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Sample records for pleural fluid procalcitonin

  1. Pleural fluid procalcitonin to distinguish infectious from noninfectious etiologies of pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Rahul; Khosla, Shikha G; Becker, Kenneth L; Nylen, Eric S

    2016-05-01

    In this study we investigate the diagnostic value of pleural fluid procalcitonin (PCT) in distinguishing infectious and noninfectious etiologies of pleural effusion. We reviewed the medical records of 75 hospitalized patients who underwent thoracentesis between 2011 and 2012. Data on pleural fluid lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), protein, albumin, cell count and differential, pH, Gram stain and culture, cytology, triglyceride, cholesterol, amylase, and PCT were collected. Data on serum LDH, protein, albumin, prothrombin time, normalized, and blood culture were also collected. Pleural effusions were classified into 2 groups, infectious and noninfectious. There were 18 infectious pleural effusions (IPE) and 57 noninfectious pleural effusions (NIPE). Median pleural fluid PCT was 1.088 ng/mL (0.312-2.940 ng/mL) in IPE and 0.123 ng/mL (0.05-0.263 ng/mL) in NIPE, with a P value < 0.0001. Pleural fluid PCT > 0.25 ng/mL had a sensitivity of 77.78% and specificity of 74.14% for diagnosing an IPE. A subgroup analysis of PCT in exudative infectious effusions versus exudative noninfectious malignant/paramalignant effusions showed higher levels in the former. PCT is a novel biomarker for diagnosing infectious pleural effusion, and it would be worthwhile to investigate the role of pleural PCT in assessing severity of illness, risk stratification, and antibiotic stewardship in hospitalized patients with pleural effusions. Journal of Hospital Medicine 2016;11:363-365. 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine. © 2016 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Pleural fluid culture

    MedlinePlus

    Culture - pleural fluid ... is used to get a sample of pleural fluid. The sample is sent to a laboratory and ... the chest wall into the pleural space. As fluid drains into a collection bottle, you may cough ...

  3. Pleural fluid smear

    MedlinePlus

    ... the fluid that has collected in the pleural space. This is the space between the lining of the outside of the ... the chest. When fluid collects in the pleural space, the condition is called pleural effusion .

  4. Cytology exam of pleural fluid

    MedlinePlus

    ... the lungs. This area is called the pleural space. Cytology means the study of cells. ... A sample of fluid from the pleural space is needed. The sample is taken using a procedure called thoracentesis . The procedure is done in the following way: You sit on a ...

  5. Pleural Fluid Cholesterol in Differentiating Exudative and Transudative Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Hamal, A. B.; Yogi, K. N.; Bam, N.; Das, S. K.; Karn, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To study the diagnostic value of pleural fluid cholesterol in differentiating transudative and exudative pleural effusion. To compare pleural fluid cholesterol level for exudates with Light's criteria. Design. Cross sectional descriptive study. Settings. Medical wards of Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital. Methods. Sixty two cases of pleural effusion with definite clinical diagnosis admitted in TUTH were taken and classified as transudates (19) and exudates (43). The parameters pleural fluid protein/serum protein ratio (pfP/sP), pleural fluid LDH/ serum LDH ratio, pleural fluid LDH (pfLDH) and pleural fluid cholesterol (pCHOL) were compared with clinical diagnosis with regard to their usefulness for distinguishing between pleural exudates and transudates. Results. The pCHOL values determined were 1.92 ± 0.75 for exudates, 0.53 ± 0.28 for transudates, the differences between the transudates and others are statistically significant (P < 0.0001). It is seen that pfP/sP ratio has a sensitivity of 81.4% and specificity of 82.6%; pfLDH/sLDH ratio has a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 94.7% and pCHOL with sensitivity of 97.7% and specificity of 100% for differentiating exudative and transudative PE. Conclusion. The determination of pCHOL is of great value for distinguishing between pleural exudates and transudates and should be included in routine laboratory analysis of pleural effusion. PMID:23365740

  6. Pleural fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mosby; 2014:chap 77. Read More Cirrhosis Heart failure - overview Pleural effusion Review Date 11/19/2015 Updated by: Denis Hadjiliadis, MD, MHS, Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. Also ...

  7. Pleural Fluid Pentraxin-3 for the Differential Diagnosis of Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Chang Dong; Kim, Jin Woo; Cho, Mi Ran; Kang, Ji Young; Kim, Young Kyoon; Lee, Sang Haak; Park, Chan Kwon; Kim, Sang Ho; Park, Mi Sun; Yim, Hyeon Woo; Park, Jong Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Conventional biomarkers cannot always establish the cause of pleural effusions; thus, alternative tests permitting rapid and accurate diagnosis are required. The primary aim of this study is to assess the ability of pentraxin-3 (PTX3) in order to diagnose the cause of pleural effusion and compare its efficacy to that of other previously identified biomarkers. Methods We studied 118 patients with pleural effusion, classified as transudates and exudates including malignant, tuberculous, and parapneumonic effusions (MPE, TPE, and PPE). The levels of PTX3, C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT) and lactate in the pleural fluid were assessed. Results The levels of pleural fluid PTX3 were significantly higher in patients with PPE than in those with MPE or TPE. PTX3 yielded the most favorable discriminating ability to predict PPE from MPE or TPE by providing the following: area under the curve, 0.74 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-0.84), sensitivity, 62.07%; and specificity, 81.08% with a cut-off point of 25.00 ng/mL. Conclusion Our data suggests that PTX3 may allow improved differentiation of PPE from MPE or TPE compared to the previously identified biomarkers CRP and PCT. PMID:24416055

  8. Isolation of Allescheria boydii from pleural fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Bousley, P H

    1977-01-01

    Allescheria boydii was repeatedly isolated from thoracentesis fluid from a patient with a right pleural effusion. Histological study of methanamine-stained pleural tissue revealed the presence of septate hyphae. After a thoracotomy and decortication, the patient's symptoms cleared, and he has remained asymptomatic over a postoperative period of 13 months. Images PMID:845248

  9. Pleural effusion: Role of pleural fluid cytology, adenosine deaminase level, and pleural biopsy in diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Biswajit; Sharma, Sudershan Kumar; Negi, Rameshwar Singh; Gupta, Neelam; Jaswal, Virender Mohan Singh; Niranjan, Narsimhalu

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present study is designed to evaluate the role of pleural fluid analysis in diagnosing pleural diseases and to study the advantages and disadvantages of thoracocentasis and pleural biopsy. Materials and Methods: We prospectively included 66 consecutive indoor patients over a duration of 1 year. Pleural fluid was collected and cytological smears were made from the fluid. Plural biopsy was done in the same patient by Cope needle. Adequate pleural biopsy tissue yielding specific diagnosis was obtained in 47 (71.2%) cases. Results: Tuberculosis was the commonest nonneoplastic lesion followed by chronic nonspecific pleuritis comprising 60% and 33.3% of the nonneoplastic cases respectively and tuberculosis was predominantly diagnosed in the younger age group. Majority (70.8%) of malignancy cases were in the age group of >50-70. Adenocarcinoma was found to be the commonest (66.7%) malignant neoplasm in the pleurae followed by small-cell carcinoma (20.8%). Conclusion: Pleural biopsy is a useful and minimally invasive procedure. It is more sensitive and specific than pleural fluid smears. PMID:27756990

  10. Pleural fluid infection caused by Dietzia cinnamea.

    PubMed

    Cawcutt, Kelly A; Bhatti, Micah M; Nelson, Darlene R

    2016-08-01

    Dietzia cinnamea was recovered from pleural fluid in an immunocompromised patient by inoculating blood culture bottles and was identified with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The case shows the expanding ability of microbiology laboratories to identify rare organisms through newer techniques and technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Microfilaria in pleural fluid cytology: A rare finding

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Subrata; Bose, Kingshuk; Sharma, Abhishek; Sikder, Mrinal

    2017-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is endemic in India and Southeast Asia. Detection of microfilaria is infrequently reported during cytological evaluation of various lesions or body cavity fluids. Presence of microfilaria in pleural fluid cytology is very rare finding even in endemic areas. Few cases of accidental finding of microfilaria have been reported in association with malignant pleural effusion. But pleural effusion of filarial origin is extremely rare manifestation. Here we report a classical case of microfilaria in pleural fluid cytology. PMID:28367033

  12. Identifying Malignant Pleural Effusion by A Cancer Ratio (Serum LDH: Pleural Fluid ADA Ratio).

    PubMed

    Verma, Akash; Abisheganaden, John; Light, R W

    2016-02-01

    We studied the diagnostic potential of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in malignant pleural effusion. Retrospective analysis of patients hospitalized with exudative pleural effusion in 2013. Serum LDH and serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio was significantly higher in cancer patients presenting with exudative pleural effusion. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, pleural fluid ADA was negatively correlated 0.62 (0.45-0.85, p = 0.003) with malignancy, whereas serum LDH 1.02 (1.0-1.03, p = 0.004) and serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio 0.94 (0.99-1.0, p = 0.04) was correlated positively with malignant pleural effusion. For serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio, a cut-off level of >20 showed sensitivity, specificity of 0.98 (95 % CI 0.92-0.99) and 0.94 (95 % CI 0.83-0.98), respectively. The positive likelihood ratio was 32.6 (95 % CI 10.7-99.6), while the negative likelihood ratio at this cut-off was 0.03 (95 % CI 0.01-0.15). Higher serum LDH and serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio in patients presenting with exudative pleural effusion can distinguish between malignant and non-malignant effusion on the first day of hospitalization. The cut-off level for serum LDH: pleural fluid ADA ratio of >20 is highly predictive of malignancy in patients with exudative pleural effusion (whether lymphocytic or neutrophilic) with high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. [THE ANALYSTS OF PROCALCITONIN IN LACRIMAL FLUID AND BLOOD SERUM UNDER UVEITIS].

    PubMed

    Konkova, A Yu; Sosnin, D Yu; Gavrilova, T V; Chereshneva, M V

    2015-10-01

    The analysis was applied to concentration of procalcitonin in lacrimal fluid and blood serum in 15 healthy persons (control group), 16 patients with uveitis (main group) and 14 patients with non-inflammatory pathology of organ of vision (comparison group). The concentration of procalcitonin was detected by immunoenzyme method using commercial test-system "Procalcitonin-IFA-BEST" ("Vector-Best", Russia). The content of procalcitonin in blood serum was low (75% quartile--0.031 ng/ml) and had no significant difference between groups (H-criterion of Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.0872). The level of procalcitonin in lacrimal fluid 8-11 times exceeded its concentration in blood serum of all groups (Wilcoxon criterion, p < 0.005). The least content of procalcitonin is detected in lacrimal fluid of patients of comparison group (0.072 ± 0.064 ng/ml). In main and control groups its level was reliably higher (H-criterion of Kruskal-Wallis test, p = 0.0002) and amounted to 0.257 ± 0.146 and 0.198 ± 0.151 ng/ml correspondingly. The correlation analysis established no dependencies between concentration of procalcitonin in tear and blood serum (Spearman correlation coefficient had no exceeding |0.1| in all groups). The development of uveitis is not accompanied by alteration of concentration of procalcitonin in both blood serum and lacrimal fluid. The absence of correlation and higher concentration of procalcitonin in tear as compared with blood serum testify availability of additional source of this protein in lacrimal fluid.

  14. NT-brain natriuretic peptide levels in pleural fluid distinguish between pleural transudates and exudates.

    PubMed

    Tomcsányi, János; Nagy, Erzsébet; Somlói, Miklós; Moldvay, Judit; Bezzegh, Attila; Bózsik, Béla; Strausz, János

    2004-10-01

    Pleural effusion is not pathognomic and distinguishing between transudates and exudates often presents a diagnostic dilemma. The purpose of our study was to examine whether the inclusion of pleural fluid brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurement into the analysis improves the diagnostic accuracy of pleural effusion. The pleural effusion of 14 patients with CHF (group A) and 14 subjects with different pleural pathology (group B) were analyzed. Samples of pleural fluid and serum were obtained from all patients on admission and biochemical analysis, bacterial and fungal culture, acid-fast bacilli smear and culture and cytology were performed on the pleural fluid. In vitro quantitative determination of N-terminal pro-Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in serum and pleural fluid were performed by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay proBNP method on an Elecsys 2010 (Roche) analyzer. The median NT-proBNP levels in groups A and B were 6295 pg/ml and 276 pg/ml, respectively: (P=0.0001). There was no overlap between the two groups. While the Light's criteria had a sensitivity of 93% and specificity of 43% for transudates, the pleural fluid NT-proBNP level accurately differentiated between the two groups. The pleural NT-proBNP levels were elevated in all patients who had transudate. Therefore if the NT-proBNP levels of pleural effusion are within the normal range, transudate resulting from congestive heart failure can be ruled out. Our results suggest that the inclusion of pleural fluid NT-proBNP measurement in the routine diagnostic panel would enhance discrimination among the different causes of pleural effusions.

  15. Randomized Trial of Pleural Fluid Drainage Frequency in Patients with Malignant Pleural Effusions. The ASAP Trial.

    PubMed

    Wahidi, Momen M; Reddy, Chakravarthy; Yarmus, Lonny; Feller-Kopman, David; Musani, Ali; Shepherd, R Wesley; Lee, Hans; Bechara, Rabih; Lamb, Carla; Shofer, Scott; Mahmood, Kamran; Michaud, Gaetane; Puchalski, Jonathan; Rafeq, Samaan; Cattaneo, Stephen M; Mullon, John; Leh, Steven; Mayse, Martin; Thomas, Samantha M; Peterson, Bercedis; Light, Richard W

    2017-04-15

    Patients with malignant pleural effusions have significant dyspnea and shortened life expectancy. Indwelling pleural catheters allow patients to drain pleural fluid at home and can lead to autopleurodesis. The optimal drainage frequency to achieve autopleurodesis and freedom from catheter has not been determined. To determine whether an aggressive daily drainage strategy is superior to the current standard every other day drainage of pleural fluid in achieving autopleurodesis. Patients were randomized to either an aggressive drainage (daily drainage; n = 73) or standard drainage (every other day drainage; n = 76) of pleural fluid via a tunneled pleural catheter. The primary outcome was the incidence of autopleurodesis following the placement of the indwelling pleural catheters. The rate of autopleurodesis, defined as complete or partial response based on symptomatic and radiographic changes, was greater in the aggressive drainage arm than the standard drainage arm (47% vs. 24%, respectively; P = 0.003). Median time to autopleurodesis was shorter in the aggressive arm (54 d; 95% confidence interval, 34-83) as compared with the standard arm (90 d; 95% confidence interval, 70 to nonestimable). Rate of adverse events, quality of life, and patient satisfaction were not significantly different between the two arms. Among patients with malignant pleural effusion, daily drainage of pleural fluid via an indwelling pleural catheter led to a higher rate of autopleurodesis and faster time to liberty from catheter. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 00978939).

  16. C-Reactive Protein, Sialic Acid and Adenosine Deaminase Levels in Serum and Pleural Fluid from Patients with Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Woon; Yang, In Ae; Oh, Eun A; Rhyoo, Young Gun; Jang, Young Ho; Ryang, Dong Wook; Yoo, JooYong

    1988-01-01

    Laboratory analysis of pleural fluids is essential to determine underlying diseases. The authors evaluated the clinical significance of C-reactive protein (C-RP), sialic acid (SA), and adenosine deaminase (ADA) determinations in sera and pleural fluids from 37 patients with pleural effusion. (FP12)C-RP and sialic acid levels and ADA activities were higher in exudates than in transudates of pleural fluids. Serum and pleural fluid C-RP levels were high in patients with pyothorax. Determinations of serum sialic acid and the pleural fluid to serum ratio were useful for the differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and malignancy. ADA activities of pleural fluid and serum are useful for the differentiation of malignancy from tuberculosis and nonspecific pyothorax. C-RP concentrations of pleural fluid correlated to serum levels. However, concentrations of sialic acid and ADA activities were not correlated to serum levels and only correlated to protein concentrations of pleural fluids. PMID:3154188

  17. Predicting Malignant and Paramalignant Pleural Effusions by Combining Clinical, Radiological and Pleural Fluid Analytical Parameters.

    PubMed

    Herrera Lara, Susana; Fernández-Fabrellas, Estrella; Juan Samper, Gustavo; Marco Buades, Josefa; Andreu Lapiedra, Rafael; Pinilla Moreno, Amparo; Morales Suárez-Varela, María

    2017-06-27

    The usefulness of clinical, radiological and pleural fluid analytical parameters for diagnosing malignant and paramalignant pleural effusion is not clearly stated. Hence this study aimed to identify possible predictor variables of diagnosing malignancy in pleural effusion of unknown aetiology. Clinical, radiological and pleural fluid analytical parameters were obtained from consecutive patients who had suffered pleural effusion of unknown aetiology. They were classified into three groups according to their final diagnosis: malignant, paramalignant and benign pleural effusion. The CHAID (Chi-square automatic interaction detector) methodology was used to estimate the implication of the clinical, radiological and analytical variables in daily practice through decision trees. Of 71 patients, malignant (n = 31), paramalignant (n = 15) and benign (n = 25), smoking habit, dyspnoea, weight loss, radiological characteristics (mass, node, adenopathies and pleural thickening) and pleural fluid analytical parameters (pH and glucose) distinguished malignant and paramalignant pleural effusions (all with a p < 0.05). Decision tree 1 classified 77.8% of malignant and paramalignant pleural effusions in step 2. Decision tree 2 classified 83.3% of malignant pleural effusions in step 2, 73.3% of paramalignant pleural effusions and 91.7% of benign ones. The data herein suggest that the identified predictor values applied to tree diagrams, which required no extraordinary measures, have a higher rate of correct identification of malignant, paramalignant and benign effusions when compared to techniques available today and proved most useful for usual clinical practice. Future studies are still needed to further improve the classification of patients.

  18. Role of aquaporin water channels in pleural fluid dynamics.

    PubMed

    Song, Y; Yang, B; Matthay, M A; Ma, T; Verkman, A S

    2000-12-01

    Continuous movement of fluid into and out of the pleural compartment occurs in normal chest physiology and in pathophysiological conditions associated with pleural effusions. RT-PCR screening and immunostaining revealed expression of water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) in microvascular endothelia near the visceral and parietal pleura and in mesothelial cells in visceral pleura. Comparative physiological measurements were done on wild-type vs. AQP1 null mice. Osmotically driven water transport was measured in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated mice from the kinetics of pleural fluid osmolality after instillation of 0.25 ml of hypertonic or hypotonic fluid into the pleural space. Osmotic equilibration of pleural fluid was rapid in wild-type mice (50% equilibration in <2 min) and remarkably slowed by greater than fourfold in AQP1 null mice. Small amounts of AQP3 transcript were also detected in pleura by RT-PCR, but osmotic water transport was not decreased in AQP3 null mice. In spontaneously breathing mice, the clearance of isosmolar saline instilled in the pleural space ( approximately 4 ml. kg(-1). h(-1)) was not affected by AQP1 deletion. In a fluid overload model produced by intraperitoneal saline administration and renal artery ligation, the accumulation of pleural fluid (approximately 0.035 ml/h) and was not affected by AQP1 deletion. Finally, in a thiourea toxicity model of acute endothelial injury causing pleural effusions and lung interstitial edema, pleural fluid accumulation in the first 3 h ( approximately 4 ml. kg(-1). h(-1)) was not affected by AQP1 deletion. These results indicate rapid osmotic equilibration across the pleural surface that is facilitated by AQP1 water channels. However, AQP1 does not appear to play a role in clinically relevant mechanisms of pleural fluid accumulation or clearance.

  19. "Fluid color" sign: a useful indicator for discrimination between pleural thickening and pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Wu, R G; Yang, P C; Kuo, S H; Luh, K T

    1995-10-01

    Color Doppler imaging has been applied traditionally in the evaluation of cardiovascular diseases. Recently it was observed that color signal may appear within the fluid collection in the pleural space during respiratory and cardiac cycles ("fluid color sign"). We performed this applicability of fluid color sign to the detection of pleural fluid capable of being removed to assess needle aspiration. From July 1992 to February 1994, we prospectively analyzed 76 patients who were suspected of having minimal pleural effusion on the basis of their chest radiographs. All patients were examined by color Doppler ultrasonography for the presence of fluid color sign, which was followed by needle aspiration to verify the presence of pleural effusion. Among the 65 patients with aspiratable fluid, 58 demonstrated positive fluid color sign (sensitivity 89.2%). None of the patients with solid pleural thickening showed fluid color sign (specificity 100%). With its relatively high sensitivity and specificity, the fluid color sign may be a useful diagnostic aid to real-time, gray scale ultrasonography for minimal or loculated effusion.

  20. DIFFERENCES IN CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND PLEURAL FLUID CHARATERISTICS BETWEEN TUBERCULOUS AND MALIGNANT PLEURAL EFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Saiphoklang, Narongkorn; Kanitsap, Apichart; Nambunchu, Andanake

    2015-05-01

    Tuberculous and malignant pleural effusions share similar clinical and radiographic findings and both may produce lymphocytic-predominant exudative effusions. This study aimed to determine distinguishing clinical features between the two diseases. We conducted a retrospective study among 47 patients with tuberculous pleural effusions (TBPE) and 73 with malignant pleural effusions (MPE). Demographic data, clinical features, pleural fluid characteristics, and radiographic findings were obtained for each patient and the 2 groups were compared. Sixty-nine (57.5%) patients were males. The mean (+/- SD, range) age was 60.2 (+/- 16.9, 19-94) years. Mean (+/- SD) symptom duration was 31.6 (+/- 51.6) days. Univariate analysis identified 20 clinical, pleural fluid and radiological differences between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed 3 independent predictors of TBPE: fever (OR=8.2; 95% CI: 1.9 - 35.9; p=0.005), having a non-serosanguinous effusion (OR=6.1; 95% CI: 1.1 - 33.6; p=0.038), and a fluid adenosine deaminase level > 30 U/I (OR=86.7; 95% CI: 4.3 - 1735; p=0.004). Fever, non-serosanguinous pleural effusions and high adenosine deaminase levels were suggestive of a TBPE and could be clinically useful when evaluating a pleural effusion of unknown etiology.

  1. Pleural fluid tumour markers in malignant pleural effusion with inconclusive cytologic results.

    PubMed

    Antonangelo, L; Sales, R K; Corá, A P; Acencio, M M P; Teixeira, L R; Vargas, F S

    2015-10-01

    The presence of tumour cells in pleural fluid or tissue defines an effusion as malignant. Cytology analysis of the pleural fluid has about 60% diagnostic sensitivity. Several tests have been proposed to improve diagnosis-among them, the concentrations of tumour markers in pleural fluid. We evaluated whether the concentrations of tumour markers in pleural fluid could improve the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion (mpe) when cytology is doubtful. Lymphocytic pleural fluids secondary to tuberculosis or malignancy from 156 outpatients were submitted for cytology and tumour marker quantification [carcinoembryonic antigen (cea), cancer antigen 15-3 (ca15-3), carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (ca19-9), cancer antigen 72-4 (ca72-4), cancer antigen 125 (ca125), and cyfra 21-1). Oneway analysis of variance, the Student t-test or Mann-Whitney test, and receiver operating characteristic curves were used in the statistical analysis. Concentrations of the tumour markers cea, ca15-3, ca125, and cyfra 21-1 were higher in mpes than they were in the benign effusions (p < 0.001), regardless of cytology results. The markers ca19-9 and ca72-4 did not discriminate malignant from benign effusions. When comparing the concentrations of tumour markers in mpes having positive, suspicious, or negative cytology with concentrations in benign effusions, we observed higher levels of cea, ca15-3, cyfra 21-1, and ca125 in malignant effusions with positive cytology (p = 0.003, p = 0.001, p = 0.002, and p = 0.001 respectively). In pleural fluid, only ca125 was higher in mpes with suspicious or negative cytology (p = 0.001) than in benign effusions. Given high specificity and a sensitivity of about 60%, the concentrations of tumour markers in pleural effusions could be evaluated in cases of inconclusive cytology in patients with a high pre-test chance of malignancy or a history of cancer.

  2. Atypical Pleural Fluid Profiles in Tuberculous Pleural Effusion: Sequential Changes Compared with Parapneumonic and Malignant Pleural Effusions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang Ho; Lee, So Yeon; Lee, Yong Dae; Yoo, Seung Soo; Lee, Shin Yup; Cha, Seung Ick; Park, Jae Yong; Lee, Jaehee

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) is commonly characterized by lymphocytic predominance and high adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels, it may present with neutrophilic predominance or low ADA levels, which are more commonly found in parapneumonic effusion (PPE) or malignant pleural effusion (MPE), respectively. A few studies have observed that the atypical pleural fluid profiles of these cases of TPE may resolve at follow-up thoracentesis. However, these observations were incompletely analyzed and lacked comparison with proper control groups. Thus, limited data are available comparing the sequential pleural fluid changes between TPE and PPE or MPE with similar pleural fluid profiles. Methods TPE, PPE, and MPE patients who underwent sequential thoracentesis were retrospectively reviewed. The sequential changes in the pleural fluid profiles were compared between neutrophilic TPE and PPE, and lymphocytic TPE and MPE with low ADA levels. Results Twenty-three TPE patients (16 with neutrophilic exudates, seven with lymphocytic exudates), 72 cases of PPE with neutrophilic exudates, and 18 cases of MPE with lymphocytic exudates were included in the analysis. A sequential shift to lymphocytic exudates occurred significantly more often in TPE than in PPE cases. The initial and follow-up ADA levels in TPE cases with a lymphocytic shift were significantly higher than those in PPE cases with a lymphocytic shift. The ADA levels in the TPE cases with initial lymphocytic exudates and low ADA levels significantly increased at follow-up thoracentesis. For the TPE and MPE cases with initial lymphocytic exudates and ADA levels <40 U/L, the frequency of effusion with ADA levels ≥40 U/L at the second thoracentesis was significantly higher in the TPE cases. Conclusion Follow-up thoracentesis may provide useful information for clinical decision-making in suspected atypical TPE cases with neutrophilic exudates or low ADA levels.

  3. Pleural fluid cell-free DNA integrity index to identify cytologically negative malignant pleural effusions including mesotheliomas.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishna B; Relan, Vandana; Clarke, Belinda E; Duhig, Edwina E; Windsor, Morgan N; Matar, Kevin S; Naidoo, Rishendran; Passmore, Linda; McCaul, Elizabeth; Courtney, Deborah; Yang, Ian A; Bowman, Rayleen V; Fong, Kwun M

    2012-09-25

    The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions (MPE) is often clinically challenging, especially if the cytology is negative for malignancy. DNA integrity index has been reported to be a marker of malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of pleural fluid DNA integrity index in the diagnosis of MPE. We studied 75 pleural fluid and matched serum samples from consecutive subjects. Pleural fluid and serum ALU DNA repeats [115bp, 247bp and 247bp/115bp ratio (DNA integrity index)] were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Pleural fluid and serum mesothelin levels were quantified using ELISA. Based on clinico-pathological evaluation, 52 subjects had MPE (including 16 mesotheliomas) and 23 had benign effusions. Pleural fluid DNA integrity index was higher in MPE compared with benign effusions (1.2 vs. 0.8; p<0.001). Cytology had a sensitivity of 55% in diagnosing MPE. If cytology and pleural fluid DNA integrity index were considered together, they exhibited 81% sensitivity and 87% specificity in distinguishing benign and malignant effusions. In cytology-negative pleural effusions (35 MPE and 28 benign effusions), elevated pleural fluid DNA integrity index had an 81% positive predictive value in detecting MPEs. In the detection of mesothelioma, at a specificity of 90%, pleural fluid DNA integrity index had similar sensitivity to pleural fluid and serum mesothelin (75% each respectively). Pleural fluid DNA integrity index is a promising diagnostic biomarker for identification of MPEs, including mesothelioma. This biomarker may be particularly useful in cases of MPE where pleural aspirate cytology is negative, and could guide the decision to undertake more invasive definitive testing. A prospective validation study is being undertaken to validate our findings and test the clinical utility of this biomarker for altering clinical practice.

  4. Pleural fluid cell-free DNA integrity index to identify cytologically negative malignant pleural effusions including mesotheliomas

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions (MPE) is often clinically challenging, especially if the cytology is negative for malignancy. DNA integrity index has been reported to be a marker of malignancy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of pleural fluid DNA integrity index in the diagnosis of MPE. Methods We studied 75 pleural fluid and matched serum samples from consecutive subjects. Pleural fluid and serum ALU DNA repeats [115bp, 247bp and 247bp/115bp ratio (DNA integrity index)] were assessed by real-time quantitative PCR. Pleural fluid and serum mesothelin levels were quantified using ELISA. Results Based on clinico-pathological evaluation, 52 subjects had MPE (including 16 mesotheliomas) and 23 had benign effusions. Pleural fluid DNA integrity index was higher in MPE compared with benign effusions (1.2 vs. 0.8; p<0.001). Cytology had a sensitivity of 55% in diagnosing MPE. If cytology and pleural fluid DNA integrity index were considered together, they exhibited 81% sensitivity and 87% specificity in distinguishing benign and malignant effusions. In cytology-negative pleural effusions (35 MPE and 28 benign effusions), elevated pleural fluid DNA integrity index had an 81% positive predictive value in detecting MPEs. In the detection of mesothelioma, at a specificity of 90%, pleural fluid DNA integrity index had similar sensitivity to pleural fluid and serum mesothelin (75% each respectively). Conclusion Pleural fluid DNA integrity index is a promising diagnostic biomarker for identification of MPEs, including mesothelioma. This biomarker may be particularly useful in cases of MPE where pleural aspirate cytology is negative, and could guide the decision to undertake more invasive definitive testing. A prospective validation study is being undertaken to validate our findings and test the clinical utility of this biomarker for altering clinical practice. PMID:23009708

  5. [Contribution of pleural fluid analysis to the diagnosis of pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; Toubes, María Elena; Valdés, Luis

    2015-08-21

    Analysis of pleural fluid can have, on its own, a high diagnostic value. In addition to thoracocentesis, a diagnostic hypothesis based on medical history, physical examination, blood analysis and imaging tests, the diagnostic effectiveness will significantly increase in order to establish a definite or high probable diagnosis in a substantial number of patients. Differentiating transudates from exudates by the classical Light's criteria helps knowing the pathogenic mechanism resulting in pleural effusion, and it is also useful for differential diagnosis purposes. An increased N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide, both in the fluid and in blood, in a due clinical context, is highly suggestive of heart failure. The presence of an increased inflammatory marker, such as C-reactive protein, together with the presence of over 50% of neutrophils is highly suggestive of parapneumonic pleural effusion. If, in these cases, the pH is<7.20, then the likelihood of complicated pleural effusion is high. There remains to be demonstrated the usefulness of other markers to differentiate complicated from uncomplicated effusions. An adenosine deaminase > 45 U/L and>50% lymphocytes is suggestive of tuberculosis. If a malignant effusion is suspected but the cytological result is negative, increased concentrations of some markers in the pleural fluid can yield high specificity values. Increased levels of mesothelin and fibruline-3 are suggestive of mesothelioma. Immunohistochemical studies can be useful to differentiate reactive mesothelial cells, mesothelioma and metastatic adenocarcinoma. An inadequate use of the information provided by the analysis of pleural fluid would results in a high rate of undiagnosed effusions, which is unacceptable in current clinical practice.

  6. Diagnostic Utility of Pleural Fluid Cell Block versus Pleural Biopsy Collected by Flex-Rigid Pleuroscopy for Malignant Pleural Disease: A Single Center Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sasada, Shinji; Izumo, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Yuji; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background Some trials recently demonstrated the benefit of targeted treatment for malignant disease; therefore, adequate tissues are needed to detect the targeted gene. Pleural biopsy using flex-rigid pleuroscopy and pleural effusion cell block analysis are both useful for diagnosis of malignancy and obtaining adequate samples. The purpose of our study was to compare the diagnostic utility between the two methods among patients with malignant pleural disease with effusion. Methods Data from patients who underwent flex-rigid pleuroscopy for diagnosis of pleural effusion suspicious for malignancy at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Japan between April 2011 and June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All procedures were performed under local anesthesia. At least 150 mL of pleural fluid was collected by pleuroscopy, followed by pleural biopsies from the abnormal site. Results Thirty-five patients who were finally diagnosed as malignant pleural disease were included in this study. Final diagnoses of malignancy were 24 adenocarcinoma, 1 combined adeno-small cell carcinoma, and 7 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), and 3 metastatic breast cancer. The diagnostic yield was significantly higher by pleural biopsy than by cell block [94.2% (33/35) vs. 71.4% (25/35); p = 0.008]. All patients with positive results on cell block also had positive results on pleural biopsy. Eight patients with negative results on cell block had positive results on pleural biopsy (lung adenocarcinoma in 4, sarcomatoid MPM in 3, and metastatic breast cancer in 1). Two patients with negative results on both cell block and pleural biopsy were diagnosed was sarcomatoid MPM by computed tomography-guided needle biopsy and epithelioid MPM by autopsy. Conclusion Pleural biopsy using flex-rigid pleuroscopy was efficient in the diagnosis of malignant pleural diseases. Flex-rigid pleuroscopy with pleural biopsy and pleural effusion cell block analysis should be considered as the initial diagnostic

  7. Diagnostic Utility of Pleural Fluid Cell Block versus Pleural Biopsy Collected by Flex-Rigid Pleuroscopy for Malignant Pleural Disease: A Single Center Retrospective Analysis.

    PubMed

    Miyoshi, Shion; Sasada, Shinji; Izumo, Takehiro; Matsumoto, Yuji; Tsuchida, Takaaki

    2016-01-01

    Some trials recently demonstrated the benefit of targeted treatment for malignant disease; therefore, adequate tissues are needed to detect the targeted gene. Pleural biopsy using flex-rigid pleuroscopy and pleural effusion cell block analysis are both useful for diagnosis of malignancy and obtaining adequate samples. The purpose of our study was to compare the diagnostic utility between the two methods among patients with malignant pleural disease with effusion. Data from patients who underwent flex-rigid pleuroscopy for diagnosis of pleural effusion suspicious for malignancy at the National Cancer Center Hospital, Japan between April 2011 and June 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All procedures were performed under local anesthesia. At least 150 mL of pleural fluid was collected by pleuroscopy, followed by pleural biopsies from the abnormal site. Thirty-five patients who were finally diagnosed as malignant pleural disease were included in this study. Final diagnoses of malignancy were 24 adenocarcinoma, 1 combined adeno-small cell carcinoma, and 7 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), and 3 metastatic breast cancer. The diagnostic yield was significantly higher by pleural biopsy than by cell block [94.2% (33/35) vs. 71.4% (25/35); p = 0.008]. All patients with positive results on cell block also had positive results on pleural biopsy. Eight patients with negative results on cell block had positive results on pleural biopsy (lung adenocarcinoma in 4, sarcomatoid MPM in 3, and metastatic breast cancer in 1). Two patients with negative results on both cell block and pleural biopsy were diagnosed was sarcomatoid MPM by computed tomography-guided needle biopsy and epithelioid MPM by autopsy. Pleural biopsy using flex-rigid pleuroscopy was efficient in the diagnosis of malignant pleural diseases. Flex-rigid pleuroscopy with pleural biopsy and pleural effusion cell block analysis should be considered as the initial diagnostic approach for malignant pleural diseases

  8. The minimum volume of pleural fluid required to diagnose malignant pleural effusion: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huimin; Khosla, Rahul; Rohatgi, Prashant K; Chauhan, Suman S; Paal, Edina; Chen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pleural fluid cytology is a quick and accurate method to diagnose malignant pleural effusions. The optimal volume of fluid for cytological analysis has not yet been identified, and clinical recommendation based on some published clinical experiences has been to send large volumes of fluid for cytological analysis. A quality improvement initiative at our institution was conducted to determine the volume of fluid sufficient for a diagnosis of malignant pleural effusion. Materials and Methods: The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. All pleural fluid specimens that were divided into three volumes (25 mL, 50 mL, and 150 mL) and sent for cytological examination were reviewed. Results: A total of 74 samples from 60 individual patients were evaluable. Thirty-six patients (60%) had a previous diagnosis of malignancy. Of the 74 specimens, 26 (35.1%) were positive for malignancy. The detection rate for malignant pleural effusion by cytology for 25 mL, 50 mL, and 150 mL were 88.5%, 96.2%, and 100.0%, respectively (P = 0.16). Two specimens that were negative in the 25 mL samples turned out to be positive in the 50 mL and 150 mL samples. One specimen was negative in the 25 mL and 50 mL samples but positive in the 150 mL sample. Conclusions: Our study did not show any statistically significant difference in the detection of malignant effusion in the 25 mL, 50 mL, and 150 mL group. PMID:28144058

  9. Antinuclear antibody testing in pleural fluid for the diagnosis of lupus pleuritis.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Ordi-Ros, J; Esquerda, A; Vives, M; Madroñero, A B; Bielsa, S; Vilardell-Tarrés, M; Light, R W

    2007-01-01

    We sought to determine whether measuring antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and their specificities [dsDNA, extractable nuclear antigens (ENA)] on pleural fluid may contribute to the differential diagnosis of pleural effusions. ANA were tested by indirect immunofluorescence on Hep-2 cells in the pleural fluid of 266 patients with effusions of different etiologies, including 15 lupus pleuritis. The cutoff value for diagnostic use was set at 1:160. Pleural fluid analysis of specific autoantibodies, such as anti-dsDNA and anti-ENA, was also performed if a positive ANA test was obtained. All patients with lupus pleurisy and 16 of 251 (6.4%) patients with pleural effusions secondary to other causes were ANA positive. Fifty-six percent of the positive ANAs in non-lupus pleural fluids were due to neoplasms. The pleural fluid ANA titers were low (< or = 1:80) or absent in two patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and effusions due to other factors. Whereas ANA staining patterns in pleural fluid did not help to discriminate lupus pleuritis from non-lupus etiologies, the absence of pleural fluid anti-dsDNA or anti-ENA favored the latter. ANAs in pleural fluid provided no additional diagnostic information beyond that obtained by the measurement in serum and, therefore, these tests need not be routinely performed on pleural fluid samples. However, in patients with SLE and a pleural effusion of uncertain etiology, lack of ANAs or specific autoantibodies in pleural fluid argues against the diagnosis of lupus pleuritis.

  10. Defect in recruiting effector memory CD8+ T-cells in malignant pleural effusions compared to normal pleural fluid

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusions (MPE) are a common and fatal complication in cancers including lung or breast cancers, or malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). MPE animal models and immunotherapy trials in MPM patients previously suggested defects of the cellular immunity in MPE. However only few observational studies of the immune response were done in MPM patients, using questionable control groups (transudate…). Methods We compared T cell populations evaluated by flow cytometry from blood and pleural effusion of untreated patients with MPM (n = 58), pleural metastasis of adenocarcinoma (n = 30) or with benign pleural lesions associated with asbestos exposure (n = 23). Blood and pleural fluid were also obtained from healthy subjects, providing normal values for T cell populations. Results Blood CD4+ or CD8+ T cells percentages were similar in all groups of patients or healthy subjects. Whereas pleural fluid from healthy controls contained mainly CD8+ T cells, benign or malignant pleural effusions included mainly CD4+ T cells. Effector memory T cells were the main T cell subpopulation in pleural fluid from healthy subjects. In contrast, there was a striking and selective recruitment of central memory CD4+ T cells in MPE, but not of effector cells CD8+ T cells or NK cells in the pleural fluid as one would expect in order to obtain an efficient immune response. Conclusions Comparing for the first time MPE to pleural fluid from healthy subjects, we found a local defect in recruiting effector CD8+ T cells, which may be involved in the escape of tumor cells from immune response. Further studies are needed to characterize which subtypes of effector CD8+ T cells are involved, opening prospects for cell therapy in MPE and MPM. PMID:23816056

  11. Model for a pump that drives circulation of pleural fluid.

    PubMed

    Butler, J P; Huang, J; Loring, S H; Lai-Fook, S J; Wang, P M; Wilson, T A

    1995-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models were used to study a mechanism that could maintain the layer of pleural fluid that covers the surface of the lung. The pleural space was modeled as a thin layer of viscous fluid lying between a membrane carrying tension (T), representing the lung, and a rigid wall, representing the chest wall. Flow of the fluid was driven by sliding between the membrane and wall. The physical model consisted of a cylindrical balloon with strings stretched along its surface. When the balloon was inflated inside a vertical circular cylinder containing a viscous fluid, the strings formed narrow vertical channels between broad regions in which the balloon pressed against the outer cylinder. The channels simulated the pleural space in the regions of lobar margins. Oscillatory rotation of the outer cylinder maintained a lubricating layer of fluid between the balloon and the cylinder. The thickness of the fluid layer (h), measured by fluorescence videomicroscopy, was larger for larger fluid viscosity (mu), larger sliding velocity (U), and smaller pressure difference (delta P) between the layer and the channel. A mathematical model of the flow in a horizontal section was analyzed, and numerical solutions were obtained for parameter values of mu, U, delta P, and T that matched those of the physical model. The computed results agreed reasonably well with the experimental results. Scaling laws yield the prediction that h is approximately (T/delta P)(microU/T)2/3. For physiological values of the parameters, the predicted value of h is approximately 10(-3) cm, in good agreement with the observed thickness of the pleural space.

  12. The comparative value of pleural fluid adenosine deaminase and neopterin levels in diagnostic utility of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Koşar, Filiz; Yurt, Sibel; Arpınar Yiğitbaş, Burcu; Şeker, Barış; Kutbay Özçelik, Hatice; Uzun, Hafize

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of pleura levels of adenosine deaminase (ADA) and neopterin for the differential diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis (TP). The study included 50 patients with TB, 27 patients with malignancies, and 24 patients with pleural effusion of non-tuberculous and non-malignant origin as controls. ADA and neopterin levels in pleural fluid were measured by spectrofotometric and ELISA method, respectively. Pleural neopterin levels were significantly higher in patients with pleural TB than patients with malignancy (p< 0.001). Pleural ADA levels were significantly higher in patients with pleural TB than patients with malignancy (p< 0.001) and patients with benign non-tuberculosis effusions (p< 0.001). The mean levels of ADA and neopterin in pleural effusion were evaluated according to their underlying diseases for the diagnostic accuracy. As for pleural TB receiving operating characteristic curves identified the following results; The best cut-off value for pleural neopterin was 4.7 U/L and yielded a sensitivity and specificity of 86% and 72.55%, respectively. Taking a cut-off value of 42 U/L for pleural ADA, the sensitivity and the specificity were found to be 88% and 68.63%, respectively. In the diagnosis of pleural TB pleural neopterin level has a comparable sensitivity to pleural ADA activity. Both markers may find a place as a routine investigation in the coming days for early detection of TB. However, these tests should not be considered an alternative to biopsy and culture.

  13. Aberrant DNA methylation profile in pleural fluid for differential diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masanori; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Hiraki, Akio; Gemba, Kenichi; Aoe, Keisuke; Umemura, Shigeki; Katayama, Hideki; Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2012-03-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) usually develops pleural fluid. We investigated the value of DNA methylation in the pleural fluid for differentiating MPM from lung cancer (LC). Pleural fluid was collected from 39 patients with MPM, 46 with LC, 25 with benign asbestos pleurisy (BAP) and 30 with other causes. The methylation of O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p16(INK4a) , ras association domain family 1A (RASSF1A), death-associated protein kinase (DAPK), and retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) was examined using quantitative real-time PCR. DNA methylation of RASSF1A, p16(INK4a), RARβ, MGMT and DAPK was detected in 12 (30.8%), 3 (7.7%), 11 (28.2%), 0 (0.0%) and five patients (12.8%) with MPM, and in 22 (47.8%), 14 (30.4%), 24 (52.2%), 1 (2.2%) and six patients (13.0%) with LC, respectively. The mean methylation ratios of RASSF1A, p16(INK4a) and RARβ were 0.37 (range 0.0-2.84), 0.11 (0.0-2.67) and 0.44 (0.0-3.32) in MPM, and 0.87 (0.0-3.14), 1.16 (0.0-5.35) and 1.69 (0.0-6.49) in LC, respectively. The methylation ratios for the three genes were significantly higher in LC than in MPM (RASSF1A, P = 0.039; p16(INK4a), P = 0.005; and RARβ, P = 0.002). Patients with methylation in at least one gene were 3.51 (95% confidence interval, 1.09-11.34) times more likely to have LC. Hypermethylation seemed no greater with MPM than with BAP. Extended exposure to asbestos (≧30 years) was correlated with an increased methylation frequency (P = 0.020). Hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in pleural fluid DNA has the potential to be a valuable marker for differentiating MPM from LC.

  14. IMMUNOLOGICAL REACTIONS OF PNEUMONIC PLEURAL FLUIDS

    PubMed Central

    Finland, Maxwell

    1932-01-01

    Pleuritic exudates from patients with lobar pneumonia may be sterile or infected. Sterile fluids, at or about the time of crisis, contain actively acquired antibodies similar to those in the blood serum. Infected fluids do not contain such antibodies, presumably because of the presence in them of large amounts of soluble specific substance. Sterile fluids from patients treated with immune sera have both horse serum and antibodies similar to those injected. Infected fluids from serum-treated cases contain horse serum and such heterologous antibodies as were contained in the therapeutic sera together with homologous soluble specific substance. The concentration of horse serum and antibodies in pneumonic fluids is usually the same or somewhat less than that of the corresponding blood sera. PMID:19869983

  15. Catheter drainage of pleural fluid collections and pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Frendin, J; Obel, N

    1997-06-01

    A technique for virtually atraumatic placement of small size chest catheters for suction drainage of pleural effusions and pneumothorax in the dog and cat is described. Thirty-nine dogs and two cats were treated for pyothorax (10 cases), hydrothorax (eight), chylothorax (three), haemothorax (three), haemothorax/ pneumothorax (three) and pneumothorax (14). In all 41 cases, thin or viscous fluid and/or air were efficiently drained. The mean period of drainage was four days (range, 0.5 to 18 days). The average amount of fluid removed from each patient in 24 hours was 530 ml in pyothorax cases (range, 140 to 1100 ml) and 1300 ml in the other cases (range, 20 to 5000 ml). In 40 cases there were no complications related to the procedure. One dog with severe pleural adhesions was euthanased because of lung perforation and pneumothorax secondary to misplacement of the catheter.

  16. The interface sign: a computed tomographic sign for distinguishig pleural and intra-abdominal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Teplick, J.G.; Teplick, S.K.; Goodman, L.; Haskin, M.E.

    1982-07-01

    On computed tomographic scans of the upper abdomen the interface sign can help distinguish pleural and intra-abdominal fluid readily and accurately.A hazy interface between the fluid and liver or spleen is characteristic of pleural fluid. A sharp interface is characteristic of ascites. The interface sign has proved to be accurate in 30 consecutive cases.

  17. Pleural fluid from a dog with marked eosinophilia.

    PubMed

    Cowgill, Elizabeth; Neel, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male Shar-Pei was presented to the North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital cardiology service with a 2-week history of coughing and a 2-day history of lethargy and anorexia. Pleural effusion and a mediastinal mass were detected with thoracic radiographs. Ten mL of fluid were removed via thoracocentesis, and cytologic examination of the fluid revealed marked eosinophilic inflammation and few atypical mast cells. Mast cell neoplasia was suspected. Aspirates of the mediastinal mass, abdominal lymph nodes, and bone marrow contained similar pleomorphic mast cells and increased numbers of eosinophils. The dog was diagnosed with systemic (visceral) mastocytosis, a rare form of neoplasia in dogs, and was euthanized. These tumors carry a poor to grave prognosis and the etiology is uncertain.

  18. Use of pleural fluid ceruloplasmin in the differentiation of exudative and transudative pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Shanthaveeranna, Girish K.; Thykadavil, Vinod G.; D’souza, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Differentiating into transudate or exudate is the first step in the evaluation of effusions. Light's criteria is the standard but a significant number of transudates may not be differentiated based on these criteria. Acute phase proteins (APP) are present in plasma, which increase or decrease by about 25% during an acute inflammatory response. Ceruloplasmin (CP) is a positive APP. Hence, this study was done to know the diagnostic value of pleural fluid (pf) CP and pf to serum ceruloplasmin ratio (CPr) to differentiate the pleural effusion (PE) into exudate and transudate as compared to Light's criteria. Materials and Methods: Setting: Medical wards of St John's Medical College Hospital, Bangalore. Design: Cross-sectional descriptive study. Patients with PE were divided into exudate and transudate by definitive diagnosis. pfCP, CPr and Light's criteria were compared with definitive diagnosis for the differentiation of pf into exudate and transudate. Results: The mean value of the pfCP and CPr was found to be significantly different between exudates and transudates. Sensitivity and specificity of pfCP at ≥ 13.34 mg/dl is 89.7% and 83.3%, CPr at ≥ 0.37 is 91.4% and 83.3%, Light's criteria 94.82% and 83.3%, respectively. Light's criteria, pfCP and CPr have similar PPV (98%) with Light's criteria having higher NPV (62.5%) than pfCP (45%) and CPr (50%), respectively. CPr has higher NPV than pfCP. Conclusions: pfCP and CPr can differentiate pf into exudate and transudate with comparable PPV to Light's criteria. PMID:25624589

  19. Useful tests on pleural fluid that distinguish transudates from exudates.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Vives, M; Vicente de Vera, M C; Cao, G; Rubio, M; Rivas, M C

    2001-11-01

    We aimed to compare the classic Light's criteria with different testing strategies in an effort to improve the accuracy of pleural fluid (PF) categorization. Thirty-two patients with transudates and 140 with exudates on the basis of their clinical diagnosis were entered into the study. We examined the discriminative properties of 10 analytes in the identification of PF, both singly and in combination with an 'or' rule, to see which was best in distinguishing a transudate from an exudate. A combination of PF lactate dehydrogenase (LD) > 307 U/L (two-thirds of the upper limit of the serum LD reference range) with either PF cholesterol > 1.55 mmol/L or PF to serum protein ratio > 0.5 had a diagnostic accuracy similar to that of Light's criteria. We suggest the use of PF LD and cholesterol in combination as an alternative method for distinguishing pleural transudates from exudates. This test combination avoids the need for venepuncture and the simultaneous collection of a blood sample.

  20. Antimicrobial peptides are highly abundant and active in postoperative pleural drainage fluids.

    PubMed

    Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Hochdaninger, Moritz; Traxler, Denise; Gschwandtner, Maria; Kasiri, Mohammad Mahdi; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Schweiger, Thomas; Hegedus, Balazs; Klepetko, Walter; Tschachler, Erwin; Ankersmit, Hendrik J; Mildner, Michael

    2014-09-01

    The human lung is considered a nonsterile organ, and surgical interventions therefore take place in a more or less contaminated operating field. Nevertheless, infectious complications of the pleural cavity are low after major lung resections. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are part of the innate immunity and display a broad capacity to kill pathogens. We hypothesized that the pleural space must have a high natural antimicrobial barrier and that AMPs might effectively protect the pleural cavity. Pleural effusions were collected after lung operations. Antimicrobial activity of the fluids against gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens was analyzed by microdilution assays. AMPs were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and immunohistochemical analysis. The impact of proinflammatory triggers on AMP release from pleural mesothelial cells was evaluated. Antimicrobial activity assays revealed high bactericidal properties of postoperative pleural drainage fluids. They effectively killed gram-negative pathogens (Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) as well as gram-positive pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Streptococcus pyogenes). A variety of AMPs was detected at constantly high concentrations in the pleural fluids. They mainly derived from leukocytes and pleural epithelium. Although proinflammatory cytokine levels were elevated in the postoperative pleural fluids, AMP expression could not be augmented by Toll-like receptor (TLR) triggering or by the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α. We provide the first evidence of a high abundance of AMPs in postoperative pleural fluids. Our findings might explain the broad protection against infectious complications of the pleural space after major lung operations. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Serum procalcitonin in Egyptian patients with acute meningitis and a negative direct cerebrospinal fluid examination.

    PubMed

    Abdelkader, Nadia A; Mahmoud, Waheed A; Saber, Sally Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    To reduce the morbidity and mortality related to bacterial meningitis, it is important to discriminate bacterial meningitis from aseptic meningitis during the acute phase of the disease, when the clinical symptoms are often similar. To test the reliability of serum procalcitonin (PCT) to discriminate bacterial meningitis from aseptic meningitis in patients who have a negative direct cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination, and to evaluate the role of serum PCT to assess treatment efficacy compared with the total leukocyte count (TLC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Forty patients with suspected acute meningitis and negative gram stains were included, and ten healthy persons were included as controls. According to the clinical examination and the CSF cytochemical analysis and cultures, the patients were divided into bacterial and aseptic groups. The measurements of serum PCT, ESR, CRP and TLC were performed. Patients in the bacterial group had a higher value of serum PCT at admission and at 3 days post-treatment than those in the aseptic group, with a highly significant difference between them. Serum PCT and, to a lesser extent, TLC had prognostic value in patients with acute meningitis, and PCT is more useful because it can be frequently measured for the diagnosis and follow-up of bacterial meningitis. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TLR2 in pleural fluid is modulated by talc particles during pleurodesis.

    PubMed

    Jankovicova, Karolina; Kondelkova, Katerina; Habal, Petr; Andrys, Ctirad; Krejsek, Jan; Mandak, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of TLR2 molecule in pleural space during thoracoscopic talc pleurodesis period in patients with malignant pleural effusion. We analyzed TLR2 molecule in soluble form as well as on membrane of granulocytes in pleural fluid. Pleural fluid examination was done at three intervals during pleurodesis procedure: 1st-before the thoracoscopic procedure, 2nd-2 hours after the terminating thoracoscopic procedure with talc insufflation, 3rd-24 hours after the thoracoscopic procedure. We reported significant increase of soluble TLR2 molecule in pleural fluid effusion during talc pleurodesis from preoperative value. This increase was approximately 8-fold in the interval of 24 hours. The changes on granulocyte population were quite different. The mean fluorescent intensity of membrane TLR2 molecule examined by flow cytometry on granulocyte population significantly decreased after talc exposure with comparison to prethoracoscopic density. To estimate the prognostic value of TLR2 expression in pleural fluid patients were retrospectively classified into either prognostically favourable or unfavourable groups. Our results proved that patients with favourable prognosis had more than 3-fold higher soluble TLR2 level in pleural fluid early, 2 hours after talc pleurodesis intervention.

  3. TLR2 in Pleural Fluid Is Modulated by Talc Particles during Pleurodesis

    PubMed Central

    Jankovicova, Karolina; Kondelkova, Katerina; Habal, Petr; Andrys, Ctirad; Krejsek, Jan; Mandak, Jiri

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of TLR2 molecule in pleural space during thoracoscopic talc pleurodesis period in patients with malignant pleural effusion. We analyzed TLR2 molecule in soluble form as well as on membrane of granulocytes in pleural fluid. Pleural fluid examination was done at three intervals during pleurodesis procedure: 1st—before the thoracoscopic procedure, 2nd—2 hours after the terminating thoracoscopic procedure with talc insufflation, 3rd—24 hours after the thoracoscopic procedure. We reported significant increase of soluble TLR2 molecule in pleural fluid effusion during talc pleurodesis from preoperative value. This increase was approximately 8-fold in the interval of 24 hours. The changes on granulocyte population were quite different. The mean fluorescent intensity of membrane TLR2 molecule examined by flow cytometry on granulocyte population significantly decreased after talc exposure with comparison to prethoracoscopic density. To estimate the prognostic value of TLR2 expression in pleural fluid patients were retrospectively classified into either prognostically favourable or unfavourable groups. Our results proved that patients with favourable prognosis had more than 3-fold higher soluble TLR2 level in pleural fluid early, 2 hours after talc pleurodesis intervention. PMID:23304186

  4. Lactic acid levels in pleural fluid from patients with bacterial pleuritis.

    PubMed Central

    Riley, T V

    1985-01-01

    Pleural fluid lactic acid estimations were carried out on 60 samples by gas-liquid chromatography. Lactic acid levels in 12 patients with bacterial pleural infection were statistically significantly higher (mean, 287 mg/dl; range, 135 to 482 mg/dl) than in 18 patients with malignancy (mean, 71 mg/dl; range, 24 to 157 mg/dl) and 30 other patients with pleural effusions (mean, 19 mg/dl; range, 10 to 57 mg/dl). The determination of pleural fluid lactic acid may help in differentiating between empyema and nonbacterial pleural effusions in most cases. It is of particular value when antibiotic therapy has commenced before specimen collection and may be useful for monitoring therapy. PMID:3973003

  5. Detection of EpCAM-positive microparticles in pleural fluid: A new approach to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Roca, Elisa; Lacroix, Romaric; Judicone, Coralie; Laroumagne, Sophie; Robert, Stéphane; Cointe, Sylvie; Muller, Alexandre; Kaspi, Elise; Roll, Patrice; Brisson, Alain R; Tantucci, Claudio; Astoul, Philippe; Dignat-George, Françoise

    2016-01-19

    Pleural biomarkers allowing to mini-invasively discriminate benign from malignant pleural effusions are needed. Among potential candidates, microparticles (MPs) are extracellular vesicles that vectorize antigen derived from the parent cell. We hypothesized that tumor-derived MPs could be present in the pleural liquid and help to identify patients with malignant pleural effusions. Using highly sensitive flow cytometry and cryo-electron microscopy, we showed that large amounts of MPs from hematopoïetic and vascular origin could be detectable in pleural fluids. Their level did not differ between benign (n = 14) and malignant (n = 71) pleural effusions. Analysis of selected tumoral associated antigens (podoplanin, mucin 1 and EpCAM, epithelial-cell-adhesion-molecule) evidenced for the first time the presence of tumor-derived MPs expressing EpCAM in malignant pleural fluids only (Specificity = 93%, Sensitivity = 49% and 45% for flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively). The detection of EpCAM-positive-MPs (EpCAM + MPs) by flow cytometry showed a better specificity and sensitivity than ELISA to distinguish between pleural carcinoma and the others malignant pleural effusions (MPE; Sp: 96% vs 89%; Se: 79% vs 66%). Combining EpCAM+ MPs and cytology improved the diagnosis of MPE compared to cytology alone. This study establishes the basis for using EpCAM+ MPs as a promising new biomarker that could be added to the armamentarium to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions.

  6. Detection of EpCAM-positive microparticles in pleural fluid: A new approach to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    Roca, Elisa; Lacroix, Romaric; Judicone, Coralie; Laroumagne, Sophie; Robert, Stéphane; Cointe, Sylvie; Muller, Alexandre; Kaspi, Elise; Roll, Patrice; Brisson, Alain R.; Tantucci, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Pleural biomarkers allowing to mini-invasively discriminate benign from malignant pleural effusions are needed. Among potential candidates, microparticles (MPs) are extracellular vesicles that vectorize antigen derived from the parent cell. We hypothesized that tumor-derived MPs could be present in the pleural liquid and help to identify patients with malignant pleural effusions. Using highly sensitive flow cytometry and cryo-electron microscopy, we showed that large amounts of MPs from hematopoïetic and vascular origin could be detectable in pleural fluids. Their level did not differ between benign (n = 14) and malignant (n = 71) pleural effusions. Analysis of selected tumoral associated antigens (podoplanin, mucin 1 and EpCAM, epithelial-cell-adhesion-molecule) evidenced for the first time the presence of tumor-derived MPs expressing EpCAM in malignant pleural fluids only (Specificity = 93%, Sensitivity = 49% and 45% for flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively). The detection of EpCAM-positive-MPs (EpCAM + MPs) by flow cytometry showed a better specificity and sensitivity than ELISA to distinguish between pleural carcinoma and the others malignant pleural effusions (MPE; Sp: 96% vs 89%; Se: 79% vs 66%). Combining EpCAM+ MPs and cytology improved the diagnosis of MPE compared to cytology alone. This study establishes the basis for using EpCAM+ MPs as a promising new biomarker that could be added to the armamentarium to mini-invasively identify patients with malignant pleural effusions. PMID:26689993

  7. Pleural fluid IL-8 as an inflammatory mediator for discriminating transudates and exudates.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Sanaa M; Ashour, Laila

    2007-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pleural effusion is a frequent clinical problem. The possible role of pleural fluid cytokines in discriminating transudates from exudates has not been studied adequately. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum and pleural fluid levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and compare it with common biochemical parameters such as total protein lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Forty patients with pleural effusion were studied. IL-8 was measured simultaneously in serum and pleural fluid using a commercially available ELISA kit. Standard laboratory methods were employed for biochemical parameters. Serum IL-8 levels were higher in the exudative group (8.1 +/- 0.2), but without statistical difference, when compared with transudate patients (6.8 +/- 0.1) (p > 0.05). Pleural IL-8 levels were significantly increased in exudate effusion when compared with transudate (26.6 +/- 3.7, 7.1 +/- 0.04 respectively, p < 0.001). In addition, a significant difference was found between pleural IL-8 in the malignant group (28.2 +/- 4.4) in comparison with the tuberculous group (21.1 +/- 2.9) (p < 0.01). Using ROC analysis, a pleural IL-8 cut off level of 19.7 pg/ml was found the best discriminating ratio in distinguishing exudates from transudates, with sensitivity of 100%, low specificity (from 50 to 66.7%) and good PPV (from 94.4 to 94.7%). Regarding pleural protein, the best discriminating value was 3 g/dl, while that for LDH was 200 IU/L. It is concluded that IL-8 could be considered as a sensitive, but not specific marker in differentiating pleural effusion into exudate and transudate, specially when used together with other criteria such as protein and LDH levels.

  8. Pleural effusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fluid on the lung; Pleural fluid Images Lungs Respiratory system Pleural cavity References Broaddus VC, Light RW. Pleural effusion. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016: ...

  9. Pleural Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... layers of the pleura is a very thin space. Normally it's filled with a small amount of ... breathing Pleural effusion - excess fluid in the pleural space Pneumothorax - buildup of air or gas in the ...

  10. Adenosine deaminase in CSF and pleural fluid for diagnosis of tubercular meningitis and pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nepal, A K; Gyawali, N; Poudel, B; Mahato, R V; Lamsal, M; Gurung, R; Baral, N; Majhi, S

    2012-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most common infectious diseases in developing countries including Nepal. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis results in poor prognosis of the disease. This study was conducted to estimate diagnostic cut off values of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and pleural fluid and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values ofADA in pleural fluid and CSF from patients with tuberculous and non-tuberculous disease. A total of 98 body fluid (CSF: 24, Pleural fluid: 74) specimens were received for the estimation of ADA. ADA activity was measured at 37 degrees C by spectrophotometric method of Guisti and Galanti, 1984 at 625nm wavelength. Among the patients enrolled for the study subjects for which CSF were received (n = 24) included 8 tuberculous meningitis (TBM), and 16 non-tubercular meningitis (NTM). Pleural fluid samples (n = 74) were received from 19 pulmonary TB with pleural effusion, 17 PTB without pleural effusion and 37 of non-tuberculous disease patients. CSF ADA activity were (11. 1 +/- 2.03 IU/L) and (5.3 +/- +1.89 IU/L) (p <00001) in TM and non-NTM groups and Pleural fluid ADA activity were (10 +/- 22.18 IU/L) and (23.79 +/- 11.62 IU/L) (p < 0.001) in PTB and non-TB groups respectively. ADA test in body fluids, which is simple, cost-effective and sensitive, specific for the tubercular disease is recommended to perform before forwarding the cumbersome and expensive procedures like culture and PCR for TB diagnosis.

  11. Outcome of tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collections.

    PubMed

    Ekpe, Eyo E; Akpan, M U

    2013-01-01

    Management of pleural fluid collection not due to trauma increases workload of the paediatric thoracic surgeons, while delay or inappropriate treatment worsens the prognosis of the disease. This study aimed at assessing the outcome of therapeutic tube thoracostomy in non-traumatic paediatric pleural fluid collections and identifying factors responsible for treatment failure with tube thoracostomy. Prospective analysis of socio-demographic characteristics, clinical features, clinical diagnosis, radiological diagnosis, and bacteriological diagnosis including bacteria cultured with sensitivity pattern, also treatment offered including tube thoracostomy with duration of tube thoracostomy and length of hospitalisation, indication for additional surgical procedure with type, and outcome of treatment of 30 paediatric patients with non-traumatic pleural fluid collection. Thirty paediatric patients with various causes of non-traumatic pleural fluid collection in 34 pleural spaces were analysed. Their ages ranged between six months and 16 years (mean = 6.5 years) and M:F ratio of 2:1. Pleural effusion and empyema thoracis accounted for 46% and 40% with staphylococcus aureus and streptococcus pneumoniae cultured in 10% each and a high negative culture rate of 46%, which was higher with age. The parents of 40% of the patients belonged to social class 3. Success rate of tube thoracostomy was 86% in unilateral cases, 50% in bilateral cases and 81% in all cases. Alternative treatment with thoracotomy and decortications gave a success rate of 100%. Thoracotomy with decortication is superior to tube thoracostomy in paediatric non-traumatic pleural fluid collection and should be chosen as the primary treatment option when there is bilateral disease, chronicity, loculated effusion, thickened pleural membranes or trapped lung.

  12. Pleural Fluid Adenosine Deaminase (Pfada) in the Diagnosis of Tuberculous Effusions in a Low Incidence Population

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, David T.; Bhatnagar, Rahul; Fairbanks, Lynette D.; Zahan-Evans, Natalie; Clive, Amelia O.; Morley, Anna J.; Medford, Andrew R. L.; Maskell, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Previous studies have assessed the diagnostic ability of pleural fluid adenosine deaminase (pfADA) in detecting tuberculous pleural effusions, with good specificity and sensitivity reported. However, in North Western Europe pfADA is not routinely used in the investigation of a patient with an undiagnosed pleural effusion, mainly due to a lack of evidence as to its utility in populations with low mycobacterium tuberculosis (mTB) incidence. Methods Patients presenting with an undiagnosed pleural effusion to a tertiary pleural centre in South-West England over a 3 year period, were prospectively recruited to a pleural biomarker study. Pleural fluid from consecutive patients with robust 12-month follow up data and confirmed diagnosis were sent for pfADA analysis. Results Of 338 patients enrolled, 7 had confirmed tuberculous pleural effusion (2%). All mTB effusions were lymphocyte predominant with a median pfADA of 72.0 IU/L (range- 26.7 to 91.5) compared to a population median of 12.0 IU/L (range- 0.3 to 568.4). The optimal pfADA cut off was 35 IU/L, which had a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.7% (95% CI; 98.2-99.9%) for the exclusion of mTB, and sensitivity of 85.7% (95% CI; 42.2-97.6%) with an area under the curve of 0.88 (95% CI; 0.732–1.000). Discussion This is the first study examining the diagnostic utility of pfADA in a low mTB incidence area. The chance of an effusion with a pfADA under 35 IU/L being of tuberculous aetiology was negligible. A pfADA of over 35 IU/L in lymphocyte-predominant pleural fluid gives a strong suspicion of mTB. PMID:25647479

  13. Dynamic and volumetric variables reliably predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Broch, Ole; Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Heß, Katharina; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    The ability of stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) for prediction of fluid responsiveness in presence of pleural effusion is unknown. The aim of the present study was to challenge the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusions. Pigs were studied at baseline and after fluid loading with 8 ml kg(-1) 6% hydroxyethyl starch. After withdrawal of 8 ml kg(-1) blood and induction of pleural effusion up to 50 ml kg(-1) on either side, measurements at baseline and after fluid loading were repeated. Cardiac output, stroke volume, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary occlusion pressure (PAOP) were obtained by pulmonary thermodilution, whereas GEDV was determined by transpulmonary thermodilution. SVV and PPV were monitored continuously by pulse contour analysis. Pleural effusion was associated with significant changes in lung compliance, peak airway pressure and stroke volume in both responders and non-responders. At baseline, SVV, PPV and GEDV reliably predicted fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.85 (p<0.001), 0.88 (p<0.001), 0.77 (p = 0.007). After induction of pleural effusion the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness was well preserved and also PAOP was predictive. Threshold values for SVV and PPV increased in presence of pleural effusion. In this porcine model, bilateral pleural effusion did not affect the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness.

  14. Dynamic and Volumetric Variables Reliably Predict Fluid Responsiveness in a Porcine Model with Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Broch, Ole; Gruenewald, Matthias; Renner, Jochen; Meybohm, Patrick; Schöttler, Jan; Heß, Katharina; Steinfath, Markus; Bein, Berthold

    2013-01-01

    Background The ability of stroke volume variation (SVV), pulse pressure variation (PPV) and global end-diastolic volume (GEDV) for prediction of fluid responsiveness in presence of pleural effusion is unknown. The aim of the present study was to challenge the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness in a porcine model with pleural effusions. Methods Pigs were studied at baseline and after fluid loading with 8 ml kg−1 6% hydroxyethyl starch. After withdrawal of 8 ml kg−1 blood and induction of pleural effusion up to 50 ml kg−1 on either side, measurements at baseline and after fluid loading were repeated. Cardiac output, stroke volume, central venous pressure (CVP) and pulmonary occlusion pressure (PAOP) were obtained by pulmonary thermodilution, whereas GEDV was determined by transpulmonary thermodilution. SVV and PPV were monitored continuously by pulse contour analysis. Results Pleural effusion was associated with significant changes in lung compliance, peak airway pressure and stroke volume in both responders and non-responders. At baseline, SVV, PPV and GEDV reliably predicted fluid responsiveness (area under the curve 0.85 (p<0.001), 0.88 (p<0.001), 0.77 (p = 0.007). After induction of pleural effusion the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness was well preserved and also PAOP was predictive. Threshold values for SVV and PPV increased in presence of pleural effusion. Conclusions In this porcine model, bilateral pleural effusion did not affect the ability of SVV, PPV and GEDV to predict fluid responsiveness. PMID:23418546

  15. [Dielectric parameters of ascitic and pleural fluids in the microwave range in different nosologies].

    PubMed

    Romanov, A N; Kovrigin, A O; Grigorchuk, O G; Lubennikov, V A; Lazarev, A F

    2011-01-01

    The dielectric parameters of ascitic and pleural fluids formed in the human body in oncological and nononcological diseases of different nosology have been estimated in the range between 400 MHz and 1.2 GHZ. The dependence of refractive and absorption indices of ascitic and pleural liquids on the signal frequency and mass concentration of dissolved substances was found. Common regularities and distinctions in the behavior of their dielectric properties were revealed.

  16. Diagnostic Accuracy of Cerebrospinal Fluid Procalcitonin in Bacterial Meningitis Patients with Empiric Antibiotic Pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Sun, Xiaolong; Yuan, Fang; Gao, Qiong; Ma, Yue; Jiang, Yongli; Yang, Xiai; Yang, Fang; Ma, Lei; Jiang, Wen

    2017-04-01

    Accurate diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (BM) relies on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram staining and bacterial culture, which often present high false-negative rates because of antibiotic abuse. Thus, a novel and reliable diagnostic biomarker is required. Procalcitonin (PCT) has been well demonstrated to be specifically produced from peripheral tissues by bacterial infection, which makes it a potential diagnostic biomarker candidate. Here, we performed a prospective clinical study comprising a total of 143 patients to investigate the diagnostic value of CSF PCT, serum PCT, and other conventional biomarkers for BM. Patients were assigned to the BM (n = 49), tuberculous meningitis (TBM) (n = 25), viral meningitis/encephalitis (VM/E) (n = 34), autoimmune encephalitis (AIE) (n = 15), or noninflammatory nervous system diseases (NINSD) group (n = 20). Empirical antibiotic pretreatment was not an exclusion criterion. Our results show that the CSF PCT level was significantly (P < 0.01) higher in patients with BM (median, 0.22 ng/ml; range, 0.13 to 0.54 ng/ml) than in those with TBM (median, 0.12 ng/ml; range, 0.07 to 0.16 ng/ml), VM/E (median, 0.09 ng/ml; range, 0.07 to 0.11 ng/ml), AIE (median, 0.06 ng/ml; range, 0.05 to 0.10 ng/ml), or NINSD (median, 0.07 ng/ml; range, 0.06 to 0.08 ng/ml). Among the assessed biomarkers, CSF PCT exhibited the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (0.881; 95% confidence interval, 0.810 to 0.932; cutoff value, 0.15 ng/ml; sensitivity, 69.39%; specificity, 91.49%). Our study sheds light upon the diagnostic dilemma of BM due to antibiotic abuse. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT02278016.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Revisiting tuberculous pleurisy: pleural fluid characteristics and diagnostic yield of mycobacterial culture in an endemic area

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Chuang, Yu-Chung; Lin, Jou-Wei; Chien, Jung-Yien; Huang, Chun-Ta; Kuo, Yao-Wen; Lee, Li-Na; Yu, Chong-Jen J

    2012-01-01

    Background Tuberculous pleurisy is traditionally indicated by extreme lymphocytosis in pleural fluid and low yield of effusion culture. However, there is considerable inconsistency among previous study results. In addition, these data should be updated due to early effusion studies and advances in culture methods. Methods From January 2004 to June 2009, patients with tuberculous pleurisy were retrospectively identified from the mycobacteriology laboratories and the pathology and tuberculosis registration databases of two hospitals in Taiwan where tuberculosis is endemic. Pleural fluid characteristics and yields of mycobacterial cultures using liquid media were evaluated. Results A total of 382 patients with tuberculous pleurisy were identified. The median lymphocyte percentage of total cells in pleural fluids was 84% (IQR 64–95%) and 17% of cases had a lymphocyte percentage of <50%. The lymphocyte percentage was negatively associated with the probability of a positive effusion culture (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.96 to 0.99). The diagnostic yields were 63% for effusion culture, 48% for sputum culture, 79% for the combination of effusion and sputum cultures, and 74% for histological examination of pleural biopsy specimens. Conclusion The degree of lymphocyte predominance in tuberculous pleurisy was lower than was previously thought. The lymphocyte percentage in pleural fluid was negatively associated with the probability of a positive effusion culture. With the implementation of a liquid culture method, the sensitivity of effusion culture was much higher than has been previously reported, and the combination of effusion and sputum cultures provided a good diagnostic yield. PMID:22436167

  18. Combined pleural fluid cholesterol and total protein in differentiation of exudates and transudates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Anand K; Choudhury, Sushmita

    2013-01-01

    The management strategy to be adopted in pleural effusion depends on whether an effusion is a transudate or exudate. To evaluate the usefulness of pleural fluid cholesterol and/or total protein measurements for differentiating between exudates and transudates, and to compare it with Light's criteria. In this prospective study 60 patients with pleural effusion were included. Pleural fluid total protein, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and cholesterol as well as serum total protein and LDH levels along with other investigations were studied. Clinical classification of transudate or exudate was done on the basis of aetiology. Based on clinical signs and symptoms, chest radiograph, other investigations and response to treatment, 49 of these effusions were classified as exudates and 11 as transudates. Using pleural fluid cholesterol levels at a cut-off point of greater than 60 mg/dL and/or total protein at a cut-off point of greater than 3 g/dL for distinguishing transudates and exudates, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV), were 100 percent. Using Light's criteria for discriminating transudates and exudates, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV were found to be 98%; 100%; 100% and 92%, respectively. The differences resulted from a mis-classification of one expected exudate as transudate by Light's criteria. Pleural fluid cholesterol and total protein are simple, cost-effective, and useful parameters in distinguishing pleural transudates from exudates, with the advantage of requiring only two laboratory determinations and no simultaneous blood sample, compared to the use of Light's criteria.

  19. Vitamin D nutritional status and vitamin D regulated antimicrobial peptides in serum and pleural fluid of patients with infectious and noninfectious pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Amado, Carlos A; García-Unzueta, María T; Fariñas, M Carmen; Santos, Francisca; Ortiz, María; Muñoz-Cacho, Pedro; Amado, José A

    2016-07-08

    Vitamin D and vitamin D dependent antimicrobial peptides such as Cathelicidin (LL-37) and β-defensin 2 have an important role in innate and adaptative immunity, but their role in pleural effusions has not been studied before. Serum and pleural fluid samples from 152 patients with pleural effusion were collected, corresponding to 45 transudates and 107 exudates, 51 infectious effusions (14 complicated and 37 non-complicated), 44 congestive heart failure effusions and 38 malignant effusions. The levels of 25 OH-vitamin D, 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D, Vitamin D Binding Protein (VDBP), LL-37 and β-defensin 2, both in serum and pleural fluid were evaluated in this prospective study. Differences between groups were analysed using unpaired t tests or Mann-Whitney tests. Correlations between data sets were examined using Pearson correlation coefficient or Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Diagnostic accuracy was estimated using ROC curve analysis. Low serum 25 OH vitamin D levels were found in all groups. Infectious effusions (IE) had higher serum and pleural fluid LL-37 levels compared to congestive heart failure or malignant effusions. Among IE, complicated had higher serum and pleural fluid LL-37 levels, and lower serum β-defensin-2 levels. Positive correlations were found between serum 25 OH-vitamin D levels and serum or pleural 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D levels, and between 1,25-(OH)2-vitamin D and LL-37 serum. Diagnostic accuracy of the different molecules was moderate at best. Hypovitaminosis D is highly prevalent in pleural effusions. LL-37 is produced intrapleurally in IE. This production is higher in complicated IE. No evidence of pleural production of β-defensin 2 was found in any of the groups. Diagnostic accuracy of the different molecules is at the best moderate for discriminating different types of effusions.

  20. Cytokine levels in pleural fluid as markers of acute rejection after lung transplantation*

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Priscila Cilene León Bueno; Afonso, José Eduardo; Samano, Marcos Naoyuki; Acencio, Milena Marques Pagliarelli; Antonangelo, Leila; Teixeira, Ricardo Henrique de Oliveira Braga

    2014-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF, as well as the total and differential cell counts, in the pleural fluid of lung transplant recipients, correlating those levels with the occurrence and severity of rejection. We analyzed pleural fluid samples collected from 18 patients at various time points (up to postoperative day 4). The levels of IL-6, IL-8, and VEGF tended to elevate in parallel with increases in the severity of rejection. Our results suggest that these levels are markers of acute graft rejection in lung transplant recipients. PMID:25210966

  1. The Diagnostic Value of the Pleural Fluid C-Reactive Protein in Parapneumonic Effusions.

    PubMed

    Izhakian, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G; Fox, Benjamin D; Vainshelboim, Baruch; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of pleural C-reactive protein (CRP) biomarker levels in identifying parapneumonic effusions. Methods. A single-center, retrospective review of 244 patients diagnosed with pleural effusions was initiated among patients at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel, between January 2011 and December 2013. The patients were categorized into 4 groups according to their type of pleural effusion as follows: heart failure, malignant, post-lung transplantation, and parapneumonic effusion. Results. The pleural CRP levels significantly differentiated the four groups (p < 0.001) with the following means: parapneumonic effusion, 5.38 ± 4.85 mg/dL; lung transplant, 2.77 ± 2.66 mg/dL; malignancy, 1.19 ± 1.51 mg/dL; and heart failure, 0.57 ± 0.81 mg/dL. The pleural fluid CRP cut-off value for differentiating among parapneumonic effusions and the other 3 groups was 1.38 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 84.2%, 71.5%, 37%, and 95%, respectively. A backward logistic regression model selected CRP as the single predictor of parapneumonic effusion (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.37-1.89). Conclusions. Pleural fluid CRP levels can be used to distinguish between parapneumonic effusions and other types of exudative effusions. CRP levels < 0.64 mg/dL are likely to indicate a pleural effusion from congestive heart failure, whereas levels ≥ 1.38 mg/dL are suggestive of an infectious etiology.

  2. The Diagnostic Value of the Pleural Fluid C-Reactive Protein in Parapneumonic Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Izhakian, Shimon; Wasser, Walter G.; Fox, Benjamin D.; Vainshelboim, Baruch; Kramer, Mordechai R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of pleural C-reactive protein (CRP) biomarker levels in identifying parapneumonic effusions. Methods. A single-center, retrospective review of 244 patients diagnosed with pleural effusions was initiated among patients at the Rabin Medical Center, Petah Tikva, Israel, between January 2011 and December 2013. The patients were categorized into 4 groups according to their type of pleural effusion as follows: heart failure, malignant, post-lung transplantation, and parapneumonic effusion. Results. The pleural CRP levels significantly differentiated the four groups (p < 0.001) with the following means: parapneumonic effusion, 5.38 ± 4.85 mg/dL; lung transplant, 2.77 ± 2.66 mg/dL; malignancy, 1.19 ± 1.51 mg/dL; and heart failure, 0.57 ± 0.81 mg/dL. The pleural fluid CRP cut-off value for differentiating among parapneumonic effusions and the other 3 groups was 1.38 mg/dL. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were 84.2%, 71.5%, 37%, and 95%, respectively. A backward logistic regression model selected CRP as the single predictor of parapneumonic effusion (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.37–1.89). Conclusions. Pleural fluid CRP levels can be used to distinguish between parapneumonic effusions and other types of exudative effusions. CRP levels < 0.64 mg/dL are likely to indicate a pleural effusion from congestive heart failure, whereas levels ≥ 1.38 mg/dL are suggestive of an infectious etiology. PMID:27194820

  3. Procalcitonin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... CRP) , cultures (e.g., blood culture , urine culture ), lactate , blood gases , complete blood count (CBC) , and cerebrospinal ... of procalcitonin can be seen with medullary thyroid cancer , but the test is not used to diagnose ...

  4. Is albumin gradient or fluid to serum albumin ratio better than the pleural fluid lactate dehydroginase in the diagnostic of separation of pleural effusion?

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jose; Badrinath, Padmanabhan; Basran, Gurnam S; Sahn, Steven A

    2002-01-01

    Background To determine the accuracy of serum-effusion albumin gradient (SEAG) and pleural fluid to serum albumin ratio (ALBR) in the diagnostic separation of pleural effusion into transudate and exudate and to compare SEAG and ALBR with pleural fluid LDH (FLDH) the most widely used test. Methods Data collected from 200 consecutive patients with a known cause of pleural effusion in a United Kingdom district general hospital. Results The median and inter quartile ranges (IQR) for SEAG 93.5 (33.8 to 122.5) g/dl, ALBR 0.49 (0.42 to 0.62) and FLDH 98.5 IU/L(76.8 to 127.5) in transudates were significantly lower than the corresponding values for exudates 308.5 (171 to 692), 0.77 (0.63 to 0.85), 344 (216 to 695) all p < 0.0001. The Area Under the Curve (AUC) with 95% confidence intervals (Cl) for SEAG, ALBR and FLDH were 0.81 (0.75 to 0.87), 0.79 (0.72 to 0.86) and 0.9 (0.87 to 0.96) respectively. The positive likelihood ratios with 95%CI for FLDH, SEAG, and ALBR were: 7.3(3.5–17), 6.3(3–15) 6.2(3–14) respectively. There was a significant negative correlation between SEAG and ALBR (r= -0.89, p < 0.0001). Conclusion The discriminative value for SEAG and ALBR appears to be similar in the diagnostic separation of transudates and exudates. FLDH is a superior test compared to SEAG and ALBR. PMID:11914151

  5. Is the pleural fluid transudate or exudate? A revisit of the diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, J; Badrinath, P; Basran, G; Sahn, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Pleural effusions are classified into transudates and exudates based on criteria developed in the 1970s. However, their accuracy has not been evaluated. We compared the performance of the pleural fluid absolute lactic dehydrogenase level (FLDH), fluid to serum ratio of LDH (LDHR), and fluid to serum ratio of total protein (TPR). TPR has been used instead of the absolute value of fluid protein based on the observation that fluid protein is influenced by changes in the serum protein concentration. However, the rationale for using LDHR remains unexplored.
METHODS—Of 212 consecutive patients with pleural effusions, four with multiple causes and eight with an uncertain diagnosis were excluded. ROC curves were generated using sensitivity and 1-specificity values for TPR, FLDH, and LDHR and positive likelihood ratios (LR +ve) were computed using the optimum cut off values. The correlation between pleural fluid and serum concentrations of total protein and LDH was also estimated.
RESULTS—Of 200 effusions studied, 156 were exudates and 44 were transudates. The optimum cut off levels were: FLDH 163 IU/l, TPR 0.5,LDHR 0.6, and the FLDH-TPR combination 163 and 0.4, respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was: 0.89 (0.86 to 0.96) for FLDH, 0.86 (0.80 to 0.91) for TPR, 0.82 (0.77 to 0.89) for LDHR, and 0.90 (0.86 to 95) for FLDH-TPR. A significant correlation was observed between serum and pleural fluid protein levels in transudates and exudates (r=0.5 and 0.6,respectively), but the correlation between serum and pleural fluid LDH levels was insignificant.
CONCLUSION—FLDH is the most accurate marker for the diagnostic separation of transudates and exudates and LDHR has no role in this process. Combining TPR with FLDH appears to improve the diagnostic accuracy slightly.

 PMID:11641512

  6. Coccidioidomycosis: adenosine deaminase levels, serologic parameters, culture results, and polymerase chain reaction testing in pleural fluid.

    PubMed

    Thompson, George R; Sharma, Shobha; Bays, Derek J; Pruitt, Rachel; Engelthaler, David M; Bowers, Jolene; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Davis, Michael; Libke, Robert; Cohen, Stuart H; Pappagianis, Demosthenes

    2013-03-01

    In a patient with positive serum serology for coccidioidomycosis, the differential diagnosis of concurrent pleural effusions can be challenging. We, therefore, sought to clarify the performance characteristics of biochemical, serologic, and nucleic-acid-based testing in an attempt to avoid invasive procedures. The utility of adenosine deaminase (ADA), coccidioidal serology, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the evaluation of pleuropulmonary coccidioidomycosis has not been previously reported. Forty consecutive patients evaluated for pleuropulmonary coccidioidomycosis were included. Demographic data, pleural fluid values, culture results, and clinical diagnoses were obtained from patient chart review. ADA testing was performed by ARUP Laboratories, coccidioidal serologic testing was performed by the University of California-Davis coccidioidomycosis serology laboratory, and PCR testing was performed by the Translational Genomics Research Institute using a previously published methodology. Fifteen patients were diagnosed with pleuropulmonary coccidioidomycosis by European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer/Mycoses Study Group criteria. Pleural fluid ADA concentrations were < 40 IU/L in all patients (range, < 1.0-28.6 IU/L; median, 4.7). The sensitivity and specificity of coccidioidal serologic testing was 100% in this study. The specificity of PCR testing was high (100%), although the overall sensitivity remained low, and was comparable to the experience of others in the clinical use of PCR for coccidioidal diagnostics. Contrary to prior speculation, ADA levels in pleuropulmonary coccidioidomycosis were not elevated in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of coccidioidal serologic testing in nonserum samples remained high, but the clinical usefulness of PCR testing in pleural fluid was disappointing and was comparable to pleural fluid culture.

  7. Absence of trisomy 7 in nonneoplastic human ascitic and pleural fluid cells. An interphase cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Larramendy, M L; Björkqvist, A M; Tammilehto, L; Taavitsainen, M; Mattson, K; Knuutila, S

    1994-11-01

    Trisomy 7 is a frequent aneuploid change in lymphomas, adenocarcinomas, and malignant mesenchymal and neurogenic tumors. Moreover, it has been observed in cultured and uncultured non-neoplastic cells from brain, kidney, liver, lung, and atherosclerotic plaques, among other tissues, opening debate on the role of this change in normal and neoplastic tissue. We used nonradioactive in situ hybridization (ISH) with a biotinylated chromosome 7-specific alpha-satellite DNA probe to seek an extra copy of chromosome 7 in ascitic and pleural fluid interphase cells from 26 donors. The donors comprised 24 patients with nonmalignant clinical history, one patient with non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma (positive control), and one patient with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, negative control). The highest frequency of fluid cells with three hybridization signals in patients without neoplasia was 0.5%, in contrast to the frequency of 40.5% noted in the fluid cells of the patient with non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma. The results demonstrate that the frequency of trisomic cells in pleural as well as in ascitic fluid is very low, making possible use of the cells in ascitic or pleural fluids in identification of malignancy.

  8. Mindray BC-6800 body fluid mode, performance of nucleated cells, and differential count in ascitic and pleural fluids.

    PubMed

    Buoro, S; Mecca, T; Azzarà, G; Seghezzi, M; Candiago, E; Gianatti, A; Crippa, A; La Gioia, A

    2016-02-01

    An accurate and rapid analysis of cells in body fluids (BFs) is important for diagnosis and follow-up in many pathological conditions. We evaluated the analytical performance of the module BF Mindray BC-6800 (BC-6800-BF) for cytometric analysis of ascitic and pleural fluids. A total of 99 ascitic and 45 pleural samples were collected and assessed with BC-6800-BF and optical microscopy. This study also includes the evaluation of limit blank (LoB), limit detection (LoD), limit quantitation, (LoQ), carryover, linearity, and diagnostic concordance between the two methods. For TC-BF, LoB was 1 × 10(6) cells/L, LoD was 3 × 10(6) cells/L, and LoQ was 4 × 10(6) cells/L. Linearity was excellent (r(2) = 0.99) and carryover was negligible. TC-BF performed with the two methods showed Pearson's correlation of 0.99 (P < 0.0001), Passing-Bablok regression y = 1.04x - 1.17, and bias 33.7 cells. In ascitic fluids, polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) showed an area under curve (AUC) of 0.98 (P < 0.0001). In pleural fluids, mononuclear cells (MN) and PMN % displayed an AUC of 0.79 (P < 0.0001) and 0.93 (P < 0.0001), respectively. BC-6800-BF in ascitic and pleural fluids offers rapid and accurate cell and differential counts in clinically relevant concentration ranges. The use of BC-6800-BF may allow to replace routine optical counting, except for samples displaying abnormal cell counts or abnormal DIFF scattergram. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Comparison of refractometry and biuret assay for measurement of total protein concentration in canine abdominal and pleural fluid specimens.

    PubMed

    Rose, Alexandra; Funk, Deborah; Neiger, Reto

    2016-04-01

    To compare total protein (TP) concentrations in canine pleural and abdominal fluid specimens as measured by refractometry and biuret assay. Diagnostic test evaluation. Data regarding 92 pleural and 148 abdominal fluid specimens from dogs with various diseases. TP concentrations in fluid specimens as measured by refractometry and biuret assay were recorded. Strength of association between sets of measurements was assessed by Spearman rank correlations and Bland-Altman plots. Optimal concentration cutoff for diagnostic discrimination between exudate and nonexudate was identified by construction of receiver operating characteristic curves. Median TP concentration in pleural fluid specimens was 2.7 g/dL (range, 0.3 to 4.8 g/dL) for refractometry and 2.9 g/dL (range, 0.7 to 5.8 g/dL) for biuret assay. Median TP concentration in abdominal fluid specimens was 3.5 g/dL (range, 0.1 to 6.0 g/dL) for refractometry and 3.5 g/dL (range, 0.6 to 5.7 g/dL) for biuret assay. Correlation was significant between refractometric and biuret results for pleural (ρ = 0.921) and abdominal (ρ = 0.908) fluid. Bland-Altman plots revealed bias of -0.18 g/dL for pleural fluid and -0.03 g/dL for abdominal fluid for refractometry versus biuret assay. With a TP concentration of ≥ 3 g/dL used to distinguish exudate from nonexudate, sensitivity of refractometry was 77% for pleural fluid and 80% for abdominal fluid. Specificity was 100% and 94%, respectively. Refractometry yielded acceptable results for measurement of TP concentration in canine pleural and abdominal fluid specimens, providing a more rapid and convenient method than biuret assay.

  10. Early pleural fluid dynamics following video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy has limited clinical value.

    PubMed

    Holbek, Bo Laksáfoss; Petersen, René Horsleben; Kehlet, Henrik; Hansen, Henrik Jessen

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of predicting the pleural fluid output in patients after video-assisted thoracoscopic lobectomy of the lung. Detailed measurements of continuous fluid output were obtained prospectively using an electronic thoracic drainage device (Thopaz+™, Medela AG, Switzerland). Patients were divided into high (≥500 mL) and low (<500 mL) 24-hour fluid output, and detailed flow curves were plotted graphically to identify arithmetic patterns predicting fluid output in the early (≤24 hours) and later (24-48 hours) post-operative phase. Furthermore, multiple logistic regression analysis was used to predict high 24-hour fluid output using baseline data. Data were obtained from 50 patients, where 52% had a fluid output of <500 mL/24 hours. From visual assessment of flow curves, patients were grouped according to fluid output 6 hours postoperatively. An output ≥200 mL/6 hours was predictive of 'high 24-hour fluid output' (P<0.0001). However, 33% of patients with <200 mL/6 hours ended with a 'high 24-hour fluid output'. Baseline data showed no predictive value of fluid production, and 24-hour fluid output had no predictive value of fluid output between 24 and 48 hours. Assessment of initial fluid production may predict high 24-hour fluid output (≥500 mL) but seems to lack clinical value in drain removal criteria.

  11. Parapneumonic pleural effusion

    MedlinePlus

    Pleural effusion - pneumonia ... Pneumonia, most commonly from bacteria, causes parapneumonic pleural effusion. ... Antibiotics are prescribed to treat the pneumonia. If the person ... be used to drain the fluid. If better drainage of the fluid is ...

  12. Pleural fluid osteopontin, vascular endothelial growth factor, and urokinase-type plasminogen activator levels as predictors of pleurodesis outcome and prognosticators in patients with malignant pleural effusion: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Han; Hsu, Pei-Chi; Liao, Tien-Ling; Feng, An-Chen; Chu, Nei-Min; Kao, Shu-Huei

    2016-07-13

    Rapidly growing cancer cells secrete growth-promoting polypeptides and have increased proteolytic activity, contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. Their presentation in malignant pleural effusion (MPE) and their predictive value for the outcome of pleurodesis and survival were studied. Between February 2011 and March 2012, MPE samples were prospectively collected from 61 patients. Twenty-five patients with non-malignant pleural effusion in the same period were included as controls. Pleural fluid osteopontin (OPN), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) concentrations were measured. Patients with MPE had higher pleural fluid OPN, VEGF, and uPA concentrations than those with non-malignant pleural effusion, but only differences in VEGF were statistically significant (p = 0.045). Patients with distant metastases had significantly elevated pleural fluid VEGF concentrations than those without (p = 0.004). Pleural fluid OPN, VEGF, and uPA concentrations were positively correlated in most patients. However, there was no significant difference in pleural fluid OPN, VEGF, and uPA concentrations between patients with successful pleurodesis and those without. There was also no significant difference in cancer-specific survival between sub-groups with higher and lower pleural fluid OPN, VEGF, or uPA concentrations. Patients with successful pleurodesis had significantly longer cancer-specific survival than those without (p = 0.015). Pleural fluid OPN, VEGF, and uPA concentrations are elevated in MPE but are not satisfactory predictors of pleurodesis outcome or survival. Patients with higher pleural fluid VEGF concentration have higher risk of distant metastasis. Evaluating the benefits of therapy targeting the VEGF pathway in these patients warrants further studies.

  13. Identifying Thoracic Malignancies Through Pleural Fluid Biomarkers: A Predictive Multivariate Model.

    PubMed

    Porcel, José M; Esquerda, Aureli; Martínez-Alonso, Montserrat; Bielsa, Silvia; Salud, Antonieta

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions may be challenging when cytological examination of aspirated pleural fluid is equivocal or noncontributory. The purpose of this study was to identify protein candidate biomarkers differentially expressed in the pleural fluid of patients with mesothelioma, lung adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, and tuberculosis (TB).A multiplex protein biochip comprising 120 biomarkers was used to determine the pleural fluid protein profile of 29 mesotheliomas, 29 lung adenocarcinomas, 12 lymphomas, and 35 tuberculosis. The relative abundance of these predetermined biomarkers among groups served to establish the differential diagnosis of: malignant versus benign (TB) effusions, lung adenocarcinoma versus mesothelioma, and lymphoma versus TB. The selected putative markers were validated using widely available commercial techniques in an independent sample of 102 patients.Significant differences were found in the protein expressions of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), cathepsin-B, C-reactive protein, and chondroitin sulfate between malignant and TB effusions. When integrated into a scoring model, these proteins yielded 85% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.98 for labeling malignancy in the verification sample. For lung adenocarcinoma-mesothelioma discrimination, combining CA19-9, CA15-3, and kallikrein-12 had maximal discriminatory capacity (65% sensitivity, 100% specificity, AUC 0.94); figures which also refer to the validation set. Last, cathepsin-B in isolation was only moderately useful (sensitivity 89%, specificity 62%, AUC 0.75) in separating lymphomatous and TB effusions. However, this last differentiation improved significantly when cathepsin-B was used with respect to the patient's age (sensitivity 72%, specificity 100%, AUC 0.94).In conclusion, panels of 4 (i.e., MMP-9, cathepsin-B, C-reactive protein, chondroitin sulfate), or 3 (i.e., CA19-9, CA15-3, kallikrein-12) different protein biomarkers on pleural

  14. Pleural fluid adenosine deaminase (pfADA) in the diagnosis of tuberculous effusions in a low incidence population.

    PubMed

    Arnold, David T; Bhatnagar, Rahul; Fairbanks, Lynette D; Zahan-Evans, Natalie; Clive, Amelia O; Morley, Anna J; Medford, Andrew R L; Maskell, Nicholas A

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have assessed the diagnostic ability of pleural fluid adenosine deaminase (pfADA) in detecting tuberculous pleural effusions, with good specificity and sensitivity reported. However, in North Western Europe pfADA is not routinely used in the investigation of a patient with an undiagnosed pleural effusion, mainly due to a lack of evidence as to its utility in populations with low mycobacterium tuberculosis (mTB) incidence. Patients presenting with an undiagnosed pleural effusion to a tertiary pleural centre in South-West England over a 3 year period, were prospectively recruited to a pleural biomarker study. Pleural fluid from consecutive patients with robust 12-month follow up data and confirmed diagnosis were sent for pfADA analysis. Of 338 patients enrolled, 7 had confirmed tuberculous pleural effusion (2%). All mTB effusions were lymphocyte predominant with a median pfADA of 72.0 IU/L (range- 26.7 to 91.5) compared to a population median of 12.0 IU/L (range- 0.3 to 568.4). The optimal pfADA cut off was 35 IU/L, which had a negative predictive value (NPV) of 99.7% (95% CI; 98.2-99.9%) for the exclusion of mTB, and sensitivity of 85.7% (95% CI; 42.2-97.6%) with an area under the curve of 0.88 (95% CI; 0.732-1.000). This is the first study examining the diagnostic utility of pfADA in a low mTB incidence area. The chance of an effusion with a pfADA under 35 IU/L being of tuberculous aetiology was negligible. A pfADA of over 35 IU/L in lymphocyte-predominant pleural fluid gives a strong suspicion of mTB.

  15. Time-related course of pleural space fluid collection and pulmonary aeration on postmortem computed tomography (PMCT).

    PubMed

    Hyodoh, Hideki; Shimizu, Jyunya; Watanabe, Satoshi; Okazaki, Shunichiro; Mizuo, Keisuke; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2015-07-01

    Postmortem CT (PMCT) is increasingly used in forensic practice, and knowledge and classification of typical postmortem imaging findings would facilitate the interpretation of PMCT. The goal of this study was to define the time-related course of postmortem chest findings. Twelve cadavers (eight male, four female, 27-81 [mean, 60.0]years) were examined twice by PMCT within an interval of time (4-164 h [mean, 30.8; median, 17.5]). The pleural-space-fluid volume, pulmonary parenchyma volume, decreased aerated lung volume (DLV), %DLV (=DLV/pulmonary parenchyma volume) and chest cavity volume were compared between the first and second PMCT examinations. To evaluate the volume change rate, the rate of increase in pleural space fluid volume (mL/h) and the DLV rate (mL/h) were plotted according to the postmortem period. On the second PMCT, the volume of pleural space fluid (p=0.0469) and %DLV (p=0.0161) were significantly increased. The increase rate of the pleural space fluid increased at approximately 30 h and the volume continued to increase until approximately 40 h after death. The rate of DLV constantly decreased in the early postmortem period. In conclusion, the pleural-space-fluid collection and the DLV increased over different time-related courses in the postmortem period. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. The rate of pleural fluid drainage as a criterion for the timing of chest tube removal: theoretical and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    Utter, Garth H

    2013-12-01

    Clinicians place chest tubes approximately 1 million times each year in the United States, but little information is available to guide their management. Specifically, use of the rate of pleural fluid drainage as a criterion for tube removal is not standardized. Absent such tubes, pleural fluid drains primarily through parietal pleural lymphatics at rates approaching 500 mL of fluid per day or more for each hemithorax. Early removal of tubes does not appear to be harmful. A noninferiority randomized trial currently in progress comparing removal without considering the drainage rate to a conservative threshold (2 mL/kg body weight in 24 hours) may better inform tube management. Copyright © 2013 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantification and characterization of pleural fluid in healthy dogs with thoracostomy tubes.

    PubMed

    Hung, Germaine C; Gaunt, M Casey; Rubin, Joseph E; Starrak, Gregory S; Sakals, Sherisse A

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To quantify and characterize pleural fluid collected from healthy dogs after placement of a thoracostomy tube (TT). ANIMALS 8 healthy Coonhound-cross dogs (mean ± SD weight, 27.2 ± 1.6 kg). PROCEDURES Thoracic CT of each dog was performed before placement of a TT and daily thereafter for 7 days. Thoracic fluid volume was calculated from CT images. Effusion was aspirated when detected; volume was recorded, and cytologic analysis and bacterial culture were performed. RESULTS Mean ± SD volume of pleural effusion detected by CT was 1.43 ± 0.59 mL/kg (range, 0.12 to 3.32 mL/kg). Mean volume collected via aspiration was 0.48 ± 0.84 mL/kg (range, 0 to 2.16 mL/kg). Cytologic analysis yielded results consistent with an exudate, characterized by septic suppurative inflammation in 6 dogs and mixed inflammation in 1 dog; there was insufficient volume for analysis in 1 dog. Sufficient volume was obtained for bacterial culture for 6 dogs, which yielded pure growths of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (n = 3) and Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus (2) and mixed growth of both of these species (1). The TT was removed before day 7 in 4 dogs because of pyothorax (n = 3) and irreversible damage to the TT (1). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Presence of a TT induced a minimal volume of pleural effusion in healthy dogs. Pyothorax developed in most dogs between 4 and 6 days after TT placement. On the basis of these findings, a TT should be removed by the fourth day after placement, unless complications are detected sooner.

  18. Examination of cytological smears and cell blocks of pleural fluid: Complementary diagnostic value for malignant effusions.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Quirós, M; Gatius, S; Bielsa, S

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the independent usefulness of pleural fluid smear and cell block (CB) preparations for the diagnosis of malignant effusions. A total of 632 cytological smears and 554 CBs from 414 consecutive patients with malignant effusions were retrospectively evaluated. The diagnostic yield of a first specimen was 44% regardless of whether a smear or CB cytologic examination was performed. The use of subsequent separated specimens increased the identification of malignancy to 56%. Overall, 11% of samples found to be negative by cytologic smears showed malignant cells on CBs, whereas 15% of negative CBs were reported as positive on smear slides. Pleural fluid specimens with low red and/or white blood cell counts more frequently resulted in the generation of suboptimal CB preparations. If CBs and smears are prepared and examined, the percentage of positive diagnoses will be greater than if only one method is used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. TTF-1 and napsin A on cell blocks and supernatants of pleural fluids for labeling malignant effusions.

    PubMed

    Porcel, José M; Palma, Rosa; Bielsa, Silvia; Esquerda, Aureli; Gatius, Sonia; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Salud, Antonieta

    2015-07-01

    In this retrospective study of 80 pleural effusions, the combination of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) and napsin A immunostaining on fluid cell blocks was positive in 80% of lung adenocarcinomas. Although measuring TTF-1 pleural fluid concentrations was of no value, quantification of napsin A levels allowed the identification of one third of the double-negative stained lung adenocarcinomas, with an overall accuracy similar to classical tumour markers for malignant-benign discrimination (sensitivity 40%, specificity 100%). © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  20. Secretion of IFN-γ Associated with Galectin-9 Production by Pleural Fluid Cells from a Patient with Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingge; Shiratori, Beata; Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Matsumoto, Makoto; Niki, Toshiro; Tanaka, Michinori; Takahashi, Yayoi; Usami, Osumu; Ashino, Yugo; Hattori, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of a matricellular protein galectin-9 (Gal-9) in pleural effusion related to tuberculosis (TB). Plasma and pleural fluid of a patient with extrapulmonary TB were analyzed for cytokine content by ELISA and Luminex. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and pleural fluid cells (PFCs) were examined for interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion by the enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assay or IFN-γ ELISA, for apoptosis and necrosis by Cell Death Detection ELISA, and also underwent cell sorting. The results indicate that compared to plasma, pleural fluid had increased levels of IFN-γ (1.6 vs. 55.5 pg/mL), IL-10, IL-12p40, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and Gal-9 (3.0 vs. 936.0 pg/mL), respectively. PFCs culture supernatant exhibited higher concentration of Gal-9 compared to PBMCs in culture, consistent with enriched Gal-9 staining in the granuloma that is in closer vicinity to PFCs compared to PBMCs. PFCS displayed higher IFN-γ secretion after stimulation with TB antigens ESAT-6/CFP-10. Furthermore, in PFCs, Gal-9 alone could stimulate IFN-γ synthesis in culture or ELISPOT, which was inhibited by a Gal-9 antagonist lactose, and which may promote apoptosis and necrosis. These findings suggest that Gal-9 could modulate immune responses and participate in immunopathology of pleural effusion during TB. PMID:28657598

  1. Diagnostic utility of the cell block method versus the conventional smear study in pleural fluid cytology

    PubMed Central

    Shivakumarswamy, Udasimath; Arakeri, Surekha U; Karigowdar, Mahesh H; Yelikar, BR

    2012-01-01

    Background: The cytological examinations of serous effusions have been well-accepted, and a positive diagnosis is often considered as a definitive diagnosis. It helps in staging, prognosis and management of the patients in malignancies and also gives information about various inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions. Diagnostic problems arise in everyday practice to differentiate reactive atypical mesothelial cells and malignant cells by the routine conventional smear (CS) method. Aims: To compare the morphological features of the CS method with those of the cell block (CB) method and also to assess the utility and sensitivity of the CB method in the cytodiagnosis of pleural effusions. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the cytology section of the Department of Pathology. Sixty pleural fluid samples were subjected to diagnostic evaluation for over a period of 20 months. Along with the conventional smears, cell blocks were prepared by using 10% alcohol–formalin as a fixative agent. Statistical analysis with the ‘z test’ was performed to identify the cellularity, using the CS and CB methods. Mc. Naemer's χ2test was used to identify the additional yield for malignancy by the CB method. Results: Cellularity and additional yield for malignancy was 15% more by the CB method. Conclusions: The CB method provides high cellularity, better architectural patterns, morphological features and an additional yield of malignant cells, and thereby, increases the sensitivity of the cytodiagnosis when compared with the CS method. PMID:22438610

  2. Predicting Value of Serum Procalcitonin, C-Reactive Protein, Drain Fluid Culture, Drain Fluid Interleukin-6, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Levels in Anastomotic Leakage after Rectal Resection.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Ismail Ahmet; Hatipoglu, Engin; Aghayeva, Afag; Arikan, Akif Enes; Incir, Said; Mamal Torun, Müzeyyen; Dirican, Ahmet; Erguney, Sabri

    2017-04-01

    Anastomotic leak is the most dreaded septic complication of colorectal surgical procedures. Death is proportional to the time between occurrence and diagnosis of the leakage. Biomarkers, which may help to predict anastomotic leakage before appearance of its clinical features, may be beneficial in preventing adverse outcomes. This study investigates a biomarker that might be useful to predict rectal anastomotic leakage before its clinical presentation. Serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, bacterial proliferation, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) levels of drain fluid were evaluated in 50 consecutive patients who underwent low anterior resection without diverting ostomy for rectal carcinoma. Anastomotic leakage occurred in seven of 50 (14%) patients. Serum CRP and procalcitonin levels at post-operative day three were higher in patients with anastomotic leakage (p = 0.01, p = 0.02 respectively). Drain TNF-α values were increased 63.2% on post-operative day five when compared with post-operative day three in patients with anastomotic leakage, but were decreased in patients without leakage. There was no statistical difference for drain IL-6 levels between groups. The bacterial proliferation rate of drain fluid culture in the leakage group was 42.9% at post-operative day three and 85.7% at post-operative day five (p = 0.29 and p = 0.0001, respectively). High serum CRP and procalcitonin values on post-operative day three are alarming, and assessment of anastomotic leakage by abdominal imaging with rectal contrast is suggested. In addition, increasing levels of TNF-α and bacterial proliferation in drain fluid are predictive, whereas IL-6 is not.

  3. Active α-macroglobulin is a reservoir for urokinase after fibrinolytic therapy in rabbits with tetracycline-induced pleural injury and in human pleural fluids

    PubMed Central

    Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali; Karandashova, Sophia; Kurdowska, Anna K.; Idell, Steven

    2013-01-01

    Intrapleural processing of prourokinase (scuPA) in tetracycline (TCN)-induced pleural injury in rabbits was evaluated to better understand the mechanisms governing successful scuPA-based intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT), capable of clearing pleural adhesions in this model. Pleural fluid (PF) was withdrawn 0–80 min and 24 h after IPFT with scuPA (0–0.5 mg/kg), and activities of free urokinase (uPA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and uPA complexed with α-macroglobulin (αM) were assessed. Similar analyses were performed using PFs from patients with empyema, parapneumonic, and malignant pleural effusions. The peak of uPA activity (5–40 min) reciprocally correlated with the dose of intrapleural scuPA. Endogenous active PAI-1 (10–20 nM) decreased the rate of intrapleural scuPA activation. The slow step of intrapleural inactivation of free uPA (t1/2β = 40 ± 10 min) was dose independent and 6.7-fold slower than in blood. Up to 260 ± 70 nM of αM/uPA formed in vivo [second order association rate (kass) = 580 ± 60 M−1·s−1]. αM/uPA and products of its degradation contributed to durable intrapleural plasminogen activation up to 24 h after IPFT. Active PAI-1, active α2M, and α2M/uPA found in empyema, pneumonia, and malignant PFs demonstrate the capacity to support similar mechanisms in humans. Intrapleural scuPA processing differs from that in the bloodstream and includes 1) dose-dependent control of scuPA activation by endogenous active PAI-1; 2) two-step inactivation of free uPA with simultaneous formation of αM/uPA; and 3) slow intrapleural degradation of αM/uPA releasing active free uPA. This mechanism offers potential clinically relevant advantages that may enhance the bioavailability of intrapleural scuPA and may mitigate the risk of bleeding complications. PMID:23997178

  4. Cytokine & chemokine response in the lungs, pleural fluid and serum in thoracic surgery using one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thoracic surgery mandates usually a one-lung ventilation (OLV) strategy with the collapse of the operated lung and ventilation of the non-operated lung. These procedures trigger a substantial inflammatory response. The aim of this study was to analyze the cytokine and chemokine reaction in both lungs, pleural space and blood in patients undergoing lung resection with OLV with special interest in the chemokine growth-regulated peptide alpha (GROα) which is the human equivalent to the rat cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-1 (CINC-1). Methods Broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid of both the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lung, respectively, pleural space drainage fluid and blood was collected and the concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1RA and GROα were determined with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 15 patients. Results Substantial inter-individual differences in the BAL fluid between patients in cytokine and chemokine levels occurred. In the pleural fluid and the blood these inter-individual differences were less pronounced. Both sides of the lung were affected and showed a significant increase in IL-6 and IL-1RA concentrations over time but not in GROα concentrations. Except for IL-6, which increased more in the collapsed, operated lung, no difference between the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lung occurred. In the blood, IL-6 and IL-1RA increased early, already at the end of surgery. GROα was not detectable. In the pleural fluid, both cytokine and chemokine concentrations increased by day one. The increase was significantly higher in the pleural fluid compared to the blood. Conclusion The inflammatory response of cytokines affects both the collapsed, operated and the ventilated, non-operated lungs. The difference in extent of response underlines the complexity of the inflammatory processes during OLV. In contrast to the cytokines, the chemokine GROα concentrations did not react in the

  5. Loculated Tuberculous Pleural Effusion: Easily Identifiable and Clinically Useful Predictor of Positive Mycobacterial Culture from Pleural Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yousang; Kim, Changhwan; Chang, Boksoon; Lee, Suh-Young; Park, So Young; Mo, Eun-Kyung; Hong, Su Jin; Lee, Myung Goo; Hyun, In Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Background Isolation of M. tuberculosis (MTB) is required in cases of Tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE) for confirming diagnosis and successful therapy based on drug sensitivity test. Several studies have focused on predictors of MTB culture positivity in TBPE. However, the clinical role of loculated TBPE as a predictor of MTB cultivation from TBPE remains unclear. The aim of this study was to examine possible predictors including loculation of TBPE of MTB culture positivity in TBPE. Methods We retrospectively examined associations between clinical, radiological, microbiological, and laboratory characteristics and positive MTB culture from TBPE to determine a potent predictor of culture positivity. Results From January 2011 to August 2015, 232 patients with TBPE were identified. Of these, 219 were finally analyzed. Among them, 69 (31.5%) were culture positive for MTB in TBPE and 86 (39.3%) had loculated TBPE. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, the loculation of TBPE was independently associated with culture positivity for MTB in TBPE (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 40.062; 95% confidence interval [CI], 9.355–171.556; p<0.001). In contrast, the lymphocyte percentage of TBPE (adjusted OR, 0.934; 95% CI, 0.899–0.971; p=0.001) was inversely associated with culture positivity for MTB in TBPE. Conclusion In clinical practice, identification of loculation in TBPE is easy, reliable to measure, not uncommon and may be helpful to predict the possibility of positive mycobacterial culture. PMID:28119745

  6. Diagnostic Tools of Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pleural effusion is not a rare disease in Korea. The diagnosis of pleural effusion is very difficult, even though the patients often complain of typical symptoms indicating of pleural diseases. Pleural effusion is characterized by the pleural cavity filled with transudative or exudative pleural fluids, and it is developed by various etiologies. The presence of pleural effusion can be confirmed by radiological studies including simple chest radiography, ultrasonography, or computed tomography. Identifying the causes of pleural effusions by pleural fluid analysis is essential for proper treatments. This review article provides information on the diagnostic approaches of pleural effusions and further suggested ways to confirm their various etiologies, by using the most recent journals for references. PMID:24920946

  7. Increased plasma microRNA and CD133/CK18-positive cancer cells in the pleural fluid of a pancreatic cancer patient with liver and pleural metastases and correlation with chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ren, Chuanli; Chen, Hui; Han, Chongxu; Wang, Daxin; Fu, Deyuan

    2012-10-01

    We report a case of notably increased plasma levels of microRNA (miR)-21, miR-25, miR-103 and miR-151 in a pancreatic cancer patient with liver and pleural metastases. CD45-coated immunomagnetic beads detected an enrichment of malignant cancer cells in the pleural fluid, and CD133(+)CK18(+) cancer cells were identified. Using computer tomography (CT) combined with cancer cells stained in the pleural fluid, a previously healthy 60-year-old male was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer with multiple liver tumor metastases. Cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and γ-glutamate-transpeptidase (γ-GT) were notably increased in the serum, and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was increased in the pleural fluid. The patient succumbed to the disease three months following standard chemotherapy. The increased levels of plasma miR-21, miR-25, miR-103 and miR-151, as well as the identification of CD133(+)CK18(+) cells in the pleural fluid of a pancreatic cancer patient with liver metastases, may regulate the molecular mechanisms involved in chemoresistance. The patient was insensitive to chemotherapy and succumbed 3 months later. Full elucidation of the molecular and pathological features of pancreatic cancer may be a novel strategy for diagnosis and tailored therapy.

  8. Obliteration of the lymphatic trunks draining diaphragmatic lymph causes peritoneal fluid to enter the pleural cavity.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Y; Ohtani, O

    1997-12-01

    Pathways of peritoneal fluids to the pleural cavity in the rat were investigated by light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Intraperitoneally injected India ink was demonstrated to enter the subperitoneal lymphatics through lymphatic stomata, and to drain through the subpleural collecting lymphatics, into the parasternal, paravertebral and mediastinal lymphatic trunks as well as the thoracic duct. Five to 10 min after the intraperitoneal injection of India ink, the parasternal lymphatic trunk was ligated at the third intercostal space. Thirty minutes, 1 h, or 2 h after the ligation of either the right or the left trunk, India ink was macroscopically recognized only around the ligated trunk. When the right and left trunks were simultaneously ligated, India ink leaked around both trunks. Five hours after the ligation of both trunks, a massive amount of ink was located in the interstitium of the anterior thoracic wall. TEM revealed carbon particles passing through gaps of the lymphatic endothelial cells into the interstitial space, and partly reaching the mesothelial surface lining the anterior thoracic wall. Results show that obstruction or narrowing of the lymphatic trunks draining the diaphragmatic lymph causes a hydrothorax, indicating that this is at least one mechanism causing this during continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and diseases with ascites.

  9. Reflex Testing Rules for Cell Count and Differentiation of Nucleated Elements in Pleural and Ascitic Fluids on Sysmex XE-5000.

    PubMed

    Buoro, Sabrina; Appassiti Esposito, Sara; Vavassori, Mauro; Mecca, Tommaso; Ottomano, Cosimo; Dominoni, Paola; Seghezzi, Michela; Candiago, Elisabetta; Farina, Claudio; Gianatti, Andrea; Crippa, Alberto; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Flow cytometry is widely used in many laboratories for automated nucleated cell counts and their differentiation in body fluids. The implementation of new reflex testing rules on these automated instruments could open new frontiers in laboratory workflow, improving characterization of body fluids and clinical diagnosis and decreasing costs. Ascitic (150) and pleural (33) fluids were collected and assessed by XE-5000 and optical microscopy. Cell counts performed with the methods showed a Pearson's correlation of 0.98 (p < 0.0001), Passing-Bablok regression y = 0.99x + 2.44, and bias of 32.3. In ascitic fluids, the best diagnostic performance was found for polymorphonuclear and neutrophil counts on XE-5000, which exhibited areas under the curve (AUCs) 0.98 (p < 0.0001) and 0.99 (p < 0.0001), respectively. In pleural fluids the best diagnostic performance was found for polymorphonuclear percent parameter, which displayed 0.97 (p < 0.0001). Specific reflex test rules based on these parameters were characterized by 92% diagnostic concordance, 1.00 sensitivity, and 0.84 specificity with optical microscopy. The application of a set of reflex testing rules may improve the diagnostic performance of XE-5000, increasing its reliability for routine automated cell count in body fluids. We acknowledge that further studies should be planned to validate our findings according to clinical data. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  10. Ampicillin and penicillin concentration in serum and pleural fluid of hospitalized children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Giachetto, Gustavo; Pirez, María Catalina; Nanni, Luciana; Martínez, Adriana; Montano, Alicia; Algorta, Gabriela; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Ferrari, Ana María

    2004-07-01

    Optimal therapeutic efficacy of beta-lactam antibiotics for treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia is thought to be associated with the serum concentration greater than the minimum inhibitory concentration for 40-50% of the interdose interval at site of infection. Establish whether intravenous administration of ampicillin 400 mg/kg/day or penicillin 200,000 IU/kg/day in 6 divided doses reaches serum and or pleural concentrations above 4 microg/ml for at least 40% of the interdose interval. Hospitalized healthy children 1 month-14 years old with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and empyema were eligible. Blood samples were obtained 30 min (C1) and 3 h (C2) after an antibiotic dose. Pleural fluid samples were obtained 1 and 4 h after the same dose in which blood samples were obtained. The concentrations were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. The study included 17 patients treated with ampicillin and 13 treated with penicillin. For ampicillin, mean serum concentrations were C1 37.3 +/- 19 microg/ml and C2 11 +/- 10.2 microg/ml and mean pleural fluid concentrations were C1 25.8 +/- 9.9 microg/ml and C2 16.2 +/- 7.9 microg/ml. For penicillin, mean serum concentrations were C1 21.8 +/- 16.4 microg/ml and C2 23.9 +/- 3.4 microg/ml. Mean pleural fluid concentrations were C1 10.9 +/- 2.2 microg/ml and C2 7.7 +/- 3.4 microg/ml. In 8 of 30 patients, serum C2 was <4 microg/ml; in all of them serum concentrations were >4 microg/ml for >40% of the interdose interval. This study of the pharmacokinetics of beta-lactam antibiotics in children with bacterial pneumonia may help in the development of therapeutic guidelines for the treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia.

  11. [Influence of pleural fluid red blood cell count on the misidentification of transudates].

    PubMed

    Porcel, José Manuel; Esquerda, Aureli; Martínez, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Panadero, Francisco; Bielsa, Silvia

    2008-12-06

    Light's criteria misclassify a quarter of transudates as exudates. We assessed the influence of red blood cell counts on pleural lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and, thereby, on the specificity of Light's criteria. We retrospectively reviewed 1,312 consecutive patients with pleural effusion, of whom 1,014 were exudates and 298 transudates according to clinical criteria. The relationship between pleural erythrocytes and LDH using simple linear regression analysis, as well as the operating characteristics of Light's criteria, were assessed. Finally, a formula to correct pleural LDH levels, according to the erythrocyte count, was generated. There was a linear relationship between the pleural erythrocyte count and LDH levels (r = 0.44; p < 0.001). Light's criteria yielded 81% specificity in patients with pleural erythrocyte counts < or = 10.000 3 10(6)/l, as compared to 61% in a group with a higher erythrocyte counts (p < 0.01). The application of the LDH formula enabled the correct reclassification of 24 of 64 (37%) false exudates. A high pleural erythrocyte count, through its influence on the LDH levels, may lead to a transudate being misclassified as an exudate after applying Light's criteria.

  12. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the pleura ( pleural needle biopsy ) Removal of fluid from around the lungs ( thoracentesis ) ... primary) cancer should be treated. Chemotherapy and radiation ... of fluid collecting around your lungs and you have shortness ...

  13. Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis, ascitic and pleural body fluids evaluation with the Mindray BC-6800 hematology analyzer.

    PubMed

    Fuster, Oscar; Andino, Belinda; Pardo, Amparo; Laiz, Begoña

    2017-04-26

    Accurate evaluation of hematology analyzers is recommended before these devices can be broadly introduced for the routine testing of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), ascitic, and pleural fluids. We evaluated the performance of Mindray BC-6800 for white blood cell (WBC) and differential cell count in 50 CAPD, 60 ascitic and 40 pleural compared with manual microscopy. Within-run precision, limit of blank (LoB), limit of detection (LoD), limit of quantitation (LoQ), and carryover were assessed. The Passing-Bablok regression in all fluids showed the following equations: yWBC =1.05x+3.31 (95%CI slope 0.95 to 1.12; intercept -0.25 to 5.52); yMN =0.85x+15.63 (95%CI slope 0.72 to 1.05; intercept -24.18 to 84.47); and yPMN =1.21x+13.37 (95%CI slope 1.03 to 1.35; intercept 4.00 to 32.47) with bias 78 cells/μL. The AUC for clinical PMN cut-off was 0.88 (95%CI: 0.77 to 0.98). In ascitic, pleural, and CAPD fluids the AUC for clinical PMN cut-off were 0.88 (95%CI: 0.63 to 1.00), 0.83 (95%CI: 0.68 to 0.99), and 1.00 (95%CI: 1.00 to 1.00) respectively. CV ranged from 3%-34%. LoB of 3 cell/μL was verified. LoD and LoQ reported the same result (8 cells/μL). Carry over never exceeded 0.05%. The effectiveness of BC-6800 to categorize cells from different body fluids was not compromised by the slight positive bias observed. This conclusion is supported by the high AUC and agreement between the automated method and the reference method. The results show that BC-6800 offers rapid, accurate, and reproducible results for clinical management of CAPD, ascitic, and pleural fluids. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Measurement of pleural pressure swings with a fluid-filled esophageal catheter vs pulmonary artery occlusion pressure.

    PubMed

    Verscheure, S; Massion, P B; Gottfried, S; Goldberg, P; Samy, L; Damas, P; Magder, S

    2017-02-01

    Pleural pressure measured with esophageal balloon catheters (Peso) can guide ventilator management and help with the interpretation of hemodynamic measurements, but these catheters are not readily available or easy to use. We tested the utility of an inexpensive, fluid-filled esophageal catheter (Peso) by comparing respiratory-induced changes in pulmonary artery occlusion (Ppao), central venous (CVP), and Peso pressures. We studied 30 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery who had pulmonary artery and esophageal catheters in place. Proper placement was confirmed by chest compression with airway occlusion. Measurements were made during pressure-regulated volume control (VC) and pressure support (PS) ventilation. The fluid-filled esophageal catheter provided a high-quality signal. During VC and PS, change in Ppao (∆Ppao) was greater than ∆Peso (bias = -2 mm Hg) indicating an inspiratory increase in cardiac filling. During VC, ∆CVP bias was 0 indicating no change in right heart filling, but during PS, CVP fell less than Peso indicating an inspiratory increase in filling. Peso measurements detected activation of expiratory muscles, development of non-west zone 3 lung conditions during inspiration, and ventilator-triggered inspiratory efforts. A fluid-filled esophageal catheter provides a high-quality, easily accessible, and inexpensive measure of change in pleural pressure and provided insights into patient-ventilator interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Diagnostic utility of serum and pleural fluid carcinoembryonic antigen, and cytokeratin 19 fragments in patients with effusion from nonsmall cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sushil Kumar; Bhat, Sanjay; Chandel, Vikas; Sharma, Mayank; Sharma, Pulkit; Gupta, Sakul; Sharma, Sashank; Bhat, Aijaz Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Aims: To assess the diagnostic value of CEA and CYFRA 21-1 (cytokeratin 19 fragments) in serum and pleural fluid in non small cell lung cancer with malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Settings and Design: Two subsets of patients were recruited with lymphocytic exudative effusion, one subset constituted diagnosed patients of NSCLC with malignant pleural effusion and the other subset of constituted with Tubercular pleural effusion. Materials and Methods: CYFRA 21-1 and CEA levels were measured using Electrochemilumiscence Immunoassay (ECLIA). The test principle used the Sandwich method. For both the tests, results are determined via a calibration curve which is instrument specifically generated by 2 - point calibration and a master curve provided via reagent barcode. Statistical Analysis Used: All data are expressed as means ± SD and percentage. All the parametric variables were analysed by student-t test where as non parametric variables were compared by Mann-Whitney U-test Statistical significance was accepted for P values < 0.05. Software used were SPSS 11.5, and MS excel 2007. In order to compare the performance of the tumor markers, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and compared with area under the curve (AUC). The threshold for each marker was selected based on the best diagnostic efficacy having achieved equilibrium between sensitivity and specificity. Results: In cases serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 34.1 ± 29.9 with a range of 1.6-128.3 where as in controls serum CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.0 with a range of 0.5–4.7. In cases serum CEA levels had mean value of 24.9 ± 47.3 with a range of 1.0, 267.9 where as in controls serum CEA levels had mean value of 1.9 ± 1.4 with a range of 0.2-6.8. The difference in the means of serum CYFRA 21-l (P = 0.000) and CEA (P = 0.046) were statistically significant. In cases pleural fluid CYFRA21-1 levels had mean value of 160.1 ± 177.1 with a range of 5.4–517

  16. Effect of time duration of digestion/decontamination technique on yield of mycobacteria and contamination rates from sterile body fluids (pleural and ascitic fluid) and pus specimens.

    PubMed

    Shafiq, Samreen; Saleem, Faryal; Jabeen, Kauser; Farooqi, Joveria; Alam, Warda; Hanif, Sadia; Ali, Shazia; Shakoor, Sadia; Hasan, Rumina

    2016-12-01

    Duration of digestion/decontamination has a considerable impact on yield of mycobacteria especially from sterile body fluids and pus specimens. Additionally, duration of digestion/decontamination affects the contamination rates. This study evaluates the effect of digestion/decontamination protocol for 15 and 20min versus inoculation of media directly from the sample on contamination rates as well as the yield of mycobacteria from pus and sterile fluids other than cerebrospinal fluids. Pleural fluid (n=60), pus (n=48) and ascitic fluid (n=12) specimens were cultured for mycobacteria and evaluated for contamination and mycobacterial yield using three different processing methodologies: without digestion/decontamination with 5% NaOH-NALC (D/D), D/D for 15min and D/D for 20min. All samples >3mL in volume were spun at 3000 RCF for 15min, whereas those less than 3mL were used as is. They were simultaneously processed using the three different methods as mentioned above, and inoculated on LJ media and MGIT. Smear was made from samples treated for 20min and stained with fluorescent stain. Kinyoun staining was done on smears with dubious findings. Mycobacterial culture yield and contamination rates were recorded at 6weeks as recommended by the Global Laboratory Initiative (GLI) laboratory manual 2014. Pleural fluid and pus contamination rates were substantially lowered by increasing decontamination time from 15 to 20min, but it did not have any effect for ascitic fluid (Table 1). The 5-min difference in the decontamination procedure improved mycobacterial culture yield for pus samples by 10%, but there was no substantial effect on pleural and ascitic fluids. Prolonged decontamination did not compromise the culture yield in any of the mentioned specimens. In areas where specimen delay is common and sterility of collection procedure cannot be ensured, digestion/decontamination with NaOH-NALC for up to 20min can reduce contamination rates without considerably compromising

  17. Regional recruitment of rat diaphragmatic lymphatics in response to increased pleural or peritoneal fluid load

    PubMed Central

    Moriondo, Andrea; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Sciacca, Laura; Guidali, Maria Luisa; Marcozzi, Cristiana; Negrini, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The specific role of the diaphragmatic tendinous and muscular tissues in sustaining lymph formation and propulsion in the diaphragm was studied in 24 anaesthetized spontaneously breathing supine rats. Three experimental protocols were used: (a) control; (b) peritoneal ascitis, induced through an intraperitoneal injection of 100 ml kg−1 of iso-oncotic saline; and (c) pleural effusion, induced through an intrapleural injection of 6.6 ml kg−1 saline solution. A group of animals (n = 12) was instrumented to measure the hydraulic transdiaphragmatic pressure gradient between the pleural and peritoneal cavities in the three protocols. In the other group (n = 12), the injected iso-oncotic saline was enriched with 2% fluorescent dextrans (molecular mass = 70 kDa); at 30 min from the injections these animals were suppressed and their diaphragm excised and processed for confocal microscopy analysis. In control conditions, in spite of a favourable peritoneal-to-pleural pressure gradient, the majority of the tracer absorbed into the diaphragmatic lymphatic system converges towards the deeper collecting lymphatic ducts. This suggests that diaphragmatic lymph formation mostly depends upon pressure gradients developing between the serosal cavities and the lymphatic vessel lumen. In addition, the tracer distributes to lymph vessels located in the muscular diaphragmatic tissue, suggesting that active muscle contraction, rather than passive tendon stretch, more efficiently enhances local diaphragmatic lymph flow. Vice versa, a prevailing recruitment of the lymphatics of the tendinous diaphragmatic regions was observed in peritoneal ascitis and pleural effusion, suggesting a functional adaptation of the diaphragmatic network to increased draining requirements. PMID:17218349

  18. [Management of parapneumonic pleural effusions].

    PubMed

    Asensio de la Cruz, O; Blanco González, J; Moreno Galdó, A; Pérez Frías, J; Salcedo Posadas, A; Sanz Borrell, L

    2001-03-01

    Pleural effusion in children is most often due to bacterial pneumonia. Between 0.6 and 2% of pneumonias are complicated by empyema and approximately 40% of children hospitalized with pneumonia have a pleural effusion. In recent years Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most prevalent organism. Treatment is based on the early and judicious use of antibiotics, imaging techniques, thoracocentesis, pleural drainage, fibrinolytics, thoracoscopy and thoracotomy. Indications for early pleural drainage are gross pus, positive Gram stain in pleural fluid, pleural glucose less than 50mg/dL, pleural fluid pH of less than 7 and sonographic evidence of loculations. Local fibrinolytics may decrease the need for surgical treatment, with a success rate between 38 and 100%, according to the effusion stage. Thoracoscopic debridement is useful in the fibrinopurulent stage with loculations, with favorable results in 30-100% of patients, also depending on the effusion stage.

  19. How Are Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... a pleural effusion, fluid buildup in the pleural space will prevent a friction rub. But if you ... buildup of air or gas in the pleural space). Diagnostic Tests Depending on the results of your ...

  20. Do we need all three criteria for the diagnostic separation of pleural fluid into transudates and exudates? An appraisal of the traditional criteria.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jose; Badrinath, Padmanabhan; Basran, Gurnam S; Sahn, Steven A

    2003-11-01

    Classification of pleural effusions into transudates and exudates is based on pleural fluid absolute lactic dehydrogenase value (FLDH), fluid to serum ratio of LDH (LDHR) and fluid to serum ratio of total protein (TPR) used in a parallel combination strategy. Combining multiple tests in a parallel strategy to improve diagnostic accuracy is useful only if the pair-wise correlation of the individual tests is less than 0.75. So far, this concept has not been tested in patients with pleural effusions. Biochemical data from our 200-patient series with a known cause of pleural effusion were included in this study. Correlation between the three possible combinations of tests was determined. There were 116 males and 84 females. The mean age was 62+/-1.1 years (mean+/-SEM). Of the 200 effusions, 156 were exudates and 44 were transudates. There was a significant correlation between FLDH and LDHR (r=0.93, p<0.00). However, the correlation between FLDH and TPR (r=0.27) and TPR and LDHR (r=0.22) was not significant. The operative mechanism for LDHR and FLDH used in the classification of transudate and exudates appears to be similar, and therefore unsuitable for a parallel combination strategy in the diagnostic separation of pleural effusion. FLDH and TPR have a dissimilar operating mechanism, and can therefore be combined in this process. Therefore, the diagnostic separation of pleural effusion can be done cost effectively by utilizing FLDH and TPR alone, as the cost for estimating serum LDH is eliminated in this approach.

  1. Tuberculous pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Kan; Lu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Although it is curable, tuberculosis remains one of the most frequent causes of pleural effusions on a global scale, especially in developing countries. Tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) is one of the most common forms of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. TPE usually presents as an acute illness with fever, cough and pleuritic chest pain. The pleural fluid is an exudate that usually has predominantly lymphocytes. The gold standard for the diagnosis of TPE remains the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pleural fluid, or pleural biopsy specimens, either by microscopy and/or culture, or the histological demonstration of caseating granulomas in the pleura along with acid fast bacilli, Although adenosine deaminase and interferon-γ in pleural fluid have been documented to be useful tests for the diagnosis of TPE. It can be accepted that in areas with high tuberculosis prevalence, the easiest way to establish the diagnosis of TPE in a patient with a lymphocytic pleural effusion is to generally demonstrate a adenosine deaminase level above 40 U/L. The recommended treatment for TPE is a regimen with isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide for two months followed by four months of two drugs, isoniazid and rifampin. PMID:27499981

  2. Processing Technology in Microscopic Images of Cancer Cells in Pleural Fluid Based on Fuzzy Edge Detection Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, Q. G.; Qi, J. P.

    2006-10-01

    The traditional manual method of cancer cell recognizing requests a long period of diagnoses. In order to improve the efficiency and veracity of diagnoses, this article applies technology of image processing to analysis and recognition of cancer cell image. This article uses the fuzzy edge extraction, which is based on the OTSU threshold to process the original image of the cancer cells in pleural fluid, and then extracts the feature of the cancer cells according to the morphology automatically. The experiment shows that features such as area rate of karyon and cytoplasm, karyon division, shape of karyon and so on will provide evidences for diagnoses and will improve the efficiency and veracity of diagnoses.

  3. Pleural fluid analysis of lung cancer vs benign inflammatory disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, R; Best, L A; Savulescu, D; Gavish, M; Nagler, R M

    2010-01-01

    Background: Correct diagnosis of pleural effusion (PE) as either benign or malignant is crucial, although conventional cytological evaluation is of limited diagnostic accuracy, with relatively low sensitivity rates. Methods: We identified biological markers accurately detected in a simple PE examination. We analysed data from 19 patients diagnosed with lung cancer (nine adeno-Ca, five non-small-cell Ca (not specified), four squamous-cell Ca, one large-cell Ca) and 22 patients with benign inflammatory pathologies: secondary to trauma, pneumonia or TB. Results: Pleural effusion concentrations of seven analysed biological markers were significantly lower in lung cancer patients than in benign inflammatory patients, especially in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-3 and CycD1 (lower by 65% (P<0.000003), 40% (P<0.0007) and 34% (P<0.0001), respectively), and in Ki67, ImAnOx, carbonyls and p27. High rates of sensitivity and specificity values were found for MMP-9, MMP-3 and CycD1: 80 and 100% 87 and 73% and 87 and 82%, respectively. Conclusion: Although our results are of significant merit in both the clinical and pathogenetic aspects of lung cancer, further research aimed at defining the best combination for marker analysis is warranted. The relative simplicity in analysing these markers in any routine hospital laboratory may result in its acceptance as a new diagnostic tool. PMID:20216542

  4. Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor is present in most pleural effusion fluids from cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Eagles, G.; Warn, A.; Ball, R. Y.; Baillie-Johnson, H.; Arakaki, N.; Daikuhara, Y.; Warn, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Pleural effusion samples were obtained from 55 patients with malignant disease, including patients with primary lung cancers and those with a variety of other tumours metastatic to the pleura. The effusions were assayed for the presence of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), by both ELISA and bioassay. The presence of malignant cells in the effusions was also assessed. Detectable amounts of the factor, as judged by both criteria, were found in over 90% of all the effusions, including those from patients with a wide variety of carcinomas and also lymphomas. A wide range of HGF/SF levels were found for all tumour classes, some effusions containing high levels above 4 ng ml-1. It is concluded that tumours within the pleura and adjacent lung tissue are usually exposed to biologically significant levels of HGF/SF. PMID:8562345

  5. What Causes Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... buildup of air or gas in the pleural space). Such lung diseases may include COPD (chronic obstructive ... effusion (a buildup of fluid in the pleural space) is heart failure . Lung cancer, LAM, pneumonia, tuberculosis, ...

  6. Positive pleural cytology is an indicator for visceral pleural invasion in metastatic pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Froudarakis, Marios E; Plojoux, Jerôme; Kaspi, Elise; Anevlavis, Stavros; Laroumagne, Sophie; Karpathiou, Georgia; Roca, Elisa; Adler, Dan; Dutau, Hervé; Astoul, Philippe

    2017-02-28

    In case of undiagnosed pleural effusions, it is necessary to conduct thoracentesis with pleural fluid (PF) cytology. Yet, sensitivity of PF cytology is widely variable as a result of sample size, experience, and preparation method. The aim of this study was to assess whether pleural fluid (PF) cytology is correlated to visceral or parietal pleural invasion as assessed by thoracoscopy in metastatic pleural effusions. All records of patients with pleural effusion were reviewed. The inclusion criteria were as follows: PF cytology, reported appearance of macroscopic pleural invasion during thoracoscopy and malignant diagnosis. Patients with mesothelioma were excluded. Finally, 287 patients who met all criteria were selected. According to the thoracoscopy findings, the extent of the disease on the pleura was analyzed in relation to the PF cytology. In this study, 160 patients (55.7%) had a positive PF cytology (Group A) while 127 (44.3%) recorded negative PF cytology (Group B). From Group A, patients with visceral pleural invasion were 120 (75%) while only 49 patients (38.5%) were found from Group B and the difference was statistically significant (P < .00001). In univariate analysis, visceral pleural invasion was strongly associated with positive PF cytology (P < .001). Other significant associations with positive PF cytology included PF bloody aspect (P = .012), and endoscopic mixed pattern of pleural invasion (P = .0039). Only visceral pleural invasion was statistically significant in multivariate analysis (P < .001). In patients with pleural metastatic disease, visceral pleural invasion is the only significant factor associated with positive pleural fluid cytology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [Diagnostic performance of T-SPOT.TB on peripheral blood in combination with adenosine deaminase on pleural fluid for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy within different age group].

    PubMed

    Xu, H Y; Zhang, D Q; Ye, J R; Su, S S; Xie, Y P; Chen, C S; Li, Y P

    2017-06-27

    Objective: To evaluate the performance of T cell enzyme-linked immuno-spot assay (T-SPOT) on peripheral blood in combination with adenosine deaminase (ADA) on pleural fluid for diagnosis of tuberculous (TB) pleurisy within different age groups. Methods: The data of patients with pleural effusion from the Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine of the First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University from April 2012 to November 2016 were retrospectively analyzed, and the diagnoses of these patients were histopathologically confirmed through medical thoracoscopy. The cases who had confirmed diagnosis, in the same time, received peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB were enrolled. The performance of peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB in combination with pleural fluid ADA on diagnosing TB pleurisy in the younger patients (16-59 years old) and elderly patients (≥60 years old) were analyzed respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were adopted for statistical analysis. Results: A total of 448 cases were finally enrolled, 341(76.1%) confirmed with TB pleurisy, 224 males, 117 females, (47±19) years old; and 107 (23.9%) classified as non-TB pleurisy, 65 males, 42 females, (61±14) years old. There were 285 cases who were classified as younger group, and the other 163 cases were classified as elderly group. The sensitivity and specificity of peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB were 85.4% (204/239) and 71.7% (33/46) in the younger patients, 76.5% (78/102) and 59.0% (36/61) respectively in the elderly patients. The sensitivity of peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB in the younger patients was significantly higher than that in the elderly patients (P=0.047). The sensitivity and specificity were 99.2% and 95.7% in combination with peripheral blood T-SPOT.TB and pleural fluid ADA respectively in the younger patients. The area under ROC curve (AUC) of T-SPOT.TB in the younger patients was 0.833, AUC of T-SPOT.TB combined with ADA was 0

  8. Diagnostic Value of Measurement Specific Gravity by Refractometric and Dipstick Method in Differentiation between Transudate and Exudate in Pleural and Peritoneal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Nozarian, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of pleural and peritoneal fluid is seen in some diseases. In order to diagnose the disease and start the treatment, one of the most important actions will be to differentiate between exudates and transudates. The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of measuring the specific gravity of the fluid through refractometer and strip in differentiation of exudates from transudates. The serum of patients was evaluated for protein, LDH, cholesterol, bilirubin and albumin. The fluid was evaluated for the number of white blood cells, protein, LDH, cholesterol, bilirubin and albumin. Then the fluids were divided into exduate and transudate categories based on Light and Gradient criteria. Finally, the specific gravity of the fluids was measured by refractometer, Erma, Japan and Medi-Test Combi II. The categorized fluids were compared with Gold Standards (final diagnosis) so that the sensitivity and specificity of Light and Gradient criteria in the transudate-exudate differentiation were specified. In comparison with Light criteria, the cut off level of 1022 specific gravity measured by refractometer for pleural effusion has sensitivity, specificity of 92.1%, 68.1%respectively. In evaluation of peritoneal fluid considering cut off point 1023, measured by refractometer has reliable sensitivity 92.4%, specificity 70.4 compared with standard gradient method. Differentiating transudate from exudates by measuring its special gravity by refractometer will have acceptable sensitivity and specificity, and when rapidity is necessary or access to lab equipment is limited, this method could be used.

  9. Diagnostic Value of Measurement Specific Gravity by Refractometric and Dipstick Method in Differentiation between Transudate and Exudate in Pleural and Peritoneal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Abdollahi, Alireza; Nozarian, Zohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accumulation of pleural and peritoneal fluid is seen in some diseases. In order to diagnose the disease and start the treatment, one of the most important actions will be to differentiate between exudates and transudates. The objective of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of measuring the specific gravity of the fluid through refractometer and strip in differentiation of exudates from transudates. Methods: The serum of patients was evaluated for protein, LDH, cholesterol, bilirubin and albumin. The fluid was evaluated for the number of white blood cells, protein, LDH, cholesterol, bilirubin and albumin. Then the fluids were divided into exduate and transudate categories based on Light and Gradient criteria. Finally, the specific gravity of the fluids was measured by refractometer, Erma, Japan and Medi-Test Combi II. The categorized fluids were compared with Gold Standards (final diagnosis) so that the sensitivity and specificity of Light and Gradient criteria in the transudate-exudate differentiation were specified. Results: In comparison with Light criteria, the cut off level of 1022 specific gravity measured by refractometer for pleural effusion has sensitivity, specificity of 92.1%, 68.1%respectively. In evaluation of peritoneal fluid considering cut off point 1023, measured by refractometer has reliable sensitivity 92.4%, specificity 70.4 compared with standard gradient method. Conclusion: Differentiating transudate from exudates by measuring its special gravity by refractometer will have acceptable sensitivity and specificity, and when rapidity is necessary or access to lab equipment is limited, this method could be used. PMID:28855928

  10. Cell Population Data and reflex testing rules of cell analysis in pleural and ascitic fluids using body fluid mode on Sysmex XN-9000.

    PubMed

    Buoro, Sabrina; Mecca, Tommaso; Azzarà, Giovanna; Seghezzi, Michela; Dominoni, Paola; Crippa, Alberto; Ottomano, Cosimo; Lippi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-15

    Although optical microscopy (OM) remains the reference technique for analysis of ascitic (AF) and pleural (PF) fluids, novel hematological analyzers are equipped with modules for body fluid (BF) analysis. This study was aimed to analyze the performance of XN-BF module in Sysmex XN-9000, and to develop validation rules for automated cell counts in BFs. The evaluation of XN-BF module included assessment of carryover, Limit of Blank (LoB), Limit of Detection (LoD), Limit of Quantitation (LoQ), linearity, data comparison with OM, and development of rules for assisting the validation of automated analysis of BFs and activating reflex testing. The carryover was negligible. The LoB, LoD, LoQ and linearity were always excellent. The comparison with OM was characterized by Pearson's correlations ranging from r=0.50 to r=0.99 (p<0.001), modest bias and high diagnostic concordance (Area Under the Curve between 0.85 and 0.99). The use of instrument-specific cut-offs further increased diagnostic concordance. The implementation of reflex testing rules based on XN-BF data increased sensitivity and specificity of BFs classification to 0.98 and 0.95. Our results suggest that the XN-BF module on Sysmex-9000 may be a suitable alternative to OM for screening BF samples, especially when specific validation rules are used. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Anatomy and pathophysiology of the pleura and pleural space.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Nilay Gamze; Choong, Cliff K C; Eizenberg, Norman

    2013-02-01

    Pleural effusions are most often secondary to an underlying condition and may be the first sign of the underlying pathologic condition. The balance between the hydrostatic and oncotic forces dictates pleural fluid homeostasis. The parietal pleura has a more significant role in pleural fluid homeostasis. Its vessels are closer to the pleural space compared with its visceral counterpart; it contains lymphatic stomata, absent on visceral pleura, which are responsible for a bulk clearance of fluid. The diagnosis and successful treatment of pleural effusions requires a mixture of imaging techniques and pleural fluid analysis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. [Pleural lymphatics and effusions].

    PubMed

    Mordant, P; Arame, A; Legras, A; Le Pimpec Barthes, F; Riquet, M

    2013-06-01

    The pleural lymphatic system has a great absorption capacity. Its most known function is fluid resorption. The pleura which cover the lungs (visceral pleura), the mediastinum, diaphragm and thoracic wall (parietal pleura) are formed by a mesothelial cell layer (mesothelium). This permeable layer is in direct contact with the vascular endothelium. The mesothelium is based over a connective tissue (interstitium) containing the blood and lymphatic vessels. The primary lymphatic vessels drain interstitium but are also in direct contact with pleural space by the stoma or openings, situated in the lower parts of parietal pleura, i.e: diaphragm, over lower ribs and mediastinum but not existing in the adjacent visceral pleura. In addition, a part of interstitial pulmonary fluid entered in the pleural cavity by passing the visceral pleura would be absorbed by these openings. The resorption process is active and directly related to the function of smooth muscles of lymphatic vessels. Besides resorption, we must emphasize that this "pumping" activity is permanent and the origin of negative pressure (the pleural void) in pleural cavity, a unique property. The other resorbed elements are molecules, bacterial and cellular debris, cells, red blood and cancer cells. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Pleural malignancies.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Joseph S; Cengel, Keith A

    2010-07-01

    Pleural malignancies, primary or metastatic, portend a grim prognosis. In addition to the serious oncologic implications of a pleural malignancy, these tumors can be highly symptomatic. A malignant pleural effusion can cause dyspnea, secondary to lung compression, or even tension physiology from a hydrothorax under pressure. The need to palliate these effusions is a seemingly straightforward clinical scenario, but with nuances that can result in disastrous complications for the patient if not attended to appropriately. Solid pleural malignancies can cause great pain from chest wall invasion or can cause a myriad of morbid symptoms because of the invasion of thoracic structures, such as the heart, lungs, or esophagus. This article reviews pleural malignancies, the purely palliative treatments, and the treatments that are performed with definitive (curative) intent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Residual pleural thickening is related to vascular endothelial growth factor levels in parapneumonic pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Papaioannou, Andriana I; Kostikas, Konstantinos; Tsopa, Paschalina; Kiropoulos, Theodoros; Tsilioni, Irene; Oikonomidi, Smaragda; Gerogianni, Irene; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2010-01-01

    Many patients with pneumonia develop pleural effusions. Pleural fluid vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels are known to be elevated in complicated parapneumonic effusion and seem to play a major role in the fibrotic process in the pleura. To test whether VEGF levels in pleural effusions of infectious origin correlate with the residual pleural thickening. VEGF levels were measured in the pleural fluid of 45 patients with pleural effusion of infectious origin. Patients were reassessed 3 months after hospital discharge and residual pleural thickening (RPT) was recorded using a simple chest radiograph. Pleural fluid VEGF was higher in empyemas compared to simple parapneumonic and complicated parapneumonic effusions. RPT was higher in patients with empyemas compared to simple parapneumonic effusions. Patients with RPT >2 mm had higher pleural fluid LDH and pleural fluid to serum LDH ratio, lower glucose and pH and higher VEGF levels. However, patients with RPT ≥10 mm differed only in pleural fluid VEGF levels. Pleural fluid VEGF levels correlated to RPT and to pleural fluid pH. VEGF presented moderate performance for the prediction of RPT 3 months after hospital discharge. Its performance was comparable to that of pleural fluid glucose and pH for the development of a radiologically significant RPT >2 mm, whereas it was the only statistically significant predictor of a clinically significant RPT ≥10 mm. VEGF levels are elevated in complicated parapneumonic effusions and empyemas compared to simple parapneumonic effusions and are a significant predictor for the development of clinically significant RPT. Copyright © 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Use of the Advia 120 hematology analyzer in the differential cytologic analysis of biological fluids (cerebrospinal, peritoneal, pleural, pericardial, synovial, and others).

    PubMed

    Aulesa, C; Mainar, I; Prieto, M; Cobos, N; Galimany, R

    2003-01-01

    The centralization of our laboratories and the demand for new parameters to measure have led to an increase in the number of biological fluid samples, which are generally sent for urgent analysis. Due to this they cannot be processed by manual methods. Meeting this increased demand for assistance is a challenge for the laboratory, and the challenge has been met by the automated hematology area. A study of the reliability of the Advia 120 hematology analyzer has been carried out through leukocyte and red blood cell counting of 179 biological fluids: cerebrospinal, peritoneal or ascitic, pleural, pericardial, synovial, and others. The automated leukocyte counts of cerebrospinal fluid samples containing up to 0.150 x 10(9) leukocytes/L are correlated with counts obtained with the manual reference method in a Neubauer counting chamber (r = 0.958; P = .0001). Applying Passing-Bablok regression analysis to these results indicates a slope p of 1.155 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.915-1.347) and an ordinate intercept b of 0.0076 (95% CI, 0.012-0.034), showing the results to be perfectly interchangeable. In the comparison of the manual analysis of the leukocyte differential using the May-Grünwald-Giemsa staining method with the analysis using the automated method, the percentage of polymorphonuclear granulocytes of the Advia 120 basophil/lobularity method is significantly correlated (r = 0.844; P = .0001) with that obtained with the manual count. The results of Passing-Bablok regression analysis (p = 0.859 [95% CI, 0.58-1.190]; b = 8.8 [95% CI, -12.09-24.2]) indicate that these two counting methods are also perfectly interchangeable. Automated leukocyte and differential counts of peritoneal or ascitic fluids also show good correlations with the manual method, and the results are not statistically different. Pretreating synovial fluid samples with hyaluronidase enzyme allows their processing on the Advia 120; no significant differences were found between manual and

  16. Factors influencing pleural drainage in parapneumonic effusions.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Valencia, H; Bielsa, S

    2016-10-01

    The identification of parapneumonic effusions (PPE) requiring pleural drainage is challenging. We aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of radiological and pleural fluid findings in discriminating between PPE that need drainage (complicated PPE (CPPE)) and those that could be resolved with antibiotics only (uncomplicated PPE (UPPE)). A retrospective review of 641 consecutive PPE, of which 393 were categorized as CPPE and 248 as UPPE. Demographics, radiological (size and laterality on a chest radiograph) and pleural fluid parameters (pus, bacterial cultures, biochemistries) were compared among groups. Logistic regression was performed to determine variables useful for predicting chest drainage, and receiver-operating characteristic curves assisted in the selection of the best cutoff values. According to the likelihood ratios (LR), findings increasing the probability of chest tube usage the most were: effusions occupying ≥1/2 of the hemithorax (LR 13.5), pleural fluid pH ≤7.15 (LR 6.2), pleural fluid glucose ≤40mg/dL (LR 5.6), pus (LR 4.8), positive pleural fluid cultures (LR 3.6), and pleural fluid lactate dehydrogenase >2000U/L (LR 3.4). In the logistic regression analysis only the first two were selected as significant predictors of CPPE. In non-purulent effusions, the effusion's size and pleural fluid pH retained their discriminatory properties, in addition to a pleural fluid C-reactive protein (CRP) level >100mg/L. Large radiological effusions and a pleural fluid pH ≤7.15 were the best predictors for chest drainage in patients with PPE. In the subgroup of patients with non-purulent effusions, pleural fluid CRP also contributed to CPPE identification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  17. Update on Procalcitonin Measurements

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is used as a biomarker for the diagnosis of sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. At the same time, PCT has also been used to guide antibiotic therapy. This review outlines the main indications for PCT measurement and points out possible pitfalls. The classic indications for PCT measurement are: (i) confirmation or exclusion of diagnosis of sepsis, severe sepsis, or septic shock, (ii) severity assessment and follow up of systemic inflammation mainly induced by microbial infection, and (iii) individual, patient adapted guide of antibiotic therapy and focus treatment. Using serially monitored PCT levels, the duration and need of antibiotic therapy can be better adapted to the individual requirements of the patient. This individualized approach has been evaluated in various studies, and it is recommended to be a part of an antibiotic stewardship program. PMID:24982830

  18. Pleural Fluid Analysis Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... malignant cells (cancer cells). Gram stain – for direct observation of bacteria or fungi under a microscope. There ... if infection is suspected: Gram stain — for direct observation of bacteria or fungi under a microscope. There ...

  19. Pleural fluid gram stain

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Gram stain). A laboratory specialist uses a microscope to look for bacteria on the slide. If bacteria are present, the color, number, and structure of the cells are used to identify the type of bacteria. This test will be ...

  20. Pleural effusion in liver disease.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José Castellote

    2010-12-01

    Hepatic hydrothorax is the paradigmatic pleural effusion in liver cirrhosis. It is defined as a pleural effusion in a patient with portal hypertension and no cardiopulmonary disease. The estimated prevalence of this complication in patients with liver cirrhosis is 5 to 6%. Its pathophysiology involves movement of ascitic fluid from the peritoneal cavity into the pleural space through diaphragmatic defects. Thoracentesis and pleural fluid analysis are necessary for diagnosis. Initial management consists of sodium restriction, diuretics, and therapeutic thoracentesis. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt may provide a bridge prior to liver transplantation. Spontaneous bacterial empyema is the infection of a preexisting hydrothorax. The more frequent bacteria involved are ENTEROBACTERIACEAE and gram-positive cocci. Antibiotic therapy is the cornerstone of therapy. This article reviews etiology, clinical manifestations, and therapy of these two complications of liver cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

  1. Pleural pressure theory revisited: a role for capillary equilibrium

    PubMed Central

    Caruana-Gauci, Roberto; Manche, Alexander; Gauci, Marilyn; Chetcuti, Stanley; Bertolaccini, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Background Theories elucidating pleural pressures should explain all observations including the equal and opposite recoil of the chest wall and lungs, the less than expected pleural hydrostatic gradient and its variation at lobar margins, why pleural pressures are negative and how pleural fluid circulation functions. Methods A theoretical model describing equilibrium between buoyancy, hydrostatic forces, and capillary forces is proposed. The capillary equilibrium model described depends on control of pleural fluid volume and protein content, powered by an active pleural pump. Results The interaction between buoyancy forces, hydrostatic pressure and capillary pressure was calculated, and values for pleural thickness and pressure were determined using values for surface tension, contact angle, pleural fluid and lung densities found in the literature. Modelling can explain the issue of the differing hydrostatic vertical pleural pressure gradient at the lobar margins for buoyancy forces between the pleural fluid and the lung floating in the pleural fluid according to Archimedes’ hydrostatic paradox. The capillary equilibrium model satisfies all salient requirements for a pleural pressure model, with negative pressures maximal at the apex, equal and opposite forces in the lung and chest wall, and circulatory pump action. Conclusions This model predicts that pleural effusions cannot occur in emphysema unless concomitant heart failure increases lung density. This model also explains how the non-confluence of the lung with the chest wall (e.g., lobar margins) makes the pleural pressure more negative, and why pleural pressures would be higher after an upper lobectomy compared to a lower lobectomy. Pathological changes in pleural fluid composition and lung density alter the equilibrium between capillarity and buoyancy hydrostatic pressure to promote pleural effusion formation. PMID:28523153

  2. Successful analysis of anticancer drug sensitivity by CD-DST using pleural fluid and ascites from patients with advanced ovarian cancer: case reports.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Makiko; Banno, Kouji; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Yanokura, Megumi; Kuwabara, Yoshiko; Hirao, Nobumaru; Tsukazaki, Katsumi; Nozawa, Shiro

    2005-01-01

    In vitro anticancer drug sensitivity tests have been performed for various types of cancers, and a relationship with clinical response has been observed. The collagen gel droplet-embedded culture drug sensitivity test (CD-DST) is a new in vitro anticancer drug sensitivity test by Yabushita et al., recently reported to be useful in ovarian cancer. CD-DST allows analysis of a small number of cells, compared to other anticancer drug sensitivity tests. Here, we report a successful analysis of anticancer drug sensitivity by CD-DST using cancerous ascites and pleural fluid samples from 2 patients with advanced ovarian cancer. To our knowledge, this is only the second report of the application of CD-DST in ovarian cancer, and our results suggest that CD-DST could be helpful in the selection of anticancer drugs for neoadjuvant chemotherapy in advanced ovarian cancer.

  3. The prognostic value of carcinoembryonic antigen levels in blood and intraoperative pleural lavage fluid in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cagirici, Ufuk; Ergonul, Ayse Gul; Ozdil, Ali; Kavurmaci, Onder; Turhan, Kutsal; Cakan, Alpaslan; Barutcuoglu, Burcu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There is no specific marker for lung cancer, but, in some lung cancer types, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) can reach high levels in the blood and pleural fluid. Aim This study investigated the relationship of CEA levels in blood (CEAB) and intraoperative pleural lavage fluid (CEAP) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with the type, stage, and extent of lung cancer. Material and methods A total of 50 patients, who underwent surgery at our clinic due to NSCLC (group I) or benign lung pathology (group II), were assessed. For this prospectively designed study, 25 consecutive patients were included in each group, and their CEAB and CEAP levels were investigated. Results When the levels of CEAP were compared, the average value of group I (1.35 ng/ml) was significantly higher than the average value of group II (0.04 ng/ml) (p = 0.027). When CEA levels were examined separately, and average values were taken according to surgical pathology results, both CEAB and CEAP levels of adenocarcinoma patients were found to be higher than those of the other groups. This difference was only significant for the level of CEAP (p = 0.026). Conclusions Although the average CEAB levels of patients with adenocarcinoma were higher than those of patients with other histopathological types, this difference was not statistically significant. However, we found that CEAP levels were significantly higher in patients with adenocarcinoma. These results have led us to consider that CEAP elevation is a more sensitive marker than the elevation of CEAB. PMID:28747941

  4. A new radiologic appearance of pulmonary thromboembolism: multiloculated pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Erkan, Levent; Fýndýk, Serhat; Uzun, Oğz; Atýcý, Atilla G; Light, Richard W

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to describe the clinical course and response to treatment of five patients who developed loculated pleural effusions as complications of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). The clinical charts of five patients who had loculated pleural effusions in the course of their PTE were reviewed, with special attention paid to the duration of symptoms before diagnosis, the pleural fluid analysis findings, and the response of the loculations to anticoagulant therapy. In a tertiary care academic medical center, the five patients described in the present study had multiple locules of pleural fluid seen on chest radiographs and thoracic CT scans. In all cases, the diagnosis of PTE had been delayed for at least 2 weeks after symptoms developed. The loculated pleural fluid had led to the mistaken diagnosis of empyema in three cases. The pleural fluid in all cases was exudative, with a predominance of lymphocytes. With anticoagulant therapy, the loculations largely disappeared within the first few days of therapy. Although most pleural effusions secondary to PTE are relatively small and free-flowing, this study demonstrates that PTE can lead to loculated pleural effusions. The loculations occurred in patients who had been symptomatic from their PTE for > 2 weeks. In each instance, the pleural fluid was a lymphocytic exudate. The effusions rapidly resolved with the institution of anticoagulant therapy. PTE should be included in the differential diagnosis of a loculated pleural effusion, particularly if the pleural fluid contains predominantly lymphocytes.

  5. How Are Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor may use a chest tube to deliver medicines called fibrinolytics to the pleural space. If the fluid still won't drain, you ... build up again after it's drained. Sometimes antitumor medicines will ... the pleural space. Sealing the pleural space is called pleurodesis (plur- ...

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Pleural Transudates.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; Porcel, José M; Valdés, Luis

    2017-06-19

    Various clinical trials have been published on the optimal clinical management of patients with pleural exudates, particularly those caused by malignant tumors, while little information is available on the diagnosis and treatment of pleural transudates. The etiology of pleural transudates is wide and heterogeneous, and they can be caused by rare diseases, sometimes constituting a diagnostic challenge. Analysis of the pleural fluid can be a useful procedure for establishing diagnosis. Treatment should target not only the underlying disease, but also management of the pleural effusion itself. In cases refractory to medical treatment, invasive procedures will be necessary, for example therapeutic thoracentesis, pleurodesis with talc, or insertion of an indwelling pleural catheter. Little evidence is currently available and no firm recommendations have been made to establish when to perform an invasive procedure, or to determine the safest, most efficient approach in each case. This article aims to describe the spectrum of diseases that cause pleural transudate, to review the diagnostic contribution of pleural fluid analysis, and to highlight the lack of evidence on the efficacy of invasive procedures in the management and control of pleural effusion in these patients. Copyright © 2017 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. [Elevated pleural copeptin levels can distinguish to exudate from transudates].

    PubMed

    Gümüş, Aziz; Çınarka, Halit; Karataş, Mevlüt; Kırbaş, Aynur; Kayhan, Servet; Şahin, Ünal

    2014-01-01

    Copeptin is released simultaneously along with arginine-vasopressine as a result of different stimuli from the neurohypophysis. Physiological function of copeptin is still unclear. Increased blood copeptin levels is associated with poor prognosis in many diseases. Pleural effusion is a common clinical condition. The most common causes of pleural effusions are heart failure, parapneumonic effusion, pulmonary embolism and malignacy.Tuberculosis is one of the other major causes of pleural effusion in developing countries. In this study, we aimed to assess whether pleural copeptin level may be a new discriminative biomarker for exudates and transudates pleural effusions. Research was done at Recep Tayyip Erdogan University School of Medicine in the Department of Chest Diseases. The concentrations of pleural copeptin and typical pleural and serum marker levels were measured in 76 subjects with pleural effusions including 22 transudates caused by congestive heart failure (CHF), and 54 exudates including 18 parapneumonic (PPE), 18 tuberculous pleural effusions (TBPEs), 18 malignant effusions (MPEs). Median pleural fluid copeptin levels were higher in exudates than in transudates (1936 ng/mL and 1313 pg/mL, p value < 0.001). There was no statistical significancy for pleural fluid copeptin levels with in-group exudates (n= 54). Pleural copeptin levels of exudates, with a cut off value of 1469 ng/mL, yielded a 79.6% sensitivity, 81.8% specificity, with an are a under the curve of 0.851. Pleural copeptin level is a new biomarker to separate exudates from transudates. Pleural effusion discriminative effect of copeptin is lower than plasma protein level and plasma lactat dehydrogenase (LDH). Pleural copeptin measurement is not recommended for routine clinical use. Pleural copeptin level is not contribute to different iate exudative pleural fluids from each other like PPE, TBPE and MPE.

  8. Pleural needle biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the pleural membrane. Pleural biopsy can diagnose tuberculosis , cancer, and other diseases. If this type of pleural biopsy is not enough to make a diagnosis, you may need a surgical biopsy of the ...

  9. Pleural effusion following ovarian hyperstimulation.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Bammann, Ricardo Helbert; Terra, Ricardo Mingarini; Castro, Ana Cristina P; Ishy, Augusto; Fernandez, Angelo

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is an iatrogenic complication that occurs in the luteal phase of an induced hormonal cycle. In most cases, the symptoms are self-limited and spontaneous regression occurs. However, severe cases are typically accompanied by acute respiratory distress. The objective of the present study was to describe the clinical presentation, treatment, and outcome of pleural effusion associated with OHSS in three patients undergoing in vitro fertilization. The patients ranged in age from 27 to 33 years. The onset of symptomatic pleural effusion (bilateral in all cases) occurred, on average, 43 days (range, 27-60 days) after initiation of hormone therapy for ovulation induction. All three patients required hospitalization for massive fluid resuscitation, and two required noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Although all three patients initially underwent thoracentesis, early recurrence of symptoms and pleural effusion prompted the use of drainage with a pigtail catheter. Despite the high output from the pleural drain (mean, 1,000 mL/day in the first week) and prolonged drainage (for 9-22 days), the outcomes were excellent: all three patients were discharged from hospital. Although pleural effusion secondary to OHSS is probably underdiagnosed, the associated morbidity should not be underestimated, especially because it affects potentially pregnant patients. In this study, early diagnosis and appropriate supportive measures yielded favorable results, limiting the surgical approach to adequate pleural drainage.

  10. Activation of calpain by renin-angiotensin system in pleural mesothelial cells mediates tuberculous pleural fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Xiang, Fei; Cai, Peng-Cheng; Lu, Yu-Zhi; Xu, Xiao-Xiao; Yu, Fan; Li, Feng-Zhi; Greer, Peter A.; Shi, Huan-Zhong; Zhou, Qiong; Xin, Jian-Bao; Ye, Hong; Su, Yunchao

    2016-01-01

    Pleural fibrosis is defined as an excessive deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) components that results in destruction of the normal pleural tissue architecture. It can result from diverse inflammatory conditions, especially tuberculous pleurisy. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) play a pivotal role in pleural fibrosis. Calpain is a family of calcium-dependent endopeptidases, which plays an important role in ECM remodeling. However, the role of calpain in pleural fibrosis remains unknown. In the present study, we found that tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) induced calpain activation in PMCs and that inhibition of calpain prevented TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and cell proliferation of PMCs. Moreover, our data revealed that the levels of angiotensin (ANG)-converting enzyme (ACE) were significantly higher in pleural fluid of patients with TPE than those with malignant pleural effusion, and ACE-ANG II in TPE resulted in activation of calpain and subsequent triggering of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway in PMCs. Finally, calpain activation in PMCs and collagen depositions were confirmed in pleural biopsy specimens from patients with tuberculous pleurisy. Together, these studies demonstrated that calpain is activated by renin-angiotensin system in pleural fibrosis and mediates TPE-induced collagen-I synthesis and proliferation of PMCs via the PI3K/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway. Calpain in PMCs might be a novel target for intervention in tuberculous pleural fibrosis. PMID:27261452

  11. The case against performing pleural biopsies for the aetiological diagnosis of exudates.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    2017-04-19

    In most cases, the etiological diagnosis of pleural exudates does not require a pleural biopsy. However, when it is considered necessary, the biopsy should seldom be conducted using invasive methods such as thoracoscopy. Two paradigmatic examples are pleural tuberculosis and malignant effusions. In many centres, pleural fluid adenosine deaminase measurement has replaced closed pleural biopsies in the diagnosis of tuberculosis. Similarly, pathological and molecular studies on pleural fluid cell blocks or alternatively, image-guided pleural biopsies have drastically reduced the need for thoracoscopy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. [Pleural effusion: criteria for distinguishing between transudates and exudates].

    PubMed

    Garcia Pachon, E; Padilla Navas, I

    1996-02-01

    The first step in the diagnostic study of a pleural effusion is to classify as a transudate or exudate. Light's criteria (pleural fluid/serum proteines > 0.5; lactatedehydrogenase [LDH] > 2/3 of the upper normal limit in serum; pleural fluid/serum LDH > 0.6) usually used, incorrectly classify some cases, especially transudates. For this reason, different alternative criteria has been proposed: pleural fluid cholesterol, pleural fluid/serum cholesterol ratio, pleural fluid/serum bilirubin ratio, and serum/pleura albumin ratio. Althought the first results suggested better results that those obtained with the Light's criteria, after the analysis of the different studys we conclude that a method to diferentiate perfectly transudates and exudates is not yet available.

  13. Tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; San José, Esther; Valdés, Luis

    2014-10-01

    Tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE) is the most common form of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in Spain, and is one of the most frequent causes of pleural effusion. Although the incidence has steadily declined (4.8 cases/100,000population in 2009), the percentage of TBPE remains steady with respect to the total number of TB cases (14.3%-19.3%). Almost two thirds are men, more than 60% are aged between 15-44years, and it is more common in patients with human immunodeficiency virus. The pathogenesis is usually a delayed hypersensitivity reaction. Symptoms vary depending on the population (more acute in young people and more prolonged in the elderly). The effusion is almost invariably a unilateral exudate (according to Light's criteria), more often on the right side, and the tuberculin test is negative in one third of cases. There are limitations in making a definitive diagnosis, so various pleural fluid biomarkers have been used for this. The combination of adenosine deaminase and lymphocyte percentage may be useful in this respect. Treatment is the same as for any TB. The addition of corticosteroids is not advisable, and chest drainage could help to improve symptoms more rapidly in large effusions.

  14. The clinical utility of pleural YKL-40 levels in diagnosing pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    Gumus, Aziz; Cinarka, Halit; Murat, Naci; Yilmaz, Adnan; Bedir, Recep; Sahin, Unal

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Recent evidence suggests that YKL-40 is a relatively new biomarker of inflammation and it is involved in the pathogenesis of several pulmonary diseases. Details of serum and pleural YKL-40 in pleural effusions however, remain unknown. We aimed to assess whether serum and pleural YKL-40 is an accurate biomarker of pleural effusions. Methods This clinical study was prospective, observational and cross-sectional. The concentrations of serum and pleural fluid YKL-40 and conventional pleural marker levels were measured in 80 subjects with pleural effusions, including 23 transudates caused by congestive heart failure (CHF), and 57 exudates including 23 parapneumonic, 22 malignant and 12 tuberculous pleural effusions (TBPEs). Results Median pleural fluid YKL-40 levels were higher in exudates than in transudates (219.4 and 205.9 ng/mL, respectively, P<0.001). High pleural YKL-40 levels, with a cutoff value of >215 ng/mL, yielded a 73% sensitivity, 73% specificity, likelihood ratio 2.8 for diagnosing exudate, with an area under the curve of 0.770 [95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.657-0.884]. Pleural YKL-40/serum YKL-40 ratio >1.5 yielded a 75% sensitivity, 72% specificity and likelihood ratio 2.6 for diagnosing TBPE, with an area under the curve of 0.825 (95% CI: 0.710-0.940). Conclusions High concentrations of pleural YKL-40 level may help to differentiate exudate from transudate and a high pleural YKL-40/serum YKL-40 ratio may be helpful in seperating TBPE from non-tuberculous effusions. PMID:24255777

  15. Physiology of breathlessness associated with pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rajesh; Jenkins, Susan; Eastwood, Peter R; Lee, Y C Gary; Singh, Bhajan

    2015-07-01

    Pleural effusions have a major impact on the cardiorespiratory system. This article reviews the pathophysiological effects of pleural effusions and pleural drainage, their relationship with breathlessness, and highlights key knowledge gaps. The basis for breathlessness in pleural effusions and relief following thoracentesis is not well understood. Many existing studies on the pathophysiology of breathlessness in pleural effusions are limited by small sample sizes, heterogeneous design and a lack of direct measurements of respiratory muscle function. Gas exchange worsens with pleural effusions and improves after thoracentesis. Improvements in ventilatory capacity and lung volumes following pleural drainage are small, and correlate poorly with the volume of fluid drained and the severity of breathlessness. Rather than lung compression, expansion of the chest wall, including displacement of the diaphragm, appears to be the principle mechanism by which the effusion is accommodated. Deflation of the thoracic cage and restoration of diaphragmatic function after thoracentesis may improve diaphragm effectiveness and efficiency, and this may be an important mechanism by which breathlessness improves. Effusions do not usually lead to major hemodynamic changes, but large effusions may cause cardiac tamponade and ventricular diastolic collapse. Patients with effusions can have impaired exercise capacity and poor sleep quality and efficiency. Pleural effusions are associated with abnormalities in gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, respiratory muscle function and hemodynamics, but the association between these abnormalities and breathlessness remains unclear. Prospective studies should aim to identify the key mechanisms of effusion-related breathlessness and predictors of improvement following pleural drainage.

  16. Pleural controversies: indwelling pleural catheter vs. pleurodesis for malignant pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    Fortin, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusions (MPE) are frequent consequences of malignant disease and significantly impair the quality of life (QoL) of patients. There are two main options for the palliation of MPE-related symptoms: obliterating the pleural space by pleurodesis to prevent further fluid reaccumulation, or chronically draining the pleural fluid with an indwelling pleural catheter (IPC). There is controversy as to which approach is superior each having advantages and drawbacks. Pleurodesis offers a higher chance of rapid resolution of the pleural effusion with an intervention that is time limited but at the expense of a more invasive procedure, the need for a hospital stay and a higher need for repeat procedures. IPC offers an outpatient solution which is less invasive but at the cost of prolonged catheter drainages and care in a significant portion of patients who will not achieve pleurodesis. Impact on QoL, symptom relief and costs do not appear to be significantly different between the two options. Treatment of MPE should be tailored to the patient’s functional status, comorbidities, prognosis and personal preferences as well as local expertise. Hybrid approaches using pleurodesis techniques and IPC concomitantly may come into play in the near future to further improve patient care. PMID:26150918

  17. Clinical and laboratory parameters of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rashid, M M; Ghose, A; Islam, M B; Amin, R; Rahman, R; Faiz, M A

    2010-04-01

    This prospective observational clinical study was done to find out the clinical and laboratory parameters of pleural tuberculosis patients, to find out a sensitive and specific tool for diagnosis and to see the effectively of a standard anti-TB regime Isoniazide, Rifampicine, Pyrazinamide, Ethambutol, (2HRZE/4HR) for treatment of pleural tuberculosis in an adult medicine unit, department of Medicine, Chittagong Medical College Hospital, Chittagong, Bangladesh. A series of total thirty-three consecutive pleural tuberculosis patients admitted in that unit over a period of 6 months were enrolled. All thirty-three pleural tuberculosis patients were observed for their demographic and clinical parameters and undergone some relevant investigations like complete blood count, Mantoux test, pleural fluid study and pleural histopathological study. Later on, they were put on anti-tuberculosis therapy without steroid and followed their response after one month. All patients of pleural tuberculosis presented in this medicine unit had fever and cough associated with chest pain (87.9%), dysnoea (42.4%), haemoptysis (9.1%), weight loss (84.4%), anorexia (90.9%). Age of presentation was 34.1+/-16.2 years and of them, 60.7% patients were below 30. Mean Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR) was 97.04 mm in 1st hour and 57.6% cases had ESR more than 100. 63.6% had Mantoux Test (MT) positive (>10 mm). Only 6.1% had hemorrhagic effusion and others had straw colored fluid. Mean pleural fluid protein is 5.9 gram/L and sugar 65.7 mg/dl. No Acid Fast Bacilli (AFB) was seen on microscopy in pleural fluid. Pleural biopsy revealed 54.5% granulomatous lesion with or without caseation and another 24.2% shows chronic inflammation. Seventy seven percentage (77%) patients were attended follow-up clinic after 1 month and all patients (100%) were improved with this anti-TB therapy. Of the total patient treated with anti TB drug, 53.5% had no pleural effusion, other had minimum effusion. Only 6

  18. Advances in pleural disease management including updated procedural coding.

    PubMed

    Haas, Andrew R; Sterman, Daniel H

    2014-08-01

    Over 1.5 million pleural effusions occur in the United States every year as a consequence of a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and malignant conditions. Although rarely fatal in isolation, pleural effusions are often a marker of a serious underlying medical condition and contribute to significant patient morbidity, quality-of-life reduction, and mortality. Pleural effusion management centers on pleural fluid drainage to relieve symptoms and to investigate pleural fluid accumulation etiology. Many recent studies have demonstrated important advances in pleural disease management approaches for a variety of pleural fluid etiologies, including malignant pleural effusion, complicated parapneumonic effusion and empyema, and chest tube size. The last decade has seen greater implementation of real-time imaging assistance for pleural effusion management and increasing use of smaller bore percutaneous chest tubes. This article will briefly review recent pleural effusion management literature and update the latest changes in common procedural terminology billing codes as reflected in the changing landscape of imaging use and percutaneous approaches to pleural disease management.

  19. Pleural ultrasound for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    2016-11-01

    Pleural ultrasonography is useful for identifying and characterising pleural effusions, solid pleural lesions (nodules, masses, swellings) and pneumothorax. Pleural ultrasonography is also considered the standard care for guiding interventionist procedures on the pleura at the patient's bedside (thoracentesis, drainage tubes, pleural biopsies and pleuroscopy). Hospitals should promote the acquisition of portable ultrasound equipment to increase the patient's safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. The Differential Diagnosis of Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Sahn, Steven A.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of pleural effusion enables a physician to obtain a specimen of a body cavity fluid easily. With a systematic analysis of the pleural fluid, in conjunction with the clinical features and ancillary laboratory data, a clinician should be able to arrive at either a presumptive or definitive diagnosis in approximately 90 percent of cases. Selectivity should be exercised in ordering analyses on pleural fluid. The first important deductive step is to decide whether the effusion is a transudate (due to imbalances in hydrostatic or oncotic pressures) or an exudate (inflammatory); serum protein and lactate dehydrogenase measurements will be decisive. The differential diagnosis of a transudate is relatively limited and usually easily discernible from the clinical presentation. The differential diagnosis of exudate poses a more difficult challenge for clinicians. The use of certain pleural fluid tests such as leukocyte count and differential, glucose, pH and, when indicated, pleural fluid amylase determinations, helps to narrow the differential diagnosis of an exudative pleural effusion. PMID:6182697

  1. Identification of Streptococcus pneumoniae lytA, plyA and psaA genes in pleural fluid by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Juan Carlos; Ríos, Esther; Rodríguez-Avial, Iciar; Ramos, Belén; Marín, Mercedes; Cercenado, Emilia

    2017-08-14

    The aim was to evaluate the utility of a multiplex real-time PCR to detect Streptococcus pneumoniae lytA, plyA and psaA genes in pleural fluid (PF). A collection of 81 PF samples was used. Sixty were considered positive for S. pneumoniae according to previous results (54 by an in-house lytA gene PCR and eight by universal rRNA PCR). The sensitivity for detection of the lytA, plyA and psaA genes by multiplex PCR was 100% (60/60), 98.3% (59/60) and 91.7% (55/60), respectively. The detection of all three genes was negative in 21 samples formerly confirmed as negative for S. pneumoniae (100% specificity) by the other procedures (9 by in-house lytA PCR and 12 by rRNA PCR). The use of this multiplex PCR may be a useful option to identify S. pneumoniae directly in PF samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  2. Uremic pleuritis: A case report and review of recurrent exudative pleural effusions in children.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Matthew D; Galambos, Csaba; Stillwell, Paul C

    2017-09-01

    Despite similar mechanisms driving pleural fluid accumulation, the causes of pleural effusions in children differ significantly from that of adults. When a pleural effusion re-occurs in an adult, literature recommends early thoracentesis, and consideration for pleuroscopy with biopsy to guide the diagnostic evaluation. In children, there is a paucity of literature for guiding management of recurrent exudative pleural effusion. We present an unusual pediatric case of uremic pleuritis with recurrent pericardial and exudative pleural effusions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Pleural effusion: diagnosis, treatment, and management

    PubMed Central

    Karkhanis, Vinaya S; Joshi, Jyotsna M

    2012-01-01

    A pleural effusion is an excessive accumulation of fluid in the pleural space. It can pose a diagnostic dilemma to the treating physician because it may be related to disorders of the lung or pleura, or to a systemic disorder. Patients most commonly present with dyspnea, initially on exertion, predominantly dry cough, and pleuritic chest pain. To treat pleural effusion appropriately, it is important to determine its etiology. However, the etiology of pleural effusion remains unclear in nearly 20% of cases. Thoracocentesis should be performed for new and unexplained pleural effusions. Laboratory testing helps to distinguish pleural fluid transudate from an exudate. The diagnostic evaluation of pleural effusion includes chemical and microbiological studies, as well as cytological analysis, which can provide further information about the etiology of the disease process. Immunohistochemistry provides increased diagnostic accuracy. Transudative effusions are usually managed by treating the underlying medical disorder. However, a large, refractory pleural effusion, whether a transudate or exudate, must be drained to provide symptomatic relief. Management of exudative effusion depends on the underlying etiology of the effusion. Malignant effusions are usually drained to palliate symptoms and may require pleurodesis to prevent recurrence. Pleural biopsy is recommended for evaluation and exclusion of various etiologies, such as tuberculosis or malignant disease. Percutaneous closed pleural biopsy is easiest to perform, the least expensive, with minimal complications, and should be used routinely. Empyemas need to be treated with appropriate antibiotics and intercostal drainage. Surgery may be needed in selected cases where drainage procedure fails to produce improvement or to restore lung function and for closure of bronchopleural fistula. PMID:27147861

  4. Etiologies of bilateral pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    Puchalski, Jonathan T.; Argento, A. Christine; Murphy, Terrence E.; Araujo, Katy L.B.; Oliva, Isabel B.; Rubinowitz, Ami N.; Pisani, Margaret A.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background To evaluate the safety, etiology and outcomes of patients undergoing bilateral thoracentesis. Methods This is a prospective cohort study of 100 consecutive patients who underwent bilateral thoracenteses in an academic medical center from July 2009 through November 2010. Pleural fluid characteristics and etiologies of the effusions were assessed. Mean differences in levels of fluid characteristics between right and left lungs were tested. Associations between fluid characteristics and occurrence of bilateral malignant effusions were evaluated. The rate of pneumothorax and other complications subsequent to bilateral thoracentesis was determined. Results Exudates were more common than transudates, and most effusions had multiple etiologies, with 83% having two or more etiologies. Bilateral malignant effusions occurred in 19 patients, were the most common single etiology of exudative effusions, and were associated with higher levels of protein and LDH in the pleural fluid. Among 200 thoracenteses performed with a bilateral procedure, seven resulted in pneumothoraces, three of which required chest tube drainage and four were ex vacuo. Conclusions More often than not, there are multiple etiologies that contribute to pleural fluid formation, and of the combinations of etiologies observed congestive heart failure was the most frequent contributor. Exudative effusions are more common than transudates when bilateral effusions are present. Malignancy is a common etiology of exudative effusions. This study suggests that the overall complication rate following bilateral thoracentesis is low and the rate of pneumothorax subsequent to bilateral thoracentesis is comparable to unilateral thoracentesis. PMID:23219348

  5. Pleural effusions from congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Porcel, José M

    2010-12-01

    In heart failure (HF), pleural effusion results from increased interstitial fluid in the lung due to elevated pulmonary capillary pressure. Rarely, pleural effusions may occur in association with isolated right HF. HF-associated effusions are typically bilateral, but if unilateral, they are more commonly seen on the right side. The fluid typically meets the biochemical characteristics of a transudate, although in 25% of the cases it may fall into the exudative range. Testing for natriuretic peptides, such as NT-proBNP, significantly aids in diagnosing or excluding HF in patients with pleural effusion of unknown origin. The measurement of pleural fluid NT-proBNP is the best way to identify pleural effusions that meet the exudative criteria of Light but are due to HF. However, if natriuretic peptide assays are not available, calculation of the serum to pleural fluid albumin gradient represents a good substitute for making this distinction. Loop diuretics are the mainstay of therapy, although a therapeutic thoracentesis for very large effusions may occasionally be required.

  6. PLEURAL EFFECTS OF INDIUM PHOSPHIDE IN B6C3F1 MICE: NONFIBROUS PARTICULATE INDUCED PLEURAL FIBROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Kirby, Patrick J.; Shines, Cassandra J.; Taylor, Genie J.; Bousquet, Ronald W.; Price, Herman C.; Everitt, Jeffrey I.; Morgan, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism(s) by which chronic inhalation of indium phosphide (InP) particles causes pleural fibrosis is not known. Few studies of InP pleural toxicity have been conducted because of the challenges in conducting particulate inhalation exposures, and because the pleural lesions developed slowly over the 2-year inhalation study. The authors investigated whether InP (1 mg/kg) administered by a single oropharyngeal aspiration would cause pleural fibrosis in male B6C3F1 mice. By 28 days after treatment, protein and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were significantly increased in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), but were unchanged in pleural lavage fluid (PLF). A pronounced pleural effusion characterized by significant increases in cytokines and a 3.7-fold increase in cell number was detected 28 days after InP treatment. Aspiration of soluble InCl3 caused a similar delayed pleural effusion; however, other soluble metals, insoluble particles, and fibers did not. The effusion caused by InP was accompanied by areas of pleural thickening and inflammation at day 28, and by pleural fibrosis at day 98. Aspiration of InP produced pleural fibrosis that was histologically similar to lesions caused by chronic inhalation exposure, and in a shorter time period. This oropharyngeal aspiration model was used to provide an initial characterization of the progression of pleural lesions caused by InP. PMID:19995279

  7. Pleural LDH as a prognostic marker in adenocarcinoma lung with malignant pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Verma, Akash; Phua, Chee Kiang; Sim, Wen Yuan; Algoso, Reyes Elmer; Tee, Kuan Sen; Lew, Sennen J W; Lim, Albert Y H; Goh, Soon Keng; Tai, Dessmon Y H; Kor, Ai Ching; Ho, Benjamin; Abisheganaden, John

    2016-06-01

    To study the performance of serum and pleural lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level in predicting survival in patients with adenocarcinoma lung presenting with malignant pleural effusions (MPE) at initial diagnosis.Retrospective cohort study of the patient hospitalized for adenocarcinoma lung with MPE in year 2012.Univariate analyses showed lower pleural fluid LDH 667 (313-967) versus 971 (214-3800), P = 0.04, female gender 9 (100%) versus 27 (41.5%), P = 0.009, never smoking status 9 (100%) versus 36 (55.3%), P = 0.009, and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy 8 (89%) versus 26 (40%), P = 0.009 to correlate with survival of more than 1.7 year versus less than 1.7 year. In multivariate analysis, low pleural fluid LDH and female gender maintained significance. The pleural LDH level of ≤1500 and >1500 U/L discriminated significantly (P = 0.009) between survival.High pleural LDH (>1500 IU/L) predicts shorter survival (less than a year) in patients with adenocarcinoma lung presenting with MPE at the time of initial diagnosis. This marker may be clinically applied for selecting therapeutic modality directed at prevention of reaccumulation of MPE. Patients with low pleural LDH may be considered suitable for measures that provide more sustained effect on prevention of reaccumulation such as chemical pleurodesis or tunneled pleural catheter.

  8. Pleural LDH as a prognostic marker in adenocarcinoma lung with malignant pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Phua, Chee Kiang; Sim, Wen Yuan; Algoso, Reyes Elmer; Tee, Kuan Sen; Lew, Sennen J. W.; Lim, Albert Y. H.; Goh, Soon Keng; Tai, Dessmon Y. H.; Kor, Ai Ching; Ho, Benjamin; Abisheganaden, John

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To study the performance of serum and pleural lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level in predicting survival in patients with adenocarcinoma lung presenting with malignant pleural effusions (MPE) at initial diagnosis. Retrospective cohort study of the patient hospitalized for adenocarcinoma lung with MPE in year 2012. Univariate analyses showed lower pleural fluid LDH 667 (313–967) versus 971 (214–3800), P = 0.04, female gender 9 (100%) versus 27 (41.5%), P = 0.009, never smoking status 9 (100%) versus 36 (55.3%), P = 0.009, and epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) therapy 8 (89%) versus 26 (40%), P = 0.009 to correlate with survival of more than 1.7 year versus less than 1.7 year. In multivariate analysis, low pleural fluid LDH and female gender maintained significance. The pleural LDH level of ≤1500 and >1500 U/L discriminated significantly (P = 0.009) between survival. High pleural LDH (>1500 IU/L) predicts shorter survival (less than a year) in patients with adenocarcinoma lung presenting with MPE at the time of initial diagnosis. This marker may be clinically applied for selecting therapeutic modality directed at prevention of reaccumulation of MPE. Patients with low pleural LDH may be considered suitable for measures that provide more sustained effect on prevention of reaccumulation such as chemical pleurodesis or tunneled pleural catheter. PMID:27368006

  9. The diagnosis and management of pleural effusions in the ICU.

    PubMed

    Maslove, David M; Chen, Benson Tze-Ming; Wang, Helena; Kuschner, Ware G

    2013-01-01

    Pleural effusions are common in critically ill patients. Most effusions in intensive care unit (ICU) patients are of limited clinical significance; however, some are important and require aggressive management. Transudative effusions in the ICU are commonly caused by volume overload, decreased plasma oncotic pressure, and regions of altered pleural pressure attributable to atelectasis and mechanical ventilation. Exudates are sequelae of pulmonary or pleural infection, pulmonary embolism, postsurgical complications, and malignancy. Increases in pleural fluid volume are accommodated principally by chest wall expansion and, to a lesser degree, by lung collapse. Studies in mechanically ventilated patients suggest that pleural fluid drainage can result in improved oxygenation for up to 48 hours, but data on clinical outcomes are limited. Mechanically ventilated patients with pleural effusions should be semirecumbant and treated with higher levels of positive-end expiratory pressure. Rarely, large effusions can cause cardiac tamponade or tension physiology, requiring urgent drainage. Bedside ultrasound is both sensitive and specific for diagnosing pleural effusions in mechanically ventilated patients. Sonographic findings of septation and homogenous echogenicity may suggest an exudative effusion, but definitive diagnosis requires pleural fluid sampling. Thoracentesis should be carried out under ultrasound guidance. Antibiotic regimens for parapneumonic effusions should be based on current pneumonia guidelines, and anaerobic coverage should be included in the case of empyema. Decompression of the pleural space may be necessary to improve respiratory mechanics, as well as to treat complicated effusions. While small-bore catheters inserted under ultrasound guidance may be used for nonseptated effusions, surgical consultation should be sought in cases where this approach fails, or where the effusion appears complex and septated at the outset. Further research is needed to

  10. Memory-Like Antigen-Specific Human NK Cells from TB Pleural Fluids Produced IL-22 in Response to IL-15 or Mycobacterium tuberculosis Antigens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoying; Yu, Sifei; Yang, Binyan; Lao, Suihua; Li, Baiqing; Wu, Changyou

    2016-01-01

    Our previous result indicated that memory-like human natural killer (NK) cells from TB pleural fluid cells (PFCs) produced large amounts of IFN-γ in response to Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG). Furthermore, recent studies have shown that human lymphoid tissues harbored a unique NK cell subset that specialized in production of interleukin (IL)-22, a proinflammatory cytokine that mediates host defense against pathogens. Yet little information was available with regard to the properties of IL-22 production by memory-like human NK cells. In the present study, we found that cytokines IL-15 induced and IL-12 enhanced the levels of IL-22 by NK cells from TB PFCs. In addition, IL-22 but not IL-17 was produced by NK cells from PFCs in response to BCG and M.tb-related Ags. More importantly, the subset of specific IL-22-producing NK cells were distinct from IFN-γ-producing NK cells in PFCs. CD45RO+ or CD45RO- NK cells were sorted, co-cultured with autologous monocytes and stimulated with BCG for the production of IL-22. The result demonstrated that CD45RO+ but not CD45RO- NK cells produced significantly higher level of IL-22. Anti-IL-12Rβ1 mAbs (2B10) partially inhibit the expression of IL-22 by NK cells under the culture with BCG. Consistently, BCG specific IL-22-producing NK cells from PFCs expressed CD45ROhighNKG2Dhighgranzyme Bhigh. In conclusion, our data demonstrated that memory-like antigen-specific CD45RO+ NK cells might participate in the recall immune response for M. tb infection via producing IL-22, which display a critical role to fight against M. tb.

  11. Open pleural biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... due to a virus, fungus, or parasite Mesothelioma Tuberculosis Risks There is a slight chance of: Air ... More Metastatic pleural tumor Pleural needle biopsy Pulmonary tuberculosis Tumor Review Date 11/4/2014 Updated by: ...

  12. Delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion postsplenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shu-Guang; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Yan, Lu-Nan; Zeng, Yong

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of pancreatic pleural effusion, secondary to an internal pancreatic fistula, is a rare clinical syndrome and diagnosis is often missed. The key to the diagnosis is a dramatically elevated pleural fluid amylase. This pancreatic pleural effusion is also called a pancreatic pleural fistula. It is characterized by profuse pleural fluid and has a tendency to recur. Here we report a case of delayed internal pancreatic fistula with pancreatic pleural effusion emerging after splenectomy. From the treatment of this case, we conclude that the symptoms and signs of a subphrenic effusion are often obscure; abdominal computed tomography may be required to look for occult, intra-abdominal infection; and active conservative treatment should be carried out in the early period of this complication to reduce the need for endoscopy or surgery. PMID:20845520

  13. Pleural effusion segmentation in thin-slice CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, Rory; Shearer, Andrew; Bruzzi, John; Khosa, Huma

    2009-02-01

    A pleural effusion is excess fluid that collects in the pleural cavity, the fluid-filled space that surrounds the lungs. Surplus amounts of such fluid can impair breathing by limiting the expansion of the lungs during inhalation. Measuring the fluid volume is indicative of the effectiveness of any treatment but, due to the similarity to surround regions, fragments of collapsed lung present and topological changes; accurate quantification of the effusion volume is a difficult imaging problem. A novel code is presented which performs conditional region growth to accurately segment the effusion shape across a dataset. We demonstrate the applicability of our technique in the segmentation of pleural effusion and pulmonary masses.

  14. Diagnosis and management of patients with pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Myatt, Rebecca

    2014-06-17

    Pleural effusions occur when fluid accumulates between the visceral and parietal pleura in the chest cavity, preventing the lung from expanding fully during inspiration. The reduction in lung volume, depression of the diaphragm and reduced chest wall compliance cause dyspnoea, and occasionally pain or cough. Pleural effusion is a complex problem caused by a variety of conditions requiring different treatment depending on the underlying diagnosis. This article discusses the causes and treatment of pleural effusions, referencing guidelines produced by the British Thoracic Society.

  15. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  16. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation.

    PubMed

    Giannou, Anastasios D; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell-induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable.

  17. The Differential Diagnostic Values of Cytokine Levels in Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Akarsu, Saadet; Kurt, A. Nese Citak; Dogan, Yasar; Yilmaz, Erdal; Godekmerdan, Ahmet; Aygun, A. Denizmen

    2005-01-01

    The aim is to examine whether the changes in pleural fluid interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 levels were significant in differential diagnosis of childhood pleural effusions. IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 levels in pleural fluids of all 36 patients were measured. The levels of IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 in pleural fluids were statistically significantly higher in the transudate group compared with those of the exudate group. The levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-8 were also found to be statistically significantly higher in the empyema group compared with both the parapneumonic and the tuberculous pleural effusion groups. The levels of IL-2 and IL-6 were detected to be statistically significantly higher in the tuberculous pleural effusion group in comparison with those of the parapneumonic effusion group. The results showed that pleural fluids IL-1β, IL-2, IL-6, and IL-8 could be used in pleural fluids exudate and transudate distinction. PMID:15770060

  18. Elevated expression of prostaglandin receptor and increased release of prostaglandin E2 maintain the survival of CD45RO+ T cells in the inflamed human pleural space

    PubMed Central

    Pace, Elisabetta; Bruno, Tony F; Berenger, Byron; Mody, Christopher H; Melis, Mario; Ferraro, Maria; Tipa, Annalisa; Bruno, Andreina; Profita, Mirella; Bonsignore, Giovanni; Gjomarkaj, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Throughout the body, the distribution and differentiation of T-cell subsets varies in a way that optimizes host responses. The role of activation-induced cell death (AICD) in altering the distribution of T-lymphocyte subsets at an immune or inflammatory sites has been unexplored. The objective of this study was to assess whether pleural macrophages modulate AICD of specific pleural T-lymphocyte subsets. We found that pleural T-lymphocytes spontaneously undergo apoptosis, which is associated to increased expression of both FAS and FAS ligand, to decreased expression of Bcl 2 and to caspase 8 and 3 activation. While pleural T lymphocytes were partly protected from apoptosis, autologous peripheral blood T lymphocytes increased their apoptosis when cultured with exudative pleural fluids. Pleural CD45RO+ T cells, in comparison to pleural CD45RA+ T cells, were more susceptible to apoptosis, but were preferentially protected by exudative pleural fluids. Pleural prostaglandin E 2 (PGE2) was implicated in protecting T-lymphocytes from apoptosis because exudative pleural T lymphocytes highly express PGE2 receptors, and because exudative pleural fluid contained high concentrations of PGE2. Activated pleural macrophages released PGE2 and reduced the spontaneous apoptosis of pleural T lymphocytes and depletion of PGE2 from pleural fluids decreased this protective effect. This study demonstrates that PGE2, released in the pleural fluids following pleural macrophage activation, prolongs the survival of specific T-cell subsets, resulting in differentiation of the T-cell repertoire within the inflamed pleural space. PMID:17386077

  19. Pleural controversies: image guided biopsy vs. thoracoscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusions?

    PubMed

    Dixon, Giles; de Fonseka, Duneesha; Maskell, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Undiagnosed pleural effusions present an increasing diagnostic burden upon healthcare providers internationally. The investigation of pleural effusions often requires the acquisition of tissue for histological analysis and diagnosis. Historically there were two options for tissue biopsy: a 'gold standard' surgical biopsy or a "blind" closed pleural biopsy. Over the last decade however, image-guided Tru-cut biopsies and local anaesthetic thoracoscopic (local anaesthetic thoracoscopy) biopsies have become more widespread. Image-guided techniques acquire samples under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) guidance whereas LAT involves the direct visualisation and biopsy of the pleura with pleuroscopy. Both techniques have been shown to be superior to 'blind' closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of pleural or metastatic malignancy. However, closed biopsy remains a viable method of investigation in areas of high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Beyond this, each investigative technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. Image-guided biopsy is less invasive, usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, and enables tissue biopsy in frail patients and those with pleural thickening but no pleural fluid. Local anaesthetic thoracoscopy (LAT) provides diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in one procedure. Large volume thoracentesis, multiple pleural biopsies and talc poudrage can be carried out in a single procedure. The overall diagnostic yield is similar for both techniques, although there are no large-scale direct comparisons. Both techniques share low complication rates.

  20. Pleural controversies: image guided biopsy vs. thoracoscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusions?

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Giles; de Fonseka, Duneesha

    2015-01-01

    Undiagnosed pleural effusions present an increasing diagnostic burden upon healthcare providers internationally. The investigation of pleural effusions often requires the acquisition of tissue for histological analysis and diagnosis. Historically there were two options for tissue biopsy: a ‘gold standard’ surgical biopsy or a “blind” closed pleural biopsy. Over the last decade however, image-guided Tru-cut biopsies and local anaesthetic thoracoscopic (local anaesthetic thoracoscopy) biopsies have become more widespread. Image-guided techniques acquire samples under ultrasound (US) or computed tomography (CT) guidance whereas LAT involves the direct visualisation and biopsy of the pleura with pleuroscopy. Both techniques have been shown to be superior to ‘blind’ closed pleural biopsy for the diagnosis of pleural or metastatic malignancy. However, closed biopsy remains a viable method of investigation in areas of high incidence of tuberculosis (TB). Beyond this, each investigative technique has its own advantages and disadvantages. Image-guided biopsy is less invasive, usually carried out as an outpatient procedure, and enables tissue biopsy in frail patients and those with pleural thickening but no pleural fluid. Local anaesthetic thoracoscopy (LAT) provides diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities in one procedure. Large volume thoracentesis, multiple pleural biopsies and talc poudrage can be carried out in a single procedure. The overall diagnostic yield is similar for both techniques, although there are no large-scale direct comparisons. Both techniques share low complication rates. PMID:26150917

  1. Translational Research in Pleural Infection and Beyond.

    PubMed

    Lee, Y C Gary; Idell, Steven; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2016-12-01

    The incidence of pleural infection has been rising in recent years. Intrapleural therapy with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and deoxyribonuclease (DNase) has significantly reduced the need for surgery, and its impact on clinical care is rising worldwide. Efforts are underway to optimize the delivery regimen and establish the short and longer term effects of this therapy. The complex interactions of bacterial infection within the pleura with inflammatory responses and clinical interventions (antibiotics and tPA/DNase or other fibrinolysins) require further studies to improve future treatment options. Intrapleural instillation of tPA potently induces pleural fluid formation, principally via a monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP)-1 dependent mechanism. Activation of transcriptional programs in pleural resident cells and infiltrating cells during pleural infection and malignancy results in the local secretion of a cocktail of proinflammatory signaling molecules (including MCP-1) within the pleural confines that contributes to effusion formation. Understanding the biology of these molecules and their interaction may provide novel targets for pleural fluid control. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Pleural effusion and sarcoidosis: an unusual combination.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; San José, Esther; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Suárez-Antelo, Juan; Toubes, M Elena; Valdés, Luis

    2014-12-01

    Pleural involvement in sarcoidosis is uncommon and appears in several forms. To document the incidence and characteristics of pleural effusion in sarcoidosis patients, a review of the cases diagnosed in our centre between January 2001 and December 2012 was carried out. One hundred and ninety-five patients with sarcoidosis were identified; three (two men and one woman) presented with unilateral pleural effusion (1.5%): one in the right side and two in the left. Two were in stageii and one was in stageiv. The pleural fluid of the two patients who underwent thoracocentesis was predominantly lymphocytic. One of these patients presented chylothorax and the other had high CA-125levels. In general, these effusions are lymphocyte-rich, paucicellular, serous exudates (sometimes chylothorax) and contain proportionally higher levels of protein than LDH. Most cases are treated with corticosteroids, although it may resolve spontaneously.

  3. Effects of pneumothorax or pleural effusion on pulmonary function.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, J J; Wright, A J; Gibson, G J

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pneumothorax or pleural effusion on respiratory function as measured by the commonly applied tests were investigated by studying 13 patients (six with pneumothorax, seven with effusion) with and, as far as possible, without air or fluid in the pleural cavity. Measurements included spirometric volumes, carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO), and KCO by the single breath method, maximum expiratory flow-volume curves, and subdivisions of lung volume estimated by both inert gas dilution and body plethysmography. In patients with pneumothorax "pleural volume" was estimated as the difference between lung volumes measured by dilution and thoracic gas volume measured by plethysmography. In patients with effusion the change in "pleural volume" was equated with the volume of fluid subsequently aspirated. "Total thoracic capacity" (TTC) was estimated by adding total lung capacity (TLC) measured by dilution and "pleural volume." Both effusion and pneumothorax produced a restrictive ventilatory defect with reductions of vital capacity, functional residual capacity, and TLC. In the patients with effusion TTC fell after aspiration, suggesting that the pleural fluid produced relative expansion of the chest wall as well as compression of the lung. In patients with pneumothorax, however, there was no difference in TTC with and without air in the pleural space. In the presence of pleural air or fluid there was a slight decrease in TLCO and increase in KCO, with a small but significant increase in the rate of lung emptying during forced expiration. PMID:3969656

  4. Pneumocephalus and Pneumorrhachis due to a Subarachnoid Pleural Fistula That Developed after Thoracic Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Ki; Kim, Woo-Jae; Kim, Ho-Sang; Kim, Jeong-Ho; Kim, Yun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Development of a communication between the spinal subarachnoid space and the pleural space after thoracic spine surgery is uncommon. Subarachnoid pleural fistula (SAPF), a distressing condition, involves cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Here we report an unusual case of SAPF, occurring after thoracic spine surgery, that was further complicated by pneumocephalus and pneumorrhachis postthoracentesis, which was performed for unilateral pleural effusion. PMID:27799999

  5. Eosinophilia in Pleural Effusions: a Speculative Negative Predictor for Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Fang-Yeh; Liou, Ching-Biau; Sun, Jen-Tang; Bei, Chia-Hao; Liou, Tse-Hsuan; Tan, N-Chi; Yu, Yun-Chieh; Chang, Chih-Chun; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Su, Ming-Jang

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic pleural effusion (EPE) is an eosinophil count more than 10% on cytology of pleural samples. Recently, it was reported that malignancy had been the most prevalent cause inducing EPE. Therefore, we conducted an analysis on the prevalence and etiology of EPE and investigated the relationship between EPE and malignancy. Data for pleural cell differential count from patients receiving thoracentesis during the period from January 2008 to December 2013 were compared with clinical data and established diagnosis of patients obtained via electronic chart review. A total of 6,801 requests of pleural cytology from 3,942 patients with pleural effusion who had received thoracentesis were available at Far Eastern Memorial Hospital from 2008 to 2013, and of these subjects, 115 (2.9%) were found to have EPE. The most frequent cause of EPE was malignancy (33.0%, n=38), followed by parapneumonic effusions (27.8%, n=32), tuberculosis pleuritis (13.9%, n=16), transudate effusions (12.2%, n=14) and the presence of blood or air in pleural space (10.4%, n=12). Additionally, an inverse relationship of eosinophilia in pleural fluid was identified in patients with malignancy and EPE. The cut-off eosinophil count in pleural fluid was 15% for the most accurate discrimination between malignancy and benign disorders in patients with EPE. At the cut-off level, the sensitivity and specificity were 65.8% and 67.5%, respectively. Pleural fluid eosinophilia was a speculative negative predictor for malignancy, despite the fact that cancers, including lung cancers and metastatic cancers to lung, were the most leading cause of pleural fluid eosinophilia. An inverse correlation was observed between the pleural eosinophil percentage and the likelihood of malignancy in patients with EPE.

  6. [Utility of amylase levels in malignant pleural effusions].

    PubMed

    Haro-Estarriol, Manuel; Casamitjá-Sot, María Teresa; Alvarez-Castillo, Luis Alberto; Calderón-López, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Somolinos, Sandra; Sebastián-Quetglas, Fernando

    2007-09-22

    To analyze the utility of the measurement of pleural amylase levels (AL) and pleural fluid/serum amylase ratio (AR) in malignant pleural effusions. Prospective and comparative study of AL and its AR in relation to the patient and pleural fluid characteristics in 295 malignant effusions and 673 nonmalignant. There were 103 patients with AL greater than 100 U/l (11%) and 268 with AR greater than 1 (28%): 53 (18%) and 109 (37%) in malignant effusions respectively. Patients with malignant effusions had higher AL and AR, especially when tumour origin was lung cancer, had positive pleural citology or biopsy and showed an adenocarcinoma. Multivariate regression analysis revealed a significant difference in the changes in AL associated with positive pleural citology or biopsy and massive pleural effusion. The malignant effusions had higher AL in lung cancer of stage IV. AL and AR should not be routinely measured to exclude a malignant effusion. A high AL or AR was related to positive pleural citology or biopsy, a massive pleural effusion and lung cancer with an advanced disease.

  7. Proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokine levels in complicated and noncomplicated parapneumonic pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Evaldo; Vargas, Francisco S; Acencio, Milena M; Sigrist, Rosa M S; Biscaro, Marjourie D A; Antonangelo, Leila; Teixeira, Lisete R; Light, Richard W

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate a panel of proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines in noncomplicated and complicated parapneumonic pleural effusions and to correlate their levels with pleural fluid biochemical parameters. Serum and pleural effusion were collected from 60 patients with noncomplicated (n = 26) or complicated (n = 34) parapneumonic effusions and assayed for cytologic, biochemical, and proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokines. Student t test was used to compare serum and pleural fluid values, Spearman correlation to analyze the relationship between pleural fluid cytokines and biochemical parameters, and accuracy of pleural fluid cytokine levels to determine the optimal cutoff value for identification of complicated effusions. Corrections for multiple comparisons were applied and a P value < .05 was accepted as significant. Serum and pleural fluid cytokine levels of IL-8, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) soluble receptor (sR) II were similar between groups. In contrast, complicated effusions had higher levels of pleural fluid IL-1β, IL-1 receptor antagonist (ra), and TNF sRI. Negative correlations were found between pleural fluid glucose with IL-1β and TNF sRI and positive correlations between lactic dehydrogenate (LDH) with IL-1β, IL-8, and VEGF. Pleural fluid levels of IL-1β, IL-1ra, and TNF sRI were more accurate than IL-8, VEGF, IL-10, and TNF sRII in discriminating complicated effusions. Both proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokine levels in pleural fluid are elevated in complicated in comparison with noncomplicated parapneumonic pleural effusions, and they correlate with both pleural fluid glucose and LDH levels. IL-1β, IL-1ra, and TNF sRI had higher sensitivity and specificity than IL-8, VEGF, IL-10, and TNF sRII in discriminating complicated effusions.

  8. Pleural effusion in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Trejo, O; Girón, J A; Pérez-Guzmán, E; Segura, E; Fernández-Gutiérrez, C; García-Tapia, A; Clavo, A J; Bascuñana, A

    1997-11-01

    In order to analyze the etiology, cytological and biochemical characteristics, and outcome of pleural disease in patients infected with HIV, the medical records of 86 HIV-positive patients with pleural effusion were reviewed. Controls were 106 HIV-negative patients with parapneumonic or tuberculous effusion. Most HIV-positive patients were intravenous drug abusers (95.3%). Pleural effusions in HIV-positive patients were caused by infections in 76 (89.4%) cases. Parapneumonic effusion was diagnosed in 59 patients and tuberculous pleuritis in 15 patients. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently isolated bacteria. Parameters for differentiating complicated cases of parapneumonic exudate from uncomplicated cases, such as pleural fluid pH < 7.20 (sensitivity 80% vs. 84.3%), pleural fluid glucose < 35 mg/dl (sensitivity 45% vs. 56.25%) pleural fluid LDH > 1600 UI/l (sensitivity 85% vs. 62.50%), showed similar sensitivity in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients. Monocytes in pleural fluid were significantly decreased in tuberculous pleuritis in HIV-positive patients (506 +/- 425 vs. 1014 +/- 1196 monocytes/ml, p < 0.05). No significant differences were detected in the outcome of HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients with pleural disease. It can be concluded that the pleural effusion was of predominantly infectious etiology in HIV-positive patients from populations with a high prevalence of intravenous drug abuse. Neither the biochemical parameters in pleural fluid nor the outcome differed significantly between HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients.

  9. Pleural effusion: characterization with CT attenuation values and CT appearance.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Yigal; Simanovsky, Natalia; Goldstein, Michael S; Hiller, Nurith

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of CT in characterizing pleural effusions on the basis of attenuation values and CT appearance. We retrospectively analyzed 100 pleural effusions in patients who underwent chest CT and diagnostic thoracentesis within 48 hours of each other. On the basis of Light's criteria, effusions were classified as exudates or transudates using laboratory biochemistry markers. The mean value in Hounsfield units of an effusion was determined using a region of interest on the three slices with the greatest quantity of fluid. All CT scans also were reviewed for the presence of additional pleural features such as fluid loculation, pleural thickening, and pleural nodules. Twenty-two of the 100 pleural effusions were transudates and 78 were exudates. The mean attenuation of the exudates (7.2 HU; [SD] 9.4 HU; range, 21-28 HU) was not significantly lower than the mean attenuation of the transudates (10.1 HU; 6.9 HU; range, 0.3-32 HU), (p = 0.24). None of the additional CT features accurately differentiated exudates from transudates (p > 0.1). Fluid loculation was found in 58% of exudates and in 36% of transudates. Pleural thickening was found in 59% of exudates and in 36% of transudates. The clinical use of CT attenuation values to characterize pleural fluid is not accurate. Although fluid loculation, pleural thickness, and pleural nodules were more commonly found in patients with exudative effusions, the presence of these features does not accurately differentiate between exudates and transudates.

  10. Persistent benign pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M

    In this narrative review we describe the main aetiologies, clinical characteristics and treatment for patients with benign pleural effusion that characteristically persists over time: chylothorax and cholesterol effusions, nonexpansible lung, rheumatoid pleural effusion, tuberculous empyema, benign asbestos pleural effusion and yellow nail syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  11. Interleukin-18 is up-regulated in infectious pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Rovina, Nikoletta; Dima, Efrossini; Psallidas, Ioannis; Moschos, Charalampos; Kollintza, Androniki; Kalomenidis, Ioannis

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the pleural and systemic expression of interleukin-18 (IL-18) in patients with pleural effusions (PEs), and the effects of the cytokine in mouse pleural space. One hundred and sixty patients, 23 with pleural effusions (PEs) due to heart failure, 60 malignant, 25 parapneumonic/empyemas, 15 tuberculous and 37 with exudates of miscellaneous etiologies were included in the study. Pleural fluid (PF) and serum IL-18 content was determined using ELISA. IL-18 was injected intrapleurally in mice and pleural inflammation was assessed using pleural lavage. The highest PF IL-18 levels were observed in parapneumonic PEs and the lowest PF IL-18 levels in patients with exudates of miscellaneous aetiologies and transudates. PF IL-18 levels were significantly higher in patients with empyemas compared to those with uncomplicated (p=0.009) or complicated (p=0.028) parapneumonic effusions, while serum levels did not differ significantly among the three groups. Pleural IL-18 content was higher than that of blood only in patients with empyemas. In patients with pleural exudates of all etiologies and in those with parapneumonic PEs/empyema, PF IL-18 levels were correlated with markers of acute pleural inflammation such as the percentage of PF neutrophils, PF LDH and PF/serum LDH ratio, low PF glucose and PF/serum glucose ratio and low PF pH. In mice, intrapleural IL-18 caused neutrophil-predominant pleural inflammation. In conclusion, IL-18 is linked to the intensity of neutrophilic pleural inflammation in patients with PEs, it is up-regulated in the pleural space of patients with empyema and it stimulates the accumulation of neutrophils in mouse pleura. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Investigation of Benign Asbestos Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Aoe, Keisuke; Kato, Katsuya; Yokoyama, Takako; Usami, Ikuji; Onishi, Kazuo; Mizuhashi, Keiichi; Yusa, Toshikazu; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    There is no detailed information about benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE). The aim of the study was to clarify the clinical features of BAPE. The criteria of enrolled patients were as follows: (1) history of asbestos exposure; (2) presence of pleural effusion determined by chest X-ray, CT, and thoracentesis; and (3) the absence of other causes of effusion. Clinical information was retrospectively analysed and the radiological images were reviewed. There were 110 BAPE patients between 1991 and 2012. All were males and the median age at diagnosis was 74 years. The median duration of asbestos exposure and period of latency for disease onset of BAPE were 31 and 48 years, respectively. Mean values of hyaluronic acid, adenosine deaminase, and carcinoembryonic antigen in the pleural fluid were 39,840 ng/mL, 23.9 IU/L, and 1.8 ng/mL, respectively. Pleural plaques were detected in 98 cases (89.1%). Asbestosis was present in 6 (5.5%) cases, rounded atelectasis was detected in 41 (37.3%) cases, and diffuse pleural thickening (DPT) was detected in 30 (27.3%) cases. One case developed lung cancer (LC) before and after BAPE. None of the cases developed malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) during the follow-up. PMID:26689234

  13. Clinical Investigation of Benign Asbestos Pleural Effusion.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Aoe, Keisuke; Kato, Katsuya; Yokoyama, Takako; Usami, Ikuji; Onishi, Kazuo; Mizuhashi, Keiichi; Yusa, Toshikazu; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    There is no detailed information about benign asbestos pleural effusion (BAPE). The aim of the study was to clarify the clinical features of BAPE. The criteria of enrolled patients were as follows: (1) history of asbestos exposure; (2) presence of pleural effusion determined by chest X-ray, CT, and thoracentesis; and (3) the absence of other causes of effusion. Clinical information was retrospectively analysed and the radiological images were reviewed. There were 110 BAPE patients between 1991 and 2012. All were males and the median age at diagnosis was 74 years. The median duration of asbestos exposure and period of latency for disease onset of BAPE were 31 and 48 years, respectively. Mean values of hyaluronic acid, adenosine deaminase, and carcinoembryonic antigen in the pleural fluid were 39,840 ng/mL, 23.9 IU/L, and 1.8 ng/mL, respectively. Pleural plaques were detected in 98 cases (89.1%). Asbestosis was present in 6 (5.5%) cases, rounded atelectasis was detected in 41 (37.3%) cases, and diffuse pleural thickening (DPT) was detected in 30 (27.3%) cases. One case developed lung cancer (LC) before and after BAPE. None of the cases developed malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) during the follow-up.

  14. Auscultatory percussion: a simple method to detect pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Guarino, J R; Guarino, J C

    1994-02-01

    To assess a new technique for the detection of free pleural fluid. 118 consecutive inpatients with radiologic evidence of free pleural fluid and a control group of 175 randomly selected inpatients were examined over a three-year period in a prospective blind study by auscultatory percussion (AP) for evidence of pleural effusion. The cutoff in the percussion note by AP is strikingly loud and sharp at the fluid level and allows precise delineation of even minimal amounts of pleural fluid. The fluid level was measured in reference to the last rib. The criterion for detection of pleural effusion by AP was a demonstrable horizontal fluid level at the sound cutoff across the posterior hemithorax above the last rib that shifted with lateral tilt. A general medical and surgical university-affiliated teaching Veterans Affairs hospital. All inpatients were eligible. Ready availability of examiners was essential. Rotating third- and fourth-year medical students, residents, and senior staff members participated. None. 113 of the 118 patients with radiologic evidence of pleural effusion had a distinct horizontal fluid level above the last rib that shifted with lateral tilt (sensitivity = 95.8%). None of the 175 control patients examined at random showed evidence of pleural effusion by AP examination, which was confirmed by chest radiography (specificity = 100%). Nine of the 175 patients without radiologic evidence of pleural effusion had elevated diaphragms that simulated a fluid level in the examination by AP. Each of the nine patients, however, had no shift in the level with lateral tilt. Subpulmonic effusions were readily displaced and identified by this method of AP. Examination by AP is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of free pleural fluid, even in the presence of obesity, thickened pleura, lung masses, pneumonia, and associated lung disease. The examination correlates closely with standard and lateral decubitus chest radiography. Pleural effusion

  15. Differentiating Malignant from Tubercular Pleural Effusion by Cancer Ratio Plus (Cancer Ratio: Pleural Lymphocyte Count)

    PubMed Central

    Dagaonkar, Rucha S.; Marshall, Dominic; Abisheganaden, John; Light, R. W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. We performed prospective validation of the cancer ratio (serum LDH : pleural ADA ratio), previously reported as predictive of malignant effusion retrospectively, and assessed the effect of combining it with “pleural lymphocyte count” in diagnosing malignant pleural effusion (MPE). Methods. Prospective cohort study of patients hospitalized with lymphocyte predominant exudative pleural effusion in 2015. Results. 118 patients, 84 (71.2%) having MPE and 34 (28.8%) having tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE), were analysed. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, cancer ratio, serum LDH : pleural fluid lymphocyte count ratio, and “cancer ratio plus” (ratio of cancer ratio and pleural fluid lymphocyte count) correlated positively with MPE. The sensitivity and specificity of cancer ratio, ratio of serum LDH : pleural fluid lymphocyte count, and “cancer ratio plus” were 0.95 (95% CI 0.87–0.98) and 0.85 (95% CI 0.68–0.94), 0.63 (95% CI 0.51–0.73) and 0.85 (95% CI 0.68–0.94), and 97.6 (95% CI 0.90–0.99) and 94.1 (95% CI 0.78–0.98) at the cut-off level of >20, >800, and >30, respectively. Conclusion. Without incurring any additional cost, or requiring additional test, effort, or time, cancer ratio maintained and “cancer ratio plus” improved the specificity of cancer ratio in identifying MPE in the prospective cohort. PMID:28070157

  16. Spatial context learning approach to automatic segmentation of pleural effusion in chest computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansoor, Awais; Casas, Rafael; Linguraru, Marius G.

    2016-03-01

    Pleural effusion is an abnormal collection of fluid within the pleural cavity. Excessive accumulation of pleural fluid is an important bio-marker for various illnesses, including congestive heart failure, pneumonia, metastatic cancer, and pulmonary embolism. Quantification of pleural effusion can be indicative of the progression of disease as well as the effectiveness of any treatment being administered. Quantification, however, is challenging due to unpredictable amounts and density of fluid, complex topology of the pleural cavity, and the similarity in texture and intensity of pleural fluid to the surrounding tissues in computed tomography (CT) scans. Herein, we present an automated method for the segmentation of pleural effusion in CT scans based on spatial context information. The method consists of two stages: first, a probabilistic pleural effusion map is created using multi-atlas segmentation. The probabilistic map assigns a priori probabilities to the presence of pleural uid at every location in the CT scan. Second, a statistical pattern classification approach is designed to annotate pleural regions using local descriptors based on a priori probabilities, geometrical, and spatial features. Thirty seven CT scans from a diverse patient population containing confirmed cases of minimal to severe amounts of pleural effusion were used to validate the proposed segmentation method. An average Dice coefficient of 0.82685 and Hausdorff distance of 16.2155 mm was obtained.

  17. Elastohydrodynamic separation of pleural surfaces during breathing.

    PubMed

    Gouldstone, Andrew; Brown, Richard E; Butler, James P; Loring, Stephen H

    2003-08-14

    To examine effects of lung motion on the separation of pleural surfaces during breathing, we modeled the pleural space in two dimensions as a thin layer of fluid separating a stationary elastic solid and a sliding flat solid surface. The undeformed elastic solid contained a series of bumps, to represent tissue surface features, introducing unevenness in fluid layer thickness. We computed the extent of deformation of the solid as a function of sliding velocity, solid elastic modulus, and bump geometry (wavelength and amplitude). For physiological values of the parameters, significant deformation occurs (i.e. bumps are 'flattened') promoting less variation in fluid thickness and decreased fluid shear stress. In addition, deformation is persistent; bumps of sufficient wavelength, once deformed, require a recovery time longer than a typical breath-to-breath interval to return near their undeformed configuration. These results suggest that in the pleural space during normal breathing, separation of pleural surfaces is promoted by the reciprocating sliding of lung and chest wall.

  18. A new approach to pleural effusion in cats: markers for distinguishing transudates from exudates.

    PubMed

    Zoia, Andrea; Slater, Linda A; Heller, Jane; Connolly, David J; Church, David B

    2009-10-01

    Classification of pleural effusion (PE) is central to diagnosis. Traditional veterinary classification has distinguished between transudates, modified transudates and exudates. In human medicine PEs are divided into only two categories: transudates and exudates. The aim of this study was to evaluate, in 20 cats presented with PE, paired samples of serum and pleural fluid for the following parameters: Light's criteria (pleural fluid lactate dehydrogenase concentration (LDHp), pleural fluid/serum LDH ratio, pleural fluid/serum total protein ratio (TPr)), pleural fluid total protein, pleural fluid cholesterol concentration, pleural fluid/serum cholesterol ratio (CHOLr), serum-effusion cholesterol gradient (serum cholesterol minus PE cholesterol concentration (CHOLg)), PE total nucleated cells count (TNCCp) and pleural fluid glucose (GLUp). LDHp and TPr were found most reliable when distinguishing between transudates and exudates, with sensitivity of 100% and 91% and specificity of 100%, respectively. When conflict between the clinical picture and laboratory results exists, calculation of CHOLr, CHOLg and TNCCp measurement may help in the classification of the effusion. Measurement of serum albumin (in the case of a transudate) may provide additional information regarding the pathogenesis of the effusion.

  19. Immune targeting of the pleural space by intercostal approach.

    PubMed

    Weber, Georg F

    2015-02-18

    Infectious diseases of the airways are a major health care problem world wide. New treatment strategies focus on employing the body's immune system to enhance its protective capacities during airway disease. One source for immune-competent cells is the pleural space, however, its immune-physiological function remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to develop an experimental technique in rodents that allows for an in vivo analysis of pleural space immune cells participating in the host defense during airway disease. I developed an easy and reliable technique that I named the "InterCostal Approach of the Pleural Space" (ICAPS) model that allows for in vivo analysis of pleural space immune cells in rodents. By injection of immune cell altering fluids into or flushing of the pleural space the immune response to airway infections can be manipulated. The results reveal that (i) the pleural space cellular environment can be altered partially or completely as well as temporarily or permanently, (ii) depletion of pleural space cells leads to increased airway inflammation during pulmonary infection, (iii) the pleural space contributes immune competent B cells during airway inflammation and (iv) inhibition of B cell function results in reduced bacterial clearance during pneumonia. As the importance for in-depth knowledge of participating immune cells during health and disease evolves, the presented technique opens new possibilities to experimentally elucidate immune cell function, trafficking and contribution of pleural space cells during airway diseases.

  20. Metastatic thyroid carcinoma presenting as malignant pleural effusion: A cytologic review of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Monika; Harigopal, Malini

    2016-12-01

    Malignant pleural effusion can be a manifestation of many malignancies. Involvement of pleural fluid by metatstatic thyroid carcinoma, though reported, is relatively rare. We present 5 cases of metastatic thyroid carcinoma involving the pleural fluid. The diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma in pleural fluid can be particularly challenging as thyroid transcription factor -1 (TTF-1) which is a marker for carcinoma of thyroid origin is also positive in lung adenocarcinomas (which are more frequently associated with pleural effusions) and thyroglobulin (TG) can often be negative in poorly differentiated/analplastic thyroid carcinomas. In our experience, PAX8 is a particularly useful marker in making the distinction. The diagnosis of metastatic thyroid carcinoma in pleural fluid can be challenging and knowledge of the clinical context and supporting immunohistochemical stains is essential for making the right diagnosis. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2016;44:1085-1089. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Use of anabolic-androgenic steroids masking the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculous pleural effusions are not always easy to diagnose but the presence of a lymphocyte-rich exudate associated with an increased adenosine deaminase level and a positive skin test result are highly sensitive diagnostic signs. Case presentation We report a case of pleural tuberculosis in a 31-year-old white male patient from Caracas, Venezuela who was negative for human immunodeficiency virus and presented 2 weeks after injecting the anabolic-androgenic steroid nandrolone decanoate, in whom all the tests for tuberculosis were initially negative; an eosinophilic pleural effusion with a low adenosine deaminase level, a negative tuberculin skin test and negative for acid-fast bacilli staining and culture of the pleural fluid. After excluding other causes of eosinophilic pleural effusion malignant pleural effusion was suspected. The patient did not return until 4 months later. The second thoracentesis obtained a pleural fluid suggestive for tuberculosis, with a predominance of lymphocytes, an elevated adenosine deaminase level (51 U/l) and a positive tuberculin skin test. Culture of pleural fragments confirmed pleural tuberculosis. Conclusion This case suggests that the use of an anabolic-androgenic steroid masks the definitive diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis by changing the key diagnostic parameters of the pleural fluid, a finding not previously reported. Available evidence of the effects of anabolic steroids on the immune system also suggests that patients using anabolic-androgenic steroids might be susceptible to developing tuberculosis in either reactivating a latent infection or facilitating development of the disease after a recent infection. PMID:19175931

  2. Soluble mesothelin-related protein in pleural effusion from patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Asano, Michiko; Wada, Sae; Ono, Katsuichiro; Ozaki, Shinji; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2010-03-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a highly aggressive neoplasm primarily arising from surface serosal cells of the pleura and is strongly associated with asbestos exposure. Patients with MPM often develop pleural fluid as initial presentation. However, cytological diagnosis using pleural fluid is usually difficult and has limited utility. A useful molecular marker for differential diagnosis particularly with lung cancer (LC) is urgently needed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic value of soluble mesothelin-related protein (SMRP) in pleural fluid. Pleural fluids were collected from 23 patients with MPM, 38 with LC, 26 with benign asbestos pleurisy (BAP), 5 with tuberculosis pleurisy (TP) and 4 with chronic heart failure (CHF), and the SMRP concentration was determined. All data were analyzed by using non-parametric two-sided statistical tests. The median concentration of SMRP in MPM, LC, BAP, TP and CHF were 11.5 (range 0.90-82.80), 5.20 (0.05-36.40), 6.65 (1.45-11.25), 3.20 (1.65-6.50) and 2.03 (1.35-2.80) nmol/l, respectively. The SMRP concentration was significantly higher in MPM than in the other diseases (P=0.001). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) values of the MPM diagnosis was 0.75 for the differential diagnosis from the other groups. Based on the cut-off value of 8 nmol/l, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of MPM were 70.0 and 68.4%, respectively. These results indicate that the SMRP concentration in pleural fluid is a useful marker for the diagnosis of MPM.

  3. Soluble mesothelin-related protein in pleural effusion from patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    FUJIMOTO, NOBUKAZU; GEMBA, KENICHI; ASANO, MICHIKO; WADA, SAE; ONO, KATSUICHIRO; OZAKI, SHINJI; KISHIMOTO, TAKUMI

    2010-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a highly aggressive neoplasm primarily arising from surface serosal cells of the pleura and is strongly associated with asbestos exposure. Patients with MPM often develop pleural fluid as initial presentation. However, cytological diagnosis using pleural fluid is usually difficult and has limited utility. A useful molecular marker for differential diagnosis particularly with lung cancer (LC) is urgently needed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the diagnostic value of soluble mesothelin-related protein (SMRP) in pleural fluid. Pleural fluids were collected from 23 patients with MPM, 38 with LC, 26 with benign asbestos pleurisy (BAP), 5 with tuberculosis pleurisy (TP) and 4 with chronic heart failure (CHF), and the SMRP concentration was determined. All data were analyzed by using non-parametric two-sided statistical tests. The median concentration of SMRP in MPM, LC, BAP, TP and CHF were 11.5 (range 0.90–82.80), 5.20 (0.05–36.40), 6.65 (1.45–11.25), 3.20 (1.65–6.50) and 2.03 (1.35–2.80) nmol/l, respectively. The SMRP concentration was significantly higher in MPM than in the other diseases (P=0.001). The area under the ROC curve (AUC) values of the MPM diagnosis was 0.75 for the differential diagnosis from the other groups. Based on the cut-off value of 8 nmol/l, the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of MPM were 70.0 and 68.4%, respectively. These results indicate that the SMRP concentration in pleural fluid is a useful marker for the diagnosis of MPM. PMID:22993544

  4. Serum procalcitonin levels in patients with primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Kenneth K; Grys, Thomas E; Chang, Yu-Hui H; Vikram, Holenarasipur R; Blair, Janis E

    2014-10-01

    The serum procalcitonin assay has emerged as a promising biomarker to distinguish between bacterial and viral respiratory tract infections but has not been used to differentiate coccidioidomycosis from bacterial infection. A correlation between procalcitonin serum levels and coccidioidomycosis has never been reported. To determine any association between serum procalcitonin levels and primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis. We identified and enrolled 20 immunocompetent patients with symptomatic primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis of < 8 weeks' duration and performed a one-time procalcitonin assay, with a cutoff of < 0.25 μg/L indicating a nonbacterial infection. Nineteen of 20 patients (95%) had serum procalcitonin of < 0.25 μg/L. The median procalcitonin level was 0.05 μg/L (range, < 0.05-0.87 μg/L; interquartile range, 0.05-0.05 μg/L). Sixteen of 20 patients (80%) had undetectable procalcitonin of < 0.05 μg/L. The four patients with detectable procalcitonin had a median value of 0.2 μg/L (range, 0.09-0.87 μg/L). In this pilot study, procalcitonin was not elevated in immunocompetent patients with primary pulmonary coccidioidomycosis at a median of 32 days after symptom onset. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  5. Disposition of phosphomycin in patients with pleural effusion.

    PubMed Central

    Lastra, C F; Mariño, E L; Barrueco, M; Gervós, M S; Gil, A D

    1984-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of phosphomycin were studied in seven patients with pleural effusion of varied etiologies. All patients received a single intravenous bolus of 30 mg of antibiotic per kg. Phosphomycin levels in plasma and pleural fluid were determined simultaneously. Antibiotic levels in plasma followed a two-compartment open kinetic model. In the pleural fluid, maximum concentrations of phosphomycin, 42.63 +/- 16.03 micrograms/ml (mean +/- standard deviation), were reached at 3.69 +/- 1.08 h after administration of the antibiotic. The disappearance constant of the antibiotic from the pleural fluid was significantly smaller (0.16 +/- 0.06 h-1) than the elimination constant determined from the levels of drug in plasma (0.73 +/- 0.26 h-1). Phosphomycin persisted in antibacterial concentrations in the pleural fluid for a considerable period of time. The low accessibility of phosphomycin observed in one of the patients in the study, with a maximum concentration value of 2.16 micrograms of phosphomycin per ml of pleural fluid, could be due to the existence of pachypleuritis in that patient; this was later confirmed in clinical and histological studies done after the research described here. PMID:6732214

  6. Pleural effusions in non-transplanted cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Adam R; Nguyen, Kimtuyen; Osman, Umar; Gilbert, Christopher R; Allen, Katie; Al Rais, Ahmad Farid; Yarmus, Lonny; Akulian, Jason A

    2017-07-01

    Pleural effusions are considered rare in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. There is a paucity of available information in the literature concerning the nature and significance of pleural effusions in non-transplanted CF patients. We conducted a multicenter retrospective evaluation of non-transplanted adult CF patients. Given the small sample size, only descriptive statistics were performed. A total of 17 CF patients with pleural effusion were identified, of whom 9 patients underwent thoracentesis. The crude incidence of pleural effusion was 43 per 10,000 person-years in hospitalized CF patients at large CF centers. All sampled effusions were inflammatory in nature. All samples submitted for culture grew at least one organism. Pleural effusions are rare in adult non-transplanted CF patients. These fluid collections appear to be quite inflammatory with a higher rate of empyema than in the general population. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Pleural effusion lipoproteins measured by NMR spectroscopy for diagnosis of exudative pleural effusions: a novel tool for pore-size estimation.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ching-Wan; Law, Chun-Yiu

    2014-09-05

    High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry of biofluids has been increasingly used in laboratory diagnosis of various diseases. In this study, we extended the use of (1)H NMR spectroscopy for laboratory diagnosis of exudative pleural effusions using pleural fluids. We compared this new NMR-based test with Light's criteria, the current gold standard for laboratory diagnosis of exudative pleural effusions. We analyzed 67 samples of pleural effusions from patients with pulmonary malignancy (N = 32), pulmonary tuberculosis (N = 18), and congestive heart failure (N = 17). The metabolomes of pleural effusions were analyzed using (1)H NMR spectroscopy on a Bruker 600 MHz spectrometer. Through a metabolome-wide association approach with filtering of insignificant markers (p value <4 × 10(-6)) and multivariate analysis (principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis), lipoprotein was found to be the best biomarker that distinguished exudates from transudates. Using NMR-based lipoprotein profiling to classify exudative pleural effusions from transudates, the area-under-receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.96 with sensitivity of 98%, specificity of 88%, and accuracy of 98%. In contrast, the current gold standard, Light's criteria, give a specificity of only 65% at the same sensitivity level of 98%. Using the principle of size exclusion, NMR-based lipoprotein profiling of pleural fluids has an unprecedented diagnostic performance superiority over the Light's criteria. The capillary leaks secondary to inflammation result in a larger pleural pore-size, which allows the large-sized lipoproteins to accumulate in exudative pleural effusions. In contrast, the pleural permeability is intact in transudates, which allow only small-sized lipoproteins to pass into the pleural effusions. The average capillary pore-size of the pleura can therefore be determined by using NMR-based lipoprotein profiling of

  8. A vagabond pleural pebble.

    PubMed

    Zamperlin, A; Drigo, R; Famulare, C I; Rampazzo, F

    1987-01-01

    This article concerns a case of an extremely mobile pulmonary opacity. This opacity was attributed to a free calcified mass in the pleural space. It is probably a small benign neoplasm whose peduncle underwent necrosis.

  9. [Parapneumonic pleural effusions and empyema in adults:current practice].

    PubMed

    Porcel, J M; Light, R W

    2009-11-01

    About 20% of hospitalized patients with bacterial pneumonia have an accompanying pleural effusion. Parapneumonic effusions (PPE) are associated with a considerable morbidity and mortality. The main decision in managing a patient with a PPE is whether to insert a chest tube (complicated PPE). Imaging (i.e., chest radiograph, ultrasound and computed tomography) and pleural fluid analysis (i.e., pH, glucose, lactate dehydrogenase, bacterial cults) provide essential information for patient management. Therefore, all PPEs should be aspirated for diagnostic purposes. This may require image-guidance if the effusion is small or heavily loculated. According to the current guidelines, any PPE that fulfills at least one of the following criteria should be drained: size > or = 1/2 of the hemithorax, loculations, pleural fluid pH < 7.20 (or alternatively pleural fluid glucose < 60 mg/dl), positive pleural fluid Gram stain or culture, or purulent appearance. The key components of the treatment of complicated PPE and empyema are the use of appropriate antibiotics, provision of nutritional support, and drainage of the pleural space by one of the following methods: therapeutic thoracentesis, tube thoracostomy, intrapleural fibrinolytics, thoracoscopy with breakdown of adhesions or thoracotomy with decortication. The routine use of intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy remains controversial. (c) 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Usefulness of pleural effusion antinuclear antibodies in the diagnosis of lupus pleuritis.

    PubMed

    Toworakul, C; Kasitanon, N; Sukitawut, W; Wichinun, R; Louthrenoo, W

    2011-10-01

    We performed this study to determine sensitivity and specificity of pleural effusion antinuclear antibodies (ANA) at a titer of ≥1 : 160, and the ratio of pleural effusion to serum ANA of ≥1, to distinguish between pleural fluid from lupus pleuritis and other causes. A prospective study of 54 patients with pleural effusion (12 lupus pleuritis, seven parapneumonic effusion, 26 malignancy-associated pleural effusions, nine transudative effusions) was performed. ANA at a titer of ≥1 : 160 were found in 11 of 12 lupus pleuritis samples, and in four of 42 pleural effusions from non-systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. The pleural effusion ANA at a titer of ≥1 : 160 gave a sensitivity of 91.67% for lupus pleuritis, with a specificity of 83.33% when compared with all other pleural effusions, 90.91% when compared with exudative effusion (parapneumonic effusion and malignancy-associated effusion) and 55.56% when compared with the transudative pleural effusion group. Using the ratio of pleural effusion to serum ANA of ≥1, the sensitivity and the specificity decreased to 75.00% and 78.57%, respectively. This study provides further evidence that the pleural effusion ANA at a titer of ≥1 : 160 is a sensitive and specific diagnostic biomarker for lupus pleuritis in patients with lupus. However, pleural effusion ANA can occasionally be found in other conditions.

  11. Analysis of Lymphocyte Immunological Reactivity in Patients with Pleural Effusions of Different Aetiology.

    PubMed

    Goseva, Zlatica; Kaeva, Biserka Jovkovska; Gjorcev, Angelko; Janeva, Elena Jovanovska; Arsovski, Zoran; Pejkovska, Sava; Tatabitovska, Aleksandra

    2016-03-15

    The proportion of T and B lymphocytes in pleural fluids and blood may point to the presence of local immunological phenomena in pleural disorders. Aim of study was to evaluate the lymphocyte phenotype and the ratio between helper (CD4+) and cytotoxic/suppressor (CD8+) lymphocytes in malignant and non-malignant effusions. We studied 48 patients with pleural effusions. First group had 18 patients with tuberculosis pleural effusions; second group had 20 patients with malignant pleural fluids, third group had 10 patients with transudates and 30 healthy controls. We investigated the distribution of T and B lymphocytes, T cells with helper/inducer CD4 or suppresser/cytotoxic CD8 phenotypes and the CD16 subset. Results showed decreases levels of CD3, CD4, and CD16 T cells in blood of patients versus healthy controls. There were increases in the percentage of the CD3 and CD4 T cells in the pleural fluid compared with values in the blood with statistical significance in tuberculous pleurisy. The values of CD8 were similar in the pleural fluid and in blood. Levels of CD16 were non-significantly higher in pleural fluid in all groups. This study confirms the hypothesis that pleural cavity is compartment with immunological reactivity and results could be used in differential diagnosis together with other examinations.

  12. Suitable device for thoracoscopic talc poudrage in malignant pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Billè, Andrea; Borasio, Piero; Gisabella, Mara; Errico, Luca; Gatherer, Robert; Ardissone, Francesco

    2011-07-01

    Chemical pleurodesis is widely used in symptomatic patients with malignant pleural effusion to relieve symptoms, prevent fluid recurrence, and improve quality of life. Talc has been repeatedly found to be the most effective sclerosant agent, and thoracoscopic talc poudrage has been found to be the most effective pleurodesis technique. A homogeneous talc distribution on the visceral and parietal pleura helps to achieve complete pleural symphysis. We have recently adopted a new suitable sterile device that delivers talc under low and constant pressure, facilitating uniform coating of the whole pleural surface and avoiding inappropriate deposition of talc clumps.

  13. Ultrasound in the Diagnosis & Management of Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Nilam J.; Franco, Ricardo; Velez, Maria I.; Schnobrich, Daniel; Dancel, Ria; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Mayo, Paul H.

    2015-01-01

    We review the literature on the use of point-of-care ultrasound to evaluate and manage pleural effusions. Point-of-care ultrasound is more sensitive than physical exam and chest radiography to detect and characterize pleural fluid, and avoids many negative aspects of computerized tomography (CT). Additionally, point-of-care ultrasound can be used to assess pleural fluid volume and character, revealing possible underlying pathologies and guiding management. Thoracentesis performed with ultrasound guidance has lower risk of pneumothorax and bleeding complications. Future research should focus on the clinical-effectiveness of point-of-care ultrasound in the routine management of pleural effusions and how new technologies may expand its clinical utility. PMID:26218493

  14. Broncho-Pleural Fistula with Hydropneumothorax at CT: Diagnostic Implications in Mycobacterium avium Complex Lung Disease with Pleural Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hyun Jung; Chung, Myung Jin; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Jung Soo; Park, Hye Yun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the patho-mechanism of pleural effusion or hydropneumothorax in Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) lung disease through the computed tomographic (CT) findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively collected data from 5 patients who had pleural fluid samples that were culture-positive for MAC between January 2001 and December 2013. The clinical findings were investigated and the radiological findings on chest CT were reviewed by 2 radiologists. Results The 5 patients were all male with a median age of 77 and all had underlying comorbid conditions. Pleural fluid analysis revealed a wide range of white blood cell counts (410–100690/µL). The causative microorganisms were determined as Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracellulare in 1 and 4 patients, respectively. Radiologically, the peripheral portion of the involved lung demonstrated fibro-bullous changes or cavitary lesions causing lung destruction, reflecting the chronic, insidious nature of MAC lung disease. All patients had broncho-pleural fistulas (BPFs) and pneumothorax was accompanied with pleural effusion. Conclusion In patients with underlying MAC lung disease who present with pleural effusion, the presence of BPFs and pleural air on CT imaging are indicative that spread of MAC infection is the cause of the effusion. PMID:26957917

  15. Developing a 'pleural team' to run a reactive pleural service.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Rahul; Maskell, Nick

    2013-10-01

    Pleural disease is increasingly recognised as an important subspecialty within respiratory medicine, especially as cases of pleural disease continue to rise internationally. Recent advances have seen an expansion in the options available for managing patients with pleural disease, with access to local-anaesthetic thoracoscopy, indwelling pleural catheters and thoracic ultrasound all becoming commonplace. Pleural teams usually consist of a range of practitioners who can optimise the use of specialist services to ensure that patients with all types of pleural disease - who have traditionally needed extended admissions - are managed efficiently, often entirely as outpatients. A pleural service can also provide improved opportunities for enhancing procedural skills, engaging in clinical research, and reducing the costs of care. This article explores the justification for dedicated pleural services and teams, as well as highlighting the various roles of hospital personnel who might be most useful in ensuring their success.

  16. Tuberculous pleural effusions: advances and controversies.

    PubMed

    Vorster, Morné J; Allwood, Brian W; Diacon, Andreas H; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F N

    2015-06-01

    On a global scale, tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most frequent causes of pleural effusions. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease has evolved and what was once thought to be an effusion as a result of a pure delayed hypersensitivity reaction is now believed to be the consequence of direct infection of the pleural space with a cascade of events including an immunological response. Pulmonary involvement is more common than previously believed and induced sputum, which is grossly underutilised, can be diagnostic in approximately 50%. The gold standard for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleuritis remains the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pleural fluid, or pleural biopsy specimens, either by microscopy and/or culture, or the histological demonstration of caseating granulomas in the pleura along with acid fast bacilli (AFB). In high burden settings, however, the diagnosis is frequently inferred in patients who present with a lymphocytic predominant exudate and a high adenosine deaminase (ADA) level, which is a valuable adjunct in the diagnostic evaluation. ADA is generally readily accessible, and together with lymphocyte predominance justifies treatment initiation in patients with a high pre-test probability. Still, false-negative and false-positive results remain an issue. When adding closed pleural biopsy to ADA and lymphocyte count, diagnostic accuracy approaches that of thoracoscopy. The role of other biomarkers is less well described. Early pleural drainage may have a role in selected cases, but more research is required to validate its use and to define the subpopulation that may benefit from such interventions.

  17. Tuberculous pleural effusions: advances and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Allwood, Brian W.; Diacon, Andreas H.; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F. N.

    2015-01-01

    On a global scale, tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most frequent causes of pleural effusions. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease has evolved and what was once thought to be an effusion as a result of a pure delayed hypersensitivity reaction is now believed to be the consequence of direct infection of the pleural space with a cascade of events including an immunological response. Pulmonary involvement is more common than previously believed and induced sputum, which is grossly underutilised, can be diagnostic in approximately 50%. The gold standard for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleuritis remains the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in pleural fluid, or pleural biopsy specimens, either by microscopy and/or culture, or the histological demonstration of caseating granulomas in the pleura along with acid fast bacilli (AFB). In high burden settings, however, the diagnosis is frequently inferred in patients who present with a lymphocytic predominant exudate and a high adenosine deaminase (ADA) level, which is a valuable adjunct in the diagnostic evaluation. ADA is generally readily accessible, and together with lymphocyte predominance justifies treatment initiation in patients with a high pre-test probability. Still, false-negative and false-positive results remain an issue. When adding closed pleural biopsy to ADA and lymphocyte count, diagnostic accuracy approaches that of thoracoscopy. The role of other biomarkers is less well described. Early pleural drainage may have a role in selected cases, but more research is required to validate its use and to define the subpopulation that may benefit from such interventions. PMID:26150911

  18. Translational advances in pleural malignancies.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2011-01-01

    Pleural malignancies, including primary malignant pleural mesothelioma and secondary pleural metastasis of various tumours resulting in malignant pleural effusion, are frequent and lethal diseases that deserve devoted translational research efforts for improvements to be introduced to the clinic. This paper highlights select clinical advances that have been accomplished recently and that are based on preclinical research on pleural malignancies. Examples are the establishment of folate antimetabolites in mesothelioma treatment, the use of PET in mesothelioma management and the discovery of mesothelin as a marker of mesothelioma. In addition to established translational advances, this text focuses on recent research findings that are anticipated to impact clinical pleural oncology in the near future. Such progress has been substantial, including the development of a genetic mouse model of mesothelioma and of transplantable models of pleural malignancies in immunocompetent hosts, the deployment of stereological and imaging methods for integral assessment of pleural tumour burden, as well as the discovery of the therapeutic potential of aminobiphosphonates, histone deacetylase inhibitors and ribonucleases against malignant pleural disease. Finally, key obstacles to overcome towards a more rapid advancement of translational research in pleural malignancies are outlined. These include the dissection of cell-autonomous and paracrine pathways of pleural tumour progression, the study of mesothelioma and malignant pleural effusion separately from other tumours at both the clinical and preclinical levels, and the expansion of tissue banks and consortia of clinical research of pleural malignancies. © 2010 The Author. Respirology © 2010 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. The management of benign non-infective pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Bintcliffe, Oliver J; Lee, Gary Y C; Rahman, Najib M; Maskell, Nick A

    2016-09-01

    The evidence base concerning the management of benign pleural effusions has lagged behind that of malignant pleural effusions in which recent randomised trials are now informing current clinical practice and international guidelines.The causes of benign pleural effusions are broad, heterogenous and patients may benefit from individualised management targeted at both treating the underlying disease process and direct management of the fluid. Pleural effusions are very common in a number of non-malignant pathologies, such as decompensated heart failure, and following coronary artery bypass grafting. Pleural fluid analysis forms an important basis of the diagnostic evaluation, and more specific assays and imaging modalities are helpful in specific subpopulations.Options for management beyond treatment of the underlying disorder, whenever possible, include therapeutically aspirating the fluid, talc pleurodesis and insertion of an indwelling pleural catheter. Randomised trials will inform clinicians in the future as to the risks and benefits of these options providing a guide as to how best to manage patient symptoms in this challenging clinical setting. Copyright ©ERS 2016.

  20. Switching off malignant pleural effusion formation-fantasy or future?

    PubMed

    Spella, Magda; Giannou, Anastasios D; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is common and difficult to treat. In the vast majority of patients the presence of MPE heralds incurable disease, associated with poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Current therapeutic approaches are inefficient and merely offer palliation of associated symptoms. Recent scientific progress has shed light in the biologic processes governing the mechanisms behind the pathobiology of MPE. Pleural based tumors interfere with pleural fluid drainage, as well as the host vasculature and immune system, resulting in decreased fluid absorption and increased pleural fluid production via enhanced plasma extravasation into the pleural space. In order to achieve this feat, pleural based tumors must elicit critical vasoactive events in the pleura, thus forming a favorable microenvironment for tumor dissemination and MPE development. Such properties involve specific transcriptional signaling cascades in addition to secretion of important mediators which attract and activate host cell populations which, in turn, impact tumor cell functions. The dissection of the biologic steps leading to MPE formation provides novel therapeutic targets and recent research findings provide encouraging results towards future therapeutic innovations in MPE management.

  1. Switching off malignant pleural effusion formation—fantasy or future?

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is common and difficult to treat. In the vast majority of patients the presence of MPE heralds incurable disease, associated with poor quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Current therapeutic approaches are inefficient and merely offer palliation of associated symptoms. Recent scientific progress has shed light in the biologic processes governing the mechanisms behind the pathobiology of MPE. Pleural based tumors interfere with pleural fluid drainage, as well as the host vasculature and immune system, resulting in decreased fluid absorption and increased pleural fluid production via enhanced plasma extravasation into the pleural space. In order to achieve this feat, pleural based tumors must elicit critical vasoactive events in the pleura, thus forming a favorable microenvironment for tumor dissemination and MPE development. Such properties involve specific transcriptional signaling cascades in addition to secretion of important mediators which attract and activate host cell populations which, in turn, impact tumor cell functions. The dissection of the biologic steps leading to MPE formation provides novel therapeutic targets and recent research findings provide encouraging results towards future therapeutic innovations in MPE management. PMID:26150914

  2. [Sarcoid pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Rábade, Carlos; Valdés, Luis

    2014-12-09

    Pleural effusion (PE) is a very uncommon manifestation of sarcoidosis. It is equally observed in men and women, can appear at any age and in all radiologic stages, though it is more common in stages i and ii. Effusions have usually a mild or medium size and mainly involve the right side. Various mechanisms can be implicated. PE will be a serous exudate if there is an increase in the capillary permeability due to direct involvement of the pleural membrane, a chylothorax if mediastinum lymph nodes compress the thoracic duct and/or the lymphatic drainage from the pleural cavity, an hemothorax if granuloma compress or invade pleural small vessels or capillaries, and even a transudate if there is compression of the inferior vena cava, atelectasis due to complete bronchial obstruction or when the resolution of the PE is incomplete with chronic thickening of visceral pleura (trapped lung). It manifests biochemically as a pauci-cellular exudate with a predominance of lymphocytes, though there can be a preponderance of eosinophils or neutrophils. Protein concentrations are usually proportionately higher than lactate dehidrogenase, adenosine deaminase is normally low and it is possible to find increased levels of CA-125 in women. The tuberculin test is negative and pleural or lung biopsies yield the diagnosis by confirming the presence of non-caseating granulomata. These PE can have a favorable self-limited outcome, even though in most cases treatment with corticosteroids is needed, while surgery is required in a few cases.

  3. Characteristics of pleural effusions in systemic lupus erythematosus: differential diagnosis of lupus pleuritis.

    PubMed

    Choi, B Y; Yoon, M J; Shin, K; Lee, Y J; Song, Y W

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the clinical characteristics of pleural effusion in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A prospective analysis of 17 SLE patients with pleural effusion (seven lupus pleuritis, eight transudative effusions and two parapneumonic effusions) was performed. Thirty non-SLE patients with pleural effusion were recruited as controls. A pleural fluid ANA titer ≥1:160 was found in 8/17 (47.1%) SLE patients and none of the 30 non-SLE patients (p = 0.0001). Pleural fluid to serum C3 ratios were significantly lower in SLE than in non-SLE (median (minimum-maximum) 0.29 (0.03-0.43) versus 0.52 (0.26-0.73), p = 0.0002). Among SLE patients, pleural fluid ANA titers ≥1:160 were more frequently found in patients with lupus pleuritis than in those with pleural effusion from causes other than lupus itself (85.7% versus 20.0%, p = 0.0152). Serum CRP levels were significantly increased in patients with lupus pleuritis compared with SLE patients with transudative pleural effusion (2.30 (0.30-5.66) versus 0.7 (0.12-1.47) mg/dl, p = 0.0062). In conclusion, pleural fluid ANA titer and serum CRP levels are significantly increased in lupus pleuritis.

  4. A potential role for VEGF in the diagnostic approach of pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Psatha, Aggeliki; Makris, Demosthenes; Kerenidi, Theodora; Daniil, Zoe; Kiropoulos, Theodoros; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos

    2016-07-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may play a role in pleural fluid formation, as it represents a potent inducer of capillary permeability. We aimed to investigate the diagnostic utility of VEGF levels in pleural fluid and serum in patients with pleural effusions with initially negative diagnostic work up. Seventy-one patients with exudative lymphocytic pleural effusions undiagnosed after initial diagnostic work up were enrolled in this prospective study and their clinical course was followed up to 24 months. VEGF levels were measured in serum and pleural fluid by using immunoenzymometric assay. During the follow up period, in 43 patients the pleural effusion was eventually attributed to malignancy while in the rest 28 patients it was due to non-malignant causes (benign and unknown origin). Patients with malignancy had significantly higher VEGF levels in pleural fluid compared to patients with non-malignant effusions (1,506 vs. 588 pg/dL, P=0.0001), while no statistically significant difference was found in the VEGF serum levels between the two groups. Pleural VEGF levels may be helpful in identifying malignant pleural effusion (MPE) in patients with negative diagnostic work up at the initial assessment and help in selecting patients for more invasive procedures.

  5. The impact of between analytical platform variability on the classification of pleural effusions into exudate or transudate using Light's criteria.

    PubMed

    Cornes, Michael P; Chadburn, Andrew J; Thomas, Claire; Darby, Catherine; Webster, Rachel; Ford, Clare; Gama, Rousseau

    2017-07-01

    Light's criteria are ratios of pleural fluid to serum total protein (TP), pleural fluid to serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pleural fluid LDH to the upper reference limit for serum LDH. They are used to classify pleural effusions into an exudate or transudate when pleural fluid protein is 25-35 g/L. We evaluated the impact of between analytical platforms on the classification of pleural effusions using Light's criteria. Light's criteria were used to classify pleural effusions with fluid TP between 25 and 35 g/L into exudate and transudate. LDH and TP were analysed using an Abbott ARCHITECT c16000 analyser using a lactate to pyruvate method for LDH and two Roche Cobas 800 c702 analysers, one using a lactate to pyruvate method (laboratory B) and one a lactate to pyruvate method (laboratory C). Eighty-three paired serum and pleural fluid samples were analysed. Of these, 44 samples had a pleural fluid TP between 25 and 35 g/L and were classified according to Light's criteria. Classification of pleural fluid into transudate or exudate using different analytical platforms was 82% concordant. The LDH ratio and TP ratio were similar in laboratory B and laboratory C, but these were respectively lower (p<0.001) and higher (p<0.001) than those at laboratory A. Although Light's criteria are ratios, which should minimise interassay variability, we report 18% discordance between different analytical platforms. The discordance was largely due to the performance of LDH and to a lesser extent protein assays in pleural fluid. Laboratories should be aware that assays may perform differently in serum and pleural fluid. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor, a “Floating Island” Pattern in Pleural Fluid Cytology: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; McMeekin, Emily Marie; Sturgis, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare aggressive sarcoma with characteristic clinical and pathologic features. It typically involves pelvic and abdominal organs of young male patients, and patients usually present at advanced stage with poor prognosis. A few reports are available describing the cytopathologic features of DSRCT in serous effusions, with the majority of published cases depicting undifferentiated small blue cells that need to be distinguished from other small blue cell tumors. We report an interesting case of DSRCT involving a pleural effusion with a “floating island” pattern that has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and adrenal cortical carcinoma. In our case, the epithelioid tumor cells form cohesive aggregates surrounded by a single layer of spindle cells, mimicking the “endothelial wrapping” in other tumors with “floating island” patterns. We demonstrate, by ancillary testing, that these peripheral spindle cells are tapered/flattened DSRCT cells, in contrast to endothelial wrapping cells, as seen in other tumors with this unique cytomorphology. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DSRCT showing a “floating island” pattern that needs to be differentiated from metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and adrenal cortical carcinoma in effusion cytology. PMID:26413364

  7. Aetiology of pleural plaques

    PubMed Central

    Rous, V.; Studeny, J.

    1970-01-01

    Pleural plaques were found in 644 (6·6%) of 9,760 photofluorograms taken in 1965 in a region of Pelhřimov district; the incidence was highest in the age group 66-70 years. The advanced age of those affected may be explained by the greater frequency of the causative agent in the past. The disorder was known in Pelhřimov district as early as 1930; it was then thought to be posttuberculous. The past history of the cases was uninformative; as a rule, the only common previous disease was pleurisy with effusion, occurring in 9·7%. The general condition of those affected was excellent; only 8% were aware of the fact that pleural lesions were present. The disorder was found mainly in farmers, familial incidence was common, and if two generations of one family suffered from the condition, the older generation was affected in 100%. Pleural plaques consist morphologically of limited areas of hyalinized collagenous connective tissue with calcium salt deposits. Tubercle bacilli could not be cultivated from the lesions. Mineralological analysis showed no evidence of silicates in the pleural plaques and a normal content in the lungs. The aetiological factor responsible for the development of pleural plaques in Pelhřimov district is not known, but asbestos cannot be implicated. The unknown noxious agent is carried to the pleura by the lymph and blood stream. Pleural plaques are an endemic disorder. The traditional view that lesions are post-tuberculous appears, in the region submitted to this study, to be a possible explanation. Images PMID:5465601

  8. [Pleural involvement in Rustitskiĭ-Kahler disease (a clinical case report)].

    PubMed

    Dobre, V

    1994-01-01

    The author presents a case with pleural effusion expressing a secondary pleural involvement in Rüstitzki-Kahler disease during a solitary plasmocytoma of the 8th rib. Biologically the monoclonal protein was an IgM, a rather seldom met evolution of myeloma. Blood electrophoresis and immunoelectrophoresis modifications were reflected in the pleural fluid too. The case stresses the difficulties met in the etiological diagnosis of pleurisies.

  9. The pleural curtain of the camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Buzzell, Gerald R; Kinne, Joerg; Tariq, Saeed; Wernery, Ulrich

    2010-10-01

    The visceral pleura of the camel (Camelus dromedarius) possesses a fibrous curtain of pleural threads or extensions along its basal margins, which extends into the pleural cavity of the costophrenic recesses. These threads are lined by mesothelium and have a core or stroma, which is largely collagenous. Small threads are avascular and nearly acellular. In larger proximal threads, blood vessels in the stroma are often arranged in a branching network, with irregular endothelia surrounded by several incomplete basal laminae. Lymphocytes and other inflammatory cell types aggregate in the stroma near blood vessels. The threads are lined by typical mesothelium except in patches close to the main pleural surface. These patches consist of layers of loosely applied cells with numerous cellular processes and features suggestive of phagocytosis. The position of the pleural curtain in the costophrenic recess and the presence of possibly phagocytotic cells suggest that the pleural curtain stirs, samples, and cleans the pleural fluid. The pleural curtain appears to be a feature of camelids and has also been seen in giraffes. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Clinical and Laboratory Differences between Lymphocyte- and Neutrophil-Predominant Pleural Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kang; Kim, Sukyeon; Oh, Ki-Jong; Jeong, Suk Hyeon; Jung, Woo Jin; Shin, Beomsu; Jhun, Byung Woo; Lee, Hyun; Park, Hye Yun; Koh, Won-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Pleural tuberculosis (TB), a form of extrapulmonary TB, can be difficult to diagnose. High numbers of lymphocytes in pleural fluid have been considered part of the diagnostic criteria for pleural TB; however, in many cases, neutrophils rather than lymphocytes are the predominant cell type in pleural effusions, making diagnosis more complicated. Additionally, there is limited information on the clinical and laboratory characteristics of neutrophil-predominant pleural effusions caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). To investigate clinical and laboratory differences between lymphocyte- and neutrophil-predominant pleural TB, we retrospectively analyzed 200 patients with the two types of pleural TB. Of these patients, 9.5% had neutrophil-predominant pleural TB. Patients with lymphocyte-predominant and neutrophil-predominant pleural TB showed similar clinical signs and symptoms. However, neutrophil-predominant pleural TB was associated with significantly higher inflammatory serum markers, such as white blood cell count (P = 0.001) and C-reactive protein (P = 0.001). Moreover, MTB was more frequently detected in the pleural fluid from patients in the neutrophil-predominant group than the lymphocyte-predominant group, with the former group exhibiting significantly higher rates of positive results for acid-fast bacilli in sputum (36.8 versus 9.4%, P = 0.003), diagnostic yield of MTB culture (78.9% versus 22.7%, P < 0.001) and MTB detected by polymerase chain reaction (31.6% versus 5.0%, P = 0.001). Four of seven patients with repeated pleural fluid analyses revealed persistent neutrophil-predominant features, which does not support the traditional viewpoint that neutrophil-predominant pleural TB is a temporary form that rapidly develops into lymphocyte-predominant pleural TB. In conclusion, neutrophil-predominant pleural TB showed a more intense inflammatory response and a higher positive rate in microbiological testing compared to lymphocyte-predominant pleural TB

  11. [Reappraisal of the standard method (Light's criteria) for identifying pleural exudates].

    PubMed

    Porcel, José M; Peña, José M; Vicente de Vera, Carmina; Esquerda, Aureli

    2006-02-18

    Light's criteria remain the best method for separating pleural exudates from transudates. We assessed their operating characteristics, as well as those resulting from omitting the pleural fluid to serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) ratio from the original criteria (abbreviated Light criteria), in a large series of patients. We also searched for the best combination of pleural fluid parameters, including protein, LDH and cholesterol that identify exudates. We conducted a retrospective study of 1,490 consecutive patients with pleural effusion who underwent a diagnostic thoracentesis. There were 1,192 exudates and 298 transudates. Sensitivity, specificity, area under ROC curve, and odds ratio for both individual and combined pleural fluid parameters were calculated. Light's criteria yielded 97.5% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Both abbreviated Light criteria (sensitivity: 95.4%; specificity: 83.3%) and the combined use in an "or" rule of pleural fluid protein and LDH (sensitivity: 95.4%; specificity: 80,2%) had similar discriminative properties than standard criteria. Diagnostic separation of pleural effusions into exudates or transudates can be done effectively thorough the abbreviated Light criteria when the serum LDH value is not available. On the other hand, if venipuncture wants to be avoided (an unusual circumstance) the combination of pleural fluid protein and LDH represents an alternative to Light's criteria.

  12. Procalcitonin as a Diagnostic and Prognostic Factor for Tuberculosis Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinseung; Kim, Si Eun; Park, Bong Soo; Shin, Kyong Jin; Ha, Sam Yeol; Park, JinSe; Kim, Sung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose We investigated the potential role of serum procalcitonin in differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial and viral meningitis, and in predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. Methods This was a retrospective study of 26 patients with tuberculosis meningitis. In addition, 70 patients with bacterial meningitis and 49 patients with viral meningitis were included as the disease control groups for comparison. The serum procalcitonin level was measured in all patients at admission. Differences in demographic and laboratory data, including the procalcitonin level, were analyzed among the three groups. In addition, we analyzed the predictive factors for a prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at discharge, and the correlation between the level of procalcitonin and the GCS score at discharge. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a low level of procalcitonin (≤1.27 ng/mL) independently distinguished tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis. The sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis were 96.2% and 62.9%, respectively. However, the level of procalcitonin in patients with tuberculosis meningitis did not differ significantly from that in patients with viral meningitis. In patients with tuberculosis meningitis, a high level of procalcitonin (>0.4 ng/mL) was a predictor of a poor prognosis, and the level of procalcitonin was negatively correlated with the GCS score at discharge (r=-0.437, p=0.026). Conclusions We found that serum procalcitonin is a useful marker for differentiating tuberculosis meningitis from bacterial meningitis and is also valuable for predicting the prognosis of tuberculosis meningitis. PMID:27165424

  13. Procalcitonin to Detect Suspected Bacterial Infections in the PICU.

    PubMed

    Mandell, Iris M; Aghamohammadi, Sara; Deakers, Timothy; Khemani, Robinder G

    2016-01-01

    Nonspecific clinical symptoms frequently lead to suspicion of bacterial infection in critically ill children. Clinicians send bacterial cultures for suspected infection and begin an empiric course of antibiotics while microbiology results are pending. We investigated whether the biomarker procalcitonin could be useful to predict confirmed bacterial infection in critically ill children in the PICU, before culture results are available. Prospective, blinded single-center study. Tertiary PICU and cardiothoracic ICU. There were one hundred forty-four patients with suspected bacterial infections that had bacterial cultures sent by clinicians. Procalcitonin samples were obtained at three time intervals: as close to the time of the initial culture as possible (up to 12 hr after) and 24 and 72 hours after the initial culture. Patients were stratified into clinical outcome groups based on microbiology results and clinical symptoms using Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria. These assignments were blinded to procalcitonin levels. Primary outcome was the presence of culture-proven bacterial infection. There was a statistically significant difference in initial and subsequent median procalcitonin values between patients with confirmed bacterial infections and patients with low suspicion of bacterial infection (p < 0.02). However, there was extremely high variability in procalcitonin values among all groups. Procalcitonin had only a fair ability to predict bacterial infection, with area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic plots ranging between 0.63 and 0.71. When using serial procalcitonin values to predict bacterial infection, positive likelihood ratios were near 1 and negative likelihood ratios were between 0.3 and 0.4. Procalcitonin levels were higher in children with documented confirmed bacterial infection as compared with those with low suspicion of infection. However, neither single nor serial procalcitonin measurements were able to

  14. Cautious application of pleural N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in diagnosis of congestive heart failure pleural effusions among critically ill patients.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Jiann-Horng; Huang, Chun-Ta; Liu, Chia-Hsiung; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Chien, Ying-Chun; Yang, Ching-Yao; Huang, Chun-Kai; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Lee, Pei-Lin; Ku, Shih-Chi; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Several studies on diagnostic accuracy of pleural N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) for effusions from congestive heart failure (CHF) conclude that pleural NT-pro-BNP is a useful biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing CHF effusions. However, its applicability in critical care settings remains uncertain and requires further investigations. NT-proBNP was measured in pleural fluid samples of a prospective cohort of intensive care unit patients with pleural effusions. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine diagnostic accuracy of pleural NT-proBNP for prediction of CHF effusions. One hundred forty-seven critically ill patients were evaluated, 38 (26%) with CHF effusions and 109 (74%) with non-CHF effusions of various causes. Pleural NT-proBNP levels were significantly elevated in patients with CHF effusions. Pleural NT-pro-BNP demonstrated the area under the curve of 0.87 for diagnosing effusions due to CHF. With a cutoff of 2200 pg/mL, pleural NT-proBNP displayed high sensitivity (89%) but moderate specificity (73%). Notably, 29 (27%) of 109 patients with non-CHF effusions had pleural NT-proBNP levels >2200 pg/mL and these patients were more likely to experience septic shock (18/29 vs. 10/80, P<0.001) or acute kidney injury (19/29 vs. 9/80, P<0.001). Among critically ill patients, pleural NT-proBNP measurements remain a useful diagnostic aid in evaluation of pleural effusions. However, patients with non-CHF effusions may exhibit high pleural NT-proBNP concentrations if they suffer from septic shock or acute kidney injury. Accordingly, it is suggested that clinical context should be taken into account when interpreting pleural NT-proBNP values in critical care settings.

  15. Cautious Application of Pleural N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Diagnosis of Congestive Heart Failure Pleural Effusions among Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Jiann-Horng; Huang, Chun-Ta; Liu, Chia-Hsiung; Ruan, Sheng-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ju; Chien, Ying-Chun; Yang, Ching-Yao; Huang, Chun-Kai; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Kuo, Lu-Cheng; Lee, Pei-Lin; Ku, Shih-Chi; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective Several studies on diagnostic accuracy of pleural N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) for effusions from congestive heart failure (CHF) conclude that pleural NT-pro-BNP is a useful biomarker with high diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing CHF effusions. However, its applicability in critical care settings remains uncertain and requires further investigations. Methods NT-proBNP was measured in pleural fluid samples of a prospective cohort of intensive care unit patients with pleural effusions. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine diagnostic accuracy of pleural NT-proBNP for prediction of CHF effusions. Results One hundred forty-seven critically ill patients were evaluated, 38 (26%) with CHF effusions and 109 (74%) with non-CHF effusions of various causes. Pleural NT-proBNP levels were significantly elevated in patients with CHF effusions. Pleural NT-pro-BNP demonstrated the area under the curve of 0.87 for diagnosing effusions due to CHF. With a cutoff of 2200 pg/mL, pleural NT-proBNP displayed high sensitivity (89%) but moderate specificity (73%). Notably, 29 (27%) of 109 patients with non-CHF effusions had pleural NT-proBNP levels >2200 pg/mL and these patients were more likely to experience septic shock (18/29 vs. 10/80, P<0.001) or acute kidney injury (19/29 vs. 9/80, P<0.001). Conclusions Among critically ill patients, pleural NT-proBNP measurements remain a useful diagnostic aid in evaluation of pleural effusions. However, patients with non-CHF effusions may exhibit high pleural NT-proBNP concentrations if they suffer from septic shock or acute kidney injury. Accordingly, it is suggested that clinical context should be taken into account when interpreting pleural NT-proBNP values in critical care settings. PMID:25502236

  16. Use of the PleuralPort device for management of pleural effusion in six dogs and four cats.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Aimee C; Hardie, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    To describe the placement technique, complications, and outcomes associated with use of the PleuralPort device for management of pleural effusion in dogs and cats. Case Series. Six dogs and 4 cats. Medical records of all animals with pleural effusion managed with the PleuralPort device were reviewed. Data regarding signalment, fluid analysis, placement technique, duration of function, duration of implantation, complications, and outcome were collected. Owners and referring veterinarians were contacted for follow-up information. Nine animals had chylous effusion and 1 dog had pleural carcinomatosis. Eleven ports were placed with 1 cat receiving bilateral ports. Four animals developed complications. One cat developed pneumothorax immediately after implantation and was euthanatized. In 2 dogs and 1 cat, the ports obstructed. The 6 remaining animals had functioning ports at time of death or resolution of effusion and no longer required use of the port. No significant port migration, irritation, or infection of the device was reported. Excluding the cat with pneumothorax, median duration of port function was 20 days (range 1-391), and median duration of port implantation was 391 days (range 6-723). The PleuralPort device is a feasible option for the management of pleural effusion in dogs and cats. © Copyright 2011 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  17. Status of Exudative Pleural Effusion in Adults of South Khorasan Province, Northeast Iran: Pleural Tuberculosis Tending toward Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi-Moghaddam, Sayyed Gholam Reza; Sharifzadeh, Gholam Reza; Rezvani, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    The causes and situation of exudative pleural effusion vary from one area to another. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 327 patients with exudative pleural effusion in South Khorasan province (Iran). The patients were older than 12 years and comprised 172 (52.6%) males and 155 (47.4%) females. The study commenced in 2007 with seven years duration. The Light’s criteria were used to define exudative effusion. Procedures including pleural fluid analysis, microbiological study, pleural biopsy, and systemic investigations were conducted to determine the special cause of pleural effusion. The mean age of the patients was 63.4±18.4 years. Malignancies, tuberculosis, and parapneumonia pleural exudation were diagnosed in 125 (38.2%), 48 (14.7%), and 45 (13.8%) cases, respectively. Among malignant effusions, metastasis from lung cancer made 48 (38.4%) of the cases. The origin of metastasis was not determined in 44 (35.2%) patients. The mean age of patients was not significantly different between malignant (66.9±14.3 years) and tuberculosis (63.9±19.7 years) cases (P=0.16). The older age of tuberculosis patients could be a new discussion point on the overall impression created on the subject of tuberculosis pleural exudation (TB-PLE) occurring in young people. PMID:27365554

  18. [Procalcitonin as a marker of intra-abdominal infection].

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Comesaña, Elías; Ballinas-Miranda, Julio Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Procalcitonin is a quite specific biomarker of infection and in recent years has shown its superiority to others markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, for the diagnosis and monitoring of a variety of infections. For this reason, several researchers have studied the potential role of procalcitonin for diagnosis and management of these infections. Intra-abdominal infections are a heterogeneous group of infections that, sometimes, pose difficult challenges to physicians. The published studies have produced mixed results, leading to controversy on the utility of this marker in intra-abdominal infections. This review summarizes these data and discuss the utility of procalcitonin in several intra abdominal infections, including postoperative infections.

  19. Laparoscopic diagnosis of pleural mesothelioma presenting with pseudoachalasia

    PubMed Central

    Saino, Greta; Bona, Davide; Nencioni, Marco; Rubino, Barbara; Bonavina, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    Pseudoachalasia due to pleural mesothelioma is an extremely rare condition. A 70-year-old woman presented with progressive dysphagia for solid and liquids and a mild weight loss. A barium swallow study revealed an esophageal dilatation and a smoothly narrowed esophagogastric junction. An esophageal manometry showed absence of peristalsis. Endoscopy demonstrated an extrinsic stenosis of the distal esophagus with negative biopsies. A marked thickening of the distal esophagus and a right-sided pleural effusion were evident at computed tomography (CT) scan, but cytological examination of the thoracic fluid was negative. Endoscopic ultrasound showed the disappearance of the distal esophageal wall stratification and thickening of the esophageal wall. The patient underwent an explorative laparoscopy. Biopsies of the esophageal muscle were consistent with the diagnosis of epithelioid type pleural mesothelioma. An esophageal stent was placed for palliation of dysphagia. The patient died four months after the diagnosis. This is the first reported case of pleural mesothelioma diagnosed through laparoscopy. PMID:19630117

  20. Hyaluronic acid levels are increased in complicated parapneumonic pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Zaga, T; Makris, D; Tsilioni, I; Kiropoulos, T; Oikonomidi, S; Damianos, A; Gourgoulianis, K I

    2011-09-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a component of extracellular matrix and may play a role in the pleural inflammation which is implicated in parapneumonic effusions.The aim of the current study was to investigate HA levels in serum and pleura in patients with parapneumonic effusions. We prospectively studied pleural and serum levels of HA in 58 patients with pleural effusions due to infection (complicated and uncomplicated parapneumonic effusions), malignant effusions and transudative effusions due to congestive heart failure. In addition to HA, TNF-alpha and IL-beta levels were determined in pleural fluid and serum by ELISA. The median +/- SD HA levels (pg/ml) in pleural fluid of patients with complicated effusions (39.058 +/- 11.208) were significantly increased (p < 0.005), compared to those with uncomplicated parapneumonic effusions (11.230 +/- 1.969), malignant effusions (10.837 +/- 4.803) or congestive heart failure (5.392 +/- 3.133). There was no correlation between pleural fluid and serum HA values. Pleural fluid TNF-alpha levels (146 +/- 127 pg/mL) and IL-1beta levels (133.4 +/- 156 pg/mL) were significantly higher in patients with complicated parapneumonic effusions compared to patients with other types of effusion (p < 0.05). No significant association between HA and TNF-alpha or IL-1beta was found. CONCLUSIONS. HA may play a significant role in the inflammatory process which characterises exudative infectious pleuritis. Further investigation might reveal whether HA is a useful marker in the management of parapneumonic effusions.

  1. Pleural Cholesterol to the Diagnosis of Exudative Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Rufino, Rogério; Marques, Bruna L.; Azambuja, Renato de Lima; Mafort, Thiago; Pugliese, José G.; da Costa, Cláudia Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnostic approaches to patients with a pleural effusion must be precise because many procedures depend on the nature of the fluid in the effusion. To date, no biochemical test is considered an appropriate alternative to Light’s criteria. This study compared the absolute pleural cholesterol (PC) level and the pleural cholesterol/serum cholesterol (PC/SC) ratio with Light’s criteria to determine exudative pleural effusions. Materials and Methodology: This study was a case series of 100 consecutive patients with pleural effusions. The clinical parameters that were used to diagnosis an exudative effusion included the cholesterol level, a pleural cholesterol level ≥ 50 mg/dL, a pleural/serum ratio ≥ 0.4, and Light’s criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of each test for the diagnosis of an exudative effusion were assessed. Results: A total of 79 patients were definitively diagnosed with an exudative effusion and were included in the trial and analyzed. The mean PC level in the exudates was 90.39 mg/dL. The PC levels demonstrated a sensitivity of 97.22%, a specificity of 85.71%, a positive predictive value of 98.59% and a negative predictive value of 75%. The PC/SC ratio demonstrated a sensitivity of 81.48%, a specificity of 57.14%, a positive predictive value of 93.61% and a negative predictive value of 28.57%. Conclusion: The pleural cholesterol dosage level and the pleural/serum cholesterol ratio can be utilized as unique biomarkers to identify an exudative effusion and replace Light’s criteria. PMID:24799966

  2. Can malignant and inflammatory pleural effusions in dogs be distinguished using computed tomography?

    PubMed

    Watton, Thom C; Lara-Garcia, Ana; Lamb, Christopher R

    2017-07-16

    Computed tomography (CT) is the primary imaging modality used to investigate human patients with suspected malignant or inflammatory pleural effusion, but there is a lack of information about the clinical use of this test in dogs. To identify CT signs that could be used to distinguish pleural malignant neoplasia from pleuritis, a retrospective case-control study was done based on dogs that had pleural effusion, pre- and postcontrast thoracic CT images, and cytological or histopathological diagnosis of malignant or inflammatory pleural effusion. There were 20 dogs with malignant pleural effusion (13 mesothelioma, 6 carcinoma; 1 lymphoma), and 32 dogs with pleuritis (18 pyothorax; 14 chylothorax). Compared to dogs with pleuritis, dogs with malignant pleural effusions were significantly older (median 8.5 years vs. 4.9 years, P = 0.001), more frequently had CT signs of pleural thickening (65% vs.34%, P = 0.05), tended to have thickening of the parietal pleura only (45% vs. 3%, P = 0.002) and had more marked pleural thickening (median 3 mm vs. 0 mm, P = 0.03). Computed tomography signs of thoracic wall invasion were observed only in dogs with malignant pleural effusions (P = 0.05). There were no significant differences in pleural fluid volume, distribution or attenuation, degree of pleural contrast accumulation, amount of pannus, or prevalence of mediastinal adenopathy. Although there was considerable overlap in findings in dogs with malignant pleural effusion and pleuritis, marked thickening affecting the parietal pleural alone and signs of thoracic wall invasion on CT support diagnosis of pleural malignant neoplasia, and may help prioritize further diagnostic testing. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  3. Salivary procalcitonin and periodontitis in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Bassim, C W; Redman, R S; DeNucci, D J; Becker, K L; Nylen, E S

    2008-07-01

    Periodontitis and type 2 diabetes are co-morbid conditions, both characterized by infectious susceptibility. We investigated procalcitonin (ProCT) levels in the serum and saliva of persons with periodontitis and type 2 diabetes (n = 20), to determine if these levels are altered by periodontitis activity or by hyperglycemia. Persons with severe periodontitis showed higher levels of salivary-ProCT than did those with moderate periodontitis (241 +/- 71 vs. 77 +/- 516 pg/mL, p = 0.02) and higher levels than did healthy control individuals (118 +/- 26 pg/mL, p = 0.05). Salivary-ProCT levels were correlated with bleeding-on-probing (r = 0.45, p = 0.05), as well as with HgbA(1c) (r = 0.49, p = 0.03). Salivary levels of ProCT were higher than serum levels for the periodontitis/diabetes group (152 +/- 37 vs. 78 +/- 17 pg/mL, p = 0.02) and the control group (118 +/- 146 vs. 48 +/- 17 pg/mL, p = 0.01). Persons with periodontitis and type 2 diabetes have salivary-ProCT levels that reflect their degree of periodontitis activity and hyperglycemia. This study demonstrates, for the first time, the presence of procalcitonin (ProCT), an established serum marker of infection, in saliva.

  4. Role of the Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio in the Differential Diagnosis of Exudative Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Akturk, Ulku Aka; Ernam, Dilek; Akbay, Makbule Ozlem; Koçak, Nagihan Durmus; Ogur, Erhan; Irmak, Ilim

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pleural effusion is a common diagnostic and clinical problem. The differential diagnosis of pleural effusion may be difficult and may require several procedures, including invasive ones. Certain studies have investigated biochemical parameters to facilitate the diagnosis of exudative pleural effusion; however, it remains a challenging problem in clinical practice. We aimed to investigate the potential role of the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, which can be easily obtained by determining the cell count of the pleural fluid, in the differential diagnosis of exudative pleural effusion. METHODS: Records from patients who underwent thoracentesis and pleural fluid analysis between May 1, 2013, and March 1, 2015, were obtained from the electronic database of our hospital. The patients who met the inclusion criteria were divided into five groups according to their diagnosis: malignant pleural effusion, para-malignant pleural effusion, para-pneumonic effusion, tuberculosis-related effusion or other. The neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio value was calculated by dividing the absolute neutrophil count by the absolute lymphocyte count. The patient groups were compared according to the given parameter. RESULTS: A total of 465 patients who met the inclusion criteria among 1616 patients with exudative pleural effusion were included in the study. The mean neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio value was significantly lower in tuberculosis-related pleural effusion compared to malignant, para-pneumonic and para-malignant effusions (p=0.001, p=0.001, p=0.012, respectively). The areas under the curve for tuberculosis pleurisy compared to malignant, para-pneumonic and para-malignant effusions were 0.38, 0.36, and 0.37, respectively. Lower cut-off values had higher sensitivity but lower specificity for tuberculosis pleurisy, while higher cut-off values had higher specificity but lower sensitivity for this condition. CONCLUSION: The pleural fluid neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, which is an

  5. Predictive models of malignant transudative pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    Gude, Francisco; Toubes, María E.; Lama, Adriana; Suárez-Antelo, Juan; San-José, Esther; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Golpe, Antonio; Álvarez-Dobaño, José M.; Rábade, Carlos; Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Díaz-Louzao, Carla; Valdés, Luis

    2017-01-01

    Background There are no firm recommendations when cytology should be performed in pleural transudates, since some malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) behave biochemically as transudates. The objective was to assess when would be justified to perform cytology on pleural transudates. Methods Consecutive patients with transudative pleural effusion (PE) were enrolled and divided in two groups: malignant and non-MPE. Logistic regression analysis was used to estimate the probability of malignancy. Two prognostic models were considered: (I) clinical-radiological variables; and (II) combination of clinical-radiological and analytical variables. Calibration and discrimination [receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves and area under the curve (AUC)] were performed. Results A total of 281 pleural transudates were included: 26 malignant and 255 non-malignant. The AUC obtained with Model 1 (left PE, radiological images compatible with malignancy, absence of dyspnea, and serosanguinous appearance of the fluid), and Model 2 (the variables of Model 1 plus CEA) were 0.973 and 0.995, respectively. Although no false negatives are found in Models 1 and 2 to probabilities of 11% and 14%, respectively, by applying bootstrapping techniques to not find false negatives in 95% of other possible samples would require lowering the cut-off points for the aforementioned probabilities to 3% (Model 1) and 4% (Model 2), respectively. The false positive results are 32 (Model 1) and 18 (Model 2), with no false negatives. Conclusions The applied models have a high discriminative ability to predict when a transudative PE may be of neoplastic origin, being superior to adding an analytical variable to the clinic-radiological variables. PMID:28203412

  6. Intra-Pleural Colistin Methanesulfonate Therapy for Pleural Infection caused by Carbapenem-Resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii: A Successful Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Muhammad Asim; Rahman, Basheer Abd El; Mady, Ahmed Fouad; Odat, Mohammed Al; AlHarthy, Abdurehman; Ramadan, Omar El Sayed; Mumtaz, Shahzad Ahmed; Omrani, Ali S.

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by carbapenem-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria are an increasing clinical challenge, since the antimicrobial treatment options are often limited to colistin methanesulfonate. No data are available regarding the pharmacokinetics of colistin in pleural fluid. We report the case of a 92-year old man with ventilator-associated pneumonia and pleurisy caused by Acinetobacter baumannii and Escherichia coli, which were both multidrug-resistant. After an unsuccessful treatment with intravenous colistin methanesulfonate and imipen-em-cilastatin, the addition of intra-pleural colistin methanesulfonate to the intravenous treatment led to a prompt clinical, radiological and microbiological resolution. This is the first report of a successful use of intra-pleural colistin in the literature. The intra-pleural colistin therapy should be considered in selected cases of pleurisy caused by multi-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25276329

  7. Bosutinib induced pleural effusions: Case report and review of tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicity.

    PubMed

    Moguillansky, Natalia I; Fakih, Hafiz Abdul Moiz; Wingard, John R

    2017-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are known to cause pulmonary complications. We report a case of bosutinib related bilateral pleural effusions in a patient with chronic myeloid leukemia. Characteristics of the pleural fluid are presented. We also discuss other tyrosine kinase inhibitors induced pulmonary toxicities, including pulmonary hypertension and interstitial lung disease.

  8. Chemical and immunological features of pleural effusions: comparison between rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, T; Klockars, M; Hellström, P E

    1982-01-01

    The value of determination of pleural fluid glucose, pH, lactic dehydrogenase, IgG, IgA, IgM, C3, C4, anti-IgG antibody, and hydroxyproline in distinguishing between pleural effusions caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and those resulting from other diseases was studied. The series comprised seven patients with RA and 115 patients with other diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus, tuberculosis, malignant disease, empyema, pneumonia, congestive heart failure, and nonspecific pleural effusion. The low glucose concentration, the low pH and the low C4 level in rheumatoid pleural effusion were the most valuable diagnostic findings. The presence of anti-IgG antibody in pleural fluid was not specific for RA. The concentration of hydroxyproline in pleural fluid and the pleural fluid-to-plasma hydroxyproline ratio were significantly higher in RA than in tuberculosis and malignant disease. The results support the view that local metabolic and immunological phenomena as well as a high turnover of collagen occur in the pleural cavity in RA. PMID:6981226

  9. Management of Parapneumonic Pleural Effusion in Adults.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, Lucía; San José, María Esther; Valdés, Luis

    2015-12-01

    Pleural infections have high morbidity and mortality, and their incidence in all age groups is growing worldwide. Not all infectious effusions are parapneumonic and, in such cases, the organisms found in the pleural space are not the same as those observed in lung parenchyma infections. The diagnostic difficulty lies in knowing whether an infectious effusion will evolve into a complicated effusion/empyema, as the diagnostic methods used for this purpose provide poor results. The mainstays of treatment are to establish an early diagnosis and to commence an antibiotic regimen and chest drain as soon as possible. This should preferably be carried out with fine tubes, due to certain morphological, bacteriological and biochemical characteristics of the pleural fluid. Fluid analysis, particularly pH, is the most reliable method for assessing evolution. In a subgroup of patients, fibrinolytics may help to improve recovery, and their combination with DNase has been found to obtain better results. If medical treatment fails and surgery is required, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is, at least, comparable to decortication by thoracotomy, so should only undertaken if previous techniques have failed. Further clinical trials are needed to analyze factors that could affect the results obtained, in order to define new evidence-based diagnostic and therapeutic strategies that provide more effective, standardized management of this disease.

  10. Evaluation of Serum and Pleural Levels of Angiopoietin-1 and Angiopoietin-2 in Children with Transudative and Exudative Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Sanad, Mohammed; Shouman, Waheed; Gharib, Amal F.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Angiopoietins are involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases. We tried to evaluate the application of pleural and serum Angiopoietin-1 and 2 in categorizing pleural effusions (PEs) into exudates and transudates in children. Methods Pleural fluid (PF) and serum Angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and Ang-2 were measured in 80 children with PEs (40 transudative and 40 exudative) by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Findings PF Ang-2 levels were significantly higher in pleural exudates than in transudates (P 0.012). PF Ang-2 levels were significantly higher than serum Ang-2 levels in patients with pleural exudates and transudates (P<0.001). PF Ang-2 levels were higher in tuberculous than in non-tuberculous pneumonic PEs and empyema (P=0.01). PF Ang-2 levels correlate with serum Ang-2 levels (P<0.003). PF Ang-1 levels were significantly lower than serum Ang-1 levels both in patients with exudates and those with transudates (P<0.001). Cutoff points of serum and PF Ang-2, differentiating between transudative and exudative effusions were 3ng/ml and 8ng/ml respectively. Predictive potentials of serum and PF Ang-2 cutoff points were: Sensitivity 90% and 95% respectively, specificity 92.50% and 97.50% respectively, positive predictive value 92.30% and 97.40% respectively and negative predictive value 90.20% and 95.10% respectively. Conclusion Ang-2 levels were elevated in exudative PEs and correlated with levels of markers of pleural inflammation and pleural vascular hyperpermeability. It could categorize PE to exudates and transudates with valuable discriminative properties. That was detected more obviously in pleural fluids than in serum. PMID:23056802

  11. Marked serum procalcitonin level in response to isolated anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Mann, Jason; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to present a case report that highlights the limitation of serum procalcitonin levels greater than 10 ng/mL as being almost exclusively secondary to septic shock. Data source was a medical intensive care unit patient at the University of Louisville. Anaphylactic shock may cause elevations of serum procalcitonin to levels greater than 10 ng/mL.

  12. Serum Procalcitonin Level Reflects the Severity of Cellulitis

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Soo Hyeon; Park, Seok Don

    2016-01-01

    Background Cellulitis is a common bacterial infection of the superficial skin. Procalcitonin is one of the precursor proteins of calcitonin, its levels are elevated in bacterial infection, and it has been established as a diagnostic marker for severe bacterial infections. Objective This study evaluated the clinical usefulness of procalcitonin for predicting disease severity and prognosis of cellulitis. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 160 patients diagnosed with cellulitis in the past 3 years. Body temperature, procalcitonin, white blood cell (WBC), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured on their first day of admission. The associations of procalcitonin, WBC, ESR, and CRP with the body temperature and the number of hospitalized days were assessed. Results Procalcitonin, WBC, and CRP showed a positive correlation with body temperature. In addition, procalcitonin, WBC, ESR, and CRP showed a positive correlation with number of hospitalized days (p<0.05). Conclusion In patients diagnosed with cellulitis, proclacitonin was a helpful parameter to indicate the severity of disease and also a useful predictor of prognosis. PMID:27904269

  13. Long-term Outcome of Patients With Undiagnosed Pleural Effusion.

    PubMed

    Gunluoglu, Gulsah; Olcmen, Aysun; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Dincer, Ibrahim; Sayar, Adnan; Camsari, Gungor; Yilmaz, Veysel; Altin, Sedat

    2015-12-01

    The cause of exudative pleural effusion cannot be determined in some patients. The longterm outcomes of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusion were analyzed. Patients with exudative pleural effusion whose diagnostic procedures included pleural biopsy using video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery carried out between 2008 and 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients diagnosed with non-specific pleuritis were included. Fifty-three patients with available follow-up data were included in the study. Forty men and 13 women (mean age 53.9±13.9 years) were included. Median follow-up time was 24 months. No diagnosis was given in 27 patients (51%), and a clinical diagnosis was given in 26 patients (49%) during the follow-up period. Malignant disease (malignant mesothelioma) was diagnosed in 2 (3.7%) patients. Other diseases were parapneumonic effusion in 12, congestive heart failure in 8, and miscellaneous in 4 patients. Volume of effusion at the time of initial examination and re-accumulation of fluid after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery were associated with malignant disease (P=.004 and .0001, respectively). Although the probability is low, some patients with exudative pleural effusion undiagnosed after pleural biopsy via video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery may have malignant disease. Patients with an initially large volume of effusion that re-accumulates after examination should be closely monitored. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging characteristics of pleural tumours.

    PubMed

    De Paoli, Luca; Quaia, Emilio; Poillucci, Gabriele; Gennari, Antonio; Cova, Maria Assunta

    2015-12-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is doubtless the more known pleural tumour. However, according to the morphology code of the International Classification of Diseases for Oncology (ICD-O), there are several histological types of pleural neoplasms, divided into mesothelial, mesenchymal and lymphoproliferative tumours, that may be misdiagnosed. In this paper we summarise and illustrate the incidence aspects and the clinical, pathological and radiological features of these neoplasms. • According to the ICD-O, there are 11 different histological types of pleural neoplasm. • Imaging, clinical and histopathological aspects of these neoplasms may be overlapping. • Knowledge of different pleural tumours plays an important role for diagnosis orientation.

  15. Late postoperative pleural effusion following lung transplantation: characteristics and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Shitrit, David; Izbicki, Gabriel; Fink, Gershon; Bendayan, Daniel; Aravot, Dan; Saute, Milton; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2003-04-01

    Pleural effusions are extremely common in the early postoperative period after lung transplantation (LTX). It occurs in all transplant recipients, and like pleural fluid following other cardiothoracic surgery is bloody, exudative and neutrophil predominant. There was no information, however, on the characteristics of the late (14-45 days) postoperative pleural fluid after LTX. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics and the clinical implications of late postoperative pleural effusion after LTX. Thirty-five patients underwent TX between May 1997 and May 2001. Seven patients (20%) developed late postoperative pleural effusion. Thoracentesis were performed in these patients and the white blood cell counts, cell differential as well as biochemical parameters were determined. The median time for late pleural effusion appearance was 23 days (range, 14-34 days) after TX. The pleural effusions were medium in size (700 ml, range, 100-1300), exudative in all the patients and had lymphocyte predominance. No evidence of fluid recurrence or clinical deterioration was noted in these patients. Late-onset exudative lymphocytic pleural effusion after LTX is not uncommon. When there is no evidence of rejection or infection, it usually has a benign, favorable outcome.

  16. Pleural plaques and the risk of pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Pairon, Jean-Claude; Laurent, François; Rinaldo, Mickaël; Clin, Bénédicte; Andujar, Pascal; Ameille, Jacques; Brochard, Patrick; Chammings, Soizick; Ferretti, Gilbert; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Gislard, Antoine; Letourneux, Marc; Luc, Amandine; Schorlé, Evelyne; Paris, Christophe

    2013-02-20

    The association between pleural plaques and pleural mesothelioma remains controversial. The present study was designed to examine the association between pleural plaques on computed tomography (CT) scan and the risk of pleural mesothelioma in a follow-up study of asbestos-exposed workers. Retired or unemployed workers previously occupationally exposed to asbestos were invited to participate in a screening program for asbestos-related diseases, including CT scan, organized between October 2003 and December 2005 in four regions in France. Randomized, independent, double reading of CT scans by a panel of seven chest radiologists focused on benign asbestos-related abnormalities. A 7-year follow-up study was conducted in the 5287 male subjects for whom chest CT scan was available. Annual determination of the number of subjects eligible for free medical care because of pleural mesothelioma was carried out. Diagnosis certification was obtained from the French mesothelioma panel of pathologists. Survival regression based on the Cox model was used to estimate the risk of pleural mesothelioma associated with pleural plaques, with age as the main time variable and time-varying exposure variables, namely duration of exposure, time since first exposure, and cumulative exposure index to asbestos. All statistical tests were two-sided. A total of 17 incident cases of pleural mesothelioma were diagnosed. A statistically significant association was observed between mesothelioma and pleural plaques (unadjusted hazard ratio (HR) = 8.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 3.0 to 26.5; adjusted HR = 6.8, 95% CI = 2.2 to 21.4 after adjustment for time since first exposure and cumulative exposure index to asbestos). The presence of pleural plaques may be an independent risk factor for pleural mesothelioma.

  17. Evaluation of predictive value of pleural CEA in patients with pleural effusions and histological findings: A prospective study and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tozzoli, Renato; Basso, Stefano M M; D'Aurizio, Federica; Metus, Paolo; Lumachi, Franco

    2016-11-01

    Pleural effusion recognizes heterogeneous etiology and pathogenesis and requires invasive diagnostic procedures. Usually, after pleural fluid analysis, 30-50% of patients with malignant pleural effusion exhibit negative pleural cytology, and the sensitivity of image-guided pleural needle-aspiration biopsy ranges between 60% and 70%. With the aim of differentiating between benign (BPE) and malignant (MPE) pleural effusions, several tumor markers have been assayed in the pleural fluid and the majority of studies focus on pleural carcinoembryonic antigen (p-CEA). The aims of this study were to evaluate (i) the diagnostic accuracy of p-CEA of patients with pleural effusions undergoing video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) for diagnostic purpose, (ii) the relationship between p-CEA and serum CEA (s-CEA), and (iii) the usefulness of the p-CEA/s-CEA ratio in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions (MPE). We prospectively enrolled in the study 134 consecutive patients with pleural effusions, scheduled for having VATS and biopsy. The final diagnosis, based on histopathology of the VATS-guided specimens, was available for all patients. p-CEA and s-CEA was assayed with a chemiluminescence immunoassay method (CLIA), applied on the Maglumi 2000 Plus automated platform (SNIBE, Shenzen, China). The sensitivity and accuracy of p-CEA was significantly higher than that of pleural cytology at the same specificity comparing BPE with MPE and BPE with non-small lung cancer. The sensitivity of p-CEA and PC together reached 100% (BPE vs. NSCLC) and 91.5% (BPE vs. MPE excluding mesothelioma), respectively. The p-CEA measurement in patients with pleural effusion of uncertain etiology is a safe and cost-effective procedure, everywhere easily available, which may help clinicians in selecting patients for further evaluations. An elevated p-CEA level in a patient with pleural effusion and negative pleural cytology suggests the need of more invasive procedure (e.g. VATS

  18. Pleural, peritoneal and pericardial effusions – a biochemical approach

    PubMed Central

    Kopcinovic, Lara Milevoj; Culej, Jelena

    2014-01-01

    The pathological accumulation of serous fluids in the pleural, peritoneal and pericardial space occurs in a variety of conditions. Since patient management depends on right and timely diagnosis, biochemical analysis of extravascular body fluids is considered a valuable tool in the patient management process. The biochemical evaluation of serous fluids includes the determination of gross appearance, differentiation of transudative from exudative effusions and additional specific biochemical testing to assess the effusion etiology. This article summarized data from the most relevant literature concerning practice with special emphasis on usefulness of biochemical tests used for the investigation of pleural, peritoneal and pericardial effusions. Additionally, preanalytical issues concerning serous fluid analysis were addressed and recommendations concerning acceptable analytical practice in serous fluid analysis were presented. PMID:24627721

  19. Behaviour of nucleated cells in various types of pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Ferreiro, L; Pereiro, T; San José, E; Toubes, M E; Suárez-Antelo, J; Álvarez Dobaño, J M; González Barcala, F J; Rodríguez Núñez, N; Lama, A; Valdés, L

    2017-04-01

    To know the behavior of cellular components of pleural fluid can help focus the differential diagnosis of a pleural effusion. Our objective was to assess their composition in different types of pleural effusions and assess whether it provides relevant clinical information. Observational, cross-sectional and retrospective study in which the cellular components of pleural effusions of different etiology were analyzed. Pleural effusions were classified as neutrophilic, lymphocytic (≥50% of each one of them), eosinophilic (≥10%) or mesothelial (>5%) and were grouped into six diagnostic categories RESULTS: 1.467 patients were studied (354 heart failure; 59 other transudates; 349 paraneumonic; 133 tuberculous; 397 malignant and 175 other exudates). The predominance cell was lymphocytic in heart failure (44,4%), uncomplicated parapneumonic (29,2%), tuberculosis (88%) and malignant (49,6%); neutrophilic in parapneumonic (57%) and malignant (9,6%); eosinophilic in malignant (6,3%) and mesotelial in tuberculosis (12%). The most frequent etiologies with lymphocyte count ≥80% were tuberculosis (35,1%) and malignant (23,3%). Parameters with higher discriminating accuracy were: leukocytes (transudates: AUC 0,835) and percentage of neutrophils (empyemas: AUC 0,906 and complicated parapneumonic+empyemas: AUC 0,907). Nucleated cell counts will help focus the etiology of pleural effusions, since each etiology often have a characteristic cell predominance. The percentage of nucleated cells in pleural fluid not ruled out tuberculosis if there is a high count of mesothelial cells, nor a parapneumonic effusion with lymphocytic predominance, or malignancy with ≥80% lymphocytes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  20. Cholesterol in pleural exudates depends mainly on increased capillary permeability.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Luis; San-José, Esther; Estévez, Juan Carlos; González-Barcala, Francisco Javier; Alvarez-Dobaño, José Manuel; Golpe, Antonio; Valle, José Manuel; Penela, Pedro; Vizcaíno, Luis; Pose, Antonio

    2010-04-01

    Pleural fluid (PF) cholesterol is a useful parameter to differentiate between pleural transudates and exudates, although the pathophysiologic mechanisms for its increase in exudates are not fully understood. We aim to elucidate the cause of this increase by analyzing the levels of cholesterol-high-density lipoproteins (HDLs), low-density lipoproteins (LDLs), apolipoprotein A (ApoA), and apolipoprotein B (ApoB)-in PF and blood as well as the number of leucocytes and red cells in the PF. We studied 259 patients with pleural effusion (57 transudates and 202 exudates). The correlations of the pleural and serum (S) levels of these parameters were analyzed, with the pleural cholesterol fractions as the dependent variables and their levels in blood and the pleural/serum protein ratio (P/S prot ratio) as the independent variables. The pleural fluid cholesterol levels (PFCHOL) correlated with their blood levels and the capillary permeability (r=0.885). No significant differences were found between the percentage of LDL, with regard to total cholesterol in the serum [SCHOL], and the same percentage in the exudates, between the PF/S LDL ratio (0.46) and the PF/S CHOL ratio (0.48), or between the PF/S ApoB ratio and the PF/S LDL ratio. The percentage of PF cholesterol bound to HDL and LDL was significantly higher (91.9%) than in the blood (90%). No significant correlations were found between any of the lipids studied and the number of erythrocytes and leucocytes. In conclusion, the PFCHOL may be predicted from the SCHOL, and the capillary permeability may be reflected by the PF/S prot ratio. Copyright 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Medical thoracoscopy vs CT scan-guided Abrams pleural needle biopsy for diagnosis of patients with pleural effusions: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Metintas, Muzaffer; Ak, Guntulu; Dundar, Emine; Yildirim, Huseyin; Ozkan, Ragip; Kurt, Emel; Erginel, Sinan; Alatas, Fusun; Metintas, Selma

    2010-06-01

    In cases of pleural effusion, tissue samples can be obtained through Abrams needle pleural biopsy (ANPB), thoracoscopy, or cutting-needle pleural biopsy under the guidance of CT scan (CT-CNPB) for histopathologic analysis. This study aimed to compare the diagnostic efficiency and reliability of ANPB under CT scan guidance (CT-ANPB) with that of medical thoracoscopy in patients with pleural effusion. Between January 2006 and January 2008, 124 patients with exudative pleural effusion that could not be diagnosed by cytologic analysis were included in the study. All patients were randomized after the CT scan was performed. Patients either underwent CT-ANPB or thoracoscopy. The two groups were compared in terms of diagnostic sensitivity and complications associated with the methods used. Of the 124 patients, malignant mesothelioma was diagnosed in 33, metastatic pleural disease in 47, benign pleural disease in 42, and two were of indeterminate origin. In the CT-ANPB group, the diagnostic sensitivity was 87.5%, as compared with 94.1% in the thoracoscopy group; the difference was not statistically significant (P = .252). No difference was identified between the sensitivities of the two methods based on the cause, the CT scan findings, and the degree of pleural thickening. Complication rates were low and acceptable. We recommend the use of CT-ANPB as the primary method of diagnosis in patients with pleural thickening or lesions observed by CT scan. In patients with only pleural fluid appearance on CT scan and in those who may have benign pleural pathologies other than TB, the primary method of diagnosis should be medical thoracoscopy. clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00720954.

  2. Pleurisy and Other Pleural Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the layers of tissue is a very thin space called the pleural space. Normally this space is filled with a small amount of fluid— ... or gas can build up in the pleural space. When this happens, it's called a pneumothorax (noo- ...

  3. Pleural sarcoidosis: a rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Loughney, E.; Higgins, B. G.

    1997-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a chronic disorder of unknown aetiology which causes tissue injury and granuloma formation in many organs. Although over 80% of cases have intrathoracic disease at presentation, pleural sarcoidosis remains an unusual manifestation. A case of sarcoidosis presenting with a discrete pleural mass is reported. 




 PMID:9059488

  4. A comparative analysis of the biochemical parameters used to distinguish between pleural exudates and transudates.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A; Tunaboyu, I K; Akkaya, E; Bayramgürler, B

    2000-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the various parameters used to identify exudates. The study included 255 patients with pleural effusions. According to aetiological diagnosis, 105 pleural effusions were labelled as transudates and 150 were labelled as exudates. Using the criteria of Light et al., 94.5% of the effusions were correctly classified, yielding a sensitivity and specificity of 99.3% and 87.6%, respectively. Use of the pleural fluid/serum bilirubin ratio produced results of 92.9%, 90.7%, and 96.2%, respectively. Using pleural fluid cholesterol level yielded results of 95.7%, 95.3%, and 96.2%, respectively. When the combination of pleural fluid cholesterol level and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was used, the specificity and accuracy were found to be higher than that using the criteria of Light et al. We found that there was no significant difference among the parameters with respect to accuracy. When the accuracy and cost are considered, differentiation of pleural exudates and transudates can be achieved only by pleural fluid cholesterol level or LDH level; and when two parameters were used together, the accuracy and specificity were higher than that using the criteria of Light et al.

  5. Thoracentesis-reverting cardiac tamponade physiology in a patient with myxedema coma and large pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Werlang, Monia E.; Pimentel, Mario R.

    2017-01-01

    A large pleural effusion causing cardiac tamponade physiology and severe hemodynamic compromise is an uncommon event. We report a case of a 53-year-old woman with severe hypothyroidism presenting with myxedema coma and refractory shock. Her hemodynamic status failed to respond to fluid resuscitation and vasopressors. A transthoracic echocardiogram and chest radiograph demonstrated a pericardial fluid accumulation associated with a large left-sided pleural effusion. Thoracostomy tube insertion resulted in prompt improvement of the patient's hemodynamic status. Our finding demonstrates that a large pleural effusion may play an important role in cardiac tamponade physiology. PMID:28670061

  6. Pleural mesothelioma – case report

    PubMed Central

    Klawiter, Anna; Damaszke, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Pleural mesothelioma is a very rare neoplasm; especially the local form. The diagnostics is difficult and the prognosis unfavourable. Case Report: We presented a case of a man with dyspnoea and cough. His chest radiogram showed hydrothorax on the left side. Neither the examinations of the pleural liquid, nor the CT-guided fine needle biopsy established the diagnosis. CT showed features suggestive of pleural mesothelioma. The diagnosis was confirmed by thoracoscopy. Although no neoplastic cells were found in the thoracoscopic specimen from the supradiaphragmatic tumor, we assumed that to be a case of a diffuse, primarily local form of mesothelioma. Conclusions: Diagnostics of pleural mesothelioma is very difficult. CT and thoracoscopy seem to be very valuable diagnostic methods. It is worth remembering that pleural mesothelioma can have a local form which may transform into a diffuse one. PMID:22802809

  7. Indwelling Pleural Catheters: A Clinical Option in Trapped Lung.

    PubMed

    Bertolaccini, Luca; Viti, Andrea; Paiano, Simona; Pomari, Carlo; Assante, Luca Rosario; Terzi, Alberto

    2017-02-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) symptoms have a real impact on quality of life. Surgical approach through video-assisted thoracic surgery provides a first step in palliation. In patients unfit for general anesthesia, awake pleuroscopy represents an alternative. Sclerosing agents can be administered at the bedside through a chest tube. Ideal treatment of MPE should include adequate long-term symptom relief, minimize hospitalization, and reduce adverse effects. Indwelling pleural catheter (IPC) allows outpatient management of MPE through periodic ambulatory fluid drainage. IPC offers advantages over pleurodesis in patients with poor functional status who cannot tolerate pleurodesis or in patients with trapped lungs.

  8. [Management of pleural drainage].

    PubMed

    Soffiati, M; Bonaldi, A; Biban, P

    2010-06-01

    In the neonatal population, pleural effusion and particularly tension pneumothorax can be a deadly situation. Pneumothorax occurs more often in the neonatal period that any other time of life. Tension pneumothorax can result in very high pressures within the pleural space, collapsing the lung on the involved side and resulting in immediate hypoxia, hypercapnia and subsequent circulatory collapse. For these reasons, the ability to recognize, understand and treat these pathologies is essential for neonatal health and a good outcome. Neonates have many factors that can contribute to. these problems. These include respiratory distress syndrome, mechanical ventilation, sepsis, pneumonia, aspiration of meconium, congentital malformation, hydrothorax, congenital or acquired chylothorax. The diagnosis can be made by clinical examination, transillumination (pneumothorax) and chest x-ray. Besides, lung ultrasound constitutes a visual medicine and provides a transparent approach to the acutely ill patient, newborn included, guiding diagnosis, management and care. Newborns with moderate to severe symptoms and those receiving positive pressure ventilation require tube thoracostomy. If a tension pneumothorax is suspected, emergency needle decompression in the second intercostal space in the midclavicular line is required. In this article, we describe the management of tube thoracostomy using trocar tubes or pigtail catheters. Besides, we pay attention to the use of pain control for neonates undergoing painful procedures such as chest tube insertion.

  9. Pleural ultrasound as an adjunct to physical examination in the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bah, Ismaël; Goudie, Eric; Khereba, Mohamed; Ferraro, Pasquale; Duranceau, André; Martin, Jocelyne; Thiffault, Vicky; Liberman, Moishe

    2014-05-01

    Preoperative evaluation of patients with suspected or confirmed lung cancer consists of clinical and radiological staging. Malignant pleural effusion is a poor prognosticator in non-small-cell lung cancer. Pleural ultrasound (PU) allows for the assessment of pleural effusion, providing real-time guidance for its aspiration and cytological analysis. Pleural Ultrasonography in Lung Cancer (PULC) as an adjunct to physical examination has the potential to improve preoperative staging of non-small-cell lung cancer during first surgical encounter by allowing the evaluation of previously unassessed pleural effusion. This study consisted of a prospective trial of surgeon-performed PU in the preoperative evaluation of lung cancer patients. All patients evaluated in the thoracic surgery clinic with the new or presumed diagnosis of lung cancer were eligible. A portable ultrasound machine was used to evaluate pleural fluid in the bilateral costophrenic sulci with pleural fluid aspiration for cytological analysis. Forty-five patients were prospectively enrolled over a 3-month period. Thirteen patients had ultrasound evidence of a pleural effusion, of which 3 were significant enough for aspiration. Cytological analysis of these effusions yielded malignant cells in 1 patient. Positive PULC evaluation led to a change in clinical staging (M0 to M1a) in 10 patients and a change in pathological staging (pleural fluid cytology positive) in 1 patient. The time required for PULC examination was 15 ± 7 min. There were no complications related to the procedures. Preoperative pleural ultrasonography is a rapid and effective way to improve precision of staging in patients with lung cancer. More precise staging may allow for more appropriate testing, patient prognostication and operative planning.

  10. Severe "sweet" pleural effusion in a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient.

    PubMed

    Maude, Rapeephan R; Barretti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothorax is a rare complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) which can progress quickly to cause acute respiratory distress. We present a 76 year-old female with a past medical history significant for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on daily home peritoneal dialysis for 2 years presented to the hospital from home with shortness of breath at rest and cough for 2 days prior to admission. She developed severe respiratory distress and had emergent pleurocentesis that released 3.8 L of pleural fluid. The analysis showed significantly high sugar indicative of hydrothorax from CAPD. She underwent thoracotomy with pleurodesis and switched to hemodialysis for 6 weeks before resuming CAPD. A high glucose concentration in the pleural fluid is pathognomonic for hydrothorax from dialysis fluid after rule out other possible causes of pleural effusion. Patients who are on CAPD presenting with marked pleural effusion should prompt clinicians to consider the differential diagnosis of pleuroperitoneal communications.

  11. Pleural involvement in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Agalioti, Theodora; Giannou, Anastasios D; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2015-06-01

    The pleural space, a sterile secluded environment in the thoracic cavity, represents an attractive metastatic site for various cancers of lung, breast and gastrointestinal origins. Whereas lung and breast adenocarcinomas could invade the pleural space because of their anatomic proximity, "distant" cancers like ovarian or gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas may employ more active mechanisms to the same end. A pleural metastasis is often accompanied by a malignant pleural effusion (MPE), an unfavorable complication that severely restricts the quality of life and expectancy of the cancer patient. MPE is the net "product" of three different processes, namely inflammation, enhanced angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Current efforts are focusing on the identification of cancer cell autocrine (specific mutation spectra and biochemical pathways) and paracrine (cytokine and chemokine signals) characteristics as well as host features (immunological or other) that underlie the MPE phenotype. Herein we examine the pleural histology, cytology and molecular characteristics that make the pleural cavity an attractive metastasis destination for lung adenocarcinoma. Mesothelial and tumor features that may account for the tumor's ability to invade the pleural space are highlighted. Finally, possible therapeutic interventions specifically targeting MPE are discussed.

  12. Pleural involvement in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    The pleural space, a sterile secluded environment in the thoracic cavity, represents an attractive metastatic site for various cancers of lung, breast and gastrointestinal origins. Whereas lung and breast adenocarcinomas could invade the pleural space because of their anatomic proximity, “distant” cancers like ovarian or gastrointestinal tract adenocarcinomas may employ more active mechanisms to the same end. A pleural metastasis is often accompanied by a malignant pleural effusion (MPE), an unfavorable complication that severely restricts the quality of life and expectancy of the cancer patient. MPE is the net “product” of three different processes, namely inflammation, enhanced angiogenesis and vascular leakage. Current efforts are focusing on the identification of cancer cell autocrine (specific mutation spectra and biochemical pathways) and paracrine (cytokine and chemokine signals) characteristics as well as host features (immunological or other) that underlie the MPE phenotype. Herein we examine the pleural histology, cytology and molecular characteristics that make the pleural cavity an attractive metastasis destination for lung adenocarcinoma. Mesothelial and tumor features that may account for the tumor’s ability to invade the pleural space are highlighted. Finally, possible therapeutic interventions specifically targeting MPE are discussed. PMID:26150915

  13. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in a 17-year old boy: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Guzmán, C.; Barrera-Rodríguez, R.; Portilla-Segura, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare, invasive and often fatal neoplasm that develops in the thin layer of tissue surrounding the lungs known as the pleura. Although rare, mesotheliomas do occur in the young; their characteristics are distinct from those of older patients. Case presentation This is a case report of a 17-year-old boy who had moderate dyspnea, cough, right-sided pleuritic chest pain, fever, headache and no weight loss. Physical examination showed a right pleural effusion and chest roentgenograms revealed a homogenous opacity on lower right hemithorax. Biochemical analysis of pleural fluid showed hemorrhagic/turbid effusion compatible with exudate. It was initially treated as an empyema. The pleural fluid culture was negative. Adenosine deaminase level was 34.3 U/L (admission) and 19.02 U/L (two weeks after). Pleural fluid smear and culture for Mtb were negative. During the open pleural biopsy, thickened pleura and multiple pale yellow nodules in the lung were observed. The histopathological report was compatible with malignant pleural mesothelioma. With this diagnosis, a chemotherapy regimen with cisplatin was initiated. After two cycles, the patient had no clinical and radiological improvement. The patient is currently under regular follow up. Conclusion MPM is rare in young adults and its clinical presentation makes it different from mesothelioma in elderly patients, so it will be necessary to identify the new risk factors that can identify these patients. PMID:27222787

  14. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in a 17-year old boy: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Guzmán, C; Barrera-Rodríguez, R; Portilla-Segura, J

    2016-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare, invasive and often fatal neoplasm that develops in the thin layer of tissue surrounding the lungs known as the pleura. Although rare, mesotheliomas do occur in the young; their characteristics are distinct from those of older patients. This is a case report of a 17-year-old boy who had moderate dyspnea, cough, right-sided pleuritic chest pain, fever, headache and no weight loss. Physical examination showed a right pleural effusion and chest roentgenograms revealed a homogenous opacity on lower right hemithorax. Biochemical analysis of pleural fluid showed hemorrhagic/turbid effusion compatible with exudate. It was initially treated as an empyema. The pleural fluid culture was negative. Adenosine deaminase level was 34.3 U/L (admission) and 19.02 U/L (two weeks after). Pleural fluid smear and culture for Mtb were negative. During the open pleural biopsy, thickened pleura and multiple pale yellow nodules in the lung were observed. The histopathological report was compatible with malignant pleural mesothelioma. With this diagnosis, a chemotherapy regimen with cisplatin was initiated. After two cycles, the patient had no clinical and radiological improvement. The patient is currently under regular follow up. MPM is rare in young adults and its clinical presentation makes it different from mesothelioma in elderly patients, so it will be necessary to identify the new risk factors that can identify these patients.

  15. Bacterial Infection Elicits Heat Shock Protein 72 Release from Pleural Mesothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varano della Vergiliana, Julius F.; Lansley, Sally M.; Porcel, Jose M.; Bielsa, Silvia; Brown, Jeremy S.; Creaney, Jenette; Temple, Suzanna E. L.; Waterer, Grant W.; Lee, Y. C. Gary

    2013-01-01

    Heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) has been implicated in infection-related processes and has been found in body fluids during infection. This study aimed to determine whether pleural mesothelial cells release HSP70 in response to bacterial infection in vitro and in mouse models of serosal infection. In addition, the in vitro cytokine effects of the HSP70 isoform, Hsp72, on mesothelial cells were examined. Further, Hsp72 was measured in human pleural effusions and levels compared between non-infectious and infectious patients to determine the diagnostic accuracy of pleural fluid Hsp72 compared to traditional pleural fluid parameters. We showed that mesothelial release of Hsp72 was significantly raised when cells were treated with live and heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae. In mice, intraperitoneal injection of S. pneumoniae stimulated a 2-fold increase in Hsp72 levels in peritoneal lavage (p<0.01). Extracellular Hsp72 did not induce or inhibit mediator release from cultured mesothelial cells. Hsp72 levels were significantly higher in effusions of infectious origin compared to non-infectious effusions (p<0.05). The data establish that pleural mesothelial cells can release Hsp72 in response to bacterial infection and levels are raised in infectious pleural effusions. The biological role of HSP70 in pleural infection warrants exploration. PMID:23704948

  16. Update on pleural diseases - 2007

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, Ayman; Raoof, Suhail; Esan, Adebayo; Sung, Arthur; Wali, Siraj; Lee, Leonard Y.; George, Liziamma; Saleh, Anthony; Baumann, Michael

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: New information is available on pleural diseases. The authors selected articles to make recommendations on diagnostic and treatment aspects of pleural diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven articles published in the English language between 2004 and 2007 were chosen. The basis of selection of the articles was the impact on daily practice, change in prior thinking of a disease process or specific treatment modality, as well as proper design and execution of the study. 5-amino-laevulinic acid with fluorescent light combined with white light may allow further diagnostic yield in undiagnosed pleural disease. FDG-PET may allow prognostication of patients with pleural tumors. Utilizing ultrasound by trained Emergency Department physicians is a rapid and effective technique to evaluate non-traumatic pleural effusions in symptomatic patients. Serum osteopontin levels may distinguish patients exposed to asbestos with benign disease from those with pleural mesothelioma. Administration of streptokinase in patients with empyema does not need for surgical drainage, length of hospital stay, or mortality as compared to conventional treatment with chest tube drainage and intravenous antibiotics. Silver nitrate may be an alternative agent to talc for producing pleurodesis. Routine use of graded talc (50% particles greater than 25 microns) is recommended to reduce the morbidity associated with talc pleurodesis. Study design does not permit us to conclude that aspiration of spontaneous pneumothorax is as effective as chest tube drainage. Pleural catheter may prove to be an important palliative modality in treating debilitated patients or patients with trapped lung who show symptomatic improvement with drainage; however, at the present time, these catheters cannot be considered a first line treatment option for patients with malignant pleural effusion. One of the studies reviewed showed no significant difference in tract metastasis in patients with malignant mesothelioma

  17. Establishment of triglyceride cut-off values to detect chylous ascites and pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Thaler, Markus A; Bietenbeck, Andreas; Schulz, Christoph; Luppa, Peter B

    2017-02-01

    Lipoprotein electrophoresis is the gold standard for the detection of chylous ascites and pleural effusions. It is, however, not suitable as a front-line test and not widely available. Most clinicians must rely solely on the quantitative determination of lipids. The aim of this work was to establish lipid cut-off values for the presence of chylomicrons in pleural and peritoneal fluid. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels from 113 peritoneal and 154 pleural fluid samples investigated for chylomicrons via lipoprotein electrophoresis were considered. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed and cut-off levels determined. 54 peritoneal and 59 pleural fluid samples were positive for chylomicrons. In peritoneal fluid, triglycerides and triglycerides/cholesterol ratio exhibited areas under the curve (AUC) not significantly different from each other, but significantly larger than cholesterol alone. The AUC for triglycerides in pleural fluid was significantly larger than the AUCs for cholesterol and the triglycerides/cholesterol ratio. Triglyceride cut-offs with maximum Youden-Index, sensitivity >95%, and specificity >95% were calculated to be 187, 148, and 246mg/dl (2.13, 1.69, and 2.80mmol/l) for peritoneal fluid, and 240, 94, and 240mg/dl (2.74, 1.07, and 2.74mmol/l) for pleural fluid. Triglyceride levels are the best parameter to detect chylous body fluids when lipoprotein electrophoresis is not available. Single-point triglyceride cut-offs of 187 and 240mg/dl (2.13 and 2.74mmol/l) or alternatively equivocal ranges of 148-246 and 94-240mg/dl (1.69-2.80 and 1.07-2.74mmol/l) were established for peritoneal and pleural fluid, respectively. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Markers to differentiate between Kaposi's sarcoma and tuberculous pleural effusions in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M; Finney, L J; Komrower, D; Chitani, A; Bates, J; Chipungu, G A; Corbett, E; Allain, T J

    2015-02-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) and tuberculosis (TB) commonly cause pleural effusions in high human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) burden resource-limited countries. Differentiating between them is challenging, as pleural biopsy and TB culture are rarely available. To identify markers to differentiate between TB effusions and KS effusions in HIV-positive patients, and to compare liquid culture and Xpert MTB/RIF in pleural fluid. Fifty HIV-positive patients with pleural effusions recruited in Malawi underwent pleural ultrasound and aspiration. Fluid visual inspection, cell count, bacterial culture, glucose/protein, solid and liquid TB culture and Xpert were performed. The mean age of the patients was 32 years; 30/50 (60%) were male and 29 (58%) had cutaneous/oral KS. Thirteen (26%) pleural fluid samples were liquid culture-positive for TB, while 9/13 (69%) were Xpert-positive. Three (10.3%) KS patients had culture-positive TB effusions; 17 (58.6%) had KS effusions. The relative risk of TB in KS patients increased with limited KS, loculated fluid and low glucose. Eleven (52.3%) non-KS patients had culture-positive TB effusions associated with male sex, straw-coloured fluid and fibrin stranding on ultrasound. KS patients were most likely to have KS effusion, but TB should be considered. Most non-KS patients had TB, supporting the use of World Health Organization guidelines. Xpert identified two thirds of liquid culture-positive results.

  19. Intrapleural administration of DNase alone for pleural empyema

    PubMed Central

    Bobek, Vladimir; Majewski, Andrzej; Kolostova, Katarina; Rzechonek, Adam; Lischke, Robert; Schutzner, Jan; Kacprzak, Grzegorz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pleural empyema is a severe complication of various diseases. The essential is the inserting a drain into the pleural cavity and evacuation of the pus. Sometimes the pus is very thick and its evacuation and re-expansion of the lung is very difficult. Methods: We report a group of 10 patients with intrapleural administration of Pulmozyme (dornase alpha) in dosages of either 2.5 mg once or on two separate occasions. All of the patients had a chest tube inserted into the pleural cavity. Measurement of viscosity was done before and after the instillation of the dornase alpha. Results: In six patients dornase alfa was introduced into the pleural cavity once. Three of them received this on the 4th whilst the rest were treated with the agent on the 6th day. Four patients received the dornase alpha twice because of the small amount of drainage fluid after the previous instillation. Five patients were discharged from hospital with complete re-expansion of their lungs. Two patients were qualified for a surgical operation since the lung was trapped and did not re-expand. Three patients had to be discharged with a drain as a result of incomplete re-expansion of the lung. In all the patients the density of the pus after administering the dornase alpha decreased and the amount of the pus drainage increased. Conclusions: Dornase alpha may be used in some patients with pleural empyema with good results. PMID:26885174

  20. Recurrent Malignant Melanoma Presenting as Isolated Pleural Metastases in a Patient with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Kartik; Cingam, Shashank; Peddi, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    Isolated pleural metastasis with pleural effusion is a rare occurrence in malignant melanoma. We report an unusual case of a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and recurrent pleural effusions. The pleural fluid cytology and immunohistochemistry profile were consistent with the diagnosis of CLL. However, chemotherapy with pentostatin, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab did not result in any meaningful clinical response. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery and biopsy of the affected nodular parietal layer of the pleura were consistent with malignant melanoma. Our case underlines the importance of having a suspicion for secondary causes of effusion in patients with CLL. We briefly discuss the mechanisms of an increased incidence of secondary cancers in CLL and the diagnosis of isolated pleural metastases in malignant melanoma. PMID:28203169

  1. Lung scan perfusion defects limited to matching pleural effusions: low probability of pulmonary embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Bedont, R.A.; Datz, F.L.

    1985-12-01

    Patients with a new pleural effusion are often sent for a ventilation-perfusion scan to exclude a pulmonary embolism. This retrospective study assessed the probability of pulmonary embolism when a pleural effusion and a perfusion defect of similar size are the only significant imaging abnormalities. In 451 reports of patients who were scanned for suspected pulmonary embolism, 53 had perfusion defects secondary to pleural effusion without other significant perfusion defects. Using pulmonary angiography, venography, analysis of pleural fluid, clinical course, and other radiographic and laboratory studies to establish the final diagnosis, only two patients had documented venous thrombotic disease: one had pulmonary emboli, the other thrombophlebitis. Lung scans having significant perfusion defects limited to pleural effusions and matching them in size have a low probability for pulmonary embolism.

  2. Efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage for pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weitian; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Ningming; Xu, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The factors influencing the efficacy of ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage were investigated in the present study. A retrospective analysis of clinical data from 435 patients who presented with a pleural effusion was performed. Patients were divided into a control group and an intervention group. Thirty-seven patients in the control group were given standard care using pleural puncture to draw the excess fluid. The 398 patients in the intervention group were treated using ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage. The rate of successful drainage of a pleural effusion was significantly higher (P<0.05), while the rate of complication was lower, in the ultrasound-guided thoracentesis cases compared to standard care treatment. In conclusion, ultrasound-guided thoracentesis catheter drainage is an efficient, safe and minimally invasive procedure to alleviate pleural effusion. The efficacy of the procedure is related to the separation of pleural effusion, drainage tube type and tube diameter. PMID:28105155

  3. Pleural mesothelial cells in pleural and lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Veena B.

    2015-01-01

    During development, the mesoderm maintains a complex relationship with the developing endoderm giving rise to the mature lung. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) derived from the mesoderm play a key role during the development of the lung. The pleural mesothelium differentiates to give rise to the endothelium and smooth muscle cells via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). An aberrant recapitulation of such developmental pathways can play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease processes such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The PMC is the central component of the immune responses of the pleura. When exposed to noxious stimuli, it demonstrates innate immune responses such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns as well as causes the release of several cytokines to activate adaptive immune responses. Development of pleural effusions occurs due to an imbalance in the dynamic interaction between junctional proteins, n-cadherin and β-catenin, and phosphorylation of adherens junctions between PMCs, which is caused in part by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) released by PMCs. PMCs play an important role in defense mechanisms against bacterial and mycobacterial pleural infections, and in pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion, asbestos related pleural disease and malignant pleural mesothelioma. PMCs also play a key role in the resolution of inflammation, which can occur with or without fibrosis. Fibrosis occurs as a result of disordered fibrin turnover and due to the effects of cytokines such as transforming growth factor-β, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor; which are released by PMCs. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for PMCs in the pathogenesis of IPF suggesting their potential as a cellular biomarker of disease activity and as a possible therapeutic target. Pleural-based therapies targeting PMCs for treatment of IPF and other lung diseases need

  4. Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Tsao, Anne S.; Wistuba, Ignacio; Roth, Jack A.; Kindler, Hedy Lee

    2009-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a deadly disease that occurs in 2,000 to 3,000 people each year in the United States. Although MPM is an extremely difficult disease to treat, with the median overall survival ranging between 9 and 17 months regardless of stage, there has been significant progress over the last few years that has reshaped the clinical landscape. This article will provide a comprehensive discussion of the latest developments in the treatment of MPM. We will provide an update of the major clinical trials that impact mesothelioma treatment in the resectable and unresectable settings, discuss the impact of novel therapeutics, and provide perspective on where the clinical research in mesothelioma is moving. In addition, there are controversial issues, such as the role of extrapleural pneumonectomy, adjuvant radiotherapy, and use of intensity-modulated radiotherapy versus hemithoracic therapy that will also be addressed in this manuscript. PMID:19255316

  5. [Pleural lymphatics and pleural diseases related to fibres].

    PubMed

    Fleury Feith, J; Jaurand, M-C

    2013-12-01

    It is now well established that some pleural diseases, pleural plaques and malignant mesothelioma are related to asbestos fibre exposure although the mechanism of action of asbestos fibres is not fully understood. The development of artificial mineral fibres and carbon nanotubes, which share some morphological characteristics similar to asbestos fibres, is a present concern in the context of pleural diseases. Pleural plaques develop only in the parietal pleura, and in the 1990s, clinical observations have shown that the early development of mesothelioma also occurred on the parietal pleura. The peculiarity of the parietal pleura in contrast to the visceral pleura is the presence of "stomas" which are communication holes between the pleural cavity and the parietal pleura lymphatics. Morphological observations by thoracoscopy and experimental studies have shown that inhaled fibres translocate to the pleural space and, in human, are present in the parietal pleura at specific anthracotic areas (blackspots). Fibres accumulate on the stomas, up to block and locally induce an inflammatory reaction with cytokines release, that can be the bed of mesothelioma. However, despite the experimental data and observations in human pathology, the mechanisms of fibre translocation into the pleura is not yet clearly established.

  6. Incidence and risk factors of pleural effusions in patients with POEMS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cui, Rong-Tai; Yu, Sheng-Yuan; Huang, Xu-Sheng; Zhang, Jia-Tang; Tian, Cheng-Lin; Dou, Li-Ping; Pu, Chuan-Qiang

    2015-06-01

    Information regarding the characteristics of pleural effusions in patients with POEMS syndrome is limited. The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and risk factors of pleural effusions in patients with POEMS syndrome and characterize the pleural fluid biochemistry in those patients. A retrospective review of 96 patients with POEMS syndrome was conducted. The patients were divided into groups with and without pleural effusions. The clinical data were obtained from medical charts. Risk factors were studied with univariate and multivariate analysis. The median age at the time of diagnosis of POEMS syndrome was 45.1 years, and the median disease duration was 30.4 months. Pleural effusions were detected in 41 (42.7%) of the 96 patients. Increased serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), complement component 3 (C3), Lambda light chain, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 levels and low albumin as well as cardiac disease were found to be significantly correlated with pleural effusions. By multivariate logistic regression, independent risk factors for pleural effusions in POEMS syndrome were VEGF [odds ratio (OR): 2.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.720-3.414, p = 0.01], TNF-α (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.073-4.338, p = 0.04) and C3 (OR: 3.77, 95% CI: 1.225-3.591, p = 0.02) levels. Pleural effusions are the most common thoracic involvement findings in patients with POEMS syndrome, and all the pleural fluids are exudates. Serum VEGF, TNF-α and C3 levels are identified as important risk factors for presence of pleural effusions in POEMS syndrome. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Pleural inhibition of the caspase-1/IL-1β pathway diminishes profibrotic lung toxicity of bleomycin.

    PubMed

    Burgy, Olivier; Bellaye, Pierre-Simon; Causse, Sebastien; Beltramo, Guillaume; Wettstein, Guillaume; Boutanquoi, Pierre-Marie; Goirand, Françoise; Garrido, Carmen; Bonniaud, Philippe

    2016-11-29

    Idiopathic and toxic pulmonary fibrosis are severe diseases starting classically in the subpleural area of the lung. It has recently been suggested that pleural mesothelial cells acquire a myofibroblast phenotype under fibrotic conditions induced by TGF-β1 or bleomycin. The importance and role of inflammation in fibrogenesis are still controversial. In this work, we explored the role of IL-1β/caspase-1 signaling in bleomycin lung toxicity and in pleural mesothelial cell transformation. C57BL/6 mice were intravenously injected with either bleomycin or nigericin or NaCl as control. In vitro, the Met5A cell line was used as a model of human pleural mesothelial cells. Intravenous injections of bleomycin induced lung fibrosis with histologically-proven peripheral distribution, collagen accumulation in the pleural and subpleural area, and overexpression of markers of myofibroblast transformation of pleural cells which migrated into the lung. These events were associated with an inflammatory process with an increase in neutrophil recruitment in pleural lavage fluid and increased caspase-1 activity. TGF-β1 was also overexpressed in pleural lavage fluid and was produced by pleural cells following intravenous bleomycin. In this model, local pleural inhibition of IL-1β with the IL-1β inhibitor anakinra diminished TGF-β1 and collagen accumulation. In vitro, caspase-1 inhibition interfered with Met5A cell transformation into the myofibroblast-like phenotype induced by bleomycin or TGF-β1. Moreover, nigericin, a caspase-1 activator, triggered transformation of Met5A cells and its intra-pleural delivery induced fibrogenesis in mice. We demonstrated, after intravenous bleomycin injection in mice, the role of the pleura and highlighted the key role of IL-1β/caspase-1 axis in this fibrogenesis process.

  8. Medical management of parapneumonic pleural disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, N P; Hull, J; Thomson, A H

    2005-02-01

    Considerable heterogeneity exists in the management of parapneumonic pleural disease. A randomized controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated the effectiveness of small-catheter drainage with fibrinolysis, but surgical devotees suggest this may only be applicable to "early" cases. We examined evidence-based medical management in "all-comers." We performed a retrospective database analysis of the management of all children with complex pleural effusion admitted to the John Radcliffe Hospital over the 7-year period 1996-2003. One hundred and ten children were admitted. Ten were excluded as they were part of a multicenter RCT and had received intrapleural saline instead of urokinase. Of the remaining 100, 51 were female and 49 male. Median age on admission was 5.8 years (range, 0.3-16.5). Symptoms preadmission averaged 11 days, with December the most common month for presentation. Ninety-six underwent chest ultrasound, confirming an effusion in all, described as loculated/septated (68) or echogenic (11). In 17 cases, no specific comment was made regarding the nature of the fluid seen on ultrasound. Ninety-five had subsequent chest tube drainage and then received intrapleural fibrinolysis with urokinase. An etiological organism was identified in 21 cases (21%) (Streptococcus pneumoniae in 10, group A Streptococcus in 5, Staphylococcus aureus in 4, Haemophilus influenzae in 1, and coliform in 1). In a further 9 cases (9%), Gram-positive organisms were seen on pleural fluid microscopy, but did not grow on culture. Two (2%) required surgery due to the persistence of symptoms and an inadequate response to medical management. Median duration of admission was 7 days (range, 2-21 days); median duration of stay from intervention was 5 days (range, 2-19 days). At median follow-up of 8 weeks (range, 3-20 weeks), all children were symptom-free, with minimal pleural thickening on chest X-ray. In conclusion, antibiotic therapy with chest drain insertion and intrapleural urokinase is

  9. Risk prediction with procalcitonin and clinical rules in community-acquired pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, David T.; Weissfeld, Lisa A.; Kellum, John A.; Yealy, Donald M.; Kong, Lan; Martino, Michael; Angus, Derek C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective The Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and CURB-65 predict outcomes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP), but have limitations. Procalcitonin, a biomarker of bacterial infection, may provide prognostic information in CAP. Our objective was to describe the pattern of procalcitonin in CAP, and determine if procalcitonin provides prognostic information beyond PSI and CURB-65. Methods We conducted a multi-center prospective cohort study in 28 community and teaching emergency departments. Patients presenting with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of CAP were enrolled. We stratified procalcitonin levels a priori into four tiers – I: < 0.1; II: ≥ 0.1 to <0.25; III: ≥ 0.25 to < 0.5; and IV: ≥ 0.5 ng/ml. Primary outcome was 30d mortality. Results 1651 patients formed the study cohort. Procalcitonin levels were broadly spread across tiers: 32.8% (I), 21.6% (II), 10.2% (III), 35.4% (IV). Used alone, procalcitonin had modest test characteristics: specificity (35%), sensitivity (92%), positive likelihood ratio (LR) (1.41), and negative LR (0.22). Adding procalcitonin to PSI in all subjects minimally improved performance. Adding procalcitonin to low risk PSI subjects (Class I–III) provided no additional information. However, subjects in procalcitonin tier I had low 30d mortality regardless of clinical risk, including those in higher risk classes (1.5% vs. 1.6% for those in PSI Class I–III vs. Class IV/V). Among high risk PSI subjects (Class IV/V), one quarter (126/546) were in procalcitonin tier I, and the negative LR of procalcitonin tier I was 0.09. Procalcitonin tier I was also associated with lower burden of other adverse outcomes. Similar results were seen with CURB-65 stratification. Conclusions Selective use of procalcitonin as an adjunct to existing rules may offer additional prognostic information in high risk patients. PMID:18342993

  10. The diagnostic role of glycosaminoglycans in pleural effusions: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Vavetsi, Rozina; Bonovas, Stefanos; Polizou, Paraskevi; Papanastasopoulou, Chrysanthi; Dougekou, Georgia; Sitaras, Nikolaos M

    2009-01-01

    Background Pleural effusions are classified into transudates and exudates. Various criteria have been used with Light's et al being the most accepted ones. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) have been detected during pleural fluids (PF) analysis in various causes. In this pilot study, we investigated: (a) the usefulness of GAGs in the assessment of pleural effusions, and (b) whether and in what way GAGs correlate with established criteria used to indicate an exudate. Methods LDH, total protein, cholesterol and GAG levels were measured in pleural fluid and serum from 50 patients with pleural effusion. GAG levels were defined by the photometric method of Hata. The discriminative properties of pleural GAGs (pGAG), pleural fluid/serum GAG ratio (GAGR), serum GAGs (sGAG) and serum LDH (sLDH) were explored with ROC analysis. Results According to ROC analysis, pGAG and GAGR exhibited satisfactory discriminative properties in the separation of pleural effusions. For GAGR, at a 1.1 cut off point, sensitivity and specificity reached 75.6%; 95%CI: 60.5–87.1 and 100%; 95%CI: 47.8–100, respectively. For pGAG at a cut off value of 8.4 μg/ml, these percentages changed to 86.7%; 95%CI: 73.2–94.9 and 100%; 95%CI: 47.8–100. The study also revealed the differential role of sGAG between malignancies and benign cases, scoring 68.8%; 95%CI: 50.0–83.9 for sensitivity, and 84.6%; 95%CI: 54.5–97.6 for specificity at a 7.8 μg/ml cut off. Conclusion Our results suggest that glycosaminoglycan measurement of both serum and pleural effusions could be useful for simultaneous differentiation of exudates from transudates, and of malignant from benign exudates. PMID:19226451

  11. Reduced survival in patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer is associated with high pleural endothelial progenitor cell levels.

    PubMed

    Pirro, Matteo; Cagini, Lucio; Mannarino, Massimo R; Andolfi, Marco; Potenza, Rossella; Paciullo, Francesco; Bianconi, Vanessa; Frangione, Maria Rosaria; Bagaglia, Francesco; Puma, Francesco; Mannarino, Elmo

    2016-12-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells are capable of contributing to neovascularization in tumours. In patients with either malignant or transudative pleural effusion, we tested the presence of pleural endothelial progenitor cells. We also measured the number of endothelial progenitor cells in post-surgery pleural drainage of either patients with early non-small-cell lung cancer or control patients with benign lung disease undergoing pulmonary resection. The prospective influence of post-surgery pleural-drainage endothelial progenitor cells on cancer recurrence/survival was investigated. Pleural endothelial progenitor cell levels were quantified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis in pleural effusion of 15 patients with late-stage non-small-cell lung cancer with pleural involvement and in 15 control patients with congestive heart failure. Also, pleural-drainage endothelial progenitor cells were measured in pleural-drainage fluid 48 h after surgery in 64 patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer and 20 benign lung disease patients undergoing pulmonary resection. Cancer recurrence and survival was evaluated in patients with high pleural-drainage endothelial progenitor cell levels. The number of pleural endothelial progenitor cells was higher in non-small-cell lung cancer pleural effusion than in transudative pleural effusion. Also, pleural-drainage endothelial progenitor cell levels were higher in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer than in patients with benign lung disease undergoing pulmonary resection (P < 0.05). Non-small-cell lung cancer patients with high pleural-drainage endothelial progenitor cell levels had a significantly 4.9 higher rate of cancer recurrence/death than patients with lower pleural-drainage endothelial progenitor cell levels, irrespective of confounders. Endothelial progenitor cells are present in the pleural effusion and are higher in patients with late-stage non-small-cell lung cancer with pleural involvement than in

  12. Evaluation of cholinesterase to differentiate pleural exudates and transudates.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manju; Gupta, K B; Goyal, Kirori M; Nand, Nitya

    2004-05-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the usefulness of pleural fluid cholinesterase (PChE) level in pleural fluid and its ratio to serum cholinesterase (P/SChE) in order to differentiate transudates and exudates and to compare their diagnostic efficacy with the Light's criteria. A total of 110 patients of pleural effusion of diverse etiology were studied. Eighty patients were of exudative pleural effusion of tubercular, malignant or parapneumonic origin and 30 patients were of transudative effusion. Cholinesterase was estimated in the pleural fluid and serum in all the patients. The mean PChE and P/S ChE were significantly higher in exudates as compared to transudates (p < 0.001). P/S ChE was 0.79 +/- 0.45 and 0.14 +/- 0.11 in exudates and transudates, respectively. When a cut-off value of 469 IU/L for PChE was taken for the diagnosis, it was found that 10% of exudates and 2.5% of transudates were misclassified. However percentage of misclassification decreased to 1.25% in exudates and 3.3% in transudates when the cut-off value of 0.24 for P/S ChE ratio was used. Using Light's criteria, a sensitivity of 91.25% and specificity of 90% with positive predictive value (PPV) of 96.05% and negative predictive value (NPV) of 79.42% was observed. However using P/S ChE, the PPV was 98.75% and NPV was 96.67%. The estimation of PChE and P/SChE ratio had better discriminatory capacity than Light's criteria. It is cost effective and more specific, therefore its routine estimation is recommended.

  13. Protean manifestations of pleural empyema caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in adults.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Cotarelo, María José; López-Medrano, Francisco; San Juan, Rafael; Díaz-Pedroche, Carmen; Lizasoain, Manuel; Chaves, Fernando; Aguado, José María

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of pleural empyema caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted at the University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid (Spain). We included all adult patients with pleural empyema caused by S. pneumoniae diagnosed from 1998 to 2004. Eighteen cases of pleural empyema due to S. pneumoniae were analyzed. Fourteen patients had symptoms of respiratory infection, three had other symptoms, and one patient was asymptomatic. One-third of the patients did not have a pneumonia infiltrate visible on chest radiogram. In 46%, bacteremia was detected. All pleural fluids had a high white blood cell count, either with polymorphonuclear or lymphocytic predominance. Drainage with a chest tube was used in 94.4% of cases. Nine patients had a favorable outcome, five had to be admitted to the intensive care unit, and two died within the first week (mortality rate of 11.1%). Pleural empyema caused by S. pneumoniae has to be considered an aggressive disease that, occasionally, affects young and previously healthy individuals. Clinical manifestations are variable and pleural fluid can be a lymphocytic exudate. It has a noticeable associated morbidity and mortality, which must be kept in mind by clinicians when approaching a patient with a pleural effusion.

  14. Does the Evaluation of Coagulation Factors Contribute to Etiological Diagnosis of Pleural Effusions?

    PubMed Central

    Vaz, Marcelo Alexandre Costa; Vargas, Francisco Suso; de Andrade Marinho, Felipe Costa; D’Amico, Élbio Antonio; Rocha, Tânia Rubia Flores; Teixeira, Lisete Ribeiro

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to identify the participation of the coagulation system in the differential diagnosis of pleural effusions. INTRODUCTION Imbalance between immunologic and metabolic factors triggers a sequence of events resulting in pleural reactions and accumulation of fluid. The coagulation system, which is fundamental for the maintenance of homeostasis, contributes to the inflammatory process responsible for pleural effusions, and participates in cellular proliferation and migration as well as in the synthesis of inflammatory mediators. METHODS We evaluated the laboratory profile of coagulation and fibrinolysis in 54 pleural fluids (15 transudates and 39 exudates). RESULTS The coagulation system acts according to the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in the development of pleural effusions. In inflammatory effusions (exudates), there is activation of coagulation with increased levels of fragment 1+2 and thrombin-antithrombin complex in addition to reduction of fibrinogen levels due to fibrinolysis and fibrin tissue incorporation. As a consequence, there is activation of the fibrinolytic system with increased levels of fibrin degradation products, including the D-dimer. These changes are not sufficient for differentiation of different subgroups of exudates. In transudates, these events were observed to a lesser degree. CONCLUSION The coagulation system plays an important role in the development of pleural diseases. Coagulation tests show differences between transudates and exudates but not among exudate subgroups. Understanding the physiopathological mechanisms of pleural disorders may help to define new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:19759883

  15. Procalcitonin Strip Test as an Independent Predictor in Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Dias, Brendan Hermenigildo; Rozario, Anthony Prakash; Olakkengil, Santosh Antony; V, Anirudh

    2015-12-01

    Plasma procalcitonin (PCT) is a highly specific marker for the diagnosis of bacterial infection and sepsis. Studies have demonstrated its role in the setting of sepsis and acute pancreatitis. This study aims to analyze and compare the prognostic efficacy of plasma procalcitonin strip test in acute pancreatitis. A prospective study was conducted in the department of general surgery from June 2012 to June 2013. Plasma procalcitonin was estimated by the semiquantitative strip test. The study included a total of 50 patients diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. Data was collected and statistically analyzed using SPSS version 17. Thirty-nine out of the 50 patients (78 %) were males with a mean age of 46.8 years (range, 25-78 years) and 25 patients (50 %) had ethanol-induced pancreatitis, while 13 patients (26 %) had gall stone pancreatitis. Plasma PCT values were found to correlate better than CRP levels and total leukocyte count with the total duration of hospitalization, ITU, and ICU stay, as well as with the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. A cut off for plasma PCT of >2 ng/mL was found to be 100 % sensitive and 100 % specific and a cut off for CRP of >19 mg/dL was 70 % sensitive and 65 % specific for predicting the progression to severe acute pancreatitis. Plasma PCT also correlated well with antibiotic requirement. A cut off value of >0.5 ng/mL for plasma PCT was 100 % sensitive and 80 % specific and a cut off value of >18 mg/dL for CRP was 86 % sensitive and 63 % specific for predicting antibiotic requirement. Plasma procalcitonin is an early and reliable prognostic indicator in acute pancreatitis. The procalcitonin strip test is a rapid test which is useful in analyzing prognosis in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  16. [Surgical pleural biopsy].

    PubMed

    Bracco, A N; Bouteiller, J M; Della Torre, H A; Golonbek, M

    1965-10-01

    The authors emphasize on the importance of histologic study of the sick pleura to obtain a diagnosis and to decide the treatment, operative or not, which must be specific. They choose the surgical biopsy and analyze the results obtained in 104 operations performed on 100 patients. Four groups of lesions are established: 1) malignant tumors (primary and secondary), 2) Non specific pleuritis consecutive to carcinoma of the lung or other organs, usually metastatic from the breast or the digestive tract, 3) Non specific pleuritis, and 4) Tuberculosis. Cancer or tuberculosis are found in pleurisies of different types. Cancer was found in a 43,7% of the serous pleurisies, in a 64% of the seroushemorrhagic, and in a 46% of the hemorrhagic pleurisies. Tuberculosis was found in a 15,6 % of the serous, in a 7,14 % of the seroushemorrhagic and in a 15,7 % of the purulent. In one case of hemorrhagic pleurisy in which the diagnosis of tuberculosis was not made, further studies confirmed it. The authors point to the existence of non specific pleuritis without neoplastic infiltration in some pleurisies consecutive to lung tumors or from other organs and to its therapeutic consequences. They also inform having found tuberculosis in patients over 50 years of age (8 in 11 cases). In this series the youngest pleural cancer case was a 27 years old man.

  17. Determining the Clinical Utility of an Absolute Procalcitonin Value for Predicting a Positive Culture Result.

    PubMed

    Caffarini, Erica M; DeMott, Joshua; Patel, Gourang; Lat, Ishaq

    2017-05-01

    Various procalcitonin ranges have been established to guide antimicrobial therapy; however, there are no data that establish whether the initial procalcitonin value can determine the likelihood of a positive culture result. This study aimed to establish if the initial procalcitonin value, on clinical presentation, has a positive predictive value for any positive culture result. This was a retrospective study of 813 medical intensive care unit patients. Data collected included patient demographics, procalcitonin assay results, sources of infection, culture results, and lengths of stay. Patients were excluded if they were immunocompromised. The primary outcome of this study was to determine a procalcitonin value that would predict any positive culture. Secondary outcomes included the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for procalcitonin. After exclusions, a total of 519 patient charts were reviewed to determine the impact of the initial procalcitonin value on culture positivity. In our analyses, the receiver operating characteristic values were 0.62 for all cultures, 0.49 for pulmonary infections, 0.43 for urinary tract infections, and 0.78 for bacteremia. A procalcitonin value of 3.61 ng/ml was determined to be the threshold value for a positive blood culture result (prevalence, 4%). For bacteremia, the sensitivity of procalcitonin was 75%, the specificity was 72%, the positive predictive value was 20%, and the negative predictive value was 97%. Procalcitonin was a poor predictor of culture positivity. An initial procalcitonin value of less than 3.61 ng/ml may be useful in predicting whether bacteremia is absent. Procalcitonin should not be used as the only predictor for determining initiation of antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Elevated levels of anti inflammatory IL-10 and pro inflammatory IL-17 in malignant pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Klimatsidas, Michail; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos; Foroulis, Christophoros; Tossios, Paschalis; Bisiklis, Alexandros; Papakonstantinou, Christos; Rammos, Kyriakos

    2012-10-04

    Pleural effusions can be caused by highly different underlying diseases and are characterized by complex interactions of various local and circulating cells as well as numerous soluble parameters like interleukins (IL). Knowledge of this complex network can be helpful in order to make the differential diagnosis in known malignant pleural effusions and understand the underlying immunochemistry of each disease or condition. We investigated immunoreactive concentrations of Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Interleukin 17 (IL-17) in malignant pleural effusions and peripheral blood from patients with bronchial carcinomas and other carcinomas, excluding other conditions such as congestive heart failure (CHF) and pneumonias in twenty four (24) patients (9 men/15 women), 37-74 years (mean:61) with already diagnosed malignant pleural effusions applying the ELISA method. The SPSS 15 program for Windows was used. Quantitative analysis showed high concentrations of IL-10 and IL-17 in pleural fluid and blood. Even though IL-17 levels -both blood and pleural- were lower than IL-10's, statistical correlation between blood and pleural concentations was proven, confirming once more the systematic action of these cytokines. At the same time high IL-17 levels in malignant effusions shows maybe a new perspective in understanding the pathophysiology of malignant pleural effusions. Our results confirm the pathogenetic role of these cytokines in malignant pleural effusions combining for the first time a pro- and an anti- inflammatory cytokine. The observation that IL-17 is elevated in malignant pleural effusions may give a new meaning in Virchow's remarks 100 years ago. Larger number of patients is needed to confirm our hypothesis.

  19. Modified TB rapid test by proteinase K for rapid diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Yari, Shamsi; Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Alireza; Ghanei, Mostafa; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Fateh, Abolfazl; Yari, Fatemeh; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis continues to be a challenge due to the low sensitivity of traditional diagnostic methods. Better and more rapid tests are needed for diagnosis of pleural TB. In this study, pleural fluids were tested with rapid test to determine Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB antigen). Affinity chromatography was used to purify specific polyclonal antibodies against MTB antigen. Pleural samples after decontamination were treated with proteinase K. Rapid test for pleural fluids was prepared by specific antibody. Rapid test was performed on 85 pleural fluid patients. The patients had a mean age of 46.55 ± 15.96 years and 38 were men. The performance of rapid test, using proteinase K, was found to be the most impressive: sensitivity 93%, specificity 94%, PPV 90%, and NPV 96% compared with adenosine deaminase test (ADA), PCR, smear, and culture. The present study did demonstrate that modified TB rapid test can substantially improve the diagnosis of extrapulmonary TB. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evaluation of two strategies for the interpretation of tumour markers in pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Trapé, Jaume; Sant, Francesc; Franquesa, Josefina; Montesinos, Jesús; Arnau, Anna; Sala, Maria; Bernadich, Oscar; Martín, Esperanza; Perich, Damià; Pérez, Concha; Lopez, Joan; Ros, Sandra; Esteve, Enrique; Pérez, Rafael; Aligué, Jordi; Gurt, Gabriel; Catot, Silvia; Domenech, Montserrat; Bosch, Joan; Badal, Josep Miquel; Bonet, Mariona; Molina, Rafael; Ordeig, Josep

    2017-05-25

    Pleural effusions present a diagnostic challenge. Approximately 20% are associated with cancer and some 50% require invasive procedures to perform diagnosis. Determination of tumour markers may help to identify patients with malignant effusions. Two strategies are used to obtain high specificity in the differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions: a) high cut-off, and b) fluid/serum (F/S) ratio and low cut-off. The aim of this study is to compare these two strategies and to establish whether the identification of possible false positives using benign biomarkers - ADA, CRP and % of polymorphonuclear cells - improves diagnostic accuracy. We studied 402 pleural effusions, 122 of them malignant. Benign biomarkers were determined in pleural fluid, and CEA, CA72-4, CA19-9 and CA15-3 in pleural fluid and serum. Establishing a cut-off value for each TM for a specificity of 100%, a joint sensitivity of 66.5% was obtained. With the F/S strategy and low cut-off points, sensitivity was 77% and specificity 98.2%, Subclassifying cases with negative benign biomarkers, both strategies achieved a specificity of 100%; sensitivity was 69.9% for single determination and 80.6% for F/S ratio. The best interpretation of TM in the differential diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions is obtained using the F/S ratio in the group with negative benign biomarkers.

  1. Does the usage of digital chest drainage systems reduce pleural inflammation and volume of pleural effusion following oncologic pulmonary resection?-A prospective randomized trial.

    PubMed

    De Waele, Michèle; Agzarian, John; Hanna, Waël C; Schieman, Colin; Finley, Christian J; Macri, Joseph; Schneider, Laura; Schnurr, Terri; Farrokhyar, Forough; Radford, Katherine; Nair, Parameswaran; Shargall, Yaron

    2017-06-01

    Prolonged air leak and high-volume pleural drainage are the most common causes for delays in chest tube removal following lung resection. While digital pleural drainage systems have been successfully used in the management of post-operative air leak, their effect on pleural drainage and inflammation has not been studied before. We hypothesized that digital drainage systems (as compared to traditional analog continuous suction), using intermittent balanced suction, are associated with decreased pleural inflammation and postoperative drainage volumes, thus leading to earlier chest tube removal. One hundred and three [103] patients were enrolled and randomized to either analog (n=50) or digital (n=53) drainage systems following oncologic lung resection. Chest tubes were removed according to standardized, pre-defined protocol. Inflammatory mediators [interleukin-1B (IL-1B), 6, 8, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α)] in pleural fluid and serum were measured and analysed. The primary outcome of interest was the difference in total volume of postoperative fluid drainage. Secondary outcome measures included duration of chest tube in-situ, prolonged air-leak incidence, length of hospital stay and the correlation between pleural effusion formation, degree of inflammation and type of drainage system used. There was no significant difference in total amount of fluid drained or length of hospital stay between the two groups. A trend for shorter chest tube duration was found with the digital system when compared to the analog (P=0.055). Comparison of inflammatory mediator levels revealed no significant differences between digital and analog drainage systems. The incidence of prolonged post-operative air leak was significantly higher when using the analog system (9 versus 2 patients; P=0.025). Lobectomy was associated with longer chest tube duration (P=0.001) and increased fluid drainage when compared to sub-lobar resection (P<0.001), regardless of drainage system. Use of post

  2. The impact of tracheotomy on levels of procalcitonin in patients without sepsis: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xingui; Fu, Chunlai; Wang, Changfa; Cai, Yeping; Zhang, Sheng'an; Guo, Wei; Kuang, Daibing

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Procalcitonin is a reliable biomarker of infection and sepsis. We aimed to determine whether tracheotomy influences the procalcitonin concentrations in patients without sepsis and assess whether operative duration and procedure affect the peak procalcitonin level. METHODS: A total of 38 non-septic patients who required a tracheotomy underwent either a percutaneous dilatational tracheotomy (n=19) or a surgical tracheotomy (n=19). Procalcitonin levels were measured at the beginning of the tracheotomy and at 2 h, 4 h, 8 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h after the procedure. RESULTS: The baseline procalcitonin concentration before the tracheotomy was 0.24±0.13 ng/mL. The postoperative levels increased rapidly, with a 4-fold elevation after 2 h, reaching a peak 4 h later with a 5-fold increase over baseline. Thereafter, the levels gradually returned to 2-fold greater than the baseline level within 72 h. The peak levels of procalcitonin showed a significant positive correlation with operative durations (r=0.710, p<0.001) and procedures (rho=0.670, p<0.001). CONCLUSION: In patients without sepsis, tracheotomy induces a rapid release of serum procalcitonin, and the operative duration and procedure have significant impacts on the peak procalcitonin levels. Thus, the nonspecific increase in procalcitonin levels following tracheotomy needs to be considered when this measure is used to evaluate infection. PMID:26375562

  3. Asymptomatic localized pleural amyloidosis mimicking malignant pleural mesothelioma: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Endo, Shunsuke; Tetsuka, Kenji; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2016-01-01

    We herein report an asymptomatic 65-year-old male with localized pleural amyloidosis mimicking malignant pleural mesothelioma. He had a history of exposure to asbestos and was admitted for investigation of an abnormal pleural thickness detected by chest radiography. Positron emission tomography showed elevation of standardized uptake value corresponding to the pleural thickness. Partial pleurectomy including the tumor was performed for the purpose of diagnosis and local disease control. The pathological examination showed that the tumor was pleural amyloidosis. The tumor was diagnosed as localized primary amyloidosis, because serum monoclonal protein concentration did not increase. Pleural amyloidosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis from pleural mesothelioma.

  4. Early dislodgement of Indwelling Pleural Catheter (IPC): a balancing act.

    PubMed

    Tung, Alvin Hon Man; Ngai, Jenny Chun Li; Ng, Susanna So Shan; Ko, Fanny Wai San; Hui, David Shu-Cheong

    2014-03-01

    A 63-year-old nonsmoker with right malignant pleural effusion derived symptomatic benefit following drainage of his effusion. Following insertion of indwelling pleural catheter (IPC), 1.3 L of blood-stained fluid was drained into underwater sealed bottle (Atrium®), but the IPC dislodged 26 h after continuous connection. We believe that the weight of the drainage bottle (including the un-emptied fluid) and the prolonged connection time contributed to this uncommon event reported in the literature. There was no recurrence when his second IPC was connected to a drainage bag which was emptied at every 500 mL, capped at 2 h each time. An anchoring stitch should also be considered when drainage devices heavier than the manufacturer bottles are used to drain IPC.

  5. Minoxidil-associated exudative pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Atif; Ansari, Mohammed; Shakil, Jawairia; Chemitiganti, Rama

    2010-05-01

    Recurrent pleural effusions are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Drug-related reactions causing pleural effusions are not common, but their identification can potentially improve patient outcome. Minoxidil has been implicated in pleuropericardial effusions in patients with chronic kidney disease. The exact mechanism by which pleural effusion occurs is still unclear. We report a case of isolated exudative pleural effusion associated with minoxidil in a patient without underlying kidney disease that almost completely resolved after the drug was discontinued.

  6. Hemorrhagic sarcoid pleural effusion: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Onkar; Nair, Vidya; Talwar, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Involvement of pleura by sarcoidosis remains a rare manifestation and varies from pleural effusion, pneumothorax, pleural thickening, hydropneumothorax, trapped lung, hemothorax, or chylothorax. Sarcoid pleural effusions presenting as hemorrhagic effusions are even more rare. We report a case of active pulmonary sarcoidosis presenting as hemorrhagic pleural effusion requiring tissue diagnosis to rule out malignancy. The rarity of the presentation prompted us to report this case. PMID:27625449

  7. Serum procalcitonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, Mustafa; Oktay, Esin; Tarhan, Emine F; Aslan, Ozgur; Oflazoglu, Utku; Koseoglu, Mehmet H

    2016-05-01

    Procalcitonin is a marker of bacterial and fungal infection and sepsis. The present study evaluated the relationship between serum procalcitonin levels and disease activity in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A total of 61 patients who met the 1984 New York criteria for AS were studied. Twenty-four age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were recruited to this study as a control group. Disease activity was assessed by the Bath AS Disease Activity Index (BASDAI). The functional status of patients was evaluated by the Bath AS Functional Index (BASFI). Spinal mobility was measured by the Bath AS Metrology Index (BASMI). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum procalcitonin levels were measured. Thirty patients were on anti-tumor necrosis factor-alpha treatment and 31 patients were on conventional treatment. Seventeen (28%) of the AS patients were active (BASDAI > 4) and 44 (72%) of the AS patients were in remission. The median ESR was 14 (34-6) mm/h and 4 (7-2) mm/h (P < 0.001) for the patient and control groups, respectively. The median CRP level was 0.91 (2.72-0.37) mg/dL and 0.15 (0.25-0.07) mg/dL in the patient and control groups, respectively (P < 0.001). Median BASDAI, BASFI and BASMI scores for all AS patients were 3.6 (5.25-2.29), 2.5 (4.22-0.91) and 3 (5-1), respectively. Serum procalcitonin levels were normal (< 0.05 ng/mL) for all patients and controls. Serum procalcitonin levels were not high in AS patients and controls, and the levels were independent of disease activity and medications. If bacterial or fungal infection is suspected in an AS patient, serum procalcitonin level may be useful for diagnosis. © 2014 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. [Benign pleural pathology of asbestos].

    PubMed

    Chailleux, E; Rembeaux, A; de Lajartre, A Y; Delumeau, J

    1988-01-01

    The most frequent benign lesions of the pleura created by asbestos are fibro-hyaline plaques, i.e. thick areas of collagen located on the parietal pleura and gradually becoming calcified. Less common is benign pleural effusion the cause of which is not always easy to determine. To these must be added an extensive pleural fibrosis with functional repercussions that are not negligible, and round pseudotumoral atelectasias. These pleural asbestos-induced lesions are often observed after a low intensity exposure, but they appear as a rule after more than 20 years of latency. While they betray a previous exposure to asbestos, they also raise the problem of possible asbestos-induced lung cancer and mesothelioma.

  9. Management of malignant pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongbin; Brahmer, Julie

    2008-07-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) often presents in patients with cancer at an advanced stage and thus carries a poor prognosis. This review updates the current knowledge on the management of MPE, focusing on recent literature about the efficacy and safety of the most common methods, including pleurodesis by either thoracoscopy with talc insufflation or thoracostomy with talc slurry, use of an indwelling pleural catheter, and intrapleural chemotherapy. Talc remains the agent of choice in pleurodesis, although the use of alternative agents continues to be explored. The choice of procedure to achieve pleurodesis depends on careful patient selection based on predictive factors and individual characteristics. Talc pleuro-desis is relatively well tolerated and safe, as is an indwelling pleural catheter, in an appropriate patient population. Because MPE is a common problem in cancer patients, future research with more randomized, prospective designs and innovative interventions is needed.

  10. Primary pleural liposarcoma, pleomorphic variant.

    PubMed

    Carrillo B, Jorge Alberto; Navarrete, Constanza; López Arias, María Alejandra; Peláez, Mauricio

    2014-09-01

    Primary pleural liposarcoma (PPL) is a rare tumor derived from primitive mesenchymal tissue. We report a case of a 49-year-old female patient complaining of thoracic pain and dyspnea for 3 months. The chest X-ray showed a left basal opacity of lobulated contours and the thoracic computer tomography (CT) scan revealed a left pleural collection/mass, of 18 HU density and passive pulmonary atelectasis. The patient was taken to surgery and the cytologic examination of the gelatinous mass found in the procedure confirmed the diagnosis of a pleomorphic variant of pleural liposarcoma. We emphasise in the importance of careful inspection of the origin of the tumor in the diagnostic images to allow accurate diagnosis.

  11. Spontaneous Bacterial Empyema in Liver Cirrhosis: An Underdiagnosed Pleural Complication

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Naglaa A. H.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema, defined as spontaneous infection of the pleural fluid, represents a distinct complication of hepatic hydrothorax with a different pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment strategy from those of empyema secondary to pneumonia. Nearly 40% of episodes of spontaneous empyema are not associated with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or even ascites. The condition portends a poor prognosis, and is frequently under-diagnosed. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of spontaneous bacterial empyema. PMID:19568497

  12. Spontaneous bacterial empyema in liver cirrhosis: an underdiagnosed pleural complication.

    PubMed

    Allam, Naglaa A H

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema, defined as spontaneous infection of the pleural fluid, represents a distinct complication of hepatic hydrothorax with a different pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment strategy from those of empyema secondary to pneumonia. Nearly 40% of episodes of spontaneous empyema are not associated with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or even ascites. The condition portends a poor prognosis, and is frequently under-diagnosed. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of spontaneous bacterial empyema.

  13. Pleural Effusion in Meigs' Syndrome-Transudate or Exudate?: Systematic Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Krenke, Rafal; Maskey-Warzechowska, Marta; Korczynski, Piotr; Zielinska-Krawczyk, Monika; Klimiuk, Joanna; Chazan, Ryszarda; Light, Richard W

    2015-12-01

    Although Meigs' syndrome is regarded as a well-defined entity, contradictory data on pleural fluid characteristics have been presented, with some papers classifying it as a transudate, whereas others stating that it is an exudate.The aims of the study were: (1) to evaluate pleural fluid characteristics in patients with Meigs' syndrome and (2) to analyze the prevalence of transudative and exudative pleural effusion in relation to the applied definition of the syndrome.We performed a search through medical databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, and GOOGLE SCHOLAR) to identify papers on Meigs' syndrome published between 1940 and 2013. Two authors independently reviewed each paper searching for prespecified data: (1) signs and symptoms, (2) tumor characteristics, (3) clinical and laboratory data on ascites, (4) clinical, radiological, and laboratory data on pleural fluid, (5) clinical course after tumor removal. All case reports were reclassified according to a new unequivocal classification of Meigs' syndrome-related entities.A total of 653 papers were initially identified, and 454 articles reporting 541 patients were included in the final analysis. After reclassification according to our case definitions, there were 196, 113, and 108 patients defined as classic Meigs' syndrome, nonclassic Meigs' syndrome, and pseudo-Meigs' syndrome, respectively. Significantly more patients presented with right-sided than left-sided and bilateral pleural effusions (P < 0.001). Median volume of withdrawn pleural fluid was 2950 (1500-6000) mL. The classification of pleural effusion with the use of Light's criteria was possible in only 7 patients. In 6 of these patients pleural effusion met the criteria for an exudate. When the protein concentration > 3.0 g/dL was applied as a criterion of pleural exudate, 88.8% (80/90) of effusions were classified as exudates. Increasing the cut-off level to 3.5 g/dL resulted in only a modest decrease in the percentage of exudative effusions (81

  14. Traumatic subarachnoid-pleural fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.H.; Stothert, J.C. Jr.

    1985-11-01

    Traumatic subarachnoid-pleural fistulas are rare. The authors found nine cases reported since 1959. Seven have been secondary to trauma and two following thoracotomy. One patient's death is thought to be directly related to the fistula. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients with a pleural effusion and associated vertebral trauma. The diagnosis can usually be confirmed with contrast or radioisotopic myelography. Successful closure of the fistula will usually occur spontaneously with closed tube drainage and antibiotics; occasionally, thoracotomy is necessary to close the rent in the dura.

  15. Diagnosis and management options in malignant pleural effusions

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Ramakant; Agarwal, KC; Gokhroo, Archana; Patil, Chetan B; Meena, Manoj; Shah, Narender S; Arora, Piyush

    2017-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) denotes an advanced malignant disease process. Most of the MPE are metastatic involvement of the pleura from primary malignancy at lung, breast, and other body sites apart from lymphomas. The diagnosis of MPE has been traditionally made on cytological examination of pleural fluid and/or histological examination of pleural biopsy tissue that still remains the initial approach in these cases. There has been tremendous advancement in the diagnosis of MPE now a day with techniques i.e. characteristic Ultrasound and computed tomography features, image guided biopsies, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography imaging, thoracoscopy with direct biopsy under vision, tumor marker studies and immunocytochemical analysis etc., that have made possible an early diagnosis of MPE. The management of MPE still remains a challenge to pulmonologist and oncologist. Despite having various modalities with better tolerance such as pleurodesis and indwelling pleural catheters etc., for long-term control, all the management approaches remain palliative to improve the quality of life and reduce symptoms. While choosing an appropriate management intervention, one should consider the clinical status of the patient, life expectancy, overall cost, availability and comparative institutional outcomes, etc. PMID:28360465

  16. Efficacy of CT in diagnosis of transudates and exudates in patients with pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Çullu, Neşat; Kalemci, Serdar; Karakaş, Ömer; Eser, İrfan; Yalçin, Funda; Boyacı, Fatıma Nurefşan; Karakaş, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of multidetector computed tomography (CT) imaging in diagnosis of pleural exudates and transudates using attenuation values. This retrospective study included 106 patients who were diagnosed with pleural effusion between January 2010 and June 2012. After the patients underwent chest CT, thoracentesis was performed in the first week. The attenuation values of the pleural effusions were measured in all patients. According to Light's criteria, 30 of 106 patients with pleural effusions had transudates, and the remaining patients had exudates. The Hounsfield unit (HU) value of the exudates (median, 12.5; range, 4-33) was significantly higher than that of the transudates (median, 5; range, 2-15) (P = 0.001). Additionally, when evaluated by disease subgroups, congestive heart failure and empyema were predictable in terms of median HU values of the pleural effusions with high and moderate sensitivity and specificity values (84.6% and 81.2%, respectively; 76.9% and 66.7%, respectively). Compared with other patients, the empyema patients had significantly more loculation and pleural thickening. CT attenuation values may be useful in differentiating exudates from transudates. Although there is an overlap in most effusions, exudate can be considered when the CT attenuation values are >15 HU. Because of overlapping HU values, close correlation with clinical findings is essential. Additional signs, such as fluid loculation and pleural thickness, should be considered and may provide further information for the differentiation.

  17. Efficacy of CT in diagnosis of transudates and exudates in patients with pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Çullu, Neşat; Kalemci, Serdar; Karakaş, Ömer; Eser, İrfan; Yalçın, Funda; Boyacı, Fatıma Nurefşan; Karakaş, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of multidetector computed tomography (CT) imaging in diagnosis of pleural exudates and transudates using attenuation values. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study included 106 patients who were diagnosed with pleural effusion between January 2010 and June 2012. After the patients underwent chest CT, thoracentesis was performed in the first week. The attenuation values of the pleural effusions were measured in all patients. RESULTS According to Light’s criteria, 30 of 106 patients with pleural effusions had transudates, and the remaining patients had exudates. The Hounsfield unit (HU) value of the exudates (median, 12.5; range, 4–33) was significantly higher than that of the transudates (median, 5; range, 2–15) (P = 0.001). Additionally, when evaluated by disease subgroups, congestive heart failure and empyema were predictable in terms of median HU values of the pleural effusions with high and moderate sensitivity and specificity values (84.6% and 81.2%, respectively; 76.9% and 66.7%, respectively). Compared with other patients, the empyema patients had significantly more loculation and pleural thickening. CONCLUSION CT attenuation values may be useful in differentiating exu-dates from transudates. Although there is an overlap in most effusions, exudate can be considered when the CT attenuation values are >15 HU. Because of overlapping HU values, close correlation with clinical findings is essential. Additional signs, such as fluid loculation and pleural thickness, should be considered and may provide further information for the differentiation. PMID:24100060

  18. Procalcitonin and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children.

    PubMed

    Giulia, Bivona; Luisa, Agnello; Concetta, Scazzone; Bruna, Lo Sasso; Chiara, Bellia; Marcello, Ciaccio

    2015-12-07

    The role of procalcitonin (PCT) as a biomarker for sepsis in adults is well documented, while its role in infections affecting neonatal children remains controversial. Among these infections, Community-Acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been studied extensively, because it's the second cause of death in children in developing countries, and one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization in industrialized countries. The PubMed database and the Cochrane Library were used to search for the following keywords: CAP, procalcitonin, and children. Thirteen articles were studied to determine the role of PCT in CAP management, specifically its usefulness for distinguishing pneumococcal infections from viral and unknown infections, for predicting severity and the correct antibiotic treatment. This paper focuses on the studies performed to identify the best inflammatory biomarker for CAP management. Although there is an increase in studies confirming the usefulness of PCT in CAP management in children, further studies are needed to have better understanding of its role for pediatric CAP management.

  19. Pleural infection-current diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Pleural infection is a common and increasing clinical problem in thoracic medicine, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. In recent years there has been a marked increase in interests and publications relating to evolving interventions and management options for pleural infection and empyema. Recently published research data as well as guidelines have suggested better approaches of radiological assessment, updated management algorithms for pleural infection, intrapleural adjunct therapies and re-examined the roles of biomarkers, pleural drainage techniques, and the role of surgery. This review highlights some of the recent advances and recommendations relevant to clinical care of pleural infection. PMID:22833824

  20. [Malignant pleural mesothelioma with multiple nodules].

    PubMed

    Asano, Michiko; Gemba, Kenichi; Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Nishi, Hideyuki; Taguchi, Koji; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2011-12-01

    A 62-year-old man with left chest pain had left pleural effusion pointed out on a chest radiograph. Chest CT scans showed multiple nodules on the left parietal pleura and pleural effusion. He was referred to our hospital and we performed thoracoscopic examination. Malignant pleural mesothelioma (biphasic type) was diagnosed, based on the pathological findings of a parietal nodular mass, including immunohistological analysis. Chemotherapy using carboplatin and pemetrexed reduced the size of tumor and left pleural effusion. This is a rare case with atypical CT findings of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

  1. Adenosine deaminase activity level as a tool for diagnosing tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Khow-Ean, Nathapol; Booraphun, Suchart; Aekphachaisawat, Noppadol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2013-07-04

    The yield for using a pleural fluid culture to diagnose tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) is low. Adenosine deaminase activity (ADA) has been shown to have good diagnostic value for TPE. The ADA cutoff point for the diagnosis of TPE is unclear. We attempted to determine the ADA level cutoff point for diagnosing of TPE in Thailand, where tuberculosis is endemic. We reviewed the medical records of patients with newly diagnosed pleural effusion aged >15 years who had a pleural fluid ADAlevel and who underwent a pleural biopsy. The study period was from March 1, 2010 to January 31, 2011. The diagnoses of TPE and malignant pleural effusion (MPE) were based on pathological findings. The diagnostic cutoff level for using ADA to diagnose TPE was determined. Forty-eight patients met study criteria. Of those, 18 patients (37.5%) were diagnosed with TPE. The mean ADA level was significantly higher among patients in the TPE group than in the MPE group (38.2 vs 14.8 U/l, p < 0.001). The cutoff level of 17.5 U/l gave sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio, and negative likelihood ratio of 88.9%, 73.3%, 3.33, and 0.15, respectively. An ADA level >17.5 U/l had good diagnostic values among TPE patients in our study.

  2. The case for performing pleural biopsies for the aetiological diagnosis of exudates. Yes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Panadero, F

    2017-10-01

    Pleural biopsies are especially indicated in the following circumstances: a) inconclusive pleural fluid analysis and negative sputum study, if adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels are unavailable; b) suspected multi-resistant tuberculosis; c) a need for differentiating tuberculous pleurisy (if it progresses with neutrophilia) and complicated parapneumonic effusion; d) malignant pleural effusion coexisting with very high ADA levels; e) effusion coexisting with lung cancer and negative pleural cytology; f) suspected mesothelioma; and g) need for implementing re-treatment for patients with relapse after chemotherapy. Image-guided needle biopsy is recommended for cases a and b, while thoracoscopy is preferable for the other cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  3. Medical Thoracoscopy vs Closed Pleural Biopsy in Pleural Effusions: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Nithya; K P, Suraj; T P, Rajagopal; P T, James; Chetambath, Ravindran

    2014-05-01

    Pleural effusion is a common diagnostic dilemma for the pulmonologist. A histological diagnosis would many a time steer the way to an accurate diagnosis of the aetiologies of pleural effusions. This study has compared two methods for obtaining histological specimens in cases of undiagnosed pleural effusions. To compare the efficacy of closed pleural biopsy with Abrahm's needle and medical thoracoscopic biopsy in the diagnosis of undiagnosed exudative pleural effusions at a tertiary care setting. Randomized controlled study. November 2008-October 2010. All patients who were admitted with pleural effusions underwent a clinical workup for pleural effusions. Light's criterion was used to differentiate between exudative and transudative pleural effusions. Those patients with exudative pleural effusions, who did not have a specific diagnosis, were included in the study. Fifty eight patients were included in the study and they were randomized into 2 Groups of 29 patients each. One group was subjected to medical thoracoscopic pleural biopsy and the other to closed pleural biopsy with Abrahm's needle. Demographic, clinical and biochemical characteristics, diagnostic yields and the complications among the two groups were compared. Medical thoracoscopy has a diagnostic yield of 86.2% with complication rate of 10.3% compared to 62.1% and 17.2% respectively in closed pleural biopsy group. Medical thoracoscopic pleural biopsy had a better diagnostic yield with a lower complication rate as compared to closed pleural biopsy with Abrahm's needle.

  4. The Association of Fibrinous Pleural Effusion with Survival and Complications in Horses with Pleuropneumonia (2002-2012): 74 Cases.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, J E; Reef, V B; Boston, R C; Johnson, A L

    2015-01-01

    Fibrinous parapneumonic pleural effusions are associated with decreased efficacy of pleural fluid drainage and increased risk of medical treatment failure in people, but similar associations have not been established in horses. We hypothesized that fibrin deposition in the pleural cavity of horses with parapneumonic effusions increases the risk of poor outcome. Seventy four horses with bacterial pleuropneumonia diagnosed by culture and cytology of tracheal aspirates, pleural fluid, or both, and pleural effusion diagnosed by ultrasonographic examination. Retrospective study of cases was from 2002 to 2012. Information obtained from the medical records included signalment, history, sonographic findings, treatments, and outcome. The primary outcome investigated was survival and secondary outcomes were development of complications and surgical intervention. Fisher's exact test and logistic regression were applied for categorical variables. A t-test was used to find differences in continuous variables between groups. Seventy four horses met study criteria and 50 (68%) survived. Fibrinous pleural effusion was associated with higher respiratory rate and pleural fluid height at admission, necrotizing pneumonia, increased number of indwelling thoracic drains required for treatment, and decreased survival. Fibrin accumulation in parapneumonic effusions is associated with increased mortality. Direct fibrinolytic treatment might be indicated in affected horses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  5. [Procalcitonin as a predictor of bacteremia in pediatric patients with malignancies and febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Aliyev, D A; Vezirova, Z Sh; Geyusheva, T F

    2015-02-01

    Dynamics of procalcitonin level was studied in 75 pediatric patients, in whom on back- ground of polychemotherapy conduction for oncological disease bacteremia and neutropenia have occurred. Determination of procalcitonin level as a rapidly reacting biomarker of generalized infectious process permits to establish its progression, to con- duct early diagnosis, to perform timely and adequate treatment measures.

  6. Prognostic value of procalcitonin in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Nobre, Vandack; Borges, Isabela

    2016-01-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections are common and potentially lethal conditions and are a major cause of inadequate antibiotic prescriptions. Characterization of disease severity and prognostic prediction in affected patients can aid disease management and can increase accuracy in determining the need for and place of hospitalization. The inclusion of biomarkers, particularly procalcitonin, in the decision taken process is a promising strategy. This study aims to present a narrative review of the potential applications and limitations of procalcitonin as a prognostic marker in hospitalized patients with lower respiratory tract infections. The studies on this topic are heterogeneous with respect to procalcitonin measurement techniques, cutoff values, clinical settings, and disease severity. The results show that procalcitonin delivers moderate performance for prognostic prediction in patients with lower respiratory tract infections; its predictive performance was not higher than that of classical methods, and knowledge of procalcitonin levels is most useful when interpreted together with other clinical and laboratory results. Overall, repeated measurement of the procalcitonin levels during the first days of treatment provides more prognostic information than a single measurement; however, information on the cost-effectiveness of this procedure in intensive care patients is lacking. The results of studies that evaluated the prognostic value of initial procalcitonin levels in patients with community-acquired pneumonia are more consistent and have greater potential for practical application; in this case, low procalcitonin levels identify those patients with a low risk of adverse outcomes. PMID:27305038

  7. Expression and regulation of epithelial Na+ channels by nucleotides in pleural mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hong-Guang; Tucker, Torry; Su, Xue-Feng; Na, Tao; Peng, Ji-Bin; Smith, Peter R; Idell, Steven; Ji, Hong-Long

    2009-05-01

    Pleural effusions are commonly clinical disorders, resulting from the imbalance between pleural fluid turnover and reabsorption. The mechanisms underlying pleural fluid clearance across the mesothelium remain to be elucidated. We hypothesized that epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is expressed and forms the molecular basis of the amiloride-sensitive resistance in human mesothelial cells. Our RT-PCR results showed that three ENaC subunits, namely, alpha, beta, gamma, and two delta ENaC subunits, are expressed in human primary pleural mesothelial cells, a human mesothelioma cell line (M9K), and mouse pleural tissue. In addition, Western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy studies revealed that alpha, beta, gamma, and delta ENaC subunits are expressed in primary human mesothelial cells and M9K cells at the protein level. An amiloride-inhibitable short-circuit current was detected in M9K monolayers and mouse pleural tissues when mounted in Ussing chambers. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings showed an ENaC-like channel with an amiloride concentration producing 50% inhibition of 12 microM in M9K cells. This cation channel has a high affinity for extracellular Na+ ions (K(m): 53 mM). The ion selectivity of this channel to cations follows the same order as ENaC: Li+ > Na+ > K+. The unitary Li(+) conductance was 15 pS in on-cell patches. Four ENaC subunits form a functional Na+ channel when coinjected into Xenopus oocytes. Furthermore, we found that both forskolin and cGMP increased the short-circuit currents in mouse pleural tissues. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the ENaC channels are biochemically and functionally expressed in human pleural mesothelial cells, and can be up-regulated by cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP.

  8. Pleural Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Zauderer, Marjorie G.; Laser, Benjamin; Krug, Lee M.; Yorke, Ellen; Sima, Camelia S.; Flores, Raja; Rusch, Valerie

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: In patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma who are unable to undergo pneumonectomy, it is difficult to deliver tumoricidal radiation doses to the pleura without significant toxicity. We have implemented a technique of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to treat these patients, and we report the feasibility and toxicity of this approach. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2010, 36 patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma and two intact lungs (i.e., no previous pneumonectomy) were treated with pleural IMRT to the hemithorax (median dose, 46.8 Gy; range, 41.4-50.4) at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Results: Of the 36 patients, 56% had right-sided tumors. The histologic type was epithelial in 78%, sarcomatoid in 6%, and mixed in 17%, and 6% had Stage I, 28% had Stage II, 33% had Stage III, and 33% had Stage IV. Thirty-two patients (89%) received induction chemotherapy (mostly cisplatin and pemetrexed); 56% underwent pleurectomy/decortication before IMRT and 44% did not undergo resection. Of the 36 patients evaluable for acute toxicity, 7 (20%) had Grade 3 or worse pneumonitis (including 1 death) and 2 had Grade 3 fatigue. In 30 patients assessable for late toxicity, 5 had continuing Grade 3 pneumonitis. For patients treated with surgery, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 75% and 53%, and the median survival was 26 months. For patients who did not undergo surgical resection, the 1- and 2-year survival rate was 69% and 28%, and the median survival was 17 months. Conclusions: Treating the intact lung with pleural IMRT in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma is a safe and feasible treatment option with an acceptable rate of pneumonitis. Additionally, the survival rates were encouraging in our retrospective series, particularly for the patients who underwent pleurectomy/decortication. We have initiated a Phase II trial of induction chemotherapy with pemetrexed and cisplatin with or without pleurectomy

  9. Sestrin-2 is significantly increased in malignant pleural effusions due to lung cancer and is potentially secreted by pleural mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Tsilioni, Irene; Filippidis, Aristotelis S; Kerenidi, Theodora; Budanov, Andrei V; Zarogiannis, Sotirios G; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I

    2016-06-01

    Sestrin-2 (Sesn2) belongs to a family of highly conserved antioxidant proteins that were discovered as p53-inducible proteins and inhibits cell growth and proliferation. Our aim was to assess the levels of Sesn2 in malignant pleural effusions of lung cancer patients compared to benign pleural effusions. We enrolled 73 patients (55/males and 18/females) diagnosed with pleural effusion (PE). PEs were grouped as 44 malignant pleural effusions (MPEs; lung cancer) and 29 benign (BPE; 7 congestive heart failure, 9 tuberculosis, 13 parapneumonic). Pleural fluid (PF) Sesn2 levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Standard biochemical PF analysis was also performed and Sesn2 levels were correlated with PF lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), protein, cell counts and age. Sesn2 was detected in 24/44 patients with MPEs and in 3/29 patients with BPEs (p=0.0001). The mean value (mean±SEM) of Sesn2 in patients with MPEs was 0.54±0.22ng/mL while in BPEs it was 0.12±0.04ng/mL (p=0.0004). In MPEs Sesn2 pleural fluid levels did not correlate with PF LDH and cell counts (p=0.89 and p=0.64 respectively). Our study shows that Sesn2 is significantly increased in MPEs compared to BPEs. Moreover, the lack of correlation of Sesn2 levels with PF cell counts and PF LDH suggests that it is potentially secreted by pleural mesothelial cells. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protocol of the PLeural Effusion And Symptom Evaluation (PLEASE) study on the pathophysiology of breathlessness in patients with symptomatic pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Rajesh; Azzopardi, Maree; Muruganandan, Sanjeevan; Read, Catherine; Murray, Kevin; Eastwood, Peter; Jenkins, Sue; Singh, Bhajan; Lee, Y C Gary

    2016-08-03

    Pleural effusion is a common clinical problem that can complicate many medical conditions. Breathlessness is the most common symptom of pleural effusion of any cause and the most common reason for pleural drainage. However, improvement in breathlessness following drainage of an effusion is variable; some patients experience either no benefit or a worsening of their breathlessness. The physiological mechanisms underlying breathlessness in patients with a pleural effusion are unclear and likely to be multifactorial with patient-related and effusion-related factors contributing. A comprehensive study of the physiological and symptom responses to drainage of pleural effusions may provide a clearer understanding of these mechanisms, and may identify predictors of benefit from drainage. The ability to identify those patients whose breathlessness will (or will not) improve after pleural fluid drainage can help avoid unnecessary pleural drainage procedures, their associated morbidities and costs. The PLeural Effusion And Symptom Evaluation (PLEASE) study is a prospective study to comprehensively evaluate factors contributing to pleural effusion-related breathlessness. The PLEASE study is a single-centre prospective study of 150 patients with symptomatic pleural effusions that require therapeutic drainage. The study aims to identify key factors that underlie breathlessness in patients with pleural effusions and develop predictors of improvement in breathlessness following effusion drainage. Participants will undergo evaluation pre-effusion and post-effusion drainage to assess their level of breathlessness at rest and during exercise, respiratory and other physiological responses as well as respiratory muscle mechanics. Pre-drainage and post-drainage parameters will be collected and compared to identify the key factors and mechanisms that correlate with improvement in breathlessness. Approved by the Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC number 2014

  11. Design and rationale of the Procalcitonin Antibiotic Consensus Trial (ProACT), a multicenter randomized trial of procalcitonin antibiotic guidance in lower respiratory tract infection.

    PubMed

    Huang, David T; Angus, Derek C; Chang, Chung-Chou H; Doi, Yohei; Fine, Michael J; Kellum, John A; Peck-Palmer, Octavia M; Pike, Francis; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Yabes, Jonathan; Yealy, Donald M

    2017-08-29

    Overuse of antibiotics is a major public health problem, contributing to growing antibiotic resistance. Procalcitonin has been reported to be commonly elevated in bacterial, but not viral infection. Multiple European trials found procalcitonin-guided care reduced antibiotic use in lower respiratory tract infection, with no apparent harm. However, applicability to US practice is limited due to trial design features impractical in the US, between-country differences, and residual safety concerns. The Procalcitonin Antibiotic Consensus Trial (ProACT) is a multicenter randomized trial to determine the impact of a procalcitonin antibiotic prescribing guideline, implemented with basic reproducible strategies, in US patients with lower respiratory tract infection. We describe the trial methods using the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) framework, and the rationale for key design decisions, including choice of eligibility criteria, choice of control arm, and approach to guideline implementation. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02130986 . Registered May 1, 2014.

  12. Protocol of the Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial: a multicentre randomised study comparing indwelling pleural catheter versus talc pleurodesis.

    PubMed

    Fysh, Edward T H; Thomas, Rajesh; Read, Catherine A; Kwan, Ben C H; Lam, Ben C H; Yap, Elaine; Horwood, Fiona C; Lee, Pyng; Piccolo, Francesco; Shrestha, Ranjan; Garske, Luke A; Lam, David C L; Rosenstengel, Andrew; Bint, Michael; Murray, Kevin; Smith, Nicola A; Lee, Y C Gary

    2014-11-06

    Malignant pleural effusion can complicate most cancers. It causes breathlessness and requires hospitalisation for invasive pleural drainages. Malignant effusions often herald advanced cancers and limited prognosis. Minimising time spent in hospital is of high priority to patients and their families. Various treatment strategies exist for the management of malignant effusions, though there is no consensus governing the best choice. Talc pleurodesis is the conventional management but requires hospitalisation (and substantial healthcare resources), can cause significant side effects, and has a suboptimal success rate. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) allow ambulatory fluid drainage without hospitalisation, and are increasingly employed for management of malignant effusions. Previous studies have only investigated the length of hospital care immediately related to IPC insertion. Whether IPC management reduces time spent in hospital in the patients' remaining lifespan is unknown. A strategy of malignant effusion management that reduces hospital admission days will allow patients to spend more time outside hospital, reduce costs and save healthcare resources. The Australasian Malignant Pleural Effusion (AMPLE) trial is a multicentred, randomised trial designed to compare IPC with talc pleurodesis for the management of malignant pleural effusion. This study will randomise 146 adults with malignant pleural effusions (1:1) to IPC management or talc slurry pleurodesis. The primary end point is the total number of days spent in hospital (for any admissions) from treatment procedure to death or end of study follow-up. Secondary end points include hospital days specific to pleural effusion management, adverse events, self-reported symptom and quality-of-life scores. The Sir Charles Gairdner Group Human Research Ethics Committee has approved the study as have the ethics boards of all the participating hospitals. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals

  13. Evaluation of ferritin, interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and tumor necrosis factor alpha in the differentiation of exudates and transudates in pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Alexandrakis, M G; Coulocheri, S A; Bouros, D; Eliopoulos, G D

    1999-01-01

    In an attempt to define diagnostic criteria for the differentiation of pleural exudates from transudates, we measured ferritin (FER), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in pleural effusions and blood serum in 84 consecutive patients with pleural effusions of various etiologies. Concentrations of FER, IL-8 and TNF-alpha were significantly higher in serum and pleural effusion in patients with exudates than in patients with transudates. Serum concentrations of IL-6 were not significantly increased in pleural exudate patients (9.78 +/- 17.12 fmol/L) compared to transudate patients (4.05 +/- 2.33 fmol/L), while significant differences were found between pleural exudates and transudates (p < 0.001). Increased levels of FER were found in serum and pleural effusion of cancer patients in comparison to non cancer patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Serum concentrations of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha were not significantly increased in cancer compared to non-cancer patients, while increased concentrations of IL-6 and IL-8 were found in pleural fluid of patients with cancer in comparison to non-cancer patients. Finally/ no statistically significant differences were found in serum and pleural TNF-alpha concentrations among patients with cancer and patients with non-cancer effusion. We conclude that FER, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha concentrations in pleural effusions are useful markers in differentiating exudates from transudates.

  14. Reactive oxygen metabolites can be used to differentiate malignant and non-malignant pleural efffusions

    PubMed Central

    Cobanoglu, Ufuk; Sayir, Fuat; Mergan, Duygu

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Increase in reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) and free radicals is an important cause of cell injury. In this study, we investigated whether determination of ROM in pleural fluids of patients with malignant and non-malignant pleural effusions can be used as a tumor marker indicating malignant effusions in the differential diagnosis. METHODS: Sixty subjects with exudative pleural effusion and 25 healthy individuals as the control group were included in the study. Of the subjects with pleural effusion, 50% were malignant and 50% were non-malignant. ROM was studied in the pleural fluids and sera of the subjects with pleural effusion and in the sera of those in the control group. The ROM values of smokers and non-smokers were compared in each group. The Student’s t-test and the Mann-Whitney U test were used in order to detect differences between groups for descriptive statistics in terms of pointed features. The statistical significance level was set at 5% in computations, and the computations were made using the SPSS (ver.13) statistical package program RESULTS: It was determined that the difference between the ROM values of subjects with malignant and non-malign pleural effusions and the sera of the control group was significant in the malignant group compared to both groups (P = 0.0001), and the sera ROM values of patients with non-malignant pleural effusion were significant compared to the control group (P = 0.0001), and the ROM values of smokers were significant compared to non-smokers in each of the three groups (P = 0.0001). CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that sera ROM levels are increased considerably in patients with exudative effusions compared to that of the control group. This condition can be instructive in terms of serum ROM value being suggestive of exudative effusion in patients with effusions. Furthermore, the detection of pleural ROM values being significantly higher in subjects with malignant pleural effusions compared to non

  15. Treatment of complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion and pleural parapneumonic empyema

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Pedro Rodríguez; Gilart, Jorge Freixinet; Pérez, José María Hernández; Serhal, Mohamed Hussein; Artalejo, Antonio López

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background We performed this observational prospective study to evaluate the results of the application of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for complicated parapneumonic pleural effusion (CPPE) and pleural parapneumonic empyema (PPE). Material/Methods From 2001 to 2007, 210 patients with CPPE and PPE were confirmed through thoracocentesis and treated with pleural drainage tubes (PD), fibrinolytic treatment or surgical intervention (videothoracoscopy and posterolateral thoracotomy). Patients were divided into 3 groups: I (PD); II (PD and fibrinolytic treatment); IIIa (surgery after PD and fibrinolysis), and IIIb (direct surgery). The statistical study was done by variance analysis (ANOVA), χ 2 and Fisher exact test. Results The presence of alcohol or drug consumption, smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were strongly associated with a great necessity for surgical treatment. The IIIa group was associated with increased drainage time, length of stay and complications. No mortality was observed. The selective use of PD and intrapleural fibrinolysis makes surgery unnecessary in more than 75% of cases. Conclusions The selective use of PD and fibrinolysis avoids surgery in more than 75% of cases. However, patients who require surgery have more complications, longer hospital stay, and more days on PD and they are more likely to require admittance to the Intensive Care Unit. PMID:22739734

  16. Pleural interleukin-1 beta in differentiating transudates and exudates: comparative analysis with other biochemical parameters.

    PubMed

    Alexandrakis, Michael G; Kyriakou, Despina; Alexandraki, Rea; Pappa, Konstantina A; Antonakis, Nikolaos; Bouros, Demosthense

    2002-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pleural effusion is a frequent clinical problem. The possible role of pleural fluid cytokines in discriminating transudates from exudates has not been studied adequately. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum and pleural fluid levels of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and to compare it with common biochemical parameters such as cholesterol (CHOL), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total protein and albumin. One hundred and six consecutive patients with pleural effusion were studied. IL-1 beta was measured simultaneously in blood and pleural fluid using a radioimmunoassay. Standard laboratory methods were employed for biochemical parameters. Using ROC analysis, a pleural IL-1 beta cutoff level 18.16 fmol/ml had a sensitivity of 76.8%, a specificity of 58.3% and a positive predictive value (PPV) 86.3% in the discrimination of transudates vs. all exudates. Serum IL-1 beta levels were higher in the nonmalignant group but without statistical difference compared with transudate patients. In addition, a significant difference was found between serum IL-1 beta in the malignant group in comparison with those of the transudate group (p < 0.01), also IL-1 beta levels were significantly increased in exudate effusion when compared with transudate (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, respectively). CHOL values of > or =65 mg/dl had 92.7% sensitivity, and 100% specificity and PPV for both. The results of this study suggest that although IL-1 beta could be a marker with relatively good sensitivity and PPV for the differentiation of pleural effusion, the cost and time needed do not support its use as a routine laboratory test. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Elevated levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC) in pleural effusion samples from patients infested with Paragonimus westermani

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, N; Mukae, H; Nakamura-Uchiyama, F; Ashitani, J-I; Abe, K; Katoh, S; Kohno, S; Nawa, Y; Matsukura, S

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of eosinophilic pleural effusion in patients with paragonimiasis, we measured the levels of various chemokines including thymus and activation-regulated chemokine (TARC), eotaxin, RANTES and IL-8 in pleural effusion samples. Samples were obtained from 11 patients with Paragonimus westermani infection, six patients with pleural transudate, eight with tuberculous pleurisy and five with empyema. High percentages of eosinophils were detected in pleural fluid (range 9–100%, median 81%) of patients with paragonimiasis. TARC concentrations in pleural effusions of paragonimiasis were markedly higher than those of other groups. Eotaxin levels were also higher in pleural effusions of paragonimiasis patients, although significant difference was noted only against transudate samples. There was a significant correlation between TARC concentrations and percentages of eosinophils, and between TARC and eotaxin concentrations in pleural effusion. There were also significant correlations between TARC concentration and the titre of anti-P. westermani IgG and between eotaxin concentration and the titre of anti-P. westermani IgG. Our findings suggest that TARC contributes to the pathogenesis of eosinophilic pleural effusion in paragonimiasis. PMID:12390321

  18. Asbestos pleural effusion: a clinical entity.

    PubMed Central

    Mårtensson, G; Hagberg, S; Pettersson, K; Thiringer, G

    1987-01-01

    In a case-control study asbestos exposure in 64 consecutive men with idiopathic pleural effusion and 129 randomly sampled age matched male controls was compared. Furthermore, seven women and 64 men with idiopathic pleural effusion were studied, including a three year re-examination, in an attempt to identify characteristics that might distinguish asbestos exposed from non-exposed patients. Asbestos exposure was significantly (p less than 0.01) more frequent in men with idiopathic effusions than in controls. The idiopathic effusions seen in asbestos exposed patients were compatible with the diagnosis "asbestos pleural effusion." Two features were characteristic of patients with asbestos pleural effusion: a chest radiograph at the initial examination showing converging pleural linear structures or rounded atelectasis or a history of recurrent pleural effusion, or both. PMID:3686454

  19. Pleural effusion in a neonate

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sandeep Krishnanand; Butler, Mark

    2011-01-01

    A premature neonate who developed respiratory distress in the first few days of life was found to have a pleural effusion, which reaccumulated following drainage. The effusion was demonstrated to be a chylothorax. He required multiple chest drains and was started on a medium chain triglyceride formula feed. This brought about a full resolution of the effusions and he made a complete recovery. PMID:22688472

  20. Pleural calcification in northwest Greece

    SciTech Connect

    Bazas, T.; Oakes, D.; Gilson, J.C.; Bazas, B.; McDonald, J.C.

    1985-12-01

    Mass miniature radiography in 1969 detected a high prevalence of pleural calcification in three villages in northwest Greece. In 1980 a survey of a 15% sample of the population over the age of 10 was carried out with a 80% response rate. Full-size radiographs, ventilatory capacity measurements, and a detailed questionnaire on respiratory symptoms, type of work, and residence were used. Independent classification of the 408 films by two readers using the ILO/UC scheme showed very few small opacities but a very high prevalence of pleural calcification first evident in young adults and rising to 70% in the elderly. The overall prevalence was 34.7% in men and 21.5% in women. A comparison with the 1969 survey showed a progression rate of 5% per annum. In neither sex was there a significant relation of pleural calcification to smoking, ventilatory capacity, nor type of work, though those classified as field croppers had a slightly higher prevalence. There was no obvious evidence of increased lung cancer or mesothelioma in the village. The agent responsible for this apparently benign condition was not identified.

  1. Pleural effusions in children from Southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Gilberto Bueno

    2016-01-01

    Parapneumonic pleural effusions (PPE) are a relatively common (5-40%) complication of paediatric pneumonia. However, in clinical practice the majority of the effusions are small and do not need any further investigation or specific treatment apart from antibiotic therapy. A small number require drainage or surgical intervention. Rarely, significant effusions are associated with non-bacterial pneumonia in the paediatric population. Pleural tuberculosis in our hospital is the second highest cause of pleural effusions related to the high incidence of TB in our city. In the last 3 years we have had around 50 cases of pleural TB in children. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Apical parietal pleural holes: what are they?

    PubMed

    Galetta, D; Serra, M; Gossot, D

    2010-06-01

    We report the incidental discovery of an apical pleural abnormality characterized by the presence of pleural holes during video-thoracoscopic surgery for upper limb hyperhidrosis. Patients were 4 males and one female with a median age of 24 years. These pleural anomalies were left sided in all cases with a maximum diameter of 5 mm. One of the defects was double. There was neither air leakage nor water leakage after irrigation. Our hypothesis is that the revealed pleural defect is a precursor of cervical lung hernia.

  3. Superoxide dismutase 2 as a marker to differentiate tuberculous pleural effusions from malignant pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Maoshui; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinfeng

    2014-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that superoxide dismutase levels were higher in tuberculous pleural effusions than in malignant pleural effusions, but that this difference could not be used to discriminate between the two. The objective of the present study was to investigate the levels of superoxide dismutase 2 in pleural effusions and to evaluate the diagnostic significance of pleural effusion superoxide dismutase 2. Superoxide dismutase 2 concentrations were determined in pleural effusions from 54 patients with tuberculous pleural effusion and 33 with malignant pleural effusion using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. Pleural effusion interferon gamma and tumor necrosis factor alpha levels were also analyzed by ELISA. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate the significance of differences. Associations between superoxide dismutase 2 concentrations and sex, age and smoking habits were assessed using Spearman's or Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis. Receiver operator characteristic analysis was performed to evaluate the value of superoxide dismutase 2 levels in the discrimination of tuberculous pleural effusion from malignant pleural effusion. Superoxide dismutase 2 levels were significantly higher in patients with tuberculous pleural effusion compared with those with malignant pleural effusion (p<0.05). When superoxide dismutase 2 was used to differentiate between tuberculous pleural effusions and malignant pleural effusions, the area under the receiver operator characteristic curve was 0.909 (95% confidence interval, 0.827-0.960; p<0.01). With a cut-off value of 54.2 ng/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, positive likelihood ratio and negative likelihood ratio were 75.8% (95%CI: 57.7-88.9%), 98.1% (95%CI: 90.1-99.7%), 40.91 and 0.25, respectively. Furthermore, significant correlations between pleural effusion superoxide dismutase 2 and interferon gamma (r=0.579, p<0.01) and between pleural effusion superoxide dismutase 2 and tumor

  4. [Clinical utility of measurement of procalcitonin for diagnosis of urosepsis].

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Yukinari; Takenaga, Maho; Itami, Yoshitaka; Shinohara, Masatake; Takada, Satoshi; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Hashimura, Masaya; Fujimoto, Kiyohide; Hirao, Yoshihiko

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) in urosepsis on 54 patients with urinary tract infections (UTI), suspected of having urosepsis. The results of urine culture, blood culture, and serum concentrations of PCT were analyzed. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of PCT for bacteremia were as follows : 100 and 31.6% at concentrations of >0.5 ng/ml and 75.0 and 78.9% at concentrations of >10 ng/ml. we concluded that the PCT level could be a reliable early marker suggestive of urosepsis, and may be helpful when deciding whether to perform immediate urological intervention or not.

  5. Mechanisms of T-Lymphocyte Accumulation during Experimental Pleural Infection Induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG▿

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Mariana C.; Penido, Carmen; Costa, Maria F. S.; Henriques, Maria Graças

    2008-01-01

    Tuberculous pleurisy is a frequent extrapulmonary manifestation characterized by accumulation of fluid and inflammatory cells in the pleural space. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation in the pleural space by using a murine model of pleurisy induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Intrathoracic (i.t.) injection of BCG (4.5 × 105 bacteria/cavity) induced accumulation of T lymphocytes in the pleural cavities of C57BL/6 mice. We observed the presence of CFU in pleural washes conducted 1, 2, 3, 7, and 15 days after pleurisy induction. Pretreatment with fucoidan inhibited T-lymphocyte accumulation at 1 day, but not at 15 days, after BCG-induced pleurisy. Accordingly, adoptive transfer of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled blood mononuclear cells to infected mice showed that T lymphocytes migrated into the pleural cavity 1 day (but not 15 days) after BCG injection. Cell-free pleural wash fluids recovered from mice 1 day after BCG i.t. stimulation (day 1 BCG-PW), but not day 7 or day 15 BCG-PW, induced in vitro T-cell transmigration, which was dependent on L-, P-, and E-selectins. In contrast, day 7 BCG-PW (but not day 1 BCG-PW) induced in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation via interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Accordingly, in vivo IL-2 or IFN-γ neutralization abolished T-lymphocyte accumulation 7 days after pleurisy induction. Our results demonstrate that pleural infection induced by BCG leads to T-lymphocyte accumulation in two waves. The acute phase depends on selectin-mediated migration, while the second wave of T-lymphocyte accumulation seems to depend on a local proliferation induced by cytokines produced in situ. PMID:18809659

  6. A Review of the Value of Procalcitonin as a Marker of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Adriana; Kelly, Steven; Simpson, Michael; Mabey, Jordan

    2017-01-01

    Septicemia is a growing problem within the United States (US), which increases mortality and the cost of care. Procalcitonin is a pro-inflammatory marker that could be useful in the diagnosis of infection. In the past, procalcitonin levels have been evaluated to diagnose sepsis or guide antibiotic therapy, but it was not determined if it would differentiate between sepsis and other causes of inflammation. Studies reviewed here showed procalcitonin to be a useful biomarker as an indication of bacterial infection. Infections can be diagnosed earlier and managed appropriately to avoid progression to septicemia, reduce mortality, and overall medical costs. PMID:28497010

  7. Value of adenosine deaminase in the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusions in young patients in a region of high prevalence of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Valdés, L.; Alvarez, D.; San José, E.; Juanatey, J. R.; Pose, A.; Valle, J. M.; Salgueiro, M.; Suárez, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Pleural biopsy is usually considered important for the diagnosis of pleural effusions, especially for distinguishing between tuberculosis and neoplasia, even though tuberculous pleural fluid contains sensitive biochemical markers. In regions with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, and in patient groups with a low risk of other causes of pleurisy, the positive predictive value of these markers is increased. The criteria for performing a pleural biopsy under these circumstances have been investigated, using adenosine deaminase (ADA) as a pleural fluid marker for tuberculosis. METHODS--One hundred and twenty nine patients with a pleural effusion aged < or = 35 years (mean (SD) 25.2 (4.9) years) were studied. Seventy three were men. Eighty one effusions (62.8%) were tuberculous, 12 (9.3%) parapneumonic, and 10 (7.7%) neoplastic, five were caused by pulmonary thromboembolism, four by systemic lupus erythematosus, seven by empyema, three following surgery, one was the result of asbestosis, and one of nephrotic syndrome. In five cases no definitive diagnosis was reached. ADA levels were determined by the method of Galanti and Giusti. RESULTS--The diagnostic yield of procedures not involving biopsy was 94.5% (122/129). Pleural biopsy provided a diagnosis in a further two cases, but not in the remaining five. All tuberculous cases had pleural fluid levels of ADA of > 47 U/l (mean (SD) 111.1 (36.6) U/l). The only other cases in which ADA exceeded this level were six of the seven patients with empyema. Cytological examination of the pleural fluid diagnosed eight of the 10 neoplastic cases, compared with six diagnosed by pleural biopsy. CONCLUSIONS--In a region with a high prevalence of tuberculosis procedures not involving pleural biopsy have a very high diagnostic yield in patients with a pleural effusion aged < or = 35 years, making biopsy necessary only in cases in which pleural levels of ADA are below 47 U/l, pleural fluid cytology is negative and, in the

  8. Diffuse pleural thickening following heart failure-related pleural effusions in an asbestos exposed patient.

    PubMed

    Evison, Matthew; Barber, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse pleural thickening (DPT) is a well-recognized consequence of asbestos exposure and often follows a benign asbestos-related pleural effusion. At our tertiary center, in the North West of England where the prevalence of asbestos-related pleural disease is high, we have encountered a series of patients that have had led us to consider a new hypothesis in DPT. We postulate that non-asbestos-related pleural effusions, particularly transudative pleural effusions, caused by heart failure can trigger the development of DPT. We present one such case, discuss the limitations of our temporal observations, and invite further discussions from readers.

  9. FDG-PET evaluation of pleural abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, V.J.; Patz, E.; Harris, P.L.

    1994-05-01

    Pleural abnormalities identified on anatomical studies are often nonspecific and may represent benign or malignant disease. We prospectively evaluated the ability of FDG-PET to identify malignancy in patients with pleural abnormalities detected on chest radiographs or chest CT. Thirty-two patients with pleural abnormalities (pleural masses, thickening or effusions) found on chest radiographs or CT were evaluated by FDG-PET. Regions of interest (ROI) were identified on the PET images correlating to anatomic abnormalities and standard uptake ratios (SUR`s) of these ROI`s were calculated. A SUR value of 2.5 or greater was considered positive for malignancy. Physicians blinded to biopsy results graded their confidence of malignancy (1-5 scale) and graded lesion FDG uptake with respect to mediastinal radioactivity. Twenty-three of the patients had definitive diagnoses by tissue biopsy. Seventeen of these patients had malignant (SUR=7.9{plus_minus}3.8) and 6 had benign (SUR=2.8{plus_minus}2.4) causes of their pleural abnormalities (p=0.001). All but two malignant cases had SURs higher than 2.5 and one of these two was correctly interpreted by the observers. SURs lower than 2.5 were seen in four of the six (67%) benign pleural abnormalities. Using a combination of both visual and semiquantitative analysis, the sensitivity of FDG-PET for detecting malignant pleural abnormalities was 94%. Active infections in the pleural space had increased FDG uptake on PET studies while other benign pleural abnormalities did not. FDG-PET has very high sensitivity for detecting malignant pleural abnormalities and can differentiate benign from malignant pleural abnormalities.

  10. Primary pulmonary/pleural melanoma in a 13 year-old presenting as pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Baniak, Nick; Podberezin, Mark; Kanthan, Selliah C; Kanthan, Rani

    2017-02-01

    Melanoma in children, adolescents, and young adults is uncommon and reported almost exclusively as cutaneous melanoma. Melanoma presenting as a pleural effusion is very rare in adults and not reported in the pediatric population. Additionally, primary pulmonary melanoma is overall very rare and undocumented in pediatric patients. Furthermore, the distinction between a primary pulmonary/pleural melanoma versus a regressed cutaneous melanoma with pulmonary/pleural metastases remains extremely challenging. We discuss a case of a previously healthy 13-year-old girl that presented with a left-sided pleural effusion. Investigations revealed a large mediastinal mass, left-sided pleural and pulmonary nodules, a sacral mass, and bone marrow infiltration. The neoplasm was subsequently diagnosed by morphology and immunocytochemistry with histological correlation as malignant melanoma. As no mucosal, eye, or cutaneous lesions were identified, we deliberate the likelihood of a regressed cutaneous melanoma with metastases versus primary pulmonary/pleural melanoma with pleural effusion and discuss its diagnostic approach.

  11. Subarachnoidal-pleural fistula (SAPF) as an unusual cause of persistent pleural effusion. Beta-trace protein as a marker for SAPF. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Deseyne, S; Vanhouteghem, K; Hallaert, G; Delanghe, J; Malfait, T

    2015-02-01

    We describe a case of a 56-year-old woman who developed a recurrent pleural effusion after a thoracoscopic resection of an anterior bulging thoracic disc hernia (level D9-D10). Despite several evacuating pleural punctions, dyspnea reoccurred due to recurrent pleural effusion, the same side as the disc resection. Because of increasing headache after each punction, a subarachnoidal pleural fistula (SAPF) was suspected. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed features suggestive of SAPF, there was not enough evidence to justify a new thorascopy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage into the thoracic and abdominal cavity has been described as a result of trauma or surgery. Detection of beta-trace protein (BTP, a brain-specific protein) has been described to detect CSF fistulae causing rhino- and otoliquorrhea. Similarly, BTP determination could be used to identify the presence of CSF at other anatomical sites such as the thoracic cavity. Therefore, we decided to determine the concentration of BTP in the pleural effusion of this patient. BTP was assayed using immunonephelometry. The patient's BTP pleural fluid concentration was 14·0 mg/l, which was a 25-fold increase compared with the BTP serum concentration. After insertion of a subarachnoidal lumbal catheter, a video-assisted thorascopy was performed. Leakage of liquor through the parietal pleura into the thoracic cavity was observed. The SAPF was closed using a durasis patch and DuraSeal®. Postoperatively, there was no reoccurrence of pleural fluid. SAPF has to be included to the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent pleural effusion after spinal surgery. This case illustrates the importance of BTP in diagnosing SAPF, especially in cases where major therapeutic consequences may need to be drawn.

  12. A hydrodynamic study of pleural drainage systems: some practical consequences.

    PubMed

    Manzanet, Gerardo; Vela, Antonio; Corell, Ricardo; Morón, Ramón; Calderón, Rogelio; Suelves, Consuelo

    2005-06-01

    A pleural drainage system must be capable of efficiently evacuating the air or fluids from the pleural cavity so that adequate lung reexpansion can take place. The air flow and negative pressure of the system will depend on the particular design of each model. This experimental study analyzes the specifications and performance of the pleural drainage systems currently on the market. Thirteen models of pleural drainage systems connected to wall suction were examined. The models were classified into the following three groups: dry systems; wet systems; and single-chamber systems. We determined the ambient air flow and the negative pressure generated according to the suction level. The components of each model are also described. Under normal conditions, dry (except for the Sentinel Seal; Sherwood Medical; Tullamore, Ireland), wet, and single-chamber systems reach similar air flow rates (17 to 30, 24 to 27, and 22 to 28 L/min, respectively). With higher wall suction levels, wet systems increase the air flow (26 to 49 L/min) but the negative pressure becomes unstable because of the water loss phenomenon, dry systems increase the air flow (29 to 50 L/min) without modifying the regulator pressure, and single-chamber systems also raise the air flow (45 to 51 L/min) but increase the negative pressure. When there is an air leak, dry systems (except for the Sentinel Seal) lose less negative pressure than the other systems. The functioning of these systems can be optimized only by applying a suitable wall suction level adjusted to each case. Although the three types of systems are capable of evacuating adequate air flow rates, the negative pressure and the capacity to maintain it in the presence of an air leak are different in each system. Being fitted with valves and not water compartments makes the dry systems the safest and the ideal for use when the patient has to be moved.

  13. Pleural effusion in aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    PubMed

    Garg, Kranti; Mohapatra, Prasanta R; Sodhi, Mandeep K; Janmeja, Ashok K

    2012-10-01

    Aluminium phosphide (ALP) is a common agrochemical pesticide poisoning with high mortality rate. Primary manifestations are due to myocardial and gastrointestinal involvement. Pleural effusion in ALP poisoning is occasionally reported. We report a case of pleural effusion that developed after ALP ingestion and resolved along with recovery from poisoning.

  14. Pleural effusion in aluminum phosphide poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Kranti; Mohapatra, Prasanta R.; Sodhi, Mandeep K.; Janmeja, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium phosphide (ALP) is a common agrochemical pesticide poisoning with high mortality rate. Primary manifestations are due to myocardial and gastrointestinal involvement. Pleural effusion in ALP poisoning is occasionally reported. We report a case of pleural effusion that developed after ALP ingestion and resolved along with recovery from poisoning. PMID:23243353

  15. Ultrasound in the management of pleural disease.

    PubMed

    Mercer, Rachel M; Psallidas, Ioannis; Rahman, Najib M

    2017-04-01

    Pleural disease encompasses a large range of conditions, is a common presentation to the acute medical take and often requires comprehensive investigation and treatment. Ultrasound is well recognised as a useful investigative tool in pleural disease especially in the field of pleural effusion, pleural thickening and interventional procedures. Thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has gained widespread use by physicians as evidence has shown a reduced rate of complications when performing pleural procedures with ultrasound guidance. Areas covered: This article will review studies assessing the role of TUS in the management of pleural disease and examine ongoing research into how TUS could advance our knowledge and understanding over the next decade. Expert commentary: Physician lead thoracic ultrasound has become commonplace over the last decade, and now represents a minimum standard of safety in conducting the majority of 'bedside' pleural procedures. The current evidence points to important diagnostic and procedural roles of the use of bedside thoracic ultrasound. In the future, research developments are likely to lead to the use of thoracic ultrasound in prognostication, targeted treatment and understanding pathogenesis in pleural disease.

  16. Characteristics of patients with yellow nail syndrome and pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Luis; Huggins, John T; Gude, Francisco; Ferreiro, Lucía; Alvarez-Dobaño, José M; Golpe, Antonio; Toubes, María E; González-Barcala, Francisco J; José, Esther San; Sahn, Steven A

    2014-10-01

    Yellow nail syndrome (YNS) can be associated with a pleural effusion (PE) but the characteristics of these patients are not well defined. We performed a systematic review across four electronic databases for studies reporting clinical findings, PE characteristics, and most effective treatment of YNS. Case descriptions and retrospective studies were included, unrestricted by year of publication. We reviewed 112 studies (150 patients), spanning a period of nearly 50 years. The male/female ratio was 1.2/1. The median age was 60 years (range: 0-88). Seventy-eight percent were between 41-80 years old. All cases had lymphoedema and 85.6% had yellow nails. PEs were bilateral in 68.3%. The appearance of the fluid was serous in 75.3%, milky in 22.3% and purulent in 3.5%. The PE was an exudate in 94.7% with lymphocytic predominance in 96% with a low count of nucleated cells. In 61 of 66 (92.4%) of patients, pleural fluid protein values were >3 g/dL, and typically higher than pleural fluid LDH. Pleurodesis and decortication/pleurectomy were effective in 81.8% and 88.9% of cases, respectively, in the treatment of symptomatic PEs. The development of YNS and PE occurs between the fifth to eighth decade of life and is associated with lymphoedema. The PE is usually bilateral and behaves as a lymphocyte-predominant exudate. The most effective treatments appear to be pleurodesis and decortication/pleurectomy.

  17. Diagnostic value of Light's criteria and albumin gradient in classifying the pathophysiology of pleural effusion formation in cats.

    PubMed

    Zoia, Andrea; Drigo, Michele

    2016-08-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess whether human Light's criteria with the cut-off values previously published for cats are useful and superior to the traditional veterinary classification in diagnosing pathophysiology of fluid formation in cats with pleural effusion. The secondary aim was to assess if the albumin gradient (ALBg) is a reliable criterion for differentiating exudates from transudates in patients with pleural effusion thought to be transudative by clinical criteria but identified as exudative by Light's criteria. Nineteen client-owned cats with pleural effusion were studied. The aetiology of the pleural effusion was used to establish the pathophysiology of its formation. Parameters measured or calculated undergoing statistical analysis included Light's criteria, total protein and total nucleated cell count in the pleural effusions, and the ALBg. Based on the pathophysiology of fluid formation there were seven transudates caused by increased hydrostatic pressure and 12 exudates. There was a significant difference in the accuracy of the Light's criteria in correctly classifying origin of the pleural fluid formation compared with the traditional veterinary classification (84% vs 53%). ALBg values were significantly different between transudates and exudates. One of the three transudates misclassified as exudates by Light's criteria was correctly identified as a transudate by the ALBg. In conclusion, pleural effusion should be classified as either a transudate or an exudate using Light's criteria. In cats with pleural effusion thought to be transudative by clinical criteria, but identified as exudative by Light's criteria, the ALBg may further help in correctly differentiating exudates from transudates. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Procalcitonin as the biomarker of inflammation in diagnostics of pediatric appendicular peritonitis and for the prognosis of early postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Chakhunashvili, L; Inasaridze, A; Svanidze, S; Samkharadze, J; Chkhaidze, I

    2005-12-01

    A total of 43 patients up to 15 years, who underwent appendectomy with preliminary diagnosis of acute appendicitis have been studied at M. Guramishvili Pediatric Clinic in 2004-2005 years. Procalcitonin concentration has been defined in patients' blood sera using the immunoluminometric method (LUMITest PCT, BRAHMS Diagnostika, Berlin, Germany). Analysis of procalcitonin in different groups of patients has shown that increase in procalcitonin correlates with disease severity, and maximally increases in case of peritonitis due to acute destructive appendicitis. The procalcitonin level can be used to confirm the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. It has been suggested that procalcitonin can be used not only as diagnostic marker for acute appendicitis but also as a prognostic marker of it's complications. Using of procalcitonin in case of acute appendicitis would help to carry out timely surgical interventions and predict disease complications.

  19. Early monitoring of ventriculostomy-related infections with procalcitonin in patients with ventricular drains.

    PubMed

    Omar, Amr S; ElShawarby, Amr; Singh, Rajvir

    2015-12-01

    Several factors are implicated in the increased vulnerability of multiple trauma victims to infection, especially in intensive care units. The incidence of EVD related infections ranges from 5 to 20%. To assess the accuracy of serum procalcitonin (PCT) in predicting central nervous system (CNS) infection in patients with EVDs. Thirty-six adult patients with severe head trauma were enrolled in this prospective study, after exclusion of other causes of fever; patients were subjected to sampling of C-reactive protein (CRP), PCT, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures every other day. Five patients developed ventriculostomy-related infections, and all had an elevated serum PCT concentration. Patients with negative CSF cultures had mean serum PCT <2.0 ng/ml, while patients with positive culture had early elevation of serum PCT with mean of 4.18 ng/ml, CRP did not show similar early changes. Patients who acquire CNS infection had prolonged length of stay in hospital and length of ventilation. In absence of other nosocomial infections, early high serum PCT concentrations appear to be a reliable indicator of bacterial CNS infection in patients with EVD.

  20. A New Method of an Axial Puncture Approach for Draining Loculated Pleural Effusions

    SciTech Connect

    Takizawa, Kenji Nakajima, Yasuo Ogawa, Yukihisa Hmaguchi, Shingo Yoshimatsu, Misako Fujikawa, Atsuko Koike, Yuya Kato, Hiroshi

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The authors devised a new method of an axial puncture approach through the pulmonary apex (PA) for percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) of loculated fluid collections extending to the PA. The purpose of this report is to introduce the new procedure. Methods: Percutaneous catheter drainage by the axial puncture approach was performed in two patients with limited supine position and loculated pleural fluid collection in the posteromedial part of thoracic cavity. Results: The procedures succeeded in two patients without difficulties while keeping them in a supine position, even if the loculated fluids exist in the posterior side of thoracic cavity. Conclusions: Percutaneous catheter drainage by the axial puncture approach is particularly effective in patients with limited supine positions and loculated pleural fluid collection in the posteromedial part of thoracic cavity.

  1. Standing prone positioning in establishing causality between matched ventilation-perfusion defects and pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Fotos, Joseph S; Tulchinsky, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy is routinely performed in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism. Pleural effusions in such patients are common and can cause matched ventilation-perfusion defects. This is especially true of the posterior projections in the supine patient. Prone positioning has been described as a useful technique to redistribute pleural fluid anteriorly, exposing perfusion in posterior lung fields; however, some patients have a concurrent condition that renders prone positioning difficult. This report discusses a modified technique that allows patients to be imaged in a standing prone position with excellent results.

  2. Safety and Efficacy of Tissue Plasminogen Activator and DNase for Complicated Pleural Effusions Secondary to Abdominal Pathology.

    PubMed

    Majid, Adnan; Ochoa, Sebastian; Chatterji, Sumit; Fernandez-Bussy, Sebastian; Kheir, Fayez; Rivera, Estefania; Cheng, George; Folch, Erik

    2017-03-01

    Exudative pleural effusions may arise secondary to inflammation of intra-abdominal structures. Pleural space loculations can complicate these effusions, preventing adequate chest tube drainage and leading to consideration of surgical intervention. Previous studies have demonstrated that intrapleural administration of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) combined with human recombinant DNase can improve fluid drainage and reduce surgery for patients with loculated parapneumonic effusions; however, the efficacy of this treatment has not been evaluated for complicated pleural effusions attributed to intra-abdominal inflammation. We assessed the safety and efficacy of tPA/DNase for 17 pleural effusions associated with nonmalignant intra-abdominal pathology that did not drain adequately after placement of one or more chest tubes. Efficacy was measured by comparing post- to pretreatment fluid drainage rates, volumetric assessment of pleural fluid on radiographic images before and after treatment, and clinical improvement, including the need for surgical intervention. Symptomatic relief was assessed using the Borg scale for breathlessness. After a median of two doses of tPA/DNase, 23.5% of patients had chest pain and none had pleural bleeding. The volume of pleural fluid drained increased from a median of 325 ml to 890 ml per 24 hours after therapy (P = 0.018). The area of pleural space opacity on chest radiographs decreased from a median of 42.8-17.8% of the hemithorax (P = 0.001). tPA/DNase reduced the pleural fluid volume on chest computed tomographic imaging from a median of 294.4 ml to 116.1 ml. Borg scores improved from a median of 3 (interquartile range = 1-6) to 0 (interquartile range = 0-2) after therapy (P = 0.001). The median duration of chest tube placement and hospital stay were 4 and 11 days, respectively. Two patients required surgical intervention for lung entrapment. Overall, treatment was considered successful for 88.2% of patients

  3. Talcoma: A Diagnostic Challenge in Differential Diagnosis of Pleural Masses

    PubMed Central

    Ocak, Iclal; Dewan, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Talcoma is a pleural mass which may develop as a rare complication following talc pleurodesis. Talc pleurodesis is performed to obliterate the pleural space to prevent recurrent pleural effusions or persistent pneumothoraces. The present report describes a case of a patient who developed enlarging pleural mass (talcoma) following talc pleurodesis. PMID:26273487

  4. Procalcitonin in the setting of complicated postoperative course after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Perrakis, A; Yedibela, S; Schellerer, V; Hohenberger, W; Müller, V

    2010-12-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is a treatment for end-stage liver disease. The shortage of available organs leads to the acceptance of marginal grafts, thereby increasing the risk of perioperative complications such as acute rejection, infection, and graft dysfunction Procalcitonin (PCT) has been shown to be a reliable marker for a complicated course after traumatic injury as well as in the courses of systemic inflammatory response syndrome and sepsis. The aim of our study was to evaluate PCT as an early prognostic marker for the occurrence of complication during the postoperative course after OLT. We analyzed PCT levels and clinical and paraclinical data of 32 patients who underwent 33 OLTs. The highest PCT was termed as peak-PCT. Patients were stratified into noncomplication and complication groups. Renal replacement therapy, respiratory insufficiency, postoperative bleeding, refractory ascites, pleural effusion, rejection, sepsis, and fatal outcome were defined as complications. A secondary stratification, using a peak-PCT of 5 ng/mL, was used to analyzed the risk of a complication. We also analyzed the course of PCT after OLT in each group. The peak-PCT, which occurred between the first and third postoperative day in 30 patients, was followed by halving of the value every second day. Three subjects died because of sepsis. A constantly rising PCT or a secondary rise observed in 2 patients was associated with a fatal outcome. The noncomplication group included 18 patients, 8 of them showing a peakPCT <5 ng/mL and 10 above. The complication group included 14 patients who underwent 15 transplantations; Only 1 displayed a peakPCT <5 ng/mL. When the peak-PCT was >5 ng/mL, the odds ratio of a complication was 11.2 (95% Confidence interval, 10.81-11.59; P < .025). However, not before the 7th postoperative day was the course of mean PCT levels significantly different between the complication and noncomplication groups. In transplant patients, an elevation of PCT

  5. ACE/ACE2 Ratio and MMP-9 Activity as Potential Biomarkers in Tuberculous Pleural Effusions

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Wen-Yeh; Kuan, Tang-Ching; Cheng, Kun-Shan; Liao, Yan-Chiou; Chen, Mu-Yuan; Lin, Pei-Heng; Hsu, Yuan-Chang; Huang, Chen-Yi; Hsu, Wei-Hua; Yu, Sheng-Yao; Lin, Chih-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Pleural effusion is common problem, but the rapid and reliable diagnosis for specific pathogenic effusions are lacking. This study aimed to identify the diagnosis based on clinical variables to differentiate pleural tuberculous exudates from other pleural effusions. We also investigated the role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) in the pathogenesis of pleural exudates. Experimental design: The major components in RAS and extracellular matrix metabolism, including angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE), ACE2, MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities, were measured and compared in the patients with transudative (n = 45) and exudative (n = 80) effusions. The exudative effusions were come from the patients with tuberculosis (n = 20), pneumonia (n = 32), and adenocarcinoma (n = 28). Results: Increased ACE and equivalent ACE2 activities, resulting in a significantly increased ACE/ACE2 ratio in exudates, were detected compared to these values in transudates. MMP-9 activity in exudates was significantly higher than that in transudates. The significant correlation between ACE and ACE2 activity that was found in transudates was not found in exudates. Advanced analyses showed significantly increased ACE and MMP-9 activities, and decreased ACE2 activity in tuberculous pleural effusions compared with those in pneumonia and adenocarcinoma effusions. The results indicate that increased ACE and MMP-9 activities found in the exudates were mainly contributed from a higher level of both enzyme activities in the tuberculous pleural effusions. Conclusion: Interplay between ACE and ACE2, essential functions in the RAS, and abnormal regulation of MMP-9 probably play a pivotal role in the development of exudative effusions. Moreover, the ACE/ACE2 ratio combined with MMP-9 activity in pleural fluid may be potential biomarkers for diagnosing tuberculous pleurisy. PMID:23091417

  6. Severe “sweet” pleural effusion in a continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Rapeephan R.; Barretti, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Hydrothorax is a rare complication of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) which can progress quickly to cause acute respiratory distress. Case presentation We present a 76 year-old female with a past medical history significant for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on daily home peritoneal dialysis for 2 years presented to the hospital from home with shortness of breath at rest and cough for 2 days prior to admission. She developed severe respiratory distress and had emergent pleurocentesis that released 3.8 L of pleural fluid. The analysis showed significantly high sugar indicative of hydrothorax from CAPD. She underwent thoracotomy with pleurodesis and switched to hemodialysis for 6 weeks before resuming CAPD. Conclusion A high glucose concentration in the pleural fluid is pathognomonic for hydrothorax from dialysis fluid after rule out other possible causes of pleural effusion. Patients who are on CAPD presenting with marked pleural effusion should prompt clinicians to consider the differential diagnosis of pleuroperitoneal communications. PMID:26029545

  7. Thoracoscopy: medical versus surgical—in the management of pleural diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the pleura continue to affect a large population of patients worldwide and in the United States. Pleural fluid analysis and accompanying imaging of the pleura including chest X-rays, chest computed tomography (CT) scan and chest ultrasonography are among the first steps in the management of pleural effusions. When further diagnostic or therapeutic work up is necessary, open thoracotomy and thoracoscopy come to mind. However, given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with open thoracotomy, and the advances in medicine and medical instruments, thoracoscopy has now become a routine procedure in the management of the disease of the chest including pleura. Debates about surgical vs. medical thoracoscopy (MT) are ongoing. In the following pages we review the literature and discuss the similarities and differences between the two procedures, as well as their indications, contraindications, complications and efficacy in the management of pleural diseases. PMID:26807282

  8. Systemic lupus erythematosus presenting as pleural effusion: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Wang, D Y; Chang, D B; Kuo, S H; Yang, S; Shiah, D C; Chou, H T; Luh, K T

    1995-12-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) presenting as a pleural effusion in a young male is not common. This paper describes a 20-year-old man who was admitted to hospital with a spiking fever, chills and cough. A chest x-ray showed alveolar infiltration and a moderate right-sided pleural effusion. The patient was treated for parapneumonic effusion. Thoracentesis was performed and cytology of the aspirated fluid was initially interpreted as showing only numerous polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocytes. However, in spite of antibiotic treatment the symptoms persisted. A careful review of the cytology specimen showed classic lupus erythematosus (LE) cells in addition to PMN cells. Subsequent investigation, including antinuclear antibodies titer, confirmed the diagnosis of LE pleurisy. Therapy with antibiotics was discontinued and treatment with prednisolone 20 mg daily was begun. There was a rapid clinical response including resolution of the fever and pleural effusion.

  9. Mortality of Hospitalized Patients with Pleural Effusions.

    PubMed

    Kookoolis, Anna S; Puchalski, Jonathan T; Murphy, Terrence E; Araujo, Katy Lb; Pisani, Margaret A

    2014-06-01

    Each year in the United States an estimated 1.5 million people develop pleural effusions and approximately 178,000 thoracenteses (12%) are performed. While it has been established that malignant effusions are associated with increased mortality, the association between mortality and all-cause pleural effusions in a medical population has not been previously evaluated. Our objective was to evaluate associations between 30-day and 12-month all-cause mortality among patients with a pleural effusion. All patients admitted to the medical service at Yale-New Haven Hospital during March 2011 were screened for pleural effusion. Pleural effusions were documented by the attending radiologist and the medical record was reviewed for admitting diagnosis, severity of illness and whether a thoracenteses was performed. The outcomes were 30-day and 12-month mortality after identification of the pleural effusion. One-hundred and four patients admitted to the medical service had pleural effusions documented by the attending radiologist. At 30-days, 15% of these patients had died and by 12-months mortality had increased to 32%. Eleven (10.6%) of the 104 patients underwent a thoracenteses. Severity of illness and malignancy were associated with 30-day mortality. For 12-month mortality, associations were found with age, severity of illness, malignancy, and diagnosis of pulmonary disease. Although sample size precluded statistical significance with mortality, the hazard ratio for thoracenteses and 30-day mortality was protective, suggesting a possible short term survival benefit. In hospitalized medical patients with a pleural effusion, age, severity of illness and malignancy or pulmonary disease were associated with higher 12-month mortality. Thoracenteses may provide a protective effect in the first 30 days, but larger studies are needed to detect a short-term survival benefit. The presence of a pleural effusion indicates a high risk of death, with 15% of patients dying within 30 days

  10. The established and future biomarkers of malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Panou, V; Vyberg, M; Weinreich, U M; Meristoudis, C; Falkmer, U G; Røe, O D

    2015-06-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an asbestos-related cancer with a median survival of 12months. The MPM incidence is 1-6/100,000 and is increasing as a result of historic asbestos exposure in industrialized countries and continued use of asbestos in developing countries. Lack of accurate biomarkers makes diagnosis, prognostication and treatment prediction of MPM challenging. The aim of this review is to identify the front line of MPM biomarkers with current or potential clinical impact. Literature search using the PubMed and PLoS One databases, the related-articles function of PubMed and the reference lists of associated publications until April 26th 2015 revealed a plethora of candidate biomarkers. The current gold standard of MPM diagnosis is a combination of two positive and two negative immunohistochemical markers in the epithelioid and biphasic type, but sarcomatous type do not have specific markers, making diagnosis more difficult. Mesothelin in serum and pleural fluid may serve as adjuvant diagnostic with high specificity but low sensitivity. Circulating proteomic and microRNA signatures, fibulin-3, tumor cell gene-ratio test, transcriptomic, lncRNA, glycopeptides, pleural fluid FISH assay, hyaluronate/N-ERC mesothelin and deformability cytometry may be important future markers. Putative predictive markers for pemetrexed-platinum are tumor TS and TYMS, for vinorelbine the ERCC1, beta-tubuline class III and BRCA1. Mutations of the BAP1 gene are potential markers of MPM susceptibility. In conclusion, the current status of MPM biomarkers is not satisfactory but encouraging as more sensitive and specific non-invasive markers are emerging. However, prospective validation is needed before clinical application.

  11. Intrapleural Adenoviral Delivery of Human Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor–1 Exacerbates Tetracycline-Induced Pleural Injury in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Karandashova, Sophia; Florova, Galina; Azghani, Ali O.; Komissarov, Andrey A.; Koenig, Kathy; Tucker, Torry A.; Allen, Timothy C.; Stewart, Kris; Tvinnereim, Amy

    2013-01-01

    Elevated concentrations of plasminogen activator inhibitor–1 (PAI-1) are associated with pleural injury, but its effects on pleural organization remain unclear. A method of adenovirus-mediated delivery of genes of interest (expressed under a cytomegalovirus promoter) to rabbit pleura was developed and used with lacZ and human (h) PAI-1. Histology, β-galactosidase staining, Western blotting, enzymatic and immunohistochemical analyses of pleural fluids (PFs), lavages, and pleural mesothelial cells were used to evaluate the efficiency and effects of transduction. Transduction was selective and limited to the pleural mesothelial monolayer. The intrapleural expression of both genes was transient, with their peak expression at 4 to 5 days. On Day 5, hPAI-1 (40–80 and 200–400 nM of active and total hPAI-1 in lavages, respectively) caused no overt pleural injury, effusions, or fibrosis. The adenovirus-mediated delivery of hPAI-1 with subsequent tetracycline-induced pleural injury resulted in a significant exacerbation of the pleural fibrosis observed on Day 5 (P = 0.029 and P = 0.021 versus vehicle and adenoviral control samples, respectively). Intrapleural fibrinolytic therapy (IPFT) with plasminogen activators was effective in both animals overexpressing hPAI-1 and control animals with tetracycline injury alone. An increase in intrapleural active PAI-1 (from 10–15 nM in control animals to 20–40 nM in hPAI-1–overexpressing animals) resulted in the increased formation of PAI-1/plasminogen activator complexes in vivo. The decrease in intrapleural plasminogen-activating activity observed at 10 to 40 minutes after IPFT correlates linearly with the initial concentration of active PAI-1. Therefore, active PAI-1 in PFs affects the outcome of IPFT, and may be both a biomarker of pleural injury and a molecular target for its treatment. PMID:23002099

  12. Serial procalcitonin levels to detect bacteremia in febrile neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Reitman, Aaron J; Pisk, Rhonda M; Gates, John V; Ozeran, J Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to evaluate serial procalcitonin (PCT) levels compared with an initial PCT level at admission in predicting bacteremia in pediatric febrile neutropenic oncology patients. Serum PCT levels were measured at admission (t0) and within 24 hours of admission (t1) in pediatric oncology patients presenting with fever and neutropenia. A blood culture was collected at t0 and monitored for 5 days for bacterial growth. PCT value of 0.5 ng/mL at either t0 or t1 was considered predictive for bacteremia. PCT levels were significantly higher in children with positive blood cultures than with negative blood cultures. Serial PCT values mirrored t1 values. Serial PCT showed 76% specificity and negative predictive value of 93% in ruling out bacteremia. Elevated PCT levels are predictive of bacteremia. Using serial PCT levels within 24 hours allowed a better prediction of bacteremia than the PCT level at t0.

  13. Procalcitonin as a predictor of severe appendicitis in children.

    PubMed

    Kafetzis, D A; Velissariou, I M; Nikolaides, P; Sklavos, M; Maktabi, M; Spyridis, G; Kafetzis, D D; Androulakakis, E

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) in 212 children with appendicitis and compare it with that of the standard diagnostic modalities, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, leukocyte count, and abdominal ultrasound findings, in relation to the surgical and histological findings of the appendix. A PCT value of >0.5 ng/ml was found to be indicative of perforation or gangrene with 73.4% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity, a CRP level of >50 mg/l and a leukocyte count of >10(4)/mm3 were useful diagnostic markers for perforation, while abdominal ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 82.8% and a specificity of 91.2% for detecting appendicitis with imaging findings. PCT measurement seems to be a useful adjunctive tool for diagnosing acute necrotizing appendicitis or perforation, and surgical exploration will probably be required in patients with PCT values >0.5 ng/ml.

  14. Computed tomography of localized pleural mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Dedrick, C.G.; McLoud, T.C.; Shepard, J.O.; Shipley, R.T.

    1985-02-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of six pathologically proven cases of fibrous mesothelioma were reviewed. There were no pathognomonic CT characteristics, but in all cases CT suggested or supported the preoperative diagnosis. CT findings included well delineated, often lobulated, noncalcified soft-tissue masses in close relation to a pleural surface, associated crural thickening, and absence of chest wall invasion. An obtuse angle of the mass with respect to the pleural surface was not particularly useful. Rather, a smoothly tapering margin was more characteristic of a pleural lesion.

  15. Non-asbestos-related malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Kanbay, Asiye; Ozer Simsek, Zuhal; Tutar, Nuri; Yılmaz, Insu; Buyukoglan, Hakan; Canoz, Ozlem; Demir, Ramazan

    2014-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is an uncommon tumor derived from mesothelial lining cells. MPM has been described as an insidious neoplasm because of its long latency period. The tumor is typically found in patients several decades after asbestos exposure. We herein describe a 26-year-old patient with MPM who presented with pleural effusion. The patient had not been exposed to asbestos or erionite. There are few case reports of non-asbestos-related MPM in young patients. We report this case to remind physicians to consider MPM in the differential diagnosis of pleural effusion in young patients without exposure to asbestos or erionitis.

  16. HDL/LDL ratio: a useful parameter for separation of pleural transudates from exudates.

    PubMed

    Köktürk, Oğuz; Ulukavak Ciftci, Tansu; Firat, Hikmet; Firat, Serap

    2005-01-01

    The first diagnostic step in pleural effusions is the separation of transudates from exudates. We aimed in present study to investigate the value of HDL/LDL ratio for distinguishing between pleural exudates and transudates. Pleural fluids (PF)from 121 patients, including 28 transudates and 93 exudates were analyzed. The levels of cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol in PF were measured. The HDL/LDL ratio was calculated. HDL/LDL ratio found significantly higher in transudates than exudates (p= 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated and the cut off points determined to the highest level of accuracy and precision. The HDL/LDL ratio was to maximize sensitivity over specificity in the diagnosis of a transudative effusion. The usefulness of HDL/LDL ratio for identifying transudates was evaluated in terms of sensitivity and specificity. The value of pleural HDL/LDL ratio that best differentiated between transudates and exudates was 0.6 (sensitivity 89%, and specificity of 79%). Measurement of HDL and LDL in PF and calculating of HDL/LDL ratio can be proposed to aid for differentiation between pleural exudates and transudates with advantage of not requiring serum levels.

  17. Role of adenosine deaminase and the influence of age on the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Abrao, F C; de Abreu, I R L Bruno; Miyake, D H; Miyaki, D H; Busico, M A M; Younes, R N

    2014-11-01

    1) To determine factors affecting adenosine deaminase (ADA) levels in pleural fluid (PF), and 2) to establish the optimal ADA cut-off level for a Brazilian population. ADA levels in PF of 309 patients were analysed to investigate pleural effusion. All patients were evaluated for age, sex and presence of tuberculosis (TB) based on a positive pleural biopsy. Differences in ADA levels between groups were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance. Logistic regression analysis was also carried out to predict the occurrence of TB. ADA cut-off levels were selected using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The mean PF ADA level was significantly higher in the tuberculous pleural group than in non-tuberculous pleural patients (63.3 ± 29 IU/l vs. 19 ± 31 IU/l, P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between PF ADA levels and age: for patients aged ⩾45 years, the ROC curve for ADA had an area under the curve of 0.91. An ADA level of 29 IU/l resulted in a sensitivity of 88.6% and specificity of 91.5%. There is a significant negative correlation between PF ADA level and age. The use of a lower ADA cut-off reduces the number of false-negative results.

  18. The Angiopoietin/Tie2 Axis Mediates Malignant Pleural Effusion Formation1

    PubMed Central

    Moschos, Charalampos; Psallidas, Ioannis; Kollintza, Androniki; Karabela, Sophia; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Papiris, Spyros; Light, Richard W; Roussos, Charis; Stathopoulos, Georgios T; Kalomenidis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Angiopoietins and their receptor, Tie2, participate in angiogenesis, regulation of vascular permeability, and inflammation, all central to the pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusions (MPEs). In the present study, we aimed to examine the role of the angiopoietin/Tie2 axis in MPE pathogenesis. Experimental Design MPE was induced by intrapleural injection of murine adenocarcinoma cells in C57BL/6 mice. Animals were given twice-weekly intraperitoneal injections of 40 mg/kg MuTekdeltaFc or vehicle. MuTekdeltaFc is a soluble Tie2 (sTie2) receptor that binds murine angiopoietins thereby disrupting their interaction with Tie2 receptors expressed on tissues. Animals were killed on day 14. Results Angiopoietin/Tie2 axis blockade significantly reduced pleural fluid volume and pleural tumor foci. The mean ± SEM pleural fluid volumes were 617 ± 48 µl and 316 ± 62 µl for the control and treated groups, respectively (P = .001), whereas the mean ± SEM tumor foci were 7.3 ± 1.0 and 3.0 ± 0.52 for the control and treated groups, respectively (P = .001). In addition, tumor-associated cachexia, tumor angiogenesis, pleural vascular permeability, recruitment of inflammatory cells to the pleural cavity, and local elaboration of vascular endothelial growth factor and interleukin 6 were also downregulated, and tumor cell apoptosis was induced in animals treated with the inhibitor. Conclusions Our results indicate that the angiopoietin/Tie2 axis is an important component of MPE pathogenesis. Further studies are required to determine whether therapeutic interventions targeting this pathway could be beneficial for patients with MPE. PMID:19242611

  19. Experience with indwelling pleural catheters in the treatment of recurrent pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Chalhoub, Michel; Ali, Zulfiqar; Sasso, Louis; Castellano, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Recurrent pleural effusions are frequently encountered in clinical practice. Whether malignant or nonmalignant, they often pose a challenge to the practicing clinician. When they recur, despite optimum medical therapy of the underlying condition and repeated thoracenteses, more invasive definitive approaches are usually required. Since its introduction in 1997, the PleurX catheter became the preferred method to treat recurrent malignant pleural effusions. Since then, a number of publications have documented its utility in managing recurrent nonmalignant pleural effusions. The purpose of this paper is to review the use of the PleurX catheter in recurrent pleural effusions. © The Author(s), 2016.

  20. Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 Deficiency Augments Visceral Mesothelial Organization, Intrapleural Coagulation, and Lung Restriction in Mice with Carbon Black/Bleomycin–Induced Pleural Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeffers, Ann; Alvarez, Alexia; Owens, Shuzi; Koenig, Kathleen; Quaid, Brandon; Komissarov, Andrey A.; Florova, Galina; Kothari, Hema; Pendurthi, Usha; Mohan Rao, L. Vijaya; Idell, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Local derangements of fibrin turnover and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pleural injury. However, their role in the control of pleural organization has been unclear. We found that a C57Bl/6j mouse model of carbon black/bleomycin (CBB) injury demonstrates pleural organization resulting in pleural rind formation (14 d). In transgenic mice overexpressing human PAI-1, intrapleural fibrin deposition was increased, but visceral pleural thickness, lung volumes, and compliance were comparable to wild type. CBB injury in PAI-1−/− mice significantly increased visceral pleural thickness (P < 0.001), elastance (P < 0.05), and total lung resistance (P < 0.05), while decreasing lung compliance (P < 0.01) and lung volumes (P < 0.05). Collagen, α-smooth muscle actin, and tissue factor were increased in the thickened visceral pleura of PAI-1−/− mice. Colocalization of α-smooth muscle actin and calretinin within pleural mesothelial cells was increased in CBB-injured PAI-1−/− mice. Thrombin, factor Xa, plasmin, and urokinase induced mesothelial–mesenchymal transition, tissue factor expression, and activity in primary human pleural mesothelial cells. In PAI-1−/− mice, D-dimer and thrombin–antithrombin complex concentrations were increased in pleural lavage fluids. The results demonstrate that PAI-1 regulates CBB-induced pleural injury severity via unrestricted fibrinolysis and cross-talk with coagulation proteases. Whereas overexpression of PAI-1 augments intrapleural fibrin deposition, PAI-1 deficiency promotes profibrogenic alterations of the mesothelium that exacerbate pleural organization and lung restriction. PMID:24024554

  1. Oral metastasis in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Sproat, C P; Brown, A E; Lindley, R P

    1993-10-01

    A case is reported of a 48-year-old man with malignant sarcomatous pleural mesothelioma, who presented with a secondary deposit in the mandibular alveolus. We believe that this is the first reported case of this nature.

  2. Pleural involvement in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Bouros, Demosthenes; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Tzouvelekis, Argyris

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases, a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders including multiorgan involvement, can affect the pleura with various frequencies, either as a single presenting feature or as part of multisystem involvement. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus represent the most common immunological diseases that affect the pleural cavity; however, there is considerable variation regarding the reported prevalence, natural history and prognosis of pleural involvement in both conditions. The definition of pleural disease in the remaining systemic autoimmune disorders is unquestionably imprecise and assumptive, since it is risky to support premises based on single case reports or retrospective data from very small series. In this article, we will review the manifestations of pleural disease caused by rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjogren's syndrome and Wegener's granulomatosis.

  3. Mutant KRAS promotes malignant pleural effusion formation.

    PubMed

    Agalioti, Theodora; Giannou, Anastasios D; Krontira, Anthi C; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I; Kati, Danai; Vreka, Malamati; Pepe, Mario; Spella, Magda; Lilis, Ioannis; Zazara, Dimitra E; Nikolouli, Eirini; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Papadakis, Andreas; Papadia, Konstantina; Voulgaridis, Apostolos; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Stamou, Panagiota; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Snyder, Linda A; Antimisiaris, Sophia G; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Psallidas, Ioannis; Marazioti, Antonia; Stathopoulos, Georgios T

    2017-05-16

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is the lethal consequence of various human cancers metastatic to the pleural cavity. However, the mechanisms responsible for the development of MPE are still obscure. Here we show that mutant KRAS is important for MPE induction in mice. Pleural disseminated, mutant KRAS bearing tumour cells upregulate and systemically release chemokine ligand 2 (CCL2) into the bloodstream to mobilize myeloid cells from the host bone marrow to the pleural space via the spleen. These cells promote MPE formation, as indicated by splenectomy and splenocyte restoration experiments. In addition, KRAS mutations are frequently detected in human MPE and cell lines isolated thereof, but are often lost during automated analyses, as indicated by manual versus automated examination of Sanger sequencing traces. Finally, the novel KRAS inhibitor deltarasin and a monoclonal antibody directed against CCL2 are equally effective against an experimental mouse model of MPE, a result that holds promise for future efficient therapies against the human condition.

  4. Detection and characterization of extracellular phospholipase A sub 2 in pleural effusion of patients with tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Suk Hwan; Chang, Hyeun Wook ); Takayama, Kiyoshi; Kudo, Ichiro; Inoue, Keizo ); Lee, Hyun Woo; Do Jun Young )

    1991-01-01

    Extracellular phospholipase A{sub 2} activity has been identified in pleural fluid of patients with tuberculosis. This enzyme is a calcium requiring protein and has a pH optimum of 10.0. The enzyme was inhibited by the active site-directed histidine reagent, {rho}-bromophenacyl bromide. Ionic and non-ionic detergents, or the sulfhydryl reagent dithiothreitol, caused loss of enzyme activity. When substrate specificity was tested using 2-(1-{sup 14}C)linoleoyl phospholipids as substrates, phosphatidylethanolamine was the best substrate, followed by phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylcholine. This phospholipase A{sub 2} showed high affinity for heparin, and was recognized by a monoclonal antibody raised against phospholipase A{sub 2} from human synovial fluid. These findings suggest that an extracellular phospholipase A{sub 2}, which may belong to the 14K group II phospholipase A{sub 2} family, exists in the pleural fluid of patients with tuberculosis.

  5. Procalcitonin role in differential diagnosis of infection stages and non infection inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Gholamali

    2009-02-15

    The aim of this study is evaluation of procalcitonin role in the diagnosis of infectious and non infectious inflammation. This cross-sectional study was conducted in one hundred patients in Baqiyatallah Hospital of Iran in 2008. Patients suspected to infection were recruited to study. They were divided to four groups as: systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, sepsis syndrome and septic shock. Procalcitonin quantitative was assayed by immunoluminometric kit manufactured in Germany. Procalcitonin level was divided to four groups in < 0.5 ng mL(-1) compatible for SIRS, 0.5-2 ng mL(-1) for sepsis and 2-10 ng mL(-1) for sepsis syndrome and > 10 ng mL(-1) for septic shock. Data was analyzed by SPSS 13 for window software; T student test, ANOVA and Chi-square were used. In this study 53(53%) of subjects were men with mean age of 56.16 +/- 19.5 years old. The diagnosis was SIRS in 36%, sepsis in 38%, sepsis syndrome in 14% and septic shock in 12% of cases. Procalcitonin level was less than 0.5 ng mL(-1) in 61% and more than 10 ng mL(-1) in 10% of patients. Procalcitonin level showed significant association with septic shock, positive blood culture and mental dysfunction. Ultimately this study showed that high level of procalcitonin can differentiate septic shock from SIRS and other stages of infection. Dysfunction of mental status and high level of procalcitonin can determine septic shock.

  6. Usefulness of Measuring Serum Procalcitonin Levels in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sook Hee; Lee, Hye Won; Kim, Seung Won; Park, Soo Jung; Hong, Sung Pil; Kim, Tae Il; Kim, Won Ho; Cheon, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims The relationships between serum procalcitonin, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and intestinal Behçet’s disease (BD) have not been completely determined. We aimed to evaluate the usefulness of measuring serum procalcitonin levels to assess disease activity and infection stage in patients with IBD and intestinal BD. Methods We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 129 patients with IBD and intestinal BD for whom serum procalcitonin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were measured between January 2006 and February 2013. Results The median serum procalcitonin levels in the IBD and intestinal BD with septic shock or sepsis (n=8), with localized infection (n=76), and without infection (n=45) were 3.46 ng/mL (range, 0.17 to 63.66 ng/mL), 0.22 ng/mL (range, 0.05 to 140.18 ng/mL), and 0.07 ng/mL (range, 0.00 to 31.50 ng/mL), respectively (p=0.001). The serum CRP levels in the IBD and intestinal BD patients did not differ according to the infection stage. Variations in serum procalcitonin levels were not observed in the IBD and intestinal BD patients with different disease activities. Conclusions Serum procalcitonin levels may not be affected by IBD and intestinal BD activity itself, although they may be affected by concomitant infection. Serum procalcitonin measurements could be more useful than CRP in determining the infection stage that reflects the severity of infection in IBD and intestinal BD patients. PMID:26780089

  7. Can cholesterol be used to distinguish pleural exudates from transudates? evidence from a bivariate meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have investigated whether pleural cholesterol levels can aid in diagnosis of pleural exudates, and the results have varied considerably. To gain a more reliable answer to this question, we meta-analyzed the literature on using pleural cholesterol or the ratio of cholesterol in pleural fluid to cholesterol in serum (P/S cholesterol ratio) as diagnostic tests to help identify pleural exudates. Methods Literature databases were systematically searched for studies examining accuracy of pleural cholesterol or P/S cholesterol ratios for diagnosing pleural exudates. Data on sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative likelihood ratio (PLR/NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were pooled using bivariate-effects models. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves and area under the curve (AUC) were used to summarize overall test performance. Results Our meta-analysis included up to 20 studies involving 3,496 subjects. Summary estimates for pleural cholesterol in the diagnosis of pleural exudates were as follows: sensitivity, 0.88 (95%CI 0.84 to 0.92); specificity, 0.96 (95% CI 0.92 to 0.98); PLR, 20.31 (95% CI 11.21 to 36.78); NLR, 0.12 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.17); DOR, 167.06 (95% CI 76.79 to 363.95); and AUC 0.97 (95% CI 0.95 to 0.98). The corresponding summary performance estimates for using the P/S cholesterol ratio were as follows: sensitivity, 0.94 (95% CI 0.92 to 0.96); specificity, 0.87 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.91); PLR 7.46 (95% CI, 5.47 to 10.19); NLR, 0.07 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.10); DOR, 107.74 (95% CI 60.91 to 190.60); and AUC 0.97 (95% CI 0.95 to 0.98). Conclusions Both pleural cholesterol level and the P/S cholesterol ratio are helpful for the diagnosis of pleural exudates. Nevertheless, the results of pleural cholesterol assays should be interpreted in parallel with the results of traditional tests and clinical information. PMID:24731290

  8. Can cholesterol be used to distinguish pleural exudates from transudates? evidence from a bivariate meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yongchun; Zhu, Hong; Wan, Chun; Chen, Lei; Wang, Tao; Yang, Ting; Wen, Fuqiang

    2014-04-15

    Many studies have investigated whether pleural cholesterol levels can aid in diagnosis of pleural exudates, and the results have varied considerably. To gain a more reliable answer to this question, we meta-analyzed the literature on using pleural cholesterol or the ratio of cholesterol in pleural fluid to cholesterol in serum (P/S cholesterol ratio) as diagnostic tests to help identify pleural exudates. Literature databases were systematically searched for studies examining accuracy of pleural cholesterol or P/S cholesterol ratios for diagnosing pleural exudates. Data on sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative likelihood ratio (PLR/NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were pooled using bivariate-effects models. Summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves and area under the curve (AUC) were used to summarize overall test performance. Our meta-analysis included up to 20 studies involving 3,496 subjects. Summary estimates for pleural cholesterol in the diagnosis of pleural exudates were as follows: sensitivity, 0.88 (95%CI 0.84 to 0.92); specificity, 0.96 (95% CI 0.92 to 0.98); PLR, 20.31 (95% CI 11.21 to 36.78); NLR, 0.12 (95% CI 0.09 to 0.17); DOR, 167.06 (95% CI 76.79 to 363.95); and AUC 0.97 (95% CI 0.95 to 0.98). The corresponding summary performance estimates for using the P/S cholesterol ratio were as follows: sensitivity, 0.94 (95% CI 0.92 to 0.96); specificity, 0.87 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.91); PLR 7.46 (95% CI, 5.47 to 10.19); NLR, 0.07 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.10); DOR, 107.74 (95% CI 60.91 to 190.60); and AUC 0.97 (95% CI 0.95 to 0.98). Both pleural cholesterol level and the P/S cholesterol ratio are helpful for the diagnosis of pleural exudates. Nevertheless, the results of pleural cholesterol assays should be interpreted in parallel with the results of traditional tests and clinical information.

  9. [The differential diagnosis of pleural effusions].

    PubMed

    Marel, Miloslav; Fila, Libor; Červená, Michaela

    The problems of pleural effusions are connected with many areas of medicine. The problem affects approx. 0.5 % of the population every year. The paper summarizes pathophysiological data relating to the emergence of effusions, their epidemiology, description of particular types of effusions and possibilities of treatment. More attention is paid to the differential diagnosis and therapy for malign pleural effusions. diagnostics - exudate - treatment - pleura - transudate.

  10. Urinothorax: an unusual cause of pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Handa, A; Agarwal, R; Aggarwal, A N

    2007-11-01

    Urinothorax refers to the presence of urine in the pleural space secondary to obstructive uropathy, and is an unusual cause of pleural effusion. The importance of recognising this entity lies in the fact that the condition is completely reversible following relief of urinary tract obstruction. We describe a 35-year-old man who developed urinothorax following a percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal calculi. We also reviewed the literature for reported cases between 1968 and 2006.

  11. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele; Finlay, Jarod; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles; Friedberg, Joseph; Cengel, Keith

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light dose uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  12. Thoracoscopic management of malignant pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Colt, H G

    1995-09-01

    Thoracoscopy has been around for decades, advocated by some, but until recently, ignored by many. Not surprisingly, its diagnostic and therapeutic efficacy in patients with suspected or proven malignant pleural effusions has withstood the test of time. Today, the potential benefits of thoracoscopy must be weighed against its cost in patients with limited life expectancy. Although diagnostic thoracoscopy requires only overnight hospitalization, pleurodesis imposes a longer hospital stay. The discomfort of an indwelling chest tube, the need for hospitalization, and the financial burden of thoracoscopic procedures compared with less-invasive means of pleural investigation and pleurodesis must be taken into account on an individual basis. Thoracoscopy should not be performed for the sake of intervention. Its indications and all diagnostic or therapeutic alternatives should always be carefully examined. Its role, however, in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with malignant pleural effusions is undeniable. The diagnostic accuracy of thoracoscopic pleural biopsy is excellent. Several studies demonstrate that thoracoscopic talc pleurodesis is more frequently successful than other methods of pleurodesis. As a staging procedure, thoracoscopy helps determine extent of disease, and possibly, prognosis in patients with metastatic pleural carcinomatosis, lung cancer, and malignant mesothelioma. As this procedure is increasingly rediscovered by our medical and surgical communities, greater clinical and experimental investigation aimed at establishing successful management strategies in patients with malignant pleural effusions will hopefully occur.

  13. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Timothy C; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M; Finlay, Jarod C; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Cengel, Keith A

    2015-03-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 - 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method.

  14. An IR Navigation System for Pleural PDT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Liang, Xing; Kim, Michele M.; Finlay, Jarod C.; Dimofte, Andreea; Rodriguez, Carmen; Simone, Charles B.; Friedberg, Joseph S.; Cengel, Keith A.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used as an adjuvant treatment with lung-sparing surgical treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). In the current pleural PDT protocol, a moving fiber-based point source is used to deliver the light. The light fluences at multiple locations are monitored by several isotropic detectors placed in the pleural cavity. To improve the delivery of light fluence uniformity, an infrared (IR) navigation system is used to track the motion of the light source in real-time at a rate of 20 – 60 Hz. A treatment planning system uses the laser source positions obtained from the IR camera to calculate light fluence distribution to monitor the light fluence uniformity on the surface of the pleural cavity. A novel reconstruction algorithm is used to determine the pleural cavity surface contour. A dual-correction method is used to match the calculated fluences at detector locations to the detector readings. Preliminary data from a phantom shows superior light uniformity using this method. Light fluence uniformity from patient treatments is also shown with and without the correction method. PMID:25995987

  15. Pleural procedural complications: prevention and management

    PubMed Central

    Psallidas, Ioannis; Wrightson, John M.; Hallifax, Robert J.; Rahman, Najib M.

    2015-01-01

    Pleural disease is common with a rising case frequency. Many of these patients will be symptomatic and require diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures. Patients with pleural disease present to a number of different medical specialties, and an equally broad range of clinicians are therefore required to have practical knowledge of these procedures. There is often underestimation of the morbidity and mortality associated with pleural interventions, even those regarded as being relatively straightforward, with potentially significant implications for processes relating to patient safety and informed consent. The advent of thoracic ultrasound (TUS) has had a major influence on patient safety and the number of physicians with the necessary skill set to perform pleural procedures. As the variety and complexity of pleural interventions increases, there is increasing recognition that early specialist input can reduce the risk of complications and number of procedures a patient requires. This review looks at the means by which complications of pleural procedures arise, along with how they can be managed or ideally prevented. PMID:26150919

  16. [Distinguishing pleural transudates and exudates through the quantification of biochemical parameters].

    PubMed

    Ruiz García, R; Márquez de Prado Urquía, M M; Borque de Larrea, L

    2004-10-01

    1) to evaluate the possibility of distinguishing pleural transudates and exudates through the joint determination of 26 biochemical parameters in pleural effusion and in plasma (including the determination of high molecular weight proteins, acute phase reactants, and proinflammatory citokines), and 2) to formulate a logistic regression equation for optimizing the classification efficiency, comparing the equation obtained with Light's criteria. All diagnostic thoracocentesis carried out in La Rioja Autonomous Community during a 22-month period were evaluated. The 245 clinical records were evaluated periodically along a minimum of 2 years, after the discharge of the patients. In pleural effusion and in plasma the following were quantified: total proteins, LDH, glucose, amylase, cholesterol, albumin, cholinesterase, phosphatase alkaline, urea, beta2-microglobulin, IgG, IgM, alpha2-macroglobulin, C reactive protein, transferrin, alpha1-antitrypsin, serum amyloid A protein, interleukin 1-beta, interleukin 6, tumoral necrosis factor-alpha, and lysozyme. In addition, the cellularity, polymorphonuclear elastase and adenosine deaminase were evaluated in pleural fluid. The LDH pleural effusion/plasma ratio was the individual parameter that showed higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the separation of pleural transudates and exudates. Interleukin 6 and tumoral necrosis factor-alpha showed pleural effusion/plasma ratios higher than the unit, which suggests an in situ citokines production. An predictive logistic regression equation was obtained that incorporates only LDH and cholesterol ratios, including the diuretic treatment of the patient at the time of thoracocentesis, which did not modify the protein concentrations in pleural effusion. Except for LDH ratio, the logistic regression equation showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve higher than that of all the evaluated individual parameters, with a sensitivity of 95% and a

  17. Pleural effusion as the initial extramedullary manifestation of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nieves-Nieves, José

    2012-01-01

    Leukemias rarely debut by pleural involvement as the first manifestation of the hematologic malignancy. This complication is most commonly seen in solid tumors such as carcinomas of the breast, lung, gastrointestinal tract and lymphomas. We present a case of a 66 year old male who presented with a pleural leukemic infiltration of his undiagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia that was not a complication of the disease extension, but the acute presentation of the illness. Progressive shortness of breath for two weeks, cough, clear sputum and weight loss were the initial complaints. Serum dyscrasia suggested a hematologic abnormality. A chest x-ray performed demonstrated a buildup of fluid with layering in the left pleural cavity. Diagnostic thoracentesis suggested an exudative etiology with cytology remarkable for 62% leukemic myeloblast. The diagnosis was confirmed by bone marrow biopsy with expression of the antigens CD 34+ and CD13+, with unfavorable cytogenetic prognosis and a trisomy 21 chromosomal defect. Chemotherapy was initiated, though no remission achieved with induction chemotherapy. Complications and disease progression precludes in the patient’s death. Although rare, due to the unusual presentation of the disease, this case clearly demonstrates the importance of biochemical analysis and cytopathology specimens obtained in pleural fluid. PMID:24358836

  18. Diagnostic value of interleukin-12 p40 in tuberculous pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Valdés, L; San José, E; Alvarez Dobaño, J M; Golpe, A; Valle, J M; Penela, P; González Barcala, F J

    2009-04-01

    The diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion (TBPE) is frequently problematic. Several markers of TBPE in pleural fluid have been evaluated, with different results. Pleural effusions from 96 patients were classified on the basis of definitive diagnosis as tuberculous (n = 39), neoplastic (n = 42) or parapneumonic (n = 15). Adenosine deaminase (ADA), ADA isoform ADA-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, CD3(+)/DR(+) T-lymphocytes and interleukin (IL)-12 p40 were determined in all 96 effusions. The efficiency of IL-12 p40 for diagnosis of TBPEs was evaluated, in comparison with those of the other parameters, by comparing the areas under their receiver operating characteristics. With the threshold value of 550 pg.mL(-1), IL-12 p40 had a sensitivity of 92.3% (36 out of 39) and specificity of 70.2% (17 false positives). The misclassification rate of IL-12 p40 was significantly greater than those of ADA-2 and ADA. Among TBPEs, ADA correlated significantly with ADA-2, and IFN-gamma with ADA and IL-12 p40. Although tuberculous pleural effusions show values of interleukin-12 p40 that are significantly higher than neoplastic and parapneumonic fluids, this parameter is less efficient than adenosine deaminase, adenosine deaminase isoform 2 and interferon-gamma. Its routine determination is, accordingly, not justified.

  19. Association of immunoglobulin G4 and free light chain with idiopathic pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Y; Aoe, K; Mimura-Kimura, Y; Murakami, T; Oishi, K; Matsumoto, T; Ueoka, H; Matsunaga, K; Yano, M; Mimura, Y

    2017-10-01

    The cause of pleural effusion remains uncertain in approximately 15% of patients despite exhaustive evaluation. As recently described immunoglobulin (Ig)G4-related disease is a fibroinflammatory disorder that can affect various organs, including the lungs, we investigate whether idiopathic pleural effusion includes IgG4-associated etiology. Between 2000 and 2012, we collected 830 pleural fluid samples and reviewed 35 patients with pleural effusions undiagnosed after pleural biopsy at Yamaguchi-Ube Medical Center. Importantly, IgG4 immunostaining revealed infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the pleura of 12 patients (34%, IgG4(+) group). The median effusion IgG4 level was 41 mg/dl in the IgG4(+) group and 27 mg/dl in the IgG4(-) group (P < 0·01). The light and heavy chains of effusion IgG4 antibodies of patients in the IgG4(+) group were heterogeneous by two-dimensional electrophoresis, indicating the absence of clonality of the IgG4 antibodies. Interestingly, the κ light chains were more heterogeneous than the λ light chains. The measurement of the κ and λ free light chain (FLC) levels in the pleural fluids showed significantly different κ FLC levels (median: 28·0 versus 9·1 mg/dl, P < 0·01) and κ/λ ratios (median: 2·0 versus 1·2, P < 0·001) between the IgG4(+) and IgG4(-) groups. Furthermore, the κ/λ ratios were correlated with the IgG4(+) /IgG(+) plasma cell ratios in the pleura of the IgG4(+) group. Taken together, these results demonstrate the involvement of IgG4 in certain idiopathic pleural effusions and provide insights into the diagnosis, pathogenesis and therapeutic opportunities of IgG4-associated pleural effusion. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  20. Utility and safety of procalcitonin in an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP) in patients with malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liew, Y X; Lee, W; Cai, Y Y; Teo, J; Tang, S S-L; Ong, R W-Q; Lim, C L-L; Lingegowda, P B; Kwa, A L-H; Chlebicki, M P

    2012-11-01

    As data on procalcitonin utility in antibiotics discontinuation [under an antimicrobial stewardship program (ASP)] in patients with malignancies are lacking, we aimed to evaluate the utility of procalcitonin in an ASP in patients with malignancies. We conducted a retrospective review of the ASP database of all patients with malignancies in whom at least one procalcitonin level was taken and our ASP had recommended changes in carbapenem regimen, from January to December 2011. We compared clinical outcomes between two groups of patients: patients whose physicians accepted and those whose physicians rejected ASP interventions. There were 749 carbapenem cases reviewed. Ninety-nine were suggested to either de-escalate, discontinue antibiotics, or narrow the spectrum of empiric treatment, based on procalcitonin trends. While there was no statistical difference in the mortality within 30 days post-ASP intervention (accepted: 8/65 patients vs. rejected: 9/34 patients; p = 0.076), the median duration of carbapenem therapy was significantly shorter (5 vs. 7 days; p = 0.002). Procalcitonin use safely facilitates decisions on antibiotics discontinuation and de-escalation in patients with malignancies in the ASP.

  1. Light's criteria revisited: consistency and comparison with new proposed alternative criteria for separating pleural transudates from exudates.

    PubMed

    Romero, S; Martinez, A; Hernandez, L; Fernandez, C; Espasa, A; Candela, A; Martin, C

    2000-01-01

    The first objective was to assess the diagnostic value of new biochemical criteria proposed to discriminate pleural transudates from exudates and to compare their efficiency with those of Light's criteria. The second objective of the study was to assess the interstudy variability of the parameters repeatedly determinated in two different groups of patients with pleural effusion. We recorded clinical characteristics and final diagnoses and measured pleural fluid (PF) and serum levels of protein, LDH, cholesterol and cholinesterase of 243 patients with pleural effusion. Sixty-one (25%) pleural effusions were transudates and 182 were exudates. The sensitivity (99%) and accuracy (96%) of Light's criteria were higher than those of the other criteria tested, although the differences with those of the PF LDH-cholesterol combination (96 and 93%) did not show statistical significance. Pleural LDH concentration was the criterion with the highest specificity (95%), being significantly higher (p < 0.05) than that of Light's criteria. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of most criteria tested did not vary when compared with those obtained in a study performed 5 years previously. Light's criteria remain the criteria of choice for segregating exudates from transudates. Based on cost-efficiency reasons, the PF LDH-cholesterol combination appears as an alternative. Because both sets of criteria misdiagnose a substantial percentage of transudates, exceptions based on good clinical judgment and the complementary use of a more specific criterion, as the PF concentration of LDH, must be considered. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  2. Idiopathic pleural panniculitis with recurrent pleural effusion not associated with Weber-Christian disease

    PubMed Central

    Laperuta, Paolo; Napolitano, Filomena; Di Crescenzo, Rosa Maria; Zeppa, Pio; Galderisi, Antonio; Selleri, Carmine; Vatrella, Alessandro; Capunzo, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A 82-year-old patient with dyspnea and a recurrent history of pleural effusion was admitted into our unit. He performed a Chest computed tomography showing right pleural effusion. Video-assisted thoracoscopy (VATS) exploratory showed parietal pleural thickening of adipose tissue. The surgical procedure consisted, therefore, in the execution of multiple biopsies of the parietal pleura which appeared covered, on the whole surface, by islands of adipose tissue, without macroscopic pathological aspects. After the procedure was performed pleurodesis with talc. The definitive histological examination consisted of normal mesothelial cells surrounded by fatty tissue infiltrated by small lymphocytes in a patient without skin lesions or visceral or systemic signs of inflammatory involvement of the adipose tissue. We reported a rare case of idiopathic pleural panniculitis with recurrent pleural effusion not associated with Weber-Christian disease.

  3. [Could pleural aspergillosis happen to be a complication of pleural drainage?].

    PubMed

    Bellamy, J; Onea, F; N'Guyen Huu, P

    2013-12-01

    Four cases of nosocomial aspergillosis are described where the responsibility of pleural drainage is advocated. Infection was pulmonary once, pleural three times. Pleural suction had been long lasting with incomplete re-expansion of the lung and major air leaks. The hypothesis of the responsibility of pleural drainage in the advent of aspergillosis is reinforced by the revision of medical papers, which leads to the conviction that similar cases have been described yet, even though the mechanism of the contamination had not been understood. Prevention needs to limitate the lasting of the suction, especially if there are major air leaks. Cure needs total re-expansion of the lung and suppression of any pleural cavity, even if a thoracoplasty is needed. An anti-fungal therapy is not always needed.

  4. Impact of procalcitonin-guided therapy for hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia on reducing antibiotic consumption and costs in Japan.

    PubMed

    Ito, Akihiro; Ishida, Tadashi; Tokumasu, Hironobu; Washio, Yasuyoshi; Yamazaki, Akio; Ito, Yuhei; Tachibana, Hiromasa

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the usefulness of procalcitonin-guided therapy in hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients to reduce antibiotic duration and costs without worsening prognosis. 352 hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients in an observational cohort study in which procalcitonin was measured three times serially, on admission (Day 1) and 2-3 days (Day 3) and 6-8 days (Day 7) after admission, between October 2010 and February 2016 were reviewed retrospectively. Antibiotics could be stopped if Day 7 procalcitonin was <0.25 ng mL(-1) or ≤10% of the higher value of procalcitonin on Day 1 or 3. Antibiotic duration and costs and recurrence and mortality rates were evaluated in mild to moderate or severe pneumonia by theoretical procalcitonin guidance for community-acquired pneumonia treatment. Using theoretical procalcitonin guidance, antibiotic duration could be reduced from 12.6 to 8.6 days (P < 0.001), while costs could be reduced from 45,833 to 38,952 yen (P = 0.005). Among the patients in whom theoretical procalcitonin guidance could be adopted, recurrence rates (5.6% vs. 8.1%, P = 0.15) and mortality rates (0% vs. 5.1%, P = 0.07) did not worsen between the group having the same antibiotic durations as with theoretical procalcitonin guidance in actual practice (N = 71) and the group having durations more than 2 days longer in actual practice than in theoretical procalcitonin guidance (N = 198). There was no significant difference in pneumonia severity using A-DROP, CURB-65, and PSI between two groups. Procalcitonin-guided therapy may be useful in hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients to reduce antibiotic duration and costs without worsening the prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pleuroscopy in 'Idiopathic' eosinophilic pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Archontogeorgis, Kostas; Anevlavis, Stavros; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Jain, Ajay; Karpathiou, Georgia; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Sivridis, Efthimios; Bouros, Demosthenes; Froudarakis, Marios E

    2015-10-01

    Idiopathic eosinophilic pleural effusions (IEPEs) comprise the eosinophilic pleural effusions for which a specific aetiology cannot be established. There are no reports investigating IEPE on the basis of a systematically applied pleuroscopy approach and entailing an appropriate patient follow-up till the final outcome is established; existing series rather combine clinical and thoracocentesis criteria to establish the idiopathic character of the diagnosis. The aim of our study was to assess the clinical outcome of patients with IEPE, who underwent a systematic diagnostic approach by pleuroscopy. We studied 10 patients with IEPE among 175 consecutive patients who underwent pleuroscopy for undiagnosed pleural effusion. Pleural biopsies were obtained from observed lesions. All patients were followed up by means of clinical examination and imaging. The diagnosis of IEPE was established in 10 patients (median age was 50.5 years, range 35-91). Macroscopic examination of the pleura showed diffuse thickening with pleural plaques in eight patients, consistent with diffuse pleural eosinophilic inflammation histologically proven. In two patients, macroscopic examination showed scattered nodules associated with non-caseating granulomas histologically. In all 10 patients, a specific aetiology could not be established. Follow-up was available for all patients ranging from 24-102 months (median 60 months). No patient received a specific treatment during the follow-up period. No relapse of a pleural effusion was documented during this period. Pleuroscopy is mandatory in diagnosing IEPE. Negative histology and a long follow-up showed a benign course. These findings suggest that we should call these effusions 'indeterminate'. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Talc pleurodesis as surgical palliation of patients with malignant pleural effusion. Analysis of factors affecting survival.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Mazza, Francesco; Ermani, Mario; Chiara, Giordano B; Basso, Stefano M M

    2012-11-01

    Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is common in most patients with advanced cancer, especially in those with lung cancer, metastatic breast carcinoma and lymphoma. This complication usually leads patients to suffer from significant dyspnea, which may impair their mobility and reduce their quality of life. In patients with MPE, several interventions have been shown to be useful for palliation of the symptoms, including talc pleurodesis. The aim of this study was to evaluate prognostic factors for survival of patients with symptomatic MPE who underwent palliative video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) talc pleurodesis. Thirty-five patients with MPE underwent VATS, evacuation of the pleural fluid and talc pleurodesis with large-particle talc. There were 22 (62.9%) males and 13 (37.1%) females, with an overall median age of 69 years (range 42-81 years). The main causes of MPE were non-small cell lung carcinoma, breast or ovarian cancer and malignant pleural mesothelioma. The age did not differ (p=0.88) between men (68.6±11.6 years) and women (68.0±8.7 years). The mean quantity of pleural effusion was 2005.7±1078.9 ml, while the overall survival was 11.2±8.9 months. We did not find any relationship between survival and gender (log-rank test, p=0.53) or underlying malignancy associated with MPE (p=0.89, 0.48 and 0.36 for secondary cancer, lung cancer and mesothelioma, respectively). Similarly, no correlation was found between survival and age of the patients (Cox's regression, p=0.44) or quantity of pleural effusion (p=0.88). Our results show that the prognosis of patients after talc pleurodesis is independent of age, gender, type of malignancy and amount of pleural effusion, thus, suggesting the utility of treating all patients with symptomatic MPE early.

  7. Efficacy of recombinant adenoviral human p53 gene in treatment of malignant pleural or peritoneal effusions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Hu, Yi; Wang, Jinliang; Zhang, Sujie; Tao, Haitao; Jing, Sun; Wu, Baishou

    2013-03-01

    Once the malignant pleural or peritoneal effusion is developed it is difficult to control. This report presents a new method for controlling the malignant effusions. Forty-eight patients, 29 males and 19 females with an average age of 61.2 years old, who were satisfied with the study inclusion criteria, were recruited in this study. Twenty-seven and 21 patients had a malignant pleural and peritoneal effusion, respectively. After draining most of fluids, these patients received intra-cavity infusion of rAd-p53 once per week for 4 weeks, at dose of 2×10¹² viral particles (VP) diluted into 200 mL of saline solution for pleural effusions, and 4×10¹² VP diluted into 500 mL of saline solution for peritoneal effusions. Participants were followed up for a median time of 13.6 month. A total of 11 cases, 7 with pleural effusions and 4 with peritoneal effusions achieved a complete response (CR), and 20 cases (12 pleural effusions and 8 peritoneal effusions) had a partial response (PR). The overall response rate is 64.6%. Patients' quality of life, assessed by using Karnofsky performance scale (KPS) scores, was improved by an average of 26.4. The one-year of overall survival rate was 54.2% with a median survival time of 12.5 months. There were no serious side effects observed except for self-limited fever found in 79.8% of the cases. Intra-cavity infusion of rAd-p53 is an effective and safe treatment for the patients with malignant pleural or peritoneal effusions, especially for those patients who can't tolerate the standard treatments.

  8. Clinical utility of a combination of tumour markers in the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, M J; De Miguel, J; García Díaz, J D; Díez, M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of the tumour markers carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigens CA 125, CA 15.3, CA 19.9 and tumor-associated glycoprotein 72 (TAG 72) in the pleural fluid (PF) of patients with pleural effusions of different etiologies. One hundred and fifty-five patients with pleural effusions (40 malignant, 84 benign and 31 paraneoplastic) were studied prospectively. The concentration of the tumour markers in serum and PF were measured by magnetic particle enzyme immunoassay. The PF to serum (PF/S) concentration ratios were calculated. The concentrations of CEA, CA 15.3, CA 19.9 and TAG 72 in PF and the PF/serum ratios were significantly higher in effusions of malignant and paraneoplastic origin than in those of benign origin. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated for each marker and the diagnostic cut-off point was selected as the value that offered a specificity of 100% (CEA: 6.5 ng/ml; CA 15.3:62.4 IU/l; TAG 72:10.9 IU/l). CEA presented the greatest sensitivity [45% in the malignant group, 38.7% in the paraneoplastic group, and 41.4% in the pooled group (combined malignant and paraneoplastic)]. TAG 72 presented the largest area under the curve (0.89 in the malignant group and 0.80 in the pooled group). The diagnostic efficacy of the PF/S ratios was not better than measurement of the tumour markers in pleural fluid. The highest diagnostic accuracy for the diagnosis of malignant pleural effusions was achieved by grouping the markers in a panel comprising CEA, CA 15.3 and TAG 72; this showed a sensitivity of 75% and a negative predictive value of 79.1% . In the subgroup of patients with negative cytology, the sensitivity was 41.2% for CEA, 35.5% for CA 15.3 and 33.3% for TAG 72. The combination of these three markers achieved a sensitivity of 84.6%. The combined measurement of CEA, CA 15.3 and TAG 72 in pleural fluid is a useful complementary test in the differential

  9. Increased expression of aquaporin-1 on the pleura of rats with a tuberculous pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Du, Hongchun; Xie, Canmao; He, Qiao; Deng, Xiaohua

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the expression of AQP-1 on the pleura is altered in a rat model with a tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and to study its function. A TPE model was established by intrapleural inoculation with 0.03 mg (2 ml) standard tuberculosis bacillus (H(37)Rv). The rats with TPE were sacrificed at different time points (day 1, 3, or 5) after inoculation. The control group received a 2-ml intrapleural injection of saline. The visceral and parietal pleural tissues were harvested and processed for real-time RT-PCR, Western blot, immunohistochemistry, and determination of tissue AQP-1 levels. Recombinant adenovirus Ad-rAQP-1 containing full-length cDNA of AQP-1 was constructed. Six groups of seven Wistar rats were assigned to receive the following treatments: group 1: intrapleural administration of normal saline; group 2: intrapleural administration of tuberculosis bacilli (TB); group 3: intrapleural inoculation with TB at day 7 following intrapleural administration of Ad-rAQP-1 vector; group 4: intrapleural inoculation with 0.03 mg TB at day 7 following intrapleural administration of control Ad-GFP vector; group 5: intrapleural administration of Ad-rAQP-1; group 6: intrapleural administration of control Ad-GFP vector. The expression of AQP-l on the pleural tissue was detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Histopathologic changes of the pleura and the volume of pleural fluid were examined on day 7 following gene intervention or on day 3 following TB inoculation. Bilateral pleural effusions appeared within 5 days in all rats who received an intrapleural inoculation with TB. The peak amount of pleural fluid occurred on day 3. The AQP-1 expression at protein and mRNA was increased in the early phase of TPE. The expression of AQP-1 was increased in the Ad-rAQP-1 gene transfer group, indicating successful adenovirus gene transfer. The volume of pleural fluid in group 3 (6.1 +/- 0.7 ml) was significantly

  10. Combined evaluation of adenosine deaminase level and histopathological findings from pleural biopsy with Cope’s needle for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleurisy

    PubMed Central

    Behrsin, Rodolfo Fred; Junior, Cyro Teixeira da Silva; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez; Barillo, Jorge Luiz; de Souza, Joeber Bernardo Soares; de Araújo, Elizabeth Giestal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Closed needle pleural biopsy (CNPB) has historically been the gold standard procedure for the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) is an efficient biomarker for tuberculosis that is measurable in pleural fluids. Objective: We compared the diagnostic accuracy of the pleural ADA (P-ADA) level and histopathological findings of CNPB specimens in patients with pleural tuberculosis. Methods: This prospective study consisted of two groups of examinations with a proven diagnosis of pleural effusion. The P-ADA level was measured in 218 patients with pleural effusion due to a number of causes, and 157 CNPB specimens underwent histopathological analysis. Results: CNPBs were performed in patients with tuberculosis (n=122) and other diseases: adenocarcinoma (n=23), lymphoma (n=5), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=4), squamous cell carcinoma (n=2), and small cell lung cancer (n=1). According to the ROC curve, the optimal cut-off value of the P-ADA level (Giusti and Galanti colorimetric method) was equal to or greater than 40.0 U/L. The diagnostic accuracy of the P-ADA test was 83.0%, and that of histopathological examination of the CNPB tissue, was 78.8% (AUC=0.293, P=0.7695). The association between the P-ADA assay and pleural histopathology was 24.41 (P<0.0001). The tetrachoric correlation coefficient was 0.563 (high correlation). Conclusion: In Brazil and other countries with a high incidence of tuberculosis, P-ADA activity is an accurate test for the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusions, and its use should be encouraged. The high diagnostic performance of the P-ADA test could to aid the diagnosis of pleural tuberculosis and render CNPB unnecessary. PMID:26261621

  11. A simple solution for complicated pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Sudish C; Okereke, Ikenna; Mason, David P; Rice, Thomas W

    2006-09-01

    Complicated pleural effusions are difficult to manage with conventional strategies. In this study, we review the safety, efficacy, and durability of PleurX catheters (Denver Biomedical, Golden, CO) for managing complicated pleural effusions and describe a patient population who might benefit. From July 1999 to February 2003, 63 PleurX catheters were placed in 58 symptomatic patients (an additional five had bilateral catheters) to manage complicated pleural effusions. Patients selected for catheter placement tended to have poor performance status (Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group < or =2) or had failed standard therapies. Of the 63 catheters, 52 (83%) were placed because of malignant complicated pleural effusions. A registry of patients was constructed, and data were obtained from review of medical records. Nonparametric estimates of freedom from reintervention and overall survival were obtained by the Kaplan-Meier method. Catheter-related complications were noted in four of 58 patients (7%) and included one each of pneumothorax, seroma, empyema, and pain syndrome. Freedom from reintervention for effusion management was 95%. Of the patients, 86% (50 of 58) experienced dyspnea relief. There were no procedure-related mortalities. Catheters remained functional up to 330 days, and four of 63 (6%) required one-time thrombolysis with tissue plasminogen activator. PleurX catheters are safe, effective, and durable solutions for complicated pleural effusions and seem to provide an attractive alternative for patients who have few other palliative options. We consider the catheters as first-line therapy for these patients.

  12. Determination of total proteins and lactate dehydrogenase for the diagnosis of pleural transudates and exudates: redefining the classical criterion with a new statistical approach.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Bernardo Henrique Ferraz; Silva Junior, Cyro Teixeira da; Chibante, Antonio Monteiro da Silva; Cardoso, Gilberto Perez

    2010-01-01

    To propose a new classification criterion for the differentiation between pleural exudates and transudates-quantifying total proteins in pleural fluid (TP-PF) and lactate dehydrogenase in pleural fluid (LDH-PF) exclusively-as well as to compare this new criterion with the classical criterion in terms of diagnostic yield. This was an observational, cross-sectional study with a within-subject design, comprising 181 patients with pleural effusion treated at two university hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, between 2003 and 2006. The diagnostic parameters included in the classical criterion were identified, as were those included in the new criterion. Of the 181 patients, 152 and 29 were diagnosed with pleural exudates and pleural transudates, respectively. For the classical criterion, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of pleural exudates were, respectively, 99.8%, 68.6%, and 94.5%, whereas the corresponding values for the diagnosis of pleural transudates were 76.1%, 90.1%, and 87.6%. For the new criterion (cut-off points set at 3.4 g/dL for TP-PF and 328.0 U/L for LDH-PF), the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of exudates were, respectively, 99.4%, 72.6%, and 99.2%, whereas the corresponding values for the diagnosis of transudates were 98.5%, 83.4%, and 90.0%. The accuracy of the new criterion for the diagnosis of pleural exudates was significantly greater than was that of the classical criterion (p = 0.0022). The diagnostic yield was comparable between the two criteria studied. Therefore, the new classification criterion can be used in daily practice.

  13. Detection of unsuspected malignant pleural effusion by bone scan

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Gefter, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    Technetium-99m phosphate compounds may occasionally accumulate in malignant pleural effusions. A case of metastatic pleural effusion first diagnosed by bone scan, prior to its clinical or roentgenographic detection, is reported.

  14. [Usefulness of Procalcitonin Measurement for the Detection of Sepsis].

    PubMed

    Toh, Hiromi; Harada, Sadako; Kakudou, Tomoko; Era, Fumiyoshi; Tokushige, Chiemi; Yoshimura, Hisae; Kawashima, Hironobu; Ohkubo, Kumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Matsunaga, Akira

    2014-10-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is a frequently used marker for bacterial sepsis. The present study was aimed to assess the usefulness of PCT measurement in patient with sepsis. We studied the relationship between serum PCT level and blood culture in clinical 209 cases admitted from January 2010 through June 2010. We compared PCT level with blood culture results and other clinical data, and diagnosis such as sepsis and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) were obtained from the medical records. In the case of patients with positive blood cultures and PCT < 0.5 ng/mL, the false- positive blood culture was suspected. The possibility of bacteremia was high when PCT level was more than 0.5 ng/mL. Patients with PCT ≥ 2 ng/mL had significant correlation with the presence of sepsis. The PCT measurement could be performed and reported rapidly and provided valuable information before availability of culture results. In this study, we found that the PCT would be a useful biomarker for confirming and ruling out sepsis.

  15. Streamlining antibiotic therapy with procalcitonin protocols: consensus and controversies.

    PubMed

    Haubitz, Sebastian; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2013-04-01

    Accumulating evidence supports procalcitonin (PCT) as an accurate surrogate biomarker for likelihood and severity of bacterial infections. In community-acquired pneumonia and other respiratory infections, PCT-guided antibiotic therapy algorithms resulted in reduced antibiotic exposure while maintaining a similar or even better level of safety compared with standard care. Reductions in antibiotic use translate into lower treatment costs, decreased risk of side effects and decreased bacterial multiresistance. This is especially important, as acute respiratory infections represent the most frequent reason for antibiotic prescriptions worldwide. Still, there is some controversy about the benefits of PCT measurement in sepsis patients in the intensive care unit and for nonrespiratory infections. Highly sensitive PCT assays are readily available in many hospitals today, and point-of-care assays with high enough sensitivity for antibiotic guidance are expected to be available soon. Herein, the authors provide an overview of recent studies evaluating PCT in different clinical situations and an outlook of currently enrolling or upcoming interventional trials.

  16. Proinflammatory cytokines and procalcitonin in children with acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Gürgöze, Metin Kaya; Akarsu, Saadet; Yilmaz, Erdal; Gödekmerdan, Ahmet; Akça, Zehra; Ciftçi, Ismail; Aygün, A Denizmen

    2005-10-01

    This prospective study, performed in 76 children with a urinary tract infection (UTI), evaluates the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha) in children with acute pyelonephritis documented by dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy (DMSA). Renal parenchymal involvement was assessed by (99m )Tc-DMSA scintigraphy within 7 days of admission. The diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis was confirmed only in patients with reversible lesions on scintigraphy. According to DMSA scan results, patients were divided into two groups, lower UTI or acute pyelonephritis. In acute pyelonephritis, serum PCT level was found to be significantly higher than it is in the lower UTI (p <0.001). Also, significantly higher serum proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNF-alpha) levels were detected in those with acute pyelonephritis than those with lower UTI (p <0.001). We conclude that both serum PCT and proinflammatory cytokine levels may be used as accurate markers for diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis.

  17. Nanoimprinted nanopillar array chip for procalcitonin detection (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ling Ling; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2016-03-01

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is an early and highly specific biomarker in response to bacterial infection. The PCT-guided antibiotic therapy has demonstrated to be more efficient than standard therapy to reduce in antibiotic use without adverse outcome in mortality. The PCT detection in clinics is required to be highly sensitive with a sensitivity of 0.5 ng/ml. At present, the technologies for PCT detection are limited. This paper reported a highly sensitive nanoimprinted gold nanopillar array chip for PCT detection. To achieve high sensitivity for PCT detection, the gold nanopillar array sensing chip was designed by plasmonic simulation and fabricated by high fidelity nanoimprinting technology. The gold nanopillars of 140 nm were nanoimprinted on glass substrate. A robust sandwich bioassay of capture antibody /PCT / quantum dot (QD) conjugated detection antibody was established on the gold nanopillar array chip to detect PCT. The nanopillars serve as localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) generators to enhance the fluorescent emission from QD. A limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 ng/ml was achieved for PCT detection. This is the first time that PCT is detected with such high sensitivity by LSPR enhanced QD emission. By considering the low-cost, high sensitivity of the bioassay, as well as the inexpensive mass fabrication of the high quality chips, this novel nanoimprinted gold nanopillar array chip is particularly useful for developing a point-of-care system for PCT detection.

  18. [Predictive value of procalcitonin in children with suspected sepsis].

    PubMed

    Bustos B, Raúl; Padilla P, Oslando

    2015-01-01

    The use of biomarkers could be a tool for diagnosis, prognosis and stratifying children with sepsis. Our main goal was to analyze the value of procalcitonin (PCT), C reactive protein (CRP) and lactate in predicting mortality, septic shock and the stratification in children with suspected sepsis Prospective study in 81 patients. Plasma levels of PCT, CRP and lactate were measured at admission in the pediatric intensive care unit. Patients were categorized into systemic inflammatory response syndrome, sepsis, severe sepsis and septic shock. Concentrations of PCT (ng/mL) increased significantly according to the severity of sepsis: 0.36 (0-1.2) for systemic inflammatory response syndrome; 1.96 (0.4-3.5) for sepsis; 7.5 (3.9-11.1) for severe sepsis; and 58.9 (35.1-82.7) for septic shock (P<.001). Compared to CRP and lactate, the area under the ROC curve revealed a good discriminative power of PCT to predict septic shock and mortality, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.83-0.97) and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.69-0.88), respectively. In contrast to CRP and lactate, the determination of PCT in pediatric intensive care unit admission is a good predictor of mortality and septic shock and can stratify patients according to severity of sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Procalcitonin-guided diagnosis and antibiotic stewardship revisited.

    PubMed

    Sager, Ramon; Kutz, Alexander; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-01-24

    Several controlled clinical studies have evaluated the potential of the infection biomarker procalcitonin (PCT) to improve the diagnostic work-up of patients with bacterial infections and its influence on decisions regarding antibiotic therapy. Most research has focused on lower respiratory tract infections and critically ill sepsis patients. A clinical utility for PCT has also been found for patients with urinary tract infections, postoperative infections, meningitis, and patients with acute heart failure with possible superinfection (i.e., pneumonia). In these indications, PCT levels measured on hospital admission were found to substantially reduce the initiation of antibiotic treatment in low-risk situations (i.e., bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation). For more severe infections (i.e., pneumonia, sepsis), antibiotic stewardship by monitoring of PCT kinetics resulted in shorter antibiotic treatment durations with early cessation of therapy. Importantly, these strategies appear to be safe without increasing the risk for mortality, recurrent infections, or treatment failures. PCT kinetics also proved to have prognostic value correlating with disease severity (i.e., pancreatitis, abdominal infection) and resolution of illness (i.e., sepsis). Although promising findings have been published in these different types of infections, there are a number of limitations regarding PCT, including suboptimal sensitivity and/or specificity, which makes a careful interpretation of PCT in the clinical context mandatory. This narrative review aims to update clinicians on the strengths and limitations of PCT for patient management, focusing on research conducted within the last 4 years.

  20. Use of procalcitonin in clinical oncology: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Sbrana, Andrea; Torchio, Martina; Comolli, Giuditta; Antonuzzo, Andrea; Danova, Marco

    2016-07-01

    The use of procalcitonin (PCT) as an early marker of infectious episodes in cancer patients is still controversial. We performed a MEDLINE search of peer-reviewed articles published between January 1990 and December 2015, and finally we analysed 15 articles. PCT seems to have a good diagnostic value of infectious episodes in cancer patients and its accuracy seems greater if we consider major events, such as bloodstream infections and sepsis. Serial evaluations of this protein seem to be more accurate in the diagnostic phase and useful to predict outcome and response to antibacterial treatment. On the other hand, some issues have yet to be solved, such as the use of a validated method of determination, the definition of a standard cut-off, and the heterogeneity among different settings of patients (e.g. early versus advanced-stage cancer, or haematological versus solid tumours). However, it is credible to think that PCT use in everyday clinical practice, preferably in combination with other clinical or laboratory tests, might be of help in finding and detecting early infectious complications in cancer patients.

  1. Palliative and therapeutic activity of IL-2 immunotherapy in unresectable malignant pleural mesothelioma with pleural effusion: Results of a phase II study on 31 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Castagneto, B; Zai, S; Mutti, L; Lazzaro, A; Ridolfi, R; Piccolini, E; Ardizzoni, A; Fumagalli, L; Valsuani, G; Botta, M

    2001-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is often unresectable at diagnosis, is refractory to cytotoxic agents and is frequently complicated by pleural effusion. The expected survival range for patients with or without involvement of visceral pleura is respectively 1-9 and 9-12 months; mesothelioma-related pleural effusion severely impairs the patients' quality of life and easily relapses after conservative treatments. Intrapleural administration of IL-2 is reported to be effective both in tumor-associated malignant pleurisy and on primary mesothelioma, whereas few data exist about IL-2 systemic administration. In order to assess the palliative and therapeutic activity of IL-2 in unresectable pleural malignant mesothelioma with pleural effusion, we performed a phase II study on 31 consecutive patients (M/F 16/15; median age 61 years, range 40-84; PS ECOG 0 n=7; ECOG 1 n=15; ECOG 2 n=9; stage IA n=13; IB n=9; II n=7; IV=2) who received first-line therapy with intrapleural repeated instillation of 9000000 I.U. IL-2 twice/weekly for 4 weeks, after needle thoracenthesis. In nonprogressing patients, 3000000 I.U. IL-2 were subcutaneously administered thrice weekly for up to 6 months. Toxicity (WHO criteria) with intrapleural IL-2 consisted of grade 3 fever in 6/31 (19%) patients and of cardiac toxicity (failure) grade 3 in one patient (3%); toxicity during subcutaneous treatment was mild to moderate, mainly a flu-like syndrome. In 28/31 (90%) of patients there was no further or minimal (asymptomatic) pleural fluid collection (according to Paladine criteria); pleurisy relapsed only in 1/28 patients after 19 months. Tumor objective response (WHO criteria), evaluated by CT, occurred in seven patients (one CR and six PR; ORR 22%); ten patients achieved SD and 14 patients progressed. Median overall survival was 15 months (range 5-39) in all patients. IL-2 intrapleural administration followed by low-dose IL-2 subcutaneously in pleurisy-complicated malignant mesothelioma is feasible and

  2. Secretion of intelectin-1 from malignant pleural mesothelioma into pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, S; Tsuura, Y; Morohoshi, T; Shinohara, T; Oshita, F; Yamada, K; Kameda, Y; Ohtsu, T; Nakamura, Y; Miyagi, Y

    2010-08-10

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare but fatal tumour. Although most MPM patients show pleural effusion at even the early stage, it is hard to diagnose as MPM at the early stage because a sensitive and reliable diagnostic marker for MPM has not been found in plasma or pleural effusion. In this study, we investigated whether intelectin-1 was specifically contained in MPM cells and the pleural effusion of MPM patient by immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Malignant pleural mesothelioma cell lines, but not lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, secreted intelectin-1. In immunohistochemistry, epithelioid-type MPMs, but neither pleura-invading lung adenocarcinomas nor reactive mesothelial cells near the lung adenocarcinomas, were stained with anti-intelectin antibodies. Pleural effusion of MPM patients contained a higher concentration of intelectin-1 than that of lung cancer patients. These results suggest that detection of intelectin-1 may be useful for a differential diagnosis of epithelioid-type MPM in immunohistochemistry and that a high concentration of intelectin-1 in pleural effusion can be used as a new marker for clinical diagnosis of MPM.

  3. Secretion of intelectin-1 from malignant pleural mesothelioma into pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, S; Tsuura, Y; Morohoshi, T; Shinohara, T; Oshita, F; Yamada, K; Kameda, Y; Ohtsu, T; Nakamura, Y; Miyagi, Y

    2010-01-01

    Background: Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare but fatal tumour. Although most MPM patients show pleural effusion at even the early stage, it is hard to diagnose as MPM at the early stage because a sensitive and reliable diagnostic marker for MPM has not been found in plasma or pleural effusion. Methods: In this study, we investigated whether intelectin-1 was specifically contained in MPM cells and the pleural effusion of MPM patient by immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Malignant pleural mesothelioma cell lines, but not lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, secreted intelectin-1. In immunohistochemistry, epithelioid-type MPMs, but neither pleura-invading lung adenocarcinomas nor reactive mesothelial cells near the lung adenocarcinomas, were stained with anti-intelectin antibodies. Pleural effusion of MPM patients contained a higher concentration of intelectin-1 than that of lung cancer patients. Conclusion: These results suggest that detection of intelectin-1 may be useful for a differential diagnosis of epithelioid-type MPM in immunohistochemistry and that a high concentration of intelectin-1 in pleural effusion can be used as a new marker for clinical diagnosis of MPM. PMID:20628387

  4. Pleural multicystic mesothelial proliferation that presented with hemothorax.

    PubMed

    Şentürk, Ekrem; Çokpınar, Salih; Şen, Serdar; Meteoğlu, İbrahim

    2013-01-01

    Pleural multicystic mesothelial proliferation is a very rare serosal pathology. In this paper, we share a pleural multicystic mesothelial proliferation case arrives the emergency service with sudden chest pain and dyspnea complaint that presented with hemothorax complication. In the literature, there is only one pleural multicystic mesothelial proliferation issue that is determined by coincidence. Even though being a rare benign pathology; pleural multicystic mesothelial proliferation can cause some vital complications as a hemothorax.

  5. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Claudio; Bianchi, Tommaso

    2009-01-01

    This study reviews a series of 811 malignant pleural mesothelioma cases, diagnosed at hospitals in Trieste and Monfalcone districts of north eastern Italy, a narrow coastal strip with a population of about three lakh, in the period 1968-2008. The diagnosis was based on histological examination in 801 cases, and cytological findings in 10. Necropsy was performed in 610 cases. Occupational histories were obtained directly from the patients or their relatives through personal or telephone interviews. Routine lung sections were examined for asbestos bodies in 500 cases. In 143 cases asbestos bodies were isolated and counted by chemical digestion of the lung tissue using the Smith-Naylor method. The series included 717 men and 94 women aged between 32 and 93 years (mean 69.2 years). Detailed occupational data was obtained for 732 cases. The majority of patients had marine jobs - shipbuilding (449 cases), maritime trades (56 cases), and port activities (39 cases). The nature of work of other patients included a variety of occupations, with non-shipbuilding industries being the most common. Thirty-four women cleaned the work clothes of family members occupationally exposed and hence had a history of asbestos exposure at home. Most of the patients had their first exposure to asbestos before 1960. The latency period ranged between 13 and 73 years (mean 48.2). Latency period among insulators and dock workers were shorter than other categories. Asbestos bodies were detected on routine lung sections in 343 cases (68.6%). Lung asbestos body burdens after isolation ranged between two to 10 millions bodies per gram of dried tissue. Despite some limitations in the use of asbestos in this area since the 1970s, the incidence of tumor remained high during the last years. PMID:20386624

  6. Malignant pleural mesothelioma in Italy.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Claudio; Bianchi, Tommaso

    2009-08-01

    This study reviews a series of 811 malignant pleural mesothelioma cases, diagnosed at hospitals in Trieste and Monfalcone districts of north eastern Italy, a narrow coastal strip with a population of about three lakh, in the period 1968-2008. The diagnosis was based on histological examination in 801 cases, and cytological findings in 10. Necropsy was performed in 610 cases. Occupational histories were obtained directly from the patients or their relatives through personal or telephone interviews. Routine lung sections were examined for asbestos bodies in 500 cases. In 143 cases asbestos bodies were isolated and counted by chemical digestion of the lung tissue using the Smith-Naylor method. The series included 717 men and 94 women aged between 32 and 93 years (mean 69.2 years). Detailed occupational data was obtained for 732 cases.The majority of patients had marine jobs - shipbuilding (449 cases), maritime trades (56 cases), and port activities (39 cases). The nature of work of other patients included a variety of occupations, with non-shipbuilding industries being the most common. Thirty-four women cleaned the work clothes of family members occupationally exposed and hence had a history of asbestos exposure at home. Most of the patients had their first exposure to asbestos before 1960. The latency period ranged between 13 and 73 years (mean 48.2). Latency period among insulators and dock workers were shorter than other categories. Asbestos bodies were detected on routine lung sections in 343 cases (68.6%). Lung asbestos body burdens after isolation ranged between two to 10 millions bodies per gram of dried tissue. Despite some limitations in the use of asbestos in this area since the 1970s, the incidence of tumor remained high during the last years.

  7. Pleural effusion as the initial clinical presentation in disseminated cryptococcosis and fungaemia: an unusual manifestation and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mayun; Wang, Xiaomi; Yu, Xianjuan; Dai, Caijun; Chen, Dunshun; Yu, Chang; Xu, Xiaomei; Yao, Dan; Yang, Li; Li, Yuping; Wang, Liangxing; Huang, Xiaoying

    2015-09-22

    Cryptococcus neoformans infection usually presents as chronic meningitis and is increasingly being recognized in immunocompromised patients. Presentation with pleural effusion is rare in cryptococcal disease; in fact, only 4 cases of pleural effusion as the initial clinical presentation in cryptococcosis have been reported in English-language literature to date. We report the first case of pleural effusion as the initial clinical presentation in a renal transplant recipient who was initially misdiagnosed with tuberculous pleuritis but who then developed fungaemia and disseminated cryptococcosis. The examination of this rare manifestation and the accompanying literature review will contribute to increased recognition of the disease and a reduction in misdiagnoses. We describe a 63-year-old male renal transplant recipient on an immunosuppressive regimen who was admitted for left pleural effusion and fever. Cytological examinations and pleural fluid culture were nonspecific and negative. Thoracoscopy only found chronic, nonspecific inflammation with fibrosis in the pleura. After empirical anti-tuberculous therapy, the patient developed an elevated temperature, a severe headache and vomiting and fainted in the ward. Cryptococci were specifically found in the cerebrospinal fluid following lumbar puncture. Blood cultures were twice positive for C. neoformans one week later. He was transferred to the respiratory intensive care unit (RICU) immediately and was placed on non-invasive ventilation for respiratory failure for 2 days. He developed meningoencephalitis and fungaemia with C. neoformans during hospitalization. He was given amphotericin B liposome combined with 5-flucytosine and voriconazole for first 11 days, then amphotericin B liposome combined with 5-flucytosine sustained to 8 weeks, after that changed to fluconazole for maintenance. His condition improved after antifungal treatment, non-invasive ventilation and other support. Further pathological consultation

  8. Prolonged pleural catheters in the management of pleural effusions due to breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ordu, Cetin; Toker, Alper

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the second most common etiologic cause in malignant pleural effusions (MPE). The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of long term pleural catheters in inducing self sclerosis in pleural effusions of breast cancer patients. Methods In this study, 26 patients with breast cancer relapleural effusions that occurred between January 2011 and July 2013, who were considered not to undergo any other treatments and managed with prolonged pleural catheters (Jackson-Pratt silicone flat drain), were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty pleural catheters were inserted in 26 patients. All patients were female, mean age was 52 (range, 37-66) years old. Drainage over 1,500 mL per day was not allowed in order to avoid a lung edema. The catheters were removed in patients who had restoration of lung expansion and drainage under 50 mL/day. Results The histologic subtypes in pleural effusions were invasive ductal carcinoma in 18 patients, ductal carcinoma in situ in 4, invasive lobular carcinoma in 2, tubular carcinoma in 1, and medullary carcinoma in 1. Three of the 26 patients underwent bilateral catheter insertion, and one patient underwent a reinsertion of the catheter into the same hemithorax due to a recurrence. The catheters were retained for a mean period of 18 days (range, 11-38 days). In one patient with invasive ductal carcinoma and paramalignant pleural effusion (PMPE) (3.8%), a recurrent pleural effusion was seen 34 days after removal of the catheter. There were no complications. One patient died while the catheter was in place. Conclusions Prolonged catheters for the management of pleural effusions in selected patients have become more popular than other treatment alternatives due to a shorter length of stay and lower costs. We recommend the use of Jackson Pratt (JP) silicone flat drains which in our opinion provide effective pleurodesis in addition to easy application in recurrent effusions caused by breast cancer. PMID:24605219

  9. Prolonged pleural catheters in the management of pleural effusions due to breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Demirhan, Ozkan; Ordu, Cetin; Toker, Alper

    2014-02-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common etiologic cause in malignant pleural effusions (MPE). The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of long term pleural catheters in inducing self sclerosis in pleural effusions of breast cancer patients. In this study, 26 patients with breast cancer relapleural effusions that occurred between January 2011 and July 2013, who were considered not to undergo any other treatments and managed with prolonged pleural catheters (Jackson-Pratt silicone flat drain), were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty pleural catheters were inserted in 26 patients. All patients were female, mean age was 52 (range, 37-66) years old. Drainage over 1,500 mL per day was not allowed in order to avoid a lung edema. The catheters were removed in patients who had restoration of lung expansion and drainage under 50 mL/day. The histologic subtypes in pleural effusions were invasive ductal carcinoma in 18 patients, ductal carcinoma in situ in 4, invasive lobular carcinoma in 2, tubular carcinoma in 1, and medullary carcinoma in 1. Three of the 26 patients underwent bilateral catheter insertion, and one patient underwent a reinsertion of the catheter into the same hemithorax due to a recurrence. The catheters were retained for a mean period of 18 days (range, 11-38 days). In one patient with invasive ductal carcinoma and paramalignant pleural effusion (PMPE) (3.8%), a recurrent pleural effusion was seen 34 days after removal of the catheter. There were no complications. One patient died while the catheter was in place. Prolonged catheters for the management of pleural effusions in selected patients have become more popular than other treatment alternatives due to a shorter length of stay and lower costs. We recommend the use of Jackson Pratt (JP) silicone flat drains which in our opinion provide effective pleurodesis in addition to easy application in recurrent effusions caused by breast cancer.

  10. Life Expectancy in Pleural and Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Vavra-Musser, Kate; Lee, Jessica; Brooks, Jordan

    2017-01-01

    Background. Mesothelioma is a rare cancer with a historically dire prognosis. We sought to calculate life expectancies for patients with pleural or peritoneal mesothelioma, both at time of diagnosis and several years later, and to examine whether survival has improved in recent years. Methods. Data on 10,258 pleural and 1,229 peritoneal patients from the SEER US national cancer database, 1973–2011, were analyzed using the Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results. The major factors related to survival were age, sex, stage, grade, histology, and treatment. Survival improved only modestly over the study period: 0.5% per year for pleural and 2% for peritoneal. Conclusions. Life expectancies were markedly reduced from normal, even amongst 5-year survivors with the most favorable characteristics and treatment options. PMID:28239496

  11. A rare cause of pleural effusion: ruptured primary pleural hydatid cyst.

    PubMed

    Erkoç, Mustafa Fatih; Öztoprak, Bilge; Alkan, Sevil; Okur, Aylin

    2014-03-06

    Hydatidosis is an endemic parasitic disease in Mediterranean countries, often caused by the dog tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. The disease predominantly affects the liver (60-70%) and lungs (30%), and the surgical management is considered as the gold standard for treatment. Besides anaphylactic reactions, the most frequent complication of the hydatid disease is rupture into neighbouring structures, often affecting the bronchi, gastrointestinal tract and peritoneal/pleural cavities, according to its location. Primary pleural hydatidosis is an extremely rare entity and we present a ruptured pleural hydatid cyst with unusual location.

  12. Serum Procalcitonin and Procalcitonin Clearance as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min-Yi; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chien, Ju-Huei; Wu, Kun-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wu, Kang-Hsi; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the tendency of the plasma concentration and procalcitonin (PCT) clearance (PCTc) to act as biomarkers of prognosis in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. From 2011 to 2013, we prospectively analyzed patients with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The serum PCT was evaluated at the time of sepsis diagnosis and again after 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5). PCTc after 48 h (PCTc-day 3) and 96 h (PCTc-day 5) was also calculated to evaluate the prognostic value for survival in patients with sepsis. A total of 48 patients were included. Overall mortality was 16.7% (8 patients). PCTc was higher in survivors than in nonsurvivors, with significant differences on day 3 and day 5 (p = 0.033; p = 0.002, resp.); however, serum PCT levels on day 1, day 3, and day 5 were not significant prognostic factors for survival. The prognosis of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may be associated with PCTc. Dynamic changes of PCT reflected as PCTc at 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5) after admission to the ICU may serve as a predictor of survival in critically ill patients with severe sepsis.

  13. Serum Procalcitonin and Procalcitonin Clearance as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min-Yi; Chen, Chun-Yu; Chien, Ju-Huei; Wu, Kun-Hsi; Chang, Yu-Jun; Wu, Han-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the tendency of the plasma concentration and procalcitonin (PCT) clearance (PCTc) to act as biomarkers of prognosis in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. From 2011 to 2013, we prospectively analyzed patients with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The serum PCT was evaluated at the time of sepsis diagnosis and again after 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5). PCTc after 48 h (PCTc-day 3) and 96 h (PCTc-day 5) was also calculated to evaluate the prognostic value for survival in patients with sepsis. A total of 48 patients were included. Overall mortality was 16.7% (8 patients). PCTc was higher in survivors than in nonsurvivors, with significant differences on day 3 and day 5 (p = 0.033; p = 0.002, resp.); however, serum PCT levels on day 1, day 3, and day 5 were not significant prognostic factors for survival. The prognosis of patients with severe sepsis and septic shock may be associated with PCTc. Dynamic changes of PCT reflected as PCTc at 48 h (day 3) and 96 h (day 5) after admission to the ICU may serve as a predictor of survival in critically ill patients with severe sepsis. PMID:27088084

  14. Procalcitonin as a marker of serious bacterial infections in febrile children younger than 3 years old.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Prashant; Grzybowski, Mary; Chen, Xinguang; Kannikeswaran, Nirupama; Stanley, Rachel; Singal, Bonita; Hoyle, John; Borgialli, Dominic; Duffy, Elizabeth; Kuppermann, Nathan

    2014-02-01

    There is no perfectly sensitive or specific test for identifying young, febrile infants and children with occult serious bacterial infections (SBIs). Studies of procalcitonin (PCT), a 116-amino-acid precursor of the hormone calcitonin, have demonstrated its potential as an acute-phase biomarker for SBI. The objective of this study was to compare performance of serum PCT with traditional screening tests for detecting SBIs in young febrile infants and children. This was a prospective, multicenter study on a convenience sample from May 2004 to December 2005. The study was conducted in four emergency departments (EDs): one pediatric ED and three EDs with pediatric units, all with academic faculty on staff. A total of 226 febrile children 36 months old or younger who presented to the four participating EDs and were evaluated for SBI by blood, urine, and/or cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) cultures were included. The test characteristics (with 95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of the white blood cell (WBC) counts including neutrophil and band counts were compared with PCT for identifying SBI. Thirty children had SBIs (13.3%, 95% CI = 8.85 to 17.70). Four (13.3%) had bacteremia (including one with meningitis), 18 (60.0%) had urinary tract infections (UTIs), and eight (26.6%) had pneumonia. Children with SBIs had higher WBC counts (18.6 × 10(9)  ± 8.6 × 10(9) cells/L vs. 11.5 × 10(9)  ± 5.3 × 10(9) cells/L, p < 0.001), higher absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs; 10.6 × 10(9)  ± 6.7 × 10(9) cells/L vs. 5.6 × 10(9)  ± 3.8 × 10(9) cells/L, p = 0.009), higher absolute band counts (0.90 × 10(9)  ± 1.1 × 10(9) cells/L vs. 0.35 × 10(9)  ± 0.6 × 10(9) cells/L, p = 0.009), and higher PCT levels (2.9 ± 5.6 ng/mL vs. 0.4 ± 0.8 ng/mL, p = 0.021) than those without SBIs. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the absolute band count and PCT were the two screening tests independently associated with SBI, although the area

  15. Toxocariasis: An unusual cause of pleural effusion.

    PubMed

    Vallentin, Blandine; Carsin, Ania; Dubus, Jean-Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Toxocara canis, one of the most frequent parasites worldwide, rarely triggers respiratory symptoms. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl hospitalized for a unilateral eosinophilic pleural effusion due to Toxocara canis. Besides the fact that she was living in a squat, no other medical condition was reported. There was no other site of infection caused by the parasite and she was successfully treated with albendazole. This case report is obviously unique as very few cases of pleural effusion due to Toxocara canis are reported in literature, all in adult patients.

  16. Fibrous Pleural Plaques Detected at Autopsy

    PubMed Central

    TÜRKMEN, Nursel; EREN, Bülent; GÜNDOĞMUŞ, Ümit Naci

    2014-01-01

    The reported case was a 84-year-old male, dead after a traffic accident. The death was considered to be suspicious by prosecutor and an autopsy was mandated. In macroscopic autopsy investigation left tibia, fibula and multiple rib fractures, widespread seborrheic keratoses, and hyperpigmented skin lesions were detected. In the left chest cavity blood content and white colored lesions spread on the left parietal pleura and chest surface of the thoracic diaphragm were observed. The histological examination of the pleural lesions revealed fibrotic hyalinized structures with calcified foci. Investigation of pleural plaques in forensic autopsy is important for scientific classification of this interesting entity. PMID:25705312

  17. [Clinical aspects and diagnosis of pleural fibromas].

    PubMed

    Smati, B; Djilani, H; Boudaya, M S; Ghrib, B S; Mestiri, T; Mezni, F; Bouacha, H; Kilani, T

    2005-12-01

    Pleural fibromas are rare malignant or benign tumors requiring pathology study for certain diagnosis. From January 1985 to January 2001, 7 patients underwent surgery in our unit for pleural fibroma: 4 females and 3 males, mean age 60 years. The inaugural symptoms were chest pain (3 patients), dyspnea (2 patients), joint pain in a patient with Pierre-Marie pneumonic hypertrophic osteo-arthropathy, and acute hypoglycemia. Radiological investigations were decisive in orienting the diagnosis (chest X-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography and MRI). Surgical resection and pathological study of the surgical specimen is required to confirm the diagnosis. Patients should be carefully followed due to the risk of malignant recurrence.

  18. Recurrent pleural effusion without intrathoracic migration of ventriculoperitoneal shunt catheter: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chuen-im, Piyaporn; Smyth, Matthew D; Segura, Bradley; Ferkol, Thomas; Rivera-Spoljaric, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Pleural effusion is a rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunting, usually due to the migration of the VP shunt catheter into the thorax. Herein we report a neurologically disadvantaged child with a lobar holoprosencephaly and hydrocephalus, initially treated with a VP shunt, who years later developed recurrent right-sided pleural effusion ultimately confirmed to be a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hydrothorax without intra-thoracic migration of the distal shunt catheter. Thoracentesis was compatible with a transudative effusion. Given the presence of a persistent pleural effusion, beta-2 transferrin concentrations were measured, which yielded a positive result. Plain radiographs and head computed tomography (CT) showed a normally positioned, functional VP shunt. A spine CT myelogram to look for a spinal dural-thoracic CSF fistula was negative. A radionuclide CSF shunt study demonstrated normal functioning VP shunt with radiotracer accumulation within the peritoneum, with subsequent tracer rapidly accumulating in the right hemithorax. Video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) exploration with drainage of the pleural effusion and pleurodesis was then performed. No diaphragmatic defect or shunt tubing within the thorax was found and the procedure failed to resolve the effusion. The patient's recurrent effusion was ultimately resolved with intracranial endoscopic choroid plexus coagulation to decrease CSF output.

  19. Classification tree analysis for the discrimination of pleural exudates and transudates.

    PubMed

    Esquerda, Aureli; Trujillano, Javier; López de Ullibarri, Ignacio; Bielsa, Silvia; Madroñero, Ana B; Porcel, José M

    2007-01-01

    Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis is a non-parametric technique suitable for the generation of clinical decision rules. We have studied the performance of CART analysis in the separation of pleural exudates and transudates. Basic demographic, radiologic and laboratory data were retrospectively evaluated in 1257 pleural effusions (204 transudates and 1053 exudates, according to standard clinical criteria) and submitted for CART analysis. The model's discriminative ability was compared with that of Light's criteria, in both the original formulation and an abbreviated version, i.e., deleting the pleural fluid (PF)/serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) ratio from the triad. A first CART model built starting from all available data identified PF/serum protein ratio and PF LDH ratios as the two best discriminatory parameters. This algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 96.8%, slightly lower than that of classical Light's criteria (98.5%) and comparable to that of the abbreviated Light's criteria (97.0%), and significantly better specificity (85.3%) compared to both classical (74.0%) and abbreviated (79.4%) Light's criteria. A second CART model developed after excluding serum measurements selected PF protein and PF LDH as the most discriminatory variables, and correctly classified 97.2% of exudates and 77.0% of transudates. CART-based algorithms can efficiently discriminate between pleural exudates and transudates.

  20. The clinical significance of serum procalcitonin levels following direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber column in septic patients with colorectal perforation.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Hanasawa, K; Sato, K; Umeki, M; Koga, N; Naganuma, T; Sato, S; Shimonishi, T; Ikeda, T; Matsuno, N; Ono, S; Saitoh, H; Satoh, K; Otani, Y; Endo, Y; Eguchi, Y; Tani, T

    2009-01-01

    The efficacy of direct hemoperfusion with polymyxin B-immobilized fiber columns (PMX) has already been demonstrated in clinical studies for the treatment of septic shock. However, serum procalcitonin levels following PMX remain unknown. This prospective, multicenter, nonrandomized clinical study was performed at 12 institutions. Forty-five patients with severe sepsis or septic shock due to colorectal perforation underwent PMX. Patients' outcome as well as circulating levels of endotoxin, procalcitonin and IL-6 were monitored. Before surgery, procalcitonin level, but not endotoxin and IL-6 levels, was elevated according to patients' septic conditions. Procalcitonin was significantly and positively correlated with sequential organ failure assessment score. Circulating levels of procalcitonin peaked 24 h after PMX treatment. Change in serum procalcitonin level was significantly higher in nonsurvivors than survivors. Nine mortalities were observed within 28 days. The best predictor for 28-day mortality was procalcitonin >85.7 ng/ml at 24 h after PMX (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.808 +/- 0.105). Procalcitonin may be a good indicator of severity of sepsis secondary to colorectal perforation. Furthermore, procalcitonin level at 24 h after PMX appears to predict outcome after PMX. Therefore, procalcitonin may be a useful diagnostic marker to evaluate patients' condition in candidates for PMX treatment. Copyright (c) 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Recommendations of diagnosis and treatment of pleural effusion. Update.

    PubMed

    Villena Garrido, Victoria; Cases Viedma, Enrique; Fernández Villar, Alberto; de Pablo Gafas, Alicia; Pérez Rodríguez, Esteban; Porcel Pérez, José Manuel; Rodríguez Panadero, Francisco; Ruiz Martínez, Carlos; Salvatierra Velázquez, Angel; Valdés Cuadrado, Luis

    2014-06-01

    Although during the last few years there have been several important changes in the diagnostic or therapeutic methods, pleural effusion is still one of the diseases that the respiratory specialist have to evaluate frequently. The aim of this paper is to update the knowledge about pleural effusions, rather than to review the causes of pleural diseases exhaustively. These recommendations have a longer extension for the subjects with a direct clinical usefulness, but a slight update of other pleural diseases has been also included. Among the main scientific advantages are included the thoracic ultrasonography, the intrapleural fibrinolytics, the pleurodesis agents, or the new pleural drainages techniques.

  2. Diagnostic Value of Procalcitonin Levels in Acute Mesenteric Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Karaca, Yunus; Gündüz, Abdulkadir; Türkmen, Süha; Menteşe, Ahmet; Türedi, Süleyman; Eryiğit, Umut; Karahan, Süleyman Caner

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acute mesenteric ischemia (AMI) is a potentially fatal disease. Difficulties in diagnosis make it essential to find early biomarkers. Aims: This study investigated the diagnostic value of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in AMI. Study Design: Animal experimentation. Methods: Rats were divided into six groups of six animals each. In the experimental group, an experimental ischemia model was established by clamping the superior mesenteric artery from the aortic outflow tract. Blood and tissue specimens were collected from rats in the experimental mesenteric ischemia model at 30 min and 2 and 6 h, and these were compared with specimens from the respective control groups. PCT levels were compared at 30 min and 2 and 6 h. Results: PCT levels were 185.3 pg/mL in the control group and 219.3 pg/mL in the study group, 199.6 pg/mL in the control group and 243.9 pg/mL in the study group, and 201.9 pg/mL in the control group and 286.9 pg/mL in the study group, respectively, at 30 minute, 2 and 6 hours. Significant differences were determined between 6-h control group and ischemia group PCT levels (p=0.005). Conclusion: The absence of a significant increase in PCT levels in the early period, while a significant difference was detected in the later period (6 h), shows that PCT levels rise late in mesenteric ischemia and can be a marker in the late period. PMID:26185718

  3. Serum procalcitonin as an early marker of neonatal sepsis.

    PubMed

    Ballot, Daynia E; Perovic, Olga; Galpin, Jacky; Cooper, Peter A

    2004-10-01

    It has recently been suggested that procalcitonin (PCT) is of value in the diagnosis of neonatal sepsis, with varying results. This study was to evaluate the role of PCT as a single early marker of neonatal sepsis. Neonatal Unit, Johannesburg Hospital, and Microbiology Laboratory, National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS), South Africa. Neonates undergoing evaluation for sepsis between April and August 2002 were eligible for inclusion. Patients were categorised into 'no infection', 'possible infection' and 'definite infection' on the basis of C-reactive protein (CRP), white cell count (WCC), platelet count and blood culture results. PCT was correlated with infection categories. One hundred and eighty-three neonates were enrolled. One hundred and eighteen had no infection, 52 possible infection and 13 definite infection. PCT differed significantly among infection categories (p < 0.0001) and correlated significantly with CRP at presentation (correlation coefficient 0.404, p < 0.001) and CRP at 24 hours (correlation coefficient 0.343, p < 0.001). PCT predicted 89.5% of definite infection. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for PCT to predict definite infection showed odds ratio (OR) 1.145 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05-1.25) with an area under the curve of 0.778. PCT had a negative predictive value of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.915-0.988) for definite infection. Although PCT was significantly related to the category of infection, it is not sufficiently reliable to be the sole marker of neonatal sepsis. PCT would be useful as part of a full sepsis evaluation, but is relatively expensive. A negative PCT on presentation may rule out sepsis, but this needs to be evaluated further.

  4. Early prediction of renal parenchymal injury with serum procalcitonin

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Leila; Safaeian, Baranak; Mehrjerdian, Mahshid; Vakili, Mohammad-Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in children that can be associated with renal parenchymal injuries and late scars. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan is known as golden standard for detecting acute pyelonephritis (APN) that has a lot of difficulties and limitations. Objectives: we designed this study the accuracy of one inflammatory marker, serum procalcitonin (PCT) to identify as an early predictor of renal injuries. Patients and Methods: A prospective study was carried out in 95 patients who admitted in the hospital with the first febrile UTI. Serum PCT of all patients was measured; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) of this marker was analyzed compared to DMSA scan. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: In total, 79 females and 16 males were investigated. There are 42 cases in group 1 with normal DMSA scan and 53 patients in group two with renal parenchymal injuries in their scans. Mann-Whitney test showed a meaningful relation between the two groups regarding PCT level (P<0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of PCT reported in optimum cut off were 70%, 88.1%, 88.1% and 70%, respectively. The positive likelihood ratio (PLR) of PCT test was 5.8. Conclusion: In the current survey, PCT was the eligible inflammatory marker to predict renal parenchymal injuries in children with proper sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV that play also a pivotal role in the children aged less than 24 months, although, more studies should be undertaken to confirm. PMID:27689104

  5. Procalcitonin is useful in identifying bacteraemia among children with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana M; Cardoso, Maria-Regina A; Barral, Aldina; Araújo-Neto, César A; Guerin, Sylvie; Saukkoriipi, Annika; Paldanius, Mika; Vainionpää, Raija; Lebon, Pierre; Leinonen, Maija; Ruuskanen, Olli; Gendrel, Dominique

    2010-09-01

    Empirical antibiotic use is prescribed in managing children with pneumonia worldwide. We assessed the usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) and interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in differentiating viral from bacterial pneumonia. Among 159 hospitalized children, pneumonia was diagnosed based on clinical complaints plus pulmonary infiltrate. Aetiology was investigated for 9 viruses and 4 atypical and 3 typical bacteria. PCT and IFN-alpha were measured in the serum sample collected on admission. Eight patients had bacteraemic infections, 38 had non-bacteraemic typical infections, and 19 patients had atypical bacterial infections. Viral and unknown aetiology was established in 57 (36%) and 34 (21%) cases, respectively. Three patients with bacterial infection without collected blood culture were excluded. IFN-alpha (IU/ml) was detectable in 20 (13%) cases. The difference among median PCT values of the bacteraemic (4.22; 1.56-7.56), non-bacteraemic typical bacterial (1.47; 0.24-4.07), atypical bacterial (0.18; 0.06-1.03) and only viral (0.65; 0.11-2.22) subgroups was significant (p = 0.02). PCT was > or =2 ng/ml in 52 (33%) cases. The presence of IFN-alpha was associated with PCT <2 ng/ml (90% vs. 64%, p = 0.02). The negative predictive value (95% confidence interval) of PCT > or =2 ng/ml was 95% (89-100%), 89% (78-100%), 93% (85-100%) for differentiation of bacteraemic from viral, atypical bacterial and non-bacteraemic typical bacterial infection, respectively, and 58% (49-68%) for differentiation between bacterial and viral infection. PCT may be useful in identifying bacteraemia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. IFN-alpha was uncommonly detected.

  6. Detection, modeling and matching of pleural thickenings from CT data towards an early diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisaowong, Kraisorn; Kraus, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Pleural thickenings can be caused by asbestos exposure and may evolve into malignant pleural mesothelioma. While an early diagnosis plays the key role to an early treatment, and therefore helping to reduce morbidity, the growth rate of a pleural thickening can be in turn essential evidence to an early diagnosis of the pleural mesothelioma. The detection of pleural thickenings is today done by a visual inspection of CT data, which is time-consuming and underlies the physician's subjective judgment. Computer-assisted diagnosis systems to automatically assess pleural mesothelioma have been reported worldwide. But in this paper, an image analysis pipeline to automatically detect pleural thickenings and measure their volume is described. We first delineate automatically the pleural contour in the CT images. An adaptive surface-base smoothing technique is then applied to the pleural contours to identify all potential thickenings. A following tissue-specific topology-oriented detection based on a probabilistic Hounsfield Unit model of pleural plaques specify then the genuine pleural thickenings among them. The assessment of the detected pleural thickenings is based on the volumetry of the 3D model, created by mesh construction algorithm followed by Laplace-Beltrami eigenfunction expansion surface smoothing technique. Finally, the spatiotemporal matching of pleural thickenings from consecutive CT data is carried out based on the semi-automatic lung registration towards the assessment of its growth rate. With these methods, a new computer-assisted diagnosis system is presented in order to assure a precise and reproducible assessment of pleural thickenings towards the diagnosis of the pleural mesothelioma in its early stage.

  7. Implementation of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Lavrentieva, A; Kontou, P; Soulountsi, V; Kioumis, J; Chrysou, O; Bitzani, M

    2015-09-30

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that an algorithm based on serial measurements of procalcitonin (PCT) allows reduction in the duration of antibiotic therapy compared with empirical rules, and does not result in more adverse outcomes in burn patients with infectious complications. All burn patients requiring antibiotic therapy based on confirmed or highly suspected bacterial infections were eligible. Patients were assigned to either a procalcitonin-guided (study group) or a standard (control group) antibiotic regimen. The following variables were analyzed and compared in both groups: duration of antibiotic treatment, mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score (days 1-28), length of ICU and hospital stay. A total of 46 Burn ICU patients receiving antibiotic therapy were enrolled in this study. In 24 patients antibiotic therapy was guided by daily procalcitonin and clinical assessment. PCT guidance resulted in a smaller antibiotic exposure (10.1±4 vs. 15.3±8 days, p=0.034) without negative effects on clinical outcome characteristics such as mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score, length of ICU and hospital stay. The findings thus show that use of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit may contribute to the reduction of antibiotic exposure without compromising clinical outcome parameters.

  8. Implementation of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Lavrentieva, A.; Kontou, P.; Soulountsi, V.; Kioumis, J.; Chrysou, O.; Bitzani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The purpose of this study was to examine the hypothesis that an algorithm based on serial measurements of procalcitonin (PCT) allows reduction in the duration of antibiotic therapy compared with empirical rules, and does not result in more adverse outcomes in burn patients with infectious complications. All burn patients requiring antibiotic therapy based on confirmed or highly suspected bacterial infections were eligible. Patients were assigned to either a procalcitonin-guided (study group) or a standard (control group) antibiotic regimen. The following variables were analyzed and compared in both groups: duration of antibiotic treatment, mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score (days 1-28), length of ICU and hospital stay. A total of 46 Burn ICU patients receiving antibiotic therapy were enrolled in this study. In 24 patients antibiotic therapy was guided by daily procalcitonin and clinical assessment. PCT guidance resulted in a smaller antibiotic exposure (10.1±4 vs. 15.3±8 days, p=0.034) without negative effects on clinical outcome characteristics such as mortality rate, percentage of patients with relapse or superinfection, maximum SOFA score, length of ICU and hospital stay. The findings thus show that use of a procalcitonin-guided algorithm for antibiotic therapy in the burn intensive care unit may contribute to the reduction of antibiotic exposure without compromising clinical outcome parameters. PMID:27279801

  9. TLR2 contributes to trigger immune response of pleural mesothelial cells against Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Hwanga, Eun-Ha; Kim, Tae-Hyoun; Park, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Jung Joo; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Ha, Sang-Jun; Yang, Soo-Jin; Shin, Sung Jae; Park, Jong-Hwan

    2017-02-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a causative agent leading to pleural effusion, characterized by the accumulation of fluid and immune cells in the pleural cavity. Although this phenomenon has been described before, detailed processes or mechanisms associated with the pleural effusion are still not well understood. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) are specialized epithelial cells that cover the body wall and internal organs in pleural cavity playing a central role in pleural inflammation. Toll-like receptors are expressed in various cell types including mesothelial cells and initiate the recognition and defense against mycobacterial infection. In the present study, we investigated direct immune responses of PMCs against two mycobacterial strains, M. bovis vaccine strain Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and M. tuberculosis virulent strain H37Rv, and the role of TLR2 in such responses. Infection with BCG and H37Rv increased the production of IL-6, CXCL1, and CCL2 in WT PMCs, which was partially impaired in TLR2-deficient cells. In addition, the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs induced by BCG and H37Rv was suppressed in TLR2-deficient PMCs, as compared with the WT cells. TLR2 deficiency led to the decrease of nitric oxide (NO) production through the delayed gene expression of iNOS in PMCs. TLR2 was also shown to be essential for optimal expression of cellular adhesion molecules such as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 in PMCs in response to BCG and H37Rv. These findings strongly suggest that TLR2 participates in mycobacteria-induced innate immune responses in PMCs and may play a role in pathogenesis of tuberculosis pleural effusion.

  10. Role of blind closed pleural biopsy in the managment of pleural exudates.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Marco F; San-José, Esther; Ferreiro, Lucía; Golpe, Antonio; Antúnez, José; González-Barcala, Francisco-Javier; Abdulkader, Ihab; Álvarez-Dobaño, José M; Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Valdés, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The performance of blind closed pleural biopsy (BCPB) in the study of pleural exudates is controversial. To assess the diagnostic yield of BCPB in clinical practice and its role in the study of pleural exudates. Data were retrospectively collected on all patients who underwent BCPB performed between January 1999 and December 2011. A total of 658 BCPBs were performed on 575 patients. Pleural tissue was obtained in 590 (89.7%) of the biopsies. A malignant pleural effusion was found in 35% of patients. The cytology and the BCPB were positive in 69.2% and 59.2% of the patients, respectively. Of the patients with negative cytology, 21 had a positive BCPB (diagnostic improvement, 15%), which would have avoided one pleuroscopy for every seven BCPBs that were performed. Of the 113 patients with a tuberculous effusion, granulomas were observed in 87 and the Lowenstein culture was positive in an additional 17 (sensitivity 92%). The overall sensitivity was 33.9%, with a specificity and positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 71%. Complications were recorded in 14.4% of patients (pneumothorax 9.4%; chest pain 5.6%; vasovagal reaction, 4.1%; biopsy of another organ 0.5%). BCPB still has a significant role in the study of a pleural exudate. If an image-guided technique is unavailable, it seems reasonable to perform BCPB before resorting to a pleuroscopy. These results support BCPB as a relatively safe technique.

  11. Role of blind closed pleural biopsy in the management of pleural exudates

    PubMed Central

    Pereyra, Marco F; San-José, Esther; Ferreiro, Lucía; Golpe, Antonio; Antúnez, José; González-Barcala, Francisco-Javier; Abdulkader, Ihab; Álvarez-Dobaño, José M; Rodríguez-Núñez, Nuria; Valdés, Luis

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The performance of blind closed pleural biopsy (BCPB) in the study of pleural exudates is controversial. OBJECTIVE: To assess the diagnostic yield of BCPB in clinical practice and its role in the study of pleural exudates. METHODS: Data were retrospectively collected on all patients who underwent BCPB performed between January 1999 and December 2011. RESULTS: A total of 658 BCPBs were performed on 575 patients. Pleural tissue was obtained in 590 (89.7%) of the biopsies. A malignant pleural effusion was found in 35% of patients. The cytology and the BCPB were positive in 69.2% and 59.2% of the patients, respectively. Of the patients with negative cytology, 21 had a positive BCPB (diagnostic improvement, 15%), which would have avoided one pleuroscopy for every seven BCPBs that were performed. Of the 113 patients with a tuberculous effusion, granulomas were observed in 87 and the Lowenstein culture was positive in an additional 17 (sensitivity 92%). The overall sensitivity was 33.9%, with a specificity and positive predictive value of 100%, and a negative predictive value of 71%. Complications were recorded in 14.4% of patients (pneumothorax 9.4%; chest pain 5.6%; vasovagal reaction, 4.1%; biopsy of another organ 0.5%). CONCLUSIONS: BCPB still has a significant role in the study of a pleural exudate. If an image-guided technique is unavailable, it seems reasonable to perform BCPB before resorting to a pleuroscopy. These results support BCPB as a relatively safe technique. PMID:23951560

  12. Cerebral metastasis from malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    El Molla, Mohamed; Gragnaniello, Cristian; Al-Khawaja, Darweesh; Chiribao-Negri, Concepcion; Eftekhar, Behzad

    2013-09-26

    Malignant mesothelioma is an uncommon, highly invasive tumor derived from the mesothelial cells of pleura or peritoneum characterized by poor outcome. Mesothelioma was thought to metastasize locally only via direct invasion and not have distant spread. Distant metastases were discovered mostly on post-mortem examination. The authors present a case of 62-year-old man with pleural mesothelioma and brain metastasis.

  13. Automatic spatiotemporal matching of detected pleural thickenings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaisaowong, Kraisorn; Keller, Simon Kai; Kraus, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pleural thickenings can be found in asbestos exposed patient's lung. Non-invasive diagnosis including CT imaging can detect aggressive malignant pleural mesothelioma in its early stage. In order to create a quantitative documentation of automatic detected pleural thickenings over time, the differences in volume and thickness of the detected thickenings have to be calculated. Physicians usually estimate the change of each thickening via visual comparison which provides neither quantitative nor qualitative measures. In this work, automatic spatiotemporal matching techniques of the detected pleural thickenings at two points of time based on the semi-automatic registration have been developed, implemented, and tested so that the same thickening can be compared fully automatically. As result, the application of the mapping technique using the principal components analysis turns out to be advantageous than the feature-based mapping using centroid and mean Hounsfield Units of each thickening, since the resulting sensitivity was improved to 98.46% from 42.19%, while the accuracy of feature-based mapping is only slightly higher (84.38% to 76.19%).

  14. A treatment planning system for pleural PDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandell, Julia; Chang, Chang; Finlay, Jarod C.; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2010-02-01

    Uniform light fluence distribution for patients undergoing photodynamic therapy (PDT) is critical to ensure predictable PDT outcome. However, common practice uses a point source to deliver light to the pleural cavity. To improve the uniformity of light fluence rate distribution, we have developed a treatment planning system using an infrared camera to track the movement of the point source. This study examines the light fluence (rate) delivered to chest phantom to simulate a patient undergoing pleural PDT. Fluence rate (mW/cm2) and cumulative fluence (J/cm2) was monitored at 7 different sites during the entire light treatment delivery. Isotropic detectors were used for in-vivo light dosimetry. Light fluence rate in the pleural cavity is also calculated using the diffusion approximation with a finite-element model. We have established a correlation between the light fluence rate distribution and the light fluence rate measured on the selected points based on a spherical cavity model. Integrating sphere theory is used to aid the calculation of light fluence rate on the surface of the sphere as well as inside tissue assuming uniform optical properties. The resulting treatment planning tool can be valuable as a clinical guideline for future pleural PDT treatment.

  15. Pleurodesis in follow-up and treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma patients.

    PubMed

    Ak, Güntülü; Metintaş, Muzaffer; Yildirim, Hüseyin; Metintaş, Selma; Dündar, Emine; Erginel, Sinan; Alataş, Füsun

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed the necessity of pleurodesis in the follow-up of the patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), and how much it contributes to the survival period by determining the indications, efficiency, and reliability of the pleurodesis application. 191 patients were assessed retrospectively and 69 (36%) of them were established with a pleurodesis indication. In 42 patients accepting pleurodesis, the pleurodesis success was evaluated. Factors affecting the success of pleurodesis and the effect of pleurodesis on survival were assessed. Pleurodesis was a success in 26 (62%) of the 42 patients. In the group in which the pleurodesis process was a success, it was observed that KPS and pleural fluid pH were higher (p= 0.030, p= 0.032, respectively). In case of KPS > or = 80, the sensitivity was: 76.9%, specificity: 50.0%, PPV: 71.4%, and NPV was established as 57.1%. In case of pleural fluid pH > 7.27, the sensitivity was: 92.9%, specificity: 50.0%, PPV: 76.5%, and NPV was observed as 80.0%. In the group in which pleurodesis was a success, the median survival was longer (Log-rank: 11.2; p= 0.0008). Independently from chemotherapy, the chance of living longer for patients whose pleurodesis was a success was 2.6 times higher. A severe complication concerning the process was not observed. Pleurodesis is performed less frequently than it is assumed on patients with MPM. In patients with KPS > or = 80, pleural fluid pH > 7.27, and with indication, pleurodesis must be administered. In feasible patients, a successful pleurodesis with talc increases the survival of patients with MPM, and it can be safely administered.

  16. Procalcitonin and Midregional Proatrial Natriuretic Peptide as Biomarkers of Subclinical Cerebrovascular Damage: The Northern Manhattan Study.

    PubMed

    Katan, Mira; Moon, Yeseon; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Spanaus, Kathartina; DeRosa, Janet; Gutierrez, Jose; DeCarli, Charles; Wright, Clinton; Sacco, Ralph; Elkind, Mitchell

    2017-03-01

    Chronic infections and cardiac dysfunction are risk factors for stroke. We hypothesized that blood biomarkers of infection (procalcitonin) and cardiac dysfunction (midregional proatrial natriuretic peptide [MR-proANP]), previously associated with small vessel stroke and cardioembolic stroke are also associated with subclinical cerebrovascular damage, including silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensity volume. The NOMAS (Northern Manhattan Study) was designed to assess risk factors for incident vascular disease in a multiethnic cohort. A subsample underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging and had blood samples available for biomarker measurement (n=1178). We used logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for the association of these biomarkers with silent brain infarcts after adjusting for demographic, behavioral, and medical risk factors. We used linear regression to assess associations with log-white matter hyperintensity volume. Mean age was 70±9 years; 60% were women, 66% Hispanic, 17% black, and 15% were white. After adjusting for risk factors, subjects with procalcitonin or MR-proANP in the top quartile, compared with the lowest quartile were more likely to have silent brain infarcts (adjusted odds ratio for procalcitonin, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.3-3.7 and for MR-proANP, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.7-6.3) and increased white matter hyperintensity volume (adjusted mean change in log-white matter hyperintensity volume for procalcitonin, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.13-0.44 and for MR-proANP, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.004-0.36). Higher concentrations of procalcitonin, a marker of infection, and MR-proANP, a marker of cardiac dysfunction, are independently associated with subclinical cerebrovascular damage. If further studies demonstrate an incremental value for risk stratification, biomarker-guided primary prevention studies may lead to new approaches to prevent cerebrovascular disease. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Procalcitonin to guide antibiotic administration in COPD exacerbations: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Alexander G; Chatzimavridou-Grigoriadou, Victoria; Corlateanu, Alexandru; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Challenges in the differentiation of the aetiology of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) have led to significant overuse of antibiotics. Serum procalcitonin, released in response to bacterial infections, but not viral infections, could possibly identify AECOPD requiring antibiotics. In this meta-analysis we assessed the clinical effectiveness of procalcitonin-based protocols to initiate or discontinue antibiotics in patients presenting with AECOPD.Based on a prospectively registered protocol, we reviewed the literature and selected randomised or quasi-randomised trials comparing procalcitonin-based protocols to initiate or discontinue antibiotics versus standard care in AECOPD. We followed Cochrane and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) guidance to assess risk of bias, quality of evidence and to perform meta-analyses.We included eight trials evaluating 1062 patients with AECOPD. Procalcitonin-based protocols decreased antibiotic prescription (relative risk (RR) 0.56, 95% CI 0.43-0.73) and total antibiotic exposure (mean difference (MD) -3.83, 95% CI (-4.32--3.35)), without affecting clinical outcomes such as rate of treatment failure (RR 0.81, 0.62-1.06), length of hospitalisation (MD -0.76, -1.95-0.43), exacerbation recurrence rate (RR 0.96, 0.69-1.35) or mortality (RR 0.99, 0.58-1.69). However, the quality of the available evidence is low to moderate, because of methodological limitations and small overall study population.Procalcitonin-based protocols appear to be clinically effective; however, confirmatory trials with rigorous methodology are required.

  18. Delta Procalcitonin Is a Better Indicator of Infection Than Absolute Procalcitonin Values in Critically Ill Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hankovszky, Péter; Hajdú, Edit

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate whether absolute value of procalcitonin (PCT) or the change (delta-PCT) is better indicator of infection in intensive care patients. Materials and Methods. Post hoc analysis of a prospective observational study. Patients with suspected new-onset infection were included in whom PCT, C-reactive protein (CRP), temperature, and leukocyte (WBC) values were measured on inclusion (t0) and data were also available from the previous day (t−1). Based on clinical and microbiological data, patients were grouped post hoc into infection- (I-) and noninfection- (NI-) groups. Results. Of the 114 patients, 85 (75%) had proven infection. PCT levels were similar at t−1: I-group (median [interquartile range]): 1.04 [0.40–3.57] versus NI-group: 0.53 [0.16–1.68], p = 0.444. By t0 PCT levels were significantly higher in the I-group: 4.62 [1.91–12.62] versus 1.12 [0.30–1.66], p = 0.018. The area under the curve to predict infection for absolute values of PCT was 0.64 [95% CI = 0.52–0.76], p = 0.022; for percentage change: 0.77 [0.66–0.87], p < 0.001; and for delta-PCT: 0.85 [0.78–0.92], p < 0.001. The optimal cut-off value for delta-PCT to indicate infection was 0.76 ng/mL (sensitivity 80 [70–88]%, specificity 86 [68-96]%). Neither absolute values nor changes in CRP, temperature, or WBC could predict infection. Conclusions. Our results suggest that delta-PCT values are superior to absolute values in indicating infection in intensive care patients. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02311816. PMID:27597981

  19. MicroRNA and mRNA Features of Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma and Benign Asbestos-Related Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Ak, Guntulu; Tomaszek, Sandra C.; Kosari, Farhad; Metintas, Muzaffer; Jett, James R.; Metintas, Selma; Yildirim, Huseyin; Dundar, Emine; Dong, Jie; Aubry, Marie Christine; Wigle, Dennis A.; Thomas, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. We investigated the expression of microRNAs and mRNAs in pleural tissues from patients with either malignant pleural mesothelioma or benign asbestos-related pleural effusion. Methods. Fresh frozen tissues from a total of 18 malignant pleural mesothelioma and 6 benign asbestos-related pleural effusion patients were studied. Expression profiling of mRNA and microRNA was performed using standard protocols. Results. We discovered significant upregulation of multiple microRNAs in malignant pleural mesothelioma compared to benign asbestos-related pleural effusion. Hsa-miR-484, hsa-miR-320, hsa-let-7a, and hsa-miR-125a-5p were able to discriminate malignant from benign disease. Dynamically regulated mRNAs were also identified. MET was the most highly overexpressed gene in malignant pleural mesothelioma compared to benign asbestos-related pleural effusion. Integrated analyses examining microRNA-mRNA interactions suggested multiple altered targets within the Notch signaling pathway. Conclusions. Specific microRNAs and mRNAs may have diagnostic utility in differentiating patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma from benign asbestos-related pleural effusion. These studies may be particularly helpful in patients who reside in a region with a high incidence of mesothelioma. PMID:25756049

  20. Detection of pleural effusions and increased lung water by Tc-99m DTPA imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, E.C.; Karelitz, J.R.; Bennett, L.R.

    1985-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to report a systematic observation of uptake or retention of Tc-99m DTPA in pleural effusions and other abnormal states of increased lung water. 24 patients who underwent renal imaging with 10 mCi Tc-99m DTPA were included. Imaging was performed with a large field of view camera for 0-03 minutes after injection and delayed images acquired 2-4 hours later. The images encompassed the mid and lower thorax as well as kidneys. 15 patients showed, at 0-5 minutes, cold areas at lung bases that later showed relatively increased activity at 2-4 hours (hot on delayed images). 14 of these 15 patients showed pleural effusions on chest x-ray. Small bilateral effusions were more clearly demonstrated by scan than by x-ray in 8 of 15 patients. One patient with pneumonia showed an immediate hot area in the infected lobe, and two with pulmonary edema and congestive failure showed diffuse lung retention of Tc-99m on delayed images. Among 9 patients who did not demonstrate abnormal cold or hot areas in their lungs on DTPA images, none had clinical or x-ray evidence of pleural effusion, pneumonia, or congestive failure (100% negative predictive value). Differences in rate constants for diffusion into vs. out of pleural fluid provide a plausible explanation for the observed retention of tracer in effusions, as seen on delayed images. This study indicates that imaging with Tc-99m DTPA provides information of diagnostic value in the detection of pleural effusions. Futhermore, the data suggests that DTPA imaging may also be useful as a simple, cost-effective method to detect other conditions in which regional lung water is abnormally increased.

  1. Pulmonary and pleural inflammation after intratracheal instillation of short single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Katsuhide; Fukuda, Makiko; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Shinohara, Naohide; Uchino, Kanako; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-08-22

    Relationships between the physical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their toxicities have been studied. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the pulmonary and pleural inflammation caused by short-fiber single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). This study was performed to characterize differences in rat pulmonary and pleural inflammation caused by intratracheal instillation with doses of 0.15 or 1.5mg/kg of either short-sized SWCNTs or MWCNTs. Data from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis, histopathological findings, and transcriptional profiling of rat lungs obtained over a 90-day period indicated that short SWCNTs caused persistent pulmonary inflammation. In addition, the short MWCNTs markedly impacted alveoli immediately after instillation, with the levels of pulmonary inflammation following MWCNT instillation being reduced in a time-dependent manner. MWCNT instillation induced greater levels of pleural inflammation than did short SWCNTs. SWCNTs and MWCNTs translocated in mediastinal lymph nodes were observed, suggesting that SWCNTs and MWCNTs underwent lymphatic drainage to the mediastinal lymph nodes after pleural penetration. Our results suggest that short SWCNTs and MWCNTs induced pulmonary and pleural inflammation and that they might be transported throughout the body after intratracheal instillation. The extent of changes in inflammation differed following SWCNT and MWCNT instillation in a time-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. A case of unilateral pleural effusion secondary to congestive heart failure successfully treated with traditional Chinese herbal formulas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Dao; Chiu, Hsien-Hsueh Elley

    2012-05-01

    A case is presented that illustrates the potential effect of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) herbal formulas on treatment for unilateral pleural effusion secondary to congestive heart failure (CHF). A 79-year-old woman experienced episodic dyspnea with unilateral pleural effusion for 2 years. Thoracocentesis with pleural fluid analysis revealed no infection, tuberculosis, or malignancy. She had received conventional treatment for CHF but the symptoms persisted. Therefore, she visited the authors' TCM clinic for help. This patient was treated with TCM herbal granules including Shengmaisan, Xiebaisan, and Tinglizi, 3 times a day for 4 weeks. The daily dosage was adjusted on the basis of the patient's clinical response and her follow-up chest x-ray studies. After 8 months of treatment, her symptoms improved and the pleural effusion showed significant regression. It is suggested that TCM herbal formulas could play an important role in preventing the progression of unilateral pleural effusion secondary to CHF, in case of poor response to conservative treatment. Additional studies about the mechanism of action of the medication involved are warranted.

  3. Indwelling pleural catheters for pleural effusions associated with end-stage renal disease: a case series.

    PubMed

    Potechin, Rajini; Amjadi, Kayvan; Srour, Nadim

    2015-02-01

    Pleural effusions are a common complication of end-stage renal disease.These effusions are occasionally refractory to medical management, but few options are then available. Indwelling pleural catheter insertion (IPC) has been well described for the management of malignant pleural effusions and, more recently, of nonmalignant effusions of other origin. We aimed to analyze our experience and to evaluate the safety and feasibility of using IPCs for pleural effusion associated with end-stage renal disease. We constructed a cohort of patients who underwent IPC insertion for pleural effusions associated with end-stage renal disease. The IPCs were inserted as a palliative measure in patients who had thoracentesis twice within the preceding 2 weeks, no evidence of infection and either failure to respond, complications or intolerance to maximal medical therapy, or if IPC insertion would enable discharge when the patient was hospitalized mainly for dyspnea due to pleural effusion. There were nine IPCs inserted in eight patients. Patients had significant dyspnea at baseline with a median baseline dyspnea index of 1.5 [interquartile range (IQR) 0–3]. Dyspnea improved significantly 2 weeks after catheter insertion with a median transitional dyspnea index of 6 (IQR 4.5–7.0). There was no occurrence of empyema or other major complications.Serum albumin did not decrease after catheter insertion. IPCs were removed in four patients(50%) and successful spontaneous pleurodesis occurred in three patients (37.5%) after a median of 77 days (IQR 9–208). IPC insertion for pleural effusions associated with end-stage renal disease appears safe and effective. Larger studies are needed, particularly regarding the impact of this intervention on quality of life.

  4. Efficacy and safety of diagnostic thoracoscopy in undiagnosed pleural effusions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Yang, Yuan; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Li-Li; Wu, Yan-Bing; Zhang, Jun; Tong, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Huan-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of pleural effusions can present a considerable challenge, and the etiology of pleural effusions varies depending on the population studied. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of medical thoracoscopy in the diagnosis of patients with undiagnosed pleural effusions in a Chinese population. Between July 2005 and June 2014, medical thoracoscopy (MT) using the semirigid instrument was performed in 833 patients with pleural effusions of unknown etiology in our Institute, where diagnostic thoracocentesis or/and blind pleural biopsy had failed to yield an answer. Demographic, radiographic, procedural, and histological data were recorded and analyzed. During this 9-year study, satisfactory pleural biopsy samples were obtained in 833 patients, and MT revealed malignant pleural effusion in 342 (41.1%) patients, benign pleural effusion in 429 (51.5%) patients, and 62 (7.4%) patients could not get definite diagnoses. The overall diagnostic efficiency of MT was 92.6% (771/833). After MT, the only severe complication was empyema, seen in 3 patients (0.4%). The most common minor complication was transient chest pain (44.1%) from the indwelling chest tube. MT is an effective and safe procedure for diagnosing pleural effusions of undetermined causes. In areas with high tuberculosis prevalence, MT should be particularly helpful in the differential diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Reactive oxygen species induce procalcitonin expression in trigeminal ganglia glia

    PubMed Central

    Raddant, Ann C.; Russo, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) gene expression under inflammatory conditions using trigeminal ganglia organ cultures as an experimental system. These cultures have increased proinflammatory signaling that may mimic neurogenic inflammation in the migraine state. Background The trigeminal nerve sends peripheral pain signals to the central nervous system during migraine. Understanding the dynamic processes that occur within the trigeminal nerve and ganglion may provide insights into events that contribute to migraine pain. A neuropeptide of particular interest is CGRP, which can be elevated and play a causal role in migraine. However, most studies have overlooked a second splice product of the CALCA gene, which encodes calcitonin (CT), a peptide hormone involved in calcium homeostasis. Importantly, a precursor form of calcitonin called procalcitonin (proCT) can act as a partial agonist at the CGRP receptor and elevated proCT has recently been reported during migraine. Methods We used a trigeminal ganglion whole organ explant model, which has previously been demonstrated to induce pro-inflammatory agents in vitro. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate changes in mRNA and protein levels of CGRP and proCT. Results Whole mouse trigeminal ganglia cultured for 24 h showed a 10-fold increase in CT mRNA, with no change in CGRP mRNA. A similar effect was observed in ganglia from adult rats. ProCT immunoreactivity was localized in glial cells. Cutting the tissue blunted the increase in CT, suggesting that induction required the close environment of the intact ganglia. Consistent with this prediction, there were increased reactive oxygen species in the ganglia and the elevated CT mRNA was reduced by antioxidant treatment. Surprisingly, reactive oxygen species were increased in neurons, not glia. Conclusions These results demonstrate that reactive oxygen species can activate proCT expression from the CGRP gene in trigeminal

  6. Procalcitonin Impairs Liver Cell Viability and Function In Vitro: A Potential New Mechanism of Liver Dysfunction and Failure during Sepsis?

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Johannes; Wagner, Nana-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Liver dysfunction and failure are severe complications of sepsis and result in poor outcome and increased mortality. The underlying pathologic mechanisms of hepatocyte dysfunction and necrosis during sepsis are only incompletely understood. Here, we investigated whether procalcitonin, a biomarker of sepsis, modulates liver cell function and viability. Materials and Methods. Employing a previously characterized and patented biosensor system evaluating hepatocyte toxicity in vitro, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2/C3A) were exposed to 0.01–50 ng/mL procalcitonin for 2 × 72 h and evaluated for proliferation, necrosis, metabolic activity, cellular integrity, microalbumin synthesis, and detoxification capacity. Acetaminophen served as positive control. For further standardization, procalcitonin effects were confirmed in a cellular toxicology assay panel employing L929 fibroblasts. Data were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey's test. Results. Already at concentrations as low as 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin induced HepG2/C3A necrosis (P < 0.05) and reduced metabolic activity, cellular integrity, synthesis, and detoxification capacity (all P < 0.001). Comparable effects were obtained employing L929 fibroblasts. Conclusion. We provide evidence for procalcitonin to directly impair function and viability of human hepatocytes and exert general cytotoxicity in vitro. Therapeutical targeting of procalcitonin could thus display a novel approach to reduce incidence of liver dysfunction and failure during sepsis and lower morbidity and mortality of septic patients. PMID:28255555

  7. Use of procalcitonin for the detection of sepsis in the critically ill burn patient: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mann, Elizabeth A; Wood, Geri L; Wade, Charles E

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the evidence for use of routine procalcitonin testing to diagnose the presence of sepsis in the burn patient. The electronic databases MEDLINE, Cochrane, CINAHL, ProQuest, and SCOPUS were searched for relevant studies using the MeSH terms burn, infection, procalcitonin, and meta-analysis. The focus of the review was the adult burn population, but other relevant studies of critically ill patients were included as data specific to the patient with burns are limited. Studies were compiled in tabular form and critically appraised for quality and level of evidence. Four meta-analyses, one review of the literature, one randomized controlled trial, nine prospective observational, and three retrospective studies were retrieved. Six of these studies were specific to the burn population, with one specific to burned children. Only one meta-analysis, one adult burn and one pediatric burn study reported no benefit of procalcitonin testing to improve diagnosis of sepsis or differentiate sepsis from non-infectious systemic inflammatory response. The collective findings of the included studies demonstrated benefit of incorporating procalcitonin assay into clinical sepsis determination. Evaluation of the burn specific studies is limited by the use of guidelines to define sepsis and inconsistent results from the burn studies. Utility of the procalcitonin assay is limited due to the lack of availability of rapid, inexpensive tests. However, it appears procalcitonin assay is a safe and beneficial addition to the clinical diagnosis of sepsis in the burn intensive care unit.

  8. Procalcitonin Impairs Liver Cell Viability and Function In Vitro: A Potential New Mechanism of Liver Dysfunction and Failure during Sepsis?

    PubMed

    Sauer, Martin; Doß, Sandra; Ehler, Johannes; Mencke, Thomas; Wagner, Nana-Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose. Liver dysfunction and failure are severe complications of sepsis and result in poor outcome and increased mortality. The underlying pathologic mechanisms of hepatocyte dysfunction and necrosis during sepsis are only incompletely understood. Here, we investigated whether procalcitonin, a biomarker of sepsis, modulates liver cell function and viability. Materials and Methods. Employing a previously characterized and patented biosensor system evaluating hepatocyte toxicity in vitro, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2/C3A) were exposed to 0.01-50 ng/mL procalcitonin for 2 × 72 h and evaluated for proliferation, necrosis, metabolic activity, cellular integrity, microalbumin synthesis, and detoxification capacity. Acetaminophen served as positive control. For further standardization, procalcitonin effects were confirmed in a cellular toxicology assay panel employing L929 fibroblasts. Data were analyzed using ANOVA/Tukey's test. Results. Already at concentrations as low as 0.25 ng/mL, procalcitonin induced HepG2/C3A necrosis (P < 0.05) and reduced metabolic activity, cellular integrity, synthesis, and detoxification capacity (all P < 0.001). Comparable effects were obtained employing L929 fibroblasts. Conclusion. We provide evidence for procalcitonin to directly impair function and viability of human hepatocytes and exert general cytotoxicity in vitro. Therapeutical targeting of procalcitonin could thus display a novel approach to reduce incidence of liver dysfunction and failure during sepsis and lower morbidity and mortality of septic patients.

  9. Pleural effusion in a child with a ventriculoperitoneal shunt and congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Henningfeld, Jennifer; Loomba, Rohit S; Encalada, Santiago; Magner, Kristin; Pfister, Jennifer; Matthews, Anne; Foy, Andrew; Mikhailov, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    We present the unique case of an 8 month old infant who required extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) after neonatal repair of tetralogy of Fallot. While on ECMO, he developed grade 3 intraventricular hemorrhage resulting in hydrocephalus requiring ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt placement at 5 months of life. He presented to cardiology clinic with a 2-month history of poor weight gain, tachypnea, and grunting and was found to have a large right sided pleural effusion. This was proven to be cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation secondary to poor peritoneal absorption with subsequent extravasation of CSF into the thoracic cavity via a diaphragmatic defect. After diaphragm repair, worsening ascites from peritoneal malabsorption led to shunt externalization and ultimate conversion to a ventriculoatrial (VA) shunt. This is the second reported case of VA shunt placement in a child with congenital heart disease and highlights the need to consider CSF extravasation as the cause of pleural effusions in children with VP shunts.

  10. Pleural Photodynamic Therapy and Surgery in Lung Cancer and Thymoma Patients with Pleural Spread.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke-Cheng; Hsieh, Yi-Shan; Tseng, Ying-Fan; Shieh, Ming-Jium; Chen, Jin-Shing; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Lee, Jang-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pleural spread is difficult to treat in malignancies, especially in lung cancer and thymoma. Monotherapy with surgery fails to have a better survival benefit than palliative chemotherapy, the currently accepted treatment. Photodynamic therapy utilizes a photosensitizer to target the tumor site, and the tumor is exposed to light after performing a pleurectomy and tumor resection. However, the benefits of this procedure to lung cancer or thymoma patients are unknown. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes of patients with lung cancer or thymoma with pleural seeding who underwent pleural photodynamic therapy and surgery between 2005 and 2013. Eighteen patients enrolled in this study. The mean patient age was 52.9 ± 12.2 years. Lung cancer was the inciting cancer of pleural dissemination in 10 patients (55.6%), and thymoma in 8 (44.4%). There was no procedure-related mortality. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, the 3-year survival rate and the 5-year survival rate were 68.9% and 57.4%, respectively. We compared the PDT lung cancer patients with those receiving chemotherapy or target therapy (n = 51) and found that the PDT group had better survival than n