to study pleiotropic effects on bipolar disorder and medical comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Prieto, M L; Ryu, E; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Nassan, M M; Cuellar-Barboza, A B; Pathak, J; McElroy, S L; Frye, M A; Biernacka, J M

    2016-01-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder (BD) have a high prevalence of comorbid medical illness. However, the mechanisms underlying these comorbidities with BD are not well known. Certain genetic variants may have pleiotropic effects, increasing the risk of BD and other medical illnesses simultaneously. In this study, we evaluated the association of BD-susceptibility genetic variants with various medical conditions that tend to co-exist with BD, using electronic health records (EHR) data linked to genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data. Data from 7316 Caucasian subjects were used to test the association of 19 EHR-derived phenotypes with 34 SNPs that were previously reported to be associated with BD. After Bonferroni multiple testing correction, P<7.7 × 10(-5) was considered statistically significant. The top association findings suggested that the BD risk alleles at SNP rs4765913 in CACNA1C gene and rs7042161 in SVEP1 may be associated with increased risk of 'cardiac dysrhythmias' (odds ratio (OR)=1.1, P=3.4 × 10(-3)) and 'essential hypertension' (OR=1.1, P=3.5 × 10(-3)), respectively. Although these associations are not statistically significant after multiple testing correction, both genes have been previously implicated with cardiovascular phenotypes. Moreover, we present additional evidence supporting these associations, particularly the association of the SVEP1 SNP with hypertension. This study shows the potential for EHR-based analyses of large cohorts to discover pleiotropic effects contributing to complex psychiatric traits and commonly co-occurring medical conditions. PMID:27529678

  15. REVIEWMolecular mechanisms underlying physiological and receptor pleiotropic effects mediated by GLP-1R activation

    PubMed Central

    Pabreja, K; Mohd, M A; Koole, C; Wootten, D; Furness, S G B

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes in developed countries is increasing yearly with a significant negative impact on patient quality of life and an enormous burden on the healthcare system. Current biguanide and thiazolidinedione treatments for type 2 diabetes have a number of clinical limitations, the most serious long-term limitation being the eventual need for insulin replacement therapy (Table 1). Since 2007, drugs targeting the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor have been marketed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These drugs have enjoyed a great deal of success even though our underlying understanding of the mechanisms for their pleiotropic effects remain poorly characterized even while major pharmaceutical companies actively pursue small molecule alternatives. Coupling of the GLP-1 receptor to more than one signalling pathway (pleiotropic signalling) can result in ligand-dependent signalling bias and for a peptide receptor such as the GLP-1 receptor this can be exaggerated with the use of small molecule agonists. Better consideration of receptor signalling pleiotropy will be necessary for future drug development. This is particularly important given the recent failure of taspoglutide, the report of increased risk of pancreatitis associated with GLP-1 mimetics and the observed clinical differences between liraglutide, exenatide and the newly developed long-acting exenatide long acting release, albiglutide and dulaglutide. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Molecular Pharmacology of GPCRs. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-5 PMID:23889512

  16. [Tibetan formulas as pleiotropic signatures--application of network medicines in multimorbidity].

    PubMed

    Schwabl, Herbert; Vennos, Cécile; Saller, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the network model of the organism, multimorbid states (≥ 2 chronic diseases at the same time) can be considered as a complex disease pattern which can be mapped as characteristic signatures. From the perspective of system theory, living systems such as the human body are viewed as networks of interacting parts. These in turn can themselves be subnetworks assigned to different complexity levels. They range, e.g., from the gene to the transcriptome, proteome, metabolome, and epigenome up to the network of the entire molecular interactions, the so-called interactome. In multimorbidity, the disease signature affects different networks at all levels, e.g., cell systems, organs, and functional systems. Based on this semiotics, certain signatures of effectiveness and profiles of action can be assigned to each drug. A drug signature represents the physicochemical stimuli that cause a reaction by the system, as well as the cross-links by which the entire connected system is affected at all levels. Phytotherapeutics, which chemically represent multi-component mixtures, have especially complex signatures. As multi-target medicines with a pleiotropic effect profile, they therapeutically affect different levels of the network, which is why they are also referred to as network medicines. Herbal formulas from traditional medicine systems such as Tibetan Medicine are an example for phytotherapeutics with a particularly complex pleiotropic signature. Also from the traditional point of view, a disease signature is set in relation with a corresponding drug signature. However, in this case, it is based on the traditional energetic understanding of diseases. Modern research results clearly indicate a widely diversified signature range of Tibetan Medicines and thus provide a rationale for their use in integrative treatment approaches for diseases with complex signatures, e.g. in multimorbidity. The system-theoretical approach discussed here represents a method to

  17. Pleiotropic effects of GacA on Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 in vitro and in soil.

    PubMed

    Seaton, Sarah C; Silby, Mark W; Levy, Stuart B

    2013-09-01

    Pseudomonas species can exhibit phenotypic variation resulting from gacS or gacA mutation. P. fluorescens Pf0-1 is a gacA mutant and exhibits pleiotropic changes following the introduction of a functional allele. GacA enhances biofilm development while reducing dissemination in soil, suggesting that alternative Gac phenotypes enable Pseudomonas sp. to exploit varied environments. PMID:23811507

  18. The pleiotropic role of the 26S proteasome subunit RPN10 in Arabidopsis growth and development supports a substrate-specific function in abscisic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Smalle, Jan; Kurepa, Jasmina; Yang, Peizhen; Emborg, Thomas J; Babiychuk, Elena; Kushnir, Sergei; Vierstra, Richard D

    2003-04-01

    The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for removing most short-lived intracellular proteins, especially those modified with polyubiquitin chains. We show here that an Arabidopsis mutant expressing an altered RPN10 subunit exhibited a pleiotropic phenotype consistent with specific changes in 26S proteasome function. rpn10-1 plants displayed reduced seed germination, growth rate, stamen number, genetic transmission through the male gamete, and hormone-induced cell division, which can be explained partially by a constitutive downregulation of the key cell cycle gene CDKA;1. rpn10-1 also was more sensitive to abscisic acid (ABA), salt, and sucrose stress and to DNA-damaging agents and had decreased sensitivity to cytokinin and auxin. Most of the phenotypes can be explained by a hypersensitivity to ABA, which is reflected at the molecular level by the selective stabilization of the short-lived ABA-signaling protein ABI5. Collectively, these results indicate that RPN10 affects a number of regulatory processes in Arabidopsis likely by directing specific proteins to the 26S proteasome for degradation. A particularly important role may be in regulating the responses to signals promulgated by ABA.

  19. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  20. Membrane-active Compounds Activate the Transcription Factors Pdr1 and Pdr3 Connecting Pleiotropic Drug Resistance and Membrane Lipid Homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Schüller, Christoph; Mamnun, Yasmine M.; Wolfger, Hubert; Rockwell, Nathan; Thorner, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae zinc cluster transcription factors Pdr1 and Pdr3 mediate general drug resistance to many cytotoxic substances also known as pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR). The regulatory mechanisms that activate Pdr1 and Pdr3 in response to the various xenobiotics are poorly understood. In this study, we report that exposure of yeast cells to 2,4-dichlorophenol (DCP), benzyl alcohol, nonionic detergents, and lysophospholipids causes rapid activation of Pdr1 and Pdr3. Furthermore, Pdr1/Pdr3 target genes encoding the ATP-binding cassette proteins Pdr5 and Pdr15 confer resistance against these compounds. Genome-wide transcript analysis of wild-type and pdr1Δ pdr3Δ cells treated with DCP reveals most prominently the activation of the PDR response but also other stress response pathways. Polyoxyethylene-9-laurylether treatment produced a similar profile with regard to activation of Pdr1 and Pdr3, suggesting activation of these by detergents. The Pdr1/Pdr3 response element is sufficient to confer regulation to a reporter gene by these substances in a Pdr1/Pdr3-dependent manner. Our data indicate that compounds with potential membrane-damaging or -perturbing effects might function as an activating signal for Pdr1 and Pdr3, and they suggest a role for their target genes in membrane lipid organization or remodeling. PMID:17881724

  1. A Flucytosine-Responsive Mbp1/Swi4-Like Protein, Mbs1, Plays Pleiotropic Roles in Antifungal Drug Resistance, Stress Response, and Virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min-Hee; Lee, Jang-Won; Kim, Min Su; Yoon, Ja-Kyung; White, Theodore C.; Floyd, Anna; Heitman, Joseph; Strain, Anna K.; Nielsen, Judith N.; Nielsen, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Cryptococcosis, caused by the basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, is responsible for more than 600,000 deaths annually in AIDS patients. Flucytosine is one of the most commonly used antifungal drugs for its treatment, but its resistance and regulatory mechanisms have never been investigated at the genome scale in C. neoformans. In the present study, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis by employing two-component system mutants (tco1Δ and tco2Δ) exhibiting opposing flucytosine susceptibility. As a result, a total of 177 flucytosine-responsive genes were identified, and many of them were found to be regulated by Tco1 or Tco2. Among these, we discovered an APSES-like transcription factor, Mbs1 (Mbp1- and Swi4-like protein 1). Expression analysis revealed that MBS1 was regulated in response to flucytosine in a Tco2/Hog1-dependent manner. Supporting this, C. neoformans with the deletion of MBS1 exhibited increased susceptibility to flucytosine. Intriguingly, Mbs1 played pleiotropic roles in diverse cellular processes of C. neoformans. Mbs1 positively regulated ergosterol biosynthesis and thereby affected polyene and azole drug susceptibility. Mbs1 was also involved in genotoxic and oxidative stress responses. Furthermore, Mbs1 promoted production of melanin and capsule and thereby was required for full virulence of C. neoformans. In conclusion, Mbs1 is considered to be a novel antifungal therapeutic target for treatment of cryptococcosis. PMID:22080454

  2. Two Novel AP2/EREBP Transcription Factor Genes TaPARG Have Pleiotropic Functions on Plant Architecture and Yield-Related Traits in Common Wheat.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Li, Qiaoru; Mao, Xinguo; Li, Ang; Wang, Jingyi; Chang, Xiaoping; Hao, Chenyang; Zhang, Xueyong; Jing, Ruilian

    2016-01-01

    AP2/EREBPs play significant roles in plant growth and development. A novel, pleiotropic TaPARG (PLANT ARCHITECTURE-RELATED GENE), a member of the AP2/EREBP transcription factor gene family, and its flanking sequences were isolated in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Two TaPARG genes were identified and named as TaPARG-2A and TaPARG-2D. Their amino acid sequences were highly similar especially in the functional domains. TaPARG-2A on chromosome 2A was flanked by markers Xwmc63 and Xgwm372. TaPARG-2D was mapped to chromosome 2D. Subcellular localization revealed that TaPARG-2D was localized in the nucleus. The results of tissue expression pattern, overexpression in rice, association analysis and distinct population verification jointly revealed that TaPARG functions during the entire growth cycle of wheat. Its functions include regulation of plant architecture-related and yield-related traits. Association analysis, geographic distribution and allelic frequencies suggested that favored haplotypes Hap-2A-2 and Hap-2A-3 were selected in Chinese wheat breeding programs. Both favored haplotypes might be caused by a single amino acid substitution (His/Tyr). These results suggest that TaPARG is a regulatory factor in plant growth and development, and that the favored alleles might be useful for improving plant architecture and grain yield of wheat. PMID:27555860

  3. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P.; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as “middle”, and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  4. A comprehensive analysis of the chorion locus in silkmoth.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Nohata, Junko; Guo, Huizhen; Li, Shenglong; Liu, Jianqiu; Guo, Youbing; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Liu, Chun; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Shiping; Labropoulou, Vassiliki; Swevers, Luc; Tsitoura, Panagiota; Iatrou, Kostas; Gopinathan, Karumathil P; Goldsmith, Marian R; Xia, Qingyou; Mita, Kazuei

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than 40 years of intense study, essential features of the silkmoth chorion (eggshell) are still not fully understood. To determine the precise structure of the chorion locus, we performed extensive EST analysis, constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) contig, and obtained a continuous genomic sequence of 871,711 base pairs. We annotated 127 chorion genes in two segments interrupted by a 164 kb region with 5 non-chorion genes, orthologs of which were on chorion bearing scaffolds in 4 ditrysian families. Detailed transcriptome analysis revealed expression throughout choriogenesis of most chorion genes originally categorized as "middle", and evidence for diverse regulatory mechanisms including cis-elements, alternative splicing and promoter utilization, and antisense RNA. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multigene family associations and faster evolution of early chorion genes and transcriptionally active pseudogenes. Proteomics analysis identified 99 chorion proteins in the eggshell and micropyle localization of 1 early and 6 Hc chorion proteins. PMID:26553298

  5. CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) and cohesin influence the genomic architecture of the Igh locus and antisense transcription in pro-B cells.

    PubMed

    Degner, Stephanie C; Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Wong, Timothy P; Bossen, Claudia; Iverson, G Michael; Torkamani, Ali; Vettermann, Christian; Lin, Yin C; Ju, Zhongliang; Schulz, Danae; Murre, Caroline S; Birshtein, Barbara K; Schork, Nicholas J; Schlissel, Mark S; Riblet, Roy; Murre, Cornelis; Feeney, Ann J

    2011-06-01

    Compaction and looping of the ~2.5-Mb Igh locus during V(D)J rearrangement is essential to allow all V(H) genes to be brought in proximity with D(H)-J(H) segments to create a diverse antibody repertoire, but the proteins directly responsible for this are unknown. Because CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) has been demonstrated to be involved in long-range chromosomal interactions, we hypothesized that CTCF may promote the contraction of the Igh locus. ChIP sequencing was performed on pro-B cells, revealing colocalization of CTCF and Rad21 binding at ~60 sites throughout the V(H) region and 2 other sites within the Igh locus. These numerous CTCF/cohesin sites potentially form the bases of the multiloop rosette structures at the Igh locus that compact during Ig heavy chain rearrangement. To test whether CTCF was involved in locus compaction, we used 3D-FISH to measure compaction in pro-B cells transduced with CTCF shRNA retroviruses. Reduction of CTCF binding resulted in a decrease in Igh locus compaction. Long-range interactions within the Igh locus were measured with the chromosomal conformation capture assay, revealing direct interactions between CTCF sites 5' of DFL16 and the 3' regulatory region, and also the intronic enhancer (Eμ), creating a D(H)-J(H)-Eμ-C(H) domain. Knockdown of CTCF also resulted in the increase of antisense transcription throughout the D(H) region and parts of the V(H) locus, suggesting a widespread regulatory role for CTCF. Together, our findings demonstrate that CTCF plays an important role in the 3D structure of the Igh locus and in the regulation of antisense germline transcription and that it contributes to the compaction of the Igh locus. PMID:21606361

  6. Disclosing Pleiotropic Effects during Genetic Risk Assessment for Alzheimer’s Disease: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kurt D.; Roberts, J. Scott; Whitehouse, Peter J.; Royal, Charmaine D. M.; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Vernarelli, Jacqueline A.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Linnenbringer, Erin; Butson, Melissa B.; Fasaye, Grace-Ann; Uhlmann, Wendy R.; Hiraki, Susan; Wang, Na; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Green, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing use of genetic testing raises questions about disclosing secondary findings, including pleiotropic information. Objective To determine the safety and behavioral impact of disclosing modest associations between APOE genotype and coronary artery disease (CAD) risk during APOE-based genetic risk assessments for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Design Randomized, multicenter equivalence clinical trial Setting Four teaching hospitals Participants 257 asymptomatic adults enrolled, 69% with one AD-affected first degree relative Intervention Disclosing AD and CAD genetic risk information (AD+CAD) versus disclosing only AD genetic risk (AD-only) Measurements Co-primary outcomes were Beck Anxiety Index (BAI) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) scores at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included test-related distress at 12 months, all measures at 6 weeks and 6 months, and health behavior changes at 12 months. Results 12 months after disclosure, mean BAI scores were 3.5 and 3.5 in AD-only and AD+CAD arms (Δ=0.0, 95%CI: −1.0 to 1.0), and mean CES-D scores were 6.4 and 7.1 in AD-only and AD+CAD arms (Δ=0.7, 95%CI: −1.0 to 2.4). Both confidence bounds fell within the equivalence margin of +/−5 points. Among ε4-positive participants, distress was lower in AD+CAD arms than AD-only arms (Δ=−4.8, 95%CI: −8.6 to −1.0) (p=0.031 for disclosure arm x APOE genotype). AD+CAD participants also reported more health behavior changes, regardless of APOE genotype. Limitations Outcomes were self-reported from volunteers without severe anxiety, severe depression, or cognitive problems. Analyses omitted 33 randomized participants. Conclusion Disclosing pleiotropic information did not increase anxiety or depression, and may have decreased distress among those at increased risk for two conditions. Providing risk modification information regarding CAD improved health behaviors. Findings highlight potential benefits of secondary genetic findings

  7. Locus heterogeneity in autosomal dominant spinocerebellar ataxia: Evidence for the existence of a fifth locus

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A.; Andermann, E.

    1994-09-01

    The autosomal dominantly inherited spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) are a heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, four loci have been identified: the SCA-1 locus (on chromosome (chr) 6p), the SCA-2 locus (on chr 12q), the SCA-3/MJD locus (on chr 14q), and more recently an SCA-4 locus was described (chr 16q) in a Utah kindred. We have studied one large French Canadian kindred with four generations of living affected individuals segregating an autosomal dominant form of SCA. Linkage analysis using anonymous DNA markers which flank the four previously described loci significantly excludes the French Canadian kindred from the SCA-1, SCA-2, SCA-3/MJD and SCA-4 loci. Therefore a fifth, still unmapped, SCA locus remains to be identified.

  8. STATINS MORE THAN CHOLESTEROL LOWERING AGENTS IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE: THEIR PLEIOTROPIC FUNCTIONS AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Eugenio; Domenico, Fabio Di; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment, inability to perform activities of daily living and mood changes. Statins, long known to be beneficial in conditions where dyslipidemia occurs by lowering serum cholesterol levels, also have been proposed for use in neurodegenerative conditions, including AD. However, it is not clear that the purported effectiveness of statins in neurodegenerative disorders is directly related to cholesterol-lowering effects of these agents; rather, the pleiotropic functions of statins likely play critical roles. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the new discoveries about the effects of statin therapy on the oxidative ad nitrosative stress levels as well as on the modulation of the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR) system in the brain. We propose a novel mechanism of action for atorvastatin which, through the activation of HO/BVR-A system, may contribute to the neuroprotective effects thus suggesting a potential therapeutic role in AD and potentially accounting for the observation of decreased AD incidence with persons on statin. PMID:24231510

  9. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-07-07

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research.

  10. Characterization of broadly pleiotropic phenotypes caused by an hfq insertion mutation in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Tsui, H C; Leung, H C; Winkler, M E

    1994-07-01

    The region immediately downstream from the miaA tRNA modification gene at 94.8 min contains the hfq gene and the hflA region, which are important in the bacteriophage Q beta and lambda life cycles. The roles of these genes in bacteria remain largely unknown. We report here the characterization of two chromosomal hfq insertion mutations. An omega (omega) cassette insertion near the end of hfq resulted in phenotypes only slightly different from the parent, although transcript mapping demonstrated that the insertion was completely polar on hflX expression. In contrast, an equally polar omega cassette insertion near the beginning of hfq caused pronounced pleiotropic phenotypes, including decreased growth rates and yields, decreased negative supercoiling of plasmids in stationary phase, increased cell size, osmosensitivity, increased oxidation of carbon sources, increased sensitivity to ultraviolet light, and suppression of bgl activation by hns mutations. hfq::omega mutant phenotypes were distinct from those caused by omega insertions early in the miaA tRNA modification gene. On the other hand, both hfq insertions interfered with lambda phage plaque formation, probably by means of polarity at the hflA region. Together, these results show that hfq function plays a fundamental role in Escherichia coli physiology and that hfq and the hflA-region are in the amiB-mutL-miaA-hfq-hflX superoperon. PMID:7984093

  11. QSAR classification of estrogen receptor binders and pre-screening of potential pleiotropic EDCs.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Gramatica, P

    2010-10-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are suspected of posing serious threats to human and wildlife health through a variety of mechanisms, these being mainly receptor-mediated modes of action. It is reported that some EDCs exhibit dual activities as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) binders. Indeed, such compounds can affect the normal endocrine system through a dual complex mechanism, so steps should be taken not only to identify them a priori from their chemical structure, but also to prioritize them for experimental tests in order to reduce and even forbid their usage. To date, very few EDCs with dual activities have been identified. The present research uses QSARs, to investigate what, so far, is the largest and most heterogeneous ER binder data set (combined METI and EDKB databases). New predictive classification models were derived using different modelling methods and a consensus approach, and these were used to virtually screen a large AR binder data set after strict validation. As a result, 46 AR antagonists were predicted from their chemical structure to also have potential ER binding activities, i.e. pleiotropic EDCs. In addition, 48 not yet recognized ER binders were in silico identified, which increases the number of potential EDCs that are substances of very high concern (SVHC) in REACH. Thus, the proposed screening models, based only on structure information, have the main aim to prioritize experimental tests for the highlighted compounds with potential estrogenic activities and also to design safer alternatives.

  12. From Phytocannabinoids to Cannabinoid Receptors and Endocannabinoids: Pleiotropic Physiological and Pathological Roles Through Complex Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Apart from having been used and misused for at least four millennia for, among others, recreational and medicinal purposes, the cannabis plant and its most peculiar chemical components, the plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), have the merit to have led humanity to discover one of the most intriguing and pleiotropic endogenous signaling systems, the endocannabinoid system (ECS). This review article aims to describe and critically discuss, in the most comprehensive possible manner, the multifaceted aspects of 1) the pharmacology and potential impact on mammalian physiology of all major phytocannabinoids, and not only of the most famous one Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and 2) the adaptive pro-homeostatic physiological, or maladaptive pathological, roles of the ECS in mammalian cells, tissues, and organs. In doing so, we have respected the chronological order of the milestones of the millennial route from medicinal/recreational cannabis to the ECS and beyond, as it is now clear that some of the early steps in this long path, which were originally neglected, are becoming important again. The emerging picture is rather complex, but still supports the belief that more important discoveries on human physiology, and new therapies, might come in the future from new knowledge in this field. PMID:27630175

  13. Exploiting the Pleiotropic Antioxidant Effects of Established Drugs in Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Steven, Sebastian; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-08-05

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death and reduced quality of life worldwide. Arterial vessels are a primary target for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which is accompanied or even driven by increased oxidative stress. Recent research in this field identified different sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contributing to the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. According to lessons from the past, improvement of endothelial function and prevention of cardiovascular disease by systemic, unspecific, oral antioxidant therapy are obviously too simplistic an approach. Source- and cell organelle-specific antioxidants as well as activators of intrinsic antioxidant defense systems might be more promising. Since basic research demonstrated the contribution of different inflammatory cells to vascular oxidative stress and clinical trials identified chronic inflammatory disorders as risk factors for cardiovascular events, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease are closely associated with inflammation. Therefore, modulation of the inflammatory response is a new and promising approach in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Classical anti-inflammatory therapeutic compounds, but also established drugs with pleiotropic immunomodulatory abilities, demonstrated protective effects in various models of cardiovascular disease. However, results from ongoing clinical trials are needed to further evaluate the value of immunomodulation for the treatment of cardiovascular disease.

  14. The rice FISH BONE gene encodes a tryptophan aminotransferase, which affects pleiotropic auxin-related processes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takanori; Ito, Momoyo; Sumikura, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Akira; Nishimura, Takeshi; Kitano, Hidemi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Nagato, Yasuo; Itoh, Jun-Ichi

    2014-06-01

    Auxin is a fundamental plant hormone and its localization within organs plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. Analysis of many Arabidopsis mutants that were defective in auxin biosynthesis revealed that the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) pathway, catalyzed by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) and YUCCA (YUC) families, is the major biosynthetic pathway of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In contrast, little information is known about the molecular mechanisms of auxin biosynthesis in rice. In this study, we identified a auxin-related rice mutant, fish bone (fib). FIB encodes an orthologue of TAA genes and loss of FIB function resulted in pleiotropic abnormal phenotypes, such as small leaves with large lamina joint angles, abnormal vascular development, small panicles, abnormal organ identity and defects in root development, together with a reduction in internal IAA levels. Moreover, we found that auxin sensitivity and polar transport activity were altered in the fib mutant. From these results, we suggest that FIB plays a pivotal role in IAA biosynthesis in rice and that auxin biosynthesis, transport and sensitivity are closely interrelated.

  15. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research. PMID:27399657

  16. Pleiotropic effects of the neuropeptides CCAP and myosuppressin in the beetle, Tenebrio molitor L.

    PubMed

    Wasielewski, O; Skonieczna, M

    2008-09-01

    Biological activities of crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP; PFCNAFTGCa) and leucomyosuppressin (Lem-MS; pQDVDHVFLRFa) were studied in heterologous bioassays in the larvae and adults of Tenebrio molitor. CCAP exerted a reversible and dose-dependent cardio-stimulatory effect on the semi-isolated heart of the experimental beetles at a concentration of >10(-7) M and induced an effect similar to the endogenic cardio-stimulatory peptide, proctolin. Injections of CCAP (10(-9)-10(-3) M) into 4-day-old adult reproductive females increased the concentration of soluble proteins in hemolymph in comparison to the saline injected controls. Electrophoretic analyses indicated significant increase in the level of two proteins 130 and 170 kDa, and a partial increase of the level of 67-kDa protein. The studies indicated that CCAP increased also free hemolymph sugar concentration in young larvae and adults of the mealworm beetle. The cardio-inhibitory peptide Lem-MS exerted the opposite effect: at concentration 10(-7)-10(-6) M, it significantly decreased the heartbeat frequency. The induced changes were dose-dependent and reversible, but at higher concentrations (>10(-5) M) the stimulatory effect disappeared. Injections of the Lem-MS into young larvae at concentrations 10(-9)-10(-3) M, also increased the free hemolymph sugar level similarly to the CCAP. This work demonstrates the pleiotropic effects of CCAP and Lem-MS in Tenebrio molitor.

  17. Heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces the pleiotropic drug resistance stress response.

    PubMed

    Verwaal, René; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Daran, Jean-Marc; Sandmann, Gerhard; van den Berg, Johan A; van Ooyen, Albert J J

    2010-12-01

    To obtain insight into the genome-wide transcriptional response of heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcriptome of two different S. cerevisiae strains overexpressing carotenogenic genes from the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous grown in carbon-limited chemostat cultures was analysed. The strains exhibited different absolute carotenoid levels as well as different intermediate profiles. These discrepancies were further sustained by the difference of the transcriptional response exhibited by the two strains. Transcriptome analysis of the strain producing high carotenoid levels resulted in specific induction of genes involved in pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR). These genes encode ABC-type and major facilitator transporters which are reported to be involved in secretion of toxic compounds out of cells. β-Carotene was found to be secreted when sunflower oil was added to the medium of S. cerevisiae cells producing high levels of carotenoids, which was not observed when added to X. dendrorhous cells. Deletion of pdr10, one of the induced ABC transporters, decreased the transformation efficiency of a plasmid containing carotenogenic genes. The few transformants that were obtained had decreased growth rates and lower carotenoid production levels compared to a pdr5 deletion and a reference strain transformed with the same genes. Our results suggest that production of high amounts of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae leads to membrane stress, in which Pdr10 might play an important role, and a cellular response to secrete carotenoids out of the cell. PMID:20632327

  18. Cytoplasmic male sterility in Mimulus hybrids has pleiotropic effects on corolla and pistil traits

    PubMed Central

    Barr, C M; Fishman, L

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying genetic associations have important consequences for evolutionary outcomes, but distinguishing linkage from pleiotropy is often difficult. Here, we use a fine mapping approach to determine the genetic basis of association between cytonuclear male sterility and other floral traits in Mimulus hybrids. Previous work has shown that male sterility in hybrids between Mimulus guttatus and Mimulus nasutus is due to interactions between a mitochondrial gene from M. guttatus and two tightly linked nuclear restorer alleles on Linkage Group 7, and that male sterility is associated with reduced corolla size. In the present study, we generated a set of nearly isogenic lines segregating for the restorer region and male sterility, but with unique flanking introgressions. Male-sterile flowers had significantly smaller corollas, longer styles and greater stigmatic exsertion than fertile flowers. Because these effects were significant regardless of the genotypic composition of introgressions flanking the restorer region, they suggest that these floral differences are a direct byproduct of the genetic incompatibility causing anther abortion. In addition, we found a non-significant but intriguing trend for male-sterile plants to produce more seeds per flower than fertile siblings after supplemental pollination. Such pleiotropic effects may underlie the corolla dimorphism frequently observed in gynodioecious taxa and may affect selection on cytoplasmic male sterility genes when they initially arise. PMID:21245895

  19. Pleiotropic Control by Testosterone of a Learned Vocal Behavior and Its Underlying Neuroplasticity123

    PubMed Central

    Madison, Farrah N.; Parker, Shannon E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Steroid hormones coordinate multiple aspects of behavior and physiology. The same hormone often regulates different aspects of a single behavior and its underlying neuroplasticity. This pleiotropic regulation of behavior and physiology is not well understood. Here, we investigated the orchestration by testosterone (T) of birdsong and its neural substrate, the song control system. Male canaries were castrated and received stereotaxic implants filled with T in select brain areas. Implanting T solely in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) increased the motivation to sing, but did not enhance aspects of song quality such as acoustic structure and stereotypy. In birds implanted with T solely in HVC (proper name), a key sensorimotor region of the song control system, little or no song was observed, similar to castrates that received no T implants of any sort. However, implanting T in HVC and POM simultaneously rescued all measures of song quality. Song amplitude, though, was still lower than what was observed in birds receiving peripheral T treatment. T in POM enhanced HVC volume bilaterally, likely due to activity-dependent changes resulting from an enhanced song rate. T directly in HVC, without increasing song rate, enhanced HVC volume on the ipsilateral side only. T in HVC enhanced the incorporation and recruitment of new neurons into this nucleus, while singing activity can independently influence the incorporation of new neurons into HVC. These results have broad implications for how steroid hormones integrate across different brain regions to coordinate complex social behaviors. PMID:26835510

  20. The rice FISH BONE gene encodes a tryptophan aminotransferase, which affects pleiotropic auxin-related processes.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takanori; Ito, Momoyo; Sumikura, Tsuyoshi; Nakayama, Akira; Nishimura, Takeshi; Kitano, Hidemi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Hibara, Ken-Ichiro; Nagato, Yasuo; Itoh, Jun-Ichi

    2014-06-01

    Auxin is a fundamental plant hormone and its localization within organs plays pivotal roles in plant growth and development. Analysis of many Arabidopsis mutants that were defective in auxin biosynthesis revealed that the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) pathway, catalyzed by the TRYPTOPHAN AMINOTRANSFERASE OF ARABIDOPSIS (TAA) and YUCCA (YUC) families, is the major biosynthetic pathway of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). In contrast, little information is known about the molecular mechanisms of auxin biosynthesis in rice. In this study, we identified a auxin-related rice mutant, fish bone (fib). FIB encodes an orthologue of TAA genes and loss of FIB function resulted in pleiotropic abnormal phenotypes, such as small leaves with large lamina joint angles, abnormal vascular development, small panicles, abnormal organ identity and defects in root development, together with a reduction in internal IAA levels. Moreover, we found that auxin sensitivity and polar transport activity were altered in the fib mutant. From these results, we suggest that FIB plays a pivotal role in IAA biosynthesis in rice and that auxin biosynthesis, transport and sensitivity are closely interrelated. PMID:24654985

  1. From Phytocannabinoids to Cannabinoid Receptors and Endocannabinoids: Pleiotropic Physiological and Pathological Roles Through Complex Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Ligresti, Alessia; De Petrocellis, Luciano; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2016-10-01

    Apart from having been used and misused for at least four millennia for, among others, recreational and medicinal purposes, the cannabis plant and its most peculiar chemical components, the plant cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids), have the merit to have led humanity to discover one of the most intriguing and pleiotropic endogenous signaling systems, the endocannabinoid system (ECS). This review article aims to describe and critically discuss, in the most comprehensive possible manner, the multifaceted aspects of 1) the pharmacology and potential impact on mammalian physiology of all major phytocannabinoids, and not only of the most famous one Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, and 2) the adaptive pro-homeostatic physiological, or maladaptive pathological, roles of the ECS in mammalian cells, tissues, and organs. In doing so, we have respected the chronological order of the milestones of the millennial route from medicinal/recreational cannabis to the ECS and beyond, as it is now clear that some of the early steps in this long path, which were originally neglected, are becoming important again. The emerging picture is rather complex, but still supports the belief that more important discoveries on human physiology, and new therapies, might come in the future from new knowledge in this field.

  2. Exploiting the Pleiotropic Antioxidant Effects of Established Drugs in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steven, Sebastian; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death and reduced quality of life worldwide. Arterial vessels are a primary target for endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis, which is accompanied or even driven by increased oxidative stress. Recent research in this field identified different sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contributing to the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. According to lessons from the past, improvement of endothelial function and prevention of cardiovascular disease by systemic, unspecific, oral antioxidant therapy are obviously too simplistic an approach. Source- and cell organelle-specific antioxidants as well as activators of intrinsic antioxidant defense systems might be more promising. Since basic research demonstrated the contribution of different inflammatory cells to vascular oxidative stress and clinical trials identified chronic inflammatory disorders as risk factors for cardiovascular events, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease are closely associated with inflammation. Therefore, modulation of the inflammatory response is a new and promising approach in the therapy of cardiovascular disease. Classical anti-inflammatory therapeutic compounds, but also established drugs with pleiotropic immunomodulatory abilities, demonstrated protective effects in various models of cardiovascular disease. However, results from ongoing clinical trials are needed to further evaluate the value of immunomodulation for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. PMID:26251902

  3. Effect of locus of control on disordered eating in athletes: the mediational role of self-regulation of eating attitudes.

    PubMed

    Scoffier, S; Paquet, Y; d'Arripe-Longueville, F

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the influence of locus of control on disordered eating as mediated by the self-regulation of eating attitudes. The assessment instruments were adapted for athletes as the entire sample of 179 volunteer University students (M(age)=21.12; SD=2.87) were all regularly involved in competition. The results showed that (a) an internal locus of control had a positive influence on the self-regulation of eating attitudes in social interaction contexts; (b) self-regulatory eating attitudes had a negative influence on disordered eating in contexts of negative affect, social interaction, and lack of anticipation of consequences on performance; and (c) an internal locus of control had an influence on disordered eating through the mediation of self-regulatory eating attitudes in social interaction contexts, and an external locus of control attributed to the coach and sports friends had an influence on disordered eating through the mediation of self-regulatory eating attitudes in contexts of negative affect, social interaction and lack of anticipation of consequences on performance. This study, combined with an earlier study from Scoffier, Maïano, and d'Arripe-Longueville (2009) on the antecedents of athletes' eating disorders, suggests the powerful impact of the social environment on the development of disordered eating in athletes.

  4. Effect of locus of control on disordered eating in athletes: the mediational role of self-regulation of eating attitudes.

    PubMed

    Scoffier, S; Paquet, Y; d'Arripe-Longueville, F

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the influence of locus of control on disordered eating as mediated by the self-regulation of eating attitudes. The assessment instruments were adapted for athletes as the entire sample of 179 volunteer University students (M(age)=21.12; SD=2.87) were all regularly involved in competition. The results showed that (a) an internal locus of control had a positive influence on the self-regulation of eating attitudes in social interaction contexts; (b) self-regulatory eating attitudes had a negative influence on disordered eating in contexts of negative affect, social interaction, and lack of anticipation of consequences on performance; and (c) an internal locus of control had an influence on disordered eating through the mediation of self-regulatory eating attitudes in social interaction contexts, and an external locus of control attributed to the coach and sports friends had an influence on disordered eating through the mediation of self-regulatory eating attitudes in contexts of negative affect, social interaction and lack of anticipation of consequences on performance. This study, combined with an earlier study from Scoffier, Maïano, and d'Arripe-Longueville (2009) on the antecedents of athletes' eating disorders, suggests the powerful impact of the social environment on the development of disordered eating in athletes. PMID:20434063

  5. Mutations affecting expression of the rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.S.; Curtis, D.; McCarron, M.; Love, C.; Gray, M.; Bender, W.; Chovnick, A.

    1987-05-01

    The rosy locus in Drosophila melanogaster codes for the enzyme xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH). Previous studies defined a control element near the 5' end of the gene, where variant sites affected the amount of rosy mRNA and protein produced. The authors have determined the DNA sequence of this region from both genomic and cDNA clones, and from the ry/sup +10/ underproducer strain. This variant strain had many sequence differences, so that the site of the regulatory change could not be fixed. A mutagenesis was also undertaken to isolate new regulatory mutations. They induced 376 new mutations with 1-ethyl-1-nitrosourea (ENU) and screened them to isolate those that reduced the amount of XDH protein produced, but did not change the properties of the enzyme. Genetic mapping was used to find mutations located near the 5' end of the gene. DNA from each of seven mutants was cloned and sequenced through the 5' region. Mutant base changes were identified in all seven; they appear to affect splicing and translation of the rosy mRNA. In a related study, the genomic and cDNA sequences are extended through the 3' end of the gene; the combined sequences define the processing pattern of the rosy transcript and predict the amino acid sequence of XDH.

  6. Systematic investigation of cellular response and pleiotropic effects in atorvastatin-treated liver cells by MS-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haopeng; Chen, Weixuan; Tang, George X; Smeekens, Johanna M; Wu, Ronghu

    2015-03-01

    For decades, statins have been widely used to lower cholesterol levels by inhibiting the enzyme HMG Co-A reductase (HMGCR). It is well-known that statins have pleiotropic effects including improving endothelial function and inhibiting vascular inflammation and oxidation. However, the cellular responses to statins and corresponding pleiotropic effects are largely unknown at the proteome level. Emerging mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a unique opportunity to systemically investigate protein and phosphoprotein abundance changes as a result of statin treatment. Many lipid-related protein abundances were increased in HepG2 cells treated by atorvastatin, including HMGCR, FDFT, SQLE, and LDLR, while the abundances of proteins involved in cellular response to stress and apoptosis were decreased. Comprehensive analysis of protein phosphorylation demonstrated that several basic motifs were enriched among down-regulated phosphorylation sites, which indicates that kinases with preference for these motifs, such as protein kinase A and protein kinase C, have attenuated activities. Phosphopeptides on a group of G-protein modulators were up-regulated, which strongly suggests that cell signal rewiring was a result of the effect of protein lipidation by the statin. This work provides a global view of liver cell responses to atorvastatin at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels, which provides insight into the pleiotropic effects of statins.

  7. The alpaca agouti gene: genomic locus, transcripts and causative mutations of eumelanic and pheomelanic coat color.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Renieri, Carlo; La Manna, Vincenzo; La Terza, Antonietta

    2013-06-01

    The agouti gene encodes the agouti signaling protein (ASIP) which regulates pheomelanin and eumelanin synthesis in mammals. To investigate the role of agouti in coat color variation of alpaca, we characterized the agouti gene and identified three mutations potentially involved with the determinism of eumelanic and pheomelanic phenotypes. The exon-4 hosts the mutations g.3836C>T, g.3896G>A and g.3866_3923del57. Further analysis of these mutations revealed two genotypes for black animals. The reverse transcription analysis of mRNA purified from skin biopsies of alpaca revealed the presence of three transcripts with different 5' untranslated regions (UTRs) and color specific expression. The white specific transcript, possibly originating from a duplication event (intra-chromosomal recombination) of the agouti gene is characterise by a 5'UTR containing 142bp of the NCOA6 gene sequence. Furthermore, the relative level expression analysis of mRNA demonstrates that the agouti gene has up-regulated expression in white skin, suggesting a pleiotropic effect of agouti in the white phenotype. Our findings refine the structure of the agouti locus and transcripts and provide additional information in order to understand the role of agouti in the pigmentation of alpaca.

  8. Pleiotropic Effect of a High Resolution Mapped Blood Pressure QTL on Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xi; Waghulde, Harshal; Mell, Blair; Smedlund, Kathryn; Vazquez, Guillermo; Joe, Bina

    2016-01-01

    This study is focused on a translationally significant, genome-wide-association-study (GWAS) locus for cardiovascular disease (QT-interval) on human chromosome 17. We have previously validated and high resolution mapped the homologous genomic segment of this human locus to <42.5 kb on rat chromosome 10. This <42.5 kb segment in rats regulates both QT-interval and blood pressure and contains a single protein-coding gene, rififylin (Rffl). The expression of Rffl in the hearts and kidneys is differential between Dahl S and S.LEW congenic rats, which are the strains used for mapping this locus. Our previous study points to altered rate of endocytic recycling as the underlying mechanism, through which Rffl operates to control both QT-interval and blood pressure. Interestingly, Rffl also contributes to tumorigenesis by repressing caspases and tumor suppressor genes. Moreover, the expression of Methyl-CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 (Mbd2) in the hearts and kidneys is also higher in the S.LEW congenic strain than the background (control) Dahl S strain. Mbd2 can repress methylated tumor suppressor genes. These data suggest that the S.LEW congenic strain could be more susceptible to tumorigenesis. To test this hypothesis, the S and S.LEW strains were compared for susceptibility to azoxymethane-induced colon tumors. The number of colon tumors was significantly higher in the S.LEW congenic strain compared with the S rat. Transcriptomic analysis confirmed that the chemical carcinogenesis pathway was significantly up-regulated in the congenic strain. These studies provide evidence for a GWAS-validated genomic segment on rat chromosome 10 as being important for the regulation of cardiovascular function and tumorigenesis. PMID:27073989

  9. Enhancer scanning to locate regulatory regions in genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Melissa; Gjyshi, Anxhela; Mendoza-Fandiño, Gustavo; Baskin, Rebekah; Carvalho, Renato S.; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Woods, Nicholas T.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2016-01-01

    The present protocol provides a rapid, streamlined and scalable strategy to systematically scan genomic regions for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions active in a specific cell type. It creates genomic tiles spanning a region of interest that are subsequently cloned by recombination into a luciferase reporter vector containing the Simian Virus 40 promoter. Tiling clones are transfected into specific cell types to test for the presence of transcriptional regulatory regions. The protocol includes testing of different SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) alleles to determine their effect on regulatory activity. This procedure provides a systematic framework to identify candidate functional SNPs within a locus during functional analysis of genome-wide association studies. This protocol adapts and combines previous well-established molecular biology methods to provide a streamlined strategy, based on automated primer design and recombinational cloning to rapidly go from a genomic locus to a set of candidate functional SNPs in eight weeks. PMID:26658467

  10. Erythropoietin in heart failure and other cardiovascular diseases: hematopoietic and pleiotropic effects.

    PubMed

    Manolis, Antonis S; Tzeis, Stylianos; Triantafyllou, Kostas; Michaelidis, John; Pyrros, Ioannis; Sakellaris, Nikolaos; Kranidis, Athanasios; Melita, Helen

    2005-10-01

    Erythropoietin is a hypoxia-induced hormone that is a major regulator of normal erythropoiesis. Over the last decade, the production of recombinant human erythropoietin has revolutionized the treatment of anemia associated with chronic renal failure, and has led to a greater understanding of anemia pathophysiology and to the elucidation of the interactions of erythropoietin, iron, and erythropoiesis. Anemia has been shown to be independently associated with increased mortality and disease progression. Potential survival benefits associated with correction of anemia have expanded considerably the indications of erythropoietin use in various patient populations and are leading to consideration of earlier, more aggressive treatment of mild to moderate anemia. The results of such treatment are promising in a variety of new clinical settings, including anemia associated with congestive heart failure. Furthermore, the erythropoietin receptor is widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and cardiomyocytes and preclinical studies have established erythropoietin to be a pleiotropic cytokine with anti-apoptotic activity and tissue-protective actions in the cardiovascular system, beyond correction of hemoglobin levels. Despite some potential adverse effects, such as hypertension, and the occurrence of erythropoietin resistance, early studies in heart failure patients with anemia suggest that erythropoietin therapy is safe and effective in reducing left ventricular hypertrophy, enhancing exercise performance and increasing ejection fraction. Anemia is found in about one-third of all cases of congestive heart failure (CHF). The most likely common cause is chronic renal insufficiency, which is present in about half of all CHF cases. However, anemia can occur in CHF without renal insufficiency and is likely to be due to excessive cytokine production. The anemia itself can worsen cardiac function, both because it causes

  11. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Deficiency of huntingtin has pleiotropic effects in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Myre, Michael A; Lumsden, Amanda L; Thompson, Morgan N; Wasco, Wilma; MacDonald, Marcy E; Gusella, James F

    2011-04-01

    Huntingtin is a large HEAT repeat protein first identified in humans, where a polyglutamine tract expansion near the amino terminus causes a gain-of-function mechanism that leads to selective neuronal loss in Huntington's disease (HD). Genetic evidence in humans and knock-in mouse models suggests that this gain-of-function involves an increase or deregulation of some aspect of huntingtin's normal function(s), which remains poorly understood. As huntingtin shows evolutionary conservation, a powerful approach to discovering its normal biochemical role(s) is to study the effects caused by its deficiency in a model organism with a short life-cycle that comprises both cellular and multicellular developmental stages. To facilitate studies aimed at detailed knowledge of huntingtin's normal function(s), we generated a null mutant of hd, the HD ortholog in Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium cells lacking endogenous huntingtin were viable but during development did not exhibit the typical polarized morphology of Dictyostelium cells, streamed poorly to form aggregates by accretion rather than chemotaxis, showed disorganized F-actin staining, exhibited extreme sensitivity to hypoosmotic stress, and failed to form EDTA-resistant cell-cell contacts. Surprisingly, chemotactic streaming could be rescued in the presence of the bivalent cations Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) but not pulses of cAMP. Although hd(-) cells completed development, it was delayed and proceeded asynchronously, producing small fruiting bodies with round, defective spores that germinated spontaneously within a glassy sorus. When developed as chimeras with wild-type cells, hd(-) cells failed to populate the pre-spore region of the slug. In Dictyostelium, huntingtin deficiency is compatible with survival of the organism but renders cells sensitive to low osmolarity, which produces pleiotropic cell autonomous defects that affect cAMP signaling and as a consequence development. Thus, Dictyostelium provides a novel haploid

  13. Deficiency of Huntingtin Has Pleiotropic Effects in the Social Amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Myre, Michael A.; Lumsden, Amanda L.; Thompson, Morgan N.; Wasco, Wilma; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Huntingtin is a large HEAT repeat protein first identified in humans, where a polyglutamine tract expansion near the amino terminus causes a gain-of-function mechanism that leads to selective neuronal loss in Huntington's disease (HD). Genetic evidence in humans and knock-in mouse models suggests that this gain-of-function involves an increase or deregulation of some aspect of huntingtin's normal function(s), which remains poorly understood. As huntingtin shows evolutionary conservation, a powerful approach to discovering its normal biochemical role(s) is to study the effects caused by its deficiency in a model organism with a short life-cycle that comprises both cellular and multicellular developmental stages. To facilitate studies aimed at detailed knowledge of huntingtin's normal function(s), we generated a null mutant of hd, the HD ortholog in Dictyostelium discoideum. Dictyostelium cells lacking endogenous huntingtin were viable but during development did not exhibit the typical polarized morphology of Dictyostelium cells, streamed poorly to form aggregates by accretion rather than chemotaxis, showed disorganized F-actin staining, exhibited extreme sensitivity to hypoosmotic stress, and failed to form EDTA-resistant cell–cell contacts. Surprisingly, chemotactic streaming could be rescued in the presence of the bivalent cations Ca2+ or Mg2+ but not pulses of cAMP. Although hd− cells completed development, it was delayed and proceeded asynchronously, producing small fruiting bodies with round, defective spores that germinated spontaneously within a glassy sorus. When developed as chimeras with wild-type cells, hd− cells failed to populate the pre-spore region of the slug. In Dictyostelium, huntingtin deficiency is compatible with survival of the organism but renders cells sensitive to low osmolarity, which produces pleiotropic cell autonomous defects that affect cAMP signaling and as a consequence development. Thus, Dictyostelium provides a novel haploid

  14. Breaking evolutionary and pleiotropic constraints in mammals: On sloths, manatees and homeotic mutations

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mammals as a rule have seven cervical vertebrae, except for sloths and manatees. Bateson proposed that the change in the number of cervical vertebrae in sloths is due to homeotic transformations. A recent hypothesis proposes that the number of cervical vertebrae in sloths is unchanged and that instead the derived pattern is due to abnormal primaxial/abaxial patterning. Results We test the detailed predictions derived from both hypotheses for the skeletal patterns in sloths and manatees for both hypotheses. We find strong support for Bateson's homeosis hypothesis. The observed vertebral and rib patterns cannot be explained by changes in primaxial/abaxial patterning. Vertebral patterns in sloths and manatees are similar to those in mice and humans with abnormal numbers of cervical vertebrae: incomplete and asymmetric homeotic transformations are common and associated with skeletal abnormalities. In sloths the homeotic vertebral shift involves a large part of the vertebral column. As such, similarity is greatest with mice mutant for genes upstream of Hox. Conclusions We found no skeletal abnormalities in specimens of sister taxa with a normal number of cervical vertebrae. However, we always found such abnormalities in conspecifics with an abnormal number, as in many of the investigated dugongs. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that the evolutionary constraints on changes of the number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is due to deleterious pleitropic effects. We hypothesize that in sloths and manatees low metabolic and activity rates severely reduce the usual stabilizing selection, allowing the breaking of the pleiotropic constraints. This probably also applies to dugongs, although to a lesser extent. PMID:21548920

  15. Functional variant in methionine synthase reductase intron-1 is associated with pleiotropic congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Haiqin; Li, Huili; Bu, Zhaoli; Zhang, Qin; Bai, Baoling; Zhao, Hong; Li, Ren-Ke; Zhang, Ting; Xie, Jun

    2015-09-01

    Congenital malformations, such as neural tube defects (NTDs) and congenital heart disease (CHD), cause significant fetal mortality and childhood morbidity. NTDs are a common congenital anomaly, and are typically induced by higher maternal homocysteine (Hcy) levels and abnormal folate metabolism. The gene encoding methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) is essential for adequate remethylation of Hcy. Previous studies have focused on the coding region of genes involved in one-carbon metabolism, but recent research demonstrates that an allelic change in a non-coding region of MTRR (rs326119) increases the risk of CHD. We hypothesized that this variant might contribute to the etiology of NTDs as well, based on a common role during early embryogenesis. In the present study, 244 neural tube defect cases and 407 controls from northern China were analyzed to determine any association (by χ (2) test) between rs326119 and disease phenotypes. Significant increased risk of anencephaly was seen in MTRR variant rs326119 heterozygote (het) and homozygote (hom) individuals [odds ratios (OR)het = 1.81; ORhom = 2.05)]. Furthermore, this variant was also a risk factor for congenital malformations of the adrenal gland (OR = 1.85), likely due to multiple systemic malformations in the NTDs case population. Our present data indicate that the rs326119 non-coding variant of MTRR has a pleiotropic effect on the development of multiple tissues, especially during early stages in utero. This suggests the allelic state of MTRR is a significant clinical factor affecting Hcy levels and optimal folic supplementation. PMID:26045171

  16. The NR4A subgroup: immediate early response genes with pleiotropic physiological roles

    PubMed Central

    Maxwell, Megan A.; Muscat, George E.O.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear hormone receptor (NR) superfamily includes the orphan NR4A subgroup, comprised of Nur77 (NR4A1), Nurr1 (NR4A2) and NOR-1 (NR4A3). These NRs are classified as early response genes, are induced by a diverse range of signals, including fatty acids, stress, growth factors, cytokines, peptide hormones, phorbol esters, neurotransmitters, and physical stimuli (for example magnetic fields, shear stress). The ability to sense and rapidly respond to changes in the cellular environment thus appears to be a hallmark of this subfamily. The members of the NR4A subgroup are well conserved in the DNA binding domain (~91-95%) and the C-terminal ligand-binding domain (~60%), but are divergent in the N-terminal AB region. These receptors bind as monomers, homodimers and heterodimers with RXRs (to mediate retinoid signaling) to different permutations of the canonical NR binding motif. The NR4A subgroup activates gene expression in a constitutive ligand-independent manner. NR4A-mediated trans-activation (LBD) involves unusually active N-terminal AF-1 domains that mediate coactivator recruitment. Moreover, the NR4A receptors encode atypical LBDs and AF-2 domains. For example, the LBDs contain no cavity due to bulky hydrophobic residue side chains, and lack the classical coactivator-binding cleft constituted by helices 3, 4 and 12. However, a hydrophobic patch exists between helices 11 and 12, that encodes a novel cofactor interface that modulates transcriptional activity. In line with the pleiotropic physiological stimuli that induce the NR4A subgroup, these orphan NRs have been implicated in cell cycle regulation (and apoptosis), neurological disease, steroidogenesis, inflammation, carcinogenesis and atherogenesis. PMID:16604165

  17. Pleiotropic effects of methionine adenosyltransferases deregulation as determinants of liver cancer progression and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Frau, Maddalena; Feo, Francesco; Pascale, Rosa M

    2013-10-01

    Downregulation of liver-specific MAT1A gene, encoding S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) synthesizing isozymes MATI/III, and upregulation of widely expressed MAT2A, encoding MATII isozyme, known as MAT1A:MAT2A switch, occurs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Being inhibited by its reaction product, MATII isoform upregulation cannot compensate for MATI/III decrease. Therefore, MAT1A:MAT2A switch contributes to decrease in SAM level in rodent and human hepatocarcinogenesis. SAM administration to carcinogen-treated rats prevents hepatocarcinogenesis, whereas MAT1A-KO mice, characterized by chronic SAM deficiency, exhibit macrovesicular steatosis, mononuclear cell infiltration in periportal areas, and HCC development. This review focuses upon the pleiotropic changes, induced by MAT1A/MAT2A switch, associated with HCC development. Epigenetic control of MATs expression occurs at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In HCC cells, MAT1A/MAT2A switch is associated with global DNA hypomethylation, decrease in DNA repair, genomic instability, and signaling deregulation including c-MYC overexpression, rise in polyamine synthesis, upregulation of RAS/ERK, IKK/NF-kB, PI3K/AKT, and LKB1/AMPK axis. Furthermore, decrease in MAT1A expression and SAM levels results in increased HCC cell proliferation, cell survival, and microvascularization. All of these changes are reversed by SAM treatment in vivo or forced MAT1A overexpression or MAT2A inhibition in cultured HCC cells. In human HCC, MAT1A:MAT2A and MATI/III:MATII ratios correlate negatively with cell proliferation and genomic instability, and positively with apoptosis and global DNA methylation. This suggests that SAM decrease and MATs deregulation represent potential therapeutic targets for HCC. Finally, MATI/III:MATII ratio strongly predicts patients' survival length suggesting that MAT1A:MAT2A expression ratio is a putative prognostic marker for human HCC.

  18. Epithelial progesterone receptor exhibits pleiotropic roles in uterine development and function

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Heather L.; Rubel, Cory A.; Large, Michael J.; Wetendorf, Margeaux; Fernandez-Valdivia, Rodrigo; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Spencer, Thomas E.; Behringer, Richard R.; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.

    2012-01-01

    The ovarian steroid progesterone, acting through the progesterone receptor (PR), coordinates endometrial epithelial-stromal cell communication, which is critical for its development and function. PR expression in these cellular compartments is under tight temporal and endocrine control. Although ex vivo studies demonstrated the importance of stromal PR expression, they failed to show a role for epithelial PR in uterine function. Here, the in vivo role of PR in the uterine epithelium is defined using floxed PR (PRf/f) mice crossed to Wnt7a-Cre mice. Progesterone was unable to stimulate the expression of its epithelial target genes, including Ihh, in the Wnt7a-Cre+PRf/− mice. Analysis was conducted on Ihh to determine whether PR directly regulates epithelial gene transcription. ChIP-on-chip analysis identified PR binding sites in the 5′-flanking region of Ihh. Cotransfection of the proximal Ihh promoter with PR demonstrated that PR directly regulates Ihh transcription. Female Wnt7a-Cre+PRf/− mice are infertile due to defects in embryo attachment, stromal cell decidualization, and the inability to cease estrogen-induced epithelial cell proliferation. Finally, progesterone was unable to inhibit neonatal endometrial glandular development in Wnt7a-Cre+PRf/− mice. Thus, epithelial PR is necessary for the regulation of progesterone epithelial target gene expression, as well as uterine function and development.—Franco, H. L., Rubel, C. A., Large, M. J., Wetendorf, M., Fernandez-Valdivia, R., Jeong, J.-W., Spencer, T. E., Behringer, R. R., Lydon, J. P., DeMayo, F. J. Epithelial progesterone receptor exhibits pleiotropic roles in uterine development and function. PMID:22155565

  19. Locus of Control in Alcoholics Undergoing Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Shirley C.

    Alcoholism is a complex behavior pattern. Social learning theory, which is concerned with the analysis of why individuals behave in certain ways and the effects of reinforcement patterns in their behaviors, offers an alternative to traditional treatments of alcoholics. Among alcoholics, drinking is a control issue. Locus of control is viewed as a…

  20. Aspirations, Attributions, and Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samuel, William; McNall, Sidne J.

    Self-evaluation is thought to play a major role in personality and motivation. Preliminary experience with success or failure, levels of aspiration, attributions for performance, and locus of control may all be interrelated factors in human motivation. After receiving success, failure, or no feedback on a concept formation task, subjects (N=90)…

  1. A suppressor locus for MODY3-diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Gonzalez, Miguel A.; Carette, Claire; Bagattin, Alessia; Chiral, Magali; Makinistoglu, Munevver Parla; Garbay, Serge; Prévost, Géraldine; Madaras, Cécile; Hérault, Yann; Leibovici, Michel; Pontoglio, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Maturity Onset Diabetes of the Young type 3 (MODY3), linked to mutations in the transcription factor HNF1A, is the most prevalent form of monogenic diabetes mellitus. HNF1alpha-deficiency leads to defective insulin secretion via a molecular mechanism that is still not completely understood. Moreover, in MODY3 patients the severity of insulin secretion can be extremely variable even in the same kindred, indicating that modifier genes may control the onset of the disease. With the use of a mouse model for HNF1alpha-deficiency, we show here that specific genetic backgrounds (C3H and CBA) carry a powerful genetic suppressor of diabetes. A genome scan analysis led to the identification of a major suppressor locus on chromosome 3 (Moda1). Moda1 locus contains 11 genes with non-synonymous SNPs that significantly interacts with other loci on chromosomes 4, 11 and 18. Mechanistically, the absence of HNF1alpha in diabetic-prone (sensitive) strains leads to postnatal defective islets growth that is remarkably restored in resistant strains. Our findings are relevant to human genetics since Moda1 is syntenic with a human locus identified by genome wide association studies of fasting glycemia in patients. Most importantly, our results show that a single genetic locus can completely suppress diabetes in Hnf1a-deficiency. PMID:27667715

  2. Surfeit locus gene homologs are widely distributed in invertebrate genomes.

    PubMed

    Armes, N; Fried, M

    1996-10-01

    The mouse Surfeit locus contains six sequence-unrelated genes (Surf-1 to -6) arranged in the tightest gene cluster so far described for mammals. The organization and juxtaposition of five of the Surfeit genes (Surf-1 to -5) are conserved between mammals and birds, and this may reflect a functional or regulatory requirement for the gene clustering. We have undertaken an evolutionary study to determine whether the Surfeit genes are conserved and clustered in invertebrate genomes. Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans homologs of the mouse Surf-4 gene, which encodes an integral membrane protein associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, have been isolated. The amino acid sequences of the Drosophila and C. elegans homologs are highly conserved in comparison with the mouse Surf-4 protein. In particular, a dilysine motif implicated in endoplasmic reticulum localization of the mouse protein is conserved in the invertebrate homologs. We show that the Drosophila Surf-4 gene, which is transcribed from a TATA-less promoter, is not closely associated with other Drosophila Surfeit gene homologs but rather is located upstream from sequences encoding a homolog of a yeast seryl-tRNA synthetase protein. There are at least two closely linked Surf-3/rpL7a genes or highly polymorphic alleles of a single Surf-3/rpL7a gene in the C. elegans genome. The chromosomal locations of the C. elegans Surf-1, Surf-3/rpL7a, and Surf-4 genes have been determined. In D. melanogaster the Surf-3/rpL7a, Surf-4, and Surf-5 gene homologs and in C. elegans the Surf-1, Surf-3/rpL7a, Surf-4, and Surf-5 gene homologs are located on completely different chromosomes, suggesting that any requirement for the tight clustering of the genes in the Surfeit locus is restricted to vertebrate lineages.

  3. The potato R locus codes for dihydroflavonol 4-reductase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongfei; Cheng, Shuping; De Jong, Darlene; Griffiths, Helen; Halitschke, Rayko; De Jong, Walter

    2009-09-01

    The potato R locus is required for the production of red pelargonidin-based anthocyanin pigments in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Red color also requires tissue-specific regulatory genes, such as D (for expression in tuber skin) and F (expression in flowers). A related locus, P, is required for production of blue/purple anthocyanins; P is epistatic to R. We have previously reported that the dihydroflavonol 4-reductase gene (dfr) co-segregates with R. To test directly whether R corresponds to dfr, we placed the allele of dfr associated with red color under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter and introduced it into the potato cultivar Prince Hairy (genotype dddd rrrr P-), which has white tubers and pale blue flowers. Transgenic Prince Hairy tubers remained white, but flower color changed to purple. Three independent transgenic lines, as well as a vector-transformed line, were then crossed with the red-skinned variety Chieftain (genotype D-R-pppp), to establish populations that segregated for D, R, P, and the dfr transgene or empty vector. Markers were used to genotype progeny at D and R. Progeny carrying the empty vector in the genetic background D-rrrr produced white or purple tubers, while progeny with the same genotype and the dfr transgene produced red or purple tubers. HPLC and LC-MS/MS analyses of anthocyanins present in Chieftain and in a red-skinned progeny clone with the dfr transgene in a D-rrrr background revealed no qualitative differences. Thus, dfr can fully complement R, both in terms of tuber color and anthocyanin composition.

  4. Pleiotropic Effects of a Methyl Donor Diet in a Novel Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Shorter, Kimberly R.; Anderson, Vanessa; Cakora, Patricia; Owen, Amy; Lo, Keswick; Crossland, Janet; South, April C. H.; Felder, Michael R.; Vrana, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Folate and other methyl-donor pathway components are widely supplemented due to their ability to prevent prenatal neural tube defects. Several lines of evidence suggest that these supplements act through epigenetic mechanisms (e.g. altering DNA methylation). Primary among these are the experiments on the mouse viable yellow allele of the agouti locus (Avy). In the Avy allele, an Intracisternal A-particle retroelement has inserted into the genome adjacent to the agouti gene and is preferentially methylated. To further test these effects, we tested the same diet used in the Avy studies on wild-derived Peromyscus maniculatus, a native North American rodent. We collected tissues from neonatal offspring whose parents were fed the high-methyl donor diet as well as controls. In addition, we assayed coat-color of a natural variant (wide-band agouti = ANb) that overexpresses agouti as a phenotypic biomarker. Our data indicate that these dietary components affected agouti protein production, despite the lack of a retroelement at this locus. Surprisingly, the methyl-donor diet was associated with defects (e.g. ovarian cysts, cataracts) and increased mortality. We also assessed the effects of the diet on behavior: We scored animals in open field and social interaction tests. We observed significant increases in female repetitive behaviors. Thus these data add to a growing number of studies that suggest that these ubiquitously added nutrients may be a human health concern. PMID:25121505

  5. An Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 locus involved in lipopolysaccharide production and nodule formation on Sesbania rostrata stems and roots.

    PubMed Central

    Goethals, K; Leyman, B; Van Den Eede, G; Van Montagu, M; Holsters, M

    1994-01-01

    Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571 is able to nodulate roots and stems of the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. An ORS571 Tn5 insertion mutant, strain ORS571-X15, had a rough colony morphology, was nonmotile, and showed clumping behavior on various media. When this pleiotropic mutant was inoculated on roots or stems of the host, no nodules developed (Nod-). Compared with the wild type, strain ORS571-X15 produced lipopolysaccharides (LPS) with an altered ladder pattern on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels, suggestive of a different O-antigen structure with a lower degree of polymerization. A cosmid clone, pRG20, that fully complemented all phenotypes of ORS571-X15 was isolated. With a 6-kb EcoRI subfragment of pRG20, clumping was relieved and nodulation was almost completely restored, but the strain was still nonmotile. LPS preparations from these complemented strains resembled the wild-type LPS, although minor quantitative and qualitative differences were evident. The sequence of the locus hit by the Tn5 in ORS571-X15 (the oac locus) revealed a striking homology with the rfb locus of Salmonella typhimurium, which is involved in O-antigen biosynthesis. The Tn5 insertion position was mapped to the oac3 gene, homologous to rfbA, encoding dTDP-D-glucose synthase. Biochemical assaying showed that ORS571-X15 is indeed defective in dTDP-D-glucose synthase activity, essential for the production of particular deoxyhexoses. Therefore, it was proposed that the O antigen of the mutant strain is devoid of such sugars. Images PMID:7506708

  6. Regulatory Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes the term “safety logics” to understand attempts within the European Union (EU) to harmonize member state legislation to ensure a safe and stable supply of human biological material for transplants and transfusions. With safety logics, I refer to assemblages of discourses, legal documents, technological devices, organizational structures, and work practices aimed at minimizing risk. I use this term to reorient the analytical attention with respect to safety regulation. Instead of evaluating whether safety is achieved, the point is to explore the types of “safety” produced through these logics as well as to consider the sometimes unintended consequences of such safety work. In fact, the EU rules have been giving rise to complaints from practitioners finding the directives problematic and inadequate. In this article, I explore the problems practitioners face and why they arise. In short, I expose the regulatory anatomy of the policy landscape. PMID:26139952

  7. Regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Anderson, Jorge; Contreras, Lydia M

    2013-01-01

    RNAs have many important functional properties, including that they are independently controllable and highly tunable. As a result of these advantageous properties, their use in a myriad of sophisticated devices has been widely explored. Yet, the exploitation of RNAs for synthetic applications is highly dependent on the ability to characterize the many new molecules that continue to be discovered by large-scale sequencing and high-throughput screening techniques. In this review, we present an exhaustive survey of the most recent synthetic bacterial riboswitches and small RNAs while emphasizing their virtues in gene expression management. We also explore the use of these RNA components as building blocks in the RNA synthetic biology toolbox and discuss examples of synthetic RNA components used to rewire bacterial regulatory circuitry. We anticipate that this field will expand its catalog of smart devices by mimicking and manipulating natural RNA mechanisms and functions. PMID:24356572

  8. Regulatory Physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Helen W.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Putcha, Lakshmi; Baker, Ellen; Smith, Scott M.; Stewart, Karen; Gretebeck, Randall; Nimmagudda, R. R.; Schoeller, Dale A.; Davis-Street, Janis

    1999-01-01

    As noted elsewhere in this report, a central goal of the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP) was to ensure that cardiovascular and muscle function were adequate to perform an emergency egress after 16 days of spaceflight. The goals of the Regulatory Physiology component of the EDOMP were to identify and subsequently ameliorate those biochemical and nutritional factors that deplete physiological reserves or increase risk for disease, and to facilitate the development of effective muscle, exercise, and cardiovascular countermeasures. The component investigations designed to meet these goals focused on biochemical and physiological aspects of nutrition and metabolism, the risk of renal (kidney) stone formation, gastrointestinal function, and sleep in space. Investigations involved both ground-based protocols to validate proposed methods and flight studies to test those methods. Two hardware tests were also completed.

  9. Locus of Control and Psychological Distress among the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, W. Daniel; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined relationship between locus of control and self-reported psychopathology in 139 residents of retirement complex. Correlation coefficients computed for locus of control and each of nine symptom dimensions of the Brief Symptom Inventory indicated that locus of control was correlated with self-reported psychopatholgoy for older women but not…

  10. Cognitive Evaluation Theory, Locus of Control and Positive Verbal Feedback.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonky, Edward; Reihman, Jacqueline

    This study tests the hypothesis that individual differences in locus of control orientation may mediate elementary school students' responses to positive verbal feedback. A total of 30 kindergarten through fourth grade subjects were assessed for locus of control orientation using the Bialer Children's Locus of Control Questionnaire. To establish a…

  11. Evolution of sex-specific wing shape at the widerwing locus in four species of Nasonia.

    PubMed

    Loehlin, D W; Enders, L S; Werren, J H

    2010-03-01

    How do morphological differences between species evolve at the genetic level? This study investigates the genetic basis of recent divergence in male wing size between species of the model parasitoid wasp Nasonia. The forewings of flightless Nasonia vitripennis males are 2.3 times smaller than males of their flighted sister species N. giraulti. We describe a major genetic contributor to this difference: the sex-specific widerwing (wdw) locus, which we have backcrossed from N. giraulti into N. vitripennis and mapped to an 0.9 megabase region of chromosome 1. This introgression of wdw from large-winged N. giraulti into small-winged N. vitripennis increases male but not female forewing width by 30% through wing region-specific size changes. Indirect evidence suggests that cell number changes across the wing explain the majority of the wdw wing-size difference, whereas changes in cell size are important in the center of the wing. Introgressing the same locus from the other species in the genus, N. longicornis and N. oneida, into N. vitripennis produces intermediate and large male wing sizes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to introgress a morphological quantitative trait locus (QTL) from multiple species into a common genetic background. Epistatic interactions between wdw and other QTL are also identified by introgressing wdw from N. vitripennis into N. giraulti. The main findings are (1) the changes at wdw have sex- and region-specific effects and could, therefore, be regulatory, (2) the wdw locus seems to be a co-regulator of cell size and cell number, and (3) the wdw locus has evolved different wing width effects in three species.

  12. Evolution of sex-specific wing shape at the widerwing locus in four species of Nasonia

    PubMed Central

    Loehlin, David W.; Enders, Laramy S.; Werren, John H.

    2009-01-01

    How do morphological differences between species evolve at the genetic level? This study investigates the genetic basis of recent divergence in male wing size between species of the model parasitoid wasp Nasonia. The forewings of flightless N. vitripennis males are 2.3 times smaller than males of their flighted sister species N. giraulti. We describe a major genetic contributor to this difference: the sex-specific widerwing (wdw) locus, which we have backcrossed from N. giraulti into N. vitripennis and mapped to an 0.9 megabase region of chromosome 1. This introgression of wdw from large-winged N. giraulti into small-winged N. vitripennis increases male but not female forewing width by 30% through wing region-specific size changes. Indirect evidence suggests that cell number changes across the wing explain the majority of the wdw wing size difference while changes in cell size are important in the center of the wing. Introgressing the same locus from the other species in the genus, N. longicornis and N. oneida, into N. vitripennis produces intermediate and large male wing sizes. To our knowledge, this is the first study to introgress a morphological quantitative trait locus (QTL) from multiple species into a common genetic background. Epistatic interactions between wdw and other QTL are also identified by introgressing wdw from N. vitripennis into N. giraulti. The main findings are 1) the changes at wdw have sex- and region-specific effects and could therefore be regulatory, 2) the wdw locus appears to be a co-regulator of cell size and cell number, and 3) the wdw locus has evolved different wing width effects in three species. PMID:20087390

  13. Interaction of the Stubble-Stubbloid Locus and the Broad-Complex of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, A. H.; Kiss, I.; Fristrom, D.; Fristrom, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The 2B5 region on the X chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster forms an early ecdysone puff at the end of the third instar. The region is coextensive with a complex genetic locus, the Broad-Complex (BR-C). The BR-C is a regulatory gene that contains two major functional domains, the br domain and the l(1)2Bc domain. BR-C mutants prevent metamorphosis, including morphogenesis of imaginal discs; br mutants prevent elongation and eversion of appendages and l(1)2Bc mutants prevent fusion of the discs. The Stubble-stubbloid (Sb-sbd) locus at 89B9-10 is best known for the effects of its mutants on bristle structure. Mutants of the BR-C and the Sb-sbd locus interact to produce severe malformation of appendages. Viable heteroallelic and homoallelic combinations of Sb-sbd mutants, including loss-of-function mutants, affect the elongation of imaginal disc appendages. Thus, the Sb-sbd(+) product is essential for normal appendage elongation. Sb-sbd mutants, however, do not affect eversion or fusion of discs. Correspondingly, only BR-C mutants deficient in br function interact with Sb-sbd mutants. The interaction occurs in deficiency heterozygotes using single, wild-type doses of the BR-C, of the Sb-sbd locus, or of both loci. These last results are formally consistent with the possibility that the BR-C acts as a positive regulator of the Sb-sbd locus. The data do not exclude other possible nonregulatory interactions between the two loci, e.g., interactions between the products of both genes. PMID:3143619

  14. Recurrent Somatic Mutations in Regulatory Regions of Human Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Collin; Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek V.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer can promote survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Here we integrate TCGA whole genome sequencing data of 436 patients from eight cancer subtypes with ENCODE and other regulatory annotations to identify point mutations in regulatory regions. We find evidence for positive selection of mutations in transcription factor binding sites, consistent with these sites regulating important cancer cell functions. Using a novel method that adjusts for sample- and genomic locus-specific mutation rate, we identify recurrently mutated sites across cancer patients. Mutated regulatory sites include known sites in the TERT promoter and many novel sites, including a subset in proximity to cancer genes. In reporter assays, two novel sites display decreased enhancer activity upon mutation. These data demonstrate that many regulatory regions contain mutations under selective pressure and suggest a larger role for regulatory mutations in cancer than previously appreciated. PMID:26053494

  15. Functional Analysis of APOE Locus Genetic Variation Implicates Regional Enhancers in the Regulation of Both TOMM40 and APOE

    PubMed Central

    Bekris, L.M.; Lutz, F.; Yu, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variation within the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE) locus is associated with late-onset Alzheimer's disease risk and quantitative traits as well as apoE expression in multiple tissues. The aim of this investigation was to explore the influence of APOE locus cis-regulatory element enhancer region genetic variation on regional gene promoter activity. Luciferase reporter constructs containing haplotypes of APOE locus gene promoters; APOE, APOC1, and TOMM40, and regional putative enhancers; TOMM40 IVS2-4, TOMM40 IVS6 poly-T, as well as previously described enhancers; ME1, or BCR, were evaluated for their effects on luciferase activity in 3 human cell lines. Results of this investigation demonstrate that in SHSY5Y cells, the APOE promoter is significantly influenced by the TOMM40 IVS2-4 and ME1 and the TOMM40 promoter is significantly influenced by the TOMM40 IVS6 poly-T, ME1 and BCR. In HepG2 cells, theTOMM40 promoter is significantly influenced by all four enhancers, whereas the APOE promoter is not influenced by any of the enhancers. The main novel finding of this investigation was that multiple APOE locus cis-elements influence both APOE and TOMM40 promoter activity according to haplotype and cell type suggesting that a complex transcriptional regulatory structure modulates regional expression. PMID:22089642

  16. Constraints on the evolution of a doublesex target gene arising from doublesex's pleiotropic deployment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shengzhan D; Baker, Bruce S

    2015-02-24

    "Regulatory evolution," that is, changes in a gene's expression pattern through changes at its regulatory sequence, rather than changes at the coding sequence of the gene or changes of the upstream transcription factors, has been increasingly recognized as a pervasive evolution mechanism. Many somatic sexually dimorphic features of Drosophila melanogaster are the results of gene expression regulated by the doublesex (dsx) gene, which encodes sex-specific transcription factors (DSX(F) in females and DSX(M) in males). Rapid changes in such sexually dimorphic features are likely a result of changes at the regulatory sequence of the target genes. We focused on the Flavin-containing monooxygenase-2 (Fmo-2) gene, a likely direct dsx target, to elucidate how sexually dimorphic expression and its evolution are brought about. We found that dsx is deployed to regulate the Fmo-2 transcription both in the midgut and in fat body cells of the spermatheca (a female-specific tissue), through a canonical DSX-binding site in the Fmo-2 regulatory sequence. In the melanogaster group, Fmo-2 transcription in the midgut has evolved rapidly, in contrast to the conserved spermathecal transcription. We identified two cis-regulatory modules (CRM-p and CRM-d) that direct sexually monomorphic or dimorphic Fmo-2 transcription, respectively, in the midguts of these species. Changes of Fmo-2 transcription in the midgut from sexually dimorphic to sexually monomorphic in some species are caused by the loss of CRM-d function, but not the loss of the canonical DSX-binding site. Thus, conferring transcriptional regulation on a CRM level allows the regulation to evolve rapidly in one tissue while evading evolutionary constraints posed by other tissues.

  17. Polycomb Mediated Epigenetic Silencing and Replication Timing at the INK4a/ARF Locus during Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Verthuy, Christophe; Chasson, Lionel; Serrano, Manuel; Djabali, Malek

    2009-01-01

    Background The INK4/ARF locus encodes three tumor suppressor genes (p15Ink4b, Arf and p16Ink4a) and is frequently inactivated in a large number of human cancers. Mechanisms regulating INK4/ARF expression are not fully characterized. Principal Findings Here we show that in young proliferating embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2 together with PRC1 members BMI1 and M33 are strongly expressed and localized at the INK4/ARF regulatory domain (RD) identified as a DNA replication origin. When cells enter senescence the binding to RD of both PRC1 and PRC2 complexes is lost leading to a decreased level of histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3). This loss is accompanied with an increased expression of the histone demethylase Jmjd3 and with the recruitment of the MLL1 protein, and correlates with the expression of the Ink4a/Arf genes. Moreover, we show that the Polycomb protein BMI1 interacts with CDC6, an essential regulator of DNA replication in eukaryotic cells. Finally, we demonstrate that Polycomb proteins and associated epigenetic marks are crucial for the control of the replication timing of the INK4a/ARF locus during senescence. Conclusions We identified the replication licencing factor CDC6 as a new partner of the Polycomb group member BMI1. Our results suggest that in young cells Polycomb proteins are recruited to the INK4/ARF locus through CDC6 and the resulting silent locus is replicated during late S-phase. Upon senescence, Jmjd3 is overexpressed and the MLL1 protein is recruited to the locus provoking the dissociation of Polycomb from the INK4/ARF locus, its transcriptional activation and its replication during early S-phase. Together, these results provide a unified model that integrates replication, transcription and epigenetics at the INK4/ARF locus. PMID:19462008

  18. Neuroanatomical correlates of the sense of control: Gray and white matter volumes associated with an internal locus of control.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Teruo; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Sekiguchi, Atsushi; Nouchi, Rui; Kotozaki, Yuka; Nakagawa, Seishu; Miyauchi, Carlos Makoto; Iizuka, Kunio; Yokoyama, Ryoichi; Shinada, Takamitsu; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hanawa, Sugiko; Araki, Tsuyoshi; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Kunitoki, Keiko; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2015-10-01

    A belief that effort is rewarded can develop incentive, achievement motivation, and self-efficacy. Individuals with such a belief attribute causes of events to themselves, not to external, uncontrollable factors, and are thus said to have an internal locus of control. An internal locus of control is a positive personality trait and has been thoroughly studied in applied psychology, but has not been widely examined in neuroscience. In the present study, correlations between locus of control assessment scores and brain volumes were examined in 777 healthy young adults using magnetic resonance imaging. A whole-brain multiple regression analysis with corrections for the effects of age, gender, and intelligence was conducted. Voxel-based morphometry analyses revealed that gray matter volumes in the anterior cingulate cortex, striatum, and anterior insula positively correlated with higher scores, which indicate an internal LOC. In addition, white matter volumes in the striatum showed significant correlations with an internal locus of control. These results suggest that cognitive, socioemotional, self-regulatory, and reward systems might be associated with internal control orientation. The finding of greater volumes in several brain regions in individuals with a stronger internal locus of control indicates that there is a neuroanatomical basis for the belief that one's efforts are rewarded.

  19. Locus equations derived from compensatory articulation.

    PubMed

    Sussman, H M; Fruchter, D; Cable, A

    1995-05-01

    Locus equations are linear regressions of the onset of F2 transitions on their offsets. These functions vowel-normalize the F2 transitions such that they are able to characterize consonantal place categories. The purpose of this research was to determine if compensatory articulation due to bite blocks would alter the normally linear relationship between F2 transition onset and offset frequencies or alter the differential slopes and y intercepts of locus equations as a function of stop place. Six speakers, three male and three female, each produced /bVt/, /dVt/, and /gVt/ tokens for ten vowel contexts under normal and bite block conditions. Extremely linear and practically identical scatterplots were obtained in the two speaking conditions. No adaptation to the bite blocks was found when comparing locus equations derived from the initial versus the final bite block trial. Results are discussed in relation to the "orderly output constraint," which postulates a perceptual function for linearly related F2 transition end points within consonantal place categories.

  20. Bipolar disorder: Evidence for a major locus

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, M.A.; Flodman, P.L.; Sadovnick, A.D.; Ameli, H.

    1995-10-09

    Complex segregation analyses were conducted on families of bipolar I and bipolar II probands to delineate the mode of inheritance. The probands were ascertained from consecutive referrals to the Mood Disorder Service, University Hospital, University of British Columbia and diagnosed by DSM-III-R and Research Diagnostic Criteria. Data were available on over 1,500 first-degree relatives of the 186 Caucasian probands. The purpose of the analyses was to determine if, after correcting for age and birth cohort, there was evidence for a single major locus. Five models were fit to the data using the statistical package SAGE: (1) dominant, (2) recessive, (3) arbitrary mendelian inheritance, (4) environmental, and (5) no major effects. A single dominant, mendelian major locus was the best fitting of these models for the sample of bipolar I and II probands when only bipolar relatives were defined as affected (polygenic inheritance could not be tested). Adding recurrent major depression to the diagnosis {open_quotes}affected{close_quotes} for relatives reduced the evidence for a major locus effect. Our findings support the undertaking of linkage studies and are consistent with the analyses of the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH) Collaborative Study data by Rice et al. and Blangero and Elston. 39 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cooke, N.E.; Liebhaber, S.A.; Monks, B.R.

    1995-12-01

    This article describes research involving the five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster and its expression in the placenta. The results indicate that interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression in the mouse genome. In addition, the results suggest a role for shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. 67 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Virulence and prodigiosin antibiotic biosynthesis in Serratia are regulated pleiotropically by the GGDEF/EAL domain protein, PigX.

    PubMed

    Fineran, Peter C; Williamson, Neil R; Lilley, Kathryn S; Salmond, George P C

    2007-11-01

    Gram-negative bacteria of the genus Serratia are opportunistic human, plant, and insect pathogens. Serratia sp. strain ATCC 39006 secretes pectinases and cellulases and produces the secondary metabolites carbapenem and prodigiosin. Mutation of a gene (pigX) resulted in an extremely pleiotropic phenotype: prodigiosin antibiotic biosynthesis, plant virulence, and pectinase production were all elevated. PigX controlled secondary metabolism by repressing the transcription of the target prodigiosin biosynthetic operon (pigA-pigO). The transcriptional start site of pigX was determined, and pigX expression occurred in parallel with Pig production. Detailed quantitative intracellular proteome analyses enabled the identification of numerous downstream targets of PigX, including OpgG, mutation of which reduced the production of the plant cell wall-degrading enzymes and virulence. The highly pleiotropic PigX regulator contains GGDEF and EAL domains with noncanonical motifs and is predicted to be membrane associated. Genetic evidence suggests that PigX might function as a cyclic dimeric GMP phosphodiesterase. This is the first characterization of a GGDEF and EAL domain protein in Serratia and the first example of the regulation of antibiotic production by a GGDEF/EAL domain protein.

  3. A gene locus for targeted ectopic gene integration in Zymoseptoria tritici☆

    PubMed Central

    Kilaru, S.; Schuster, M.; Latz, M.; Das Gupta, S.; Steinberg, N.; Fones, H.; Gurr, S.J.; Talbot, N.J.; Steinberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the cellular organization and biology of fungal pathogens requires accurate methods for genomic integration of mutant alleles or fluorescent fusion-protein constructs. In Zymoseptoria tritici, this can be achieved by integrating of plasmid DNA randomly into the genome of this wheat pathogen. However, untargeted ectopic integration carries the risk of unwanted side effects, such as altered gene expression, due to targeting regulatory elements, or gene disruption following integration into protein-coding regions of the genome. Here, we establish the succinate dehydrogenase (sdi1) locus as a single “soft-landing” site for targeted ectopic integration of genetic constructs by using a carboxin-resistant sdi1R allele, carrying the point-mutation H267L. We use various green and red fluorescent fusion constructs and show that 97% of all transformants integrate correctly into the sdi1 locus as single copies. We also demonstrate that such integration does not affect the pathogenicity of Z. tritici, and thus the sdi1 locus is a useful tool for virulence analysis in genetically modified Z. tritici strains. Furthermore, we have developed a vector which facilitates yeast recombination cloning and thus allows assembly of multiple overlapping DNA fragments in a single cloning step for high throughput vector and strain generation. PMID:26092798

  4. Atrial natriuretic peptide in the locus coeruleus and its possible role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, H.; Sterzel, R.B. ); Bahner, U.; Heidland, A. ); Palkovits, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANP) is present in neuronal cells of the locus coeruleus and its vicinity in the pontine tegmentum and moderate amount of ANP is detectable in this area by radioimmunoassay. The ANP is known as a neuropeptide which may influence the body salt and water homeostasis and blood pressure by targeting both central and peripheral regulatory mechanisms. Whether this pontine ANP cell group is involved in any of these regulatory mechanisms, the effect of various types of hypertension and experimental alterations in the salt and water balance on ANP levels was measured by radioimmunoassay in the locus coeruleus of rats. Adrenalectomy, as well as aldosterone and dexamethasone treatments failed to alter ANP levels in the locus coeruleus. Reduced ANP levels were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and in diabetes insipidus rats with vasopressin replacement. In contrast to these situations, elevated ANP levels were found in rats with DOCA-salt or 1-Kidney-1-clip hypertension. These data suggest a link between ANP levels in the locus coeruleus and fluid volume homeostasis. Whether this link is causal and connected with the major activity of locus coeruleus neurons needs further information.

  5. Locus of control and psychological distress among the aged.

    PubMed

    Hale, W D; Hedgepeth, B E; Taylor, E B

    A relationship between locus of control and adjustment has been found in many studies of young adults, with externals generally reporting higher levels of psychological distress. However, studies of locus of control and adjustment in the aged have produced conflicting results. This investigation examined the relationship between locus of control and self-reported psychopathology in a sample of 139 residents of a retirement complex. Correlation coefficients were computed for locus of control and each of the nine symptom dimensions of the Brief Symptom Inventory. These analyses were carried out separately for males and for females to determine if locus of control orientation was associated with adjustment for both males and females. Results indicate that locus of control is correlated with self-reported psychopathology for older women but not for older men. These results and those of related investigations are discussed within the context of Rotter's social learning theory.

  6. Topological Domains, Metagenes, and the Emergence of Pleiotropic Regulations at Hox Loci.

    PubMed

    Darbellay, Fabrice; Duboule, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Hox gene clusters of jaw vertebrates display a tight genomic organization, which has no equivalent in any other bilateria genomes sequenced thus far. It was previously argued that such a topological consolidation toward a condensed, metagenic structure was due to the accumulation of long-range regulations flanking Hox loci, a phenomenon made possible by the successive genome duplications that occurred at the root of the vertebrate lineage, similar to gene neofunctionalization but applied to a coordinated multigenic system. Here, we propose that the emergence of such large vertebrate regulatory landscapes containing a range of global enhancers was greatly facilitated by the presence of topologically associating domains (TADs). These chromatin domains, mostly constitutive, may have been used as genomic niches where novel regulations could evolve due to both the preexistence of a structural backbone poised to integrate novel regulatory inputs, and a highly adaptive transcriptional readout. We propose a scenario for the coevolution of such TADs and the emergence of pleiotropy at ancestral vertebrate Hox loci. PMID:26970625

  7. The developmental activation of the chicken lysozyme locus in transgenic mice requires the interaction of a subset of enhancer elements with the promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Huber, M C; Jägle, U; Krüger, G; Bonifer, C

    1997-01-01

    The complete chicken lysozyme locus is expressed in a position independent fashion in macrophages of transgenic mice and forms the identical chromatin structure as observed with the endogenous gene in chicken cells. Individual lysozyme cis -regulatory elements reorganize their chromatin structure at different developmental stages. Accordingly, their activities are developmentally regulated, indicating a differential role of these elements in locus activation. We have shown previously that a subset of enhancer elements and the promoter are sufficient to activate transcription of the chicken lysozyme gene at the correct developmental stage. Here, we analyzed to which grade the developmentally controlled chromatin reorganizing capacity of cis -regulatory elements in the 5'-region of the chicken lysozyme locus is dependent on promoter elements, and we examined whether the lysozyme locus carries a dominant chromatin reorganizing element. To this end we generated transgenic mouse lines carrying constructs with a deletion of the lysozyme promoter. Expression of the transgene in macrophages is abolished, however, the chromatin reorganizing ability of the cis -regulatory elements is differentially impaired. Some cis -elements require the interaction with the promoter to stabilize transcription factor complexes detectable as DNase I hypersensitive sites in chromatin, whereas other elements reorganize their chromatin structure autonomously. PMID:9224598

  8. The cell: locus or object of inquiry?

    PubMed

    Bechtel, William

    2010-09-01

    Research in many fields of biology has been extremely successful in decomposing biological mechanisms to discover their parts and operations. It often remains a significant challenge for scientists to recompose these mechanisms to understand how they function as wholes and interact with the environments around them. This is true of the eukaryotic cell. Although initially identified in nineteenth-century cell theory as the fundamental unit of organisms, researchers soon learned how to decompose it into its organelles and chemical constituents and have been highly successful in understanding how these carry out many operations important to life. The emphasis on decomposition is particularly evident in modern cell biology, which for the most part has viewed the cell as merely a locus of the mechanisms responsible for vital phenomena. The cell, however, is also an integrated system and for some explanatory purposes it is essential to recompose it and understand it as an organized whole. I illustrate both the virtues of decomposition (treating the cell as a locus) and recomposition (treating the cell as an object) with recent work on circadian rhythms. Circadian researchers have both identified critical intracellular operations that maintain endogenous oscillations and have also addressed the integration of cells into multicellular systems in which cells constitute units.

  9. Interallelic complementation at the mouse Mitf locus.

    PubMed Central

    Steingrímsson, Eiríkur; Arnheiter, Heinz; Hallsson, Jón Hallsteinn; Lamoreux, M Lynn; Copeland, Neal G; Jenkins, Nancy A

    2003-01-01

    Mutations at the mouse microphthalmia locus (Mitf) affect the development of different cell types, including melanocytes, retinal pigment epithelial cells of the eye, and osteoclasts. The MITF protein is a member of the MYC supergene family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine-zipper (bHLHZip) transcription factors and is known to regulate the expression of cell-specific target genes by binding DNA as homodimer or as heterodimer with related proteins. The many mutations isolated at the locus have different effects on the phenotype and can be arranged in an allelic series in which the phenotypes range from near normal to white microphthalmic animals with osteopetrosis. Previous investigations have shown that certain combinations of Mitf alleles complement each other, resulting in a phenotype more normal than that of each homozygote alone. Here we analyze this interallelic complementation in detail and show that it is limited to one particular allele, Mitf(Mi-white) (Mitf(Mi-wh)), a mutation affecting the DNA-binding domain. Both loss- and gain-of-function mutations are complemented, as are other Mitf mutations affecting the DNA-binding domain. Furthermore, this behavior is not restricted to particular cell types: Both eye development and coat color phenotypes are complemented. Our analysis suggests that Mitf(Mi-wh)-associated interallelic complementation is due to the unique biochemical nature of this mutation. PMID:12586714

  10. The Ity/Lsh/Bcg locus: natural resistance to infection with intracellular parasites is abrogated by disruption of the Nramp1 gene

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    In mice, natural resistance or susceptibility to infection with intracellular parasites is determined by a locus or group of loci on chromosome 1, designated Bcg, Lsh, and Ity, which controls early microbial replication in reticuloendothelial organs. We have identified by positional cloning a candidate gene for Bcg, Nramp1, which codes for a novel macrophage-specific membrane transport protein. We have created a mouse mutant bearing a null allele at Nramp1, and we have analyzed the effect of such a mutation on natural resistance to infection. Targeted disruption of Nramp1 has pleiotropic effects on natural resistance to infection with intracellular parasites, as it eliminated resistance to Mycobacterium bovis, Leishmania donovani, and lethal Salmonella typhimurium infection, establishing that Nramp1, Bcg, Lsh, and Ity are the same locus. Comparing the profiles of parasite replication in control and Nramp1-/- mice indicated that the Nramp1Asp169 allele of BcgS inbred strains is a null allele, pointing to a critical role of this residue in the mechanism of action of the protein. Despite their inability to control parasite growth in the early nonimmune phase of the infection, Nramp1-/- mutants can overcome the infection in the late immune phase, suggesting that Nramp1 plays a key role only in the early part of the macrophage-parasite interaction and may function by a cytocidal or cytostatic mechanism distinct from those expressed by activated macrophages. PMID:7650477

  11. Murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (Fah) gene is disrupted by a neonatally lethal albino deletion that defines the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Klebig, M.L. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Russell, L.B.; Rinchik, E.M. )

    1992-02-15

    Homozygous deletion of the hepatocyte-specific developmental regulation 1 (hsdr-1) locus in mouse chromosome 7 results in perinatal death and a pleiotropic syndrome characterized by ultrastructural abnormalities of the liver and kidney, failure of induction of a number of specific transcription units in the liver and kidney during late gestation, and marked overexpression of an enzyme that defends against oxidative stress. Previously, the breakpoints of two albino (c) deletions (c{sup 14CoS} and c{sup IFAFyh}) that genetically define hsdr-1 were localized, on a long-range map, in the vicinity of the distal breakpoint of a viable albino deletion (c{sup 24R75M}) that breaks proximally within the c locus. Here the authors report the use of a probe derived from a deletion breakpoint fusion fragment cloned from c{sup 24R75M}/c{sup 24R75M} DNA to clone a breakpoint fusion fragment caused by the c{sup 14CoS} deletion. The proximal breakpoint of the c{sup 14CoS} deletion was discovered to disrupt a gene (Fah) encoding fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine degradation pathway. These mouse mutants may also provide models for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia, which is associated with fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase deficiency and liver and kidney dysfunction.

  12. Multigeneic QTL: the laccase encoded within the soybean Rfs2/rhg1 locus inferred to underlie part of the dual resistance to cyst nematode and sudden death syndrome.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, M J; Ahsan, R; Afzal, A J; Jamai, A; Meksem, K; El-Shemy, H A; Lightfoot, D A

    2009-01-01

    Multigeneic QTL present significant problems to analysis. Resistance to soybean (Glycine max (L) Merr.) sudden death syndrome (SDS) caused by Fusarium virguliforme was partly underlain by QRfs2 that was clustered with, or pleiotropic to, the multigeneic rhg1 locus providing resistance to soybean cyst nematode (SCN; Heterodera glycines). A group of five genes were found between the two markers that delimited the Rfs2/rhg1 locus. One of the five genes was predicted to encode an unusual diphenol oxidase (laccase; EC 1.10.3.2). The aim of this study was to characterize this member of the soybean laccase gene-family and explore its involvement in SDS resistance. A genomic clone and a full length cDNA was isolated from resistant cultivar 'Forrest' that were different among susceptible cultivars 'Asgrow 3244' and 'Williams 82' at four residues R/H168, I/M271, R/H330, E/K470. Additional differences were found in six of the seven introns and the promoter region. Transcript abundance (TA) among genotypes that varied for resistance to SDS or SCN did not differ significantly. Therefore the protein activity was inferred to underlie resistance. Protein expressed in yeast pYES2/NTB had weak enzyme activity with common substrates but good activity with root phenolics. The Forrest isoform may underlie both QRfs2 and rhg1. PMID:19193960

  13. Alterations of the IKBKG locus and diseases: an update and a report of 13 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Francesca; Pescatore, Alessandra; Bal, Elodie; Ghoul, Aida; Paciolla, Mariateresa; Lioi, Maria Brigida; D'Urso, Michele; Rabia, Smail Hadj; Bodemer, Christine; Bonnefont, Jean Paul; Munnich, Arnold; Miano, Maria Giuseppina; Smahi, Asma; Ursini, Matilde Valeria

    2008-05-01

    Mutations in the inhibitor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells, kinase gamma (IKBKG), also called nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kB) essential modulator (NEMO), gene are the most common single cause of incontinentia pigmenti (IP) in females and anhydrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) in males. The IKBKG gene, located in the Xq28 chromosomal region, encodes for the regulatory subunit of the inhibitor of kappaB (IkB) kinase (IKK) complex required for the activation of the NF-kB pathway. Therefore, the remarkably heterogeneous and often severe clinical presentation reported in IP is due to the pleiotropic role of this signaling transcription pathway. A recurrent exon 4_10 genomic rearrangement in the IKBKG gene accounts for 60 to 80% of IP-causing mutations. Besides the IKBKG rearrangement found in IP females (which is lethal in males), a total of 69 different small mutations (missense, frameshift, nonsense, and splice-site mutations) have been reported, including 13 novel ones in this work. The updated distribution of all the IP- and EDA-ID-causing mutations along the IKBKG gene highlights a secondary hotspot mutation in exon 10, which contains only 11% of the protein. Furthermore, familial inheritance analysis revealed an unexpectedly high incidence of sporadic cases (>65%). The sum of the observations can aid both in determining the molecular basis of IP and EDA-ID allelic diseases, and in genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:18350553

  14. An ABC pleiotropic drug resistance transporter of Fusarium graminearum with a role in crown and root diseases of wheat.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Donald M; Stephens, Amber E; Munn, Alan L; Manners, John M

    2013-11-01

    FgABC1 (FGSG_04580) is predicted to encode a pleiotropic drug resistance class ABC transporter in Fusarium graminearum, a globally important pathogen of wheat. Deletion mutants of FgABC1 showed reduced virulence towards wheat in crown and root infection assays but were unaltered in infectivity on barley. Expression of FgABC1 during head blight and crown rot disease increases during the necrotrophic phases of infection suggestive of a role for FgABC1 in late infection stages in different tissue types. Deletion of FgABC1 also led to increased sensitivity of the fungus to the antifungal compound benalaxyl in culture, but the response to known cereal defence compounds, gramine, 2-benzoxazalinone and tryptamine was unaltered. FgABC1 appears to have a role in protecting the fungus from antifungal compounds and is likely to help combat as yet unidentified wheat defence compounds during disease development.

  15. Addiction Genetics and Pleiotropic Effects of Common Haplotypes that Make Polygenic Contributions to Vulnerability to Substance Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, George R.; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence from family, adoption, and twin studies point to large genetic contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to develop dependence on one or more addictive substances. Twin data suggest that most of this genetic vulnerability is shared by individuals who are dependent on a variety of addictive substances. Molecular genetic studies, especially genomewide and candidate gene association studies, have elucidated common haplotypes in dozens of genes that appear to make polygenic contributions to vulnerability to developing dependence. Most genes that harbor currently identified addiction-associated haplotypes are expressed in the brain. Haplotypes in many of the same genes are identified in genomewide association studies that compare allele frequencies in substance dependent vs. control individuals from European, African, and Asian racial/ethnic backgrounds. Many of these addiction-associated haplotypes display pleiotropic influences on a variety of related brain-based phenotypes that display 1) substantial heritability and 2) clinical cooccurence with substance dependence. PMID:19152208

  16. A Multi-Trait, Meta-analysis for Detecting Pleiotropic Polymorphisms for Stature, Fatness and Reproduction in Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bolormaa, Sunduimijid; Pryce, Jennie E.; Reverter, Antonio; Zhang, Yuandan; Barendse, William; Kemper, Kathryn; Tier, Bruce; Savin, Keith; Hayes, Ben J.; Goddard, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Polymorphisms that affect complex traits or quantitative trait loci (QTL) often affect multiple traits. We describe two novel methods (1) for finding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with one or more traits using a multi-trait, meta-analysis, and (2) for distinguishing between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL. The meta-analysis uses the effect of each SNP on each of n traits, estimated in single trait genome wide association studies (GWAS). These effects are expressed as a vector of signed t-values (t) and the error covariance matrix of these t values is approximated by the correlation matrix of t-values among the traits calculated across the SNP (V). Consequently, t'V−1t is approximately distributed as a chi-squared with n degrees of freedom. An attractive feature of the meta-analysis is that it uses estimated effects of SNPs from single trait GWAS, so it can be applied to published data where individual records are not available. We demonstrate that the multi-trait method can be used to increase the power (numbers of SNPs validated in an independent population) of GWAS in a beef cattle data set including 10,191 animals genotyped for 729,068 SNPs with 32 traits recorded, including growth and reproduction traits. We can distinguish between a single pleiotropic QTL and multiple linked QTL because multiple SNPs tagging the same QTL show the same pattern of effects across traits. We confirm this finding by demonstrating that when one SNP is included in the statistical model the other SNPs have a non-significant effect. In the beef cattle data set, cluster analysis yielded four groups of QTL with similar patterns of effects across traits within a group. A linear index was used to validate SNPs having effects on multiple traits and to identify additional SNPs belonging to these four groups. PMID:24675618

  17. Drug-Like Property Profiling of Novel Neuroprotective Compounds to Treat Acute Ischemic Stroke: Guidelines to Develop Pleiotropic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Lapchak, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    The development of novel neuroprotective compounds to treat acute ischemic stroke (AIS) has been problematic and quite complicated, since many candidates that have been tested clinically lacked significant pleiotropic activity, were unable to effectively cross the blood brain barrier (BBB), had poor bioavailability or were toxic. Moreover, the compounds did not confer significant neuroprotection or clinical efficacy measured using standard behavioral endpoints, when studied in clinical trials in a heterogeneous population of stroke patients. To circumvent some of the drug development problems describe above, we have used a rational funnel approach to identify and develop promising candidates. Using a step-wise approach, we have identified a series of compounds based upon two different neuroprotection assays. We have then taken the candidates and determined their “drug-like” properties. This guidelines article details in vitro screening assays used to show pleiotropic activity of a series of novel compounds; including enhanced neuroprotective activity compared to the parent compound fisetin. Moreover, for preliminary drug de-risking or risk reduction during development, we used compound assessment in the CeeTox assay, ADME toxicity using the AMES test for genotoxicity and interaction with Cytochrome P450 using CYP450 inhibition analysis against a spectrum of CYP450 enzymes (CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6 and CYP3A4) as a measure of drug interaction. Moreover, the compounds have been studied using a transfected Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell assay to assess blood brain barrier penetration (BBB). Using this series of assays, we have identified 4 novel molecules to be developed as an AIS treatment. PMID:23687519

  18. Genetic relationship between lodging and lodging components in barley (Hordeum vulgare) based on unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, W Y; Liu, Z M; Deng, G B; Pan, Z F; Liang, J J; Zeng, X Q; Tashi, N M; Long, H; Yu, M Q

    2014-03-17

    Lodging (LD) is a major constraint limiting the yield and forage quality of barley. Detailed analyses of LD component (LDC) traits were conducted using 246 F2 plants generated from a cross between cultivars ZQ320 and 1277. Genetic relationships between LD and LDC were evaluated by unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Ultimately, 53 unconditional QTL related to LD were identified on seven barley chromosomes. Up to 15 QTL accounted for over 10% of the phenotypic variation, and up to 20 QTL for culm strength were detected. Six QTL with pleiotropic effects showing significant negative correlations with LD were found between markers Bmag353 and GBM1482 on chromosome 4H. These alleles and alleles of QTL for wall thickness, culm strength, plant height, and plant weight originated from ZQ320. Conditional mapping identified 96 additional QTL for LD. Conditional QTL analysis demonstrated that plant height, plant height center of gravity, and length of the sixth internode had the greatest contribution to LD, whereas culm strength and length of the fourth internode, and culm strength of the second internode were the key factors for LD-resistant. Therefore, lodging resistance in barley can be improved based on selection of alleles affecting culm strength, wall thickness, plant height, and plant weight. The conditional QTL mapping method can be used to evaluate possible genetic relationships between LD and LDC while efficiently and precisely determining counteracting QTL, which will help in understanding the genetic basis of LD in barley.

  19. Engineering the AAVS1 locus for consistent and scalable transgene expression in human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Kim, Shin-Il; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Tan, Ghee Wan; Xiang, Long; Hatani, Takeshi; Kondo, Takayuki; Ikeya, Makoto; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Inoue, Haruhisa; Woltjen, Knut

    2016-05-15

    The potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in personalized regenerative medicine applications may be augmented by transgenics, including the expression of constitutive cell labels, differentiation reporters, or modulators of disease phenotypes. Thus, there is precedence for reproducible transgene expression amongst iPSC sub-clones with isogenic or diverse genetic backgrounds. Using virus or transposon vectors, transgene integration sites and copy numbers are difficult to control, and nearly impossible to reproduce across multiple cell lines. Moreover, randomly integrated transgenes are often subject to pleiotropic position effects as a consequence of epigenetic changes inherent in differentiation, undermining applications in iPSCs. To address this, we have adapted popular TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease technologies in order to introduce transgenes into pre-defined loci and overcome random position effects. AAVS1 is an exemplary locus within the PPP1R12C gene that permits robust expression of CAG promoter-driven transgenes. Gene targeting controls transgene copy number such that reporter expression patterns are reproducible and scalable by ∼2-fold. Furthermore, gene expression is maintained during long-term human iPSC culture and in vitro differentiation along multiple lineages. Here, we outline our AAVS1 targeting protocol using standardized donor vectors and construction methods, as well as provide practical considerations for iPSC culture, drug selection, and genotyping. PMID:26707206

  20. Engineering the AAVS1 locus for consistent and scalable transgene expression in human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives.

    PubMed

    Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Kim, Shin-Il; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Tan, Ghee Wan; Xiang, Long; Hatani, Takeshi; Kondo, Takayuki; Ikeya, Makoto; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Inoue, Haruhisa; Woltjen, Knut

    2016-05-15

    The potential use of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in personalized regenerative medicine applications may be augmented by transgenics, including the expression of constitutive cell labels, differentiation reporters, or modulators of disease phenotypes. Thus, there is precedence for reproducible transgene expression amongst iPSC sub-clones with isogenic or diverse genetic backgrounds. Using virus or transposon vectors, transgene integration sites and copy numbers are difficult to control, and nearly impossible to reproduce across multiple cell lines. Moreover, randomly integrated transgenes are often subject to pleiotropic position effects as a consequence of epigenetic changes inherent in differentiation, undermining applications in iPSCs. To address this, we have adapted popular TALEN and CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease technologies in order to introduce transgenes into pre-defined loci and overcome random position effects. AAVS1 is an exemplary locus within the PPP1R12C gene that permits robust expression of CAG promoter-driven transgenes. Gene targeting controls transgene copy number such that reporter expression patterns are reproducible and scalable by ∼2-fold. Furthermore, gene expression is maintained during long-term human iPSC culture and in vitro differentiation along multiple lineages. Here, we outline our AAVS1 targeting protocol using standardized donor vectors and construction methods, as well as provide practical considerations for iPSC culture, drug selection, and genotyping.

  1. Pleiotropic constraints, expression level, and the evolution of miRNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Jovelin, Richard

    2013-12-01

    Post-transcriptional gene regulation mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) plays critical roles during development by modulating gene expression and conferring robustness to stochastic errors. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that miRNA acquisition could play a role in phenotypic innovation. Moreover, miRNA-induced regulation strongly impacts genome evolution, increasing selective constraints on 3'UTRs, protein sequences, and expression level divergence. Thus, it is essential to understand the factors governing sequence evolution for this important class of regulatory molecules. Investigation of the patterns of molecular evolution at miRNA loci have been limited in Caenorhabditis elegans because of the lack of a close outgroup. Instead, I used Caenorhabditis briggsae as the focus point of this study because of its close relationship to Caenorhabditis sp. 9. I also corroborated the patterns of sequence evolution in Caenorhabditis using published orthologous relationships among miRNAs in Drosophila. In nematodes and in flies, miRNA sequence divergence is not influenced by the genomic neighborhood (i.e., intronic or intergenic) but is nevertheless affected by the genomic context because X-linked miRNAs evolve faster than autosomal miRNAs. However, this effect of chromosomal linkage can be explained by differential expression levels rather than a fast-X effect. The results presented here support a universal negative relationship between rates of molecular evolution and expression level, and suggest that mutations in highly expressed miRNAs are more likely to be deleterious because they potentially affect a larger number of target genes. Finally, I show that many single family member miRNAs evolve faster than miRNAs from multigene families and have limited functional scope, suggesting that they are not strongly integrated in gene regulatory networks.

  2. The female-specific doublesex isoform regulates pleiotropic transcription factors to pattern genital development in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sujash S; Uppendahl, Locke D; Chowdhury, Moinuddin A; Ip, Pui-Leng; Siegal, Mark L

    2011-03-01

    Regulatory networks driving morphogenesis of animal genitalia must integrate sexual identity and positional information. Although the genetic hierarchy that controls somatic sexual identity in the fly Drosophila melanogaster is well understood, there are very few cases in which the mechanism by which it controls tissue-specific gene activity is known. In flies, the sex-determination hierarchy terminates in the doublesex (dsx) gene, which produces sex-specific transcription factors via alternative splicing of its transcripts. To identify sex-specifically expressed genes downstream of dsx that drive the sexually dimorphic development of the genitalia, we performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling of dissected genital imaginal discs of each sex at three time points during early morphogenesis. Using a stringent statistical threshold, we identified 23 genes that have sex-differential transcript levels at all three time points, of which 13 encode transcription factors, a significant enrichment. We focus here on three sex-specifically expressed transcription factors encoded by lozenge (lz), Drop (Dr) and AP-2. We show that, in female genital discs, Dsx activates lz and represses Dr and AP-2. We further show that the regulation of Dr by Dsx mediates the previously identified expression of the fibroblast growth factor Branchless in male genital discs. The phenotypes we observe upon loss of lz or Dr function in genital discs explain the presence or absence of particular structures in dsx mutant flies and thereby clarify previously puzzling observations. Our time course of expression data also lays the foundation for elucidating the regulatory networks downstream of the sex-specifically deployed transcription factors. PMID:21343364

  3. Evolution of the mating type locus: insights gained from the dimorphic primary fungal pathogens Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii.

    PubMed

    Fraser, James A; Stajich, Jason E; Tarcha, Eric J; Cole, Garry T; Inglis, Diane O; Sil, Anita; Heitman, Joseph

    2007-04-01

    Sexual reproduction of fungi is governed by the mating type (MAT) locus, a specialized region of the genome encoding key transcriptional regulators that direct regulatory networks to specify cell identity and fate. Knowledge of MAT locus structure and evolution has been considerably advanced in recent years as a result of genomic analyses that enable the definition of MAT locus sequences in many species as well as provide an understanding of the evolutionary plasticity of this unique region of the genome. Here, we extend this analysis to define the mating type locus of three dimorphic primary human fungal pathogens, Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis, and Coccidioides posadasii, using genomic analysis, direct sequencing, and bioinformatics. These studies provide evidence that all three species possess heterothallic bipolar mating type systems, with isolates encoding either a high-mobility-group (HMG) domain or an alpha-box transcriptional regulator. These genes are intact in all loci examined and have not been subject to loss or decay, providing evidence that the loss of fertility upon passage in H. capsulatum is not attributable to mutations at the MAT locus. These findings also suggest that an extant sexual cycle remains to be defined in both Coccidioides species, in accord with population genetic evidence. Based on these MAT sequences, a facile PCR test was developed that allows the mating type to be rapidly ascertained. Finally, these studies highlight the evolutionary forces shaping the MAT locus, revealing examples in which flanking genes have been inverted or subsumed and incorporated into an expanding MAT locus, allowing us to propose an expanded model for the evolution of the MAT locus in the phylum Ascomycota. PMID:17337636

  4. Data set for comparison of cellular dynamics between human AAVS1 locus-modified and wild-type cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2016-01-01

    This data article describes cellular dynamics, such as migration speed and mobility of the cytoskeletal protein, of wild-type human fibroblast cells and cells with a modified adeno-associated virus integration site 1 (AAVS1) locus on human chromosome 19. Insertion of exogenous gene into the AAVS1 locus has been conducted in recent biological researches. Previously, our data showed that the AAVS1-modification changes cellular contractile force (Mizutani et al., 2015 [1]). To assess if this AAVS1-modification affects cell migration, we compared cellular migration speed and turnover of cytoskeletal protein in human fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a green fluorescent protein gene knocked-in at the AAVS1 locus in this data article. Cell nuclei were stained and changes in their position attributable to cell migration were analyzed. Fluorescence recovery was observed after photobleaching for the fluorescent protein-tagged myosin regulatory light chain. Data here are related to the research article “Transgene Integration into the Human AAVS1 Locus Enhances Myosin II-Dependent Contractile Force by Reducing Expression of Myosin Binding Subunit 85” [1]. PMID:26937449

  5. ABI3 controls embryo degreening through Mendel's I locus

    PubMed Central

    Delmas, Frédéric; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian; Deb, Srijani; Widdup, Ellen; Bournonville, Céline; Bollier, Norbert; Northey, Julian G. B.; McCourt, Peter; Samuel, Marcus A.

    2013-01-01

    Chlorophyll (chl) is essential for light capture and is the starting point that provides the energy for photosynthesis and thus plant growth. Obviously, for this reason, retention of the green chlorophyll pigment is considered a desirable crop trait. However, the presence of chlorophyll in mature seeds can be an undesirable trait that can affect seed maturation, seed oil quality, and meal quality. Occurrence of mature green seeds in oil crops such as canola and soybean due to unfavorable weather conditions during seed maturity is known to cause severe losses in revenue. One recently identified candidate that controls the chlorophyll degradation machinery is the stay-green gene, SGR1 that was mapped to Mendel’s I locus responsible for cotyledon color (yellow versus green) in peas. A defect in SGR1 leads to leaf stay-green phenotypes in Arabidopsis and rice, but the role of SGR1 in seed degreening and the signaling machinery that converges on SGR1 have remained elusive. To decipher the gene regulatory network that controls degreening in Arabidopsis, we have used an embryo stay-green mutant to demonstrate that embryo degreening is achieved by the SGR family and that this whole process is regulated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) through ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3); a B3 domain transcription factor that has a highly conserved and essential role in seed maturation, conferring desiccation tolerance. Misexpression of ABI3 was sufficient to rescue cold-induced green seed phenotype in Arabidopsis. This finding reveals a mechanistic role for ABI3 during seed degreening and thus targeting of this pathway could provide a solution to the green seed problem in various oil-seed crops. PMID:24043799

  6. Externality and Locus of Control in Obese Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isbitsky, Joyce Renee; White, Donna Romano

    1981-01-01

    Significant sex differences indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weighted children were not differentiated by their performance on either food-related measures nor by their locus of control expectancies. (Author/MP)

  7. Anxiety, locus of control and appraisal of air pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, P.L.; Simpson-Housley, P.; de Man, A.F.

    1987-06-01

    100 residents of Santiago de Chile took part in a study of the relationship among locus of control, trait-anxiety, and perception of air pollution. Concern over the problem of atmospheric pollution and number of antipollution measures taken was related to trait-anxiety. Locus of control was associated with variation in awareness of pollution hazard.

  8. Locus of Control in Underachieving and Achieving Gifted Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Robert; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study, with 87 underachieving and 77 achieving gifted students in grades 6-9, found that general locus of control measures did not differentiate between the 2 groups, that both scored significantly higher on positive internal than on negative internal locus of control, and that there were no gender or grade effects. (Author/DB)

  9. Locus of Control and Marital Stability: A Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Constantine, John A.; Bahr, Stephen J.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated relationship between locus of control and marital stability of young men. Factors derived from locus of control measures included leadership, personal, and fate scales. Results indicated the only significant difference was on the leadership scale between men remaining married and those who did not. (RC)

  10. Personality and Locus of Control among School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandya, Archana A.; Jogsan, Yogesh A.

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this investigation is to find out the sex differences in personality traits and locus of control among school children. A total 60 children (30 boys and 30 girls) were taken as a sample. The research tool for personality, children personality questionnaire was used, which was made by Cattell and Porter. Locus of control was…

  11. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... result, one of which is a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of specific locus... a statistically significant dose-related increase in the number of specific locus mutations or a... eukaryotes which are the carriers of the genetic information for the species. (c) Reference......

  12. Probing the regulatory effects of specific mutations in three major binding domains of the pleiotropic regulator CcpA of Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Detert Oude Weme, Ruud; Seidel, Gerald; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon catabolite control is required for efficient use of available carbon sources to ensure rapid growth of bacteria. CcpA is a global regulator of carbon metabolism in Gram-positive bacteria like Bacillus subtilis. In this study the genome-wide gene regulation of a CcpA knockout and three specific CcpA mutants were studied by transcriptome analysis, to further elucidate the function of specific binding sites in CcpA. The following three amino acids were mutated to characterize their function: M17(R) which is involved in DNA binding, T62(H) which is important for the allosteric switch in CcpA upon HPr-Ser46-P binding, and R304(W) which is important for binding of the coeffectors HPr-Ser46-P and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. The results confirm that CcpA was also involved in gene regulation in the absence of glucose. CcpA-M17R showed a small relief of Carbon Catabolite Control; the CcpA-M17R mutant regulates fewer genes than the CcpA-wt and the palindromicity of the cre site is less important for CcpA-M17R. CcpA-T62H was a stronger repressor than CcpA-wt and also acted as a strong repressor in the absence of glucose. CcpA-R304W was shown here to be less dependent on HPr-Ser46-P for its carbon catabolite control activities. The results presented here provide detailed information on alterations in gene regulation for each CcpA-mutant. PMID:26483775

  13. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  14. Identifying a novel locus for psoriatic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Budu-Aggrey, Ashley; Bowes, John

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have identified genetic risk loci for PsA, the majority of which also confer risk for psoriasis. The stronger heritability of PsA in comparison with psoriasis suggests that there should be risk loci that are specific for PsA. Identifying such loci could potentially inform therapy development to provide more effective treatments for PsA patients, especially with a considerable proportion being non-responsive to current therapies. Evidence of a PsA-specific locus has been previously found at HLA-B27 within the MHC region. A recent study has provided evidence of non-HLA risk loci that are specific for PsA at IL23R, PTPN22 and on chromosome 5q31. Functional characterization of these loci will provide further understanding of the pathways underlying PsA, and enable us to apply genetic findings for patient benefit. PMID:26255310

  15. Pleiotropic Effects of IL-2 on Cancer: Its Role in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Mendiola, Arturo; Gutiérrez-Hoya, Adriana; Lagunas-Cruz, María del Carmen; Weiss-Steider, Benny; Soto-Cruz, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signalling is critical for normal lymphocyte proliferation, but its role in cervical cancer is not fully understood. The receptor is composed of three chains: IL-2α, IL-2β, and IL-2γ. Intracellular signalling is initiated by ligand-induced heterodimerization of the IL-2β and IL-2γ chains, resulting in the activation of multiple intracellular kinases. Recently, IL-2R was shown to be expressed on nonhaematopoietic cells, especially on several types of tumour cells. However, the function of this receptor on malignant cells has not been clearly defined. The expression of IL-2R and the production of IL-2 in cervical cancer cells have been documented as well as expression of molecules of the JAK-STAT pathway. In the current review we have highlighted the differences in the responses of molecules downstream from the IL-2R in normal lymphocytes and tumour cells that could explain the presence of tumour cells in an environment in which cytotoxic lymphocytes also exist and compete and also the effect of different concentrations of IL-2 that could activate effector cells of the immune system cells, which favour the elimination of tumour cells, or concentrations that may promote a regulatory microenvironment in which tumour cells can easily grow. PMID:27293315

  16. Ghrelin – A Pleiotropic Hormone Secreted from Endocrine X/A-Like Cells of the Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2012-01-01

    The gastric X/A-like endocrine cell receives growing attention due to its peptide products with ghrelin being the best characterized. This peptide hormone was identified a decade ago as a stimulator of food intake and to date remains the only known peripherally produced and centrally acting orexigenic hormone. In addition, subsequent studies identified numerous other functions of this peptide including the stimulation of gastrointestinal motility, the maintenance of energy homeostasis and an impact on reproduction. Moreover, ghrelin is also involved in the response to stress and assumed to play a role in coping functions and exert a modulatory action on immune pathways. Our knowledge on the regulation of ghrelin has markedly advanced during the past years by the identification of the ghrelin acylating enzyme, ghrelin-O-acyltransferase, and by the description of changes in expression, activation, and release under different metabolic as well as physically and psychically challenging conditions. However, our insight on regulatory processes of ghrelin at the cellular and subcellular levels is still very limited and warrants further investigation. PMID:22355282

  17. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth. PMID:25617000

  18. Locus of Control Orientation: Parents, Peers, and Place.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Eileen M; Lobo Antunes, Maria João

    2015-09-01

    An internal locus of control contributes to positive youth outcomes such as a general well-being and academic success, while also serving as a protective factor against exposure to community violence and reducing negative behaviors like violence. Despite these benefits, very little is known about antecedents of an internal locus of control orientation. Without an understanding of what factors contribute to the development of an internal locus of control, it is not clear how to best encourage its formation. This study uses data from the Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods to examine whether various mesosystem variables (family management strategies, peer interactions, neighborhood context, and individual-level characteristics) are associated with an internal locus of control orientation among 1,076 youth ages 9-19 living in 78 Chicago neighborhoods. Study participants were Hispanic (46 %), African American (34 %), and White (15 %), and 50 % were female. The findings suggest that, while most levels of the mesosystem influence locus of control orientation, family management strategies are more prominent determinants of an internal locus of control than peers, neighborhood context, or individual characteristics. Parental supervision over the time a youth spends at home and family socioeconomic status are consistent predictors of an internal locus of control, while harsh discipline is associated with an external locus of control. The discussion examines the import of various parenting techniques in shaping an internal locus of control and considers future avenues for research to further unpack how antecedents of locus of control can vary across youth.

  19. Associations between a Polymorphism in the Pleiotropic GCKR and Age-Related Phenotypes: The HALCyon Programme

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, Tamuno; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Cooper, Rachel; Hardy, Rebecca; Deary, Ian J.; Elliott, Jane; Harris, Sarah E.; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Power, Chris; Starr, John M.; Kuh, Diana; Day, Ian N. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background The glucokinase regulatory protein encoded by GCKR plays an important role in glucose metabolism and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1260326 (P446L) in the gene has been associated with several age-related biomarkers, including triglycerides, glucose, insulin and apolipoproteins. However, associations between SNPs in the gene and other ageing phenotypes such as cognitive and physical capability have not been reported. Methods As part of the Healthy Ageing across the Life Course (HALCyon) collaborative research programme, men and women from five UK cohorts aged between 44 and 90+ years were genotyped for rs1260326. Meta-analysis was used to pool within-study genotypic associations between the SNP and several age-related phenotypes, including body mass index (BMI), blood lipid levels, lung function, and cognitive and physical capability. Results We confirm the associations between the minor allele of the SNP and higher triglycerides and lower glucose levels. We also observed a triglyceride-independent association between the minor allele and lower BMI (pooled beta on z-score = −0.04, p-value = 0.0001, n = 16,251). Furthermore, there was some evidence for gene-environment interactions, including physical activity attenuating the effects on triglycerides. However, no associations were observed with measures of cognitive and physical capability. Conclusion Findings from middle-aged to older adults confirm associations between rs1260326 GCKR and triglycerides and glucose, suggest possible gene-environment interactions, but do not provide evidence that its relevance extends to cognitive and physical capability. PMID:23894584

  20. HMGB1 binds to the rs7903146 locus in TCF7L2 in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuedan; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Shcherbina, Liliya; Ratti, Joyce; Kock, Kian-Hong; Su, Jing; Martin, Brian; Oskolkova, Malin Zackrisson; Göransson, Olga; Bacon, Julie; Li, Weimin; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Cilio, Corrado; Brazma, Alvis; Thatcher, Bradley; Rung, Johan; Wierup, Nils; Renström, Erik; Groop, Leif; Hansson, Ola

    2016-07-15

    The intronic SNP rs7903146 in the T-cell factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2) is the common genetic variant most highly associated with Type 2 diabetes known to date. The risk T-allele is located in an open chromatin region specific to human pancreatic islets of Langerhans, thereby accessible for binding of regulatory proteins. The risk T-allele locus exhibits stronger enhancer activity compared to the non-risk C-allele. The aim of this study was to identify transcriptional regulators that bind the open chromatin region in the rs7903146 locus and thereby potentially regulate TCF7L2 expression and activity. Using affinity chromatography followed by Edman sequencing, we identified one candidate regulatory protein, i.e. high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). The binding of HMGB1 to the rs7903146 locus was confirmed in pancreatic islets from human deceased donors, in HCT116 and in HEK293 cell lines using: (i) protein purification on affinity columns followed by Western blot, (ii) chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by qPCR and (iii) electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results also suggested that HMGB1 might have higher binding affinity to the C-allele of rs7903146 compared to the T-allele, which was supported in vitro using Dynamic Light Scattering, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. The functional consequence of HMGB1 depletion in HCT116 and INS1 cells was reduced insulin and TCF7L2 mRNA expression, TCF7L2 transcriptional activity and glucose stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that the rs7903146 locus might exert its enhancer function by interacting with HMGB1 in an allele dependent manner. PMID:26845344

  1. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression. PMID:27679683

  2. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-09-26

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression. PMID:27679683

  3. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression.

  4. Genome-wide quantitative trait locus mapping identifies multiple major loci for brittle rachis and threshability in Tibetan semi-wild wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. tibetanum Shao).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun-Feng; Lan, Xiu-Jin; Luo, Wei; Kong, Xing-Chen; Qi, Peng-Fei; Wang, Ji-Rui; Wei, Yu-Ming; Jiang, Qian-Tao; Liu, Ya-Xi; Peng, Yuan-Ying; Chen, Guo-Yue; Dai, Shou-Fen; Zheng, You-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Tibetan semi-wild wheat (Triticum aestivum ssp. tibetanum Shao) is a semi-wild hexaploid wheat resource that is only naturally distributed in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. Brittle rachis and hard threshing are two important characters of Tibetan semi-wild wheat. A whole-genome linkage map of T. aestivum ssp. tibetanum was constructed using a recombinant inbred line population (Q1028×ZM9023) with 186 lines, 564 diversity array technology markers, and 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Phenotypic data on brittle rachis and threshability, as two quantitative traits, were evaluated on the basis of the number of average spike rachis fragments per spike and percent threshability in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping performed using inclusive composite interval mapping analysis clearly identified four QTLs for brittle rachis and three QTLs for threshability. However, three loci on 2DS, 2DL, and 5AL showed pleiotropism for brittle rachis and threshability; they respectively explained 5.3%, 18.6%, and 18.6% of phenotypic variation for brittle rachis and 17.4%, 13.2%, and 35.2% of phenotypic variation for threshability. A locus on 3DS showed an independent effect on brittle rachis, which explained 38.7% of the phenotypic variation. The loci on 2DS and 3DS probably represented the effect of Tg and Br1, respectively. The locus on 5AL was in very close proximity to the Q gene, but was different from the predicted q in Tibetan semi-wild wheat. To our knowledge, the locus on 2DL has never been reported in common wheat but was prominent in T. aestivum ssp. tibetanum accession Q1028. It remarkably interacted with the locus on 5AL to affect brittle rachis. Several major loci for brittle rachis and threshability were identified in Tibetan semi-wild wheat, improving the understanding of these two characters and suggesting the occurrence of special evolution in Tibetan semi-wild wheat.

  5. Low Cost Upper Atmosphere Sounder (LOCUS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Daniel; Swinyard, Bruce M.; Ellison, Brian N.; Aylward, Alan D.; Aruliah, Anasuya; Plane, John M. C.; Feng, Wuhu; Saunders, Christopher; Friend, Jonathan; Bird, Rachel; Linfield, Edmund H.; Davies, A. Giles; Parkes, Steve

    2014-05-01

    near future. We describe the current instrument configuration of LOCUS, and give a first preview of the expected science return such a mission would yield. The LOCUS instrument concept calls for four spectral bands, a first band at 4.7 THz to target atomic oxygen (O), a second band at 3.5 THz to target hydroxyl (OH), a third band at 1.1 THz to cover several diatomic species (NO, CO, O3, H2O) and finally a fourth band at 0.8 THz to retrieve pointing information from molecular oxygen (O2). LOCUS would be the first satellite instrument to measure atomic oxygen on a global scale with a precision that will allow the retrieval of the global O distribution. It would also be the first time that annual and diurnal changes in O are measured. This will be a significant step forward in understanding the chemistry and dynamics of the MLT. Current indications (derived from CRISTA measurement) lead us to believe that current models only give a poor representation of upper atmospheric O. The secondary target species can help us to address additional scientific questions related to both Climate (distribution of climate relevant gases, highly geared cooling of the MLT in response to Climate change, increased occurrence of Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMC), etc) and Space Weather (precipitation of electrically charged particles and impact on NOx chemistry, fluctuations of solar Lyman-alpha flux through shown in the the distribution of photochemically active species, etc).

  6. Dynamic chromatin: the regulatory domain organization of eukaryotic gene loci.

    PubMed

    Bonifer, C; Hecht, A; Saueressig, H; Winter, D M; Sippel, A E

    1991-10-01

    It is hypothesized that nuclear DNA is organized in topologically constrained loop domains defining basic units of higher order chromatin structure. Our studies are performed in order to investigate the functional relevance of this structural subdivision of eukaryotic chromatin for the control of gene expression. We used the chicken lysozyme gene locus as a model to examine the relation between chromatin structure and gene function. Several structural features of the lysozyme locus are known: the extension of the region of general DNAasel sensitivity of the active gene, the location of DNA-sequences with high affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro, and the position of DNAasel hypersensitive chromatin sites (DHSs). The pattern of DHSs changes depending on the transcriptional status of the gene. Functional studies demonstrated that DHSs mark the position of cis-acting regulatory elements. Additionally, we discovered a novel cis-activity of the border regions of the DNAasel sensitive domain (A-elements). By eliminating the position effect on gene expression usually observed when genes are randomly integrated into the genome after transfection, A-elements possibly serve as punctuation marks for a regulatory chromatin domain. Experiments using transgenic mice confirmed that the complete structurally defined lysozyme gene domain behaves as an independent regulatory unit, expressing the gene in a tissue specific and position independent manner. These expression features were lost in transgenic mice carrying a construct, in which the A-elements as well as an upstream enhancer region were deleted, indicating the lack of a locus activation function on this construct. Experiments are designed in order to uncover possible hierarchical relationships between the different cis-acting regulatory elements for stepwise gene activation during cell differentiation. We are aiming at the definition of the basic structural and functional requirements for position independent and high

  7. Dynamic chromatin: the regulatory domain organization of eukaryotic gene loci.

    PubMed

    Bonifer, C; Hecht, A; Saueressig, H; Winter, D M; Sippel, A E

    1991-10-01

    It is hypothesized that nuclear DNA is organized in topologically constrained loop domains defining basic units of higher order chromatin structure. Our studies are performed in order to investigate the functional relevance of this structural subdivision of eukaryotic chromatin for the control of gene expression. We used the chicken lysozyme gene locus as a model to examine the relation between chromatin structure and gene function. Several structural features of the lysozyme locus are known: the extension of the region of general DNAasel sensitivity of the active gene, the location of DNA-sequences with high affinity for the nuclear matrix in vitro, and the position of DNAasel hypersensitive chromatin sites (DHSs). The pattern of DHSs changes depending on the transcriptional status of the gene. Functional studies demonstrated that DHSs mark the position of cis-acting regulatory elements. Additionally, we discovered a novel cis-activity of the border regions of the DNAasel sensitive domain (A-elements). By eliminating the position effect on gene expression usually observed when genes are randomly integrated into the genome after transfection, A-elements possibly serve as punctuation marks for a regulatory chromatin domain. Experiments using transgenic mice confirmed that the complete structurally defined lysozyme gene domain behaves as an independent regulatory unit, expressing the gene in a tissue specific and position independent manner. These expression features were lost in transgenic mice carrying a construct, in which the A-elements as well as an upstream enhancer region were deleted, indicating the lack of a locus activation function on this construct. Experiments are designed in order to uncover possible hierarchical relationships between the different cis-acting regulatory elements for stepwise gene activation during cell differentiation. We are aiming at the definition of the basic structural and functional requirements for position independent and high

  8. Genomic organization of the S-locus region of Brassica.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Hiroshi; Kenmochi, Masayuki; Sugihara, Minoru; Iwano, Megumi; Kawasaki, Shinji; Suzuki, Go; Watanabe, Masao; Isogai, Akira; Takayama, Seiji

    2003-03-01

    To gain some insights into the structure of the S-locus and the mechanisms that have kept its diversity, a 75-kb genomic fragment containing the self-incompatibility (S) locus region was isolated from the S12-haplotype of Brassica rapa and compared with those of other S-haplotypes. The region around the S determinant genes was highly polymorphic and filled with S-haplotype-specific intergenic sequences. The diverse genomic structure must contribute to the suppression of recombination at the S-locus.

  9. THE LOCUS COERULEUS AND CENTRAL CHEMOSENSITIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Gargaglioni, Luciane H.; Hartzler, Lynn K.; Putnam, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The locus coeruleus (LC) lies in the dorsal pons and supplies noradrenergic (NA) input to many regions of the brain, including respiratory control areas. The LC may provide tonic input for basal respiratory drive and is involved in central chemosensitivity since focal acidosis of the region stimulates ventilation and ablation reduces CO2-induced increased ventilation. The output of LC is modulated by both serotonergic and glutamatergic inputs. A large percentage of LC neurons are intrinsically activated by hypercapnia. This percentage and the magnitude of their response are highest in young neonates and decrease dramatically after postnatal day P10. The cellular bases for intrinsic chemosensitivity of LC neurons are comprised of multiple factors, primary among them being reduced extracellular and intracellular pH, which inhibit inwardly rectifying and voltage-gated K+ channels, and activate L-type Ca2+ channels. Activation of KCa channels in LC neurons may limit their ultimate response to hypercapnia. Finally, the LC mediates central chemosensitivity and contains pH-sensitive neurons in amphibians, suggesting that the LC has a long-standing phylogenetic role in respiratory control. PMID:20435170

  10. Sequence Variation Within the Fragile X Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Debra J.; Kashuk, Carl; Brightwell, Gale; Eichler, Evan E.; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2001-01-01

    The human genome provides a reference sequence, which is a template for resequencing studies that aim to discover and interpret the record of common ancestry that exists in extant genomes. To understand the nature and pattern of variation and linkage disequilibrium comprising this history, we present a study of ∼31 kb spanning an ∼70 kb region of FMR1, sequenced in a sample of 20 humans (worldwide sample) and four great apes (chimp, bonobo, and gorilla). Twenty-five polymorphic sites and two insertion/deletions, distributed in 11 unique haplotypes, were identified among humans. Africans are the only geographic group that do not share any haplotypes with other groups. Parsimony analysis reveals two main clades and suggests that the four major human geographic groups are distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree and within each major clade. An African sample appears to be most closely related to the common ancestor shared with the three other geographic groups. Nucleotide diversity, π, for this sample is 2.63 ± 6.28 × 10−4. The mutation rate, μ, is 6.48 × 10−10 per base pair per year, giving an ancestral population size of ∼6200 and a time to the most recent common ancestor of ∼320,000 ± 72,000 per base pair per year. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) at the FMR1 locus, evaluated by conventional LD analysis and by the length of segment shared between any two chromosomes, is extensive across the region. PMID:11483579

  11. Chromosomal locus for staphylococcal enterotoxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, W M; Iandolo, J J

    1978-01-01

    The genetic locus of staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) was investigated in the Staphylococcus aureus food-poisoning isolates, strains S6 and 277. Direct neutral sucrose gradient centrifugation analysis of sodium dodecyl sulfate-sodium chloride-mediated cleared lysates demonstrated that strain S6 contained a single 37S plasmid. Transductional analysis revealed that the 37S plasmid in S6 encoded for cadmium resistance (Cad) but not SEB. Additionally, elimination of cadmium resistance in S6 provided a plasmid-negative derivative that produced SEB at the same level as the parent. Examination of strain 277 showed two plasmids, a 37S species encoding for penicillin resistance (Penr) and a 21S species containing the gene(s) responsible for tetracycline resistance (Tetr). Elimination of the 37S, penr plasmid in 277 had no effect on SEB production, whereas introduction of the 21S tetr plasmid via transformation into strain 8325 (SEB--) did not confer enterotoxigenesis upon the transformants. The data obtained in this investigation suggest that the SEB gene(s) in these food-poisoning isolates of S. aureus is chromosomal. Images PMID:669796

  12. Fine mapping of the celiac disease-associated LPP locus reveals a potential functional variant

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Rodrigo; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Kumar, Vinod; Deelen, Patrick; Szperl, Agata; Trynka, Gosia; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Swertz, Morris A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Barisani, Donatella; Greco, Luigi; Mearin, Luisa; Wolters, Victorien M.; Mulder, Chris; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Sood, Ajit; Cukrowska, Bozena; Núñez, Concepción; Pratesi, Riccardo; Withoff, Sebo; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2014-01-01

    Using the Immunochip for genotyping, we identified 39 non-human leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) loci associated to celiac disease (CeD), an immune-mediated disease with a worldwide frequency of ∼1%. The most significant non-HLA signal mapped to the intronic region of 70 kb in the LPP gene. Our aim was to fine map and identify possible functional variants in the LPP locus. We performed a meta-analysis in a cohort of 25 169 individuals from six different populations previously genotyped using Immunochip. Imputation using data from the Genome of the Netherlands and 1000 Genomes projects, followed by meta-analysis, confirmed the strong association signal on the LPP locus (rs2030519, P = 1.79 × 10−49), without any novel associations. The conditional analysis on this top SNP-indicated association to a single common haplotype. By performing haplotype analyses in each population separately, as well as in a combined group of the four populations that reach the significant threshold after correction (P < 0.008), we narrowed down the CeD-associated region from 70 to 2.8 kb (P = 1.35 × 10−44). By intersecting regulatory data from the ENCODE project, we found a functional SNP, rs4686484 (P = 3.12 × 10−49), that maps to several B-cell enhancer elements and a highly conserved region. This SNP was also predicted to change the binding motif of the transcription factors IRF4, IRF11, Nkx2.7 and Nkx2.9, suggesting its role in transcriptional regulation. We later found significantly low levels of LPP mRNA in CeD biopsies compared with controls, thus our results suggest that rs4686484 is the functional variant in this locus, while LPP expression is decreased in CeD. PMID:24334606

  13. Pleiotropic syndrome of dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, pseudohyperkalemia, and perinatal edema maps to 16q23-q24.

    PubMed

    Grootenboer, S; Schischmanoff, P O; Laurendeau, I; Cynober, T; Tchernia, G; Dommergues, J P; Dhermy, D; Bost, M; Varet, B; Snyder, M; Ballas, S K; Ducot, B; Babron, M C; Stewart, G W; Gasparini, P; Iolascon, A; Delaunay, J

    2000-10-01

    Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS) is a rare genetic disorder of red cell permeability to cations, leading to a well-compensated hemolytic anemia. DHS was shown previously to be associated in some families with a particular form of perinatal edema, which resolves in the weeks following birth and, in addition, with pseudohyperkalemia in one kindred. The latter condition was hitherto regarded as the separate entity, "familial pseudohyperkalemia." DHS and familial pseudohyperkalemia are thought to stem from the same gene, mapping to 16q23-q24. This study screened 8 French and 2 American families with DHS. DHS appeared to be part of a pleiotropic syndrome in some families: DHS + perinatal edema, DHS + pseudohyperkalemia, or DHS + perinatal edema + pseudohyperkalemia. If adequately attended to, the perinatal edema resolved spontaneously after birth. Logistic regression showed that increased mean corpuscular volume and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration were the parameters best related to DHS. In patients in whom cation fluxes were investigated, the temperature dependence of the monovalent cation leak exhibited comparable curves. Specific recombination events consistently suggested that the responsible gene lies between markers D16S402 and D16S3037 (16q23-q24). The 95% confidence limits (Z(max) >/= 3.02) spanned almost the complete 9-cM interval between these 2 markers. PMID:11001917

  14. Alkylrhodamines enhance the toxicity of clotrimazole and benzalkonium chloride by interfering with yeast pleiotropic ABC-transporters.

    PubMed

    Knorre, Dmitry A; Besedina, Elizaveta; Karavaeva, Iuliia E; Smirnova, Ekaterina A; Markova, Olga V; Severin, Fedor F

    2016-06-01

    ABC-transporters with broad substrate specificity are responsible for pathogenic yeast resistance to antifungal compounds. Here we asked whether highly hydrophobic chemicals with delocalized positive charge can be used to overcome the resistance. Such molecules efficiently penetrate the plasma membrane and accumulate inside the cells. We reasoned that these properties can convert an active efflux of the compounds into a futile cycle thus interfering with the extrusion of the antibiotics. To test this, we studied the effects of several alkylated rhodamines on the drug resistance of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We found that octylrhodamine synergetically increases toxicity of Pdr5p substrate-clotrimazole, while the others were less effective. Next, we compared the contributions of three major pleiotropic ABC-transporters (Pdr5p, Yor1p, Snq2p) on the accumulation of the alkylated rhodamines. While all of the tested compounds were extruded by Pdr5p, Yor1p and Snq2p showed narrower substrate specificity. Interestingly, among the tested alkylated rhodamines, inactivation of Pdr5p had the strongest effect on the accumulation of octylrhodamine inside the cells, which is consistent with the fact that clotrimazole is a substrate of Pdr5p. As alkylated rhodamines were shown to be non-toxic on mice, our study makes them potential components of pharmacological antifungal compositions. PMID:27044313

  15. A pleiotropic drug resistance transporter in Nicotiana tabacum is involved in defense against the herbivore Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Bienert, Manuela D; Siegmund, Stephanie E G; Drozak, Anna; Trombik, Tomasz; Bultreys, Alain; Baldwin, Ian T; Boutry, Marc

    2012-12-01

    Pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) transporters are a group of membrane proteins belonging to the ABCG sub-family of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. There is clear evidence for the involvement of plant ABC transporters in resistance to fungal and bacterial pathogens, but not in the biotic stress response to insect or herbivore attack. Here, we describe a PDR transporter, ABCG5/PDR5, from Nicotiana tabacum. GFP fusion and subcellular fractionation studies revealed that ABCG5/PDR5 is localized to the plasma membrane. Staining of transgenic plants expressing the GUS reporter gene under the control of the ABCG5/PDR5 transcription promoter and immunoblotting of wild-type plants showed that, under standard growth conditions, ABCG5/PDR5 is highly expressed in roots, stems and flowers, but is only expressed at marginal levels in leaves. Interestingly, ABCG5/PDR5 expression is induced in leaves by methyl jasmonate, wounding, pathogen infiltration, or herbivory by Manduca sexta. To address the physiological role of ABCG5/PDR5, N. tabacum plants silenced for the expression of ABCG5/PDR5 were obtained. No phenotypic modification was observed under standard conditions. However, a small increase in susceptibility to the fungus Fusarium oxysporum was observed. A stronger effect was observed in relation to herbivory: silenced plants allowed better growth and faster development of M. sexta larvae than wild-type plants, indicating an involvement of this PDR transporter in resistance to M. sexta herbivory.

  16. Pleiotropic Quantitative Trait Loci Contribute to Population Divergence in Traits Associated With Life-History Variation in Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Megan C.; Basten, Christopher J.; Willis, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists seek to understand the genetic basis for multivariate phenotypic divergence. We constructed an F2 mapping population (N = 539) between two distinct populations of Mimulus guttatus. We measured 20 floral, vegetative, and life-history characters on parents and F1 and F2 hybrids in a common garden experiment. We employed multitrait composite interval mapping to determine the number, effect, and degree of pleiotropy in quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting divergence in floral, vegetative, and life-history characters. We detected 16 QTL affecting floral traits; 7 affecting vegetative traits; and 5 affecting selected floral, vegetative, and life-history traits. Floral and vegetative traits are clearly polygenic. We detected a few major QTL, with all remaining QTL of small effect. Most detected QTL are pleiotropic, implying that the evolutionary shift between these annual and perennial populations is constrained. We also compared the genetic architecture controlling floral trait divergence both within (our intraspecific study) and between species, on the basis of a previously published analysis of M. guttatus and M. nasutus. Eleven of our 16 floral QTL map to approximately the same location in the interspecific map based on shared, collinear markers, implying that there may be a shared genetic basis for floral divergence within and among species of Mimulus. PMID:16361232

  17. Inactivation of Francisella tularensis Gene Encoding Putative ABC Transporter Has a Pleiotropic Effect upon Production of Various Glycoconjugates.

    PubMed

    Dankova, Vera; Balonova, Lucie; Link, Marek; Straskova, Adela; Sheshko, Valeria; Stulik, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen causing the disease tularemia, utilizes surface glycoconjugates such as lipopolysaccharide, capsule, and capsule-like complex for its protection against inhospitable conditions of the environment. Francisella species also possess a functional glycosylation apparatus by which specific proteins are O-glycosidically modified. We here created a mutant with a nonfunctional FTS_1402 gene encoding for a putative glycan flippase and studied the consequences of its disruption. The mutant strain expressed diminished glycosylation similarly to, but to a lesser extent than, that of the oligosaccharyltransferase-deficient ΔpglA mutant. In contrast to ΔpglA, inactivation of FTS_1402 had a pleiotropic effect, leading to alteration in glycosylation and, importantly, to decrease in lipopolysaccharide, capsule, and/or capsule-like complex production, which were reflected by distinct phenotypes in host-pathogen associated properties and virulence potential of the two mutant strains. Disruption of FTS_1402 resulted in enhanced sensitivity to complement-mediated lysis and reduced virulence in mice that was independent of diminished glycosylation. Importantly, the mutant strain induced a protective immune response against systemic challenge with homologous wild-type FSC200 strain. Targeted disruption of genes shared by multiple metabolic pathways may be considered a novel strategy for constructing effective live, attenuated vaccines. PMID:26815358

  18. Pleiotropic effect of disrupting a conserved sequence involved in a long-range compensatory interaction in the Drosophila Adh gene.

    PubMed Central

    Baines, John F; Parsch, John; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental analyses of the evolution of RNA secondary structures suggest a more complex scenario than that typically considered by Kimura's classical model of compensatory evolution. In this study, we examine one such case in more detail. Previous experimental analysis of long-range compensatory interactions between the two ends of Drosophila Adh mRNA failed to fit the classical model of compensatory evolution. To further investigate and verify long-range pairing in Drosophila Adh with respect to models of compensatory evolution and its potential functional role, we introduced site-directed mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene. We explore two alternative hypotheses for why previous analysis of long-range compensatory interactions failed to fit the classical model. Specifically, we investigate whether the disruption of a conserved short-range pairing within Adh exon 2 has an effect on Adh expression or if there is a dual functional role of a conserved sequence in the 3'-UTR in both long-range pairing and the negative regulation of Adh expression. We find that a classical result was not observed due to the pleiotropic effect of changing a nucleotide involved in both long-range base pairing and the negative regulation of gene expression. PMID:15020421

  19. Gas1 is a pleiotropic regulator of cellular functions: from embryonic development to molecular actions in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Segovia, José; Zarco, Natanael

    2014-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis is governed by a precise regulation of the molecular mechanisms of action of several proteins in a given time. There is a group of proteins that have a particular role depending on the cellular context in which they are present and are known as pleiotropic proteins. The Gas1 (Growth Arrest Specific 1) gene was isolated from a subtraction library from serum arrested versus growing NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast. Gas1 is a member of the alpha receptors (GFRα) for the family of GDNF ligands (GFL), we have previously shown that Gas1 acts as a negative modulator of the GDNF-induced intracellular signaling and induces cell arrest and apoptosis. This modulating activity is the cause of the capacity of Gas1 to act as a tumor suppressor. On the other hand, several studies have shown the interaction between Gas1 and Hh (Hedgehog) proteins to potentiate the positive regulation of this pathway, which is involved in the development of the nervous system, and in both the origin and progression of different tumors. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of Gas1 and the molecular mechanism of action in different cellular functions, both during embryonic development, in the adult and its effects inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis of cancer cells.

  20. Gene Networks Underlying Convergent and Pleiotropic Phenotypes in a Large and Systematically-Phenotyped Cohort with Heterogeneous Developmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke; Taylor, Avigail; Steinberg, Julia; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne; Pfundt, Rolph; de Leeuw, Nicole; de Vries, Bert B. A.; Webber, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Readily-accessible and standardised capture of genotypic variation has revolutionised our understanding of the genetic contribution to disease. Unfortunately, the corresponding systematic capture of patient phenotypic variation needed to fully interpret the impact of genetic variation has lagged far behind. Exploiting deep and systematic phenotyping of a cohort of 197 patients presenting with heterogeneous developmental disorders and whose genomes harbour de novo CNVs, we systematically applied a range of commonly-used functional genomics approaches to identify the underlying molecular perturbations and their phenotypic impact. Grouping patients into 408 non-exclusive patient-phenotype groups, we identified a functional association amongst the genes disrupted in 209 (51%) groups. We find evidence for a significant number of molecular interactions amongst the association-contributing genes, including a single highly-interconnected network disrupted in 20% of patients with intellectual disability, and show using microcephaly how these molecular networks can be used as baits to identify additional members whose genes are variant in other patients with the same phenotype. Exploiting the systematic phenotyping of this cohort, we observe phenotypic concordance amongst patients whose variant genes contribute to the same functional association but note that (i) this relationship shows significant variation across the different approaches used to infer a commonly perturbed molecular pathway, and (ii) that the phenotypic similarities detected amongst patients who share the same inferred pathway perturbation result from these patients sharing many distinct phenotypes, rather than sharing a more specific phenotype, inferring that these pathways are best characterized by their pleiotropic effects. PMID:25781962

  1. Environmental regulatory update table

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K.J.; Langston, M.E.; Tucker, C.S.; Reed, R.M.

    1987-06-01

    The Environmental Regulatory Update Table provides information on regulatory initiatives of interest to DOE operations and contractor staff with environmental management responsibilities. The table is updated each month with information from the Federal Register and other sources, including direct contact with regulatory agencies. Each table entry provides a chronological record of the rulemaking process for that initiative with an abstract and a projection of further action.

  2. Genetic Organization of the citCDEF Locus and Identification of mae and clyR Genes from Leuconostoc mesenteroides

    PubMed Central

    Bekal-Si Ali, Sadjia; Diviès, Charles; Prévost, Hervé

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe two open reading frames coding for a NAD-dependent malic enzyme (mae) and a putative regulatory protein (clyR) found in the upstream region of citCDEFG of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris 195. The transcriptional analysis of the citrate lyase locus revealed one polycistronic mRNA covering the mae and citCDEF genes. This transcript was detected only on RNA prepared from cells grown in the presence of citrate. Primer extension experiments suggest that clyR and the citrate lyase operon are expressed from a bidirectional A-T-rich promoter region located between mae and clyR. PMID:10400601

  3. Multidimensional profiles of health locus of control in Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Brian R; Fox, Rina S; Mills, Sarah D; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Malcarne, Vanessa L

    2016-10-01

    Latent profile analysis identified health locus of control profiles among 436 Hispanic Americans who completed the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control scales. Results revealed four profiles: Internally Oriented-Weak, -Moderate, -Strong, and Externally Oriented. The profile groups were compared on sociocultural and demographic characteristics, health beliefs and behaviors, and physical and mental health outcomes. The Internally Oriented-Strong group had less cancer fatalism, religiosity, and equity health attributions, and more alcohol consumption than the other three groups; the Externally Oriented group had stronger equity health attributions and less alcohol consumption. Deriving multidimensional health locus of control profiles through latent profile analysis allows examination of the relationships of health locus of control subtypes to health variables.

  4. A highly polymorphic STR locus in Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Hsing-Mei; Hou, Rur-Jyun; Tsai, Li-Chin; Wei, Chih-Sheng; Liu, Su-Wen; Huang, Li-Hung; Kuo, Yi-Chen; Linacre, Adrian; Lee, James Chun-I

    2003-01-01

    We report on the first short tandem repeat (STR) locus to be isolated from the plant Cannabis sativa. The STR locus, isolated by a hybrid-capture enrichment procedure, was found to contain a simple sequence repeat motif of 6 bp. This 6 bp repeat motif showed no variation in repeat length but with minor variations in repeat unit sequences. The data show the locus to be highly polymorphic with the number of repeat units ranging from 3 to 40 in 108 screened samples. The observed heterozygosity was approximately 87.04%. The forward and reverse primers (CS1F and CS1R) produced no PCR products in cross-reaction study from 20 species of plants, including highly related species such as Humulus japonicus and Nicotiana tabacum. This hexanucleotide repeat DNA locus could be used to identify cannabis samples and predict their genetic relationship as the test is specific to C. sativa and is highly reproducible.

  5. The agr locus regulates virulence and colonization genes in Clostridium difficile 027.

    PubMed

    Martin, Melissa J; Clare, Simon; Goulding, David; Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Barquist, Lars; Browne, Hilary P; Pettit, Laura; Dougan, Gordon; Lawley, Trevor D; Wren, Brendan W

    2013-08-01

    The transcriptional regulator AgrA, a member of the LytTR family of proteins, plays a key role in controlling gene expression in some Gram-positive pathogens, including Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis. AgrA is encoded by the agrACDB global regulatory locus, and orthologues are found within the genome of most Clostridium difficile isolates, including the epidemic lineage 027/BI/NAP1. Comparative RNA sequencing of the wild type and otherwise isogenic agrA null mutant derivatives of C. difficile R20291 revealed a network of approximately 75 differentially regulated transcripts at late exponential growth phase, including many genes associated with flagellar assembly and function, such as the major structural subunit, FliC. Other differentially regulated genes include several involved in bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) synthesis and toxin A expression. C. difficile 027 R20291 agrA mutant derivatives were poorly flagellated and exhibited reduced levels of colonization and relapses in the murine infection model. Thus, the agr locus likely plays a contributory role in the fitness and virulence potential of C. difficile strains in the 027/BI/NAP1 lineage. PMID:23772065

  6. Dynamic estrogen receptor interactomes control estrogen-responsive trefoil Factor (TFF) locus cell-specific activities.

    PubMed

    Quintin, Justine; Le Péron, Christine; Palierne, Gaëlle; Bizot, Maud; Cunha, Stéphanie; Sérandour, Aurélien A; Avner, Stéphane; Henry, Catherine; Percevault, Frédéric; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Huet, Sébastien; Watrin, Erwan; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Legagneux, Vincent; Salbert, Gilles; Métivier, Raphaël

    2014-07-01

    Estradiol signaling is ideally suited for analyzing the molecular and functional linkages between the different layers of information directing transcriptional regulations: the DNA sequence, chromatin modifications, and the spatial organization of the genome. Hence, the estrogen receptor (ER) can bind at a distance from its target genes and engages timely and spatially coordinated processes to regulate their expression. In the context of the coordinated regulation of colinear genes, identifying which ER binding sites (ERBSs) regulate a given gene still remains a challenge. Here, we investigated the coordination of such regulatory events at a 2-Mb genomic locus containing the estrogen-sensitive trefoil factor (TFF) cluster of genes in breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that this locus exhibits a hormone- and cohesin-dependent reduction in the plasticity of its three-dimensional organization that allows multiple ERBSs to be dynamically brought to the vicinity of estrogen-sensitive genes. Additionally, by using triplex-forming oligonucleotides, we could precisely document the functional links between ER engagement at given ERBSs and the regulation of particular genes. Hence, our data provide evidence of a formerly suggested cooperation of enhancers toward gene regulation and also show that redundancy between ERBSs can occur.

  7. A genetic locus essential for formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    McClung, C R; Chelm, B K

    1987-01-01

    A genetic locus essential for the formate-dependent growth of Bradyrhizobium japonicum was isolated by complementation of ethyl methanesulfonate-induced mutants with a cosmid gene library of B. japonicum DNA. Three related cosmids containing 18.7 kilobase pairs of B. japonicum DNA in common were identified as being able to restore formate-dependent growth capability to mutants lacking either ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase or both ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase and phosphoribulokinase activities. To further localize the complementing gene(s), a series of four deletions spanning a total of 16.1 kilobase pairs were introduced into the B. japonicum chromosome. Each resulting deletion mutant lacked formate dehydrogenase activity and lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and immunologically detectable protein. Three of the four also lacked phosphoribulokinase activity. Two other mutants in which the deletion-bearing recombinant plasmid had integrated into the chromosome also lacked ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase activity and protein and phosphoribulokinase activities. The genetic locus defined by these mutants could contain the structural genes for these enzymes or a regulatory gene(s) controlling their expression or both. Images PMID:3036781

  8. Dynamic Estrogen Receptor Interactomes Control Estrogen-Responsive Trefoil Factor (TFF) Locus Cell-Specific Activities

    PubMed Central

    Quintin, Justine; Le Péron, Christine; Palierne, Gaëlle; Bizot, Maud; Cunha, Stéphanie; Sérandour, Aurélien A.; Avner, Stéphane; Henry, Catherine; Percevault, Frédéric; Belaud-Rotureau, Marc-Antoine; Huet, Sébastien; Watrin, Erwan; Eeckhoute, Jérôme; Legagneux, Vincent; Salbert, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Estradiol signaling is ideally suited for analyzing the molecular and functional linkages between the different layers of information directing transcriptional regulations: the DNA sequence, chromatin modifications, and the spatial organization of the genome. Hence, the estrogen receptor (ER) can bind at a distance from its target genes and engages timely and spatially coordinated processes to regulate their expression. In the context of the coordinated regulation of colinear genes, identifying which ER binding sites (ERBSs) regulate a given gene still remains a challenge. Here, we investigated the coordination of such regulatory events at a 2-Mb genomic locus containing the estrogen-sensitive trefoil factor (TFF) cluster of genes in breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that this locus exhibits a hormone- and cohesin-dependent reduction in the plasticity of its three-dimensional organization that allows multiple ERBSs to be dynamically brought to the vicinity of estrogen-sensitive genes. Additionally, by using triplex-forming oligonucleotides, we could precisely document the functional links between ER engagement at given ERBSs and the regulation of particular genes. Hence, our data provide evidence of a formerly suggested cooperation of enhancers toward gene regulation and also show that redundancy between ERBSs can occur. PMID:24752895

  9. Differential expression of polycytosine-binding protein isoforms in adrenal gland, locus coeruleus and midbrain.

    PubMed

    Boschi, N M; Takeuchi, K; Sterling, C; Tank, A W

    2015-02-12

    Polycytosine-binding proteins (PCBPs) are RNA-binding proteins that participate in post-transcriptional control pathways. Among the diverse functions of these proteins is the interaction with a 27 nucleotide pyrimidine-rich domain within the 3'UTR of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA. Mutations to this domain result in decreased stability of TH mRNA and loss of cAMP-mediated activation of TH mRNA translation. PCBPs are hypothesized to play key roles in these regulatory mechanisms. In order to further test this hypothesis, we examined the tissue distribution of PCBPs in catecholaminergic cells. Initial studies demonstrated that proteins from catecholaminergic tissues bind to TH mRNA 3'UTR sequences and these proteins have an apparent Mr of ∼ 44 kDa, which is close to the molecular sizes for PCBPs. Fluorescent immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy was used to analyze the distribution of PCBP isoforms in TH-positive cells of the rat midbrain, locus coeruleus, and adrenal gland. Our results suggest that: (1) PCBP2 is the predominant isoform in TH-positive cells of the rat midbrain; (2) PCBP3 is the predominant isoform in TH-positive cells of the locus coeruleus; and (3) PCBP1 is the predominant isoform in the adrenal medulla. The localization of PCBP proteins to TH-positive cells in these catecholaminergic tissues is consistent with the hypothesis that PCBPs play a role in the regulation of TH expression.

  10. Type III secretion genes identify a putative virulence locus of Chlamydia.

    PubMed

    Hsia, R C; Pannekoek, Y; Ingerowski, E; Bavoil, P M

    1997-07-01

    Four genes of Chlamydia psittaci strain guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC), whose predicted products are highly homologous to structural and regulatory components of a contact-dependent or type III secretion apparatus, were isolated. Related to genes present in several animal and plant bacterial pathogens, these genes may represent a section of a previously undetected chromosomal virulence locus analogous to several recently described virulence-associated type III secretion loci. The existence of contact-dependent secretion in Chlamydia strongly suggests that these bacteria use pathogenic mechanisms that are similar to those of other intracellular bacterial pathogens. Unlike other intracellular bacteria, however, chlamydiae are metabolically inactive extracellularly and only become capable of global protein synthesis several hours after infection. This implies that chlamydial contact-dependent secretion is only active from within, uniquely after the bacteria have been internalized by eukaryotic cells. The possible role(s) of this pathway in chlamydial pathogenesis are discussed.

  11. Principles of regulatory information conservation between mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Wu, Weisheng; Cayting, Philip; Boyle, Alan P.; Sundaram, Vasavi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Dogan, Nergiz; Li, Jingjing; Euskirchen, Ghia; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Visel, Axel; Kawli, Trupti; Yang, Xinqiong; Patacsil, Dorrelyn; Keller, Cheryl A.; Giardine, Belinda; Kundaje, Anshul; Wang, Ting; Pennacchio, Len A.; Weng, Zhiping; Hardison, Ross C.; Snyder, Michael P.

    2014-11-19

    To broaden our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation mechanisms, we generated occupancy profiles for 34 orthologous transcription factors (TFs) in human–mouse erythroid progenitor, lymphoblast and embryonic stem-cell lines. By combining the genome-wide transcription factor occupancy repertoires, associated epigenetic signals, and co-association patterns, here we deduce several evolutionary principles of gene regulatory features operating since the mouse and human lineages diverged. The genomic distribution profiles, primary binding motifs, chromatin states, and DNA methylation preferences are well conserved for TF-occupied sequences. However, the extent to which orthologous DNA segments are bound by orthologous TFs varies both among TFs and with genomic location: binding at promoters is more highly conserved than binding at distal elements. Notably, occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences tend to be pleiotropic; they function in several tissues and also co-associate with many TFs. Lastly, single nucleotide variants at sites with potential regulatory functions are enriched in occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences.

  12. Principles of regulatory information conservation between mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Wu, Weisheng; Cayting, Philip; Boyle, Alan P; Sundaram, Vasavi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Dogan, Nergiz; Li, Jingjing; Euskirchen, Ghia; Lin, Shin; Lin, Yiing; Visel, Axel; Kawli, Trupti; Yang, Xinqiong; Patacsil, Dorrelyn; Keller, Cheryl A; Giardine, Belinda; Kundaje, Anshul; Wang, Ting; Pennacchio, Len A; Weng, Zhiping; Hardison, Ross C; Snyder, Michael P

    2014-11-20

    To broaden our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation mechanisms, we generated occupancy profiles for 34 orthologous transcription factors (TFs) in human-mouse erythroid progenitor, lymphoblast and embryonic stem-cell lines. By combining the genome-wide transcription factor occupancy repertoires, associated epigenetic signals, and co-association patterns, here we deduce several evolutionary principles of gene regulatory features operating since the mouse and human lineages diverged. The genomic distribution profiles, primary binding motifs, chromatin states, and DNA methylation preferences are well conserved for TF-occupied sequences. However, the extent to which orthologous DNA segments are bound by orthologous TFs varies both among TFs and with genomic location: binding at promoters is more highly conserved than binding at distal elements. Notably, occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences tend to be pleiotropic; they function in several tissues and also co-associate with many TFs. Single nucleotide variants at sites with potential regulatory functions are enriched in occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences.

  13. Principles of regulatory information conservation between mouse and human

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Yong; Ma, Zhihai; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Wu, Weisheng; Cayting, Philip; Boyle, Alan P.; Sundaram, Vasavi; Xing, Xiaoyun; Dogan, Nergiz; Li, Jingjing; et al

    2014-11-19

    To broaden our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation mechanisms, we generated occupancy profiles for 34 orthologous transcription factors (TFs) in human–mouse erythroid progenitor, lymphoblast and embryonic stem-cell lines. By combining the genome-wide transcription factor occupancy repertoires, associated epigenetic signals, and co-association patterns, here we deduce several evolutionary principles of gene regulatory features operating since the mouse and human lineages diverged. The genomic distribution profiles, primary binding motifs, chromatin states, and DNA methylation preferences are well conserved for TF-occupied sequences. However, the extent to which orthologous DNA segments are bound by orthologous TFs varies both among TFs and withmore » genomic location: binding at promoters is more highly conserved than binding at distal elements. Notably, occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences tend to be pleiotropic; they function in several tissues and also co-associate with many TFs. Lastly, single nucleotide variants at sites with potential regulatory functions are enriched in occupancy-conserved TF-occupied sequences.« less

  14. Two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tienari, P.J. Univ. of Helsinki ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. ); Palo, J. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-01-15

    One of the major challenges in genetic linkage analyses is the study of complex diseases. The authors demonstrate here the use of two-locus linkage analysis in multiple sclerosis (MS), a multifactorial disease with a complex mode of inheritance. In a set of Finnish multiplex families, they have previously found evidence for linkage between MS susceptibility and two independent loci, the myelin basic protein gene (MBP) on chromosome 18 and the HLA complex on chromosome 6. This set of families provides a unique opportunity to perform linkage analysis conditional on two loci contributing to the disease. In the two-trait-locus/two-marker-locus analysis, the presence of another disease locus is parametrized and the analysis more appropriately treats information from the unaffected family member than single-disease-locus analysis. As exemplified here in MS, the two-locus analysis can be a powerful method for investigating susceptibility loci in complex traits, best suited for analysis of specific candidate genes, or for situations in which preliminary evidence for linkage already exists or is suggested. 41 refs., 6 tabs.

  15. Neurolinguistic programming training, trait anxiety, and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Konefal, J; Duncan, R C; Reese, M A

    1992-06-01

    Training in the neurolinguistic programming techniques of shifting perceptual position, visual-kinesthetic dissociation, timelines, and change-history, all based on experiential cognitive processing of remembered events, leads to an increased awareness of behavioral contingencies and a more sensitive recognition of environmental cues which could serve to lower trait anxiety and increase the sense of internal control. This study reports on within-person and between-group changes in trait anxiety and locus of control as measured on the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and Wallston, Wallston, and DeVallis' Multiple Health Locus of Control immediately following a 21-day residential training in neurolinguistic programming. Significant with-in-person decreases in trait-anxiety scores and increases in internal locus of control scores were observed as predicted. Chance and powerful other locus of control scores were unchanged. Significant differences were noted on trait anxiety and locus of control scores between European and U.S. participants, although change scores were similar for the two groups. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that this training may lower trait-anxiety scores and increase internal locus of control scores. A matched control group was not available, and follow-up was unfortunately not possible. PMID:1620774

  16. [Health locus of control of patients in disease management programmes].

    PubMed

    Schnee, M; Grikscheit, F

    2013-06-01

    Health locus of control beliefs plays a major role in improving self-management skills of the chronically ill - a main goal in disease management programmes (DMP). This study aims at characterising participants in disease management regarding their health locus of control. Data are based on 4 cross-sectional postal surveys between spring and autumn of 2006 and 2007 within the Health Care Monitor of the Bertelsmann Foundation. Among the 6 285 respondents, 1 266 are chronically ill and not enrolled in a DMP and 327 are participating in a DMP. A high internal locus of control (HLC) occurs significantly less often in DMP patients than in normal chronically ill patients (and healthy people) controlling for age, gender and social class. With increasing age, a high internal locus of control is also significantly less likely. When comparing healthy people, the chronically ill and the DMP participants a social gradient of a high internal locus of control belief can be observed. The weaker internal and higher doctor-related external locus of control of DMP participants should be carefully observed by the physician when trying to strengthen the patients' self-management skills. Evaluators of DMP should take into account the different baselines of DMP patients and relevant control groups and incorporate these differences into the evaluation.

  17. DNA Modification Study of Major Depressive Disorder: Beyond Locus-by-Locus Comparisons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gabriel; Wang, Sun-Chong; Pal, Mrinal; Chen, Zheng Fei; Khare, Tarang; Tochigi, Mamoru; Ng, Catherine; Yang, Yeqing A.; Kwan, Andrew; Kaminsky, Zachary A.; Mill, Jonathan; Gunasinghe, Cerisse; Tackett, Jennifer L.; Gottesman, Irving I.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Wray, Naomi R.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Turecki, Gustavo; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; McGuffin, Peter; Kustra, Rafal; Petronis, Art

    2014-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) exhibits numerous clinical and molecular features that are consistent with putative epigenetic misregulation. Despite growing interest in epigenetic studies of psychiatric diseases, the methodologies guiding such studies have not been well defined. Methods We performed DNA modification analysis in white blood cells from monozygotic twins discordant for MDD, in brain prefrontal cortex, and germline (sperm) samples from affected individuals and control subjects (total N = 304) using 8.1K CpG island microarrays and fine mapping. In addition to the traditional locus-by-locus comparisons, we explored the potential of new analytical approaches in epigenomic studies. Results In the microarray experiment, we detected a number of nominally significant DNA modification differences in MDD and validated selected targets using bisulfite pyrosequencing. Some MDD epigenetic changes, however, overlapped across brain, blood, and sperm more often than expected by chance. We also demonstrated that stratification for disease severity and age may increase the statistical power of epimutation detection. Finally, a series of new analytical approaches, such as DNA modification networks and machine-learning algorithms using binary and quantitative depression phenotypes, provided additional insights on the epigenetic contributions to MDD. Conclusions Mapping epigenetic differences in MDD (and other psychiatric diseases) is a complex task. However, combining traditional and innovative analytical strategies may lead to identification of disease-specific etiopathogenic epimutations. PMID:25108803

  18. The human growth hormone gene is regulated by a multicomponent locus control region.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B K; Monks, B R; Liebhaber, S A; Cooke, N E

    1995-01-01

    The five-member human growth hormone (hGH)/chorionic somatomammotropin (hCS) gene cluster encodes the pituitary-specific hGH-N gene and four highly related genes (hGH-V, hCS-A, hCS-B, and hCS-L) that are expressed only in the placenta. When the hGH-N or hCS-A gene, together with all previously identified cis-acting regulatory sequences, was integrated into the mouse genome, it was expressed only sporadically and at low levels in the transgenic target organs. DNase I mapping of chromatin from expressing and nonexpressing cell types was used to identify a pituitary-specific set of DNase I-hypersensitive sites (HS) and a set of HS common to both the pituitary and placenta, centered approximately 15 and 30 kb 5' of hGH-N, respectively. When contained on a cosmid insert in their native genomic configuration, these HS consistently directed high-level, pituitary-specific expression of hGH-N in transgenic mice and appeared to define a locus control region required for hGH-N expression. Individually, each set of HS was able to mediate position-independent hGH-N expression in the pituitary but demonstrated loss of physiologic control and loss of tissue specificity. The gene-proximal set of HS contained a potent enhancer activity in the pituitary, while the more distal set appeared to function primarily to establish site-of-integration independence. These data indicate that synergistic interactions among multiple elements are required to restrict hGH-N transcription to the pituitary and generate appropriate levels of expression. In addition, these results suggest a role for both shared and unique regulatory sequences in locus control region-mediated expression of the hGH/hCS gene cluster in the pituitary and possibly the placenta. PMID:8524268

  19. Flowering time modulation by a vacuolar SNARE via FLOWERING LOCUS C in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ebine, Kazuo; Uemura, Tomohiro; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The transition of plant growth from vegetative to reproductive phases is one of the most important and dramatic events during the plant life cycle. In Arabidopsis thaliana, flowering promotion involves at least four genetically defined regulatory pathways, including the photoperiod-dependent, vernalization-dependent, gibberellin-dependent, and autonomous promotion pathways. Among these regulatory pathways, the vernalization-dependent and autonomous pathways are integrated by the expression of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC), a negative regulator of flowering; however, the upstream regulation of this locus has not been fully understood. The SYP22 gene encodes a vacuolar SNARE protein that acts in vacuolar and endocytic trafficking pathways. Loss of SYP22 function was reported to lead to late flowering in A. thaliana plants, but the mechanism has remained completely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that the late flowering phenotype of syp22 was due to elevated expression of FLC caused by impairment of the autonomous pathway. In addition, we investigated the DOC1/BIG pathway, which is also suggested to regulate vacuolar/endosomal trafficking. We found that elevated levels of FLC transcripts accumulated in the doc1-1 mutant, and that syp22 phenotypes were exaggerated with a double syp22 doc1-1 mutation. We further demonstrated that the elevated expression of FLC was suppressed by ara6-1, a mutation in the gene encoding plant-unique Rab GTPase involved in endosomal trafficking. Our results indicated that vacuolar and/or endocytic trafficking is involved in the FLC regulation of flowering time in A. thaliana.

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). For this edition of the NRC's regulatory agenda, the most... publication of the last NRC semiannual agenda on April 26, 2010 (75 FR 21960). Within each group, the rules... regulations to improve the control over the distribution of source material to exempt persons and to...

  1. Copy Number Variation and Transposable Elements Feature in Recent, Ongoing Adaptation at the Cyp6g1 Locus

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Joshua M.; Good, Robert T.; Appleton, Belinda; Sherrard, Jayne; Raymant, Greta C.; Bogwitz, Michael R.; Martin, Jon; Daborn, Phillip J.; Goddard, Mike E.; Batterham, Philip; Robin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The increased transcription of the Cyp6g1 gene of Drosophila melanogaster, and consequent resistance to insecticides such as DDT, is a widely cited example of adaptation mediated by cis-regulatory change. A fragment of an Accord transposable element inserted upstream of the Cyp6g1 gene is causally associated with resistance and has spread to high frequencies in populations around the world since the 1940s. Here we report the existence of a natural allelic series at this locus of D. melanogaster, involving copy number variation of Cyp6g1, and two additional transposable element insertions (a P and an HMS-Beagle). We provide evidence that this genetic variation underpins phenotypic variation, as the more derived the allele, the greater the level of DDT resistance. Tracking the spatial and temporal patterns of allele frequency changes indicates that the multiple steps of the allelic series are adaptive. Further, a DDT association study shows that the most resistant allele, Cyp6g1-[BP], is greatly enriched in the top 5% of the phenotypic distribution and accounts for ∼16% of the underlying phenotypic variation in resistance to DDT. In contrast, copy number variation for another candidate resistance gene, Cyp12d1, is not associated with resistance. Thus the Cyp6g1 locus is a major contributor to DDT resistance in field populations, and evolution at this locus features multiple adaptive steps occurring in rapid succession. PMID:20585622

  2. Epigenetic Properties and Identification of an Imprint Mark in the Nesp-Gnasxl Domain of the Mouse Gnas Imprinted Locus

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Candice; Arnaud, Philippe; Gordon, Emma; Dean, Wendy; Coar, Elizabeth A.; Williamson, Christine M.; Feil, Robert; Peters, Jo; Kelsey, Gavin

    2003-01-01

    The Gnas locus in the mouse is imprinted with a complex arrangement of alternative transcripts defined by promoters with different patterns of monoallelic expression. The Gnas transcript is subject to tissue-specific imprinted expression, Nesp is expressed only from the maternal allele, and Gnasxl is expressed only from the paternal allele. The mechanisms controlling these expression patterns are not known. To identify potential imprinting regulatory regions, particularly for the reciprocally expressed Nesp and Gnasxl promoters, we examined epigenetic properties of the locus in gametes, embryonic stem cells, and fetal and adult tissues. The Nesp and Gnasxl promoter regions are contained in extensive CpG islands with methylation of the paternal allele at Nesp and the maternal allele at Gnasxl. Parental allele-specific DNase I-hypersensitive sites were found at these regions, which correlate with hypomethylation rather than actual expression status. A germ line methylation mark was identified covering the promoters for Gnasxl and the antisense transcript Nespas. Prominent DNase I-hypersensitive sites present on paternal alleles in embryonic stem cells are contained within this mark. This is the second gametic mark identified at Gnas and suggests that the Nesp and Gnasxl promoters are under separate control from the Gnas promoter. We propose models to account for the regulation of imprinting at the locus. PMID:12897124

  3. Murine lupus susceptibility locus Sle1a requires the expression of two sub-loci to induce inflammatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Cuda, C M; Zeumer, L; Sobel, E S; Croker, B P; Morel, L

    2010-10-01

    The NZM2410-derived Sle1a lupus susceptibility locus induces activated autoreactive CD4(+) T cells and reduces the number and function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this study, we first showed that Sle1a contributes to autoimmunity by increasing antinuclear antibody production when expressed on either NZB or NZW heterozygous genomes, and by enhancing the chronic graft versus host disease response indicating an expansion of the autoreactive B-cell pool. Screening two non-overlapping recombinants, the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals that cover the entire Sle1a locus, revealed that both Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 were necessary for the full Sle1a phenotype. Sle1a.1, and to a lesser extent Sle1a.2, significantly affected CD4(+) T-cell activation as well as Treg differentiation and function. Sle1a.2 also increased the production of autoreactive B cells. As the Sle1a.1 and Sle1a.2 intervals contain only 1 and 15 known genes, respectively, this study considerably reduces the number of candidate genes responsible for the production of autoreactive T cells. These results also show that the Sle1 locus is an excellent model for the genetic architecture of lupus, in which a major obligate phenotype results from the coexpression of multiple genetic variants with individual weak effects.

  4. Pleiotropic effects of Chr15q25 nicotinic gene cluster and the relationship between smoking, cognition and ADHD.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Jaqueline B; Polina, Evelise R; Rovaris, Diego L; Kappel, Djenifer B; Mota, Nina R; Cupertino, Renata B; Silva, Katiane L; Guimarães-da-Silva, Paula O; Karam, Rafael G; Salgado, Carlos A I; White, Melanie J; Rohde, Luis A; Grevet, Eugenio H; Bau, Claiton H D

    2016-09-01

    Polymorphisms in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster (Chr15q25) have been robustly associated with nicotine dependence, including genome-wide studies, as well as with cognitive and neuropsychological measures. In addition, cognitive processes can be influenced by nicotine use through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Here, we evaluated the effect of polymorphisms in CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster and their interaction with tobacco smoking status on cognition in patients with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Eight SNPs from the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster were evaluated on a clinical sample of 403 adults with ADHD. Cognitive performance was assessed using the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R). Analyses of covariance were used to assess the influence of single markers and their interaction with smoking status in the Vocabulary and Block Design subtests of WAIS-R. Correction for multiple comparisons was applied. Lifetime smoking was associated to Vocabulary subtest. The TT genotypes of CHRNA5 SNPs rs588765 and rs514743 showed a trend towards association with, respectively, higher and lower scores on the Vocabulary subtest. There was a significant interaction between intergenic SNP rs8023462 and smoking on Vocabulary scores. Our results are consistent with an influence of variants in the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster on cognitive measures. The overall scenario suggests a pleiotropic role of Chr15q25 nicotinic gene cluster with complex influences in ADHD, tobacco smoking and cognitive performance, characteristics that can be partially interdependent and may share underlying genetic factors. PMID:27302872

  5. Overexpression of the pleiotropic regulator CodY decreases sporulation, attachment and pellicle formation in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Gopalani, Monisha; Dhiman, Alisha; Rahi, Amit; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-15

    CodY, a global transcriptional regulator, primarily functions as a nutrient and energy sensor. It is activated by metabolic effectors like BCAA and GTP. In low G + C Gram positive bacteria, it facilitates coupling of changes in the cellular metabolite pool with those required in the transcriptome of the cell. This pleiotropic regulator controls the expression of a vast number of genes as the cell transits from exponential to the stationary phase. Earlier studies have shown that CodY is required for the virulence of Bacillus anthracis. We sought to investigate the effect of its overexpression on the physiology of B. anthracis. In our study, we found that cellular CodY levels were unchanged during this phase-transition. Expression of endogenous CodY remained the same in different nutrient limiting conditions. Immunoblotting studies revealed CodY presence in the whole spore lysate of B. anthracis indicating it to be a component of the spore proteome. We could also detect CodY in the secretome of B. anthracis. Further, CodY was overexpressed in B. anthracis Sterne strain and this led to a 100-fold decrease in the sporulation titer and a 2.5-fold decrease in the in vitro attachment ability of the bacteria. We also observed a decrease in the pellicle formation by CodY overexpressed strain when compared to wildtype bacilli. The CodY overexpressed strain showed chaining phenotype during growth in liquid media and pellicle. PMID:26686421

  6. Vitamins D and K as pleiotropic nutrients: clinical importance to the skeletal and cardiovascular systems and preliminary evidence for synergy.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Parris M

    2010-09-01

    Vitamins D and K are lipid-phase nutrients that are pleiotropic - endowed with versatile homeostatic capacities at the organ, tissue, and cellular levels. Their metabolic and physiologic roles overlap considerably, as evidenced in the bone and cardiovascular systems. Vitamin D₃ (cholecalciferol, D₃) is the prehormone for the vitamin D endocrine system. Vitamin D₃ undergoes initial enzymatic conversion to 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D, calcidiol), then to the seco-steroid hormone 1alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D, calcitriol). Beyond its endocrine roles in calcium homeostasis, 1,25D likely has autocrine, paracrine, and intracrine effects. At least 17 tissues likely synthesize 1,25D, and 35 carry the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Vitamin D functional deficiency is widespread in human populations. Vitamin K₁ (phylloquinone) is more abundant in foods but less bioactive than the vitamin K₂ menaquinones (especially MK-4, menatetrenone). Menadione (vitamin K₃) has minimal K activity. Vitamin K compounds undergo oxidation-reduction cycling within the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, donating electrons to activate specific proteins via enzymatic gamma-carboxylation of glutamate groups before being enzymatically re-reduced. Warfarin inhibits this vitamin K reduction, necessitating K supplementation during anticoagulation therapy. Along with coagulation factors (II, VII, IX, X, and prothrombin), protein C and protein S, osteocalcin (OC), matrix Gla protein (MGP), periostin, Gas6, and other vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins support calcium homeostasis, facilitate bone mineralization, inhibit vessel wall calcification, support endothelial integrity, are involved in cell growth control and tissue renewal, and have numerous other effects. This review updates vitamin D and K skeletal and cardiovascular benefits and evidence for their synergy of action. PMID:21155624

  7. Pleiotropic effects of cell wall amidase LytA on Streptococcus pneumoniae sensitivity to the host immune response.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Urzainqui, Ana; Campuzano, Susana; Moscoso, Miriam; González-Camacho, Fernando; Domenech, Mirian; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Brown, Jeremy S; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2015-02-01

    The complement system is a key component of the host immune response for the recognition and clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we demonstrate that the amidase LytA, the main pneumococcal autolysin, inhibits complement-mediated immunity independently of effects on pneumolysin by a complex process of impaired complement activation, increased binding of complement regulators, and direct degradation of complement C3. The use of human sera depleted of either C1q or factor B confirmed that LytA prevented activation of both the classical and alternative pathways, whereas pneumolysin inhibited only the classical pathway. LytA prevented binding of C1q and the acute-phase protein C-reactive protein to S. pneumoniae, thereby reducing activation of the classical pathway on the bacterial surface. In addition, LytA increased recruitment of the complement downregulators C4BP and factor H to the pneumococcal cell wall and directly cleaved C3b and iC3b to generate degradation products. As a consequence, C3b deposition and phagocytosis increased in the absence of LytA and were markedly enhanced for the lytA ply double mutant, confirming that a combination of LytA and Ply is essential for the establishment of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis in a murine model of infection. These data demonstrate that LytA has pleiotropic effects on complement activation, a finding which, in combination with the effects of pneumolysin on complement to assist with pneumococcal complement evasion, confirms a major role of both proteins for the full virulence of the microorganism during septicemia. PMID:25404032

  8. Sevelamer revisited: pleiotropic effects on endothelial and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    of sevelamer versus calcium-based binders. This review discusses recent exploratory evidence for pleiotropic effects of sevelamer on endothelial function in CKD or ESRD. Endothelial effects of sevelamer may contribute mechanistically to the improved survival observed in some studies of CKD and ESRD patients. PMID:24327730

  9. Pleiotropic effects of cell wall amidase LytA on Streptococcus pneumoniae sensitivity to the host immune response.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Urzainqui, Ana; Campuzano, Susana; Moscoso, Miriam; González-Camacho, Fernando; Domenech, Mirian; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Brown, Jeremy S; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2015-02-01

    The complement system is a key component of the host immune response for the recognition and clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In this study, we demonstrate that the amidase LytA, the main pneumococcal autolysin, inhibits complement-mediated immunity independently of effects on pneumolysin by a complex process of impaired complement activation, increased binding of complement regulators, and direct degradation of complement C3. The use of human sera depleted of either C1q or factor B confirmed that LytA prevented activation of both the classical and alternative pathways, whereas pneumolysin inhibited only the classical pathway. LytA prevented binding of C1q and the acute-phase protein C-reactive protein to S. pneumoniae, thereby reducing activation of the classical pathway on the bacterial surface. In addition, LytA increased recruitment of the complement downregulators C4BP and factor H to the pneumococcal cell wall and directly cleaved C3b and iC3b to generate degradation products. As a consequence, C3b deposition and phagocytosis increased in the absence of LytA and were markedly enhanced for the lytA ply double mutant, confirming that a combination of LytA and Ply is essential for the establishment of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis in a murine model of infection. These data demonstrate that LytA has pleiotropic effects on complement activation, a finding which, in combination with the effects of pneumolysin on complement to assist with pneumococcal complement evasion, confirms a major role of both proteins for the full virulence of the microorganism during septicemia.

  10. Sevelamer revisited: pleiotropic effects on endothelial and cardiovascular risk factors in chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Anjay

    2013-12-01

    sevelamer versus calcium-based binders. This review discusses recent exploratory evidence for pleiotropic effects of sevelamer on endothelial function in CKD or ESRD. Endothelial effects of sevelamer may contribute mechanistically to the improved survival observed in some studies of CKD and ESRD patients.

  11. Estimates of epistatic and pleiotropic effects of () and () genetic markers on beef heifer performance traits enhanced by selection.

    PubMed

    Tait, R G; Cushman, R A; McNeel, A K; Casas, E; Smith, T P L; Freetly, H C; Bennett, G L

    2016-03-01

    Genetic marker effects and type of inheritance are estimated with poor precision when minor marker allele frequencies are low. A stable composite population (MARC II) was subjected to marker assisted selection for 2 yr to equalize and genetic marker frequencies to evaluate the epistatic and pleiotropic effects of these markers on BW, reproduction, and first calf performance traits in replacement beef females ( = 171) managed under 2 postweaning development protocols. Traits evaluated on the heifers were birth BW, weaning BW, 11-mo BW, 12-mo BW, 13-mo BW, first breeding season pregnancy evaluation BW, first calving season BW, 11-mo puberty, 12-mo puberty, 13-mo puberty, first breeding season pregnancy, and first calf weaning rate. Additionally, heifer's first calf performance traits of ordinal calving date, first calf birth BW, and first calf weaning BW (with and without age adjustment) were analyzed. Selection to increase minor allele frequencies and balanced sampling across genotype classes enhanced the ability to detect all genetic effects except dominance × dominance epistasis. The × genotype effect was significant ( < 0.05) for 11-mo BW and 12-mo BW and tended to be significant ( = 0.08) for 13-mo BW. Consistently, for all 3 traits, the most significant effect among epistatic × genotype effects was the additive effect, with the G allele decreasing BW. There were no associations between × genotype and fertility related traits ( ≥ 0.46) in this study. Additionally, there were no × genotype associations with first progeny performance traits ( ≥ 0.14). The large effect of the additive × additive interaction on first calf weaning BW was imprecisely estimated, which may warrant further investigation. PMID:27065254

  12. Fine mapping of the pleiotropic locus B for black spine and orange mature fruit color in cucumber identifies a 50 kb region containing a R2R3-MYB transcription factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The spine and skin colors on fruits are two important fruit quality traits in cucumber for variety improvement. In this study, we investigated the inheritance of spine and mature fruit colors with segregation populations developed from the cross between two inbred lines WI7200 (black spine and orang...

  13. Characterization of the bvgR Locus of Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Tod J.; Barros, Cassia; Stibitz, Scott

    1998-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, produces a wide array of factors that are associated with its ability to cause disease. The expression and regulation of these virulence factors is dependent upon the bvg locus (originally designated the vir locus), which encodes two proteins: BvgA, a 23-kDa cytoplasmic protein, and BvgS, a 135-kDa transmembrane protein. It is proposed that BvgS responds to environmental signals and interacts with BvgA, a transcriptional regulator which upon modification by BvgS binds to specific promoters and activates transcription. An additional class of genes is repressed by the bvg locus. Expression of this class, the bvg-repressed genes (vrgs [for vir-repressed genes]), is reduced under conditions in which expression of the aforementioned bvg-activated virulence factors is maximal; this repression is dependent upon the presence of an intact bvgAS locus. We have previously identified a locus required for regulation of all of the known bvg-repressed genes in B. pertussis. This locus, designated bvgR, maps to a location immediately downstream of bvgAS. We have undertaken deletion and complementation studies, as well as sequence analysis, in order to identify the bvgR open reading frame and identify the cis-acting sequences required for regulated expression of bvgR. Studies utilizing transcriptional fusions of bvgR to the gene encoding alkaline phosphatase have demonstrated that bvgR is activated at the level of transcription and that this activation is dependent upon an intact bvgAS locus. PMID:9537363

  14. Regulatory guidance document

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program Management System Manual requires preparation of the OCRWM Regulatory Guidance Document (RGD) that addresses licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance. The document provides: regulatory compliance policy; guidance to OCRWM organizational elements to ensure a consistent approach when complying with regulatory requirements; strategies to achieve policy objectives; organizational responsibilities for regulatory compliance; guidance with regard to Program compliance oversight; and guidance on the contents of a project-level Regulatory Compliance Plan. The scope of the RGD includes site suitability evaluation, licensing, environmental compliance, and safety and health compliance, in accordance with the direction provided by Section 4.6.3 of the PMS Manual. Site suitability evaluation and regulatory compliance during site characterization are significant activities, particularly with regard to the YW MSA. OCRWM`s evaluation of whether the Yucca Mountain site is suitable for repository development must precede its submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Accordingly, site suitability evaluation is discussed in Chapter 4, and the general statements of policy regarding site suitability evaluation are discussed in Section 2.1. Although much of the data and analyses may initially be similar, the licensing process is discussed separately in Chapter 5. Environmental compliance is discussed in Chapter 6. Safety and Health compliance is discussed in Chapter 7.

  15. lcrR, a low-Ca2(+)-response locus with dual Ca2(+)-dependent functions in Yersinia pestis.

    PubMed Central

    Barve, S S; Straley, S C

    1990-01-01

    The low-Ca2+ response (Lcr) of Yersinia includes a regulatory cascade and a set of virulence-related proteins, one of which is the V antigen. The regulatory genes modulate both bacterial growth and expression of the virulence-related proteins in response to temperature and the presence of Ca2+ and nucleotides. In this study we defined a new Lcr locus, lcrR, in Yersinia pestis KIM. An lcrR mutant, obtained by insertion mutagenesis, failed to grow at 37 degrees C whether Ca2+ was present or not. However, it grew normally in the presence of ATP, showing that the Ca2(+)- and nucleotide-responsive mechanisms are separate in Y. pestis. The lcrR mutant was avirulent in mice, probably due to its compromised growth at 37 degrees C. beta-Galactosidase measurements and Northern (RNA blot) analysis revealed that lcrR transcription was regulated primarily by temperature. The DNA sequence of the lcrR locus contained a single open reading frame of 441 bases that could encode a protein with a molecular weight of 16,470 and a pI of 10.73. Expression of an lcrR-containing clone in Escherichia coli yielded a 16,000-molecular-weight protein. At 37 degrees C, the lcrR mutant strongly expressed V antigen and initiated lcrGVH transcription whether Ca2+ was present or not, indicating that this mutant had lost the transcriptional downregulation of lcrGVH shown by the parent in the presence of Ca2+. In the absence of Ca2+, the mutant failed to express LcrG, even though lcrGVH mRNA initiated upstream of lcrG at the normal sites. These data suggest that the lcrR locus is necessary for the regulation of LcrG expression in the absence of Ca2+. Therefore, this locus has a dual regulatory role in the low-Ca2+ response. Images PMID:1695896

  16. Locus equations are an acoustic expression of articulator synergy

    PubMed Central

    Iskarous, Khalil; Fowler, Carol A.; Whalen, D. H.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the articulatory basis of locus equations, regression lines relating F2 at the start of a Consonant-Vowel (CV) transition to F2 at the middle of the vowel, with C fixed and V varying. Several studies have shown that consonants of different places of articulation have locus equation slopes that descend from labial to velar to alveolar, and intercept magnitudes that increase in the opposite order. Using formulas from the theory of bivariate regression that express regression slopes and intercepts in terms of standard deviations and averages of the variables, it is shown that the slope directly encodes a well-established measure of coarticulation resistance. It is also shown that intercepts are directly related to the degree to which the tongue body assists the formation of the constriction for the consonant. Moreover, it is shown that the linearity of locus equations and the linear relation between locus equation slopes and intercepts originates in linearity in articulation between the horizontal position of the tongue dorsum in the consonant and to that in the vowel. It is concluded that slopes and intercepts of acoustic locus equations are measures of articulator synergy. PMID:20968373

  17. Regulatory sequence analysis tools.

    PubMed

    van Helden, Jacques

    2003-07-01

    The web resource Regulatory Sequence Analysis Tools (RSAT) (http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/rsat) offers a collection of software tools dedicated to the prediction of regulatory sites in non-coding DNA sequences. These tools include sequence retrieval, pattern discovery, pattern matching, genome-scale pattern matching, feature-map drawing, random sequence generation and other utilities. Alternative formats are supported for the representation of regulatory motifs (strings or position-specific scoring matrices) and several algorithms are proposed for pattern discovery. RSAT currently holds >100 fully sequenced genomes and these data are regularly updated from GenBank.

  18. Identification of an imprinted master trans regulator at the KLF14 locus related to multiple metabolic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Small, Kerrin S; Hedman, Asa K; Grundberg, Elin; Nica, Alexandra C; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteindottir, Unnur; Shin, So-Youn; Richards, Hannah B; Soranzo, Nicole; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Stefansson, Kari; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Deloukas, Panos; Spector, Timothy D; McCarthy, Mark I

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified many genetic variants associated with complex traits. However, at only a minority of loci have the molecular mechanisms mediating these associations been characterized. In parallel, whereas cis regulatory patterns of gene expression have been extensively explored, the identification of trans regulatory effects in humans has attracted less attention. Here we show that the type 2 diabetes and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol-associated cis-acting expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) of the maternally expressed transcription factor KLF14 acts as a master trans regulator of adipose gene expression. Expression levels of genes regulated by this trans-eQTL are highly correlated with concurrently measured metabolic traits, and a subset of the trans-regulated genes harbor variants directly associated with metabolic phenotypes. This trans-eQTL network provides a mechanistic understanding of the effect of the KLF14 locus on metabolic disease risk and offers a potential model for other complex traits. PMID:21572415

  19. Regulation of a duplicated locus: Drosophila sloppy paired is replete with functionally overlapping enhancers.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Miki; Jaynes, James B

    2012-02-15

    In order to investigate regulation and redundancy within the sloppy paired (slp) locus, we analyzed 30 kilobases of DNA encompassing the tandem, coordinately regulated slp1 and slp2 transcription units. We found a remarkable array of stripe enhancers with overlapping activities surrounding the slp1 transcription unit, and, unexpectedly, glial cell enhancers surrounding slp2. The slp stripe regulatory region generates 7 stripes at blastoderm, and later 14 stripes that persist throughout embryogenesis. Phylogenetic analysis among drosophilids suggests that the multiplicity of stripe enhancers did not evolve through recent duplication. Most of the direct integration among cis-regulatory modules appears to be simply additive, with one notable exception. Despite the apparent redundancy among stripe enhancers, transgenic rescue suggests that most are required for full function, to maintain wingless expression and parasegment boundaries throughout embryogenesis. Transgenic rescue also reveals indirect positive autoregulation by the 7 early stripes, without which alternate stripes within the 14-stripe pattern are lost, leading to embryos with a pair-rule phenotype.

  20. Endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats within the HLA-DQ locus.

    PubMed Central

    Kambhu, S; Falldorf, P; Lee, J S

    1990-01-01

    Two endogenous retroviral long terminal repeats (LTRs) were found in the human major histocompatibility complex locus HLA-DQ. The solo LTRs, unlinked to retrovirus structural genes, are located approximately 5 kilobases apart from each other and in the same transcriptional orientation, which is opposite to that for the HLA-DQB1 gene. These elements exhibit greater than 90% homology to the LTRs of the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-K10. The conservation of putative regulatory elements found within the LTRs and their position relative to the HLA-DQB1 gene suggest that these elements may confer distinct regulatory properties on genes in the HLA-DQ region. Polymorphic variation between different HLA haplotypes for the presence of the LTRs at this location and of the molecular architecture within this subregion is supported by polymerase chain reaction and Southern blot analysis. Comparisons of chromosomes with and without the LTRs in this region will provide a unique opportunity in the human genome to analyze transposition or integration of retroviral sequences. Images PMID:2114643

  1. 3 CFR - Regulatory Review

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... been learned since that time. Far more is now known about regulation—not only about when it is... interests of future generations; identify methods of ensuring that regulatory review does not produce...

  2. Two-locus sampling distributions and their application.

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, R R

    2001-01-01

    Methods of estimating two-locus sample probabilities under a neutral model are extended in several ways. Estimation of sample probabilities is described when the ancestral or derived status of each allele is specified. In addition, probabilities for two-locus diploid samples are provided. A method for using these two-locus probabilities to test whether an observed level of linkage disequilibrium is unusually large or small is described. In addition, properties of a maximum-likelihood estimator of the recombination parameter based on independent linked pairs of sites are obtained. A composite-likelihood estimator, for more than two linked sites, is also examined and found to work as well, or better, than other available ad hoc estimators. Linkage disequilibrium in the Xq28 and Xq25 region of humans is analyzed in a sample of Europeans (CEPH). The estimated recombination parameter is about five times smaller than one would expect under an equilibrium neutral model. PMID:11779816

  3. Tension versus ecological zones in a two-locus system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xin-Sheng

    2005-08-01

    Previous theories show that tension and ecological zones are indistinguishable in terms of gene frequency clines. Here I analytically show that these two types of zones can be distinguished in terms of genetic statistics other than gene frequency. A two-locus cline model is examined with the assumptions of random mating, weak selection, no drift, no mutation, and multiplicative viabilities. The genetic statistics for distinguishing the two types of zones are the deviations of one- or two-locus genotypic frequencies from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) or from random association of gametes (RAG), and the deviations of additive and dominance variances from the values at HWE. These deviations have a discontinuous distribution in space and different extents of interruptions in the ecological zone with a sharp boundary, but exhibit a continuous distribution in the tension zone. Linkage disequilibrium enhances the difference between the deviations from HWE and from RAG for any two-locus genotypic frequency.

  4. Function and evolution of local repeats in the Firre locus

    PubMed Central

    Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Shukla, Chinmay J.; Weiner, Catherine L.; Rinn, John L.

    2016-01-01

    More than half the human and mouse genomes are comprised of repetitive sequences, such as transposable elements (TEs), which have been implicated in many biological processes. In contrast, much less is known about other repeats, such as local repeats that occur in multiple instances within a given locus in the genome but not elsewhere. Here, we systematically characterize local repeats in the genomic locus of the Firre long noncoding RNA (lncRNA). We find a conserved function for the RRD repeat as a ribonucleic nuclear retention signal that is sufficient to retain an otherwise cytoplasmic mRNA in the nucleus. We also identified a repeat, termed R0, that can function as a DNA enhancer element within the intronic sequences of Firre. Collectively, our data suggest that local repeats can have diverse functionalities and molecular modalities in the Firre locus and perhaps more globally in other lncRNAs. PMID:27009974

  5. Molecular organization of the cut locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Jack, J W

    1985-10-01

    Mutations of the cut locus (ct) of Drosophila can be divided into four groups based on their phenotypes and complementation patterns. Each group alters the phenotype of a different set of tissues. Two hundred kilobases of ct DNA, located in 7B1-2, have been cloned by chromosomal walking, and the cloned sequences have been used to analyze more than 40 mutants. Based on the location of transposable element mutations and the extent of deficiencies and an inversion, four cut locus regions can be defined. Mutations in each region affect the phenotype of a different set of tissues. The most centromere proximal region contains mutations that are null for cut locus function. Within individual regions, a higher level of organization can be detected. PMID:2996782

  6. Locus coeruleus syndrome as a complication of tectal surgery.

    PubMed

    Kronenburg, Annick; Spliet, Wim G; Broekman, Marike; Robe, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of a 48-year-old woman who underwent a resection of a tectal pilocytic astrocytoma complicated by a sequence of fluctuating consciousness, psychosis with complex hallucinations and lasting sleeping disturbances in which she vividly acts out her dreams. Based on the clinical and anatomical evidence of this case, we propose the term locus coeruleus syndrome to describe this association of iatrogenic symptoms. Along with those of the locus coeruleus, lesions of the dorsal raphe nucleus, ventral tegmentum, substantia nigra pars compacta, the superior colliculus and other peduncular lesions (such as peduncular hallucinosis) are involved in the regulation of sleep-wake/arousal, behaviour, sleeping disorders and rapid eye movement atonia. However, iatrogenic lesion of the locus coeruleus could explain the complications on all levels in our patient. PMID:25903199

  7. Assessing the regulatory picture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This article addresses the safety of the nation's drinking water supply and discusses compliance of the Clean Water Act. Right now, the shape of the regulatory future is uncertain. The results of the D-DBP regulatory negotiation are imminent. Congress is ready to begin debating reauthorization of the Safe Drinking Water Act, and utilities are trying to comply with the regulations while trying not to price water out of the reach of some of their customers.

  8. NRC regulatory initiatives

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.C.

    1989-11-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is addressing several low-level waste disposal issues that will be important to waste generators and to States and Compacts developing new disposal capacity. These issues include Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) waste, mixed waste, below regulatory concern (BRC) waste, and the low-level waste data base. This paper discusses these issues and their current status.

  9. hcf5, a nuclear photosynthetic electron transport mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with a pleiotropic effect on chloroplast gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Dinkins, R D; Bandaranayake, H; Baeza, L; Griffiths, A J; Green, B R

    1997-01-01

    A photosynthetic mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, hcf5, was isolated by screening M2 seedlings for high chlorophyll fluorescence. Thylakoid morphology was strikingly abnormal, with large grana stacks and almost no stroma lamellae. Fluorescence induction kinetics, activity assays, and immunoblotting showed that photosystem II was absent. Polypeptides of the photosystem I complex, the Cyt b6/f complex, coupling factor, and the large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase were also severely depleted. However, the nuclear-encoded chlorophyll a/b light-harvesting complex polypeptides were unaffected. The rbcL transcript was present at very low levels, the pattern of transcripts from the polycistronic psbB-psbH-petB-petD operon was abnormal, and the mature psbH message was almost completely lacking. This suggests that the hcf5 locus may encode a product required for the correct expression of several chloroplast genes. PMID:9112766

  10. Locus-specific view of flax domestication history.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yong-Bi; Diederichsen, Axel; Allaby, Robin G

    2012-01-01

    Crop domestication has been inferred genetically from neutral markers and increasingly from specific domestication-associated loci. However, some crops are utilized for multiple purposes that may or may not be reflected in a single domestication-associated locus. One such example is cultivated flax (Linum usitatissimum L.), the earliest oil and fiber crop, for which domestication history remains poorly understood. Oil composition of cultivated flax and pale flax (L. bienne Mill.) indicates that the sad2 locus is a candidate domestication locus associated with increased unsaturated fatty acid production in cultivated flax. A phylogenetic analysis of the sad2 locus in 43 pale and 70 cultivated flax accessions established a complex domestication history for flax that has not been observed previously. The analysis supports an early, independent domestication of a primitive flax lineage, in which the loss of seed dispersal through capsular indehiscence was not established, but increased oil content was likely occurred. A subsequent flax domestication process occurred that probably involved multiple domestications and includes lineages that contain oil, fiber, and winter varieties. In agreement with previous studies, oil rather than fiber varieties occupy basal phylogenetic positions. The data support multiple paths of flax domestication for oil-associated traits before selection of the other domestication-associated traits of seed dispersal loss and fiber production. The sad2 locus is less revealing about the origin of winter tolerance. In this case, a single domestication-associated locus is informative about the history of domesticated forms with the associated trait while partially informative on forms less associated with the trait.

  11. Quantitative Trait Locus Mapping of Yield-Related Components and Oligogenic Control of the Cap Color of the Button Mushroom, Agaricus bisporus

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Anne; Rousseau, Thierry; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    As in other crops, yield is an important trait to be selected for in edible mushrooms, but its inheritance is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits in Agaricus bisporus through the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), using second-generation hybrid progeny derived from a cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar. Yield, average weight per mushroom, number of fruiting bodies per m2, earliness, and cap color were evaluated in two independent experiments. A total of 23 QTL were detected for 7 yield-related traits. These QTL together explained between 21% (two-flushes yield) and 59% (earliness) of the phenotypic variation. Fifteen QTL (65%) were consistent between the two experiments. Four regions underlying significant QTL controlling yield, average weight, and number were detected on linkage groups II, III, IV, and X, suggesting a pleiotropic effect or tight linkage. Up to six QTL were identified for earliness. The PPC1 locus, together with two additional genomic regions, explained up to 90% of the phenotypic variation of the cap color. Alleles from the wild parent showed beneficial effects for some yield traits, suggesting that the wild germ plasm is a valuable source of variation for several agronomic traits. Our results constitute a key step toward marker-assisted selection and provide a solid foundation to go further into the biological mechanisms controlling productive traits in the button mushroom. PMID:22267676

  12. Quantitative trait locus mapping of yield-related components and oligogenic control of the cap color of the button mushroom, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Foulongne-Oriol, Marie; Rodier, Anne; Rousseau, Thierry; Savoie, Jean-Michel

    2012-04-01

    As in other crops, yield is an important trait to be selected for in edible mushrooms, but its inheritance is poorly understood. Therefore, we have investigated the complex genetic architecture of yield-related traits in Agaricus bisporus through the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL), using second-generation hybrid progeny derived from a cross between a wild strain and a commercial cultivar. Yield, average weight per mushroom, number of fruiting bodies per m(2), earliness, and cap color were evaluated in two independent experiments. A total of 23 QTL were detected for 7 yield-related traits. These QTL together explained between 21% (two-flushes yield) and 59% (earliness) of the phenotypic variation. Fifteen QTL (65%) were consistent between the two experiments. Four regions underlying significant QTL controlling yield, average weight, and number were detected on linkage groups II, III, IV, and X, suggesting a pleiotropic effect or tight linkage. Up to six QTL were identified for earliness. The PPC1 locus, together with two additional genomic regions, explained up to 90% of the phenotypic variation of the cap color. Alleles from the wild parent showed beneficial effects for some yield traits, suggesting that the wild germ plasm is a valuable source of variation for several agronomic traits. Our results constitute a key step toward marker-assisted selection and provide a solid foundation to go further into the biological mechanisms controlling productive traits in the button mushroom. PMID:22267676

  13. Tether mutations that restore function and suppress pleiotropic phenotypes of the C. elegans isp-1(qm150) Rieske iron–sulfur protein

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Gholamali; Wasko, Brian M.; Tonge, Ashley; Schurman, Nathan; Dong, Cindy; Li, Zhongyu; Peters, Rebecca; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Pitt, Jason N.; Morgan, Phil G.; Sedensky, Margaret M.; Crofts, Antony R.; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in numerous diseases as well as normative aging. Severe reduction in mitochondrial function contributes to childhood disorders such as Leigh Syndrome, whereas mild disruption can extend the lifespan of model organisms. The Caenorhabditis elegans isp-1 gene encodes the Rieske iron–sulfur protein subunit of cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex III of the electron transport chain). The partial loss of function allele, isp-1(qm150), leads to several pleiotropic phenotypes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of ISP-1 function, we sought to identify genetic suppressors of the delayed development of isp-1(qm150) animals. Here we report a series of intragenic suppressors, all located within a highly conserved six amino acid tether region of ISP-1. These intragenic mutations suppress all of the evaluated isp-1(qm150) phenotypes, including developmental rate, pharyngeal pumping rate, brood size, body movement, activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response reporter, CO2 production, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and lifespan extension. Furthermore, analogous mutations show a similar effect when engineered into the budding yeast Rieske iron–sulfur protein Rip1, revealing remarkable conservation of the structure–function relationship of these residues across highly divergent species. The focus on a single subunit as causal both in generation and in suppression of diverse pleiotropic phenotypes points to a common underlying molecular mechanism, for which we propose a “spring-loaded” model. These observations provide insights into how gating and control processes influence the function of ISP-1 in mediating pleiotropic phenotypes including developmental rate, movement, sensitivity to stress, and longevity. PMID:26504246

  14. Tether mutations that restore function and suppress pleiotropic phenotypes of the C. elegans isp-1(qm150) Rieske iron-sulfur protein.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Gholamali; Wasko, Brian M; Tonge, Ashley; Schurman, Nathan; Dong, Cindy; Li, Zhongyu; Peters, Rebecca; Kayser, Ernst-Bernhard; Pitt, Jason N; Morgan, Phil G; Sedensky, Margaret M; Crofts, Antony R; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2015-11-10

    Mitochondria play an important role in numerous diseases as well as normative aging. Severe reduction in mitochondrial function contributes to childhood disorders such as Leigh Syndrome, whereas mild disruption can extend the lifespan of model organisms. The Caenorhabditis elegans isp-1 gene encodes the Rieske iron-sulfur protein subunit of cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex III of the electron transport chain). The partial loss of function allele, isp-1(qm150), leads to several pleiotropic phenotypes. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of ISP-1 function, we sought to identify genetic suppressors of the delayed development of isp-1(qm150) animals. Here we report a series of intragenic suppressors, all located within a highly conserved six amino acid tether region of ISP-1. These intragenic mutations suppress all of the evaluated isp-1(qm150) phenotypes, including developmental rate, pharyngeal pumping rate, brood size, body movement, activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response reporter, CO2 production, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, and lifespan extension. Furthermore, analogous mutations show a similar effect when engineered into the budding yeast Rieske iron-sulfur protein Rip1, revealing remarkable conservation of the structure-function relationship of these residues across highly divergent species. The focus on a single subunit as causal both in generation and in suppression of diverse pleiotropic phenotypes points to a common underlying molecular mechanism, for which we propose a "spring-loaded" model. These observations provide insights into how gating and control processes influence the function of ISP-1 in mediating pleiotropic phenotypes including developmental rate, movement, sensitivity to stress, and longevity.

  15. [Selective "death programs" or pleiotropic"life programs"? Looking for programmed cell death in the light of evolution].

    PubMed

    Ameisen, Jean-Claude

    2005-01-01

    a model that I have termed the "original sin" hypothesis, I have proposed the existence of an initial pleiotropy of the molecular tools involved in the control and execution of self-destruction--an ancestral involvement in both pro-life and pro-death activities. I will discuss how this hypothesis may be reconciled with the C. elegans paradigm of programmed cell death. Finally I will discuss how an ancestral level of pleiotropic functions of the molecular tools involved in the control of cell death, aging and genetic diversification might have favored their initial selection, their constant availability for de novo selection, and their progressive propagation in most--if not all--species during the course of evolution.

  16. Neighborhood Vigilance, Health Locus of Control, and Smoking Abstinence

    PubMed Central

    Reitzel, Lorraine R.; Lahoti, Sejal; Li, Yisheng; Cao, Yumei; Wetter, David W.; Waters, Andrew J.; Vidrine, Jennifer Irvin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether health locus of control mediated relations of self-reported neighborhood vigilance and biochemically verified, continuous short-term smoking abstinence among 200 smokers enrolled in a cohort study. Methods A nonparametric bootstrapping procedure was used to assess mediation. Results Health locus of control-chance mediated relations between neighborhood vigilance and smoking abstinence in analyses adjusted for sociodemographics and tobacco dependence (p < .05). Greater vigilance was associated with greater attributions that health was affected by chance, which was associated with a lower likelihood of smoking abstinence. Conclusions Results suggest that neighborhood perceptions influence residents’ attributions for health outcomes, which can affect smoking abstinence. PMID:23985180

  17. Reorganisation of Hoxd regulatory landscapes during the evolution of a snake-like body plan.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Isabel; Gitto, Sandra; Novoa, Ana; Codourey, Julien; Nguyen Huynh, Thi Hanh; Gonzalez, Federico; Milinkovitch, Michel C; Mallo, Moises; Duboule, Denis

    2016-01-01

    Within land vertebrate species, snakes display extreme variations in their body plan, characterized by the absence of limbs and an elongated morphology. Such a particular interpretation of the basic vertebrate body architecture has often been associated with changes in the function or regulation of Hox genes. Here, we use an interspecies comparative approach to investigate different regulatory aspects at the snake HoxD locus. We report that, unlike in other vertebrates, snake mesoderm-specific enhancers are mostly located within the HoxD cluster itself rather than outside. In addition, despite both the absence of limbs and an altered Hoxd gene regulation in external genitalia, the limb-associated bimodal HoxD chromatin structure is maintained at the snake locus. Finally, we show that snake and mouse orthologous enhancer sequences can display distinct expression specificities. These results show that vertebrate morphological evolution likely involved extensive reorganisation at Hox loci, yet within a generally conserved regulatory framework. PMID:27476854

  18. Transgene integration into the human AAVS1 locus enhances myosin II-dependent contractile force by reducing expression of myosin binding subunit 85.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Takeomi; Li, Rui; Haga, Hisashi; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2015-09-18

    The adeno-associated virus site 1 (AAVS1) locus in the human genome is a strong candidate for gene therapy by insertion of an exogenous gene into the locus. The AAVS1 locus includes the coding region for myosin binding subunit 85 (MBS85). Although the function of MBS85 is not well understood, myosin II-dependent contractile force may be affected by altered expression of MBS85. The effect of altered expression of MBS85 on cellular contractile force should be examined prior to the application of gene therapy. In this study, we show that transgene integration into AAVS1 and consequent reduction of MBS85 expression changes myosin II-dependent cellular contractile force. We established a human fibroblast cell line with exogenous DNA knocked-in to AAVS1 (KI cells) using the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system. Western blotting analysis showed that KI cells had significantly reduced MBS85 expression. KI cells also showed greater cellular contractile force than control cells. The increased contractile force was associated with phosphorylation of the myosin II regulatory light chain (MRLC). Transfection of KI cells with an MBS85 expression plasmid restored cellular contractile force and phosphorylation of MRLC to the levels in control cells. These data suggest that transgene integration into the human AAVS1 locus induces an increase in cellular contractile force and thus should be considered as a gene therapy to effect changes in cellular contractile force.

  19. Transgenic mice containing a 248-kb yeast artificial chromosome carrying the human beta-globin locus display proper developmental control of human globin genes.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, K R; Clegg, C H; Huxley, C; Josephson, B M; Haugen, H S; Furukawa, T; Stamatoyannopoulos, G

    1993-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated using a purified 248-kb yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) bearing an intact 82-kb human beta-globin locus and 148 kb of flanking sequence. Seventeen of 148 F0 pups were transgenic. RNase protection analysis of RNA isolated from the blood of 13 gamma- and beta-globin-positive founders showed that only the human beta-globin gene was expressed in the adult founders. Studies of F1 and F2 fetuses demonstrated that the genes of the beta-locus YAC displayed the proper developmental switches in beta-like globin gene expression. Expression of epsilon- and gamma-globin, but not beta-globin, was observed in the yolk sac, there was only minor gamma and mostly beta expression in the 14-day liver, and only beta mRNA in the blood of the adult animals. Structural data showed that the locus was intact. These results indicate that it is now possible to dissect regulatory mechanisms within the context of an entire locus in vivo by using the ability to perform mutagenesis efficiently in yeast via homologous recombination, followed by purification of the altered YAC and its introduction into mice. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8356061

  20. Balancing selection on a regulatory region exhibiting ancient variation that predates human-neandertal divergence.

    PubMed

    Gokcumen, Omer; Zhu, Qihui; Mulder, Lubbertus C F; Iskow, Rebecca C; Austermann, Christian; Scharer, Christopher D; Raj, Towfique; Boss, Jeremy M; Sunyaev, Shamil; Price, Alkes; Stranger, Barbara; Simon, Viviana; Lee, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Ancient population structure shaping contemporary genetic variation has been recently appreciated and has important implications regarding our understanding of the structure of modern human genomes. We identified a ∼36-kb DNA segment in the human genome that displays an ancient substructure. The variation at this locus exists primarily as two highly divergent haplogroups. One of these haplogroups (the NE1 haplogroup) aligns with the Neandertal haplotype and contains a 4.6-kb deletion polymorphism in perfect linkage disequilibrium with 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across diverse populations. The other haplogroup, which does not contain the 4.6-kb deletion, aligns with the chimpanzee haplotype and is likely ancestral. Africans have higher overall pairwise differences with the Neandertal haplotype than Eurasians do for this NE1 locus (p<10⁻¹⁵). Moreover, the nucleotide diversity at this locus is higher in Eurasians than in Africans. These results mimic signatures of recent Neandertal admixture contributing to this locus. However, an in-depth assessment of the variation in this region across multiple populations reveals that African NE1 haplotypes, albeit rare, harbor more sequence variation than NE1 haplotypes found in Europeans, indicating an ancient African origin of this haplogroup and refuting recent Neandertal admixture. Population genetic analyses of the SNPs within each of these haplogroups, along with genome-wide comparisons revealed significant FST (p = 0.00003) and positive Tajima's D (p = 0.00285) statistics, pointing to non-neutral evolution of this locus. The NE1 locus harbors no protein-coding genes, but contains transcribed sequences as well as sequences with putative regulatory function based on bioinformatic predictions and in vitro experiments. We postulate that the variation observed at this locus predates Human-Neandertal divergence and is evolving under balancing selection, especially among European populations. PMID

  1. Heterotic Trait Locus (HTL) Mapping Identifies Intra-Locus Interactions That Underlie Reproductive Hybrid Vigor in Sorghum bicolor

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Israel, Imri; Kilian, Benjamin; Nida, Habte; Fridman, Eyal

    2012-01-01

    Identifying intra-locus interactions underlying heterotic variation among whole-genome hybrids is a key to understanding mechanisms of heterosis and exploiting it for crop and livestock improvement. In this study, we present the development and first use of the heterotic trait locus (HTL) mapping approach to associate specific intra-locus interactions with an overdominant heterotic mode of inheritance in a diallel population using Sorghum bicolor as the model. This method combines the advantages of ample genetic diversity and the possibility of studying non-additive inheritance. Furthermore, this design enables dissecting the latter to identify specific intra-locus interactions. We identified three HTLs (3.5% of loci tested) with synergistic intra-locus effects on overdominant grain yield heterosis in 2 years of field trials. These loci account for 19.0% of the heterotic variation, including a significant interaction found between two of them. Moreover, analysis of one of these loci (hDPW4.1) in a consecutive F2 population confirmed a significant 21% increase in grain yield of heterozygous vs. homozygous plants in this locus. Notably, two of the three HTLs for grain yield are in synteny with previously reported overdominant quantitative trait loci for grain yield in maize. A mechanism for the reproductive heterosis found in this study is suggested, in which grain yield increase is achieved by releasing the compensatory tradeoffs between biomass and reproductive output, and between seed number and weight. These results highlight the power of analyzing a diverse set of inbreds and their hybrids for unraveling hitherto unknown allelic interactions mediating heterosis. PMID:22761720

  2. Cia27 is a novel non-MHC arthritis severity locus on rat chromosome 10 syntenic to the rheumatoid arthritis 17q22-q25 locus.

    PubMed

    Brenner, M; Laragione, T; Yarlett, N C; Li, W; Mello, A; Gulko, P S

    2006-07-01

    Cia27 on rat chromosome 10 is a collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) severity quantitative trait locus originally identified in a study of (DA x ACI) F2. As an initial step towards the positional cloning of the Cia27 gene, a 17 cM (21 Mb) interval from the DA strain (arthritis-susceptible) containing the two-logarithm of odds support interval comprising Cia27 was introgressed into the ACI (arthritis-resistant) background through genotype-guided congenic breeding. ACI.DA(Cia27) congenics developed a significantly more severe form of arthritis (CIA), with a 5.9-fold increase in median arthritis severity index, a parameter known to correlate with synovial inflammation, and cartilage and bone erosions, compared with ACI (P< or =0.001). The arthritis severity enhancing effect could be detected from day 21 onwards. Rats heterozygous at the congenic interval developed a disease similar to ACI rats, suggesting that DA alleles operate in a recessive manner. Levels of autoantibodies anti-rat type II collagen did not correlate with arthritis severity. Synovial tissue mRNA levels of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) were significantly increased in ACI.DA(Cia27) congenics compared with ACI. These results demonstrate that Cia27 harbors a novel arthritis severity regulatory gene. The identification of this gene should facilitate the identification of the rheumatoid arthritis gene mapped to the human syntenic region on chromosome 17q22-q25. PMID:16691185

  3. On the Concept of Cis-regulatory Information: From Sequence Motifs to Logic Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpine, Ryan; Istrail, Sorin

    The regulatory genome is about the “system level organization of the core genomic regulatory apparatus, and how this is the locus of causality underlying the twin phenomena of animal development and animal evolution” (E.H. Davidson. The Regulatory Genome: Gene Regulatory Networks in Development and Evolution, Academic Press, 2006). Information processing in the regulatory genome is done through regulatory states, defined as sets of transcription factors (sequence-specific DNA binding proteins which determine gene expression) that are expressed and active at the same time. The core information processing machinery consists of modular DNA sequence elements, called cis-modules, that interact with transcription factors. The cis-modules “read” the information contained in the regulatory state of the cell through transcription factor binding, “process” it, and directly or indirectly communicate with the basal transcription apparatus to determine gene expression. This endowment of each gene with the information-receiving capacity through their cis-regulatory modules is essential for the response to every possible regulatory state to which it might be exposed during all phases of the life cycle and in all cell types. We present here a set of challenges addressed by our CYRENE research project aimed at studying the cis-regulatory code of the regulatory genome. The CYRENE Project is devoted to (1) the construction of a database, the cis-Lexicon, containing comprehensive information across species about experimentally validated cis-regulatory modules; and (2) the software development of a next-generation genome browser, the cis-Browser, specialized for the regulatory genome. The presentation is anchored on three main computational challenges: the Gene Naming Problem, the Consensus Sequence Bottleneck Problem, and the Logic Function Inference Problem.

  4. Two-trait-locus linkage analysis: A powerful strategy for mapping complex genetic traits

    SciTech Connect

    Schork, N.J.; Boehnke, M. ); Terwilliger, J.D.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Nearly all diseases mapped to date follow clear Mendelian, single-locus segregation patterns. In contrast, many common familial diseases such as diabetes, psoriasis, several forms of cancer, and schizophrenia are familial and appear to have a genetic component but do not exhibit simple Mendelian transmission. More complex models are required to explain the genetics of these important diseases. In this paper, the authors explore two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis in which two trait loci are mapped simultaneously to separate genetic markers. The authors compare the utility of this approach to standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis with and without allowance for heterogeneity. The authors also compare the utility of the two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus analysis to two-trait-locus, one-marker-locus linkage analysis. For common diseases, pedigrees are often bilineal, with disease genes entering via two or more unrelated pedigree members. Since such pedigrees often are avoided in linkage studies, the authors also investigate the relative information content of unilineal and bilineal pedigrees. For the dominant-or-recessive and threshold models that the authors consider, the authors find that two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus linkage analysis can provide substantially more linkage information, as measured by expected maximum lod score, than standard one-trait-locus, one-marker-locus methods, even allowing for heterogeneity, while, for a dominant-or-dominant generating model, one-locus models that allow for heterogeneity extract essentially as much information as the two-trait-locus methods. For these three models, the authors also find that bilineal pedigrees provide sufficient linkage information to warrant their inclusion in such studies. The authors discuss strategies for assessing the significance of the two linkages assumed in two-trait-locus, two-marker-locus models. 37 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  5. Lessons from Domestication: Targeting Cis-Regulatory Elements for Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Gwen; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-06-01

    Domestication of wild plant species has provided us with crops that serve our human nutritional needs. Advanced DNA sequencing has propelled the unveiling of underlying genetic changes associated with domestication. Interestingly, many changes reside in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that control the expression of an unmodified coding sequence. Sequence variation in CREs can impact gene expression levels, but also developmental timing and tissue specificity of expression. When genes are involved in multiple pathways or active in several organs and developmental stages CRE modifications are favored in contrast to mutations in coding regions, due to the lack of detrimental pleiotropic effects. Therefore, learning from domestication, we propose that CREs are interesting targets for genome editing to create new alleles for plant breeding.

  6. Relationships among Impulsiveness, Locus of Control, Sex, and Music Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter

    2006-01-01

    This study is an investigation of relationships among impulsiveness, locus of control, sex, observed practice behaviors, practice effectiveness, and self-reported practice habits in a sample of 40 college brass players. Practice effectiveness was defined by the amount of change in pretest and posttest performance achievement scores over one…

  7. Dimensions of Locus of Control: Impact of Early Educational Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Mark W.

    A study was conducted to: (1) assess the equivalence of the Nowicki Strickland Locus of Control Scale for Children, the Stephens-Delys Reinforcement Contingency Interview, and the Gruen-Korte-Stephens test and the construct validity of each; and (2) investigate the impact on IE of the open classroom Follow Through program sponsored by the…

  8. Nucleotide variation at the Gpdh locus in the genus Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wells, R S

    1996-05-01

    The Gpdh locus was sequenced in a broad range of Drosophila species. In contrast to the extreme evolutionary constraint seen at the amino acid level, the synonymous sites evolve at rates comparable to those of other genes. Gpdh nucleotide sequences were used to infer a phylogenetic tree, and the relationships among the species of the obscura group were examined in detail. A survey of nucleotide polymorphism within D. pseudoobscura revealed no amino acid variation in this species. Applying a modified McDonald-Kreitman test, the amino acid divergence between species in the obscura group does not appear to be excessive, implying that drift is adequate to explain the patterns of amino acid change at this locus. In addition, the level of polymorphism at the Gpdh locus in D. pseudoobscura is comparable to that found at other loci, as determined by a Hudson-Kreitman-Aguadé test. Thus, the pattern of nucleotide variation within and between species at the Gpdh locus is consistent with a neutral model.

  9. Should Farmers' Locus of Control Be Used in Extension?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nuthall, Peter L.

    2010-01-01

    To explore whether Farmers' Locus of Control (LOC) could be useful in agricultural extension programmes to improve managerial ability. This test records a farmer's belief in her/his control over production outcomes. A mail survey of 2300 New Zealand farmers was used to obtain a range of variables, and to measure their LOC using a question set…

  10. The Locus of the Focus of a Rolling Parabola

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Anurag; Marengo, James

    2010-01-01

    The catenary is usually introduced as the shape assumed by a hanging flexible cable. This is a "physical" description of a catenary. In this article we give a "geometrical" description of a catenary. Specifically we show that the catenary is the locus of the focus of a certain parabola as it rolls on the x-axis.

  11. The Influence of Locus of Control on Student Financial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Sonya; Cumbie, Julie A.; Bell, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Data on psychological influences of financial behaviors has not been well addressed in student populations, which is concerning given the high levels of general and financial stress experienced by college students. The findings of this study indicate that college students with an external locus of control exhibit the worst financial behaviors.…

  12. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control Scale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Jessica W.; Donatelle, Rebecca J.; Acock, Alan C.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a confirmatory factor analysis of the Cancer Locus of Control scale (M. Watson and others, 1990), administered to 543 women with a history of breast cancer. Results support a three-factor model of the scale and support use of the scale to assess control dimensions. (SLD)

  13. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  14. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  15. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  16. 40 CFR 798.5200 - Mouse visible specific locus test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of data for exposed spermatagonial stem cells thereafter. Repeated mating cycles should be conducted... visible characteristics of certain mouse strains. (2) The germ line is the cells in the gonads of higher... mouse germ cells: (A) The visible specific locus test using either 5 or 7 loci. (B) The...

  17. Attitudes toward Nutrition, Locus of Control and Smoking Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, V. Kilian; And Others

    Research has shown that many behaviors previously thought to be purely psychological in origin do, in fact, have a physiological basis. To examine the relationship of smoking behavior to locus of control, and to attitudes toward, knowledge about, and behavior with respect to nutrition, 116 Canadian undergraduate students completed the Nutrition…

  18. Fetal Health Locus of Control Scale: Development and Validation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labs, Sharon M.; Wurtele, Sandy K.

    1986-01-01

    Describes development of the Fetal Health Locus of Control scale, the scale's utility in predicting maternal health-related behavior during pregnancy, normative data, and information on factor structure and internal consistency. Reports that cigarette and caffeine consumption during pregnancy, and women's intentions to participate in prepared…

  19. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Work Locus of Control Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Joseph E.; Jose, Paul E.; Brough, Paula

    2006-01-01

    Original formulations of the Work Locus of Control Scale (WLCS) proposed a unidimensional structure of this measure; however, more recently, evidence for a two-dimensional structure has been reported, with separate subscales for internal and external loci of control. The current study evaluates the one- and two-factor models with confirmatory…

  20. Thought Recognition, Locus of Control, and Adolescent Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Thomas M.; Stack, Steven A.

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the underlying assumptions and principles of a new psychological paradigm, Psychology of Mind/Health Realization (POM/HR). Thought recognition is compared with locus of control (LOC). The relationship of LOC to self-reported happiness and satisfaction is examined from the perspective of POM/HR, using a sample of at-risk adolescents…

  1. The Influence of Labor Market Discrimination on Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Brian E.; Krzystofiak, Frank J.

    1982-01-01

    Drawing on a national probability sample (N=2,857) of young men, used multiple regression analysis to estimate the effect of labor market discrimination on subsequent locus of control. Results indicated that perceptions of employment discrimination influenced the level of externality among Blacks, over and above racial identification. (Author/RC)

  2. Dealing with Malfunction: Locus of Control in Web-Conferencing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klebl, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers how students deal with malfunctions that occur during the use of web conferencing systems in learning arrangements. In a survey among participants in online courses that make use of a web-conferencing system (N = 129), the relationship between a preference for internal or external locus of control and the perception of…

  3. Locus of Control and Learning Disabilities: A Review and Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley-Marling, Curtis C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A literature review reveals that learning disabled children are more likely than normal achievers to attribute successes, but not failures, to external factors. The implications of locus of control for the field of learning disabilities are discussed in terms of its relation to academic achievement, learned helplessness, and remediation programs.…

  4. Inferring relationships between pairs of individuals from locus heterozygosities

    PubMed Central

    Presciuttini, Silvano; Toni, Chiara; Tempestini, Elena; Verdiani, Simonetta; Casarino, Lucia; Spinetti, Isabella; Stefano, Francesco De; Domenici, Ranieri; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E

    2002-01-01

    Background The traditional exact method for inferring relationships between individuals from genetic data is not easily applicable in all situations that may be encountered in several fields of applied genetics. This study describes an approach that gives affordable results and is easily applicable; it is based on the probabilities that two individuals share 0, 1 or both alleles at a locus identical by state. Results We show that these probabilities (zi) depend on locus heterozygosity (H), and are scarcely affected by variation of the distribution of allele frequencies. This allows us to obtain empirical curves relating zi's to H for a series of common relationships, so that the likelihood ratio of a pair of relationships between any two individuals, given their genotypes at a locus, is a function of a single parameter, H. Application to large samples of mother-child and full-sib pairs shows that the statistical power of this method to infer the correct relationship is not much lower than the exact method. Analysis of a large database of STR data proves that locus heterozygosity does not vary significantly among Caucasian populations, apart from special cases, so that the likelihood ratio of the more common relationships between pairs of individuals may be obtained by looking at tabulated zi values. Conclusions A simple method is provided, which may be used by any scientist with the help of a calculator or a spreadsheet to compute the likelihood ratios of common alternative relationships between pairs of individuals. PMID:12441003

  5. Fixing the broken system of genetic locus symbols

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Katja; Lang, Anthony; Klein, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Originally, locus symbols (e.g., DYT1) were introduced to specify chromosomal regions that had been linked to a familial disorder with a yet unknown gene. Symbols were systematically assigned in a numerical series to designate mapped loci for a specific phenotype or group of phenotypes. Since the system of designating and using locus symbols was originally established, both our knowledge and our techniques of gene discovery have evolved substantially. The current system has problems that are sources of confusion, perpetuate misinformation, and misrepresent the system as a useful reference tool for a list of inherited disorders of a particular phenotypic class. These include erroneously assigned loci, duplicated loci, missing symbols, missing loci, unconfirmed loci in a consecutively numbered system, combining causative genes and risk factor genes in the same list, and discordance between phenotype and list assignment. In this article, we describe these problems and their impact, and propose solutions. The system could be significantly improved by creating distinct lists for clinical and research purposes, creating more informative locus symbols, distinguishing disease-causing mutations from risk factors, raising the threshold of evidence prior to assigning a locus symbol, paying strict attention to the predominant phenotype when assigning symbols lists, and having a formal system for reviewing and continually revising the list that includes input from both clinical and genetics experts. PMID:22454269

  6. Marathon Group: Changes in Perceived Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foulds, Melvin L.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Fifteen college students participated in a 24-hour marathon group and responded to the Internal-External Scale immediately before and after the experience. The results disclosed significant positive change at the .001 level in perceived locus of internal-external control of reinforcement expectancies in the direction of increased internality.…

  7. Motive to Avoid Success, Locus of Control, and Reinforcement Avoidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katovsky, Walter

    Subjects were four groups of 12 college women, high or low in motive to avoid success (MAS) and locus of control (LC), were reinforced for response A on a fixed partial reinforcement schedule on three concept learning tasks, one task consisting of combined reward and punishment, another of reward only, and one of punishment only. Response B was…

  8. Exploring Learner Autonomy: Language Learning Locus of Control in Multilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peek, Ron

    2016-01-01

    By using data from an online language learning beliefs survey (n?=?841), defining language learning experience in terms of participants' multilingualism, and using a domain-specific language learning locus of control (LLLOC) instrument, this article examines whether more experienced language learners can also be seen as more autonomous language…

  9. Job Satisfaction and Locus of Control in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stachowiak, Bonni J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored any relationships that existed between faculty members' locus of control and job satisfaction at a small, private, faith-based university. Two demographic variables were also analyzed in the findings: number of years teaching in higher education and tenure status. The job satisfaction instrument used was the Job in General…

  10. Seven novel mutations at the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase locus

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, P.; Frosst, P.; Rosenblatt, D.S.; Rozen, R.

    1994-09-01

    5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), a flavoprotein, catalyzes the conversion of 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to 5-methyltetrahydrofolate, a cofactor for methionine synthase in the methylation of homocysteine to methionine. Severe MTHFR deficiency, which causes homocysteinemia, is an autosomal recessive disorder with variable clinical features; developmental delay, perinatal death, mental retardation and asymptomatic individuals have been observed. A milder deficiency has been reported in patients with cardiovascular disease. We have recently described the isolation of a cDNA for MTHFR and the identification of 2 mutations in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. We report here the characterization of 7 additional mutations at this locus: 5 missense mutations and 2 splicing mutations. Mutation analysis was performed by SSCP on PCR products generated either from reverse transcription-PCR of patients` total fibroblast RNA or from PCR of patients` genomic DNA. The 5 missense mutations are as follows: 1 Arg to Cys substitution in a hydrophilic segment proposed to be the hinge region that connects the catalytic and regulatory domains, 2 different Arg to Cys substitutions in 2 patients whose enzymatic thermolability is responsive to FAD, 1 Thr to Met substitution affecting an evolutionarily-conserved residue and a Pro to Leu substitution. The 2 splicing mutations affect the 5{prime} splice site and the 3{prime} splice site of 2 introns, respectively. The 5{prime} splice site mutation generates a 57 bp in-frame deletion of the RNA through the utilization of a cryptic 5{prime} splice site within the coding sequence. The identification of 9 mutations at this locus has allowed us to make preliminary correlations between genotype and phenotype and to contribute to a structure:function analysis of the enzyme.

  11. A schizophrenia-associated HLA locus affects thalamus volume and asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Brucato, Nicolas; Guadalupe, Tulio; Franke, Barbara; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde

    2015-05-01

    Genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) have recently been shown to have neuronal functions in the thalamus and hippocampus. Common genetic variants in the Human Leukocyte Antigens (HLA) region, human homologue of the MHC locus, are associated with small effects on susceptibility to schizophrenia, while volumetric changes of the thalamus and hippocampus have also been linked to schizophrenia. We therefore investigated whether common variants of the HLA would affect volumetric variation of the thalamus and hippocampus. We analysed thalamus and hippocampus volumes, as measured using structural magnetic resonance imaging, in 1.265 healthy participants. These participants had also been genotyped using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. We imputed genotypes for single nucleotide polymorphisms at high density across the HLA locus, as well as HLA allotypes and HLA amino acids, by use of a reference population dataset that was specifically targeted to the HLA region. We detected a significant association of the SNP rs17194174 with thalamus volume (nominal P=0.0000017, corrected P=0.0039), as well as additional SNPs within the same region of linkage disequilibrium. This effect was largely lateralized to the left thalamus and is localized within a genomic region previously associated with schizophrenia. The associated SNPs are also clustered within a potential regulatory element, and a region of linkage disequilibrium that spans genes expressed in the thalamus, including HLA-A. Our data indicate that genetic variation within the HLA region influences the volume and asymmetry of the human thalamus. The molecular mechanisms underlying this association may relate to HLA influences on susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  12. Effects of gene regulatory reprogramming on gene expression in human and mouse developing hearts.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Hao; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Lineage-specific regulatory elements underlie adaptation of species and play a role in disease susceptibility. We compared functionally conserved and lineage-specific enhancers by cross-mapping 5042 human and 6564 mouse heart enhancers. Of these, 79 per cent are lineage-specific, lacking a functional orthologue. Heart enhancers tend to cluster and, commonly, there are multiple heart enhancers in a heart locus providing a regulatory stability to the locus. We observed little cross-clustering, however, between lineage-specific and functionally conserved heart enhancers suggesting regulatory function acquisition and development in loci previously lacking heart activity. We also identified 862 human-specific heart enhancers: 417 featuring sequence conservation with mouse (class II) and 445 with neither sequence nor function conservation (class III). Ninety-eight per cent of class III enhancers were deleted from the mouse genome, and we estimated a similar-sized enhancer gain in the human lineage. Human-specific enhancers display no detectable decrease in the negative selection pressure and are strongly associated with genes partaking in the heart regulatory programmes. The loss of a heart enhancer could be compensated by activity of a redundant heart enhancer; however, we observed redundancy in only 15 per cent of class II and III enhancer loci indicating a large-scale reprogramming of the heart regulatory programme in mammals.

  13. [Drug compliance and health locus of control in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Combes, C; Feral, F

    2011-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a frequent disorder since it affects about 1% of the general population. Drug compliance, that is to say patients' adherence to their treatment, remains rather poor concerning this disease with, on an average, one patient out of two not complying with his/her medication. Among the factors influencing drug compliance, we focused on patients' beliefs in terms of health control, a concept known as health locus of control. This is a concept that originated from social psychology and derived from the Rotters' original concept of locus of control: it corresponds to the type of connexion established by an individual between subsequent events in the history of his/her disease and internal (personal abilities) or external factors (chance, powerful others). Nowadays, the tridimensional structure of this concept is commonly admitted as being in three dimensions: internality, chance externality and powerful others externality, the latter group being divided between doctors and others. We have assumed that there is a correlation between the degree of drug compliance and the internal and/or doctors' external health locus of control. For this purpose, we have determined the quality of drug compliance by using the Medical Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) and the type of health locus of control by using the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scale among 65 schizophrenic patients. We have also considered it was important to evaluate patients' insight by using the Amador's scale (Scale of Unawareness of Mental Disorder) because many researchers have established a strong correlation between insight and drug compliance in schizophrenia. Associations between the four dimensions of health locus of control ("internal", "chance external", "others external" and "doctors' external") and drug compliance were assessed by estimating Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (r) and its degree of significance (p). These associations were judged significant at an alpha

  14. Pleiotropic consequences of gene knockouts in the phthiocerol dimycocerosate and phenolic glycolipid biosynthetic gene cluster of the opportunistic human pathogen Mycobacterium marinum.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, Poornima; Budell, William C; Mueller, Emily; Au, Andrew; Bythrow, Glennon V; Quadri, Luis E N

    2016-03-01

    Phthiocerol dimycocerosates (PDIMs) and phenolic glycolipids (PGLs) contribute to the pathogenicity of several mycobacteria. Biosynthesis of these virulence factors requires polyketide synthases and other enzymes that represent potential targets for the development of adjuvant antivirulence drugs. We used six isogenic Mycobacterium marinum mutants, each with a different gene knockout in the PDIM/PGL biosynthetic pathway, to probe the pleiotropy of mutations leading to PDIM(-) PGL(-), PDIM(+) PGL(-) or PDIM(-) PGL(+) phenotypes. We evaluated the M. marinum mutants for changes in antibiotic susceptibility, cell envelope permeability, biofilm formation, surface properties, sliding motility and virulence in an amoeba model. The analysis also permitted us to begin exploring the hypothesis that different gene knockouts rendering the same PDIM and/or PGL deficiency phenotypes lead to M. marinum mutants with equivalent pleiotropic profiles. Overall, the results of our study revealed a complex picture of pleiotropic patterns emerging from different gene knockouts, uncovered unexpected phenotypic inequalities between mutants, and provided new insight into the phenotypic consequences of gene knockouts in the PDIM/PGL biosynthetic pathway. PMID:26818253

  15. Levosimendan beyond inotropy and acute heart failure: Evidence of pleiotropic effects on the heart and other organs: An expert panel position paper.

    PubMed

    Farmakis, Dimitrios; Alvarez, Julian; Gal, Tuvia Ben; Brito, Dulce; Fedele, Francesco; Fonseca, Candida; Gordon, Anthony C; Gotsman, Israel; Grossini, Elena; Guarracino, Fabio; Harjola, Veli-Pekka; Hellman, Yaron; Heunks, Leo; Ivancan, Visnja; Karavidas, Apostolos; Kivikko, Matti; Lomivorotov, Vladimir; Longrois, Dan; Masip, Josep; Metra, Marco; Morelli, Andrea; Nikolaou, Maria; Papp, Zoltán; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Poelzl, Gerhard; Pollesello, Piero; Ravn, Hanne Berg; Rex, Steffen; Riha, Hynek; Ricksten, Sven-Erik; Schwinger, Robert H G; Vrtovec, Bojan; Yilmaz, M Birhan; Zielinska, Marzenna; Parissis, John

    2016-11-01

    Levosimendan is a positive inotrope with vasodilating properties (inodilator) indicated for decompensated heart failure (HF) patients with low cardiac output. Accumulated evidence supports several pleiotropic effects of levosimendan beyond inotropy, the heart and decompensated HF. Those effects are not readily explained by cardiac function enhancement and seem to be related to additional properties of the drug such as anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative and anti-apoptotic ones. Mechanistic and proof-of-concept studies are still required to clarify the underlying mechanisms involved, while properly designed clinical trials are warranted to translate preclinical or early-phase clinical data into more robust clinical evidence. The present position paper, derived by a panel of 35 experts in the field of cardiology, cardiac anesthesiology, intensive care medicine, cardiac physiology, and cardiovascular pharmacology from 22 European countries, compiles the existing evidence on the pleiotropic effects of levosimendan, identifies potential novel areas of clinical application and defines the corresponding gaps in evidence and the required research efforts to address those gaps.

  16. Pleiotropic physiological effects in the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense following chromosomal labeling in the clpX gene.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hilda; Mendoza, Alberto; Cruz, M Antonia; Holguin, Gina; Glick, Bernard R; Bashan, Yoav

    2006-08-01

    Azospirillum brasilense 8-I was chromosomally labeled with green fluorescent protein (gfp) genes, using either the native promoterless gfp gene or the mutant gfpmut2 gene under the transcriptional control of the neomycin phosphate transferase (npt2) promoter inserted into Tn5 suicide plasmid vectors. One A. brasilense exconjugant, showing a steady and strong fluorescence following irradiation with 365-nm UV light was characterized in detail. This strain, A. brasilense 8-I-gfp showed increased N(2)-fixation of approximately threefold, up to a twofold increase in exopolysaccharide production, and a significant decrease in indole-3-acetic acid and poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate production over the parental strain. Sequence analysis showed that the Tn5 carrying the gfp gene was inserted in the clpX gene encoding a heat-shock protein. This data is consistent with a model in which the observed physiological changes are a consequence of pleiotropic changes that occur as a consequence of impaired heat shock (stress) protein synthesis. In summary, (i) chromosomally labelled Azospirillum brasilense was obtained carrying either native or mutant gfp genes, (ii) Pleiotropic physiological effects were caused by disruption of the clpX gene as the consequence of the insertion, (iii) a new indole-3-acetic acid-attenuated mutant of A. brasilense producing only 0.25% of the indole-3-acetic acid produced by the wild-type is presented.

  17. Receptor protein kinase gene encoded at the self-incompatibility locus

    DOEpatents

    Nasrallah, June B.; Nasrallah, Mikhail E.; Stein, Joshua

    1996-01-01

    Described herein is a S receptor kinase gene (SRK), derived from the S locus in Brassica oleracea, having a extracellular domain highly similar to the secreted product of the S-locus glycoprotein gene.

  18. Coordinated forms of noradrenergic plasticity in the locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Ana Raquel O.; Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is plastic and represents the world according to the significance of sensory stimuli. However, cortical networks are embodied within complex circuits including neuromodulatory systems such as the noradrenergic locus coeruleus, providing information about internal state and behavioral relevance. While norepinephrine is important for cortical plasticity, it is unknown how modulatory neurons themselves respond to changes of sensory input. Here we examine how locus coeruleus neurons are modified by experience, and the consequences of locus coeruleus plasticity on cortical representations and sensory perception. We made whole-cell recordings from rat locus coeruleus and primary auditory cortex (AI), pairing sounds with locus coeruleus activation. Although initially unresponsive, locus coeruleus neurons developed and maintained auditory responses afterwards. Locus coeruleus plasticity induced changes in AI responses lasting at least hours and improved auditory perception for days to weeks. Our results demonstrate that locus coeruleus is highly plastic, leading to substantial changes in regulation of brain state by norepinephrine. PMID:26301326

  19. Homozygosity mapping of the Werner syndrome locus (WRN)

    SciTech Connect

    Nakura, J.; Miki, T.; Kamino, K.

    1994-10-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the early onset of several age-related diseases. The locus for this disease was recently mapped to 8p12. We studied 27 WS kindreds of mixed ethnic origins, 26 of which were consanguineous. In 24 of these families, the affected subject was given the diagnosis of {open_quotes}definite{close_quotes} WS and affected subjects in the remaining 3 pedigrees were given the diagnosis of {open_quotes}probable{close_quotes} WS. Affected subjects from each kindred were genotyped for 13 short tandem repeat polymorphic sites. Two-point linkage analysis yielded significant evidence for linkage to D8S137, D8S339, D8S87, PLAT, D8S165, and D8S166. The locus yielding a maximum lod score at the smallest recombination fraction was D8S339, suggesting that this marker is the closest to the WS gene (WRN locus) of those tested. D8S339 gave significant lod scores (Z{sub max}{>=}3.0) for both Japanese and non-Japanese (mostly Caucasian) families, demonstrating that a single locus is responsible for WS in both groups. Multipoint analysis of these markers yielded a maximum lod score of 17.05 at a distance of approximately 0.6 cM from D8S339. The combined evidence from 2-point analysis, multipoint analysis, and analysis of regions of homozygosity in subjects from inbred pedigrees indicates that the WRN locus is between D8S131 and D8S87, in an 8.3-cM interval containing D8S339. 32 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  20. The Salmonella typhimurium mar locus: molecular and genetic analyses and assessment of its role in virulence.

    PubMed Central

    Sulavik, M C; Dazer, M; Miller, P F

    1997-01-01

    The marRAB operon is a regulatory locus that controls multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli. marA encodes a positive regulator of the antibiotic resistance response, acting by altering the expression of unlinked genes. marR encodes a repressor of marRAB transcription and controls the production of MarA in response to environmental signals. A molecular and genetic study of the homologous operon in Salmonella typhimurium was undertaken, and the role of marA in virulence in a murine model was assessed. Expression of E. coli marA (marAEC) present on a multicopy plasmid in S. typhimurium resulted in a multiple antibiotic resistance (Mar) phenotype, suggesting that a similar regulon exists in this organism. A genomic plasmid library containing S. typhimurium chromosomal sequences was introduced into an E. coli strain that was deleted for the mar locus and contained a single-copy marR'-'lacZ translational fusion. Plasmid clones that contained both S. typhimurium marR (marRSt) and marA (marASt) genes were identified as those that were capable of repressing expression of the fusion and which resulted in a Mar phenotype. The predicted amino acid sequences of MarRSt, MarASt, and MarBSt were 91, 86, and 42% identical, respectively, to the same genes from E. coli, while the operator/promoter region of the operon was 86% identical to the same 98-nucleotide-upstream region in E. coli. The marRAB transcriptional start sites for both organisms were determined by primer extension, and a marRABSt transcript of approximately 1.1 kb was identified by Northern blot analysis. Its accumulation was shown to be inducible by sodium salicylate. Open reading frames flanking the marRAB operon were also conserved. An S. typhimurium marA disruption strain was constructed by an allelic exchange method and compared to the wild-type strain for virulence in a murine BALB/c infection model. No effect on virulence was noted. The endogenous S. typhimurium plasmid that is associated with virulence

  1. [Effect of estradiol on food intake, glucose and fat metabolism in mice C57BL/6J with mutation yellow at the agouti locus].

    PubMed

    Iakovleva, T V; Makarova, E N; Kazantseva, A Iu; Bazhan, N M

    2012-05-01

    Mutation yellow at the agouti locus in mice (A(y)/a-mice) causes the increase of food intake and development of obesity and type 2 diabetes. In A(y)/a-females the disturbances of glucose and fat metabolisms occur after puberty. We have assumed that the mutation yellow violates the regulatory effect of estradiol on glucose and fat metabolism in mice. We investigated the effects of ovariectomy and estradiol treatment on body weight, food intake, glucose tolerance, plasma levels of glucose, insulin and etherified fatty acids in A(y)/a-females. C57Bl/6J females, not carrying yellow mutation at the agouti locus (a/a-mice), were used as a control. The data suggest that the yellow mutation did not affect estradiol regulation of food intake and glucose blood levels after a night of fasting, but, apparently, prevented estradiol participation in the regulation of glucose and fat metabolisms in the muscle and fat tissues.

  2. Viral complement regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Rosengard, A M; Ahearn, J M

    1999-05-01

    The inactivation of complement provides cells and tissues critical protection from complement-mediated attack and decreases the associated recruitment of other inflammatory mediators. In an attempt to evade the host immune response, viruses have evolved two mechanisms to acquire complement regulatory proteins. They can directly seize the host cell complement regulators onto their outer envelope and/or they can produce their own proteins which are either secreted into the neighboring intercellular space or expressed as membrane-bound proteins on the infected host cell. The following review will concentrate on the viral homologues of the mammalian complement regulatory proteins, specifically those containing complement control protein (CCP) repeats. PMID:10408371

  3. Rationales for regulatory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Perhac, R.M.

    1997-02-01

    The author provides an outline which touches on the types of concerns about risk evaluation which are addressed in the process of establishing regulatory guides. Broadly he says regulatory activity serves three broad constituents: (1) Paternalism (private risk); (2) Promotion of social welfare (public risks); (3) Protection of individual rights (public risks). He then discusses some of the major issues encountered in reaching a decision on what is an acceptable level of risk within each of these areas, and how one establishes such a level.

  4. Allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR at the p16INK4a locus

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Yuno, Miyuki; Fujii, Hodaka

    2016-01-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) system has been adopted for a wide range of biological applications including genome editing. In some cases, dissection of genome functions requires allele-specific genome editing, but the use of CRISPR for this purpose has not been studied in detail. In this study, using the p16INK4a gene in HCT116 as a model locus, we investigated whether chromatin states, such as CpG methylation, or a single-nucleotide gap form in a target site can be exploited for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR in vivo. First, we showed that allele-specific locus binding and genome editing could be achieved by targeting allele-specific CpG-methylated regions, which was successful for one, but not all guide RNAs. In this regard, molecular basis underlying the success remains elusive at this stage. Next, we demonstrated that an allele-specific single-nucleotide gap form could be employed for allele-specific locus binding and genome editing by CRISPR, although it was important to avoid CRISPR tolerance of a single nucleotide mismatch brought about by mismatched base skipping. Our results provide information that might be useful for applications of CRISPR in studies of allele-specific functions in the genomes. PMID:27465215

  5. Enhancer turnover and conserved regulatory function in vertebrate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Domené, Sabina; Bumaschny, Viviana F.; de Souza, Flávio S. J.; Franchini, Lucía F.; Nasif, Sofía; Low, Malcolm J.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in regulatory regions including enhancers are an important source of variation and innovation during evolution. Enhancers can evolve by changes in the sequence, arrangement and repertoire of transcription factor binding sites, but whole enhancers can also be lost or gained in certain lineages in a process of turnover. The proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc), which encodes a prohormone, is expressed in the pituitary and hypothalamus of all jawed vertebrates. We have previously described that hypothalamic Pomc expression in mammals is controlled by two enhancers—nPE1 and nPE2—that are derived from transposable elements and that presumably replaced the ancestral neuronal Pomc regulatory regions. Here, we show that nPE1 and nPE2, even though they are mammalian novelties with no homologous counterpart in other vertebrates, nevertheless can drive gene expression specifically to POMC neurons in the hypothalamus of larval and adult transgenic zebrafish. This indicates that when neuronal Pomc enhancers originated de novo during early mammalian evolution, the newly created cis- and trans-codes were similar to the ancestral ones. We also identify the neuronal regulatory region of zebrafish pomca and confirm that it is not homologous to the mammalian enhancers. Our work sheds light on the process of gene regulatory evolution by showing how a locus can undergo enhancer turnover and nevertheless maintain the ancestral transcriptional output. PMID:24218639

  6. A highly pleiotropic amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor contributes to life-history adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B.; Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; Schmidt, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Finding the specific nucleotides that underlie adaptive variation is a major goal in evolutionary biology, but polygenic traits pose a challenge because the complex genotype–phenotype relationship can obscure the effects of individual alleles. However, natural selection working in large wild populations can shift allele frequencies and indicate functional regions of the genome. Previously, we showed that the two most common alleles of a complex amino acid insertion–deletion polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor show independent, parallel clines in frequency across the North American and Australian continents. Here, we report that the cline is stable over at least a five-year period and that the polymorphism also demonstrates temporal shifts in allele frequency concurrent with seasonal change. We tested the alleles for effects on levels of insulin signaling, fecundity, development time, body size, stress tolerance, and life span. We find that the alleles are associated with predictable differences in these traits, consistent with patterns of Drosophila life-history variation across geography that likely reflect adaptation to the heterogeneous climatic environment. These results implicate insulin signaling as a major mediator of life-history adaptation in Drosophila, and suggest that life-history trade-offs can be explained by extensive pleiotropy at a single locus. PMID:25319083

  7. Sequence-based Association Analysis Reveals an MGST1 eQTL with Pleiotropic Effects on Bovine Milk Composition

    PubMed Central

    Littlejohn, Mathew D.; Tiplady, Kathryn; Fink, Tania A.; Lehnert, Klaus; Lopdell, Thomas; Johnson, Thomas; Couldrey, Christine; Keehan, Mike; Sherlock, Richard G.; Harland, Chad; Scott, Andrew; Snell, Russell G.; Davis, Stephen R.; Spelman, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammary gland is a prolific lipogenic organ, synthesising copious amounts of triglycerides for secretion into milk. The fat content of milk varies widely both between and within species, and recent independent genome-wide association studies have highlighted a milk fat percentage quantitative trait locus (QTL) of large effect on bovine chromosome 5. Although both EPS8 and MGST1 have been proposed to underlie these signals, the causative status of these genes has not been functionally confirmed. To investigate this QTL in detail, we report genome sequence-based imputation and association mapping in a population of 64,244 taurine cattle. This analysis reveals a cluster of 17 non-coding variants spanning MGST1 that are highly associated with milk fat percentage, and a range of other milk composition traits. Further, we exploit a high-depth mammary RNA sequence dataset to conduct expression QTL (eQTL) mapping in 375 lactating cows, revealing a strong MGST1 eQTL underpinning these effects. These data demonstrate the utility of DNA and RNA sequence-based association mapping, and implicate MGST1, a gene with no obvious mechanistic relationship to milk composition regulation, as causally involved in these processes. PMID:27146958

  8. Reframing Student Affairs Leadership: An Analysis of Organizational Frames of Reference and Locus of Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tull, Ashley; Freeman, Jerrid P.

    2011-01-01

    Examined in this study were the identified frames of reference and locus of control used by 478 student affairs administrators. Administrator responses were examined to identify frames of reference most commonly used and their preference order. Locus of control most commonly used and the relationship between frames of reference and locus of…

  9. Rasch Analysis of the Locus-of-Hope Scale. Brief Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadiana, Leny G.; David, Adonis P.

    2015-01-01

    The Locus-of-Hope Scale (LHS) was developed as a measure of the locus-of-hope dimensions (Bernardo, 2010). The present study adds to the emerging literature on locus-of-hope by assessing the psychometric properties of the LHS using Rasch analysis. The results from the Rasch analyses of the four subscales of LHS provided evidence on the…

  10. Adolescent Values Clarification: A Positive Influence on Perceived Locus of Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Mark R.

    1990-01-01

    Used locus of control assessments to monitor specific aspect of adolescent chemical dependency treatment program. Used song lyric analysis activities to note short-term modifications in experimental group's (N=10) perceived locus of control. No improvements were noted in matched control group's locus of control. Findings suggest that addictions…

  11. On the Locus Formed by the Maximum Heights of Projectile Motion with Air Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez-Saldana, H.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis on the locus formed by the set of maxima of the trajectories of a projectile launched in a medium with linear drag. Such a place, the locus of apexes, is written in terms of the Lambert "W" function in polar coordinates, confirming the special role played by this function in the problem. To characterize the locus, a study of…

  12. Antecedents and Correlates of Locus of Control in High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masi, Wendy Segal

    This study dealt with the perceived parental attitudes of affection, physical contact, consistency-trust, security and perceived parental locus of control orientation as possible determinants of locus of control orientation in high school seniors. A second phase was concerned with the relationship of perceived parental locus of control orientation…

  13. On the Relation of Locus of Control and L2 Reading and Writing Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghonsooly, Behzad; Shirvan, Majid Elahi

    2011-01-01

    Locus of control, a psychological construct, has been the focus of attention in recent decades. Psychologists have discussed the effect of locus of control on achieving life goals in social/psychological interactions. While learning a foreign language involves both social interactions and psychological processes, the role and relation of locus of…

  14. EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Program manages several transportation regulatory activities established by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended by the Energy Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998, EPAct 2005, and the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA).

  15. The regulatory horizon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, ED

    1987-01-01

    The author briefly discusses the FAA's position as it relates to cockpit resource management. For example, if Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) is a positive concept, why isn't everyone required to implement it? The regulatory practice of the FAA is discussed and questions and answers are presented.

  16. A Common Missense Variant in the Glucokinase Regulatory Protein Gene (GCKR) Is Associated with Increased Plasma Triglyceride and C-Reactive Protein but Lower Fasting Glucose Concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    OBJECTIVE-Using the genome-wide-association approach, we recently identified the glucokinase regulatory protein gene (GCKR, rs780094) region as a novel quantitative trait locus for plasma triglyceride concentration in Europeans. Here, we sought to study the association of GCKR variants with metaboli...

  17. Long-term pleiotropic effect of statins upon nitric oxide and C-reactive protein levels in patients with peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Bleda, S; De Haro, J; Florez, A; Varela, C; Esparza, L; Acin, F

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Peripheral arterial disease can be regarded as a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting the entire vascular system. In the early clinical stages, it is characterised by the deterioration of endothelial function, which does not progress with the development of the disease. This study analyses the pleiotropic effects upon the plasma nitrite and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in claudicating patients after 12 months of treatment with statins. Study design A prospective randomised controlled translational study was made in patients with Fontaine grade II ischaemia, treated with the best medical treatment with or without statins for 12 months from the time of diagnosis for assessing the pleiotropic effects of those statins. Methods Measurements of plasma high-sensitivity CRP (hsCRP), lipid profile and nitrites were made at baseline and after 1 month and 1 year of treatment with atorvastatin 40 mg/day. Results A significant reduction in nitrite levels was observed after 1 month of treatment (11.8±7.8 μM vs 5.7±1.8 μM, p=0.0001), but this effect did not persist after 1 year (11.8±7.8 μM vs 9.4±8.9 μM, p=0.27). HsCRP underwent a significant reduction after both 1 month (7 (2.2–12) vs 3.4 (1.6–5.5), p<0.01) and 1 year of treatment with atorvastatin (7 (2.2–12) vs 2.25 (1.67–6.7), p=0.02). Statin treatment reduced hsCRP levels in 9.64 (95% CI (1.60 to 17.68)) after 1 month and in 9.14 (95% CI (0.18 to 18.47)) after 1 year. Conclusions The long-term biological pleiotropic effects of statins provide information on the role of endothelial function and systemic inflammation in the aetiopathogenesis of peripheral arterial disease. Statins slow endothelial degradation at the start of the disease, with no effects over the long term. These drug substances reduce progressive inflammation throughout the treatment period. This supports the novel hypothesis that endothelial dysfunction is only a disease-triggering phenomenon

  18. Externality and locus of control in obese children.

    PubMed

    Isbitsky, J R; White, D R

    1981-03-01

    Fifty-nine obese and normal-weight children, aged 8-12 years were compared on two dimensions of "externality," previously examined in obese adults. Significant sex difference indicated that boys generally ate more than girls and held more internal locus of control expectancies. However, obese and normal-weight children were not differentiated by their performance on either a food-related or three nonfood-related measures of external-cue responsiveness, nor by their locus of control expectancies. Furthermore, the various measures were neither strongly nor consistently intercorrelated, providing little support for the notion of a single underlying dimension of "externality." The contribution of physiological, sensory, cognitive-motivational, and sociocultural parameters to the regulation of eating behavior was discussed.

  19. Negative Complementation at the Notch Locus of DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Geoffrey G.

    1975-01-01

    Four Abruptex alleles (AxE1, AxE2, Ax9B2, and Ax16172) have been mapped within the Notch locus. Based on their visible phenotypes and their interactions with one another and with N mutations, the Ax alleles can be divided into two groups. Heterozygous combinations of members of the same group are intermediate in phenotype compared to the respective homozygotes, whereas heterozygotes of Ax alleles from different groups exhibit negative heterosis, being much less viable and more extremely mutant than either homozygote. It is suggested that the Notch locus is a multi-functional regulator ("integrator") gene, whose product possesses both "repressor" and "activator" functions for the processes it regulates. PMID:812768

  20. Locus of control: a work-related variable?

    PubMed

    Knoop, R

    1989-02-01

    Inconsistencies in findings between age and perceived locus of control of reinforcement were examined in light of social learning theory. Absence of work was hypothesized to reduce opportunities for reinforcement and thus expectancies. No differences were found in internal-external (I-E) locus of control among nine age groups (20 to 65 years) for subjects (882 school teachers) during the span of their work lives. It seems that I-E depends on the frequency and intensity of expectancies for behavior reinforcement sequences that work affords. Before and after work life there is not only less to control, but many of the nonwork reinforcers are not contingent on one's own behavior. Relinquishing internal control and a shift of focus toward reflection on experience and meaning of ife may well be a desirable and natural process for older people.

  1. Refined localization of the Prieto-syndrome locus

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, F.; Prieto, F.; Gal, A.

    1996-07-12

    PRS designates the locus for a syndromal form of X-linked mental retardation (Prieto syndrome) characterized by minor facial anomalies, ear malformation, abnormal growth of teeth, clinodactyly, sacral dimple, patellar luxation, malformation of lower limbs, abnormalities of the fundus of the eye, and subcortical cerebral atrophy. Linkage analysis localized the disease locus between DXS84 (Xp21.1) and DXS255. Here we present additional linkage data that provide further support and refinement of this localization. Individual III-18 gave birth to a male, currently aged 2 7/12 years, who clearly shows delayed psychomotor development. He began to walk at 23 months and his speech is delayed. In addition, he shows the characteristic facial anomalies, {open_quotes}dysplastic{close_quotes} ears, sacral dimple, and clinodactyly, as do all other affected males in this family. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Locus-specific gene repositioning in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leshner, Marc; Devine, Michelle; Roloff, Gregory W.; True, Lawrence D.; Misteli, Tom; Meaburn, Karen J.

    2016-01-01

    Genes occupy preferred spatial positions within interphase cell nuclei. However, positioning patterns are not an innate feature of a locus, and genes can alter their localization in response to physiological and pathological changes. Here we screen the radial positioning patterns of 40 genes in normal, hyperplasic, and malignant human prostate tissues. We find that the overall spatial organization of the genome in prostate tissue is largely conserved among individuals. We identify three genes whose nuclear positions are robustly altered in neoplastic prostate tissues. FLI1 and MMP9 position differently in prostate cancer than in normal tissue and prostate hyperplasia, whereas MMP2 is repositioned in both prostate cancer and hyperplasia. Our data point to locus-specific reorganization of the genome during prostate disease. PMID:26564800

  3. The locus of microRNA-10b

    PubMed Central

    Biagioni, Francesca; Bossel Ben-Moshe, Noa; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Yarden, Yosef; Domany, Eytan; Blandino, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary microRNA research has led to significant advances in our understanding of the process of tumorigenesis. MicroRNAs participate in different events of a cancer cell’s life, through their ability to target hundreds of putative transcripts involved in almost every cellular function, including cell cycle, apoptosis, and differentiation. The relevance of these small molecules is even more evident in light of the emerging linkage between their expression and both prognosis and clinical outcome of many types of human cancers. This identifies microRNAs as potential therapeutic modifiers of cancer phenotypes. From this perspective, we overview here the miR-10b locus and its involvement in cancer, focusing on its role in the establishment (miR-10b*) and spreading (miR-10b) of breast cancer. We conclude that targeting the locus of microRNA 10b holds great potential for cancer treatment. PMID:23839045

  4. Health locus of control and participation in physical activity.

    PubMed

    Carlson, B R; Petti, K

    1989-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the physical activity participation patterns of college students when defined by their Health Locus of Control orientation. One thousand thirty-three college-aged students completed the Wellness Activity Profile, a questionnaire that yielded data on Health Locus of Control and self-reported frequency of participation in physical activities. Discriminant analyses indicated that the combination of physical activities associated with internally and externally oriented students were different for both males and females. Participation in high caloric expenditure activities was more frequent among internal subjects (Male: bicycling, volleyball, other individual sports, and snorkel/scuba diving; Female: basketball, weight training, tennis, fast walking/jogging/running, and judo/karate), while low caloric expenditure activities were associated with an external orientation (Male: baseball/softball, sailing, fishing, golf, and other recreational sports; Female: track and field jumping and fishing).

  5. Two-locus inbreeding measures for recurrent selection.

    PubMed

    Choy, S C; Weir, B S

    1977-03-01

    For a population undergoing recurrent selection, a method is presented for determining the average inbreeding coefficients at the end of each breeding cycle. The coefficients are derived in terms of probability measures that genes are identical by descent. For the one-locus case, two digametic measures are defined and employed in the derivation of a recurrence formula for the inbreeding coefficient. Two further classes of measures, trigametic and quadrigametic, are required for transition from one cycle to the previous one to allow the calculation of the inbreeding function for the two-locus case. Numerical values of the average probability of double identity by descent for populations with various imposed assumptions are listed to illustrate the effects of linkage and population size on the accrual of inbreeding and hence of homozygosity.

  6. The heavy metal tolerant soil bacterium Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a unique copper homeostasis locus and two mer operons.

    PubMed

    Ng, Shee Ping; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2012-06-01

    Copper-containing compounds are introduced into the environment through agricultural chemicals, mining, and metal industries and cause severe detrimental effects on ecosystems. Certain microorganisms exposed to these stressors exhibit molecular mechanisms to maintain intracellular copper homeostasis and avoid toxicity. We have previously reported that the soil bacterial isolate Achromobacter sp. AO22 is multi-heavy metal tolerant and exhibits a mer operon associated with a Tn21 type transposon. The present study reports that AO22 also hosts a unique cop locus encoding copper homeostasis determinants. The putative cop genes were amplified from the strain AO22 using degenerate primers based on reported cop and pco sequences, and a constructed 10,552 base pair contig (GenBank Accession No. GU929214). BLAST analyses of the sequence revealed a unique cop locus of 10 complete open reading frames, designated copSRABGOFCDK, with unusual separation of copCD from copAB. The promoter areas exhibit two putative cop boxes, and copRS appear to be transcribed divergently from other genes. The putative protein CopA may be a copper oxidase involved in export to the periplasm, CopB is likely extracytoplasmic, CopC may be periplasmic, CopD is cytoplasmic/ inner membrane, CopF is a P-type ATPase, and CopG, CopO, and CopK are likely copper chaperones. CopA, B, C, and D exhibit several potential copper ligands and CopS and CopR exhibit features of two-component regulatory systems. Sequences flanking indicate the AO22 cop locus may be present within a genomic island. Achromobacter sp. strain AO22 is thus an ideal candidate for understanding copper homeostasis mechanisms and exploiting them for copper biosensor or biosorption systems. PMID:22573150

  7. Toxicogenomics and the Regulatory Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomics presents regulatory agencies with the opportunity to revolutionize their analyses by enabling the collection of information on a broader range of responses than currently considered in traditional regulatory decision making. Analyses of genomic responses are expec...

  8. Identification of a functional capsule locus in Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Rukke, H V; Hegna, I K; Petersen, F C

    2012-04-01

    The polysaccharide capsule of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a hallmark for virulence in humans. In its close relative Streptococcus mitis, a common human commensal, analysis of the sequenced genomes of six strains revealed the presence of a putative capsule locus in four of them. We constructed an isogenic S. mitis mutant from the type strain that lacked the 19 open reading frames in the capsule locus (Δcps mutant), using a deletion strategy similar to previous capsule functional studies in S. pneumoniae. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed a capsule-like structure in the S. mitis type strain that was absent or reduced in the Δcps mutant. Since S. mitis are predominant oral colonizers of tooth surfaces, we addressed the relevance of the capsule locus for the S. mitis overall surface properties, autoaggregation and biofilm formation. The capsule deletion resulted in a mutant with approximately two-fold increase in hydrophobicity. Binding to the Stains-all cationic dye was reduced by 40%, suggesting a reduction in the overall negative surface charge of the mutant. The mutant exhibited also increased autoaggregation in coaggregation buffer, and up to six-fold increase in biofilm levels. The results suggested that the capsule locus is associated with production of a capsule-like structure in S. mitis and indicated that the S. mitis capsule-like structure may confer surface attributes similar to those associated with the capsule in S. pneumoniae.

  9. Analysis of the ABCA4 genomic locus in Stargardt disease.

    PubMed

    Zernant, Jana; Xie, Yajing Angela; Ayuso, Carmen; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel-Angel; Simonelli, Francesca; Testa, Francesco; Gorin, Michael B; Strom, Samuel P; Bertelsen, Mette; Rosenberg, Thomas; Boone, Philip M; Yuan, Bo; Ayyagari, Radha; Nagy, Peter L; Tsang, Stephen H; Gouras, Peter; Collison, Frederick T; Lupski, James R; Fishman, Gerald A; Allikmets, Rando

    2014-12-20

    Autosomal recessive Stargardt disease (STGD1, MIM 248200) is caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene. Complete sequencing of ABCA4 in STGD patients identifies compound heterozygous or homozygous disease-associated alleles in 65-70% of patients and only one mutation in 15-20% of patients. This study was designed to find the missing disease-causing ABCA4 variation by a combination of next-generation sequencing (NGS), array-Comparative Genome Hybridization (aCGH) screening, familial segregation and in silico analyses. The entire 140 kb ABCA4 genomic locus was sequenced in 114 STGD patients with one known ABCA4 exonic mutation revealing, on average, 200 intronic variants per sample. Filtering of these data resulted in 141 candidates for new mutations. Two variants were detected in four samples, two in three samples, and 20 variants in two samples, the remaining 117 new variants were detected only once. Multimodal analysis suggested 12 new likely pathogenic intronic ABCA4 variants, some of which were specific to (isolated) ethnic groups. No copy number variation (large deletions and insertions) was detected in any patient suggesting that it is a very rare event in the ABCA4 locus. Many variants were excluded since they were not conserved in non-human primates, were frequent in African populations and, therefore, represented ancestral, and not disease-associated, variants. The sequence variability in the ABCA4 locus is extensive and the non-coding sequences do not harbor frequent mutations in STGD patients of European-American descent. Defining disease-associated alleles in the ABCA4 locus requires exceptionally well characterized large cohorts and extensive analyses by a combination of various approaches. PMID:25082829

  10. Population genetics of the HRAS1 minisatellite locus

    SciTech Connect

    Devlin, B.; Risch, N. ); Krontiris, T. New England Medical Center Hospital, Boston, MA )

    1993-12-01

    Several years ago it was reported that rare HRAS1 VNTR alleles occurred more frequently in US Caucasian cancer patients than in unaffected controls. Such an association, in theory, could be caused by undetected population heterogeneity. Also, in a study clearly relevant to this issue, it was recently reported that significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium exist at this locus in a sample of US Caucasians. These considerations motivate population genetic analysis of the HRAS1 locus. From published studies of the HRAS1 VNTR locus, which classified alleles into types, the authors found only small differences in the allele frequency distributions of samples from various European nations, although there were larger differences among ethnic groups (African American, Caucasian, and Oriental). In an analysis of variation of rare-allele frequencies among samples from four European nations, most of the variance was attributable to molecular methodology, and very little of the variance was accounted for by nationality. In addition, the authors showed that mixture of European subpopulations should result in only minor deviations from expected genotype proportions in a Caucasian database and demonstrated that there was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the HRAS1 data. 35 refs., 4 tabs.

  11. Targeted disruption of the porcine immunoglobulin kappa light chain locus.

    PubMed

    Ramsoondar, J; Mendicino, M; Phelps, C; Vaught, T; Ball, S; Monahan, J; Chen, S; Dandro, A; Boone, J; Jobst, P; Vance, A; Wertz, N; Polejaeva, I; Butler, J; Dai, Y; Ayares, D; Wells, K

    2011-06-01

    Inactivation of the endogenous pig immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, and replacement with their human counterparts, would produce animals that could alleviate both the supply and specificity issues of therapeutic human polyclonal antibodies (PAbs). Platform genetics are being developed in pigs that have all endogenous Ig loci inactivated and replaced by human counterparts, in order to address this unmet clinical need. This report describes the deletion of the porcine kappa (κ) light chain constant (Cκ) region in pig primary fetal fibroblasts (PPFFs) using gene targeting technology, and the generation of live animals from these cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning. There are only two other targeted loci previously published in swine, and this is the first report of a targeted disruption of an Ig light chain locus in a livestock species. Pigs with one targeted Cκ allele (heterozygous knockout or ±) were bred together to generate Cκ homozygous knockout (-/-) animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) from Cκ -/- pigs were devoid of κ-containing Igs. Furthermore, there was an increase in lambda (λ) light chain expression when compared to that of wild-type littermates (Cκ +/+). Targeted inactivation of the Ig heavy chain locus has also been achieved and work is underway to inactivate the pig lambda light chain locus.

  12. Purpose in life, depression, and locus of control.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W M

    1980-07-01

    Parallel to Frankl's theory of the search for meaning, which posits the separateness but intertwining of the psychological and existential realms, the Purpose In Life Test (PIL) has been found to have a low to moderate relationship with most conceptually related psychological measures. Extending separate correlational studies of the PIL with depression and locus of control, the current study inspected the relationship of individual PIL items to groups formed according to Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale and Rotter Internal-External Locus Of Control scores. One-hundred thirty-four Ss were split into four groups: Depressed external, depressed internals, nondepressed externals, and nondepressed internals. Although ungrouped correlational analysis of PIL items revealed only seven significant relationships with depression and two with locus of control, multiple discriminate analysis was successful in correctly classifying depressed externals about three-fourths of the time, and the overall "hit rate" for the four groups was above 60%. In addition to further validating the interaction of purpose in life with related psychological and social expectancy variables, results indicated a compounding effect between depression and external perception of reinforcement control with PIL scores in general, and two items (#4, 12) in particular, which appear to reflect the experience of current congruent involvement between the individual and his world.

  13. Genetic analysis of the claret locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, W.; Nelson, C.R.; Szauter, P. )

    1989-11-01

    The claret (ca) locus of Drosophila melanogaster comprises two separately mutable domains, one responsible for eye color and one responsible for proper disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis and early cleavage divisions. Previously isolated alleles are of three types: (1) alleles of the claret (ca) type that affect eye color only, (2) alleles of the claret-nondisjunctional (ca{sup nd}) type that affect eye color and chromosome behavior, and (3) a meiotic mutation, non-claret disjunctional (ncd), that affects chromosome behavior only. In order to investigate the genetic structure of the claret locus, the authors have isolated 19 radiation-induced alleles of claret on the basis of the eye color phenotype. Two of these 19 new alleles are of the ca{sup nd} type, while 17 are of the ca type, demonstrating that the two domains do not often act as a single target for mutagenesis. This suggests that the two separately mutable functions are likely to be encoded by separate or overlapping genes rather than by a single gene. One of the new alleles of the ca{sup nd} type is a chromosome rearrangement with a breakpoint at the position of the claret locus. If this breakpoint is the cause of the mutant phenotype and there are no other mutations associated with the rearrangement, the two functions must be encoded by overlapping genes.

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide.

  15. 12 CFR 562.2 - Regulatory reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of the special supervisory, regulatory, and economic policy needs served by such reports. Regulatory... reflects the underlying economic substance of the transaction at issue. Regulatory reporting...

  16. Molecular Genetic Characterization of Six Recessive Viable Alleles of the Mouse Agouti Locus

    PubMed Central

    Hustad, C. M.; Perry, W. L.; Siracusa, L. D.; Rasberry, C.; Cobb, L.; Cattanach, B. M.; Kovatch, R.; Copeland, N. G.; Jenkins, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    The agouti locus on mouse chromosome 2 encodes a secreted cysteine-rich protein of 131 amino acids that acts as a molecular switch to instruct the melanocyte to make either yellow pigment (phaeomelanin) or black pigment (eumelanin). Mutations that up-regulate agouti expression are dominant to those causing decreased expression and result in yellow coat color. Other associated effects are obesity, diabetes, and increased susceptibility to tumors. To try to define important functional domains of the agouti protein, we have analyzed the molecular defects present in a series of recessive viable agouti mutations. In total, six alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(da), a(16H), a(18H), a(e)) were examined at both the RNA and DNA level. Two of the alleles, a(16H) and a(e), result from mutations in the agouti coding region. Four alleles (a(mJ), a(u), a(18H), and a(da)) appear to represent regulatory mutations that down-regulate agouti expression. Interestingly, one of these mutations, a(18H), also appears to cause an immunological defect in the homozygous condition. This immunological defect is somewhat analogous to that observed in motheaten (me) mutant mice. Short and long-range restriction enzyme analyses of homozygous a(18H) DNA are consistent with the hypothesis that a(18H) results from a paracentric inversion where one end of the inversion maps in the 5' regulatory region of agouti and the other end in or near a gene that is required for normal immunological function. Cloning the breakpoints of this putative inversion should allow us to identify the gene that confers this interesting immunological disorder. PMID:7635290

  17. Genome-Wide Characterization of cis-Acting DNA Targets Reveals the Transcriptional Regulatory Framework of Opaque2 in Maize[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chaobin; Qiao, Zhenyi; Qi, Weiwei; Wang, Qian; Yuan, Yue; Yang, Xi; Tang, Yuanping; Mei, Bing; Lv, Yuanda; Zhao, Han; Xiao, Han; Song, Rentao

    2015-01-01

    Opaque2 (O2) is a transcription factor that plays important roles during maize endosperm development. Mutation of the O2 gene improves the nutritional value of maize seeds but also confers pleiotropic effects that result in reduced agronomic quality. To reveal the transcriptional regulatory framework of O2, we studied the transcriptome of o2 mutants using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and determined O2 DNA binding targets using chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq). The RNA-Seq analysis revealed 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and 383 differentially expressed long, noncoding RNAs. The DEGs cover a wide range of functions related to nutrient reservoir activity, nitrogen metabolism, stress resistance, etc. ChIP-Seq analysis detected 1686 O2 DNA binding sites distributed over 1143 genes. Overlay of the RNA-Seq and ChIP-Seq results revealed 35 O2-modulated target genes. We identified four O2 binding motifs; among them, TGACGTGG appears to be the most conserved and strongest. We confirmed that, except for the 16- and 18-kD zeins, O2 directly regulates expression of all other zeins. O2 directly regulates two transcription factors, genes linked to carbon and amino acid metabolism and abiotic stress resistance. We built a hierarchical regulatory model for O2 that provides an understanding of its pleiotropic biological effects. PMID:25691733

  18. 78 FR 44329 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ....nasa.gov/open . Timetable: Action Date FR Cite NPRM 10/00/13 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required... Administration (NASA). ACTION: Semiannual regulatory agenda. SUMMARY: NASA's regulatory agenda describes those regulations being considered for development or amendment by NASA, the need and legal basis for the...

  19. 75 FR 79759 - Regulatory Agenda

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... Action 04/16/10 75 FR 2012 Regulatory Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact: Mohammed Khan... ``Regulatory Planning and Review,'' 58 FR 51735, and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601 et seq... use throughout the rulemaking process. Timetable: Action Date FR Cite Notice: Public Meeting...

  20. The yeast PHO5 promoter: from single locus to systems biology of a paradigm for gene regulation through chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Korber, Philipp; Barbaric, Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics crucially contributes to gene regulation. Studies of the yeast PHO5 promoter were key to establish this nowadays accepted view and continuously provide mechanistic insight in chromatin remodeling and promoter regulation, both on single locus as well as on systems level. The PHO5 promoter is a context independent chromatin switch module where in the repressed state positioned nucleosomes occlude transcription factor sites such that nucleosome remodeling is a prerequisite for and not consequence of induced gene transcription. This massive chromatin transition from positioned nucleosomes to an extensive hypersensitive site, together with respective transitions at the co-regulated PHO8 and PHO84 promoters, became a prime model for dissecting how remodelers, histone modifiers and chaperones co-operate in nucleosome remodeling upon gene induction. This revealed a surprisingly complex cofactor network at the PHO5 promoter, including five remodeler ATPases (SWI/SNF, RSC, INO80, Isw1, Chd1), and demonstrated for the first time histone eviction in trans as remodeling mode in vivo. Recently, the PHO5 promoter and the whole PHO regulon were harnessed for quantitative analyses and computational modeling of remodeling, transcription factor binding and promoter input-output relations such that this rewarding single-locus model becomes a paradigm also for theoretical and systems approaches to gene regulatory networks. PMID:25190457

  1. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-12-04

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species.

  2. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken.

    PubMed

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2016-02-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait-gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  3. Quantitative Trait Locus and Genetical Genomics Analysis Identifies Putatively Causal Genes for Fecundity and Brooding in the Chicken

    PubMed Central

    Johnsson, Martin; Jonsson, Kenneth B.; Andersson, Leif; Jensen, Per; Wright, Dominic

    2015-01-01

    Life history traits such as fecundity are important to evolution because they make up components of lifetime fitness. Due to their polygenic architectures, such traits are difficult to investigate with genetic mapping. Therefore, little is known about their molecular basis. One possible way toward finding the underlying genes is to map intermediary molecular phenotypes, such as gene expression traits. We set out to map candidate quantitative trait genes for egg fecundity in the chicken by combining quantitative trait locus mapping in an advanced intercross of wild by domestic chickens with expression quantitative trait locus mapping in the same birds. We measured individual egg fecundity in 232 intercross chickens in two consecutive trials, the second one aimed at measuring brooding. We found 12 loci for different aspects of egg fecundity. We then combined the genomic confidence intervals of these loci with expression quantitative trait loci from bone and hypothalamus in the same intercross. Overlaps between egg loci and expression loci, and trait–gene expression correlations identify 29 candidates from bone and five from hypothalamus. The candidate quantitative trait genes include fibroblast growth factor 1, and mitochondrial ribosomal proteins L42 and L32. In summary, we found putative quantitative trait genes for egg traits in the chicken that may have been affected by regulatory variants under chicken domestication. These represent, to the best of our knowledge, some of the first candidate genes identified by genome-wide mapping for life history traits in an avian species. PMID:26637433

  4. Organization and PprB-Dependent Control of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa tad Locus, Involved in Flp Pilus Biology▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Christophe S.; Bordi, Christophe; Termine, Elise; Filloux, Alain; de Bentzmann, Sophie

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial attachment to the substratum involves several cell surface organelles, including various types of pili. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Tad machine assembles type IVb pili, which are required for adhesion to abiotic surfaces and to eukaryotic cells. Type IVb pili consist of a major subunit, the Flp pilin, processed by the FppA prepilin peptidase. In this study, we investigated the regulatory mechanism of the tad locus. We showed that the flp gene is expressed late in the stationary growth phase in aerobic conditions. We also showed that the tad locus was composed of five independent transcriptional units. We used transcriptional fusions to show that tad gene expression was positively controlled by the PprB response regulator. We subsequently showed that PprB bound to the promoter regions, directly controlling the expression of these genes. We then evaluated the contribution of two genes, tadF and rcpC, to type IVb pilus assembly. The deletion of these two genes had no effect on Flp production, pilus assembly, or Flp-mediated adhesion to abiotic surfaces in our conditions. However, our results suggest that the putative RcpC protein modifies the Flp pilin, thereby promoting Flp-dependent adhesion to eukaryotic cells. PMID:19151143

  5. Disruption at the PTCHD1 locus on Xp22.11 in autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Noor, Abdul; Whibley, Annabel; Marshall, Christian R.; Gianakopoulos, Peter J.; Piton, Amelie; Carson, Andrew R.; Orlic-Milacic, Marija; Lionel, Anath; Sato, Daisuke; Pinto, Dalila; Drmic, Irene; Noakes, Carolyn; Senman, Lili; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Mo, Rong; Gauthier, Julie; Crosbie, Jennifer; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Munson, Jeffrey; Estes, Annette M.; Fiebig, Andreas; Franke, Andre; Schreiber, Stefan; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Guter, Stephen J.; Cook, Edwin H.; Dawson, Geraldine; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Battaglia, Agatino; Maestrini, Elena; Jeng, Linda; Hutchison, Terry; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica; Chudley, Albert E.; Lewis, Suzanne M.E.; Liu, Xudong; Holden, Jeanette; Fernandez, Bridget; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Bryson, Susan E.; Roberts, Wendy; Szatmari, Peter; Gallagher, Louise; Stratton, Michael R.; Gecz, Jozef; Brady, Angela F.; Schwartz, Charles E.; Schachar, Russell J.; Monaco, Anthony P.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Hui, Chi-chung; Raymond, F. Lucy; Scherer, Stephen W.; Vincent, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Autism is a common neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex mode of inheritance. It is one of the most highly heritable of the complex disorders, however, the underlying genetic factors remain largely unknown. Here, we report mutations in the X-chromosome PTCHD1 (patched-related) gene, in seven families with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and in three families with intellectual disability (ID). A 167 Kb microdeletion spanning exon 1 was found in two brothers, one with ASD the other with learning disability and ASD features, and a 90 Kb microdeletion spanning the entire gene was found in three males with ID in a second family. In 900 ASD and 208 ID male probands we identified seven different missense changes in eight probands, all male and inherited from unaffected mothers, and not found in controls. Two of the ASD individuals with missense changes also carried a de novo deletion at another ASD-susceptibility locus (DPYD and DPP6), suggesting complex genetic contributions. In additional males with ASD, we identified deletions in the 5’ flanking region of PTCHD1 disrupting a complex non-coding RNA and potential regulatory elements; equivalent changes were not found in male control individuals (p=1.2 ×10-5). Systematic screening at PTCHD1 and 5’-flanking regions, suggests involvement of this locus in ~1% of ASD and ID individuals. PMID:20844286

  6. Complete TCR-α gene locus control region activity in T cells derived in vitro from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lahiji, Armin; Kucerová-Levisohn, Martina; Lovett, Jordana; Holmes, Roxanne; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Ortiz, Benjamin D

    2013-07-01

    Locus control regions (LCRs) are cis-acting gene regulatory elements with the unique, integration site-independent ability to transfer the characteristics of their locus-of-origin's gene expression pattern to a linked transgene in mice. LCR activities have been discovered in numerous T cell lineage-expressed gene loci. These elements can be adapted to the design of stem cell gene therapy vectors that direct robust therapeutic gene expression to the T cell progeny of engineered stem cells. Currently, transgenic mice provide the only experimental approach that wholly supports all the critical aspects of LCR activity. In this study, we report the manifestation of all key features of mouse TCR-α gene LCR function in T cells derived in vitro from mouse embryonic stem cells. High-level, copy number-related TCR-α LCR-linked reporter gene expression levels are cell type restricted in this system, and upregulated during the expected stage transition of T cell development. We also report that de novo introduction of TCR-α LCR-linked transgenes into existing T cell lines yields incomplete LCR activity. These data indicate that establishing full TCR-α LCR activity requires critical molecular events occurring prior to final T lineage determination. This study also validates a novel, tractable, and more rapid approach for the study of LCR activity in T cells, and its translation to therapeutic genetic engineering.

  7. A molecular basis for the association of the HLA-DRB1 locus, citrullination, and rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Scally, Stephen W.; Petersen, Jan; Law, Soi Cheng; Dudek, Nadine L.; Nel, Hendrik J.; Loh, Khai Lee; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Eckle, Sidonia B.G.; van Heemst, Jurgen; Pike, Robert N.; McCluskey, James; Toes, Rene E.; La Gruta, Nicole L.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is strongly associated with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1 locus that possesses the shared susceptibility epitope (SE) and the citrullination of self-antigens. We show how citrullinated aggrecan and vimentin epitopes bind to HLA-DRB1*04:01/04. Citrulline was accommodated within the electropositive P4 pocket of HLA-DRB1*04:01/04, whereas the electronegative P4 pocket of the RA-resistant HLA-DRB1*04:02 allomorph interacted with arginine or citrulline-containing epitopes. Peptide elution studies revealed P4 arginine–containing peptides from HLA-DRB1*04:02, but not from HLA-DRB1*04:01/04. Citrullination altered protease susceptibility of vimentin, thereby generating self-epitopes that are presented to T cells in HLA-DRB1*04:01+ individuals. Using HLA-II tetramers, we observed citrullinated vimentin- and aggrecan-specific CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of HLA-DRB1*04:01+ RA-affected and healthy individuals. In RA patients, autoreactive T cell numbers correlated with disease activity and were deficient in regulatory T cells relative to healthy individuals. These findings reshape our understanding of the association between citrullination, the HLA-DRB1 locus, and T cell autoreactivity in RA. PMID:24190431

  8. High-resolution mapping of the x-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus

    SciTech Connect

    Zonana, J.; Jones, M.; Litt, M.; Kramer, P.; Browne, D.; Becker, H.W. ); Brockdorff, N.; Rastan, S. ); Davies, K.P.; Clarke, A. )

    1992-11-01

    The X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (EDA) locus has been previously localized to the subchromosomal region Xq11-q21.1. The authors have extended previous linkage studies and analyzed linkage between the EDA locus and 10 marker loci, including five new loci, in 41 families. Four of the marker loci showed no recombination with the EDA locus, and six other loci were also linked to the EDA locus with recombination fractions of .009-.075. Multipoint analysis gave support to the placement of the PGK1P1 locus proximal to the EDA locus and the DXS453 and PGK1 loci distal to EDA. Further ordering of the loci could be inferred from a human-rodent somatic cell hybrid derived from an affected female with EDA and an X;9 translocation and from studies of an affected male with EDA and a submicroscopic deletion. Three of the proximal marker loci, which showed no recombination with the EDA locus, when used in combination, were informative in 92% of females. The closely linked flanking polymorphic loci DXS339 and DXS453 had heterozygosites of 72% and 76%, respectively, and when used jointly, they were doubly informative in 52% of females. The human DXS732 locus was defined by a conserved mouse probe pcos169E/4 (DXCrc169 locus) that consegregates with the mouse tabby (Ta) locus, a potential homologue to the EDA locus. The absence of recombination between EDA and the DXSA732 locus lends support to the hypothesis that the DXCrc169 locus in the mouse and the DXS732 locus in humans may contain candidate sequences for the Ta and EDA genes, respectively. 36 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  9. Establishing regulatory priorities

    SciTech Connect

    Pontius, F.W.

    1995-12-01

    Statutory deadlines for setting regulations under the 1986 Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) have not been met. Faced with limited resources, the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) has historically set regulatory priorities based on perceived need, politics, and legal deadlines. This has resulted in a fragmented regulatory program and confusion on the part of the regulated community and on the part of other stakeholders. Even though the agency has been subject to court-imposed deadlines for most new regulations, resource limitations have caused these deadlines to be missed, resulting in new court-imposed deadlines. In 1994, the agency began considering a new approach for determining how many regulations can be developed and in what order. A draft strategic plan was prepared in December 1994. Based on discussion of this plan, USEPA requested the US District Court for Oregon to extend certain regulatory deadlines so that new priorities could be set for the highest-risk substances. An extension was granted until Aug. 1, 1995, and was subsequently extended to Dec. 15, 1995.

  10. Regulatory aspects on nanomedicines.

    PubMed

    Sainz, Vanessa; Conniot, João; Matos, Ana I; Peres, Carina; Zupancic, Eva; Moura, Liane; Silva, Liana C; Florindo, Helena F; Gaspar, Rogério S

    2015-12-18

    Nanomedicines have been in the forefront of pharmaceutical research in the last decades, creating new challenges for research community, industry, and regulators. There is a strong demand for the fast development of scientific and technological tools to address unmet medical needs, thus improving human health care and life quality. Tremendous advances in the biomaterials and nanotechnology fields have prompted their use as promising tools to overcome important drawbacks, mostly associated to the non-specific effects of conventional therapeutic approaches. However, the wide range of application of nanomedicines demands a profound knowledge and characterization of these complex products. Their properties need to be extensively understood to avoid unpredicted effects on patients, such as potential immune reactivity. Research policy and alliances have been bringing together scientists, regulators, industry, and, more frequently in recent years, patient representatives and patient advocacy institutions. In order to successfully enhance the development of new technologies, improved strategies for research-based corporate organizations, more integrated research tools dealing with appropriate translational requirements aiming at clinical development, and proactive regulatory policies are essential in the near future. This review focuses on the most important aspects currently recognized as key factors for the regulation of nanomedicines, discussing the efforts under development by industry and regulatory agencies to promote their translation into the market. Regulatory Science aspects driving a faster and safer development of nanomedicines will be a central issue for the next years.

  11. Role of the host cell in bacteriophage T4 development. II. Characterization of host mutants that have pleiotropic effects on T4 growth.

    PubMed Central

    Stitt, B L; Revel, H R; Lielausis, I; Wood, W B

    1980-01-01

    Mutant host-defective Escherichi coli that fail to propagate bacteriophage T4 and have a pleiotropic effect on T4 development have been isolated and characterized. In phage-infected mutant cells, specific early phage proteins are absent or reduced in amount, phage DNA synthesis is depressed by about 50%, specific structural phage proteins, including some tail and collar components, are deficient or missing, and host-cell lysis is delayed and slow. Almost all phage that can overcome the host block carry mutantions that map in functionally undefined 'nonessential' regions of the T4 genome, most near gene 39. The mutant host strains are temperature sensitive for growth and show simultaneous reversion of the ts phenotype and the inability to propagate T4+. The host mutations are cotransduced with ilv (83 min) and may lie in the gene for transcription termination factor rho. Images PMID:6999171

  12. [Role of RNA-polymerase in gene activity regulation of E. coli RNA-polymerase mutants with a pleiotropic effect. I. Physiological and biochemical studies].

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, S G; Arutiunian, A V; Ozolin', O N; Oganesian, M G

    1979-01-01

    Four Rifr-mutants of E. coli B/r (rpo B401, rpo B402, rpo B403, rpo B409) which differ from the wild strain in one or more phenotypic properties besides rifampicin resistance were obtained. Transfer of the mutant Rifr-alleles into the parent strain gives the latter all the properties of the mutant. This indicates that the new properties are due to the pleiotropic effect of Rifr-mutations. Biochemical studies of the properties of RNA-polymerases from the mutants and the parent showed that some new properties of the mutants could not be explained by the appearance of analogous properties in the mutant RNA-polymerase itself. They seem to be caused by alteration in functional activity of the mutant enzyme, particulary, alteration of its control properties during transcription. The function of the beta-subunit in genetic transcription is discussed.

  13. Pleiotropic effects of the lpxM mutation in Yersinia pestis resulting in modification of the biosynthesis of major immunoreactive antigens

    PubMed Central

    Feodorova, V.A.; Pan'kina, L.N.; Savostina, E.P.; Kuznetsov, O.S.; Konnov, N.P.; Sayapina, L.V.; Dentovskaya, S.V.; Shaikhutdinova, R.Z.; Ageev, S.A.; Lindner, B.; A.N.Kondakova; Bystrova, O.V.; Kocharova, N.A.; Senchenkova, S.N.; Holst, O.; Pier, G.B.; Knirel, Y.A.; Anisimov, A.P.; Motin, V.L.

    2010-01-01

    Deletion mutants in the lpxM gene in two Y. pestis strains, the live Russian vaccine strain EV NIIEG and a fully virulent strain, 231, synthesise a less toxic penta-acylated lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Analysis of these mutants revealed they possessed marked reductions in expression and immunoreactivity of numerous major proteins and carbohydrate antigens, including F1, Pla, Ymt, V antigen, LPS, and ECA. Moreover, both mutants demonstrated altered epitope specificities of the antigens as determined in immunodot-ELISAs and immunoblotting analyses using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The strains also differed in their susceptibility to the diagnostic plague bacteriophage L-413C. These findings indicate that the effects of the lpxM mutation on reduced virulence and enhanced immunity of the Y. pestis EV ΔlpxM is also associated with these pleiotropic changes and not just to changes in the lipid A acylation. PMID:19428838

  14. Pleiotropic effects of the lpxM mutation in Yersinia pestis resulting in modification of the biosynthesis of major immunoreactive antigens.

    PubMed

    Feodorova, V A; Pan'kina, L N; Savostina, E P; Kuznetsov, O S; Konnov, N P; Sayapina, L V; Dentovskaya, S V; Shaikhutdinova, R Z; Ageev, S A; Lindner, B; Kondakova, A N; Bystrova, O V; Kocharova, N A; Senchenkova, S N; Holst, O; Pier, G B; Knirel, Y A; Anisimov, A P; Motin, V L

    2009-04-01

    Deletion mutants in the lpxM gene in two Yersinia pestis strains, the live Russian vaccine strain EV NIIEG and a fully virulent strain, 231, synthesise a less toxic penta-acylated lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Analysis of these mutants revealed they possessed marked reductions in expression and immunoreactivity of numerous major proteins and carbohydrate antigens, including F1, Pla, Ymt, V antigen, LPS, and ECA. Moreover, both mutants demonstrated altered epitope specificities of the antigens as determined in immunodot-ELISAs and immunoblotting analyses using a panel of monoclonal antibodies. The strains also differed in their susceptibility to the diagnostic plague bacteriophage L-413C. These findings indicate that the effects of the lpxM mutation on reduced virulence and enhanced immunity of the Y. pestis EV DeltalpxM is also associated with these pleiotropic changes and not just to changes in the lipid A acylation. PMID:19428838

  15. Overexpression of Ipe protein from the coliphage mEp021 induces pleiotropic effects involving haemolysis by HlyE-containing vesicles and cell death.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Peñafiel, Eva; Fernández-Ramírez, Fernando; Ishida, Cecilia; Reyes-Cortés, Ruth; Sepúlveda-Robles, Omar; Guarneros-Peña, Gabriel; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María; Kameyama, Luis

    2012-06-01

    Lysogenic Escherichia coli K-12 harbouring the prophage mEp021 displays haemolytic activity. From a genomic library of mEp021, we identified an open reading frame (ORF 4) that was responsible for the haemolytic activity. However, the ORF 4 sequence contains four initiation codons in the same frame: ORF 4.1-ORF 4.4, coding for 83-a.a., 82-a.a., 77-a.a. and 72-a.a. products, respectively. The expression of the cloned ORF 4.3, or inducer of pleiotropic effects (ipe), reproduced the haemolytic phenotype in a native strain carrying the gene hlyE(+), but not in the mutant hlyE(-) strain. The overexpression of Ipe induced several pleiotropic effects, such as the inhibition of cell growth and the deregulation of cell division, which resulted in a mixture of normal and desiccated-like cells: normal-filamentous, desiccated-like-filamentous bacilli, minicells etc. Other effects included abnormalities of the cell membrane, the production of vesicles containing HlyE, and finally, cell death. These events were analysed at the molecular level by microarray assays. The global transcription profile of E. coli K-12 strain MC4100, which expressed Ipe after 4 h, revealed differential expression of various genes, most of which were related either to cell membrane and murein biosynthesis or to cell division. The up-regulation of some of these transcripts was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Additional research is needed to determine whether these effects are directly related to Ipe activity or are consequences of the cellular responses to putative structural damage induced by Ipe. PMID:22365985

  16. Pleiotropic effects of YC-1 selectively inhibit pathological retinal neovascularization and promote physiological revascularization in a mouse model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    PubMed

    DeNiro, M; Al-Halafi, A; Al-Mohanna, F H; Alsmadi, O; Al-Mohanna, F A

    2010-03-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) have been implicated in ischemia-induced retinal neovascularization. Retinal ischemia has been shown to induce VEGF and iNOS expression. It has been postulated that one of the crucial consequences of iNOS expression in the ischemic retina is the inhibition of angiogenesis. Furthermore, iNOS was shown to be overexpressed in Müller cells from patients with diabetic retinopathy. YC-1, a small molecule inhibitor of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 alpha, has been shown to inhibit iNOS expression in various tissue models. Our aim was to assess the pleiotropic effects of YC-1 in an oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) mouse model and evaluate its therapeutic potential in HIF-1- and iNOS-mediated retinal pathologies. Dual-injections of YC-1 into the neovascular retinas decreased the total retinopathy score, inhibited vaso-obliteration and pathologic tuft formation, and concomitantly promoted physiological retinal revascularization, compared with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-treated group. Furthermore, YC-1-treated retinas exhibited a marked increase in immunoreactivities for CD31 and von Willebrand factor and displayed significant inhibition in HIF-1alpha protein expression. Furthermore, YC-1 down-regulated VEGF, erythropoietin, endothelin-1, matrix metalloproteinase-9, and iNOS message and protein levels. When hypoxic Müller and neuoroglial cells were treated with YC-1, iNOS mRNA and protein levels were reduced in a dose-dependent fashion. We demonstrate that YC-1 inhibits pathological retinal neovascularization by exhibiting antineovascular activities, which impaired ischemia-induced expression of HIF-1 and its downstream angiogenic molecules. Furthermore, YC-1 enhanced physiological revascularization of the retinal vascular plexuses via the inhibition of iNOS mRNA and protein expressions. The pleiotropic effects of YC-1 allude to its possible use as a promising therapeutic iNOS inhibitor

  17. [PLEIOTROPIC EFFECTS OF GIBBERELLIN-SENSITIVE AND GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARFING GENES IN COMMON WHEAT OF THE SOUTHERN STEP REGION OF BLACK SEA].

    PubMed

    Chebotar, G A; Chebotar, S V; Motsnyy, I I

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the pleiotropic effects of GA-sensitive (Rht8) and GA-insensitive (Rht-B1, Rht-D1) dwarfing genes and a gene that determines the response of plants to photoperiod--Ppd-D1 were carried out for three years in the southern step region of Black Sea bank on five different genetic backgrounds. It is shown that in addition to direct effects on plant height GA-sensitive and GA-insensitive dwarfing genes have pleiotropic effects on all studied traits except the number of fertile spikelets. Presence of the dwarfing genes in the genotype of tall forms led to the decrease of stem and ear length, and at the same time to the increase of ear density. The number of spikelets per spike decreased due to sterile spikelets, whereas the number of fertile spikelets did not change. There was a significant increase in the number of grains per ear as a result of increasing of spikelets in ears. The number and weight of grains did not decrease, even though the plants were characterized by a smaller number of productive stems. The presence of Rht8x allele on genetic background of variety Stepnyak resulted in a significant decrease of plants productivity. However, in combination with Ppd-D1a allele plants with Rht8x increased the potential productivity, and surpassed the parental form (Rht8a Ppd-D1b). The presence of Rht-B1e allele resulted in reduction of grain mass per spike and 1000-grain weight, increase of l/h, and left the number of grains per spike stable in comparison with Rht8c. PMID:27266182

  18. 4-(1-Ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide – A new pleiotropic HDAC inhibitor targeting cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, Katharina; Kahlen, Philip; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer

    2015-08-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) which play a crucial role in cancer cell proliferation are promising drug targets. However, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) modelled on natural hydroxamic acids such as trichostatin A frequently lead to resistance or even an increased agressiveness of tumours. As a workaround we developed 4-(1-ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide (etacrox), a hydroxamic acid that combines HDAC inhibition with synergistic effects of the 4,5-diarylimidazole residue. Etacrox proved highly cytotoxic against a panel of metastatic and resistant cancer cell lines while showing greater specificity for cancer over non-malignant cells when compared to the approved HDACi vorinostat. Like the latter, etacrox and the closely related imidazoles bimacroxam and animacroxam acted as pan-HDACi yet showed some specificity for HDAC6. Akt signalling and interference with nuclear beta-catenin localisation were elicited by etacrox at lower concentrations when compared to vorinostat. Moreover, etacrox disrupted the microtubule and focal adhesion dynamics of cancer cells and inhibited the proteolytic activity of prometastatic and proangiogenic matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, etacrox acted strongly antimigratory and antiinvasive against various cancer cell lines in three-dimensional transwell invasion assays and also antiangiogenic in vivo with respect to blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. These pleiotropic effects and its water-solubility and tolerance by mice render etacrox a promising new HDACi candidate. - Graphical abstract: A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with pleiotropic anticancer effects. - Highlights: • Etacrox is a new HDACi with cytotoxic, antiangiogenic and antiinvasive activity. • Etacrox causes aberrant cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal reorganisation. • Pro-metastatic and angiogenic matrix metalloproteinases are inhibited by etacrox. • Etacrox impairs blood vessel maturation in vivo and cancer cell

  19. Pleiotropic effects of sitagliptin versus voglibose in patients with type 2 diabetes inadequately controlled via diet and/or a single oral antihyperglycemic agent: a multicenter, randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Matsushima, Yukiko; Takeshita, Yumie; Kita, Yuki; Otoda, Toshiki; Kato, Ken-ichiro; Toyama-Wakakuri, Hitomi; Akahori, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Akiko; Hamaguchi, Erika; Nishimura, Yasuyuki; Kanamori, Takehiro; Kaneko, Shuichi; Takamura, Toshinari

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A step-up strategy for diet therapy and/or single oral antihyperglycemic agent (OHA) regimens has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a primary end point, and the pleiotropic effects on metabolic and cardiovascular parameters as secondary end points, of sitagliptin versus voglibose in patients with type 2 diabetes with inadequate glycemic control while on diet therapy and/or treatment with a single OHA. Methods In this multicenter, randomized, open-label, parallel-group trial, a total of 260 patients with inadequately controlled type 2 diabetes (HbA1c levels >6.9%) were randomly assigned to receive either sitagliptin (50 mg, once daily) or voglibose (0.6 mg, thrice daily) for 12 weeks. The primary end point was HbA1c levels. Results Patients receiving sitagliptin showed a significantly greater decrease in HbA1c levels (−0.78±0.69%) compared with those receiving voglibose (−0.30±0.78%). Sitagliptin treatment also lowered serum alkaline phosphatase levels and increased serum creatinine, uric acid, cystatin-C and homeostasis model assessment-β values. Voglibose increased low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and altered serum levels of several fatty acids, and increased Δ-5 desaturase activity. Both drugs increased serum adiponectin. The incidence of adverse events (AEs) was significantly lower in the sitagliptin group, due to the decreased incidence of gastrointestinal AEs. Conclusions Sitagliptin shows superior antihyperglycemic effects compared with voglibose as a first-line or second-line therapy. However, both agents possess unique pleiotropic effects that lead to reduced cardiovascular risk in Japanese people with type 2 diabetes. Trial registration number UMIN 000003503. PMID:27110370

  20. α-Linolenic Acid, A Nutraceutical with Pleiotropic Properties That Targets Endogenous Neuroprotective Pathways to Protect against Organophosphate Nerve Agent-Induced Neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Piermartiri, Tetsade; Pan, Hongna; Figueiredo, Taiza H; Marini, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    α-Linolenic acid (ALA) is a nutraceutical found in vegetable products such as flax and walnuts. The pleiotropic properties of ALA target endogenous neuroprotective and neurorestorative pathways in brain and involve the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a major neuroprotective protein in brain, and downstream signaling pathways likely mediated via activation of TrkB, the cognate receptor of BDNF. In this review, we discuss possible mechanisms of ALA efficacy against the highly toxic OP nerve agent soman. Organophosphate (OP) nerve agents are highly toxic chemical warfare agents and a threat to military and civilian populations. Once considered only for battlefield use, these agents are now used by terrorists to inflict mass casualties. OP nerve agents inhibit the critical enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) that rapidly leads to a cholinergic crisis involving multiple organs. Status epilepticus results from the excessive accumulation of synaptic acetylcholine which in turn leads to the overactivation of muscarinic receptors; prolonged seizures cause the neuropathology and long-term consequences in survivors. Current countermeasures mitigate symptoms and signs as well as reduce brain damage, but must be given within minutes after exposure to OP nerve agents supporting interest in newer and more effective therapies. The pleiotropic properties of ALA result in a coordinated molecular and cellular program to restore neuronal networks and improve cognitive function in soman-exposed animals. Collectively, ALA should be brought to the clinic to treat the long-term consequences of nerve agents in survivors. ALA may be an effective therapy for other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26569216

  1. Pleiotropic effects of juvenile hormone in ant queens and the escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off.

    PubMed

    Pamminger, Tobias; Treanor, David; Hughes, William O H

    2016-01-13

    The ubiquitous trade-off between survival and costly reproduction is one of the most fundamental constraints governing life-history evolution. In numerous animals, gonadotropic hormones antagonistically suppressing immunocompetence cause this trade-off. The queens of many social insects defy the reproduction-survival trade-off, achieving both an extraordinarily long life and high reproductive output, but how they achieve this is unknown. Here we show experimentally, by integrating quantification of gene expression, physiology and behaviour, that the long-lived queens of the ant Lasius niger have escaped the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off by decoupling the effects of a key endocrine regulator of fertility and immunocompetence in solitary insects, juvenile hormone (JH). This modification of the regulatory architecture enables queens to sustain a high reproductive output without elevated JH titres and suppressed immunocompetence, providing an escape from the reproduction-immunocompetence trade-off that may contribute to the extraordinary lifespan of many social insect queens.

  2. Truncated pStat5B is associated with the Idd4 locus in NOD mice

    SciTech Connect

    Davoodi-Semiromi, Abdoreza . E-mail: semiromi@pathology.ufl.edu; McDuffie, Marcia; Litherland, Sally; Clare-Salzler, Michael

    2007-05-11

    We investigate JAK-STAT5 activation and its relationship to full-length Stat5B (FL-Stat5) and constitutive phosphorylated carboxy-truncated Stat5B (ct-pStat5) in four different strains of mouse. Our electrophoresis mobility shift assays data indicate constitutive phosphorylation of full-length-Stat5 (p < 0.001) and DNA binding in NOD but not in B6 mice. Our data suggest that the relative ratio of FL-Stat5: ct-Stat5 in NOD is 5- to 8-fold lower (p < 0.0001) when compared with normal B6 mice. Additionally, EMSAs data from B6.NOD/c11 suggest contribution of Idd4 susceptibility locus on chromosome 11 in constitutive phosphorylation of Stat5 in NOD mice. The presence of ct-pStat5 in regulatory T cells of NOD mice suggests this form of Stat5 is associated with impaired function of Tregs in NOD mouse. In agreement with our previous report the JAK-Stat5B defective pathway in NOD mice along with other defective factors is associated with the pathogenesis of autoimmune type 1 diabetes in NOD mice.

  3. Subcellular localization and immunological detection of proteins encoded by the vir locus of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Stibitz, S; Yang, M S

    1991-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the central regulatory locus vir of Bordetella pertussis predicts that three gene products, BvgA, BvgB, and BvgC, are encoded. Features of the predicted primary structures of these proteins and their homology to other two-component systems suggest that BvgA is located in the cytoplasm, BvgB is located in the periplasm, and BvgC spans the inner membrane. We have used gene fusions to the phoA and lacZ genes of Escherichia coli to investigate the subcellular localization and membrane topology of these proteins. PhoA fusion proteins were also purified and used to raise antibodies that allowed visualization of the vir-encoded polypeptides by Western immunoblotting. Our results have largely confirmed the predictions of the DNA sequence, with the exception that BvgB and BvgC were found to constitute one larger protein that was homologous to the sensor class of two-component systems. We propose that this protein be named BvgS (for sensor) and that its gene be named bvgS. Images PMID:2066330

  4. Complementation analyses for 45 mutations encompassing the pink-eyed dilution (p) locus of the mouse

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, L.B.; Montgomery, C.S.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Johnson, D.K.

    1995-12-01

    The homozygous and heterozygous phenotypes are described and characterized for 45 new pink-eyed dilution (p) locus mutations, most of them radiation-induced, that affect survival at various stages of mouse development. Cytogenetically detectable aberrations were found in three of the new p mutations (large deletion, inversion, translocation), with band 7C involved in each case. The complementation map developed from the study of 810 types of compound heterozygotes identifies five functional units: jls and jlm (two distinct juvenile-fitness functions, the latter associated with neuromuscular defects), pl-1 and pl-2 (associated with early-postimplantation and preimplantation death, respectively), and nl [neonatal lethality associated with cleft palate (the frequency of rare {open_quotes}escapers{close_quotes} from this defect varied with the genotype)]. Orientation of these units relative to genetic markers is as follows: centromere, Gas-2, pl-1, jls, jlm p, nl (equatable to cp1= Gabrb3); pl-2 probably resides in the c-deletion complex. pl-1 does not mask preimplantation lethals between Gas2 and p; and no genes affecting survival are located between p and cp1. The alleles specifying mottling or darker pigment (generically, p{sup m} and p{sup x}, respectively) probably do not represent deletions of p-coding sequences but could be small rearrangements involving proximal regulatory elements. 43 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Super-Enhancers at the Nanog Locus Differentially Regulate Neighboring Pluripotency-Associated Genes.

    PubMed

    Blinka, Steven; Reimer, Michael H; Pulakanti, Kirthi; Rao, Sridhar

    2016-09-27

    Super-enhancers are tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements that drive expression of genes associated with cell identity and malignancy. A cardinal feature of super-enhancers is that they are transcribed to produce enhancer-derived RNAs (eRNAs). It remains unclear whether super-enhancers robustly activate genes in situ and whether their functions are attributable to eRNAs or the DNA element. CRISPR/Cas9 was used to systematically delete three discrete super-enhancers at the Nanog locus in embryonic stem cells, revealing functional differences in Nanog transcriptional regulation. One distal super-enhancer 45 kb upstream of Nanog (-45 enhancer) regulates both nearest neighbor genes, Nanog and Dppa3. Interestingly, eRNAs produced at the -45 enhancer specifically regulate Dppa3 expression by stabilizing looping of the -45 enhancer and Dppa3. Our work illustrates that genomic editing is required to determine enhancer function and points to a method to selectively target a subset of super-enhancer-regulated genes by depleting eRNAs. PMID:27681417

  6. Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RD1-locus on human primary dendritic cell immune functions.

    PubMed

    Etna, Marilena P; Giacomini, Elena; Pardini, Manuela; Severa, Martina; Bottai, Daria; Cruciani, Melania; Rizzo, Fabiana; Calogero, Raffaele; Brosch, Roland; Coccia, Eliana M

    2015-11-25

    Modern strategies to develop vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aim to improve the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine or to attenuate the virulence of Mtb vaccine candidates. In the present study, the impact of wild type or mutated region of difference 1 (RD1) variants on the immunogenicity of Mtb and BCG recombinants was investigated in human primary dendritic cells (DC). A comparative analysis of transcriptome, signalling pathway activation, maturation, apoptosis, cytokine production and capacity to promote Th1 responses demonstrated that DC sense quantitative and qualitative differences in the expression of RD1-encoded factors--ESAT6 and CFP10--within BCG or Mtb backgrounds. Expansion of IFN-γ producing T cells was promoted by BCG::RD1-challenged DC, as compared to their BCG-infected counterparts. Although Mtb recombinants acted as a strong Th-1 promoting stimulus, even with RD1 deletion, the attenuated Mtb strain carrying a C-terminus truncated ESAT-6 elicited a robust Th1 promoting phenotype in DC. Collectively, these studies indicate a necessary but not sufficient role for the RD1 locus in promoting DC immune-regulatory functions. Additional mycobacterial factors are likely required to endow DC with a high Th1 polarizing capacity, a desirable attribute for a successful control of Mtb infection.

  7. Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RD1-locus on human primary dendritic cell immune functions

    PubMed Central

    Etna, Marilena P.; Giacomini, Elena; Pardini, Manuela; Severa, Martina; Bottai, Daria; Cruciani, Melania; Rizzo, Fabiana; Calogero, Raffaele; Brosch, Roland; Coccia, Eliana M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern strategies to develop vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) aim to improve the current Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine or to attenuate the virulence of Mtb vaccine candidates. In the present study, the impact of wild type or mutated region of difference 1 (RD1) variants on the immunogenicity of Mtb and BCG recombinants was investigated in human primary dendritic cells (DC). A comparative analysis of transcriptome, signalling pathway activation, maturation, apoptosis, cytokine production and capacity to promote Th1 responses demonstrated that DC sense quantitative and qualitative differences in the expression of RD1-encoded factors—ESAT6 and CFP10—within BCG or Mtb backgrounds. Expansion of IFN-γ producing T cells was promoted by BCG::RD1-challenged DC, as compared to their BCG-infected counterparts. Although Mtb recombinants acted as a strong Th-1 promoting stimulus, even with RD1 deletion, the attenuated Mtb strain carrying a C-terminus truncated ESAT-6 elicited a robust Th1 promoting phenotype in DC. Collectively, these studies indicate a necessary but not sufficient role for the RD1 locus in promoting DC immune-regulatory functions. Additional mycobacterial factors are likely required to endow DC with a high Th1 polarizing capacity, a desirable attribute for a successful control of Mtb infection. PMID:26602835

  8. Nonsense mutation in the regulatory gene ETH2 involved in methionine biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cervisiae.

    PubMed

    Masselot, M; Robichon-Szulmajster, H

    1972-08-01

    Ethionine-resistant mutants, mapping at the locus eth2-the product of which is involved in pleiotropic regulation of methionine biosynthesis-have been isolated in a strain carrying five ochre nonsense mutations. Selection for nonsense suppressors in such a strain led to characterization of several allele-specific but gene non-specific suppressors which are active on the recessive heteroallele eth2-2 (resulting in partial recovery of sensitivity toward ethionine) as well as on the five other suppressible alleles. Two of these suppressors are unlinked to the eth2 gene and either dominant or semi-dominant. It is concluded that the mutation eth2-2 resulted in a nonsense codon. Enzyme studies indicate that this mutation results in a complete absence of an active product of gene eth2, in contrast with the effect of a former mutation eth2-1 which was interpreted as leading to a modified product of this gene (Cherest, Surdin-Kerjan and de Robichon-Szulmajster 1971). This conclusion is based on the absence of repressibility of methionine group I enzymes and the observation that in a heteroallelic diploid, eth2-1 expression is not masked by eth2-2. The nonsense suppressors studied lead to at least partial recovery of repressibility of methionine group I enzymes. All these results support the idea that the product of gene ETH2 is an aporepressor protein. PMID:4560067

  9. A Discrete Transition Zone Organizes the Topological and Regulatory Autonomy of the Adjacent Tfap2c and Bmp7 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujimura, Taro; Klein, Felix A.; Langenfeld, Katja; Glaser, Juliane; Huber, Wolfgang; Spitz, François

    2015-01-01

    Despite the well-documented role of remote enhancers in controlling developmental gene expression, the mechanisms that allocate enhancers to genes are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate the cis-regulatory organization of the locus containing the Tfap2c and Bmp7 genes in vivo, using a series of engineered chromosomal rearrangements. While these genes lie adjacent to one another, we demonstrate that they are independently regulated by distinct sets of enhancers, which in turn define non-overlapping regulatory domains. Chromosome conformation capture experiments reveal a corresponding partition of the locus in two distinct structural entities, demarcated by a discrete transition zone. The impact of engineered chromosomal rearrangements on the topology of the locus and the resultant gene expression changes indicate that this transition zone functionally organizes the structural partition of the locus, thereby defining enhancer-target gene allocation. This partition is, however, not absolute: we show that it allows competing interactions across it that may be non-productive for the competing gene, but modulate expression of the competed one. Altogether, these data highlight the prime role of the topological organization of the genome in long-distance regulation of gene expression. PMID:25569170

  10. Analysis of long-range interactions in primary human cells identifies cooperative CFTR regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Moisan, Stéphanie; Berlivet, Soizik; Ka, Chandran; Gac, Gérald Le; Dostie, Josée; Férec, Claude

    2016-01-01

    A mechanism by which control DNA elements regulate transcription over large linear genomic distances is by achieving close physical proximity with genes, and looping of the intervening chromatin paths. Alterations of such regulatory ‘chromatin looping’ systems are likely to play a critical role in human genetic disease at large. Here, we studied the spatial organization of a ≈790 kb locus encompassing the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Dysregulation of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis, which is the most common lethal genetic disorder in Caucasian populations. CFTR is a relatively large gene of 189 kb with a rather complex tissue-specific and temporal expression profile. We used chromatin conformation at the CFTR locus to identify new DNA sequences that regulate its transcription. By comparing 5C chromatin interaction maps of the CFTR locus in expressing and non-expressing human primary cells, we identified several new contact points between the CFTR promoter and its surroundings, in addition to regions featuring previously described regulatory elements. We demonstrate that two of these novel interacting regions cooperatively increase CFTR expression, and suggest that the new enhancer elements located on either side of the gene are brought together through chromatin looping via CTCF. PMID:26615198

  11. Flexible long-range loops in the VH gene region of the Igh locus facilitate the generation of a diverse antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Medvedovic, Jasna; Ebert, Anja; Tagoh, Hiromi; Tamir, Ido M; Schwickert, Tanja A; Novatchkova, Maria; Sun, Qiong; Huis In 't Veld, Pim J; Guo, Chunguang; Yoon, Hye Suk; Denizot, Yves; Holwerda, Sjoerd J B; de Laat, Wouter; Cogné, Michel; Shi, Yang; Alt, Frederick W; Busslinger, Meinrad

    2013-08-22

    The immunoglobulin heavy-chain (Igh) locus undergoes large-scale contraction in pro-B cells, which facilitates VH-DJH recombination by juxtaposing distal VH genes next to the DJH-rearranged gene segment in the 3' proximal Igh domain. By using high-resolution mapping of long-range interactions, we demonstrate that local interaction domains established the three-dimensional structure of the extended Igh locus in lymphoid progenitors. In pro-B cells, these local domains engaged in long-range interactions across the Igh locus, which depend on the regulators Pax5, YY1, and CTCF. The large VH gene cluster underwent flexible long-range interactions with the more rigidly structured proximal domain, which probably ensures similar participation of all VH genes in VH-DJH recombination to generate a diverse antibody repertoire. These long-range interactions appear to be an intrinsic feature of the VH gene cluster, because they are still generated upon mutation of the Eμ enhancer, IGCR1 insulator, or 3' regulatory region in the proximal Igh domain.

  12. Mapping of crown gall resistance locus Rcg1 in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Kuczmog, Anett; Galambos, Anikó; Horváth, Szabina; Mátai, Anikó; Kozma, Pál; Szegedi, Ernő; Putnoky, Péter

    2012-11-01

    Agrobacteria are efficient plant pathogens. They are able to transform plant cells genetically resulting in abnormal cell proliferation. Cultivars of Vitis vinifera are highly susceptible to many virulent Agrobacterium strains but certain wild Vitis species, including Vitis amurensis have resistant genotypes. Studies of the molecular background of such natural resistance are of special importance, not only for practical benefits in agricultural practice but also for understanding the role of plant genes in the transformation process. Earlier, crown gall resistance from V. amurensis was introgressed into V. vinifera through interspecific breeding and it was shown to be inherited as a single and dominant Mendelian trait. To develop this research further, towards understanding underlying molecular mechanisms, a mapping population was established, and resistance-coupled molecular DNA markers were identified by three different approaches. First, RAPD makers linked to the resistance locus (Rcg1) were identified, and on the basis of their DNA sequences, we developed resistance-coupled SCAR markers. However, localization of these markers in the grapevine genome sequence failed due to their similarity to many repetitive regions. Next, using SSR markers of the grapevine reference linkage map, location of the resistance locus was established on linkage group 15 (LG15). Finally, this position was supported further by developing new chromosome-specific markers and by the construction of the genetic map of the region including nine loci in 29.1 cM. Our results show that the closest marker is located 3.3 cM from the Rcg1 locus that may correspond to 576 kb. PMID:22801874

  13. Bundle-Forming Pilus Locus of Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria

    PubMed Central

    Hadi, Nahal; Yang, Qin; Barnett, Timothy C.; Tabei, S. Mohammed B.; Kirov, Sylvia M.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the colonization mechanisms of Aeromonas spp. Previous work has suggested that the type IV bundle-forming pilus (Bfp) is an aeromonad intestinal colonization factor. This study provides the first genetic characterization of this structure. To define the role of Bfp in Aeromonas veronii bv. Sobria adherence, a 22-kb locus encoding the bundle-forming pilus was isolated; this contained 17 pilus-related genes similar to the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) of Vibrio cholerae. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the locus had two major transcriptional units, mshI to mshF and mshB to mshQ. Transcriptional fusion experiments demonstrated the presence of two strong promoters upstream of mshI and mshB. The locus encoded four putative prepilin proteins, one of which (MshA) corresponded to the N-terminal sequence of the previously isolated major pilin protein. All the pilin genes were inactivated, mutation of each minor or major pilin gene greatly reduced the bacterium's ability to adhere and form biofilms, and complementation of each mutant in trans rescued this phenotype. Mutation of the major pilin MshA and MshB, a minor pilin, resulted in their loss. The position of the mshH gene is conserved within a number of bacteria, and we have shown it is not transcriptionally linked to the other msh genes; moreover, its mutation did not have a dramatic effect on either adhesion or biofilm formation. We conclude that the bundle-forming pilus is required for A. veronii bv. Sobria adherence and biofilm formation; furthermore, both the major and minor pilin proteins are essential for this process. PMID:22311923

  14. Developmental expression of the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fjose, A.; Polito, L. C.; Weber, U.; Gehring, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    We have isolated several cDNA clones of the white locus which are derived from embryonic and pupal transcripts of Drosophila melanogaster. The cDNA sequences map within ˜7.5 kb (coordinates −3.0 to +4.6) of the genomic DNA and correspond mainly to sequences within the distal region of the gene (coordinates −0.2 to −3.0). A major RNA species of 2.6 kb was detected on Northerns of poly(A)+ RNA isolated from all developmental stages. The total accumulation of this transcript peaks in the mature third instar larva to a level of 0.003% which is about ten times higher than that observed in embryos. The spatial distribution of white locus transcripts was determined by in situ hybridization to tissue sections. In embryos, hybridization signals are restricted to the cells of the developing Malpighian tubules and the signal strength corresponds with ˜50 transcripts per cell. Before the termination of the third instar stage, hybridization signals are also detected at a comparable level in the eye antennal disks. At the same stage, a third site of labeling is observed over a small cluster of cells which seems to be associated with the larval photoreceptor organs. Thus, white locus expression is largely restricted to tissues which are known to be involved in the biosynthesis of eye pigments and these different cell types act in a temporally autonomous manner with respect to the induction of the white gene during development. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:16453550

  15. Intragenic recombination at the human phosphoglucomutase 1 locus: Predictions fulfilled

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Norio ); Neel, J.V. )

    1993-11-15

    In 1982, the authors advanced a phylogeny that attributed eight alleles of the phosphoglucomutase 1 locus (PGM1) to three independent mutations in a primal allele, followed by four intragenic recombination events involving these mutants. The recent description of a cDNA probe for this locus now renders it possible to test the validity of this phylogeny. cDNAs of PGM1 reverse-transcribed from mRNAs obtained from Japanese individuals possessing eight different electrophoretically defined alleles (PGM1*1+, PGM1*1-, PGM1*2+, PGM1*2-, PGM1*3+, PGM1*3-, PGM1*7+, PGM1*7-) were amplified by PCR and the sequences were determined. Only three different base substitutions were identified when PGM1*1+ was taken as the reference allele, as follows: an A to T transversion at residue 265, a C to T transition at residue 723, and a T to C transition at residue 1320. The second of these substitutions creates a BglII restriction enzyme site and the third creates a Nla III site. At the amino acid level, these substitutions alter amino acid 67 from Lys to Met, amino acid 220 from Arg to Cys, and amino acid 419 from Tyr to His, respectively. These mutations resulted in the electrophoretic properties defining PGM1*7+, the PGM1*2+, and PGM1*1- alleles, respectively. Subsequent intragenic recombinational events resulted in the remaining four alleles. For two of these latter alleles (PGM1*7- and PGM1*3-), more than one type of intragenic crossover can produce the allele. These findings verify the predicted phylogeny and provide a case study in the evolution of complexity at a genetic locus.

  16. Mapping of crown gall resistance locus Rcg1 in grapevine.

    PubMed

    Kuczmog, Anett; Galambos, Anikó; Horváth, Szabina; Mátai, Anikó; Kozma, Pál; Szegedi, Ernő; Putnoky, Péter

    2012-11-01

    Agrobacteria are efficient plant pathogens. They are able to transform plant cells genetically resulting in abnormal cell proliferation. Cultivars of Vitis vinifera are highly susceptible to many virulent Agrobacterium strains but certain wild Vitis species, including Vitis amurensis have resistant genotypes. Studies of the molecular background of such natural resistance are of special importance, not only for practical benefits in agricultural practice but also for understanding the role of plant genes in the transformation process. Earlier, crown gall resistance from V. amurensis was introgressed into V. vinifera through interspecific breeding and it was shown to be inherited as a single and dominant Mendelian trait. To develop this research further, towards understanding underlying molecular mechanisms, a mapping population was established, and resistance-coupled molecular DNA markers were identified by three different approaches. First, RAPD makers linked to the resistance locus (Rcg1) were identified, and on the basis of their DNA sequences, we developed resistance-coupled SCAR markers. However, localization of these markers in the grapevine genome sequence failed due to their similarity to many repetitive regions. Next, using SSR markers of the grapevine reference linkage map, location of the resistance locus was established on linkage group 15 (LG15). Finally, this position was supported further by developing new chromosome-specific markers and by the construction of the genetic map of the region including nine loci in 29.1 cM. Our results show that the closest marker is located 3.3 cM from the Rcg1 locus that may correspond to 576 kb.

  17. Genetic Locus for Streptolysin S Production by Group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Nizet, Victor; Beall, Bernard; Bast, Darrin J.; Datta, Vivekananda; Kilburn, Laurie; Low, Donald E.; De Azavedo, Joyce C. S.

    2000-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is an important human pathogen that causes pharyngitis and invasive infections, including necrotizing fasciitis. Streptolysin S (SLS) is the cytolytic factor that creates the zone of beta-hemolysis surrounding GAS colonies grown on blood agar. We recently reported the discovery of a potential genetic determinant involved in SLS production, sagA, encoding a small peptide of 53 amino acids (S. D. Betschel, S. M. Borgia, N. L. Barg, D. E. Low, and J. C. De Azavedo, Infect. Immun. 66:1671–1679, 1998). Using transposon mutagenesis, chromosomal walking steps, and data from the GAS genome sequencing project (www.genome.ou.edu/strep.html), we have now identified a contiguous nine-gene locus (sagA to sagI) involved in SLS production. The sag locus is conserved among GAS strains regardless of M protein type. Targeted plasmid integrational mutagenesis of each gene in the sag operon resulted in an SLS-negative phenotype. Targeted integrations (i) upstream of the sagA promoter and (ii) downstream of a terminator sequence after sagI did not affect SLS production, establishing the functional boundaries of the operon. A rho-independent terminator sequence between sagA and sagB appears to regulate the amount of sagA transcript produced versus transcript for the entire operon. Reintroduction of the nine-gene sag locus on a plasmid vector restored SLS activity to the nonhemolytic sagA knockout mutant. Finally, heterologous expression of the intact sag operon conferred the SLS beta-hemolytic phenotype to the nonhemolytic Lactococcus lactis. We conclude that gene products of the GAS sag operon are both necessary and sufficient for SLS production. Sequence homologies of sag operon gene products suggest that SLS is related to the bacteriocin family of microbial toxins. PMID:10858242

  18. A role for interferon regulatory factor 4 in receptor editing.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Simanta; Ma, Shibin; Trinh, Long; Lu, Runqing

    2008-04-01

    Receptor editing is the primary means through which B cells revise antigen receptors and maintain central tolerance. Previous studies have demonstrated that interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF-4) and IRF-8 promote immunoglobulin light-chain rearrangement and transcription at the pre-B stage. Here, the roles of IRF-4 and -8 in receptor editing were analyzed. Our results show that secondary rearrangement was impaired in IRF-4 but not IRF-8 mutant mice, suggesting that receptor editing is defective in the absence of IRF-4. The role of IRF-4 in receptor editing was further examined in B-cell-receptor (BCR) transgenic mice. Our results show that secondary rearrangement triggered by membrane-bound antigen was defective in the IRF-4-deficient mice. Our results further reveal that the defect in secondary rearrangement is more severe at the immunoglobulin lambda locus than at the kappa locus, indicating that IRF-4 is more critical for the lambda rearrangement. We provide evidence demonstrating that the expression of IRF-4 in immature B cells is rapidly induced by self-antigen and that the reconstitution of IRF-4 expression in the IRF-4 mutant immature B cells promotes secondary rearrangement. Thus, our studies identify IRF-4 as a nuclear effector of a BCR signaling pathway that promotes secondary rearrangement at the immature B-cell stage.

  19. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype.

  20. Platinum coat color locus in the deer mouse.

    PubMed

    Dodson, K M; Dawson, W D; Van Ooteghem, S O; Cushing, B S; Haigh, G R

    1987-01-01

    Platinum coat color in the deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus, is an autosomal recessive trait marking a locus, pt, distinct from silver (si), albino (c), blonde (bl), brown (b), and agouti (a). Platinum deer mice are conspicuously pale, with light ears and tail stripe. The pewter trait is allelic with and phenotypically identical to platinum, and represents an independent recurrence of this mutant. The rate of recoveries of coat color mutations from wild deer mice is consistent with available data for recurring mutation rates balanced by strong selection against the recessive phenotype. PMID:3611714

  1. Molecular Mapping of the ROSY Locus in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Coté, Babette; Bender, Welcome; Curtis, Daniel; Chovnick, Arthur

    1986-01-01

    The DNA from the chromosomal region of the Drosophila rosy locus has been examined in 83 rosy mutant strains. Several spontaneous and radiation-induced alleles were associated with insertions and deletions, respectively. The lesions are clustered in a 4-kb region. Some of the alleles identified on the DNA map have been located on the genetic map by fine-structure recombination experiments. The genetic and molecular maps are collinear, and the alignment identifies the DNA location of the rosy control region. A rosy RNA of 4.5 kb has been identified; its 5' end lies in or near the control region. PMID:2420682

  2. Toxicogenomics in regulatory ecotoxicology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ankley, Gerald T.; Daston, George P.; Degitz, Sigmund J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Hoke, Robert A.; Kennedy, Sean W.; Miracle, Ann L.; Perkins, Edward J.; Snape, Jason; Tillitt, Donald E.; Tyler, Charles R.; Versteeg, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Recently, we have witnessed an explosion of different genomic approaches that, through a combination of advanced biological, instrumental, and bioinformatic techniques, can yield a previously unparalleled amount of data concerning the molecular and biochemical status of organisms. Fueled partially by large, well-publicized efforts such as the Human Genome Project, genomic research has become a rapidly growing topical area in multiple biological disciplines. Since 1999, when the term “toxicogenomics” was coined to describe the application of genomics to toxicology (1), a rapid increase in publications on the topic has occurred (Figure 1). The potential utility of toxicogenomics in toxicological research and regulatory activities has been the subject of scientific discussions and, as with any new technology, has evoked a wide range of opinion (2–6). VIEWPOINT © 2006 american chemical Society july 1, 2006 / EnvironmEntal SciEncE & tEchnology n 4055 The purpose of this feature article is to consider the roles of toxicogenomics in the field of regulatory ecotoxicology, explore current limitations in the science and practice of genomics, and propose possible avenues to approach and resolve some of the major challenges. A significant amount of input to our analysis came from a workshop sponsored by the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) in Pellston, Mich., in September 2005. A complete list of names and affiliations of the experts participating in that workshop is provided online in Table 1 of the Supporting Information for this paper.

  3. Identification of novel craniofacial regulatory domains located far upstream of SOX9 and disrupted in Pierre Robin sequence.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Christopher T; Attanasio, Catia; Bhatia, Shipra; Benko, Sabina; Ansari, Morad; Tan, Tiong Y; Munnich, Arnold; Pennacchio, Len A; Abadie, Véronique; Temple, I Karen; Goldenberg, Alice; van Heyningen, Veronica; Amiel, Jeanne; FitzPatrick, David; Kleinjan, Dirk A; Visel, Axel; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the coding sequence of SOX9 cause campomelic dysplasia (CD), a disorder of skeletal development associated with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSDs). Translocations, deletions, and duplications within a ∼2 Mb region upstream of SOX9 can recapitulate the CD-DSD phenotype fully or partially, suggesting the existence of an unusually large cis-regulatory control region. Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a craniofacial disorder that is frequently an endophenotype of CD and a locus for isolated PRS at ∼1.2-1.5 Mb upstream of SOX9 has been previously reported. The craniofacial regulatory potential within this locus, and within the greater genomic domain surrounding SOX9, remains poorly defined. We report two novel deletions upstream of SOX9 in families with PRS, allowing refinement of the regions harboring candidate craniofacial regulatory elements. In parallel, ChIP-Seq for p300 binding sites in mouse craniofacial tissue led to the identification of several novel craniofacial enhancers at the SOX9 locus, which were validated in transgenic reporter mice and zebrafish. Notably, some of the functionally validated elements fall within the PRS deletions. These studies suggest that multiple noncoding elements contribute to the craniofacial regulation of SOX9 expression, and that their disruption results in PRS.

  4. Identification of novel craniofacial regulatory domains located far upstream of SOX9 and disrupted in Pierre Robin sequence

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Christopher T.; Attanasio, Catia; Bhatia, Shipra; Benko, Sabina; Ansari, Morad; Tan, Tiong Y.; Munnich, Arnold; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abadie, Véronique; Temple, I. Karen; Goldenberg, Alice; van Heyningen, Veronica; Amiel, Jeanne; FitzPatrick, David; Kleinjan, Dirk A.; Visel, Axel; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the coding sequence of SOX9 cause campomelic dysplasia (CD), a disorder of skeletal development associated with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSDs). Translocations, deletions and duplications within a ~2 Mb region upstream of SOX9 can recapitulate the CD-DSD phenotype fully or partially, suggesting the existence of an unusually large cis-regulatory control region. Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a craniofacial disorder that is frequently an endophenotype of CD and a locus for isolated PRS at ~1.2-1.5 Mb upstream of SOX9 has been previously reported. The craniofacial regulatory potential within this locus, and within the greater genomic domain surrounding SOX9, remains poorly defined. We report two novel deletions upstream of SOX9 in families with PRS, allowing refinement of the regions harbouring candidate craniofacial regulatory elements. In parallel, ChIP-Seq for p300 binding sites in mouse craniofacial tissue led to the identification of several novel craniofacial enhancers at the SOX9 locus, which were validated in transgenic reporter mice and zebrafish. Notably, some of the functionally validated elements fall within the PRS deletions. These studies suggest that multiple non-coding elements contribute to the craniofacial regulation of SOX9 expression, and that their disruption results in PRS. PMID:24934569

  5. On loops in the hyperbolic locus of the complex Hénon map and their monodromies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Zin

    2016-11-01

    We prove John Hubbard's conjecture on the topological complexity of the hyperbolic horseshoe locus of the complex Hénon map. In fact, we show that there exist several non-trivial loops in the locus which generate infinitely many mutually different monodromies. Furthermore, we prove that the dynamics of the real Hénon map is completely determined by the monodromy of the complex Hénon map, providing the parameter of the map is contained in the hyperbolic horseshoe locus.

  6. A milieu of regulatory elements in the epidermal differentiation complex syntenic block: implications for atopic dermatitis and psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    de Guzman Strong, Cristina; Conlan, Sean; Deming, Clayton B.; Cheng, Jun; Sears, Karen E.; Segre, Julia A.

    2010-01-01

    Two common inflammatory skin disorders with impaired barrier, atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis, share distinct genetic linkage to the Epidermal Differentiation Complex (EDC) locus on 1q21. The EDC is comprised of tandemly arrayed gene families encoding proteins involved in skin cell differentiation. Discovery of semi-dominant mutations in filaggrin (FLG) associated with AD and a copy number variation within the LCE genes associated with psoriasis provide compelling evidence for the role of EDC genes in the pathogenesis of these diseases. To date, little is known about the potentially complex regulatory landscape within the EDC. Here, we report a computational approach to identify conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) in the EDC queried for regulatory function. Coordinate expression of EDC genes during mouse embryonic skin development and a striking degree of synteny and linearity in the EDC locus across a wide range of mammalian (placental and marsupial) genomes suggests an evolutionary conserved regulatory milieu in the EDC. CNEs identified by comparative genomics exhibit dynamic regulatory activity (enhancer or repressor) in differentiating or proliferating conditions. We further demonstrate epidermal-specific, developmental in vivo enhancer activities (DNaseI and transgenic mouse assays) in CNEs, including one within the psoriasis-associated deletion, LCE3C_LCE3B-del. Together, our multidisciplinary study features a network of regulatory elements coordinating developmental EDC gene expression as an unexplored resource for genetic variants in skin diseases. PMID:20089530

  7. A locus-wide approach to assessing variation in the avian MHC: the B-locus of the wild turkey

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, L D; Faile, G M; Hendrickson, J A; Mock, K E; Reed, K M

    2011-01-01

    Studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity in non-model vertebrates typically focus on structure and sequence variation in the antigen-presenting loci: the highly variable and polymorphic class I and class IIB genes. Although these studies provide estimates of the number of genes and alleles/locus, they often overlook variation in functionally related and co-inherited genes important in the immune response. This study utilizes the sequence of the MHC B-locus derived from a commercial turkey to investigate MHC variation in wild birds. Sequences were obtained for nine interspersed MHC amplicons (non-class I/II) from each of 40 birds representing 3 subspecies of wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Analysis of aligned sequences identified 238 single-nucleotide variants approximately one-third of which had minor allele frequencies >0.2 in the sampled birds. PHASE analysis identified 70 prospective MHC haplotypes in the wild turkeys, whereas a combined analysis with commercial birds identified almost 100 haplotypes in the species. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the class IIB loci was used to test the efficacy of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotyping to capture locus-wide variation. Diversity in SNP haplotypes and haplotype sharing among individuals was directly reflected in the DGGE patterns. Utilization of a reference haplotype to sequence interspersed regions of the MHC has significant advantages over other methods of surveying diversity while identifying high-frequency SNPs for genotyping. SNP haplotyping provides a means to identify both divergent haplotypes and homozygous individuals for assessment of immunological variation in wild and domestic populations. PMID:21179065

  8. A locus-wide approach to assessing variation in the avian MHC: the B-locus of the wild turkey.

    PubMed

    Chaves, L D; Faile, G M; Hendrickson, J A; Mock, K E; Reed, K M

    2011-07-01

    Studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity in non-model vertebrates typically focus on structure and sequence variation in the antigen-presenting loci: the highly variable and polymorphic class I and class IIB genes. Although these studies provide estimates of the number of genes and alleles/locus, they often overlook variation in functionally related and co-inherited genes important in the immune response. This study utilizes the sequence of the MHC B-locus derived from a commercial turkey to investigate MHC variation in wild birds. Sequences were obtained for nine interspersed MHC amplicons (non-class I/II) from each of 40 birds representing 3 subspecies of wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Analysis of aligned sequences identified 238 single-nucleotide variants approximately one-third of which had minor allele frequencies >0.2 in the sampled birds. PHASE analysis identified 70 prospective MHC haplotypes in the wild turkeys, whereas a combined analysis with commercial birds identified almost 100 haplotypes in the species. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the class IIB loci was used to test the efficacy of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotyping to capture locus-wide variation. Diversity in SNP haplotypes and haplotype sharing among individuals was directly reflected in the DGGE patterns. Utilization of a reference haplotype to sequence interspersed regions of the MHC has significant advantages over other methods of surveying diversity while identifying high-frequency SNPs for genotyping. SNP haplotyping provides a means to identify both divergent haplotypes and homozygous individuals for assessment of immunological variation in wild and domestic populations.

  9. External locus of control contributes to racial disparities in memory and reasoning training gains in ACTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Zahodne, Laura B.; Meyer, Oanh L.; Choi, Eunhee; Thomas, Michael L.; Willis, Sherry L.; Marsiske, Michael; Gross, Alden L.; Rebok, George W.; Parisi, Jeanine M.

    2015-01-01

    Racial disparities in cognitive outcomes may be partly explained by differences in locus of control. African Americans report more external locus of control than non-Hispanic Whites, and external locus of control is associated with poorer health and cognition. The aims of this study were to compare cognitive training gains between African American and non-Hispanic White participants in the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly (ACTIVE) study and determine whether racial differences in training gains are mediated by locus of control. The sample comprised 2,062 (26% African American) adults aged 65 and older who participated in memory, reasoning, or speed training. Latent growth curve models evaluated predictors of 10-year cognitive trajectories separately by training group. Multiple group modeling examined associations between training gains and locus of control across racial groups. Compared to non-Hispanic Whites, African Americans evidenced less improvement in memory and reasoning performance after training. These effects were partially mediated by locus of control, controlling for age, sex, education, health, depression, testing site, and initial cognitive ability. African Americans reported more external locus of control, which was associated with smaller training gains. External locus of control also had a stronger negative association with reasoning training gain for African Americans than for Whites. No racial difference in training gain was identified for speed training. Future intervention research with African Americans should test whether explicitly targeting external locus of control leads to greater cognitive improvement following cognitive training. PMID:26237116

  10. A new EcoRI polymorphism at the D21S13 locus.

    PubMed

    Pulst, S M; Korenberg, J R; Greenwald, J; Carbone, M

    1990-05-01

    The D21S13 locus has shown linkage to a gene for familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) on chromosome 21 (St. George-Hyslop et al. 1987). The limited informativeness of probes for this locus have hindered precise mapping of the FAD locus and analysis of nonallelic heterogeneity in FAD (Schellenberg et al. 1988; St. George-Hyslop et al. 1987). We describe a new EcoRI polymorphism at the D21S13 locus that may be useful for the further study of FAD families.

  11. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf

    PubMed Central

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-01-01

    Summary The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation-induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types. PMID:20807369

  12. Genetic homogeneity at the Friedreich Ataxia locus on chromosome 9

    PubMed Central

    Chamberlain, Susan; Shaw, Jacqui; Wallis, Julie; Rowland, Alison; Chow, Larry; Farrall, Martin; Keats, Bronya; Richter, Andrea; Roy, Madeleine; Melancon, Serge; Deufel, Thomas; Berciano, José; Williamson, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Classical Friedreich ataxia, a progressive, neurodegenerative disorder involving both the central and peripheral nervous systems, has been subclassified according to the observed clinical heterogeneity. The variations in the age at onset and in the spectrum and severity of symptoms have previously been interpreted as evidence of genetic heterogeneity. We have studied the linkage between the disorder and closely linked DNA markers in families of distinct ethnic origins, including the “typical” French–Canadians and the Acadian population of Louisiana. The disease in these two populations, both of continental French origin, has a very similar initial clinical picture. However, a marked difference in the rate of progression of the obligatory symptoms after 10 years of apparent disease is observed. A total of 553 individuals from 80 families with 202 affected members have been typed with the chromosome 9 marker MCT112, which we have previously shown to be closely linked to the disease locus. Evidence for linkage was observed in all families with the generation of a combined total lod score of 25.09 at a recombination fraction of θ = .00, providing strong evidence for genetic homogeneity at this locus for the classical form of this disease. PMID:2929596

  13. A familial venous malformation locus is on chromosome 9p

    SciTech Connect

    Boon, L.M.; Mulliken, J.B.; Vikkula, M.

    1994-09-01

    Venous malformation is the most common vascular malformation affecting 0.2% of the population. Depending upon size and location, these slow-flow lesions may cause pain, anatomic distortion and threaten life. Most venous malformations occur sporadically and present as solitary lesions. For this reason, determining their pathogenic bases has proven elusive. However, venous malformations also occur in several rare syndromes, some of which demonstrate Mendelian inheritance. As a first step towards identifying the pathogenic bases for these lesions, we have mapped a locus for an autosomal dominant disorder in a three generation family that manifests as multiple cutaneous and mucosal venous malformations. This locus lies within a 24.5 cM interval on chromosome 9p, defined by the markers D9S157 and D9S163. A maximum LOD score of 4.11 at {theta} = 0.05 is obtained with several markers within the interval. The interferon gene cluster, which has previously been implicated in angiogenesis, and the multiple tumor suppressor gene, responsible for several types of malignant tumors, also lie within this interval and are potential candidates.

  14. The Locus analytical framework for indoor localization and tracking applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segou, Olga E.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2015-05-01

    Obtaining location information can be of paramount importance in the context of pervasive and context-aware computing applications. Many systems have been proposed to date, e.g. GPS that has been proven to offer satisfying results in outdoor areas. The increased effect of large and small scale fading in indoor environments, however, makes localization a challenge. This is particularly reflected in the multitude of different systems that have been proposed in the context of indoor localization (e.g. RADAR, Cricket etc). The performance of such systems is often validated on vastly different test beds and conditions, making performance comparisons difficult and often irrelevant. The Locus analytical framework incorporates algorithms from multiple disciplines such as channel modeling, non-uniform random number generation, computational geometry, localization, tracking and probabilistic modeling etc. in order to provide: (a) fast and accurate signal propagation simulation, (b) fast experimentation with localization and tracking algorithms and (c) an in-depth analysis methodology for estimating the performance limits of any Received Signal Strength localization system. Simulation results for the well-known Fingerprinting and Trilateration algorithms are herein presented and validated with experimental data collected in real conditions using IEEE 802.15.4 ZigBee modules. The analysis shows that the Locus framework accurately predicts the underlying distribution of the localization error and produces further estimates of the system's performance limitations (in a best-case/worst-case scenario basis).

  15. The discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, Mitf.

    PubMed

    Arnheiter, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    The history of the discovery of the microphthalmia locus and its gene, now called Mitf, is a testament to the triumph of serendipity. Although the first microphthalmia mutation was discovered among the descendants of a mouse that was irradiated for the purpose of mutagenesis, the mutation most likely was not radiation induced but occurred spontaneously in one of the parents of a later breeding. Although Mitf might eventually have been identified by other molecular genetic techniques, it was first cloned from a chance transgene insertion at the microphthalmia locus. And although Mitf was found to encode a member of a well-known transcription factor family, its analysis might still be in its infancy had Mitf not turned out to be of crucial importance for the physiology and pathology of many distinct organs, including eye, ear, immune system, bone, and skin, and in particular for melanoma. In fact, near seven decades of Mitf research have led to many insights about development, function, degeneration, and malignancies of a number of specific cell types, and it is hoped that these insights will one day lead to therapies benefitting those afflicted with diseases originating in these cell types.

  16. Cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) immunoglobulin heavy chain locus description.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guo-Yun; Mate, Suzanne; Garcia, Karla; Ward, Michael D; Brueggemann, Ernst; Hall, Matthew; Kenny, Tara; Sanchez-Lockhart, Mariano; Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-07-01

    Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) have become an important animal model for biomedical research. In particular, it is the animal model of choice for the development of vaccine candidates associated with emerging dangerous pathogens. Despite their increasing importance as animal models, the cynomolgus macaque genome is not fully characterized, hindering molecular studies for this model. More importantly, the lack of knowledge about the immunoglobulin (IG) locus organization directly impacts the analysis of the humoral response in cynomolgus macaques. Recent advances in next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to analyze IG repertoires open the opportunity to deeply characterize the humoral immune response. However, the IG locus organization for the animal is required to completely dissect IG repertoires. Here, we describe the localization and organization of the rearranging IG heavy (IGH) genes on chromosome 7 of the cynomolgus macaque draft genome. Our annotation comprises 108 functional genes which include 63 variable (IGHV), 38 diversity (IGHD), and 7 joining (IGHJ) genes. For validation, we provide RNA transcript data for most of the IGHV genes and all of the annotated IGHJ genes, as well as proteomic data to validate IGH constant genes. The description and annotation of the rearranging IGH genes for the cynomolgus macaques will significantly facilitate scientific research. This is particularly relevant to dissect the immune response during vaccination or infection with dangerous pathogens such as Ebola, Marburg and other emerging pathogens where non-human primate models play a significant role for countermeasure development.

  17. Interchromosomal gene conversion at an endogenous human cell locus.

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, P J; Neuwirth, E A; Grosovsky, A J

    2001-01-01

    To examine the relationship between gene conversion and reciprocal exchange at an endogenous chromosomal locus, we developed a reversion assay in a thymidine kinase deficient mutant, TX545, derived from the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Selectable revertants of TX545 can be generated through interchromosomal gene conversion at the site of inactivating mutations on each tk allele or by reciprocal exchange that alters the linkage relationships of inactivating polymorphisms within the tk locus. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at intragenic polymorphisms and flanking microsatellite markers was used to initially evaluate allelotypes in TK(+) revertants for patterns associated with either gene conversion or crossing over. The linkage pattern in a subset of convertants was then unambiguously established, even in the event of prereplicative recombinational exchanges, by haplotype analysis of flanking microsatellite loci in tk(-/-) LOH mutants collected from the tk(+/-) parental convertant. Some (7/38; 18%) revertants were attributable to easily discriminated nonrecombinational mechanisms, including suppressor mutations within the tk coding sequence. However, all revertants classified as a recombinational event (28/38; 74%) were attributed to localized gene conversion, representing a highly significant preference (P < 0.0001) over gene conversion with associated reciprocal exchange, which was never observed. PMID:11404339

  18. Focus, locus, and sensus: the three dimensions of virtual experience.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, E L; Waterworth, J A

    2001-04-01

    A model of virtual/physical experience is presented, which provides a three dimensional conceptual space for virtual and augmented reality (VR and AR) comprising the dimensions of focus, locus, and sensus. Focus is most closely related to what is generally termed presence in the VR literature. When in a virtual environment, presence is typically shared between the VR and the physical world. "Breaks in presence" are actually shifts of presence away from the VR and toward the external environment. But we can also have "breaks in presence" when attention moves toward absence--when an observer is not attending to stimuli present in the virtual environment, nor to stimuli present in the surrounding physical environment--when the observer is present in neither the virtual nor the physical world. We thus have two dimensions of presence: focus of attention (between presence and absence) and the locus of attention (the virtual vs. the physical world). A third dimension is the sensus of attention--the level of arousal determining whether the observer is highly conscious or relatively unconscious while interacting with the environment. After expanding on each of these three dimensions of experience in relation to VR, we present a couple of educational examples as illustrations, and also relate our model to a suggested spectrum of evaluation methods for virtual environments.

  19. AN ENZYMATIC LOCUS PARTICIPATING IN CELLULAR DIVISION OF A YEAST

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Walter J.

    1954-01-01

    Growing cells of a filamentous mutant of a yeast, Candida albicans, were found to accumulate and reduce tetrazolium dyes whereas cells of the parent strain, growing as a normally budding yeast, accumulated the dye but did not reduce it. In older cultures, in which rapidly metabolizable carbohydrate has been depleted, the parent strain characteristically produces filaments. These cells, growing in the absence of cellular division, also exhibit tetrazolium reduction. The filamentous mutant synthesizes cell mass at a rate almost equal to that of the parent strain and is not distinguished therefrom in fermentation ability, nutritional requirements for growth, rate of endogenous respiration, or polysaccharide composition. These facts, in conjunction with the striking differences in tetrazolium reduction, lead to the conclusion that the morphological mutant has an impairment to a cellular oxidation mechanism at a flavoprotein locus. This locus is, then, the site at which a reaction essential for cellular division, is coupled via an oxidation-reduction to cellular metabolism. Preliminary evidence is presented providing good indication that uncoupling of cellular division (by genetic block) in the mutant or in the parent (by substrate exhaustion) results from impairment to a dissociable metal chelate mechanism which normally couples a reaction essential to cellular division to flavoprotein oxidation. PMID:13143184

  20. Variation at the TERT locus and predisposition for cancer.

    PubMed

    Baird, Duncan M

    2010-05-18

    Telomerase and the control of telomere length are intimately linked to the process of tumourigenesis in humans. Here I review the evidence that variation at the 5p15.33 locus, which contains the TERT gene (encoding the catalytic subunit of telomerase), might play a role in the determination of cancer risk. Mutations in the coding regions of TERT can affect telomerase activity and telomere length, and create severe clinical phenotypes, including bone marrow failure syndromes and a substantive increase in cancer frequency. Variants within the TERT gene have been associated with increased risk of haematological malignancies, including myelodysplastic syndrome and acute myeloid leukaemia as well as chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Furthermore, there is good evidence from a number of independent genome-wide association studies to implicate variants at the 5p15.33 locus in cancer risk at several different sites: lung cancer, basal cell carcinoma and pancreatic cancer show strong associations, while bladder, prostate and cervical cancer and glioma also show risk alleles in this region. Thus, multiple independent lines of evidence have implicated variation in the TERT gene as a risk factor for cancer. The mechanistic basis of these risk variants is yet to be established; however, the basic biology suggests that telomere length control is a tantalising candidate mechanism underlying cancer risk.

  1. Drosophila histone locus bodies form by hierarchical recruitment of components.

    PubMed

    White, Anne E; Burch, Brandon D; Yang, Xiao-Cui; Gasdaska, Pamela Y; Dominski, Zbigniew; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J

    2011-05-16

    Nuclear bodies are protein- and RNA-containing structures that participate in a wide range of processes critical to genome function. Molecular self-organization is thought to drive nuclear body formation, but whether this occurs stochastically or via an ordered, hierarchical process is not fully understood. We addressed this question using RNAi and proteomic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify and characterize novel components of the histone locus body (HLB), a nuclear body involved in the expression of replication-dependent histone genes. We identified the transcription elongation factor suppressor of Ty 6 (Spt6) and a homologue of mammalian nuclear protein of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated locus that is encoded by the homeotic gene multisex combs (mxc) as novel HLB components. By combining genetic manipulation in both cell culture and embryos with cytological observations of Mxc, Spt6, and the known HLB components, FLICE-associated huge protein, Mute, U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and MPM-2 phosphoepitope, we demonstrated sequential recruitment and hierarchical dependency for localization of factors to HLBs during development, suggesting that ordered assembly can play a role in nuclear body formation. PMID:21576393

  2. Drosophila histone locus bodies form by hierarchical recruitment of components

    PubMed Central

    White, Anne E.; Burch, Brandon D.; Yang, Xiao-cui; Gasdaska, Pamela Y.; Dominski, Zbigniew; Marzluff, William F.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear bodies are protein- and RNA-containing structures that participate in a wide range of processes critical to genome function. Molecular self-organization is thought to drive nuclear body formation, but whether this occurs stochastically or via an ordered, hierarchical process is not fully understood. We addressed this question using RNAi and proteomic approaches in Drosophila melanogaster to identify and characterize novel components of the histone locus body (HLB), a nuclear body involved in the expression of replication-dependent histone genes. We identified the transcription elongation factor suppressor of Ty 6 (Spt6) and a homologue of mammalian nuclear protein of the ataxia telangiectasia–mutated locus that is encoded by the homeotic gene multisex combs (mxc) as novel HLB components. By combining genetic manipulation in both cell culture and embryos with cytological observations of Mxc, Spt6, and the known HLB components, FLICE-associated huge protein, Mute, U7 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, and MPM-2 phosphoepitope, we demonstrated sequential recruitment and hierarchical dependency for localization of factors to HLBs during development, suggesting that ordered assembly can play a role in nuclear body formation. PMID:21576393

  3. Sequence variation and haplotype structure at the human HFE locus.

    PubMed Central

    Toomajian, Christopher; Kreitman, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The HFE locus encodes an HLA class-I-type protein important in iron regulation and segregates replacement mutations that give rise to the most common form of genetic hemochromatosis. The high frequency of one disease-associated mutation, C282Y, and the nature of this disease have led some to suggest a selective advantage for this mutation. To investigate the context in which this mutation arose and gain a better understanding of HFE genetic variation, we surveyed nucleotide variability in 11.2 kb encompassing the HFE locus and experimentally determined haplotypes. We fully resequenced 60 chromosomes of African, Asian, or European ancestry as well as one chimpanzee, revealing 41 variable sites and a nucleotide diversity of 0.08%. This indicates that linkage to the HLA region has not substantially increased the level of HFE variation. Although several haplotypes are shared between populations, one haplotype predominates in Asia but is nearly absent elsewhere, causing higher than average genetic differentiation among the three major populations. Our samples show evidence of intragenic recombination, so the scarcity of recombination events within the C282Y allele class is consistent with selection increasing the frequency of a young allele. Otherwise, the pattern of variability in this region does not clearly indicate the action of positive selection at this or linked loci. PMID:12196404

  4. Defining ETS transcription regulatory networks and their contribution to breast cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Turner, David P; Findlay, Victoria J; Moussa, Omar; Watson, Dennis K

    2007-10-15

    ETS factors are members of one of the largest families of evolutionarily conserved transcription factors, regulating critical functions in normal cell homeostasis, that when perturbed contribute to tumor progression. The well documented alterations in ETS factor expression and function during breast cancer progression result in pleiotropic effects manifested by the downstream effect on their target genes. Multiple ETS factors bind to the same regulatory sites present on target genes, suggesting redundant or competitive functions. Furthermore, additional events contribute to, or may be necessary for, target gene regulation. In order to advance our understanding of the ETS-dependent regulation of breast cancer progression and metastasis, this prospect article puts forward a model for examining the effects of simultaneous expression of multiple transcription factors on the transcriptome of non-metastatic and metastatic breast cancer. Compared to existing RNA profiles defined following expression of individual transcription factors, the anti- and pro-metastatic signatures obtained by examining specific ETS regulatory networks will significantly improve our ability to accurately predict tumor progression and advance our understanding of gene regulation in cancer. Coordination of multiple ETS gene functions also mediates interactions between tumor and stromal cells and thus contributes to the cancer phenotype. As such, these new insights may provide a novel view of the ETS gene family as well as a focal point for studying the complex biological control involved in tumor progression.

  5. Structures and properties of PAX linked regulatory networks architecting and pacing the emergence of neuronal diversity.

    PubMed

    Curto, Gloria G; Gard, Chris; Ribes, Vanessa

    2015-08-01

    Over the past two decades, Pax proteins have received a lot of attention from researchers working on the generation and assembly of neural circuits during vertebrate development. Through tissue or cell based phenotypic analyses, or more recently using genome-wide approaches, they have highlighted the pleiotropic functions of Pax proteins during neurogenesis. This review discusses the wide range of molecular and cellular mechanisms by which these transcription factors control in time and space the number and identity of neurons produced during development. We first focus on the position of Pax proteins within gene regulatory networks that generate patterns of cellular differentiation within the central nervous system. Next, the architecture of Pax-linked regulatory loops that provide a tempo of differentiation to progenitor cells is presented. Finally, we examine the molecular foundations providing a "multitasking" property to Pax proteins. Amongst the Pax factors that are expressed within the developing nervous system, Pax6 is the most extensively studied and thus holds a dominant position in this article.

  6. FLOWERING LOCUS C -dependent and -independent regulation of the circadian clock by the autonomous and vernalization pathways

    PubMed Central

    Salathia, Neeraj; Davis, Seth J; Lynn, James R; Michaels, Scott D; Amasino, Richard M; Millar, Andrew J

    2006-01-01

    Background The circadian system drives pervasive biological rhythms in plants. Circadian clocks integrate endogenous timing information with environmental signals, in order to match rhythmic outputs to the local day/night cycle. Multiple signaling pathways affect the circadian system, in ways that are likely to be adaptively significant. Our previous studies of natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis thaliana accessions implicated FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) as a circadian-clock regulator. The MADS-box transcription factor FLC is best known as a regulator of flowering time. Its activity is regulated by many regulatory genes in the "autonomous" and vernalization-dependent flowering pathways. We tested whether these same pathways affect the circadian system. Results Genes in the autonomous flowering pathway, including FLC, were found to regulate circadian period in Arabidopsis. The mechanisms involved are similar, but not identical, to the control of flowering time. By mutant analyses, we demonstrate a graded effect of FLC expression upon circadian period. Related MADS-box genes had less effect on clock function. We also reveal an unexpected vernalization-dependent alteration of periodicity. Conclusion This study has aided in the understanding of FLC's role in the clock, as it reveals that the network affecting circadian timing is partially overlapping with the floral-regulatory network. We also show a link between vernalization and circadian period. This finding may be of ecological relevance for developmental programing in other plant species. PMID:16737527

  7. Genetic organization of the mle locus and identification of a mleR-like gene from Leuconostoc oenos.

    PubMed Central

    Labarre, C; Diviès, C; Guzzo, J

    1996-01-01

    Characterization of the mle locus harboring the malolactic enzyme gene mleA and malate permease gene mleP from Leuconostoc oenos was completed in this study by mRNA analysis. Northern (RNA) blot experiments revealed a 2.6-kb transcript, suggesting an operon structure harboring mleA and mleP genes. Primer extension analysis showed that the mle operon has a single transcription start site located 17 nucleotides upstream of the ATG translation start site for the mleA gene. We found sequences, TTGACT and TATGAT (which are separated by 18 bp), that are closely related to the gram-positive and Escherichia coli consensus promoter sequences. Upstream of the mleA gene, an 894-bp open reading frame that transcribed divergently from the mle operon was found. Sequence analysis and expression in E. coli minicells suggest that this open reading frame encodes a polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 34 kDa belonging to the LysR-type regulatory protein family. Protein comparisons showed the highest level of identity with the MleR regulatory protein from Lactococcus lactis, which is involved in the expression of the malolactic genes in the presence of L-malate. However, the MleR-like protein of L. oenos seems different from the protein of Lactococcus lactis, since no regulation of the malolactic enzyme by L-malate was effective under our experimental conditions. PMID:8953720

  8. Regulatory Considerations for Biosimilars

    PubMed Central

    Nellore, Ranjani

    2010-01-01

    Currently there is considerable interest in the legislative debate around generic biological drugs or “biosimilars” in the EU and US due to the large, lucrative market that it offers to the industry. While some countries have issued a few regulatory guidelines as well as product specific requirements, there is no general consensus as to a single, simple mechanism similar to the bio