Science.gov

Sample records for plexus injury patient

  1. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  2. Concomitant Traumatic Spinal Cord and Brachial Plexus Injuries in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Peter C.; Pirola, Elena; Hébert-Blouin, Marie-Noëlle; Kircher, Michelle F.; Spinner, Robert J.; Bishop, Allen T.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Combined injuries to the spinal cord and brachial plexus present challenges in the detection of both injuries as well as to subsequent treatment. The purpose of this study is to describe the epidemiology and clinical factors of concomitant spinal cord injuries in patients with a known brachial plexus injury. Methods: A retrospective review was performed on all patients who were evaluated for a brachial plexus injury in a tertiary, multidisciplinary brachial plexus clinic from January 2000 to December 2008. Patients with clinical and/or imaging findings for a coexistent spinal cord injury were identified and underwent further analysis. Results: A total of 255 adult patients were evaluated for a traumatic traction injury to the brachial plexus. We identified thirty-one patients with a combined brachial plexus and spinal cord injury, for a prevalence of 12.2%. A preganglionic brachial plexus injury had been sustained in all cases. The combined injury group had a statistically greater likelihood of having a supraclavicular vascular injury (odds ratio [OR] = 22.5; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9, 271.9) and a cervical spine fracture (OR = 3.44; 95% CI = 1.6, 7.5). These patients were also more likely to exhibit a Horner sign (OR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.5, 7.2) and phrenic nerve dysfunction (OR = 2.5; 95% CI = 1.0, 5.8) compared with the group with only a brachial plexus injury. Conclusion: Heightened awareness for a combined spinal cord and brachial plexus injury and the presence of various associated clinical and imaging findings may aid in the early recognition of these relatively uncommon injuries. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions to Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22258773

  3. Prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures: A National Trauma Data Bank review

    PubMed Central

    Chamata, Edward; Mahabir, Raman; Jupiter, Daniel; Weber, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies investigating the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures are sparse, and are frequently limited by small sample sizes and often restricted to single-centre experience. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures; to determine how the prevalence varies with the region of the scapula injured; and to assess which specific nerves of the brachial plexus were involved. METHODS: The present study was a retrospective review of data from the National Trauma Data Bank over a five-year period (2007 to 2011). RESULTS: Of 68,118 patients with scapular fractures, brachial plexus injury was present in 1173 (1.72%). In patients with multiple scapular fractures, the prevalence of brachial plexus injury was 3.12%, and ranged from 1.52% to 2.22% in patients with single scapular fractures depending on the specific anatomical location of the fracture. Of the 426 injuries with detailed information on nerve injury, 208 (49%) involved the radial nerve, 113 (26.5%) the ulnar nerve, 65 (15%) the median nerve, 36 (8.5%) the axillary nerve and four (1%) the musculocutaneous nerve. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures was 1.72%. The prevalence was similar across anatomical regions for single scapular fracture and was higher with multiple fractures. The largest percentage of nerve injuries were to the radial nerve. PMID:25535462

  4. Prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures: A National Trauma Data Bank review.

    PubMed

    Chamata, Edward; Mahabir, Raman; Jupiter, Daniel; Weber, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures are sparse, and are frequently limited by small sample sizes and often restricted to single-centre experience. To determine the prevalence of brachial plexus injuries associated with scapular fractures; to determine how the prevalence varies with the region of the scapula injured; and to assess which specific nerves of the brachial plexus were involved. The present study was a retrospective review of data from the National Trauma Data Bank over a five-year period (2007 to 2011). Of 68,118 patients with scapular fractures, brachial plexus injury was present in 1173 (1.72%). In patients with multiple scapular fractures, the prevalence of brachial plexus injury was 3.12%, and ranged from 1.52% to 2.22% in patients with single scapular fractures depending on the specific anatomical location of the fracture. Of the 426 injuries with detailed information on nerve injury, 208 (49%) involved the radial nerve, 113 (26.5%) the ulnar nerve, 65 (15%) the median nerve, 36 (8.5%) the axillary nerve and four (1%) the musculocutaneous nerve. The prevalence of brachial plexus injuries in patients with scapular fractures was 1.72%. The prevalence was similar across anatomical regions for single scapular fracture and was higher with multiple fractures. The largest percentage of nerve injuries were to the radial nerve.

  5. [Obstetric brachial plexus injury].

    PubMed

    Pondaag, Willem; van Dijk, J Gert; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2014-01-01

    Obstetric palsy is a birth injury that occurs when the brachial plexus is damaged by traction. In the majority of patients spontaneous recovery will occur; however, in case of incomplete spontaneous recovery early neurosurgical intervention may be indicated. We present 3 case reports in this article, as well as describing the strategy favoured in our clinic. We recommend referring patients who have incomplete spontaneous recovery at the age of 1 month. At that age a good prediction of prognosis can be made by combining neurological examination with needle electromyography (EMG) of the biceps muscle.

  6. Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries in American Football.

    PubMed

    Daly, Charles A; Payne, S Houston; Seiler, John G

    2016-11-01

    This article reports a series of severe permanent brachial plexus injuries in American football players. The authors describe the mechanisms of injury and outcomes from a more contemporary treatment approach in the form of nerve transfer tailored to the specific injuries sustained. Three cases of nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury in American football players are discussed in detail. Two of these patients regained functional use of the extremity, but 1 patient with a particularly severe injury did not regain significant function. Brachial plexus injuries are found along a spectrum of brachial plexus stretch or contusion that includes the injuries known as "stingers." Early identification of these severe brachial plexus injuries allows for optimal outcomes with timely treatment. Diagnosis of the place of a given injury along this spectrum is difficult and requires a combination of imaging studies, nerve conduction studies, and close monitoring of physical examination findings over time. Although certain patients may be at higher risk for stingers, there is no evidence to suggest that this correlates with a higher risk of severe brachial plexus injury. Unfortunately, no equipment or strengthening program has been shown to provide a protective effect against these severe injuries. Patients with more severe injuries likely have less likelihood of functional recovery. In these patients, nerve transfer for brachial plexus injury offers the best possibility of meaningful recovery without significant morbidity. [ Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1188-e1192.].

  7. The role of elective amputation in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-03-01

    Despite undergoing complex brachial plexus, surgical reconstructions, and rehabilitation, some patients request an elective amputation. This study evaluates the role of elective amputation after brachial plexus injury. A retrospective chart review was performed for all the 2140 patients with brachial plexus injuries treated with elective amputation between 1999 and 2012 at a single institution. Analysis was conducted on the potential predisposing factors for amputation, amputation level, and postamputation complications. Patients were evaluated using pre- and postamputation Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and hand scores in addition to visual analog pain scores. The following three conditions were observed in all nine patients who requested an elective amputation: (1) Pan-plexus injury; (2) non-recovery (mid-humeral amputation) or elbow flexion recovery only (forearm amputation) 1 year after all other surgical options were performed; and (3) at least one chronic complication (chronic infection, nonunion fractures, full-thickness burns, chronic neck pain with arm weight, etc.). Pain improvement was found in five patients. Subjective patient assessments and visual analog pain scores before and after amputation did not show a statistically significant improvement in Disabilities of the Shoulder, Arm, and Hand Scores. However, four patients reported that their shoulder pain felt "better" than it did before the amputation, and two patients indicated they were completely cured of chronic pain after surgery. Elective amputation after brachial plexus injury should be considered as an option in the above circumstances. When the informed and educated decision is made, patients can have satisfactory outcomes regarding amputation. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Our experience with triceps nerve reconstruction in patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Barmpitsioti, Antonia

    2012-05-01

    Although elbow extension is facilitated by gravity, triceps muscle provides elbow joint stability; in patients with brachial plexus injuries stable elbow is necessary for obtaining useful hand function. This study presents the senior author's experience with triceps nerve reconstruction and the functional results in patients with brachial plexus injuries. Outcomes were analyzed in relation to denervation time, severity score, length of the interposition nerve graft and donor nerves used. One hundred and sixty two patients with brachial plexus injury had triceps nerve neurotization and elbow extension recovery between 1978 and 2006. The mean patient's age was 25.45 ± 9.90 years and the mean denervation time was 16.90 ± 26.95 months. Two hundred and thirty two motor donors were used in 156 patients; 6 patients underwent neurolysis; 86 intercostal nerves were transferred in 41 patients. Interposition nerve grafts were used in 130 patients. Results were good or excellent in 31.65% of patients. The age of patients and the severity of the brachial plexus lesion are among the factors that significantly influenced functional results. Intraplexus motor donors are always preferable achieving better functional outcomes than extraplexus donors. Intercostal nerves and the posterior division of contralateral C7 proved preferred donors for elbow extension restoration in multiple avulsions. Although it is difficult to restore strong elbow extension, triceps nerve reconstruction is suggested in brachial plexus management, since it provides elbow stability. Satisfactory elbow extension strength was restored in young patients with high severity score. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Triangle Tilt Surgery in an Older Pediatric Patient With Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.; Amrani, Abdelouahed; Melcher, Sonya E.; Eichhorn, Mitchell G.

    2009-01-01

    Children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury have an elevated risk of long-term impairment if they do not fully recover by the age of 3 months. Persistent nerve damage leads to muscle abnormalities and progressive muscle and bone deformities. Several procedures have been described to treat this severe deformity. We have demonstrated the benefits of the triangle tilt procedure in young children with a mean age of 6.4 years (2.2 to 10.3), yet the treatment of humeral head subluxation secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury represents a challenge in older pediatric patients. This case report demonstrates the effectiveness of triangle tilt surgery for the treatment of glenohumeral joint deformity in a 12 year old pediatric patient with left sided residual brachial plexus injury. The patient in this study showed noticeable clinical improvements, an improvement in glenohumeral joint dysplasia, and a reduction in humeral head subluxation 2 years after triangle tilt surgery. There was functional improvement 25 months after surgery. The patient's total Mallet score for shoulder function improved from 14 to 20 (of 25). In this case report, we demonstrate that the triangle tilt procedure can be used for older pediatric patients without modification. This observation has provided valuable information and is, to our knowledge, the first documented improvement of a glenohumeral joint deformity in an older pediatric patient. Future studies will be needed to determine the long-term success of triangle tilt surgery in this age group. PMID:19641599

  10. Triangle tilt surgery in an older pediatric patient with obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Amrani, Abdelouahed; Melcher, Sonya E; Eichhorn, Mitchell G

    2009-06-30

    Children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury have an elevated risk of long-term impairment if they do not fully recover by the age of 3 months. Persistent nerve damage leads to muscle abnormalities and progressive muscle and bone deformities. Several procedures have been described to treat this severe deformity. We have demonstrated the benefits of the triangle tilt procedure in young children with a mean age of 6.4 years (2.2 to 10.3), yet the treatment of humeral head subluxation secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury represents a challenge in older pediatric patients. This case report demonstrates the effectiveness of triangle tilt surgery for the treatment of glenohumeral joint deformity in a 12 year old pediatric patient with left sided residual brachial plexus injury. The patient in this study showed noticeable clinical improvements, an improvement in glenohumeral joint dysplasia, and a reduction in humeral head subluxation 2 years after triangle tilt surgery. There was functional improvement 25 months after surgery. The patient's total Mallet score for shoulder function improved from 14 to 20 (of 25). In this case report, we demonstrate that the triangle tilt procedure can be used for older pediatric patients without modification. This observation has provided valuable information and is, to our knowledge, the first documented improvement of a glenohumeral joint deformity in an older pediatric patient. Future studies will be needed to determine the long-term success of triangle tilt surgery in this age group.

  11. Bionic reconstruction to restore hand function after brachial plexus injury: a case series of three patients.

    PubMed

    Aszmann, Oskar C; Roche, Aidan D; Salminger, Stefan; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Herceg, Malvina; Sturma, Agnes; Hofer, Christian; Farina, Dario

    2015-05-30

    Brachial plexus injuries can permanently impair hand function, yet present surgical reconstruction provides only poor results. Here, we present for the first time bionic reconstruction; a combined technique of selective nerve and muscle transfers, elective amputation, and prosthetic rehabilitation to regain hand function. Between April 2011, and May 2014, three patients with global brachial plexus injury including lower root avulsions underwent bionic reconstruction. Treatment occurred in two stages; first, to identify and create useful electromyographic signals for prosthetic control, and second, to amputate the hand and replace it with a mechatronic prosthesis. Before amputation, the patients had a specifically tailored rehabilitation programme to enhance electromyographic signals and cognitive control of the prosthesis. Final prosthetic fitting was applied as early as 6 weeks after amputation. Bionic reconstruction successfully enabled prosthetic hand use in all three patients. After 3 months, mean Action Research Arm Test score increased from 5·3 (SD 4·73) to 30·7 (14·0). Mean Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure score improved from 9·3 (SD 1·5) to 65·3 (SD 19·4). Mean Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand score improved from 46·5 (SD 18·7) to 11·7 (SD 8·42). For patients with global brachial plexus injury with lower root avulsions, who have no alternative treatment, bionic reconstruction offers a means to restore hand function. Austrian Council for Research and Technology Development, Austrian Federal Ministry of Science, Research & Economy, and European Research Council Advanced Grant DEMOVE. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... the brachial plexus can be affected during a difficult delivery. Injury may be caused by: The infant's head and neck pulling toward the side as the shoulders pass through the birth canal Stretching of the infant's shoulders during a ...

  13. Functioning free muscle transfer for the restoration of elbow flexion in brachial plexus injury patients.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Emmanuel P; Montales, Tristram D

    2016-11-01

    Restoration of elbow function in traumatic brachial plexus injury patients remains the priority in the reconstruction of the involved extremity. In cases of complete nerve root injuries and in delayed cases, the only option for elbow reconstruction is the functional free muscle transfer. The purpose of this paper was to present the clinical outcomes and complications of functioning free muscle transfers using the gracilis muscle for the restoration of elbow flexion in brachial plexus injury patients in a tertiary institution from January 1, 2005 to January 31, 2014. A retrospective review of all patients who had functioning free muscle transfers for elbow flexion was done with a minimum of 12 months follow-up. Outcome measures were elbow flexion in terms of range of motion in degrees, muscle strength of the transferred muscle, VAS (visual analogue scale) for pain, postoperative DASH scores and complications of the procedure. There were 39 males and three females. The average age at the time of surgery was 28.6 (SD, 8.5) years. The average delay to surgery was 16 months (range, 3-120 months). The flap success rate for viability was achieved in 38 of 42 patients. The average follow-up for the 38 patients was 30 months (range, 12-103 months, SD 19 months). Success rate of at least M3/5 muscle strength was achieved in 37 of 42 patients with an average range of elbow flexion of 107° (SD, 20.4°). The average post-operative VAS for pain was 3.6 (SD, 3.0). The average post-operative DASH score was 43.09 (SD, 14.9). There were a total of 10 minor complications and five major complications. Functioning free muscle transfer using the gracilis muscle was a reliable procedure in the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with incomplete brachial plexus injury treated beyond 6 months from the time of injury and in patients with complete injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Shoulder tendon transfer options for adult patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Elhassan, Bassem; Bishop, Alan; Shin, Alexander; Spinner, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Enhancement of upper-extremity function, specifically shoulder function, after brachial plexus injury requires a good understanding of nerve repair and transfer, with their expected outcome, as well as shoulder anatomy and biomechanics enabling the treating surgeon to use available functioning muscles around the shoulder for transfer, to improve shoulder function. Surgical treatment should address painful shoulder subluxation in addition to improvement of function. The literature focuses on improving shoulder abduction, but improving shoulder external rotation should take priority because this function, even if isolated, will allow patients to position their hand in front of their body. With a functional elbow and hand, patients will be able to do most activities of daily living. The lower trapezius has been shown to be a good transfer to restore external rotation of the shoulder. Other parts of the trapezius, levator scapulae, rhomboids, and, when available, the latissimus dorsi, pectoralis major, teres major, biceps, triceps, and serratus anterior muscles can all be used to replace the rotator cuff and deltoid muscle function. To optimize the results, a close working relationship is required between surgeons reconstructing brachial plexus injury and shoulder specialists.

  15. Axillary artery injury combined with delayed brachial plexus palsy due to compressive hematoma in a young patient: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Axillary artery injury in the shoulder region following blunt trauma without association with either shoulder dislocation or fracture of the humeral neck has been previously reported. Axillary artery injury might also be accompanied with brachial plexus injury. However, delayed onset of brachial plexus palsy caused by a compressive hematoma associated with axillary injury after blunt trauma in the shoulder region has been rarely reported. In previous reports, this condition only occurred in old patients with sclerotic vessels. We present a case of a young patient who suffered axillary artery injury associated with brachial plexus palsy that occurred tardily due to compressive hematoma after blunt trauma in the shoulder region without association of either shoulder dislocation or humeral neck fracture. Case presentation A 16-year-old male injured his right shoulder in a motorbike accident. On initial physical evaluation, the pulses on the radial and ulnar arteries in the affected arm were palpable. Paralysis developed later from 2 days after the injury. Functions in the right arm became significantly impaired. Angiography showed complete occlusion of the axillary artery. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass measuring 4 × 5 cm that was suspected to be a hematoma compressing the brachial plexus in a space between the subscapular muscle and the pectoralis minor muscle. Surgery was performed on the third day after injury. In intraoperative observations, the axillary artery was occluded with thrombus along 5 cm; a subscapular artery was ruptured; the brachial plexus was compressed by the hematoma. After evacuation of the hematoma, neurolysis of the brachial plexus, and revascularization of the axillary artery, the patient had an excellent functional recovery of the affected upper limb, postoperatively. Conclusion Surgeons should be aware that axillary artery injuries may even occur in young people after severe blunt trauma in the shoulder region

  16. Attenuation of brain grey matter volume in brachial plexus injury patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yechen; Liu, Hanqiu; Hua, Xuyun; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Shen, Yundong

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury (BPI) causes functional changes in the brain, but the structural changes resulting from BPI remain unknown. In this study, we compared grey matter volume between nine BPI patients and ten healthy controls by means of voxel-based morphometry. This was the first study of cortical morphology in BPI. We found that brain regions including the cerebellum, anterior cingulate cortex, bilateral inferior, medial, superior frontal lobe, and bilateral insula had less grey matter in BPI patients. Most of the affected brain regions of BPI patients are closely related to motor function. We speculate that the loss of grey matter in multiple regions might be the neural basis of the difficulties in the motor rehabilitation of BPI patients. The mapping result might provide new target regions for interventions of motor rehabilitation.

  17. Diagnostic Value and Surgical Implications of the 3D DW-SSFP MRI On the Management of Patients with Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gang; Fu, Guo; Gu, Li-Qiang; Li, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Jia-Kai

    2016-10-26

    Three-dimensional diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (3D DW-SSFP) of high-resolution magnetic resonance has emerged as a promising method to visualize the peripheral nerves. In this study, the application value of 3D DW-SSFP brachial plexus imaging in the diagnosis of brachial plexus injury (BPI) was investigated. 33 patients with BPI were prospectively examined using 3D DW-SSFP MR neurography (MRN) of brachial plexus. Results of 3D DW-SSFP MRN were compared with intraoperative findings and measurements of electromyogram (EMG) or somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for each injured nerve root. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus has enabled good visualization of the small components of the brachial plexus. The postganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 26 patients, while the preganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 22 patients. Pseudomeningoceles were commonly observed in 23 patients. Others finding of MRN of brachial plexus included spinal cord offset (in 16 patients) and spinal cord deformation (in 6 patients). As for the 3D DW-SSFP MRN diagnosis of preganglionic BPI, the sensitivity, the specificity and the accuracy were respectively 96.8%, 90.29%, and 94.18%. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus improve visualization of brachial plexus and benefit to determine the extent of injury.

  18. Diagnostic Value and Surgical Implications of the 3D DW-SSFP MRI On the Management of Patients with Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gang; Fu, Guo; Gu, Li-Qiang; Li, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Jia-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (3D DW-SSFP) of high-resolution magnetic resonance has emerged as a promising method to visualize the peripheral nerves. In this study, the application value of 3D DW-SSFP brachial plexus imaging in the diagnosis of brachial plexus injury (BPI) was investigated. 33 patients with BPI were prospectively examined using 3D DW-SSFP MR neurography (MRN) of brachial plexus. Results of 3D DW-SSFP MRN were compared with intraoperative findings and measurements of electromyogram (EMG) or somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for each injured nerve root. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus has enabled good visualization of the small components of the brachial plexus. The postganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 26 patients, while the preganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 22 patients. Pseudomeningoceles were commonly observed in 23 patients. Others finding of MRN of brachial plexus included spinal cord offset (in 16 patients) and spinal cord deformation (in 6 patients). As for the 3D DW-SSFP MRN diagnosis of preganglionic BPI, the sensitivity, the specificity and the accuracy were respectively 96.8%, 90.29%, and 94.18%. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus improve visualization of brachial plexus and benefit to determine the extent of injury. PMID:27782162

  19. Prevalence of Neuropathic Pain in Patients with Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury: A Multicenter Prospective Hospital-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Ciaramitaro, Palma; Padua, Luca; Devigili, Grazia; Rota, Eugenia; Tamburin, Stefano; Eleopra, Roberto; Cruccu, Giorgio; Truini, Andrea

    2017-03-03

    Prevalence and clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain due to traumatic brachial plexus injury. Observational epidemiological study. Hospital-based multicenter study. One hundred seven prospectively enrolled patients with brachial plexus injury. All the patients underwent clinical examination and neurophysiological testing for a definitive diagnosis of the brachial plexus lesion. The DN4 questionnaire was used to identify neuropathic pain, and the Neuropathic Pain Symptom Inventory (NPSI) to evaluate the different symptoms of neuropathic pain. The SF36 questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) were used to assess quality of life and mood disturbances in patients with neuropathic pain. Of the 107 enrolled patients, 74 had pain (69%); neuropathic pain, as assessed by means of the DN4, was identified in 60 (56%) of these patients. According to the NPSI, the most frequent and severe pain type was the spontaneous burning pain. Clinical and neurophysiological findings showed that pain is unrelated to age but is associated with the severity of peripheral nerve damage. The SF36 questionnaire and BDI showed that neuropathic pain impairs quality of life and causes depression. Our study provides information on the prevalence, characteristics, and variables associated with neuropathic pain due to traumatic brachial plexus injuries that might provide a basis for improving the clinical management of this condition.

  20. Differences in Brain Adaptive Functional Reorganization in Right and Left Total Brachial Plexus Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jun-Tao; Liu, Han-Qiu; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Shen, Yun-Dong

    2015-09-01

    Total brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) results in the total functional loss of the affected limb and induces extensive brain functional reorganization. However, because the dominant hand is responsible for more cognitive-related tasks, injuries on this side induce more adaptive changes in brain function. In this article, we explored the differences in brain functional reorganization after injuries in unilateral BPAI patients. We applied resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning to 10 left and 10 right BPAI patients and 20 healthy control subjects. The amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF), which is a resting-state index, was calculated for all patients as an indication of the functional activity level of the brain. Two-sample t-tests were performed between left BPAI patients and controls, right BPAI patients and controls, and between left and right BPAI patients. Two-sample t-tests of the ALFF values revealed that right BPAIs induced larger scale brain reorganization than did left BPAIs. Both left and right BPAIs elicited a decreased ALFF value in the right precuneus (P < 0.05, Alphasim corrected). In addition, right BPAI patients exhibited increased ALFF values in a greater number of brain regions than left BPAI patients, including the inferior temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, calcarine sulcus, and fusiform gyrus. Our results revealed that right BPAIs induced greater extents of brain functional reorganization than left BPAIs, which reflected the relatively more extensive adaptive process that followed injuries of the dominant hand. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Long-Term Outcome of Brachial Plexus Reimplantation After Complete Brachial Plexus Avulsion Injury.

    PubMed

    Kachramanoglou, Carolina; Carlstedt, Thomas; Koltzenburg, Martin; Choi, David

    2017-07-01

    Complete brachial plexus avulsion injury is a severe disabling injury due to traction to the brachial plexus. Brachial plexus reimplantation is an emerging surgical technique for the management of complete brachial plexus avulsion injury. We assessed the functional recovery in 15 patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation surgery after complete brachial plexus avulsion injury with clinical examination and electrophysiological testing. We included all patients who underwent brachial plexus reimplantation in our institution between 1997 and 2010. Patients were assessed with detailed motor and sensory clinical examination and motor and sensory electrophysiological tests. We found that patients who had reimplantation surgery demonstrated an improvement in Medical Research Council power in the deltoid, pectoralis, and infraspinatous muscles and global Medical Research Council score. Eight patients achieved at least grade 3 MRC power in at least one muscle group of the arm. Improved reinnervation by electromyelography criteria was found in infraspinatous, biceps, and triceps muscles. There was evidence of ongoing innervation in 3 patients. Sensory testing in affected dermatomes also showed better recovery at C5, C6, and T1 dermatomes. The best recovery was seen in the C5 dermatome. Our results demonstrate a definite but limited improvement in motor and sensory recovery after reimplantation surgery in patients with complete brachial plexus injury. We hypothesize that further improvement may be achieved by using regenerative cell technologies at the time of repair. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computed tomography of the shoulders in patients with obstetric brachial plexus injuries: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Humphries, Andrea D

    2008-01-01

    Background Scapular hypoplasia, elevation, and rotation (SHEAR) deformity and posterior subluxation of the humeral head are common tertiary sequelae of obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPI). Interpretations of images from bilateral computed tomography (CT) scans of the upper extremities are critical to the diagnosis and treatment plan for patients with these bony deformities resulting from OBPI. Methods We conducted a retrospective study to investigate the accuracy of radiologic reports in the diagnosis of SHEAR or posterior subluxation of the humeral head in OBPI patients. CT studies from 43 consecutive patients over a 33-month period were used in the study. For each patient, we compared the results from the radiologic report to those from a clinical examination given by the attending surgeon and to measurements taken from the CT studies by biomedical researchers. Results A comparison of SHEAR measured from the 3-D CT images to the diagnoses from the radiologists, revealed that only 40% of the radiological reports were accurate. However, there was a direct correlation between the use of the 3-D CT images and an accurate SHEAR diagnosis by the radiologists (p < 0.0001). When posterior subluxation was measured in the affected and contralateral shoulders, 93% of the patients that had greater than a 10% difference between the two shoulders did not have their deformity diagnosed. The radiological reports diagnosed 17% of these patients with a 'normal' shoulder. Only 5% of the reports were complete, accurately diagnosing SHEAR in addition to posterior subluxation. Conclusion Due to the low incidence rate of OBPI, many radiologists may be unfamiliar with the sequelae of these injuries. It is therefore critical that radiologists are made aware of the importance of an accurate measurement and diagnosis of the SHEAR deformity. Due to their lack of completeness, the radiological reports in this study did not significantly contribute to the clinical care of the patients

  3. Brain Reorganization in Patients with Brachial Plexus Injury: A Longitudinal Functional MRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Tajiri, Yasuhito; Satake, Yoshirou; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess plastic changes of the sensorimotor cortex (SMC) in patients with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Twenty patients with traumatic BPI underwent fMRI using blood oxygen level-dependent technique with echo-planar imaging before the operation. Sixteen patients underwent their second fMRI at approximately one year after injury. The subjects performed two tasks: a flexion-extension task of the affected elbow and a task of the unaffected elbow. After activation, maps were generated, the number of significantly activated voxels in SMC contralateral to the elbow movement in the affected elbow task study (Naf) and that in the unaffected task study (Nunaf) were counted. An asymmetry index (AI) was calculated, where AI = (Naf − Nunaf)/(Naf + Nunaf). Ten healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study. The AI of the first fMRI of the patients with BPI was significantly lower than that of the healthy subjects (P = 0.035). The AI of the second fMRI significantly decreased compared with that of the first fMRI (P = 0.045). Brain reorganization associates with peripheral nervous changes after BPI and after operation for functional reconstruction. PMID:22623904

  4. Treatment Options for Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sakellariou, Vasileios I.; Badilas, Nikolaos K.; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos A.; Mazis, George; Kotoulas, Helias K.; Kyriakopoulos, Stamatios; Tagkalegkas, Ioannis; Sofianos, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injuries is rapidly growing due to the increasing number of high-speed motor-vehicle accidents. These are devastating injuries leading to significant functional impairment of the patients. The purpose of this review paper is to present the available options for conservative and operative treatment and discuss the correct timing of intervention. Reported outcomes of current management and future prospects are also analysed. PMID:24967125

  5. Cerebral Reorganization in Patients with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury and Residual Shoulder Problems

    PubMed Central

    Björkman, Anders; Weibull, Andreas; Svensson, Hampus; Dahlin, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The functional outcome after a brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) is based on changes in the peripheral nerve and in the central nervous system. Most patients with a BPBI recover, but residual deficits in shoulder function are not uncommon. The aim of this study was to determine cerebral activation patterns in patients with BPBI and also residual symptoms from the shoulder. In seven patients (six females and one male, aged 17–23 years) with a BPBI and residual shoulder problems (Mallet score IV or lower), the cerebral response to active movement of the shoulder and elbow of the injured and healthy arm was monitored using functional magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T. Movements, i.e., shoulder rotation or elbow flexion and extension, of the injured side resulted in a more pronounced and more extended activation of the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex compared to the activation seen after moving the healthy shoulder and elbow. In addition, moving the shoulder or elbow on the injured side resulted in increased activation in ipsilateral primary sensorimotor areas an also increased activation in associated sensorimotor areas, in both hemispheres, located further posterior in the parietal lobe, which are known to be important for integration of motor tasks and spatial aspects of motor control. Thus, in this preliminary study based on a small cohort, patients with BPBI and residual shoulder problems show reorganization in sensorimotor areas in both hemispheres of the brain. The increased activation in ipsilateral sensorimotor areas and in areas that deal with both integration of motor tasks and spatial aspects of motor control in both hemispheres indicates altered dynamics between the hemispheres, which may be a cerebral compensation for the injury. PMID:28066323

  6. In lumbosacral plexus injuries can we identify indicators that predict spontaneous recovery or the need for surgical treatment? Results from a clinical study on 72 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Post-traumatic lumbosacral plexus injuries seem to be rare events, spontaneously recovering in high percentage: as surgery is often challenging and results in poor outcome, many Authors have advocated conservative treatment only. Nevertheless surgery should not be ruled out: in invalidating injuries, it can restore basic function in the lower extremities. Therefore, it might be necessary to establish guidelines for the management and the indication to surgery in such cases. This study aims to identify indicators predicting spontaneous recovery or the need for surgery. Method The clinical and radiological data of 72 patients with a post-traumatic lumbosacral plexus injury were reviewed. A follow up equal or superior to 3 years is available in 42 cases. Results Lumbosacral plexus injuries mostly occurred during road accidents. The incidence of associated lesions was relevant: bone injuries were found in 85% of patients, internal lesions in 30% and vascular injuries in 8%. Lumbosacral trunk and sacral plexus palsies were the most frequent injury patterns. Root avulsions were revealed in 23% of cases and only in sacral plexus and complete lumbosacral plexus injuries: L5 and S1 were the roots more prone to avulsions. About 70% of cases recovered spontaneously, mostly in 18 months. Spontaneous recovery was the rule in lumbar plexus and lumbosacral trunk injuries (where root avulsions never occurred) or in sacral and complete lumbosacral plexus palsies due to compression injuries. The causative mechanism correlated with the injury pattern, the associated bone injury being often predictive of the severity of the nerve injury. Lumbosacral plexus injuries occurred in car crashes were generally associated with fractures causing compression on the nerves, thus resulting in injuries often amenable of spontaneous recovery. Motorcycle accidents implied high kinetic energy traumas where traction played an important role, as the high percentage of sacroiliac joint

  7. Risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Karahanoglu, Ertugrul; Kasapoglu, Taner; Ozdemirci, Safak; Fadıloglu, Erdem; Akyol, Aysegul; Demirdag, Erhan; Yalvac, E Serdar; Kandemir, N Omer

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injuries. A retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary centre. The hospital records of 62,288 vaginal deliveries were evaluated retrospectively. There were 35 cases of brachial plexus injury. Of these patients, nine had brachial plexus injuries with clavicle fracture and 26 without clavicle fracture. The analysed risk factors for clavicle fracture concurrent with brachial plexus injury were gestational diabetes, labour induction and augmentation, prolonged second stage of labour, estimated foetal weight above 4000 g, birth weight above 4000 g, risky working hours, and the requirement of manoeuvres to free the impacted shoulder from behind the symphysis pubis. Labour augmentation with oxytocin increased the risk of clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury (OR 6.67; 95% CI 1.26-35.03). A birth weight higher than 4000 g also increased the risk of clavicle fracture. Risky working hours, gestational diabetes, estimated foetal weight higher than 4000 g, and requirement of shoulder dystocia manoeuvres did not increase the risk of clavicle fracture. Labour augmentation and actual birth weight higher than 4000 g were identified as risk factors for clavicle fracture in cases of brachial plexus injury.

  8. Movement related cortical source for elbow flexion in patients with branchial plexus injury after intercostal-musculocutaneous nerve crossing.

    PubMed

    Kanamaru, A; Homma, I; Hara, T

    1999-10-29

    Nine patients with brachial plexus injury whose transected musculo-cutaneous nerves had been sutured with intercostal nerves were examined and the relationship between flexion of the operated elbow and the respiratory movement were shown. Three out of nine patients showed independent control of movement from respiration after regeneration. The primary motor cortex for either flexion of the elbow to the operated side or brisk voluntary inspiration was estimated in the medial vertex region of the frontal cortex by the dipole-tracing method in these three patients. The present results suggest that patients contract the biceps muscle reinnervated by the intercostal nerve independently from respiratory movements using the same primary motor cortex with trunk movements. Functional plasticity may occur in the patients using the primary trunk motor cortex for elbow flexion.

  9. A case study from a nursing and occupational therapy perspective - Providing care for a patient with a traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Wellington, Beverley; McGeehan, Claire

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a case study that demonstrates how collaborative working between professionals enhanced the holistic care for a patient following a traumatic brachial plexus injury. The paper will describe the patient's journey of care from initial presentation, diagnosis and assessment, acute care provision, discharge & rehabilitation to ongoing supportive counselling. The care encompasses input from both a nursing and occupational therapy perspective.

  10. Systematic evaluation of brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Haynes, S

    1993-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries offer a unique challenge to the athletic trainer because of their relatively high frequency rate in contact sports and because of the complexity of the neuroanatomy in the cervical area. During a game, athletic trainers must make a fast, accurate decision regarding a player's return to competition. It is imperative that the athletic trainer be able to quickly differentiate between minor injuries and more serious injuries warranting removal from the game and/or physician referral. A systematic approach to the evaluation of a brachial plexus injury is essential to ensure proper treatment. This paper will present a structured approach to an on-the-field assessment of brachial plexus injuries.

  11. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies.

  12. MUSCLE TRANSFER FROM TRICEPS TO BICEPS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC INJURY OF THE UPPER TRUNK OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Fabiano Inúcio de; Saito, Mateus; Kimura, Luiz Koiti; Júnior, Rames Mattar; Zumiotti, Arnaldo Valdir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from transposition of the triceps for elbow flexion in patients with chronic and complete injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Methods: This was a retrospective study, including only patients who had biceps grade 0 and triceps grade 5, who underwent anterior transfer of the triceps muscle, performed between 1998 and 2005. The affected side, sex, type of accident, strength of elbow flexion, complications and patient satisfaction were investigated in 11 cases. Results: 10 patients were male; the age range was from 24 to 49 years, with a mean of 33.7 years. The minimum time between injury and surgery was 21 months (range 21-74 months). The left side was affected in eight cases, and the right only in three. Good results were obtained in 10 patients, who acquired elbow flexion strength of grade 3 (two cases) and grade 4 (eight cases), while one evolved unfavorably with grade 2 strength. Two cases had complications (initial compartment syndrome and insufficient tensioning). All the patients said that they were satisfied with the procedure. Conclusion: Anterior transposition of the triceps muscle provided patient satisfaction in all cases except one, attaining strength grade 4 in eight cases, grade 3 in two cases and grade 2 in one case. PMID:27022572

  13. Pain relief from preganglionic injury to the brachial plexus by late intercostal nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Berman, J; Anand, P; Chen, L; Taggart, M; Birch, R

    1996-09-01

    We performed intercostal nerve transfer in 19 patients to relieve pain from preganglionic injury to the brachial plexus. The procedure was successful in 16 patients at a mean of 28.6 months (12 to 68) after the injury.

  14. Effect of Co-Morbid Conditions on Persistent Neuropathic Pain after Brachial Plexus Injury in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudakshetrin, Pongparadee; Chotisukarat, Haruthai; Mandee, Sahatsa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neuropathic pain (NeuP) associated with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI) can be severe, persistent, and resistant to treatment. Moreover, comorbidity associated with NeuP may worsen the pain and quality of life. This study compared persistent NeuP after BPI between patients with and without co-morbid conditions (psychiatric dysfunction and other painful conditions) and tramadol usage as a second-line agent in combination with an antiepileptic and/or antidepressant during a 2-year follow-up. Methods The medical records of patients diagnosed with BPI referred to a pain center between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed for 2 years retrospectively. Data regarding patient demographics, injury and surgical profiles, characteristics of NeuP and its severity, and treatment received were compared between patients with and without manifesting co-morbid conditions. The NeuP and pain intensity assessments were based on the DN4 questionnaire and a numerical rating scale, respectively. Results Of the 45 patients studied, 24 patients presented with one of the following co-morbid conditions: myofascial pain (21%), psychiatric disorder (17%), phantom limb pain (4%), complex regional pain syndrome (21%), and insomnia (37%). Tramadol was required by 20 patients with co-morbidity and, 9 patients without co-morbidity (p<0.001). The mean pain score after 2 years was higher in patients with co-morbidity than in those without co-morbidity (p<0.05). Conclusions Persistent pain following BPI was more common in patients manifesting other painful conditions or psychiatric co-morbidity. A higher proportion of the patients in the co-morbid group required tramadol as a second-line of agent for pain relief. PMID:27819420

  15. Brachial plexus injuries and dysfunctions.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, H S

    1988-05-01

    The brachial plexus and its associated structures demonstrate a propensity for certain disease processes not common to other areas of the nervous system. Brachial plexus disease produces a gait disturbance that may mimic musculoskeletal disease. When evaluating a case with possible traumatic brachial plexus disease, one relies heavily on historical, physical, and neurologic information when differentiating musculoskeletal disorders, although both may sometimes be present simultaneously in the same limb. With inflammatory disease, electromyography is extremely helpful, although an empiric dietary change may help confirm a suspicion. Brachial plexus surgery requires careful planning and meticulous technique. Attempts to remove malignant schwannomas have not been as successful as one would hope (Table 2). To a large extent, these dogs are treated late in the course of their disease because they are often treated for extended periods of time for musculoskeletal disease first. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention would help many of these dogs. New histopathologic techniques, electrodiagnostic equipment, and radiographic techniques are helping to define peripheral nerve disease in the companion animal. These techniques will help us categorize and treat these diseases with greater success in the future.

  16. Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery for Failed Serial Casting Patients With Elbow Flexion Contractures Following Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of surgical outcomes of biceps tendon lengthening (BTL) surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients with elbow flexion contractures, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Background: Serial casting and splinting have been shown to be effective in correcting elbow flexion contractures in OBPI. However, the possibilities of radial head dislocations and other complications have been reported in serial casting and splinting. Literature indicates surgical intervention when such nonoperative techniques and range-of-motion exercises fail. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the contractures of the affected elbow and improvement in arm length to more normal after BTL in these patients, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Methods and Patients: Ten OBPI patients (6 girls and 4 boys) with an average age of 11.2 years (4-17.7 years) had BTL surgery after unsuccessful serial casting. Results: Mean elbow flexion contracture was 40° before and 37° (average) after serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was reduced to 8° (0°-20°) post-BTL surgical procedure with an average follow-up of 11 months. This was 75% improvement and statistically significant (P < .001) when compared to 7% insignificant (P = .08) improvement after serial casting. Conclusion: These OBPI patients in our study had 75% significant reduction in elbow flexion contractures and achieved an improved and more normal length of the affected arm after the BTL surgery when compared to only 7% insignificant reduction and no improvement in arm length after serial casting. PMID:27648115

  17. Developing core sets for patients with obstetric brachial plexus injury based on the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

    PubMed Central

    Duijnisveld, B. J.; Saraç, Ç.; Malessy, M. J. A.; Vliet Vlieland, T. P. M.; Nelissen, R. G. H. H.; Brachial Plexus Advisory Board, The ICF

    2013-01-01

    Background Symptoms of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) vary widely over the course of time and from individual to individual and can include various degrees of denervation, muscle weakness, contractures, bone deformities and functional limitations. To date, no universally accepted overall framework is available to assess the outcome of patients with OBPI. The objective of this paper is to outline the proposed process for the development of International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) Core Sets for patients with an OBPI. Methods The first step is to conduct four preparatory studies to identify ICF categories important for OBPI: a) a systematic literature review to identify outcome measures, b) a qualitative study using focus groups, c) an expert survey and d) a cross-sectional, multicentre study. A first version of ICF Core Sets will be defined at a consensus conference, which will integrate the evidence from the preparatory studies. In a second step, field-testing among patients will validate this first version of Core Sets for OBPI. Discussion The proposed method to develop ICF Core Sets for OBPI yields a practical tool for multiple purposes: for clinicians to systematically assess and evaluate the individual’s functioning, for researchers to design and compare studies, and for patients to get more insight into their health problems and their management. PMID:23836476

  18. Brachial plexus lesions in patients with cancer: 100 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Kori, S.H.; Foley, K.M.; Posner, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    In patients with cancer, brachial plexus signs are usually caused by tumor infiltration or injury from radiation therapy (RT). We analyzed 100 cases of brachial plexopathy to determine which clinical criteria helped differentiate tumor from radiation injury. Seventy-eight patients had tumor and 22 had radiation injury. Severe pain occurred in 80% of tumor patients but in only 19% of patients with radiation injury. The lower trunk was involved in 72% of the tumors. Seventy-eight percent of the radiation injuries affected the upper plexus (C5-6). Horner syndrome was more common in tumor, and lymphedema in radiation injury. The time from RT to onset of plexus symptoms, and the dose of RT, also differed.

  19. Assessment of obstetric brachial plexus injury with preoperative ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Smith, Edward C; Xixis, Kathryn Idol; Grant, Gerald A; Grant, Stuart A

    2016-06-01

    Tools used in the assessment of obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPIs) have traditionally included electrodiagnostic studies, computerized tomography with myelography, and MRI. However, the utility of ultrasound (US) in infants for such assessment has not been extensively examined. This retrospective case series reports the preoperative brachial plexus US findings in 8 patients with OBPI and compares US with intraoperative findings. When available, the preoperative US was compared with the preoperative MRI. US revealed abnormalities in all 8 patients. Although MRI detected abnormalities in the majority of patients, US provided accurate information regarding severity and anatomic location of injury in some patients. US is a relatively inexpensive, noninvasive, painless diagnostic modality that can be used to assess OBPI. This case series suggests that US is a valuable adjunct to current diagnostic modalities. Muscle Nerve 53: 946-950, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparison between partial ulnar and intercostal nerve transfers for reconstructing elbow flexion in patients with upper brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Kakinoki, Ryosuke; Ikeguchi, Ryosuke; Dunkan, Scott Fm; Nakayama, Ken; Matsumoto, Taiichi; Ohta, Soichi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2010-01-26

    There have been several reports that partial ulnar transfer (PUNT) is preferable for reconstructing elbow flexion in patients with upper brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) compared with intercostal nerve transfer (ICNT). The purpose of this study was to compare the recovery of elbow flexion between patients subjected to PUNT and patients subjected to ICNT. Sixteen patients (13 men and three women) with BPIs for whom PUNT (eight patients) or ICNT (eight patients) had been performed to restore elbow flexion function were studied. The time required in obtaining M1, M3 (Medical Research Council scale grades recovery) for elbow flexion and a full range of elbow joint movement against gravity with the wrist and fingers extended maximally and the outcomes of a manual muscle test (MMT) for elbow flexion were examined in both groups. There were no significant differences between the PUNT and ICNT groups in terms of the age of patients at the time of surgery or the interval between injury and surgery. There were significantly more injured nerve roots in the ICNT group (mean 3.6) than in the PUNT group (mean 2.1) (P = 0.0006). The times required to obtain grades M1 and M3 in elbow flexion were significantly shorter in the PUNT group than in the ICNT group (P = 0.04 for M1 and P = 0.002 for M3). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the time required to obtain full flexion of the elbow joint with maximally extended fingers and wrist or in the final MMT scores for elbow flexion. PUNT is technically easy, not associated with significant complications, and provides rapid recovery of the elbow flexion. However, separation of elbow flexion from finger and wrist motions needed more time in the PUNT group than in the ICNT group. Although the final mean MMT score for elbow flexion in the PUNT group was greater than in the ICNT group, no statistically significant difference was found between the two groups.

  1. Comparison between partial ulnar and intercostal nerve transfers for reconstructing elbow flexion in patients with upper brachial plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There have been several reports that partial ulnar transfer (PUNT) is preferable for reconstructing elbow flexion in patients with upper brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) compared with intercostal nerve transfer (ICNT). The purpose of this study was to compare the recovery of elbow flexion between patients subjected to PUNT and patients subjected to ICNT. Methods Sixteen patients (13 men and three women) with BPIs for whom PUNT (eight patients) or ICNT (eight patients) had been performed to restore elbow flexion function were studied. The time required in obtaining M1, M3 (Medical Research Council scale grades recovery) for elbow flexion and a full range of elbow joint movement against gravity with the wrist and fingers extended maximally and the outcomes of a manual muscle test (MMT) for elbow flexion were examined in both groups. Results There were no significant differences between the PUNT and ICNT groups in terms of the age of patients at the time of surgery or the interval between injury and surgery. There were significantly more injured nerve roots in the ICNT group (mean 3.6) than in the PUNT group (mean 2.1) (P = 0.0006). The times required to obtain grades M1 and M3 in elbow flexion were significantly shorter in the PUNT group than in the ICNT group (P = 0.04 for M1 and P = 0.002 for M3). However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in the time required to obtain full flexion of the elbow joint with maximally extended fingers and wrist or in the final MMT scores for elbow flexion. Conclusions PUNT is technically easy, not associated with significant complications, and provides rapid recovery of the elbow flexion. However, separation of elbow flexion from finger and wrist motions needed more time in the PUNT group than in the ICNT group. Although the final mean MMT score for elbow flexion in the PUNT group was greater than in the ICNT group, no statistically significant difference was found between the two groups. PMID

  2. Postoperative changes on functional mapping of the motor cortex in patients with brachial plexus injury: comparative study of magnetoencephalography and functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Y; Mashiko, T; Ochiai, N; Kurosawa, H

    2001-01-01

    Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), we investigated the areas of the cerebral cortex that were activated when patients with brachial plexus injuries performed elbow flexion, a motion re-acquired through nerve transfer surgery. In all patients, elbow flexion on the operated side and on the unaffected side led to the activation of an area in the motor cortex, with these areas being located almost symmetrically on either side of the sagittal midline. These findings suggest that the activity center for the transferred intercostal nerves shifted to the motor cortex for the elbow, from the original intercostal nerve site.

  3. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-06-15

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  4. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation with associated brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Charles Alexander; Blakeney, William; Zellweger, René

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 32-year-old female who sustained a left acromioclavicular (AC) joint type V injury and brachial plexus injury. The patient's AC joint injury was identified 6 days after she was involved in a motorbike accident where she sustained multiple other injuries. She required operative fixation of the AC joint using a locking compression medial proximal tibial plate. At 3 months post operatively, the patient was found to have a subluxed left shoulder as a result of an axonal injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. In addition, the tibial plate had cut out. The plate was subsequently removed. At 8 months the glenohumeral articulation had been restored and the patient had clinically regained significant shoulder function. After 15 months the patient was pain free and could complete all her activities of daily living without impediment. She returned to playing competitive pool after 24 months. PMID:24855076

  5. Reoperation for failed shoulder reconstruction following brachial plexus birth injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various approaches have been developed to treat the progressive shoulder deformity in patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Reconstructive surgery for this condition consists of complex procedures with a risk for failure. Case presentations This is a retrospective case review of the outcome in eight cases referred to us for reoperation for failed shoulder reconstructions. In each case, we describe the initial attempt(s) at surgical correction, the underlying causes of failure, and the procedures performed to rectify the problem. Results were assessed using pre- and post-operative Mallet shoulder scores. All eight patients realized improvement in shoulder function from reoperation. Conclusions This case review identifies several aspects of reconstructive shoulder surgery for brachial plexus birth injury that may cause failure of the index procedure(s) and outlines critical steps in the evaluation and execution of shoulder reconstruction. PMID:23883413

  6. Nerve reconstruction in patients with obstetric brachial plexus injury results in worsening of glenohumeral deformity: a case-control study of 75 patients.

    PubMed

    Nath, R K; Liu, X

    2009-05-01

    Whereas a general trend in the management of obstetric brachial plexus injuries has been nerve reconstruction in patients without spontaneous recovery of biceps function by three to six months of age, many recent studies suggest this may be unnecessary. In this study, the severity of glenohumeral dysplasia and shoulder function and strength in two groups of matched patients with a C5-6 lesion at a mean age of seven years (2.7 to 13.3) were investigated. One group (23 patients) underwent nerve reconstruction and secondary operations, and the other (52 patients) underwent only secondary operations for similar initial clinical presentations. In the patients with nerve reconstruction shoulder function did not improve and they developed more severe shoulder deformities (posterior subluxation, glenoid version and scapular elevation) and required a mean of 2.4 times as many operations as patients without nerve reconstruction. This study suggests that less invasive management, addressing the muscle and bone complications, is a more effective approach. Nerve reconstruction should be reserved for those less common cases where the C5 and C6 nerve roots will not recover.

  7. Types and severity of operated supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries caused by traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Radek; Waldauf, Petr; Haninec, Pavel

    2012-07-01

    Brachial plexus injuries occur in up to 5% of polytrauma cases involving motorcycle accidents and in approximately 4% of severe winter sports injuries. One of the criteria for a successful operative therapy is the type of lesion. Upper plexus palsy has the best prognosis, whereas lower plexus palsy is surgically untreatable. The aim of this study was to evaluate a group of patients with brachial plexus injury caused by traffic accidents, categorize the injuries according to type of accident, and look for correlations between type of palsy (injury) and specific accidents. A total of 441 brachial plexus reconstruction patients from our department were evaluated retrospectively(1993 to 2011). Sex, age, neurological status, and the type and cause of injury were recorded for each case. Patients with BPI caused by a traffic accident were assessed in detail. Traffic accidents were the cause of brachial plexus injury in most cases (80.7%). The most common type of injury was avulsion of upper root(s) (45.7%) followed by rupture (28.2%), complete avulsion (16.9%) and avulsion of lower root(s) (9.2%). Of the patients, 73.9% had an upper,22.7% had a complete and only 3.4% had a lower brachial plexus palsy. The main cause was motorcycle accidents(63.2%) followed by car accidents (23.5%), bicycle accidents(10.7%) and pedestrian collisions (3.1%) (p<0.001).Patients involved in car accidents had a higher percentage of lower avulsion (22.7%) and a lower percentage of upper avulsion (29.3%), whereas cyclists had a higher percentage of upper avulsion (68.6%) based on the data from the entire group of patients (p<0.001). Lower plexus palsy was significantly increased in patients after car accidents (9.3%,p<0.05). In the two main groups (car and motorcycle accidents),significantly more upper and fewer lower palsies were present. In the bicycle accident group, upper palsy was the most common (89%). Study results indicate that the most common injury was an upper plexus palsy. It was

  8. Management of Shoulder Problems Following Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Matthew; Trail, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries are common, with an incidence of 0.42 per 1000 live births in the UK, and with 25% of patients being left with permanent disability without intervention. The shoulder is the most commonly affected joint and, as a result of the subsequent imbalance of musculature, the abnormal deforming forces cause dysplasia of the glenohumeral joint. In the growing child, this presents with changing pattern of pathology, which requires a multidisciplinary approach and a broad range of treatment modalities to optimize function. PMID:27582903

  9. Birth weight and incidence of surgical obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Avila, Meera B; Melcher, Sonya E; Nath, Devin K; Eichhorn, Mitchell G; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    (1) To analyze the birth weight of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients requiring one or more reconstructive surgeries and (2) to analyze whether there is any difference in the severity of the injury, and the outcome of the surgery between the macrosomic and nonmacrosomic OBPI patients. An observational cohort study was performed on 100 consecutive patients treated with surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Ninety of the 100 patients underwent the modified Quad surgery, which improves the shoulder abduction and overall shoulder function. All OBPI patients in our study were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by evaluating video recordings of active shoulder abduction. Using a 4000 g definition of macrosomia, 52% of patients would be considered macrosomic, and using a 4500 g definition of macrosomia, 18% of patients are considered macrosomic in our study. Permanent injury occurs also in average-birth-weight children. A significant percentage (48%-82% depending on definition of macrosomia) of OBPI patients requiring major reconstructive surgery had birth weights which would put them in the "normal" birth weight category. In addition, we found that there was no significant difference in the severity of the injury, and the outcome of the modified Quad surgical procedure between macrosomic and nonmacrosomic OBPI patients. However, there was a significant improvement in shoulder movement in both macrosomic and nonmacrosomic patients after modified Quad surgery.

  10. Birth Weight and Incidence of Surgical Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.; Avila, Meera B.; Melcher, Sonya E.; Eichhorn, Mitchell G.; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: (1) To analyze the birth weight of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients requiring one or more reconstructive surgeries and (2) to analyze whether there is any difference in the severity of the injury, and the outcome of the surgery between the macrosomic and nonmacrosomic OBPI patients. Study Design: An observational cohort study was performed on 100 consecutive patients treated with surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Ninety of the 100 patients underwent the modified Quad surgery, which improves the shoulder abduction and overall shoulder function. All OBPI patients in our study were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by evaluating video recordings of active shoulder abduction. Results: Using a 4000 g definition of macrosomia, 52% of patients would be considered macrosomic, and using a 4500 g definition of macrosomia, 18% of patients are considered macrosomic in our study. Permanent injury occurs also in average-birth-weight children. Conclusions: A significant percentage (48%-82% depending on definition of macrosomia) of OBPI patients requiring major reconstructive surgery had birth weights which would put them in the “normal” birth weight category. In addition, we found that there was no significant difference in the severity of the injury, and the outcome of the modified Quad surgical procedure between macrosomic and nonmacrosomic OBPI patients. However, there was a significant improvement in shoulder movement in both macrosomic and nonmacrosomic patients after modified Quad surgery. PMID:25987939

  11. Quality of life following traumatic brachial plexus injury: A questionnaire study.

    PubMed

    Gray, Beverley

    2016-08-01

    There is limited qualitative research available that explores the impact of a traumatic brachial plexus injury on patients and their quality of life experiences. This paper builds upon previous work on this subject by this author. Patients were selected from those who were on the database for the Scottish National Brachial Plexus Injury Service between 2011 and 2013. The World Health Organization (WHO) Quality of Life (QoL) - BREF questionnaire was used and 47 questionnaires were distributed with 22 returned. Findings included patients' ratings of their quality of life, physical and psychological health along with their perceived satisfaction with social relationships. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Recent advances in the management of brachial plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Management of brachial plexus injury is a demanding field of hand and upper extremity surgery. With currently available microsurgical techniques, functional gains are rewarding in upper plexus injuries. However, treatment options in the management of flail and anaesthetic limb are still evolving. Last three decades have witnessed significant developments in the management of these injuries, which include a better understanding of the anatomy, advances in the diagnostic modalities, incorporation of intra-operative nerve stimulation techniques, more liberal use of nerve grafts in bridging nerve gaps, and the addition of new nerve transfers, which selectively neurotise the target muscles close to the motor end plates. Newer research works on the use of nerve allografts and immune modulators (FK 506) are under evaluation in further improving the results in nerve reconstruction. Direct reimplantation of avulsed spinal nerve roots into the spinal cord is another area of research in brachial plexus reconstruction. PMID:25190913

  13. Phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve for the repair of brachial plexus injury: electrophysiological characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Xu, Xun-cheng; Zou, Yi; Li, Su-rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    Phrenic nerve transfer is a major dynamic treatment used to repair brachial plexus root avulsion. We analyzed 72 relevant articles on phrenic nerve transfer to repair injured brachial plexus that were indexed by Science Citation Index. The keywords searched were brachial plexus injury, phrenic nerve, repair, surgery, protection, nerve transfer, and nerve graft. In addition, we performed neurophysiological analysis of the preoperative condition and prognosis of 10 patients undergoing ipsilateral phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve in our hospital from 2008 to 201 3 and observed the electromyograms of the biceps brachii and motor conduction function of the musculocutaneous nerve. Clinically, approximately 28% of patients had brachial plexus injury combined with phrenic nerve injury, and injured phrenic nerve cannot be used as a nerve graft. After phrenic nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve, the regenerated potentials first appeared at 3 months. Recovery of motor unit action potential occurred 6 months later and became more apparent at 12 months. The percent of patients recovering ‘excellent’ and ‘good’ muscle strength in the biceps brachii was 80% after 18 months. At 12 months after surgery, motor nerve conduction potential appeared in the musculocutaneous nerve in seven cases. These data suggest that preoperative evaluation of phrenic nerve function may help identify the most appropriate nerve graft in patients with an injured brachial plexus. The functional recovery of a transplanted nerve can be dynamically observed after the surgery. PMID:25883637

  14. A quantitative assessment of the functional recovery of flexion of the elbow after nerve transfer in patients with a brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Quick, T J; Singh, A K; Fox, M; Sinisi, M; MacQuillan, A

    2016-11-01

    Improvements in the evaluation of outcome after nerve transfers are required. The assessment of force using the Medical Research Council (MRC) grades (0 to 5) is not suitable for this purpose. A ceiling effect is encountered within MRC grade 4/5 rendering this tool insensitive. Our aim was to show how the strength of flexion of the elbow could be assessed in patients who have undergone a re-innervation procedure using a continuous measurement scale. A total of 26 patients, 23 men and three women, with a mean age of 37.3 years (16 to 66), at the time of presentation, attended for review from a cohort of 52 patients who had undergone surgery to restore flexion of the elbow after a brachial plexus injury and were included in this retrospective study. The mean follow-up after nerve transfer was 56 months (28 to 101, standard deviation (sd) 20.79). The strength of flexion of the elbow was measured in a standard outpatient environment with a static dynamometer. In total, 21 patients (81%) gained MRC grade 4 strength of flexion of the elbow. The mean force of flexion was 7.2 kgf (3 to 15.5, sd 3.3). This study establishes that the dynamometer may be used for assessing the strength of flexion of the elbow in the outpatient department after nerve reconstructive surgery. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1517-20. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  15. Different cerebral plasticity of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscles after peripheral neurotization in a patient with brachial plexus injury: A TMS and fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie; Hua, Xu-Yun; Zheng, Mou-Xiong; Wang, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong

    2015-09-14

    Contralateral C7 (CC7) neurotization has been an important approach for brachial plexus injury (BPI). Patients can achieve relatively good grasping function driven by the proximal extrinsic hand muscle (flexor digitorum, FD) after CC7 neurotization, whereas the thumb opposition function driven by the distal intrinsic muscle (abductor pollicis brevis, APB) is poor. The present study aimed to investigate the brain reorganization patterns of the recovery processes of intrinsic and extrinsic hand functions after repairing the median nerve by CC7 neurotization. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were used to evaluate the cerebral plasticity in one BPI patient after CC7 neurotization. After the CC7 neurotization, the patient showed improvements in the paralyzed hand. Combination of TMS and fMRI investigations demonstrated different cortical reshaping patterns of APB and FD. It was also found that the activated cortical areas of FD were located in bilateral motor cortices, but the area of APB was only located in ipsilateral motor cortex. The cerebral plasticity procedure appeared to be different in the gross and fine motor function recovery processes. It provided a new perspective into the cerebral plasticity induced by CC7 neurotization. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Upright MRI of glenohumeral dysplasia following obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Paizi, Melia; Melcher, Sonya E; Farina, Kim L

    2007-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of upright magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) shoulder scanning in the diagnosis of glenohumeral deformity following obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI). Eighty-nine children (ages 0.4 to 17.9 years) with OBPI who have medial rotation contracture and reduced passive and active lateral rotation of the shoulder were evaluated via upright MRI of the affected glenohumeral joint. Qualitative impressions of glenoid form were recorded, and quantitative measurements were made of glenoid version and posterior subluxation. Glenoid version of the affected shoulder averaged -16.8 +/- 11.0 degrees (range, -55 degrees to 1 degrees ), and percentage of the humeral head anterior to the glenoid fossa (PHHA) averaged 32.6 +/- 16.5% (range, -17.8% to 52.4%). The glenoid form was normal in 43 children, convex in 19 children and biconcave in 27 children. Standard MRI protocols were used to obtain bilateral images from 14 of these patients. Among the patients with bilateral MR images, glenoid version and PHHA were significantly different between the involved and uninvolved shoulders (P<.000). Glenoid version in the involved shoulder averaged -19.0 +/- 13.1 degrees (range, -52 degrees to -3 degrees ), and PHHA averaged 29.7 +/- 18.4% (range, -16.2% to 48.7%). In the uninvolved shoulder, the average glenoid version and PHHA were -5.2 +/- 3.7 degrees (range, -12 degrees to -1 degrees ) and 47.7 +/- 3.0% (range, 43% to 54%), respectively. The relative beneficial aspects of upright MRI include lack of need for sedation, low claustrophobic potential and, most important, natural, gravity-influenced position, enabling the surgeon to visualize the true preoperative picture of the shoulder. It is an effective tool for demonstrating glenohumeral abnormalities resulting from brachial plexus injury worthy of surgical exploration.

  17. Cost analysis of brachial plexus injuries: variability of compensation by insurance companies before and after surgery.

    PubMed

    Felici, N; Zaami, S; Ciancolini, G; Marinelli, E; Tagliente, D; Cannatà, C

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic paralysis of the brachial plexus is an extremely disabling pathology. The type of trauma most frequently suffered by this group of patients is due to motorcycle injuries. It therefore affects a population of young patients. In the majority of cases, these patients receive compensation for permanent damage from insurance companies. Surgery of the brachial plexus enables various forms of functional recovery, depending on the number of roots of the brachial plexus involved in the injury. The aim of this study is to compare the functional deficit and the extent of the related compensation before and after surgical intervention, and to evaluate the saving in economic terms (understood as the cost of compensation paid by insurance companies) obtainable through surgical intervention. The authors analysed the functional recovery obtained through surgery in 134 patients divided into 4 groups on the basis of the number of injured roots. The levels of compensation payable to the patient before surgical intervention, and 3 years after, were then compared. The results showed that the saving obtainable through surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries may exceed 65% of the economic value of the compensation that would have been attributable to the same patients if they had not undergone surgical treatment. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve injury after brachial plexus block: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mi Jin; Byun, Ha Young; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Seung Won; Oh, Min-Kyun; Shin, Heesuk

    2013-12-01

    Medial antebrachial cutaneous (MABC) nerve injury associated with iatrogenic causes has been rarely reported. Local anesthesia may be implicated in the etiology of such injury, but has not been reported. Two patients with numbness and painful paresthesia over the medial aspect of the unilateral forearm were referred for electrodiagnostic study, which revealed MABC nerve lesion in each case. The highly selective nature of the MABC nerve injuries strongly suggested that they were the result of direct nerve injury by an injection needle during previous brachial plexus block procedures. Electrodiagnostic studies can be helpful in evaluating cases of sensory disturbance after local anesthesia. To our knowledge, these are the first documented cases of isolated MABC nerve injury following ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block.

  19. Restoration of shoulder abduction by nerve transfer in avulsed brachial plexus injury: evaluation of 99 patients with various nerve transfers.

    PubMed

    Chuang, D C; Lee, G W; Hashem, F; Wei, F C

    1995-07-01

    During the 5-year period between 1987 and 1991, 99 patients with total root or upper root (C5, C6, or C7) injuries were treated by nerve transfer to obtain shoulder abduction. More than eight different combinations of coaptation between donor nerves (intercostal nerves, phrenic nerve, spinal accessory nerve, ipsilateral C7, or cervical motor nerves) and recipient nerves (suprascapular nerve, axillary nerve, and upper trunk or C5) were applied. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up. Different results were obtained in each category. Simultaneous neurotization of the suprascapular and axillary nerves with the phrenic and spinal accessory nerves obtained much better and more reliable shoulder abduction. Neurotization of the C5 spinal nerve by multiple nerve transfers was another good option that yielded good shoulder abduction in a single patient. If the phrenic nerve was traumatized, neurotization of the suprascapular nerve solely with the spinal accessory nerve was still capable of achieving an acceptable range of shoulder abduction.

  20. Results of ulnar nerve neurotization to biceps brachii muscle in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Rezende, Marcelo Rosa De; Rabelo, Neylor Teofilo Araújo; Silveira, Clóvis Castanho; Petersen, Pedro Araújo; Paula, Emygdio José Leomil De; Mattar, Rames

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the factors influencing the results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of the brachii biceps muscle, aiming at the restoration of elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury. METHODS: 19 patients, with 18 men and 1 woman, mean age 28.7 years. Eight patients had injury to roots C5-C6 and 11, to roots C5-C6-C7. The average time interval between injury and surgery was 7.5 months. Four patients had cervical fractures associated with brachial plexus injury. The postoperative follow-up was 15.7 months. RESULTS: Eight patients recovered elbow flexion strength MRC grade 4; two, MRC grade 3 and nine, MRC <3. There was no impairment of the previous ulnar nerve function. CONCLUSION: The surgical results of ulnar nerve neurotization at the motor branch of brachii biceps muscle are dependent on the interval between brachial plexus injury and surgical treatment, the presence of associated fractures of the cervical spine and occipital condyle, residual function of the C8-T1 roots after the injury and the involvement of the C7 root. Signs of reinnervation manifested up to 3 months after surgery showed better results in the long term. Level of Evidence: IV, Case Series. PMID:24453624

  1. Spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H; Lee, J S; Kim, Y H; Kim, T W; Kwon, K M

    2017-06-27

    We investigated the spontaneous recovery of non-operated traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI). A total of 25 cases of non-operated traumatic BPI were analysed by retrospective review of medical records; in all cases, consecutive electrodiagnostic studies (ES) were conducted from 1 to 4 months and 18 to 24 months post-trauma. Injury severity was assessed using a modified version of Dumitru and Wilbourn's scale (DWS) based on ES. Spontaneous recovery of brachial plexus components per subject was analysed using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test. A two-tailed Fisher's exact or Pearson's Chi-square test was used to examine the associations between initial injury severity (DWS grade 2 vs. 3, complete vs. incomplete), accompanying injury type (open vs. closed), main lesion location (supraclavicular vs. infraclavicular lesion), and spontaneous recovery. The most common cause of BPI was traffic accident (TA) (15 cases, 60%), and the most common type of TA-induced BPI was a motorcycle TA (5 cases), accounting for 20% of all injuries. The second most common type of injury was an occupational injury (6 cases, 24%). Thirty-eight (69%) of 55 injured brachial components in 25 cases had DWS grade 3 and 17 brachial components (31%) had grade 2. The DWS grade of brachial plexus components per subject significantly differed between the first and follow-up ES (p = 0.000). However, initial injury severity, accompanying injury type, and main lesion location were not statistically associated with spontaneous recovery (p > 0.05). Spontaneous recovery may be possible even in severe traumatic BPI. Multiple factors should be considered when predicting the clinical course of traumatic BPI.

  2. Risk factors at birth for permanent obstetric brachial plexus injury and associated osseous deformities.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Kumar, Nirupama; Avila, Meera B; Nath, Devin K; Melcher, Sonya E; Eichhorn, Mitchell G; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the most prevalent risk factors found in patients with permanent obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) to identify better predictors of injury. Methods. A population-based study was performed on 241 OBPI patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Results. Shoulder dystocia (97%) was the most prevalent risk factor. We found that 80% of the patients in this study were not macrosomic, and 43% weighed less than 4000 g at birth. The rate of instrument use was 41% , which is 4-fold higher than the 10% predicted for all vaginal deliveries in the United States. Posterior subluxation and glenoid version measurements in children with no finger movement at birth indicated a less severe shoulder deformity in comparison with those with finger movement. Conclusions. The average birth weight in this study was indistinguishable from the average birth weight reported for all brachial plexus injuries. Higher birth weight does not, therefore, affect the prognosis of brachial plexus injury. We found forceps/vacuum delivery to be an independent risk factor for OBPI, regardless of birth weight. Permanently injured patients with finger movement at birth develop more severe bony deformities of the shoulder than patients without finger movement.

  3. Risk Factors at Birth for Permanent Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury and Associated Osseous Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.; Kumar, Nirupama; Avila, Meera B.; Nath, Devin K.; Melcher, Sonya E.; Eichhorn, Mitchell G.; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the most prevalent risk factors found in patients with permanent obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) to identify better predictors of injury. Methods. A population-based study was performed on 241 OBPI patients who underwent surgical treatment at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Results. Shoulder dystocia (97%) was the most prevalent risk factor. We found that 80% of the patients in this study were not macrosomic, and 43% weighed less than 4000 g at birth. The rate of instrument use was 41% , which is 4-fold higher than the 10% predicted for all vaginal deliveries in the United States. Posterior subluxation and glenoid version measurements in children with no finger movement at birth indicated a less severe shoulder deformity in comparison with those with finger movement. Conclusions. The average birth weight in this study was indistinguishable from the average birth weight reported for all brachial plexus injuries. Higher birth weight does not, therefore, affect the prognosis of brachial plexus injury. We found forceps/vacuum delivery to be an independent risk factor for OBPI, regardless of birth weight. Permanently injured patients with finger movement at birth develop more severe bony deformities of the shoulder than patients without finger movement. PMID:22518326

  4. Restoration of elbow flexion after brachial plexus injury: the role of nerve and muscle transfers.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, K A; Orenstein, H H

    2000-11-01

    Brachial plexus trauma results in a variable loss of upper extremity function. The restoration of this function requires elbow flexion of adequate strength and range of motion. A proper evaluation of brachial plexus lesions is a prerequisite to any reconstructive procedure, and appropriate guidelines are presented. One option for restoring elbow flexion is a nerve transfer. The best results with this procedure are obtained in young patients treated within 6 months of injury. Another option is a free or pedicled muscle transfer, which should be considered in older patients or patients treated more than 6 months after an injury. Muscle transfers may also be used to augment the results of nerve transfer procedures. Choices and clinical results of donor nerves and muscle for transfer are discussed, and an algorithm for treatment is presented.

  5. Radial to axillary nerve neurotization for brachial plexus injury in children: a combined case series.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, Scott L; Eli, Ilyas M; Shah, Manish N; Bradley, Nadine; Stutz, Christopher M; Park, Tae Sung; Wellons, John C

    2014-11-01

    Axillary nerve palsy, isolated or as part of a more complex brachial plexus injury, can have profound effects on upper-extremity function. Radial to axillary nerve neurotization is a useful technique for regaining shoulder abduction with little compromise of other neurological function. A combined experience of this procedure used in children is reviewed. A retrospective review of the authors' experience across 3 tertiary care centers with brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injury in children (younger than 18 years) revealed 7 cases involving patients with axillary nerve injury as part of an overall brachial plexus injury with persistent shoulder abduction deficits. Two surgical approaches to the region were used. Four infants (ages 0.6, 0.8, 0.8, and 0.6 years) and 3 older children (ages 8, 15, and 17 years) underwent surgical intervention. No patient had significant shoulder abduction past 15° preoperatively. In 3 cases, additional neurotization was performed in conjunction with the procedure of interest. Two surgical approaches were used: posterior and transaxillary. All patients displayed improvement in shoulder abduction. All were able to activate their deltoid muscle to raise their arm against gravity and 4 of 7 were able to abduct against resistance. The median duration of follow-up was 15 months (range 8 months to 5.9 years). Radial to axillary nerve neurotization improved shoulder abduction in this series of patients treated at 3 institutions. While rarely used in children, this neurotization procedure is an excellent option to restore deltoid function in children with brachial plexus injury due to birth or accidental trauma.

  6. Traction injury of the brachial plexus confused with nerve injury due to interscalene brachial block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Ferrero-Manzanal, Francisco; Lax-Pérez, Raquel; López-Bernabé, Roberto; Betancourt-Bastidas, José Ramiro; Iñiguez de Onzoño-Pérez, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder surgery is often performed with the patient in the so called "beach-chair position" with elevation of the upper part of the body. The anesthetic procedure can be general anesthesia and/or regional block, usually interscalenic brachial plexus block. We present a case of brachial plexus palsy with a possible mechanism of traction based on the electromyographic and clinical findings, although a possible contribution of nerve block cannot be excluded. We present a case of a 62 year-old female, that suffered from shoulder fracture-dislocation. Open reduction and internal fixation were performed in the so-called "beach-chair" position, under combined general-regional anesthesia. In the postoperative period complete motor brachial plexus palsy appeared, with neuropathic pain. Conservative treatment included analgesic drugs, neuromodulators, B-vitamin complex and physiotherapy. Spontaneous recovery appeared at 11 months. DISCUSION: in shoulder surgery, there may be complications related to both anesthetic technique and patient positioning/surgical maneuvers. Regional block often acts as a confusing factor when neurologic damage appears after surgery. Intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus, and may be favored by the fixed position of the head using the accessory of the operating table in the beach-chair position. When postoperative brachial plexus palsy appears, nerve block is a confusing factor that tends to be attributed as the cause of palsy by the orthopedic surgeon. The beach chair position may predispose brachial plexus traction injury. The head and neck position should be regularly checked during long procedures, as intraoperative maneuvers may cause eventual traction of the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. [Surgical treatment of the plexus brachialis injury using long-lasting electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Tsymbaliuk, V I; Tretiak, I B; Tsymbaliuk, Iu V

    2013-06-01

    The results of surgical treatment were analyzed in 103 patients, suffering consequences of the plexus brachialis injury, using the system for long-lasting electrostimulation, called "Henci 3M". The system of a domestic manufacture is an individual one, permits to perform the direct electrostimulation seances in a home conditions several times a day for a long time. There were positive results noted: an enhancement in volume and strength of movements in upper extremity of various degree, restoration of sensitivity and disappearance or reduction of a pain syndrome intensity in 90.6% of patients. Long-lasting electrostimulation permits more effectively and valuably to restore a plexus brachialis function in its traumatic injury.

  8. Are all brachial plexus injuries caused by shoulder dystocia?

    PubMed

    Doumouchtsis, Stergios K; Arulkumaran, Sabaratnam

    2009-09-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP), is an injury of the brachial plexus at childbirth affecting the nerve roots of C5-6 (Erb-Duchenne palsy-nearly 80% of cases) or less frequently the C8-T1 nerve roots (Klumpke palsy). OBPP often has medicolegal implications. In the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland the incidence is 0.42, in the United States 1.5, and in other western countries 1 to 3 per 1000 live births. Most infants with OBPP have no known risk factors. Shoulder dystocia increases the risk for OBPP 100-fold. The reported incidence of OBPP after shoulder dystocia varies widely from 4% to 40%. Other risk factors include birth weight >4 kg, maternal diabetes mellitus, obesity or excessive weight gain, prolonged pregnancy, prolonged second stage of labor, persistent fetal malposition, operative delivery, and breech extraction of a small baby. OBPP after caesarean section accounts for 1% to 4% of cases. Historically, OBPPs have been considered to result from excessive lateral traction and forceful deviation of the fetal head from the axial plane of the fetal body, usually in association with shoulder dystocia, which increases the necessary applied peak force and time to deliver the fetal shoulders. Direct compression of the fetal shoulder on the symphysis pubis may also cause injury. However a significant proportion of OBPPs occurs in utero, as according to some studies more than half of the cases are not associated with shoulder dystocia. Possible mechanisms of intrauterine injury include the endogenous propulsive forces of labor, intrauterine maladaptation, or failure of the shoulders to rotate, and impaction of the posterior shoulder behind the sacral promontory. Uterine anomalies, such as fibroids, an intrauterine septum, or a bicornuate uterus may also result in OBPP. It is not possible to reliably predict which fetuses will experience OBPP. Future research should be directed in prospective evaluation of the mechanisms of injury, to enable

  9. Long term follow-up results of dorsal root entry zone lesions for intractable pain after brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

    PubMed

    Chen, H J; Tu, Y K

    2006-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion injury is one of the major complications after traffic, especially motorcycle accidents and machine injuries. Intractable pain and paralysis of the affected limbs are the major neurological deficits. During the past 18 years, we have encountered and treated more than 500 cases with brachial plexus avulsion injuries. Dorsal root entry zone lesions (DREZ) made by thermocoagulation were performed for intractable pain in 60 cases. Forty cases were under regular follow-up for 5-18 years. In early postoperative stage, the pain relief rate was excellent or good in 32 cases (80%). The pain relief rate dropped to 60% in 5 year follow-up period and only 9 cases (50%) had excellent or good result in 10 year follow-up. Reconstructive procedures were performed in almost all patients in the last 10 years. Dorsal root entry zone lesion is an effective procedure for pain control after brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

  10. Sensory Evaluation of the Hands in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgren, Tove; Peltonen, Jari; Linder, Tove; Rautakorpi, Sanna; Nietosvaara, Yrjana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sensory changes of the hand in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI). Ninety-five patients (43 females, 52 males) comprising two age groups, 6 to 8 years (mean age 7y 6mo) and 12 to 14 years (mean age 13y 2mo), were included. Sixty-four had upper (cervical [C] 5-6), 19 upper and middle (C5-7), and 12 had total…

  11. Sensory Evaluation of the Hands in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgren, Tove; Peltonen, Jari; Linder, Tove; Rautakorpi, Sanna; Nietosvaara, Yrjana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sensory changes of the hand in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI). Ninety-five patients (43 females, 52 males) comprising two age groups, 6 to 8 years (mean age 7y 6mo) and 12 to 14 years (mean age 13y 2mo), were included. Sixty-four had upper (cervical [C] 5-6), 19 upper and middle (C5-7), and 12 had total…

  12. [Significance of sensory evoked potentials in determination of the level of brachial plexus injuries].

    PubMed

    Bojović, V; Berisavac, I; Rasulic, L

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show the highlights of electrophysiological diagnostics, i.e. its potentials in level diagnostics of traumatic disfunction of brachial plexus (BP). In that manner we have analyzed the results of electrophysiological research, made on 53 patients with different levels and grades of traumatic lesion of brachial plexus. We have also analyzed the authors' opinions and points of view who have contributed in solving these problems. Brachial plexus is a complex, vulnerable nerve structure that is often, in life, exposed to direct or indirect influence of mechanical force. Preserved integrity of bone structures of a shoulder protects BP from longitudinal forces, which are the most common causes of injury of this structure. Traction mechanism of the injury is always up to date in the cases of fractures and dislocation of the skeleton in this region. In the early childhood, mechanical injuries of brachial plexus are caused by distocia in the second delivery period, while in adulthood most common injuries are caused by sudden and intensive forces, which cause disfunction of plexus by traction mechanism (dislocation of a shoulder and clavicular fracture) and by direct action (stabing and piercing injuries). Slowly progressive, expansive, degenerative and inflammatory processes of neighbouring organs are causing the disfunction of the plexus as well. Traction actions are aimed mostly at radiculars as a vulnerable structure that is placed between relatively mobile shoulder joint and rigid cervical part of vertebral column. Complex anatomical structure and mutual overlapping of radicular motor and sensitive innervation of muscles and dermatoms, make the diagnostics of disfunction of this periphery nerve structure very difficult and complicated. Disfunction of neighboring bone, vascular and muscle elements as well as the nearness of vital organs, which complicates even more the diagnostics. Taking into account the general analysis of all

  13. Double Distal Intraneural Fascicular Nerve Transfers for Lower Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyu; Reynolds, Michael; Satteson, Ellen; Nazir, Omar; Petit, James; Smith, Beth P

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate outcomes following transfer of the supinator motor branch of the radial nerve (SMB) to the posterior interosseous nerve (PIN) and the pronator teres motor branch of median (PTMB) to the anterior interosseous nerve (AIN) in patients with lower brachial plexus injuries. Since December 2010, 4 patients have undergone combined transfer of the SMB to PIN and PTMB to AIN for lower brachial plexus palsies. The study was prospectively designed, and the patients were followed for 4 years to monitor their functional improvement. One patient failed to return after his 4-month postoperative visit. The other 3 patients all regained M4 thumb and finger extension, and 2 recovered M4 thumb and finger flexion at the final evaluation, a mean 30 months after the nerve transfer surgeries. Combined transfer of the SMB to PIN and PTMB to AIN may lead to successful recovery of digital extrinsic flexion and extension in lower brachial plexus injuries. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Nerve transfer helps repair brachial plexus injury by increasing cerebral cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guixin; Wu, Zuopei; Wang, Xinhong; Tan, Xiaoxiao; Gu, Yudong

    2014-01-01

    In the treatment of brachial plexus injury, nerves that are functionally less important are transferred onto the distal ends of damaged crucial nerves to help recover neuromuscular function in the target region. For example, intercostal nerves are transferred onto axillary nerves, and accessory nerves are transferred onto suprascapular nerves, the phrenic nerve is transferred onto the musculocutaneous nerves, and the contralateral C7 nerve is transferred onto the median or radial nerves. Nerve transfer has become a major method for reconstructing the brachial plexus after avulsion injury. Many experiments have shown that nerve transfers for treatment of brachial plexus injury can help reconstruct cerebral cortical function and increase cortical plasticity. In this review article, we summarize the recent progress in the use of diverse nerve transfer methods for the repair of brachial plexus injury, and we discuss the impact of nerve transfer on cerebral cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury. PMID:25657729

  15. Pressure-specified sensory device versus electrodiagnostic testing in brachial plexus upper trunk injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul Kumar; Bowen, Margaret Elaine; Eichhorn, Mitchell George

    2010-05-01

    Brachial plexus upper trunk injury is associated with winged scapula owing to the close anatomical course of the long thoracic nerve and upper trunk. Needle electromyography is a common diagnostic test for this injury; however, it does not detect injury in most patients with upper trunk damage. The pressure-specified sensory device may be an alternative to needle electromyography. Thirty patients with winged scapula and upper trunk injury were evaluated with needle electromyography (EMG) and pressure-specified sensory device (PSSD) tests. EMG testing of the biceps muscle was compared with PSSD testing of the dorsal hand skin (C6 damage), and EMG testing of the deltoid and spinati muscles was compared with PSSD testing of the deltoid skin (C5 damage). PSSD pressure values were significantly higher on the affected arm. On the basis of published and calculated threshold values the PSSD was found to be significantly more sensitive than EMG. The PSSD tests consistently identified injuries that were not detected by needle EMG tests. These findings provide strong evidence that the PSSD is more effective than needle EMG in the detection of brachial plexus upper trunk injury.

  16. Histopathological basis of Horner's syndrome in obstetric brachial plexus palsy differs from that in adult brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yi-Gang; Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Yu, Guang-Rong

    2008-05-01

    Although Horner's syndrome is usually taken as an absolute indicator of avulsions of the C8 and T1 ventral roots in adult brachial plexus injury, its pathological basis in obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) is unclear. We therefore examined the morphological mechanism for the presence of Horner's syndrome in brachial plexus injury in infants and adults. Some axons of sympathetic preganglionic neurons in T1 innervate the superior cervical ganglion via the C7 ventral root in infants but not in adults. Therefore, the presence of Horner's syndrome may relate in part to avulsion of the C7 root in OBPP. These findings suggest that Horner's syndrome in OBPP is not necessarily indicative of avulsions of the C8 and T1 roots, as it can occur with avulsion of the C7 root.

  17. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a birth injury not explained by the known risk factors.

    PubMed

    Backe, Bjørn; Magnussen, Elisabeth Balstad; Johansen, Ole Jakob; Sellaeg, Gerd; Russwurm, Harald

    2008-01-01

    To determine the incidence and prognosis of obstetric brachial plexus injuries and analyze associated risk factors. Analysis of prospectively collected information comprising all births from 1991 to 2000, with complete follow-up of affected children. Setting. St Olav's University Hospital, a tertiary care hospital in the middle part of Norway. Thirty thousand five hundred and seventy-four children; all were examined within 24 hours of birth and 91 were diagnosed with brachial plexus injury. We reviewed the hospital records and analyzed the data submitted from our hospital to the Medical Birth Register of Norway. Risk factors are shoulder dystocia, macrosomy, diabetes, vacuum extraction and forceps delivery. The predictive power of these variables is poor. Almost half of the plexus injuries followed spontaneous vaginal deliveries with second stage of 30 minutes or less. Two newborns were delivered by cesarean section and two were vaginal breech deliveries. In 15 children (0.5/1,000) a permanent plexus injury has been diagnosed. Compared with transient plexus impairment, risk factors for a permanent injury were high maternal body mass index, shoulder dystocia, fractured humerus and fetal asphyxia. Fracture of the clavicle was significantly more frequent when the injury was transient, possibly reflecting a protective effect. The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury is 0.3% and the recovery rate is 84%, resulting in 0.5 permanent injuries per 1,000 births. Plexus injury is not well predicted by known risk factors. Other etiological factors should be sought.

  18. Transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells repairs brachial plexus injury: pathological and biomechanical analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qi; Luo, Min; Li, Peng; Jin, Hai

    2014-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits by stretching the C6 nerve root. Immediately after the stretching, a suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was injected into the injured brachial plexus. The results of tensile mechanical testing of the brachial plexus showed that the tensile elastic limit strain, elastic limit stress, maximum stress, and maximum strain of the injured brachial plexuses were significantly increased at 24 weeks after the injection. The treatment clearly improved the pathological morphology of the injured brachial plexus nerve, as seen by hematoxylin eosin staining, and the functions of the rabbit forepaw were restored. These data indicate that the injection of human amniotic epithelial cells contributed to the repair of brachial plexus injury, and that this technique may transform into current clinical treatment strategies. PMID:25657737

  19. Outcome Following Spinal Accessory to Suprascapular (Spinoscapular) Nerve Transfer in Infants with Brachial Plexus Birth Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ruchelsman, David E.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Alfonso, Israel; Price, Andrew E.; Grossman, Agatha

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the value of distal spinal accessory nerve (SAN) transfer to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in children with brachial plexus birth injuries in order to better define the application and outcome of this transfer in these infants. Over a 3-year period, 34 infants with brachial plexus injuries underwent transfer of the SAN to the SSN as part of the primary surgical reconstruction. Twenty-five patients (direct repair, n = 20; interposition graft, n = 5) achieved a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Fourteen children underwent plexus reconstruction with SAN-to-SSN transfer at less than 9 months of age, and 11 underwent surgical reconstruction at the age of 9 months or older. Mean age at the time of nerve transfer was 11.6 months (range, 5–30 months). At latest follow-up, active shoulder external rotation was measured in the arm abducted position and confirmed by review of videos. The Gilbert and Miami shoulder classification scores were utilized to report shoulder-specific functional outcomes. The effects of patient age at the time of nerve transfer and the use of interpositional nerve graft were analyzed. Overall mean active external rotation measured 69.6°; mean Gilbert score was 4.1 and the mean Miami score was 7.1, corresponding to overall good shoulder functional outcomes. Similar clinical and shoulder-specific functional outcomes were obtained in patients undergoing early (<9 months of age, n = 14) and late (>9 months of age, n = 11) SAN-to-SSN transfer and primary plexus reconstruction. Nine patients (27%) were lost to follow-up and are not included in the analysis. Optimum results were achieved following direct transfer (n = 20). Results following the use of an interpositional graft (n = 5) were rated satisfactory. No patient required a secondary shoulder procedure during the study period. There were no postoperative complications. Distal SAN-to-SSN (spinoscapular) nerve transfer is a reliable

  20. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-09-15

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research.

  1. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  2. Upper Limb Multifactorial Movement Analysis in Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bahm, Jorg

    2016-01-01

    Multifactorial motion analysis was first established for gait and then developed in the upper extremity. Recordings of infrared light reflecting sensitive passive markers in space, combined with surface eletromyographic recordings and/or transmitted forces, allow eclectic study of muscular coordination in the upper limb. Brachial plexus birth injury is responsible for various patterns of muscle weakness, imbalance, and/or simultaneous activation, soft tissue contractures, and bone-joint deformities, leading to individual motion patterns and adaptations, which we studied by means of motion analysis tools. We describe the technical development and examination setup to evaluate motion impairment and present first clinical results. Motion analysis is a reliable objective assessment tool allowing precise pre- and postoperative multimodal evaluation of upper limb function. Level of evidence: II. PMID:28077954

  3. Brachial plexus injury: the London experience with supraclavicular traction lesions.

    PubMed

    Birch, Rolfe

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author details the experiences of his hospital and other London hospitals in treating brachial plexus injury. As noted, important advances have been made in methods of diagnosis and repair. Myelography was replaced by CT scan and later by MRI. Among the topics the author explores are diagnosis (including pain, the presence or absence of the Tinel sign, and the irradiation of pins and needles) and the principles of repair. The author emphasizes that it is imperative that ruptured nerves be repaired as soon as possible, with the closed traction lesion coming, in urgency, close behind reattachment of the amputated hand or repair of a great artery and a trunk nerve in the combined lesion. Finally, the article concludes that the surgeon must be actively engaged in the whole process of rehabilitation and treatment of pain. This is part of a Point-Counterpoint discussion with Dr. David G. Kline's presentation of "A Personal Experience."

  4. Isolated latissimus dorsi transfer to restore shoulder external rotation in adults with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, S; Singh, V K; Jeyaseelan, L; Sinisi, M; Fox, M

    2013-05-01

    In adults with brachial plexus injuries, lack of active external rotation at the shoulder is one of the most common residual deficits, significantly compromising upper limb function. There is a paucity of evidence to address this complex issue. We present our experience of isolated latissimus dorsi (LD) muscle transfer to achieve active external rotation. This is a retrospective review of 24 adult post-traumatic plexopathy patients who underwent isolated latissimus dorsi muscle transfer to restore external rotation of the shoulder between 1997 and 2010. All patients were male with a mean age of 34 years (21 to 57). All the patients underwent isolated LD muscle transfer using a standard technique to correct external rotational deficit. Outcome was assessed for improvement in active external rotation, arc of movement, muscle strength and return to work. The mean improvement in active external rotation from neutral was 24° (10° to 50°). The mean increase in arc of rotation was 52° (38° to 55°). Mean power of the external rotators was 3.5 Medical Research Council (MRC) grades (2 to 5). A total of 21 patients (88%) were back in work by the time of last follow up. Of these, 13 had returned to their pre-injury occupation. Isolated latissimus dorsi muscle transfer provides a simple and reliable method of restoring useful active external rotation in adults with brachial plexus injuries with internal rotational deformity.

  5. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI): Canada's national clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Christakis, Marie K; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to establish an evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the primary management of obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This clinical practice guideline addresses 4 existing gaps: (1) historic poor use of evidence, (2) timing of referral to multidisciplinary care, (3) Indications and timing of operative nerve repair and (4) distribution of expertise. Setting The guideline is intended for all healthcare providers treating infants and children, and all specialists treating upper extremity injuries. Participants The evidence interpretation and recommendation consensus team (Canadian OBPI Working Group) was composed of clinicians representing each of Canada's 10 multidisciplinary centres. Outcome measures An electronic modified Delphi approach was used for consensus, with agreement criteria defined a priori. Quality indicators for referral to a multidisciplinary centre were established by consensus. An original meta-analysis of primary nerve repair and review of Canadian epidemiology and burden were previously completed. Results 7 recommendations address clinical gaps and guide identification, referral, treatment and outcome assessment: (1) physically examine for OBPI in newborns with arm asymmetry or risk factors; (2) refer newborns with OBPI to a multidisciplinary centre by 1 month; (3) provide pregnancy/birth history and physical examination findings at birth; (4) multidisciplinary centres should include a therapist and peripheral nerve surgeon experienced with OBPI; (5) physical therapy should be advised by a multidisciplinary team; (6) microsurgical nerve repair is indicated in root avulsion and other OBPI meeting centre operative criteria; (7) the common data set includes the Narakas classification, limb length, Active Movement Scale (AMS) and Brachial Plexus Outcome Measure (BPOM) 2 years after birth/surgery. Conclusions The process established a new network of opinion leaders and researchers for further

  6. The natural history of recovery of elbow flexion after obstetric brachial plexus injury managed without nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Hems, T E J; Savaridas, T; Sherlock, D A

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we report the outcome for spontaneous recovery of elbow flexion in obstetric brachial plexus injury managed without nerve reconstruction. Excluding those with transient paralysis, our records revealed 152 children with obstetric brachial plexus injury born before our unit routinely offered brachial plexus reconstruction. Five had had nerve repairs. Of the remainder, only one patient had insufficient flexion to reach their mouth. Elbow flexion started to recover clinically at a mean age of 4 months for Narakas Group 1, 6 months for Group 2, 8 months for Group 3 and 12 months for Group 4. The mean active range of elbow flexion, in 44 cases, was 138°. The mean isometric elbow flexion strength, in 39 patients, was 63% (range 23%-100%) of the normal side. It appears to be rare for elbow flexion not to recover spontaneously, although recovery occurs later in more severe injuries. It is doubtful if nerve reconstruction can improve elbow flexion above the likely spontaneous recovery in babies with obstetric brachial plexus injuries. II.

  7. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  8. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  9. Use of the DEKA Arm for amputees with brachial plexus injury: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Christopher; Latlief, Gail; Phillips, Samuel; Sasson, Nicole; Sepulveda, Eve

    2017-01-01

    Objective Patients with upper limb amputation and brachial plexus injuries have high rates of prosthesis rejection. Study purpose is to describe experiences of subjects with transhumeral amputation and brachial plexus injury, who were fit with, and trained to use, a DEKA Arm. Methods This was a mixed-methods study utilizing qualitative (e.g. interview, survey) and quantitative data (e.g. self-report and performance measures). Subject 1, a current prosthesis user, had a shoulder arthrodesis. Subject 2, not a prosthesis user, had a subluxed shoulder. Both were trained in laboratory and participated in a trial of home use. Descriptive analyses of processes and outcomes were conducted. Results Subject 1 was fitted with the transhumeral configuration (HC) DEKA Arm using a compression release stabilized socket. He had 12 hours of prosthetic training and participated in all home study activities. Subject 1 had improved dexterity and prosthetic satisfaction with the DEKA Arm and reported better quality of life (QOL) at the end of participation. Subject 2 was fit with the shoulder configuration (SC) DEKA Arm using a modified X-frame socket. He had 30 hours of training and participated in 3 weeks of home activities. He reported less functional disability at the end of training as compared to baseline, but encountered personal problems and exacerbation of PTSD symptoms and withdrew from home use portion at 3 weeks. Both subjects reported functional benefits from use, and expressed a desire to receive a DEKA Arm in the future. Discussion This paper reported on two different strategies for prosthetic fitting and their outcomes. The advantages and limitations of each approach were discussed. Conclusion Use of both the HC and SC DEKA Arm for patients with TH amputation and brachial plexus injury was reported. Lessons learned may be instructive to clinicians considering prosthetic choices for future cases. PMID:28628623

  10. Use of the DEKA Arm for amputees with brachial plexus injury: A case series.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Linda; Fantini, Christopher; Latlief, Gail; Phillips, Samuel; Sasson, Nicole; Sepulveda, Eve

    2017-01-01

    Patients with upper limb amputation and brachial plexus injuries have high rates of prosthesis rejection. Study purpose is to describe experiences of subjects with transhumeral amputation and brachial plexus injury, who were fit with, and trained to use, a DEKA Arm. This was a mixed-methods study utilizing qualitative (e.g. interview, survey) and quantitative data (e.g. self-report and performance measures). Subject 1, a current prosthesis user, had a shoulder arthrodesis. Subject 2, not a prosthesis user, had a subluxed shoulder. Both were trained in laboratory and participated in a trial of home use. Descriptive analyses of processes and outcomes were conducted. Subject 1 was fitted with the transhumeral configuration (HC) DEKA Arm using a compression release stabilized socket. He had 12 hours of prosthetic training and participated in all home study activities. Subject 1 had improved dexterity and prosthetic satisfaction with the DEKA Arm and reported better quality of life (QOL) at the end of participation. Subject 2 was fit with the shoulder configuration (SC) DEKA Arm using a modified X-frame socket. He had 30 hours of training and participated in 3 weeks of home activities. He reported less functional disability at the end of training as compared to baseline, but encountered personal problems and exacerbation of PTSD symptoms and withdrew from home use portion at 3 weeks. Both subjects reported functional benefits from use, and expressed a desire to receive a DEKA Arm in the future. This paper reported on two different strategies for prosthetic fitting and their outcomes. The advantages and limitations of each approach were discussed. Use of both the HC and SC DEKA Arm for patients with TH amputation and brachial plexus injury was reported. Lessons learned may be instructive to clinicians considering prosthetic choices for future cases.

  11. Timing of surgical reconstruction for closed traumatic injury to the supraclavicular brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Birch, R

    2015-07-01

    While it is widely accepted that cases of traumatic injury to the brachial plexus benefit from early surgical exploration and repair, with results deteriorating with long delays, policies vary regarding the exact timing of intervention. This is one of a pair of review articles considering the clinical issues, investigations, and surgical factors relating to management of injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus, as well evidence from experimental work and clinical outcomes.In this article Professor Birch argues for early exploration of the brachial plexus as the optimum both to delineate the pathology and undertake reconstructive surgery. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Intercostal nerve transfer to the biceps motor branch in complete traumatic brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Cho, Alvaro Baik; Iamaguchi, Raquel Bernardelli; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; Paulos, Renata Gregorio; Kiyohara, Leandro Yoshinobu; Sorrenti, Luiz; de Menezes, Klícia de Oliveira Costa Riker Teles; de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Mattar Júnior, Rames

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to critically evaluate our results of two intercostal nerve transfers directly to the biceps motor branch in complete traumatic brachial plexus injuries. From January 2007 to November 2012, 19 patients were submitted to this type of surgery, but only 15 of them had a follow-up for ≥2 years and were included in this report. The mean interval from trauma to surgery was 6.88 months (ranging from 3 to 9 months). Two intercostals nerves were dissected and transferred directly to the biceps motor branch. The mean follow-up was 38.06 months (ranging from 24 to 62 months). Ten patients (66.6%) recovered an elbow flexion strength ≥M3. Four of them (26.66%) recovered a stronger elbow flexion ≥M4. One patient (6.25%) recovered an M2 elbow flexion and four patients (26.66%) did not regain any movement. We concluded that two intercostal nerve transfers to the biceps motor branch is a procedure with moderate results regarding elbow flexion recovery, but it is still one of the few options available in complete brachial plexus injuries, especially in five roots avulsion scenario. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries in adults.

    PubMed

    Ricardo, Monreal

    2005-12-01

    We carried out a retrospective review of 32 consecutive patients (30 adults and two children) with total or partial lesions of the brachial plexus who had surgical repair using nerve grafting, neurotisation, and neurolysis between January 1991 and December 2003. The outcome measures of muscular strength were correlated with the type of lesion, age, preoperative time, length and number of grafts, and time to reinnervation of the biceps. The function of the upper limb was also evaluated. There was a significant correlation between muscular strength after surgical repair and both the preoperative time and the length of the nerve graft. There was also a significant correlation between muscular strength and the number of grafts. Muscular strength was better when the neurolysis was done before six months. When neurosurgical repair and reconstructive procedures were performed, the function of the upper limb was improved.

  14. Reanimation of elbow extension with medial pectoral nerve transfer in partial injuries to the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2013-03-01

    Recent advancements in operative treatment of the brachial plexus authorized more extensive repairs and, currently, elbow extension can be included in the rank of desirable functions to be restored. This study aims to describe the author's experience in using the medial pectoral nerve for reinnervation of the triceps brachii in patients sustaining C5-7 palsies of the brachial plexus. This is a retrospective study of the outcomes regarding recovery of elbow extension in 12 patients who underwent transfer of the medial pectoral nerve to the radial nerve or to the branch of the long head of the triceps. The radial nerve was targeted in 3 patients, and the branch to the long head of the triceps was targeted in 9. Grafts were used in 6 patients. Outcomes assessed as Medical Research Council Grades M4 and M3 for elbow extension were noted in 7 (58%) and 5 (42%) patients, respectively. The medial pectoral nerve is a reliable donor for elbow extension recovery in patients who have sustained C5-7 nerve root injuries.

  15. Outcomes associated with a structured prenatal counseling program for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Daly, Mary Veronica; Bender, Christina; Townsend, Kathryn E; Hamilton, Emily F

    2012-08-01

    We examined outcomes that were associated with a novel program to identify patients who are at high risk for shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. The program included a checklist of key risk factors and a multifactorial algorithm to estimate risk of shoulder dystocia with brachial plexus injury. We examined rates of cesarean delivery and shoulder dystocia in 8767 deliveries by clinicians who were enrolled in the program and in 11,958 patients of clinicians with no access to the program. Key risk factors were identified in 1071 of 8767 mothers (12.2%), of whom 40 of 8767 women (0.46%) had results in the high-risk category. The rate of primary cesarean delivery rate was stable (21.2-20.8%; P = .57). Shoulder dystocia rates fell by 56.8% (1.74-0.75%; P = .002). The rates of shoulder dystocia and cesarean birth showed no changes in the group with no access to the program. With the introduction of this program, overall shoulder dystocia rates fell by more than one-half with no increase in the primary cesarean delivery rate. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Restoration of elbow flexion in root lesions of brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Nagano, A; Ochiai, N; Okinaga, S

    1992-09-01

    A retrospective review of 87 patients with loss of elbow flexion secondary to root injuries of the brachial plexus was carried out. Results of nerve grafting, direct nerve transfer with the intercostal nerve, or tendon transfer were analyzed, and treatment recommendations were developed. Nerve transfer provided good or excellent results for injuries that included avulsion of the C5 and/or C6 roots. Nerve grafts were used successfully in cases of single or combined ruptures of C5 and C6. Tendon transfers provided good or excellent results in C5-C6 or C5-C7 avulsions, where nerve grafting was not possible and transferable muscles had good strength. Somatosensory evoked potentials were necessary to demonstrate nerve root avulsions in cases in which the roots appeared ruptured on visual inspection.

  17. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Intrauterine shoulder weakness and obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Israel; Papazian, Oscar; Shuhaiber, Hans; Yaylali, Ilker; Grossman, John A I

    2004-09-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus injury occurs when the forces preventing the stretch of the brachial plexus are overcome by the forces stretching it. This report describes an 8-day-old male delivered by uncomplicated cesarean section with right obstetrical brachial plexus palsy and congenital arm atrophy. The patient had a history of decreased right arm movement detected by fetal ultrasound at 18 to 20 weeks of gestation. The purpose of this article is to report that stretching of brachial plexus at birth sufficient to produce a plexus injury may occur in a patient with a vulnerable plexus even in the absence of traction during delivery.

  19. Timing of surgical reconstruction for closed traumatic injury to the supraclavicular brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Hems, T E J

    2015-07-01

    While it is widely accepted that cases of traumatic injury to the brachial plexus benefit from early surgical exploration and repair, with results deteriorating with long delays, policies vary regarding the exact timing of intervention. This is one of a pair of review articles considering the clinical issues, investigations, and surgical factors relating to management of injuries to the supraclavicular brachial plexus, as well as evidence from experimental work and clinical outcomes.In this article Mr Hems outlines when waiting may be advantageous, allowing for further investigation to help clarify the extent of the injury and thus the best surgical options. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Impaired growth of denervated muscle contributes to contracture formation following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Sia; Peterson, Elizabeth; Kim, Annie; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2011-03-02

    The etiology of shoulder and elbow contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury is incompletely understood. With use of a mouse model, the current study tests the novel hypothesis that reduced growth of denervated muscle contributes to contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury. Unilateral brachial plexus injuries were created in neonatal mice by supraclavicular C5-C6 nerve root excision. Shoulder and elbow range of motion was measured four weeks after injury. Fibrosis, cross-sectional area, and functional length of the biceps, brachialis, and subscapularis muscles were measured over four weeks following injury. Muscle satellite cells were cultured from denervated and control biceps muscles to assess myogenic capability. In a comparison group, shoulder motion and subscapularis length were assessed following surgical excision of external rotator muscles. Shoulder internal rotation and elbow flexion contractures developed on the involved side within four weeks following brachial plexus injury. Excision of the biceps and brachialis muscles relieved the elbow flexion contractures. The biceps muscles were histologically fibrotic, whereas fatty infiltration predominated in the brachialis and rotator cuff muscles. The biceps and brachialis muscles displayed reduced cross-sectional and longitudinal growth compared with the contralateral muscles. The upper subscapularis muscle similarly displayed reduced longitudinal growth, with the subscapularis shortening correlating with internal rotation contracture. However, excision of the external rotators without brachial plexus injury caused no contractures or subscapularis shortening. Myogenically capable satellite cells were present in denervated biceps muscles despite impaired muscle growth in vivo. Injury of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus leads to impaired growth of the biceps and brachialis muscles, which are responsible for elbow flexion contractures, and impaired growth of the subscapularis

  1. Oberlin transfer and partial radial to axillary nerve neurotization to repair an explosive traumatic injury to the brachial plexus in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Miller, Joseph H; Garber, Sarah T; McCormick, Don E; Eskandari, Ramin; Walker, Marion L; Rizk, Elias; Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C

    2013-11-01

    Explosive injuries to the pediatric brachial plexus are exceedingly rare and as such are poorly characterized in the medical literature. Herein, we describe an 8-year-old who was struck in the neck by a piece of shrapnel and suffered multiple vascular injuries in addition to a suspected avulsion of the cervical 5 and 6 ventral rami. The patient had a complete upper brachial plexus palsy and failed to demonstrate any clinical improvement at 6-months follow-up. He was taken to the operating from for a partial ulnar to musculocutaneous nerve neurotization as well as a partial radial to axillary nerve neurotization. The patient's motor exam improved from a Medical Research Council scale 1 to 4+ for biceps brachii and 0 to 4 deltoid function with greater than 90° of shoulder abduction. This outcome supports complex neurotization techniques as viable treatment options for persistent motor deficits following an upper brachial plexus injury in older, non-infant age, children.

  2. A Thematic Analysis of Online Discussion Boards for Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Morris, Marie T; Daluiski, Aaron; Dy, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Patients with brachial plexus injury (BPI) and their family members contribute to Internet discussion groups dedicated to BPI. We hypothesized that a thematic analysis of posts from BPI Internet discussion groups would reveal common themes related to the BPI patient experience, providing topics for patient education and counseling. Internet discussion boards were identified using the search term "brachial plexus injury support group" in Google, Bing, and Yahoo! search engines. Two discussion boards had substantially more posts than other Web sites and were chosen for analyses. Posts from January 1, 2015, through January 1, 2016, were examined. Using an iterative and established process, 2 investigators (M.T.M. and C.J.D) independently analyzed each post using thematic analysis in 3 steps (open coding, axial coding, and selective coding) to determine common themes. In this process, each post was reviewed 3 times. A total of 328 posts from the 2 leading discussion boards were analyzed. Investigators reached a consensus on themes for all posts. One central theme focused on emotional aspects of BPI. Four other central themes regarding information support were identified: BPI disease, BPI treatment, recovery after BPI treatment, and process of seeking care for BPI. Examination of posts on Internet support groups for BPI revealed recurring concerns, questions, and opinions of patients and their family members. The most common themes related to disease information, treatment, recovery, and the emotional element of BPI. These findings provide a helpful starting point in refining topics for patient education and support that are targeted on patients' interests and concerns. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensory restoration by lateral antebrachial cutaneous to ulnar nerve transfer in children with global brachial plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ruchelsman, David E.; Price, Andrew E.; Valencia, Herbert; Ramos, Lorna E.

    2010-01-01

    Selective peripheral nerve transfers represent an emerging reconstructive strategy in the management of both pediatric and adult brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries. Transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve of the forearm into the distal ulnar nerve is a useful means to restore sensibility to the ulnar side of the hand when indicated. This technique is particularly valuable in the management of global brachial plexus birth injuries in children for which its application has not been previously reported. Four children ages 4 to 9 years who sustained brachial plexus birth injury with persistent absent sensibility on the unlar aspect of the hand underwent transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve to the distal ulnar nerve. In three patients, a direct transfer with a distal end-to-side repair through a deep longitudinal neurotomy was performed. In a single patient, an interposition nerve graft was required. Restoration of sensibility was evaluated by the “wrinkle test.” PMID:22131917

  4. Elective cesarean section to prevent anal incontinence and brachial plexus injuries associated with macrosomia--a decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Culligan, Patrick J; Myers, John A; Goldberg, Roger P; Blackwell, Linda; Gohmann, Stephan F; Abell, Troy D

    2005-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the cost-effectiveness of a policy of elective C-section for macrosomic infants to prevent maternal anal incontinence, urinary incontinence, and newborn brachial plexus injuries. We used a decision analytic model to compare the standard of care with a policy whereby all primigravid patients in the United States would undergo an ultrasound at 39 weeks gestation, followed by an elective C-section for any fetus estimated at > or =4500 g. The following clinical consequences were considered crucial to the analysis: brachial plexus injury to the newborn; maternal anal and urinary incontinence; emergency hysterectomy; hemorrhage requiring blood transfusion; and maternal mortality. Our outcome measures included (1) number of brachial plexus injuries or cases of incontinence averted, (2) incremental monetary cost per 100,000 deliveries, (3) expected quality of life of the mother and her child, and (4) "quality-adjusted life years" (QALY) associated with the two policies. For every 100,000 deliveries, the policy of elective C-section resulted in 16.6 fewer permanent brachial plexus injuries, 185.7 fewer cases of anal incontinence, and cost savings of $3,211,000. Therefore, this policy would prevent one case of anal incontinence for every 539 elective C-sections performed. The expected quality of life associated with the elective C-section policy was also greater (quality of life score 0.923 vs 0.917 on a scale from 0.0 to 1.0 and 53.6 QALY vs 53.2). A policy whereby primigravid patients in the United States have a 39 week ultrasound-estimated fetal weight followed by C-section for any fetuses > or =4500 g appears cost effective. However, the monetary costs in our analysis were sensitive to the probability estimates of urinary incontinence following C-section and vaginal delivery and the cost estimates for urinary incontinence, vaginal delivery, and C-section.

  5. Extended Long-Term (5 Years) Outcomes of Triangle Tilt Surgery in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Methods: Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Results: Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, p<0.0001), hand-to-spine (2.6±0.6 to 3.4±1.1, p<0.005), hand-to-neck (2.7±0.7 to 4.3±0.7, p<0.0001), hand-to-mouth (2.3±0.9 (92º±33) to 4.2±0.5 (21º±16), p<0.0001), and supination (2.6±1.1 (-8.2º ±51) to 4.1±0.7 (61±32)) were significantly improved (p<0.0001), and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years). Total modified Mallet functional score was also shown to improve from 14.1±2.7 to 20.3±2.5. Conclusions: The triangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients. PMID:23730369

  6. Extended long-term (5 years) outcomes of triangle tilt surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, p<0.0001), hand-to-spine (2.6±0.6 to 3.4±1.1, p<0.005), hand-to-neck (2.7±0.7 to 4.3±0.7, p<0.0001), hand-to-mouth (2.3±0.9 (92º±33) to 4.2±0.5 (21º±16), p<0.0001), and supination (2.6±1.1 (-8.2º ±51) to 4.1±0.7 (61±32)) were significantly improved (p<0.0001), and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years). Total modified Mallet functional score was also shown to improve from 14.1±2.7 to 20.3±2.5. The triangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients.

  7. Cortical plasticity after brachial plexus injury and repair: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Indira Devi, B; Bharti, Komal; Panda, Rajanikant

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors aimed to understand the alterations of brain resting-state networks (RSNs) in patients with pan-brachial plexus injury (BPI) before and after surgery, which might provide insight into cortical plasticity after peripheral nerve injury and regeneration. METHODS Thirty-five patients with left pan-BPI before surgery, 30 patients after surgery, and 25 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI). The 30 postoperative patients were subdivided into 2 groups: 14 patients with improvement in muscle power and 16 patients with no improvement in muscle power after surgery. RSNs were extracted using independent component analysis to evaluate connectivity at a significance level of p < 0.05 (familywise error corrected). RESULTS The patients with BPI had lower connectivity in their sensorimotor network (SMN) and salience network (SN) and greater connectivity in their default mode network (DMN) before surgery than the controls. Connectivity of the left supplementary motor cortex in the SMN and medial frontal gyrus and in the anterior cingulate cortex in the SN increased in patients whose muscle power had improved after surgery, whereas no significant changes were noted in the unimproved patients. There was a trend toward reduction in DMN connectivity in all the patients after surgery compared with that in the preoperative patients; however, this result was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The results of this study highlight the fact that peripheral nerve injury, its management, and successful treatment cause dynamic changes within the brain's RSNs, which includes not only the obvious SMN but also the higher cognitive networks such as the SN and DMN, which indicates brain plasticity and compensatory mechanisms at work.

  8. A Systematic Review of Outcomes of Contralateral C7 for the Treatment of Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury: Part 1-Overall outcomes of contralateral C7 transfer for traumatic brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Chang, Kate W.-C.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Contralateral C7 (CC7) transfer has been used for treating traumatic brachial plexus injury. However, the effectiveness of CC7 transfer remains a subject of debate. We performed a systematic review to study the overall outcomes of CC7 transfer to different recipient nerves in traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Methods A literature search was conducted using PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify original articles related to CC7 transfer for traumatic brachial plexus injury. The data extracted were study/ patient characteristics, and objective outcomes of CC7 transfer to the recipient nerves. We normalized modifications of MRC and other outcome measures into an MRC-based outcome scale for comparisons. Results Thirty-nine studies were identified. The outcomes were categorized based on the three major recipient nerves: median, musculocutaneous, and radial/triceps nerves. Regarding overall functional recovery, 11% of patients achieved MRC grade M4 wrist flexion and 38% achieved M3. Grade M4 finger flexion was achieved by 7% of patients whereas 36% achieved M3. Finally, 56% of patients achieved ≥S3 sensory recovery in the median nerve territories. In the musculocutaneous nerve group, 38% of patients regained elbow flexor strength to M4 and 37% regained to M3. In the radial/triceps nerve group, 25% regained elbow or wrist extension strength to an MRC grade M4 and 25% regained to M3. Conclusions Outcome measures in the included studies were not consistently reported to uncover true patient-related benefits from the CC7 transfer. Reliable and validated outcome instruments should be applied to critically evaluate patients undergoing CC7 transfer. PMID:26397253

  9. Sacral plexus injury after radiotherapy for carcinoma of cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Sommerville, K.; Perez, R.; Velkley, D.E. )

    1990-10-01

    A 42-year-old woman developed lower extremity weakness and sensory loss 1 year after external and intracavitary radiotherapy for Stage IB carcinoma of cervix. She has been followed for 5 years posttreatment, and the neurologic abnormalities have persisted, but no evidence of recurrent carcinoma has been found. We believe this to be a rare case of sacral plexus radiculopathy developing as a late complication after radiotherapy. Suggestions are made for improving the radiotherapy technique to prevent this complication in future cases.

  10. Brachial plexus injury in two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    PubMed

    Shell, L; Richards, M; Saunders, G

    1993-01-01

    Two red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), found near Deltaville, Virginia (USA), were evaluated because of inability to use a wing. Results of needle electromyographic studies of the affected wing muscles in both hawks were compatible with denervation. On euthanasia, one hawk had extensive axon and myelin loss with multifocal perivascular lymphocytic inflammation of its brachial plexus and radial nerve. Demyelination and axon loss in the dorsal white matter of the spinal cord on the affected side also were found at the origin of the brachial plexus. The other hawk's wing had not returned to functional status > 2 yr after injury.

  11. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  12. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  13. Cross-chest radial nerve transfer in brachial plexus injuries. Experimental and anatomical basis.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, J A; Guizoni, M F; Dos Santos, A R; Calixto, J B; Duarte, H E

    1999-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion injuries are devastating injuries to the upper limb, and nerve transfer remains the only option in reconstruction. Despite the encouraging results concerning recovery of shoulder and elbow function, no option is available for treatment of the paralytic hand. In rats, we sectioned the radial nerve in the elbow region and transferred it across the chest to reinnervate the lesioned contralateral medial cord of the brachial plexus. Rats were then evaluated for motor and sensory recovery, electrophysiologically, behaviorally and morphologically. Forepaw functional recovery was estimated to be 90%. In cadavers, the radial nerve and profunda brachii artery were dissected. It was observed that the radial nerve vascularized by the profunda brachii artery was able to reach the contralateral brachial plexus distal to the shoulder region without nerve grafts. After sectioning the radial nerve, sensory loss is minimal and motor palsy can be easily restored by tendon transfers. The results of tendon transfer for radial nerve palsy are better than for any other nerve. Cross-chest radial nerve transfer might be of clinical interest in the reconstruction of hand function in entire injury to the brachial plexus.

  14. Expectations and limitations due to brachial plexus injury: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Carol A; Lee, Steve K; Dy, Christopher J; Landers, Zoe A; Model, Zina; Wolfe, Scott W

    2015-12-01

    This study described physical and psychosocial limitations associated with adult brachial plexus injuries (BPI) and patients' expectations of BPI surgery. During in-person interviews, preoperative patients were asked about expectations of surgery and preoperative and postoperative patients were asked about limitations due to BPI. Postoperative patients also rated improvement in condition after surgery. Data were analyzed with qualitative and quantitative techniques. Ten preoperative and 13 postoperative patients were interviewed; mean age was 37 years, 19 were men, all were employed/students, and most injuries were due to trauma. Preoperative patients cited several main expectations, including pain-related issues, and improvement in arm movement, self-care, family interactions, and global life function. Work-related expectations were tailored to employment type. Preoperative and postoperative patients reported that pain, altered sensation, difficulty managing self-care, becoming physically and financially dependent, and disability in work/school were major issues. All patients reported making major compensations, particularly using the uninjured arm. Most reported multiple mental health effects, were distressed with long recovery times, were self-conscious about appearance, and avoided public situations. Additional stresses were finding and paying for BPI surgery. Some reported BPI impacted overall physical health, life priorities, and decision-making processes. Four postoperative patients reported hardly any improvement, four reported some/a good deal, and five reported a great deal of improvement. BPI is a life-altering event affecting physical function, mental well-being, financial situation, relationships, self-image, and plans for the future. This study contributes to clinical practice by highlighting topics to address to provide comprehensive BPI patient-centered care.

  15. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus. PMID:28932698

  16. Quantitative magnetic resonance (MR) neurography for evaluation of peripheral nerves and plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Martín Noguerol, Teodoro; Barousse, Rafael; Socolovsky, Mariano; Luna, Antonio

    2017-08-01

    Traumatic conditions of peripheral nerves and plexus have been classically evaluated by morphological imaging techniques and electrophysiological tests. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies based on 3D fat-suppressed techniques are providing high accuracy for peripheral nerve injury evaluation from a qualitative point of view. However, these techniques do not provide quantitative information. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) are functional MRI techniques that are able to evaluate and quantify the movement of water molecules within different biological structures. These techniques have been successfully applied in other anatomical areas, especially in the assessment of central nervous system, and now are being imported, with promising results for peripheral nerve and plexus evaluation. DWI and DTI allow performing a qualitative and quantitative peripheral nerve analysis, providing valuable pathophysiological information about functional integrity of these structures. In the field of trauma and peripheral nerve or plexus injury, several derived parameters from DWI and DTI studies such as apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) or fractional anisotropy (FA) among others, can be used as potential biomarkers of neural damage providing information about fiber organization, axonal flow or myelin integrity. A proper knowledge of physical basis of these techniques and their limitations is important for an optimal interpretation of the imaging findings and derived data. In this paper, a comprehensive review of the potential applications of DWI and DTI neurographic studies is performed with a focus on traumatic conditions, including main nerve entrapment syndromes in both peripheral nerves and brachial or lumbar plexus.

  17. Balance Impairments after Brachial Plexus Injury as Assessed through Clinical and Posturographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lidiane; Lemos, Thiago; Silva, Débora C.; de Oliveira, José M.; Guedes Corrêa, José F.; Tavares, Paulo L.; Oliveira, Laura A.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a sensorimotor deficit of the upper limb following a brachial plexus injury (BPI) affects the upright balance. Design: Eleven patients with a unilateral BPI and 11 healthy subjects were recruited. The balance assessment included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the number of feet touches on the ground while performing a 60 s single-leg stance and posturographic assessment (eyes open and feet placed hip-width apart during a single 60 s trial). The body weight distribution (BWD) between the legs was estimated from the center of pressure (COP) lateral position. The COP variability was quantified in the anterior-posterior and lateral directions. Results: BPI patients presented lower BBS scores (p = 0.048) and a higher frequency of feet touches during the single-leg stance (p = 0.042) compared with those of the healthy subjects. An asymmetric BWD toward the side opposite the affected arm was shown by 73% of BPI patients. Finally, higher COP variability was observed in BPI patients compared with healthy subjects for anterior-posterior (p = 0.020), but not for lateral direction (p = 0.818). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that upper limb sensorimotor deficits following BPI affect body balance, serving as a warning for the clinical community about the need to prevent and treat the secondary outcomes of this condition. PMID:26834610

  18. Surgical normalization of the shoulder joint in obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Amrani, Abdelouahed; Melcher, Sonya E; Wentz, Melissa J; Paizi, Melia

    2010-10-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPI) result in bony derangements that include posterior humeral head subluxation, glenoid retroversion, and joint incongruity. Often these deformities are accompanied by scapular hypoplasia, elevation, and rotation, which further exacerbate shoulder dysfunction. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of triangle tilt surgery on glenohumeral joint anatomy in 100 OBPI patients. The triangle tilt surgery restores the distal acromioclavicular triangle from an abnormal superiorly angled position to a neutral position, thereby restoring normal glenohumeral anatomic relationships.Axial computed tomography and magnetic resonance images taken before and 12- to 38-months after surgery showed significant improvements in both posterior subluxation and glenoid version. Patients with complete posterior glenohumeral dislocation improved from 19% preoperatively, to 11% postoperatively. Glenoid shape was also improved, with 81% of patients classified as concave or flat after surgery compared with 53% before surgery.Triangle tilt surgery allows for both repositioning and remodeling of the glenohumeral joint. These anatomic improvements after triangle tilt surgery hold promise for improving shoulder function and quality of life for OBPI patients.

  19. Long-term outcomes of triangle tilt surgery for obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Liu, Xiaomei; Melcher, Sonya E; Fan, Jilao

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term shoulder functional outcomes from a triangle tilt procedure on obstetric patients, who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapular deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury. We retrospectively studied long-term outcomes both functionally and anatomically in 61 patients (age ranging from 2 to 12 years). Functional movements were evaluated and scored using a modified Mallet scale at different time intervals: preoperatively, 1 year and 2 year following triangle tilt surgery. Shoulder anatomy was examined on radiologic images to evaluate the severity of shoulder deformities preoperatively and anatomical improvement after the surgery. All shoulder functional movements were significantly improved at 1 and 2 year follow-ups. Functional improvements were maintained in shoulder abduction, external rotation and hand-to-mouth movements beyond the first year, and continued in hand-to-neck and hand-to-spine movements past 2 years. Remarkable glenohumeral remodeling or reservation of glenoid congruence was observed in all patients over a mean time of 27 months postoperatively. The triangle tilt procedure, which addresses scapular and glenohumeral joint abnormalities characteristic of Erb's palsy, improves shoulder functional movements and anatomical structure in patients over the long-term.

  20. Triangle tilt surgery as salvage procedure for failed shoulder surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Meera B.; Karicherla, Priyanka

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The study was conducted to review the effects of triangle tilt surgery in children with OBPI (obstetric brachial plexus injury) who had previously undergone several operative procedures at other hospitals before presenting at our institute. Methods The study included a group of 48 OBPI patients who had undergone previous operative procedures at outside hospitals by other surgeons. Patients were assessed for shoulder function using their radiological reports and the modified Mallet functional scale. The same patients underwent the triangle tilt procedure at our institution and were re-evaluated for shoulder function. Results The results of the study showed an increase in Mallet scores from 11.88 points to 15.17 points (p < 0.01), improvement in PHHA (percentage of humeral head anterior to the glenoid) from 14% to 25% (p < 0.05), enhancement in glenoid version from −32° to −25° (p < 0.01), and a decrease in the SHEAR (scapular hypoplasia, elevation, and rotation) deformity after surgery. Conclusion The data obtained demonstrated that the triangle tilt procedure significantly enhanced shoulder function and glenohumeral congruity in these patients as evidenced by the improvements in Mallet scores, PHHA, glenoid version, and SHEAR deformity. PMID:20668864

  1. Newborn brachial plexus injuries: The twisting and extension of the fetal head as contributing causes.

    PubMed

    Sandmire, H; Morrison, J; Racinet, C; Hankins, G; Pecorari, D; Gherman, R

    2008-02-01

    The exact mechanism of the causation of brachial plexus injury (BPI) has long been a matter of controversy. It is our opinion that the twisting and the extension of the fetal head, during the labour and delivery process, will increase the stretching of the neck, thus contributing to the labour forces as the cause of BPI. Our opinions are offered to other researchers and readers for their consideration of how the labour forces can cause BPI.

  2. Brachial plexus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give ... movement in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If ...

  3. Satisfactory elbow flexion in complete (preganglionic) brachial plexus injuries: produced by suture of third and fourth intercostal nerves to musculocutaneous nerve.

    PubMed

    Minami, M; Ishii, S

    1987-11-01

    The third and fourth intercostal nerves were sutured to the musculocutaneous nerve to restore flexion of the elbow joint in complete (preganglionic) brachial plexus injuries. Seventeen patients were followed on the average for 5 years and 7 months after surgery. The results were evaluated by means of manual muscle tests and electrical diagnostic tests. Good (grade IV), or better, flexion of the elbow joint occurred in 12 patients over 3 years after the operation.

  4. Percutaneous T2 and T3 Radiofrequency Sympathectomy for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Secondary to Brachial Plexus Injury: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Phui, Vui Eng; Nizar, Abd Jalil; Yeo, Sow Nam

    2013-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury is often severe, debilitating and difficult to manage. Percuteneous radiofrequency sympathectomy is a relatively new technique, which has shown promising results in various chronic pain disorders. We present four consecutive patients with complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury for more than 6 months duration, who had undergone percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy after a diagnostic block. All four patients experienced minimal pain relief with conservative treatment and stellate ganglion blockade. An acceptable 6 month pain relief was achieved in all 4 patients where pain score remained less than 50% than that of initial score and all oral analgesics were able to be tapered down. There were no complications attributed to this procedure were reported. From this case series, percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy might play a significant role in multi-modal approach of CRPS management. PMID:24156009

  5. Modified Quad surgery significantly improves the median nerve conduction and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nerve conduction studies or somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) have become an important tool in the investigation of peripheral nerve lesions, and is sensitive in detecting brachial plexus nerve injury, and other nerve injuries. To investigate whether the modified Quad surgical procedure improves nerve conductivity and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury (OBPI) patients. Methods All nerves were tested with direct functional electrical stimulation. A Prass probe was used to stimulate the nerves, and recording the response, the compound motor action potential (CMAP) in the muscle. SSEP monitoring was performed pre- and post modified Quad surgery, stimulating the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist, the radial nerve over the dorsum of the hand, recording the peripheral, cervical and cortical responses. All patients have had the modified Quad surgery (n = 19). The modified Quad surgery is a muscle release and transfer surgery with nerve decompressions. All patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by evaluating video recordings of standardized movements, the modified Mallet scale to index active shoulder movements. Results The cervical responses were significantly lower in amplitude in the affected arm than the un-affected arm. The median nerve conduction was significantly improved from 8.04 to 9.26 (P < 0.022) post-operatively. The shoulder abduction was also significantly improved (pre-op 30° ± 23.3 to 143° ± 33.7, p < 0.0001), with a mean follow-up of 43 months after the modified Quad surgery in these patients. Conclusion Median nerve conduction, and shoulder abduction were significantly improved in OBPI children, who have undergone the modified Quad procedure with neuroplasty, internal microneurolysis and tetanic stimulation of the median nerve. PMID:23714699

  6. Modified Quad surgery significantly improves the median nerve conduction and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Kumar, Nirupuma; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Nerve conduction studies or somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) have become an important tool in the investigation of peripheral nerve lesions, and is sensitive in detecting brachial plexus nerve injury, and other nerve injuries. To investigate whether the modified Quad surgical procedure improves nerve conductivity and functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus nerve injury (OBPI) patients. All nerves were tested with direct functional electrical stimulation. A Prass probe was used to stimulate the nerves, and recording the response, the compound motor action potential (CMAP) in the muscle. SSEP monitoring was performed pre- and post modified Quad surgery, stimulating the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist, the radial nerve over the dorsum of the hand, recording the peripheral, cervical and cortical responses. All patients have had the modified Quad surgery (n = 19). The modified Quad surgery is a muscle release and transfer surgery with nerve decompressions. All patients were assessed preoperatively and postoperatively by evaluating video recordings of standardized movements, the modified Mallet scale to index active shoulder movements. The cervical responses were significantly lower in amplitude in the affected arm than the un-affected arm. The median nerve conduction was significantly improved from 8.04 to 9.26 (P < 0.022) post-operatively. The shoulder abduction was also significantly improved (pre-op 30° ± 23.3 to 143° ± 33.7, p < 0.0001), with a mean follow-up of 43 months after the modified Quad surgery in these patients. Median nerve conduction, and shoulder abduction were significantly improved in OBPI children, who have undergone the modified Quad procedure with neuroplasty, internal microneurolysis and tetanic stimulation of the median nerve.

  7. Comparative study of phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuzhou; Lao, Jie; Zhao, Xin

    2015-04-01

    Global brachial plexus injuries (BPIs) are devastating events frequently resulting in severe functional impairment. The widely used nerve transfer sources for elbow flexion in patients with global BPIs include intercostal and phrenic nerves. The aim of this study was to compare phrenic and intercostal nerve transfers for elbow flexion after global BPI. A retrospective review of 33 patients treated with phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer for elbow flexion in posttraumatic global root avulsion BPI was carried out. In the phrenic nerve transfer group, the phrenic nerve was transferred to the anterolateral bundle of the anterior division of the upper trunk (23 patients); in the intercostal nerve transfer group, three intercostal nerves were coapted to the anterolateral bundles of the musculocutaneous nerve. The British Medical Research Council (MRC) grading system, angle of elbow flexion, and electromyography (EMG) were used to evaluate the recovery of elbow flexion at least 3 years postoperatively. The efficiency of motor function in the phrenic nerve transfer group was 83%, while it was 70% in the intercostal nerve transfer group. The two groups were not statistically different in terms of the MRC grade (p=0.646) and EMG results (p=0.646). The outstanding rates of angle of elbow flexion were 48% and 40% in the phrenic and intercostal nerve transfer groups, respectively. There was no significant difference of outstanding rates in the angle of elbow flexion between the two groups. Phrenic nerve transfer had a higher proportion of good prognosis for elbow flexion than intercostal nerve transfer, but the effective and outstanding rate had no significant difference for biceps reinnervation between the two groups according to MRC grading, angle of elbow flexion, and EMG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Successful outcome of triangle tilt as revision surgery in a pediatric obstetric brachial plexus patient with multiple previous operations.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Halthore, Vishnu; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) occurs during the process of labor and childbirth. OBPI has been reported to be associated with shoulder dystocia, macrosomia, and breech delivery. Its occurrence in uncomplicated delivery is possible as well. Case Presentation. The patient in the present report is a 6.5-year-old girl, who suffered a severe brachial plexus injury at birth and had many reconstructive surgical procedures at an outside brachial plexus center before presenting to us. Discussion. The traditional surgical treatments by other surgical groups were unsuccessful and therefore the patient came to our clinic for further treatment. She had triangle tilt surgery with us, as a salvage procedure. Conclusion. The OBPI patient in this study clearly showed noticeable clinical and functional improvements after triangle tilt surgical management. The posture of the arm at rest was greatly improved to a more normal position, and hand to mouth movement was improved as well. Triangle tilt surgery should be conducted as a first choice treatment for medial rotation contracture of the shoulder in OBPI patients.

  9. Successful Outcome of Triangle Tilt as Revision Surgery in a Pediatric Obstetric Brachial Plexus Patient with Multiple Previous Operations

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) occurs during the process of labor and childbirth. OBPI has been reported to be associated with shoulder dystocia, macrosomia, and breech delivery. Its occurrence in uncomplicated delivery is possible as well. Case Presentation. The patient in the present report is a 6.5-year-old girl, who suffered a severe brachial plexus injury at birth and had many reconstructive surgical procedures at an outside brachial plexus center before presenting to us. Discussion. The traditional surgical treatments by other surgical groups were unsuccessful and therefore the patient came to our clinic for further treatment. She had triangle tilt surgery with us, as a salvage procedure. Conclusion. The OBPI patient in this study clearly showed noticeable clinical and functional improvements after triangle tilt surgical management. The posture of the arm at rest was greatly improved to a more normal position, and hand to mouth movement was improved as well. Triangle tilt surgery should be conducted as a first choice treatment for medial rotation contracture of the shoulder in OBPI patients. PMID:25506033

  10. Factors related to the psychosocial functioning of youth with neonatal brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Mentrikoski, Janelle M; Duncan, Christina L; Melanson, Andrea; Louden, Emily; Allgier, Allison; Michaud, Linda; Rinaldi, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Owing to the possible visible nature and functional impairments associated with neonatal brachial plexus injuries (NBPI), the current study investigated the relations of injury severity, social support, and coping strategies to social difficulties and self-concept in youth with NBPI. 88 children (aged 10-17 years) with NBPI and their parent(s) were recruited from a national organization and two brachial plexus clinics. Participants completed a variety of questionnaires during their scheduled clinic visits. More social support from classmates was associated with better self-concept and fewer social difficulties. Less frequent use of negative coping strategies was associated with better self-concept and fewer social difficulties and was a significant moderator of the relation between injury severity and self-concept. Clinicians who work with children with NBPI should consider peer support and coping strategies when promoting the psychosocial functioning of these youth. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Restoration of elbow flexion in brachial plexus avulsion injury: comparing spinal accessory nerve transfer with intercostal nerve transfer.

    PubMed

    Waikakul, S; Wongtragul, S; Vanadurongwan, V

    1999-05-01

    This study was performed to compare the clinical outcome of 2 types of commonly used nerve transfers, the spinal accessory nerve transfer and the intercostal nerve transfer. This study was a prospective randomized parallel trial involving 205 patients presenting between 1989 and 1994. All patients were males ranging in age from 16 to 43 years. All patients underwent surgery within 6 months of injury. Spinal accessory nerve transfer was performed in 130 patients; better results were obtained in terms of less operative time, fewer blood transfusions, fewer immediate complications, and better motor function (very good and good power in 83% of patients). Intercostal nerve transfer was performed in 75 patients; better results were observed in terms of earlier electromyographic evidence of motor reinnervation, improvement in protective sensation, and reduction of pain. However, very good and good motor recovery was observed in only 64% of patients. There was no significant difference with regard to tidal volume, vital capacity, and the FEV1 to FEV ratio before and after surgery in either group. Smoking adversely affected the rate of recovery. Spinal accessory nerve transfer should be used when motor function of the elbow flexors is the major concern. Intercostal nerve transfer should be performed in patients who need both motor and sensory reconstruction and in those who have chronic pain syndrome after brachial plexus injury.

  12. Navigating the gray zone: a guideline for surgical decision making in obstetrical brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Bain, James R; Dematteo, Carol; Gjertsen, Deborah; Hollenberg, Robert D

    2009-03-01

    In the literature, the best recommendations are imprecise as to the timing and selection of infants with obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) for surgical intervention. There is a gray zone (GZ) in which the decision as to the benefits and risks of surgery versus no surgery is not clear. The authors propose to describe this category, and they have developed a guideline to assist surgical decision-making within this GZ. The authors first performed a critical review of the medical literature to determine the existence of a GZ in other clinical publications. In those reports, 47-89% of infants with OBPI fell within such a GZ. Complete recovery in those reported patients ranged from 9 to 59%. Using a prospective inception cohort design, all infants referred to the OBPI Clinic at McMaster Children's Hospital were systematically evaluated up to 3 years of age. The Active Movement Scale scores were compared for surgical and nonsurgical groups of infants in the GZ to identify any important trends that would guide surgical decision-making. In the authors' population of infants with OBPI, 81% fell within the GZ, of whom 44% achieved complete recovery. Mean scores differed significantly between surgery and no surgery groups in terms of total Active Movement Scale score and shoulder abduction and flexion at 6 months. Elbow flexion and external rotation differed at 3 months. There is compelling evidence that there is a group of infants with OBPI in whom the assessment of the risk/benefit ratio for surgical versus nonsurgical treatment is not evident. These infants reside within what the authors have called the GZ. Based on their results, a guideline was derived to assist clinicians working with infants with OBPI to navigate the GZ.

  13. Shoulder function following primary axillary nerve reconstruction in obstetrical brachial plexus patients.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Kokkalis, Zinon T

    2008-11-01

    In obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, suprascapular nerve reinnervation is a priority. For the most favorable outcomes in shoulder function, it is the authors' policy to also reconstruct the axillary nerve with intraplexus donors to the posterior cord (early cases) or directly with intraplexus or extraplexus motor donors (late cases). Between 1979 and 2003, 80 consecutive patients (82 brachial plexuses) underwent plexus exploration and nerve reconstruction for obstetrical palsy. Axillary nerve reconstruction was performed in 60 plexuses, and evaluation of the results was carried out for 55 patients (56 plexuses) with adequate follow-up (mean follow-up, 6.5 years). Overall, there were good and excellent results (>/=M3+) in 49 of 56 plexuses (87.5 percent) for the deltoid muscle, and the average postoperative muscle grade for the deltoid was 3.89 +/- 0.79. The average shoulder abduction increased from 35 +/- 31 degrees preoperatively to 109 +/- 35 degrees postoperatively (average gain, 74 degrees), and the average external rotation increased from -13 +/- 28 degrees preoperatively to 47 +/- 18 degrees postoperatively (average gain, 60 degrees). The timing of surgery and the type of paralysis significantly influenced the final outcome. Reconstruction of the axillary nerve should always be performed to maximize the final outcome of shoulder function in obstetrical brachial plexus patients. The best results were seen in early cases (

  14. Obstetrical brachial plexus injury: burden in a publicly funded, universal healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Coroneos, Christopher J; Voineskos, Sophocles H; Coroneos, Marie K; Alolabi, Noor; Goekjian, Serge R; Willoughby, Lauren I; Farrokhyar, Forough; Thoma, Achilleas; Bain, James R; Brouwers, Melissa C

    2015-10-23

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to determine the volume and timing of referrals for obstetrical brachial plexus injury (OBPI) to multidisciplinary centers in a national demographic sample. Secondarily, we aimed to measure the incidence and risk factors for OBPI in the sample. The burden of OBPI has not been investigated in a publicly funded system, and the timing and volume of referrals to multidisciplinary centers are unknown. The incidence and risk factors for OBPI have not been established in Canada. METHODS This is a retrospective cohort study. The authors used a demographic sample of all infants born in Canada, capturing all children born in a publicly funded, universal healthcare system. OBPI diagnoses and corresponding risk factors from 2004 to 2012 were identified and correlated with referrals to Canada's 10 multidisciplinary OBPI centers. Quality indicators were approved by the Canadian OBPI Working Group's guideline consensus group. The primary outcome was the timing of initial assessment at a multidisciplinary center, "good" if assessed by the time the patient was 1 month of age, "satisfactory" if by 3 months of age, and "poor" if thereafter. Joinpoint regression analysis was used to determine the OBPI incidence over the study period. Odds ratios were calculated to determine the strength of association for risk factors. RESULTS OBPI incidence was 1.24 per 1000 live births, and was consistent from 2004 to 2012. Potential biases underestimate the level of injury identification. The factors associated with a very strong risk for OBPI were humerus fracture, shoulder dystocia, and clavicle fracture. The majority (55%-60%) of OBPI patients identified at birth were not referred. Among those who were referred, the timing of assessment was "good" in 28%, "satisfactory" in 66%, and "poor" in 34%. CONCLUSIONS Shoulder dystocia was the strongest modifiable risk factor for OBPI. Most children with OBPI were not referred to multidisciplinary care. Of those who were

  15. Studies on conversion of motor function in intercostal nerves crossing for complete brachial plexus injuries of root avulsion type.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M

    1983-11-01

    The progress of the functional conversion in cases where the 3rd and 4th intercostal nerves were crossed to the musculocutaneous nerve to regain elbow flexion after a total avulsion type of brachial plexus injury was followed up by means of the electromyogram, goniogram and spirogram in 25 patients. The joint position sense was further studied. It was found that in the early stage of reinnervation, spontaneous activity which synchronized with respiration was found in the biceps brachii muscles, but this involuntary element disappeared gradually and followed this the volitional control and endurance improved and became quite satisfactory within several years. It was observed that skin sensation played an important role in judging joint position.

  16. Clinical Assessment of the Infant and Child Following Perinatal Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Duff, Susan V.; DeMatteo, Carol

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Literature review INTRODUCTION After perinatal brachial plexus injury (PBPI), clinicians play an important role in injury classification as well as the assessment of recovery and secondary conditions. Early assessment guides the initial plan of care and influences follow-up and long-term outcome. PURPOSE To review methods used to assess, classify and monitor the extent and influence of PBPI with an emphasis on guidelines for clinicians. METHODS We use The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) model to provide a guide to assessment after PBPI for rehabilitation clinicians. DISCUSSION With information gained from targeted assessments, clinicians can design interventions to increase the opportunities infants and children have for optimal recovery and to attain skills that allow participation in areas of interest. PMID:25840493

  17. The influence of seatbelts on the types of operated brachial plexus lesions caused by car accidents.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Radek; Haninec, Pavel

    2012-08-01

    To determine whether there is a relationship between seatbelt use and type of brachial plexus injury seen in automobile accidents. Knowledge of such a relationship may help guide the surgical management of these patients. We retrospectively evaluated 43 surgical patients with brachial plexus palsy caused by car accidents. We recorded sex, age, and type of injury for each case. We also obtained data regarding the patients' position in the car at the time of the accident and whether they were wearing a seatbelt. We obtained data on 39 men and 4 women. Of the seatbelted patients, 24 (100%) had upper plexus palsy on the side where the seatbelt crossed the shoulder. Of those who were not wearing seatbelts, 17 (86%) had complete plexus injuries. We also found 1 upper and 1 lower plexus injury in the unbelted group. We found a relationship between the type of brachial plexus injury sustained by the accident victim and the use and position of the seatbelt. Complete plexus injuries were more common in those who were not wearing seatbelts. We saw upper plexus injuries for those wearing seatbelts. Information about seatbelt use may be useful in clinical practice. When treating an unbelted car accident victim with a brachial plexus injury, it is reasonable to anticipate a more serious form of the injury. Prognostic IV. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Coracoid abnormalities and their relationship with glenohumeral deformities in children with obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Mahmooduddin, Faiz; Liu, Xiaomei; Wentz, Melissa J; Humphries, Andrea D

    2010-10-13

    Patients with incomplete recovery from obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) usually develop secondary muscle imbalances and bone deformities at the shoulder joint. Considerable efforts have been made to characterize and correct the glenohumeral deformities, and relatively less emphasis has been placed on the more subtle ones, such as those of the coracoid process. The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the relationship between coracoid abnormalities and glenohumeral deformities in OBPI patients. We hypothesize that coracoscapular angles and distances, as well as coracohumeral distances, diminish with increasing glenohumeral deformity, whereas coracoid overlap will increase. 39 patients (age range: 2-13 years, average: 4.7 years), with deformities secondary to OBPI were included in this study. Parameters for quantifying coracoid abnormalities (coracoscapular angle, coracoid overlap, coracohumeral distance, and coracoscapular distance) and shoulder deformities (posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion) were measured on CT images from these patients before any surgical intervention. Paired Student t-tests and Pearson correlations were used to analyze different parameters. Significant differences between affected and contralateral shoulders were found for all coracoid and shoulder deformity parameters. Percent of humeral head anterior to scapular line (PHHA), glenoid version, coracoscapular angles, and coracoscapular and coracohumeral distances were significantly lower for affected shoulders compared to contralateral ones. Coracoid overlap was significantly higher for affected sides compared to contralateral sides. Significant and positive correlations were found between coracoscapular distances and glenohumeral parameters (PHHA and version), as well as between coracoscapular angles and glenohumeral parameters, for affected shoulders. Moderate and positive correlations existed between coracoid overlap and glenohumeral parameters for affected

  19. Coracoid Abnormalities and Their Relationship with Glenohumeral Deformities in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with incomplete recovery from obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) usually develop secondary muscle imbalances and bone deformities at the shoulder joint. Considerable efforts have been made to characterize and correct the glenohumeral deformities, and relatively less emphasis has been placed on the more subtle ones, such as those of the coracoid process. The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the relationship between coracoid abnormalities and glenohumeral deformities in OBPI patients. We hypothesize that coracoscapular angles and distances, as well as coracohumeral distances, diminish with increasing glenohumeral deformity, whereas coracoid overlap will increase. Methods 39 patients (age range: 2-13 years, average: 4.7 years), with deformities secondary to OBPI were included in this study. Parameters for quantifying coracoid abnormalities (coracoscapular angle, coracoid overlap, coracohumeral distance, and coracoscapular distance) and shoulder deformities (posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion) were measured on CT images from these patients before any surgical intervention. Paired Student t-tests and Pearson correlations were used to analyze different parameters. Results Significant differences between affected and contralateral shoulders were found for all coracoid and shoulder deformity parameters. Percent of humeral head anterior to scapular line (PHHA), glenoid version, coracoscapular angles, and coracoscapular and coracohumeral distances were significantly lower for affected shoulders compared to contralateral ones. Coracoid overlap was significantly higher for affected sides compared to contralateral sides. Significant and positive correlations were found between coracoscapular distances and glenohumeral parameters (PHHA and version), as well as between coracoscapular angles and glenohumeral parameters, for affected shoulders. Moderate and positive correlations existed between coracoid overlap and

  20. Intercostal nerve crossing to restore elbow flexion and sensibility of the hand for a root avulsion type of brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Ogino, T; Naito, T

    1995-01-01

    Ten patients with a root avulsion type of brachial plexus injury were treated with simultaneous intercostal nerve crossing to the musculocutaneous and median nerves, and nine cases were followed for more than 40 months. The average interval from injury to surgery was 2.7 months. The average age at operation was 18.6 years. The elbow flexor was M4 in six patients, M3 in two patients, and M1 in one patient. The wrist flexor was more than M3 in six patients and less than M2 in four patients. The finger flexor was more than M3 in four patients and less than M2 in five patients. Protective sensation in the areas innervated by the musculocutaneous and median nerves was restored in all cases.

  1. Free Functioning Gracilis Muscle Transfer versus Intercostal Nerve Transfer to Musculocutaneous Nerve for Restoration of Elbow Flexion after Traumatic Adult Brachial Pan-Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Andrés A; Kircher, Michelle F; Spinner, Robert J; Bishop, Allen T; Shin, Alexander Y

    2016-09-01

    After complete five-level root brachial plexus injury, free functional muscle transfer and intercostal nerve transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve are two potential reconstructive options for elbow flexion. The aim of this study was to determine the outcomes of free functional muscle transfer versus intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfers with respect to strength. Sixty-two patients who underwent free functional muscle transfer reconstruction or intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion following a pan-plexus injury were included. The two groups were compared with respect to postoperative elbow flexion strength according to the British Medical Research Council grading system; preoperative and postoperative Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores. In the free functional muscle transfer group, 67.7 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. In the intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer group, 41.9 percent of patients achieved M3 or M4 elbow flexion. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Changes in Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire scores were not statistically significant. Average time from injury to surgery was significantly different (p < 0.01) in both groups. The number of intercostal nerves used for the musculocutaneous nerve transfer did not correlate with better elbow flexion grade. Based on this study, gracilis free functional muscle transfer reconstruction achieves better elbow flexion strength than intercostal nerve-to-musculocutaneous nerve transfer for elbow flexion after pan-plexus injury. The role of gracilis free functional muscle transfer should be carefully considered in acute reconstruction. Therapeutic, III.

  2. Risk factors for brachial plexus injury in a large cohort with shoulder dystocia.

    PubMed

    Volpe, Katherine A; Snowden, Jonathan M; Cheng, Yvonne W; Caughey, Aaron B

    2016-11-01

    To examine birthweight and other predictors of brachial plexus injury (BPI) among births complicated by shoulder dystocia. A retrospective cohort study of term births complicated by shoulder dystocia in California between 1997 and 2006. Birthweight at time of delivery was stratified into 500-g intervals. Women were further stratified by diabetes status, parity, and race/ethnicity. The perinatal outcome of BPI was assessed. This study included 62,762 deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia, of which 3168 (5 %) resulted in BPI. The association between birthweight and BPI remained significant regardless of confounders. Each increasing birthweight interval was associated with an increasing risk of BPI compared with 3000-3499-g birthweight. Race/ethnicity, diabetes, and parity were also independently associated with BPI. Increasing birthweight increases the risk of BPI among births with shoulder dystocia, independent of advanced maternal age, race, parity, gestational diabetes, or operative vaginal delivery.

  3. Contribution of denervated muscle to contractures after neonatal brachial plexus injury: not just muscle fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Sia; Liangjun, Hu; Tuttle, Lori J; Weekley, Holly; Christopher, Wylie; Lieber, Richard L; Cornwall, Roger

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the contribution of muscle fibrosis to elbow flexion contractures in a murine model of neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI). Four weeks after NBPI, biceps and brachialis fibrosis were assessed histologically and compared with the timing of contracture development and the relative contribution of each muscle to contractures. Modulus of elasticity and hydroxyproline (collagen) content were measured and correlated with contracture severity. The effect of halofuginone antifibrotic therapy on fibrosis and contractures was investigated. Elbow contractures preceded muscle fibrosis development. The brachialis was less fibrotic than the biceps, yet contributed more to contractures. Modulus and hydroxyproline content increased in both elbow flexors, but neither correlated with contracture severity. Halofuginone reduced biceps fibrosis but did not reduce contracture severity. Contractures after NBPI cannot be explained solely by muscle fibrosis, arguing for investigation of alternate pathophysiologic targets for contracture prevention and treatment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Repair and rehabilitation of plexus and root avulsions in animal models and patients.

    PubMed

    Havton, Leif A; Carlstedt, Thomas

    2009-12-01

    This review will discuss recent progress in experimental and translational research related to surgical repair of proximal nerve root injuries, and emerging potential therapies, which may be combined with replantation surgeries to augment functional outcomes after brachial plexus and cauda equina injuries. Progress in experimental studies of root and peripheral nerve injuries has identified potential candidates for adjunctive therapies, which may be combined with surgical replantation of avulsed roots after brachial plexus and cauda equina injuries. We will discuss recent advances related to adjunctive neuroprotective strategies, neurotrophic factor delivery, and emerging cellular treatment strategies after extensive nerve root trauma. We will also provide an update on electrical stimulation to promote regenerative axonal growth and new insights on the recovery of sensory functions after root injury and repair. In the light of recent advances in experimental studies, we envision that future repair of brachial plexus and cauda equina injuries will include spinal cord surgery to restore motor and sensory trajectories and a variety of adjunctive therapies to augment the recovery of neurological function.

  5. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Lars B.; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5–C7 and a non-rupture of C8–T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation—free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve—was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function. PMID:28316590

  6. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Lars B; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5-C7 and a non-rupture of C8-T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation-free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve-was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function.

  7. Long thoracic nerve neurotization for restoration of shoulder function in C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injuries: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Hoshino, Shushi; Sakamoto, Soutetsu; Arakawa, Yuichiro

    2010-09-01

    C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injuries are usually associated with complete paralysis of the long thoracic nerve. This makes it difficult to provide satisfactory shoulder function by neurotizing only the suprascapular nerve, compared with C5 and C6 preganglionic injuries, in which the long thoracic nerve is spared. We present a case report of a 21-year-old man who sustained a C5-7 brachial plexus preganglionic injury and obtained excellent shoulder function by intercostal nerve transfer to the long thoracic nerve in addition to neurotization of the suprascapular nerve. Our report emphasizes the importance of restoring the activity of the long thoracic nerve. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bilateral Brachial Plexus Home Going Catheters After Digital Amputation for Patient With Upper Extremity Digital Gangrene

    PubMed Central

    Abd-Elsayed, Alaa A; Seif, John; Guirguis, Maged; Zaky, Sherif; Mounir-Soliman, Loran

    2011-01-01

    Peripheral nerve catheter placement is used to control surgical pain. Performing bilateral brachial plexus block with catheters is not frequently performed; and in our case sending patient home with bilateral brachial plexus catheters has not been reported up to our knowledge. Our patient is a 57 years old male patient presented with bilateral upper extremity digital gangrene on digits 2 through 4 on both sides with no thumb involvement. The plan was to do the surgery under sequential axillary blocks. On the day of surgery a right axillary brachial plexus block was performed under ultrasound guidance using 20 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine. Patient was taken to the OR and the right fingers amputation was carried out under mild sedation without problems. Left axillary brachial plexus block was then done as the surgeon was closing the right side, two hours after the first block was performed. The left axillary block was done also under ultrasound using 20 ml of 2% mepivacaine. The brachial plexus blocks were performed in a sequential manner. Surgery was unremarkable, and patient was transferred to post anesthetic care unit in stable condition. Over that first postoperative night, the patient complained of severe pain at the surgical sites with minimal pain relief with parentral opioids. We placed bilateral brachial plexus catheters (right axillary and left infra-clavicular brachial plexus catheters). Ropivacaine 0.2% infusion was started at 7 ml per hour basal rate only with no boluses on each side. The patient was discharged home with the catheters in place after receiving the appropriate education. On discharge both catheters were connected to a single ON-Q (I-flow Corporation, Lake Forest, CA) ball pump with a 750 ml reservoir using a Y connection and were set to deliver a fixed rate of 7 ml for each catheter. The brachial plexus catheters were removed by the patient on day 5 after surgery without any difficulty. Patient's postoperative course was otherwise unremarkable

  9. Transfer of a fascicle from the posterior cord to the suprascapular nerve after injury of the upper roots of the brachial plexus: technical case report.

    PubMed

    Martins, Roberto Sergio; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Heise, Carlos Otto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2009-10-01

    A new nerve transfer technique using a healthy fascicle of the posterior cord for suprascapular nerve reconstruction is presented. This technique was used in a patient with posttraumatic brachial plexopathy resulting in upper trunk injury with proximal root stumps that were unavailable for grafting associated with multiple nerve dysfunction. A 45-year-old man sustained a right brachial plexus injury after a bicycle accident. Clinical evaluation and electromyography indicated upper trunk involvement. Trapezius muscle function and triceps strength were normal on physical examination. The patient underwent a combined supra- and infraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus. A neuroma-in-continuity of the upper trunk and fibrotic C5 and C6 roots were identified. Electrical stimulation of the phrenic and spinal accessory nerves produced no response. The suprascapular nerve was dissected from the upper trunk, transected, and rerouted to the infraclavicular fossa. A healthy fascicle of the posterior cord to the triceps muscle was transferred to the suprascapular nerve. At the time of the 1-year follow-up evaluation, arm abduction against gravity and external rotation reached 40 and 34 degrees, respectively. The posterior cord can be used as a source of donor fascicle to the suprascapular nerve after its infraclavicular relocation. This new intraplexal nerve transfer could be applied in patients with isolated injury of the upper trunk and concomitant lesion of the extraplexal nerve donors usually used for reinnervation of the suprascapular nerve.

  10. Flow-through anastomosis using a T-shaped vascular pedicle for gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation in brachial plexus injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yi; Yang, Jiantao; Yang, Yi; Qin, Bengang; Fu, Guo; Li, Xiangming; Gu, Liqiang; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Qingtang; Qi, Jian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation, the limited caliber of the dominant vascular pedicle increases the complexity of the anastomosis and the risk of vascular compromise. The purpose of this study was to characterize the results of using a T-shaped vascular pedicle for flow-through anastomosis in gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation for brachial plexus injury. METHODS: The outcomes of patients with brachial plexus injury who received gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation with either conventional end-to-end anastomosis or flow-through anastomosis from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively compared. In the flow-through group, the pedicle comprised a segment of the profunda femoris and the nutrient artery of the gracilis. The recipient artery was interposed by the T-shaped pedicle. RESULTS: A total of 46 patients received flow-through anastomosis, and 25 patients received conventional end-to-end anastomosis. The surgical time was similar between the groups. The diameter of the arterial anastomosis in the flow-through group was significantly larger than that in the end-to-end group (3.87 mm vs. 2.06 mm, respectively, p<0.001), and there were significantly fewer cases of vascular compromise in the flow-through group (2 [4.35%] vs. 6 [24%], respectively, p=0.019). All flaps in the flow-through group survived, whereas 2 in the end-to-end group failed. Minimal donor-site morbidity was noted in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Flow-through anastomosis in gracilis functioning free muscle transplantation for brachial plexus injury can decrease the complexity of anastomosis, reduce the risk of flap loss, and allow for more variation in muscle placement. PMID:26247666

  11. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  12. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed. PMID:25593443

  13. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed.

  14. [Complications in brachial plexus surgery].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Fernando; Pinazzo, Samantha; Moragues, Rodrigo; Suarez, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Although traumatic brachial plexus injuries are relatively rare in trauma patients, their effects on the functionality of the upper limb can be very disabling. The authors' objective was to assess the complications in a series of patients operated for brachial plexus injuries. This was a retrospective evaluation of patients operated on by the authors between August 2009 and March 2013. We performed 36 surgeries on 33 patients. The incidence of complications was 27.7%. Of these, only 1 (2.7%) was considered serious and associated with the procedure (iatrogenic injury of brachial artery). There was another serious complication (hypoxia in patients with airway injury) but it was not directly related to the surgical procedure. All other complications were considered minor (wound dehiscence, hematoma, infection). There was no mortality in our series. The complications in our series are similar to those reported in the literature. Serious complications (vascular, neural) are rare and represent less than 5% in all the different series. Given the rate of surgical complications and the poor functional perspective for a brachial plexus injury without surgery, we believe that surgery should be the treatment of choice. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve in patients with brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Alijani, Babak; Andalib, Sasan

    2016-09-01

    For the reconstruction of brachial plexus lesions, restoration of elbow flexion and shoulder function is fundamental and is achieved by dual nerve transfers. Shoulder stabilization and movement are crucial in freedom of motion of the upper extremity. In patients with C5-C6 brachial plexus injury, spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a fascicle of ulnar nerve to musculocutaneous nerve (dual nerve transfer) are carried out for restoration of shoulder abduction and elbow flexion, respectively. In the present study, we evaluated the long-term clinical outcomes of spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for restoration of shoulder abduction in patients with brachial plexus palsy undergoing a dual nerve transfer. In the present retrospective review, 22 consecutive subjects with upper brachial plexus palsy were assessed. All of the subjects underwent spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve and a dual nerve transfer from the ulnar nerve to the biceps branch and from the median nerve to the brachialis branch of the musculocutaneous nerve simultaneously. All of the subjects were followed up for 18 to 24 months (average, 21.7 months) for assessing the recovery of the shoulder abduction and motor function. Spinal accessory nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve showed a motor function recovery of M3 and M4 in 13.6 and 63.6% of the subjects, respectively. However, 22.7 % of the subjects remained with a motor function of M2. The mean of shoulder abduction reached 55.55 ± 9.95° (range, 40-72°). Altogether, good functional results regained in 17 out of 22 the subjects (77.2 %). Linear regression analysis showed that advanced age was a predictor of low motor functional grade. The evidence from the present study suggests that transferring spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve for restoring shoulder abduction is an effective and reliable treatment with high success rate in patients with brachial

  16. Development of a novel experimental rat model for neonatal pre-ganglionic upper brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Hidenobu; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Mishima, Kenichi; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Aoo, Naoya; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Michihiro; Ikenoue, Tsuyomu; Nakano, Shinichi; Wakisaka, Shinichiro

    2002-09-15

    A neonatal upper brachial plexus injury, referred to as Erb's palsy, is a serious obstetric problem. Some surgical methods are used to treat this injury, but they are inadequate. To seek new treatments for Erb's palsy, we used a model for cervical preganglionic root transection in neonate rats and evaluated the behavioral and histological compatibility of this model with Erb's palsy. Two groups were used in this study. In the group, receiving the Erb operation, the left anterior and posterior roots of spinal vertebra C5-C7 were transected at the preganglionic level, and the results were compared with those of a group that received a sham operation. In the group, receiving the Erb operation, walking difficulties and behavioral abnormalities were observed. These observations were noted on the side where the transection took place, and the problems were attributed to proximal muscle weakness in the forelimb. Additionally, the forepaw grip was not impaired. Furthermore, in this group, the number of anterior horn cells in the cervical cord on the transected side was significantly lower than that on the contralateral side (P < 0.001). The results of this study indicate that the model fulfills the criteria for the clinical symptoms of Erb's palsy and that it may also serve as a new method for enabling treatment of the condition.

  17. The clinical characteristics of neuropathic pain in patients with total brachial plexus avulsion: A 30-case study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yingjie; Liu, Peixi; Rui, Jing; Zhao, Xin; Lao, Jie

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain in patients with total brachial plexus avulsion has always been a sophisticated problem in clinical practice. For further researches on objective diagnosis, alleviation or even cure of neuropathic pain, we need to conclude the basic clinical features including pain intensity, distribution, type and possible risk factors. Thirty cases of patients with total brachial plexus avulsion were included and their baseline information was collected. Pain was evaluated by Present Pain Index using a visual analog scale; Douleur Neuropathique 4 was used for screening neuropathic pain. For more detailed pain description, the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory questionnaire and a picture showing the exact pain district were both fulfilled by all the eligible participants. The relationship between neuropathic pain and basic information, injury conditions, accompanied conditions and quality of life was tested. All the participants were male in both groups. The neuropathic pain group contained 22 patients (73.33%) with the mean age of 30.18±9.47; while 29.00±7.95 in the other group. Patients with neuropathic pain presented variously in pain degree, location, type and time phase, according to the results of the Neuropathic Pain Symptoms Inventory questionnaire. Nevertheless, most pain distributed on the region of hand. Among several related factors, alcohol abuse may be possible risk factors of neuropathic pain (p=0.03). Quality of life was significantly affected by pain (p<0.01). Neuropathic pain in patients with total brachial avulsion was characterized with heterogeneity in pain distribution, intensity, type and also time phase. Bad life habits might be risk factors associated with neuropathic pain. Neuropathic pain might affect quality of life of the patients with total brachial plexus avulsion remarkably. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [The avulsion of subclavian artery from brachiocephalic trunk and subclavian vein from right brachiocephalic vein with brachial plexus injury].

    PubMed

    Kasperczak, Jarosław

    2013-01-01

    The detachment of subclavian artery from brachiocephalic trunk and subclavian vein from right brachiocephalic vein with brachial plexus injury. Traumas of large vessels of mediastinal and shoulder girdle cause significant life risk and constitute serious diagnostic and therapeutic problems because of lack of time for accurate treatment planning. Particularly difficult to treat are blunt trauma of large arteries in patients under the influence of drugs or with a progressive hypovolemic shock. The aim of this dissertation is presenting my own experience in treating a seventeen-year-old motorcyclist who was under the influence of alcohol suffered a detachment of subclavian artery and subclavian vein from mediastinal large vessels following a traffic accident. Seventeen-year-old motorcyclist who was under the influence of alcohol alcohol hit a concrete pole at a speed of 130 km/h. The patient was brought to the hospital in a state of hypovolemic shock, pulse 126/min, blood pressure 80/60 mmHg, without pulse on the right upper limb. The right upper limb was cold, without active movements, pressure and pain sense. The right shoulder was tumid. The right lung without audible murmurs. Pulses on carotid arteries were perceptible. The thoracic plain film x-ray showed a shading on right half of thorax, widening of the upper mediastinum, fracture of right clavicle and the rear right shoulder sprain. Passive movements in the right elbow were correct. The patient was taken to the operating theatre because of progressive hypovolemic shock and was operated in emergency regimen. The transverse thoracotomy was made by both the intercostals spaces between the second and third rib. The thoracotomy showed that subclavian artery from brachiocephalic trunk and subclavian vein from right brachiocephalic vein were detachment. The subclavian vein was ligated and the brachiocephalic vein was sewn (phleborrhaphy). The subclavian artery was connected with brachiocephalic trunk by a synthetic

  19. Six-year incidence and some features of cases of brachial plexus injury in a tertiary referral center

    PubMed Central

    Eken, Meryem; Çınar, Mehmet; Şenol, Taylan; Özkaya, Enis; Karateke, Ateş

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present some features and incidence of cases of brachial plexus injury in deliveries at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children’s Training and Research Hospital, from January 2010 through December 2014. Materials and Methods: In total, 38.896 deliveries in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Zeynep Kamil Maternity and Children’s Training and Research Hospital, from January 2010 through December 2014 were screened from a prospectively collected database. We recorded gravidity, parity, body mass index, maternal diabetes, labor induction, gestational age at delivery, operative deliveries, malpresentations, prolonged second stage of deliveries, shoulder dystocies, clavicle and humerus fructures, estimated fetal weight, biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, femur length, fetal sex, route of delivery, maternal age, and fetal anomalies. Results: There were 28 (72/100.000) cases of brachial plexus injury among 38.896 deliveries. In the 6-year study period, there were 18.363 deliveries via c-section, whereas 20.533 were vaginal deliveries. Conclusion: Sonographic fetal weight estimation and clinical examination performed by experienced obstetricians, and active appropriate management of shoulder dystocias seemed to attenuate the incidence of brachial plexus injury in the at risk population in our tertiary referral center.

  20. Successful outcome of modified quad surgical procedure in preteen and teen patients with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of modified Quad procedure in preteen and teen patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in shoulder abduction, resulting from the modified Quad procedure in children (mean age 2.5 years; range, 0.5-9 years) with obstetric brachial plexus injury. We describe in this report the outcome of 16 patients (6 girls and 10 boys; 7 preteen and 9 teen) who have undergone the modified Quad procedure for the correction of the shoulder function, specifically abduction. The patients underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles, release of contractures of subscapularis pectoralis major and minor, and axillary nerve decompression and neurolysis (the modified Quad procedure). Mean age of these patients at surgery was 13.5 years (range, 10.1-17.9 years). The mean preoperative total Mallet score was 14.8 (range, 10-20), and active abduction was 84° (range, 20°-140°). At a mean follow-up of 1.5 years, the mean postoperative total Mallet score increased to 19.7 (range, 13-25, P < .0001), and the mean active abduction improved to 132° (range, 40°-180°, P < .0003). The modified Quad procedure greatly improves not only the active abduction but also other shoulder functions in preteen and teen patients, as this outcome is the combined result of decompression and neurolysis of the axillary nerve and the release of the contracted internal rotators of the shoulder.

  1. Clinical patterns of spontaneous recovery of paralyzed triceps brachii associated with C5 to C7 injuries of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2012-03-01

    Some patients who sustain C5 to C7 nerve root injuries may demonstrate a natural recovery of elbow extension via the lower trunk; however the surgical effect of the reinnervation of the triceps brachii in such cases is still unknown. This study aims to determine the incidence of spontaneous recovery of the tricipital function and to identify the clinical and/or radiological predictors of poor spontaneous functional rehabilitation of elbow extension resulting from injuries of the upper roots of the brachial plexus. We conducted a review of the charts of 24 subjects sustaining an upper trunk syndrome with complete elbow extension palsy and who did not undergone any intervention for reinnervation of the triceps brachii in the primary brachial plexus surgery. Two years posttrauma, the muscle was scored as M0 in 12 patients (50%), M1 in 3 (12.5%), M2 in 1 (4.1%), M3 in 4 (16.6%), and M4 in 4 subjects (16.6%). The number of avulsed roots and the preoperative power of the latissimus dorsi did not demonstrate any significance in predicting the outcome of spontaneous elbow extension recovery; whereas the preoperative paralysis of the muscles for wrist extension was determined to be reliable predictive parameter for poor natural recovery of tricipital function. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  2. Decreased rates of shoulder dystocia and brachial plexus injury via an evidence-based practice bundle.

    PubMed

    Sienas, Laura E; Hedriana, Herman L; Wiesner, Suzanne; Pelletreau, Barbara; Wilson, Machelle D; Shields, Laurence E

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate whether a standardized approach to identify pregnant women at risk for shoulder dystocia (SD) is associated with reduced incidence of SD and brachial plexus injury (BPI). Between 2011 and 2015, prospective data were collected from 29 community-based hospitals in the USA during implementation of an evidence-based practice bundle, including an admission risk assessment, required "timeout" before operative vaginal delivery (OVD), and low-fidelity SD drills. All women with singleton vertex pregnancies admitted for vaginal delivery were included. Rates of SD, BPI, OVD, and cesarean delivery were compared between a baseline period (January 2011-September 2013) and an intervention period (October 2013-June 2015), during which there was a system-wide average bundle compliance of 90%. There was a significant reduction in the incidence of SD (17.6%; P=0.028), BPI (28.6%; P=0.018), and OVD (18.0%; P<0.001) after implementation of the evidence-based practice bundle. There was a nonsignificant reduction in primary (P=0.823) and total (P=0.396) cesarean rates, but no association between SD drills and incidence of BPI. Implementation of a standard evidence-based practice bundle was found to be associated with a significant reduction in the incidence of SD and BPI. Utilization of low-fidelity drills was not associated with a reduction in BPI. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  3. Effects of shoulder dystocia training on the incidence of brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Inglis, Steven R; Feier, Nikolaus; Chetiyaar, Jyothi B; Naylor, Margaret H; Sumersille, Melanie; Cervellione, Kelly L; Predanic, Mladen

    2011-04-01

    We sought to determine whether implementation of shoulder dystocia training reduces the incidence of obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI). After implementing training for maternity staff, the incidence of OBPI was compared between pretraining and posttraining periods using both univariate and multivariate analyses in deliveries complicated by shoulder dystocia. The overall incidence of OBPI in vaginal deliveries decreased from 0.40% pretraining to 0.14% posttraining (P < .01). OBPI after shoulder dystocia dropped from 30% to 10.67% posttraining (P < .01). Maternal body mass index (P < .01) and neonatal weight (P = .02) decreased and head-to-body delivery interval increased in the posttraining period (P = .03). Only shoulder dystocia training remained associated with reduced OBPI (P = .02) after logistic regression analysis. OBPI remained less in the posttraining period (P = .01), even after excluding all neonates with birthweights >2 SD above the mean. Shoulder dystocia training was associated with a lower incidence of OBPI and the incidence of OBPI in births complicated by shoulder dystocia. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional outcome and quality of life after traumatic total brachial plexus injury treated by nerve transfer or single/double free muscle transfers: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Satbhai, N G; Doi, K; Hattori, Y; Sakamoto, S

    2016-02-01

    Between 2002 and 2011, 81 patients with a traumatic total brachial plexus injury underwent reconstruction by double free muscle transfer (DFMT, 47 cases), single muscle transfer (SMT, 16 cases) or nerve transfers (NT, 18 cases). They were evaluated for functional outcome and quality of life (QoL) using the Disability of Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire, both pre- and post-operatively. The three groups were compared and followed-up for at least 24 months. The mean shoulder abduction and flexion were comparable in all groups, but external rotation was significantly better in the DFMT group as were range and quantitative power of elbow flexion. Patients who had undergone DFMT had reasonable total active finger movement and hook grip strength. All groups showed improvement in function at a level greater than a minimum clinically important difference. The DFMT group showed the greatest improvement. Patients in the DFMT group had a better functional outcome and QoL recovery than those in the NT and SMT groups. Double free muscle transfer procedure is capable of restoring maximum function in patients of total brachial plexus palsy. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  5. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, MCB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk. PMID:23716772

  6. A Novel Approach to Brachial Plexus Catheter Management: A Brachial Plexus Test Dose for Phrenic Nerve Paralysis and Patient-Controlled, Demand-Only Dosing for a Patient With Extreme Obesity.

    PubMed

    Meier, Adam W; Lin, Shin-E; Hanson, Neil A; Auyong, David B

    2016-09-15

    A 53-year-old woman with extreme obesity (body mass index = 82 kg/m) presented for an open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus. This report describes the novel management of her continuous brachial plexus catheter in the setting of her comorbidities. Phrenic nerve paralysis from brachial plexus blocks can cause clinically significant dyspnea in obese patients. Brachial plexus catheters can be used effectively for these patients with some modification to routine management. We detail our use of a short-acting chloroprocaine test dose for phrenic paralysis and demand-only dosing to provide effective analgesia while avoiding respiratory complications associated with these blocks.

  7. Coordination and Balance in Children with Birth-Related Brachial Plexus Injury: A Preliminary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bucevska, Marija; Verchere, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: Most children with severe birth-related brachial plexus injury (BRBPI) have some functional impairment, but information on the impact of BRBPI on coordination and balance is limited. The study's purpose was to determine whether children with BRBPI exhibit deficits in body coordination and balance. Method: A prospective cohort study involving 39 children with BRBPI aged 5–15 years was conducted. Range of motion, strength, active movement, and balance and coordination motor skills were assessed using the Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, Second Edition (BOT-2), and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children—Second Edition (MABC-2). A self-report measure of physical disability, the Activities Scale for Kids—Performance Version (ASKp), was also administered. Results: Participants scored a mean of 44.72 on the BOT-2 Body Coordination composite subtest; scores can range from 20 to 80. Eleven participants (28.2%) scored below average on this test. Participants scored a mean of 7.3 on the Balance subtest of the MABC-2; scores can range from 1 to 19. Twenty-six participants (66.7%) scored below average on this test. Of 38 participants, 25 (65.8%) had an ASKp score indicating some level of disability (<95/100); we found a statistically significant difference in balance (p=0.007) between these 25 participants and those without disability (ASKp score 95–100). Conclusions: The majority of our study population scored in the categories of at risk or significant difficulty for balance on the MABC-2. Balance rehabilitation may be a valuable treatment adjunct for children with BRBPI. PMID:25931660

  8. Results of spinal accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer in 110 patients with complete palsy of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Transfer of the spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve is a common procedure, performed to reestablish shoulder motion in patients with total brachial plexus palsy. However, the results of this procedure remain largely unknown. METHODS Over an 11-year period (2002-2012), 257 patients with total brachial plexus palsy were operated upon in the authors' department by a single surgeon and had the spinal accessory nerve transferred to the suprascapular nerve. Among these, 110 had adequate follow-up and were included in this study. Their average age was 26 years (SD 8.4 years), and the mean interval between their injury and surgery was 5.2 months (SD 2.4 months). Prior to 2005, the suprascapular and spinal accessory nerves were dissected through a classic supraclavicular L-shape incision (n = 29). Afterward (n = 81), the spinal accessory and suprascapular nerves were dissected via an oblique incision, extending from the point at which the plexus crossed the clavicle to the anterior border of the trapezius muscle. In 17 of these patients, because of clavicle fractures or dislocation, scapular fractures or retroclavicular scarring, the incision was extended by detaching the trapezius from the clavicle to expose the suprascapular nerve at the suprascapular fossa. In all patients, the brachial plexus was explored and elbow flexion reconstructed by root grafting (n = 95), root grafting and phrenic nerve transfer (n = 6), phrenic nerve transfer (n = 1), or third, fourth, and fifth intercostal nerve transfer. Postoperatively, patients were followed for an average of 40 months (SD 13.7 months). RESULTS Failed recovery, meaning less than 30° abduction, was observed in 10 (9%) of the 110 patients. The failure rate was 25% between 2002 and 2004, but dropped to 5% after the staged/extended approach was introduced. The mean overall range of abduction recovery was 58.5° (SD 26°). Comparing before and after distal suprascapular nerve exploration (2005-2012), the

  9. Prevention of brachial plexus injury-12 years of shoulder dystocia training: an interrupted time-series study.

    PubMed

    Crofts, J F; Lenguerrand, E; Bentham, G L; Tawfik, S; Claireaux, H A; Odd, D; Fox, R; Draycott, T J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate management and outcomes of incidences of shoulder dystocia in the 12 years following the introduction of an obstetric emergencies training programme. Interrupted time-series study comparing management and neonatal outcome of births complicated by shoulder dystocia over three 4-year periods: (i) Pre-training (1996-99), (ii) Early training (2001-04), and (iii) Late training (2009-12). Southmead Hospital, Bristol, UK, with approximately 6000 births per annum. Infants and their mothers who experienced shoulder dystocia. A bi-monthly multi-professional 1-day intrapartum emergencies training course, that included a 30-minute practical session on shoulder dystocia management, commenced in 2000. Neonatal morbidity (brachial plexus injury, humeral fracture, clavicular fracture, 5-minute Apgar score <7) and documented management of shoulder dystocia (resolution manoeuvres performed, traction applied, head-to-body delivery interval). Compliance with national guidance improved with continued training. At least one recognised resolution manoeuvre was used in 99.8% (561/562) of cases of shoulder dystocia in the late training period, demonstrating a continued improvement from 46.3% (150/324, P < 0.001) pre-training, and 92% (241/262, P < 0.001) in the early training period. In parallel there was reduction in the brachial plexus injury at birth (24/324 [7.4%, P < 0.01], pre-training, 6/262 [2.3%] early training, and 7/562 [1.3%] late training. There are significant benefits to long-term, embedded training programmes with improvements in both management and outcomes. A decade after the introduction of training there were no cases of brachial plexus injury lasting over 12 months in 562 cases of shoulder dystocia. © 2015 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. Assessment of triangle tilt surgery in children with obstetric brachial plexus injury using the pediatric outcomes data collection instrument.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Avila, Meera B; Karicherla, Priyanka; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    demonstrate the functional benefits of triangle tilt surgery in patients with obstetric brachial plexus injury.

  11. Assessment of Triangle Tilt Surgery in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury Using the Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Avila, Meera B; Karicherla, Priyanka; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument demonstrate the functional benefits of triangle tilt surgery in patients with obstetric brachial plexus injury. PMID:22216072

  12. Successful Outcome of Modified Quad Surgical Procedure in Preteen and Teen Patients with Brachial Plexus Birth Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K.; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of modified Quad procedure in preteen and teen patients with brachial plexus birth palsy. Background: We have previously demonstrated a significant improvement in shoulder abduction, resulting from the modified Quad procedure in children (mean age 2.5 years; range, 0.5–9 years) with obstetric brachial plexus injury. Methods: We describe in this report the outcome of 16 patients (6 girls and 10 boys; 7 preteen and 9 teen) who have undergone the modified Quad procedure for the correction of the shoulder function, specifically abduction. The patients underwent transfer of the latissimus dorsi and teres major muscles, release of contractures of subscapularis pectoralis major and minor, and axillary nerve decompression and neurolysis (the modified Quad procedure). Mean age of these patients at surgery was 13.5 years (range, 10.1–17.9 years). Results: The mean preoperative total Mallet score was 14.8 (range, 10–20), and active abduction was 84° (range, 20°–140°). At a mean follow-up of 1.5 years, the mean postoperative total Mallet score increased to 19.7 (range, 13–25, P < .0001), and the mean active abduction improved to 132° (range, 40°–180°, P < .0003). Conclusion: The modified Quad procedure greatly improves not only the active abduction but also other shoulder functions in preteen and teen patients, as this outcome is the combined result of decompression and neurolysis of the axillary nerve and the release of the contracted internal rotators of the shoulder. PMID:23308301

  13. Clinical impact of magnetic resonance neurography in patients with brachial plexus neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Stephen; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Manthuruthil, Christine; Cheng, Jonathan; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-11-01

    To study the impact of brachial plexus MR neurography (MRN) in the diagnostic thinking and therapeutic management of patients with suspected plexopathy. MRN examinations of adult brachial plexuses over a period of 18 months were reviewed. Relevant data collection included-patient demographics, clinical history, pre-imaging diagnostic impression, pre-imaging treatment plan, post-imaging diagnosis, post-imaging treatment plan, surgical notes and electrodiagnostic (ED) results. Impact of imaging on the pre-imaging clinical diagnosis and therapeutic management were classified as no change, mild change or substantial change. Final sample included 121 studies. The common aetiologies included inflammatory in 31 (25.6%) of 121 patients, trauma in 29 (23.9%) of 121 patients and neoplastic in 26 (21.5%) of 121 patients. ED tests were performed in 47 (38.8%) of 121 patients and these showed concordance with MRN findings in 31 (66.0%) of 47 patients. Following MRN, there was change in the pre-imaging clinical impression for 91 (75.2%) of 121 subjects, with a mild change in diagnosis in 57 (47.1%) of 121 patients and a substantial change in 34 (28.0%) of 121 patients. 19 (15.7%) of 121 patients proceeded to therapies that would not have been performed in the same manner without the information obtained from MRN. MRN of the brachial plexus significantly impacts clinical decision-making and should be routinely performed in suspected brachial plexopathy. Advances in knowledge: MRN significantly impacts the diagnostic thinking and therapeutic management of patients with suspected brachial plexopathy. MRN not only provides concordant information to ED tests in majority of cases, but also supplements with additional diagnostic data in patients who are ED negative.

  14. Brachial plexus trauma: the morbidity of hemidiaphragmatic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Franko, O I; Khalpey, Z; Gates, J

    2008-09-01

    Phrenic nerve palsy has previously been associated with brachial plexus root avulsion; severe unilateral phrenic nerve injury is not uncommonly associated with brachial plexus injury. Brachial plexus injuries can be traumatic (gunshot wounds, lacerations, stretch/contusion and avulsion injuries) or non-traumatic in aetiology (supraclavicular brachial plexus nerve block, subclavian vein catheterisation, cardiac surgeries, or obstetric complications such as birth palsy). Despite the known association, the incidence and morbidity of a phrenic nerve injury and hemidiaphragmatic paralysis associated with traumatic brachial plexus stretch injuries remains ill-defined. The incidence of an associated phrenic nerve injury with brachial plexus trauma ranges from 10% to 20%; however, because unilateral diaphragmatic paralysis often presents without symptoms at rest, a high number of phrenic nerve injuries are likely to be overlooked in the setting of brachial plexus injury. A case report is presented of a unilateral phrenic nerve injury associated with brachial plexus stretch injury presenting with a recalcitrant left lower lobe pneumonia.

  15. Investigation of brachial plexus traction lesions by peripheral and spinal somatosensory evoked potentials.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S J

    1979-01-01

    Peripheral, spinal and cortical somatosensory evoked potentials were recorded in 26 patients with unilateral traction injuries of the brachial plexus ganglia. Of 10 cases explored surgically the recordings correctly anticipated the major site of the lesion in eight. PMID:422958

  16. Analgesic efficacy of bilateral superficial and deep cervical plexus block in patients with secondary hyperparathyroidism due to chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yinglan; Zhang, Qiuli; Zhang, Yaoxian; Liu, Zhanli

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) develops in patients with chronic renal failure. This study aimed to compare analgesic efficacy in SHPT patients who undergo subtotal parathyroidectomy after superficial versus deep cervical plexus block. Methods Sixty chronic renal failure patients with SPHT scheduled for subtotal parathyroidectomy were randomized to receive general anesthesia (group GA), general anesthesia plus bilateral superficial and deep cervical plexus block (group BD), or general anesthesia plus bilateral superficial cervical plexus block (group BS) (n = 20). Bilateral superficial cervical plexus block or combined superficial and deep cervical plexus block with 0.5% ropivacaine was administered. Postoperative pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS). Results VAS score at 1 hour, 4 hours, and 8 hours after operation was 3.71 ± 0.60, 2.72 ± 0.54, 2.17 ± 0.75 in BS group; 4.00 ± 0.28, 2.89 ± 0.21, and 2.46 ± 1.01 in BD group, significantly lower than in GA group (6.50 ± 0.50, 5.02 ± 0.54, and 4.86 ± 0.51, respectively). The dosage of tramadol was 109.0 ± 35.2 mg in BS group and 93.0 ± 24.52 mg in BD group, significantly lower than in GA group (300.0 ± 27.13 mg). The incidence of complications in GA group (90%) was significantly higher than in BS group (30%) and BD group (15%). Serum glucose and norepinephrine levels were significantly higher at 1 hour, 4 hours, and 8 hours after operation, but returned to baseline levels at 24 hours after operation. Conclusion Superficial cervical plexus block or combined superficial and deep cervical plexus block effectively reduces postoperative pain, stress response, and complications in SHPT patients who undergo subtotal parathyroidectomy. PMID:26665128

  17. [Effect of electroacupuncture combined with cervical plexus block on stress responses in patients undergoing thyroid surgery].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai-Ju; Yang, Fan; Li, Man

    2013-02-01

    To observe the effect of electroacupuncture (EA) combined with cervical plexus block (CPB) on the stress response of patients undergoing thyroid surgery. Forty thyroidectomy patients were randomly divided into sham EA plus CPB group (sham group) and EA+CPB group (20 cases in each group). For patients of the sham group, deep cervical plexus block (25% ropivacaine hydrochloride + 1% lidocaine hydrochloride) was performed first, followed by inserting acupuncture needles into bilateral Hegu (LI 4) and Neiguan (PC 6) separately without needle manipulation and then connecting the output wires of the EA therapeutic instrument to the handles of the acupuncture needles but without electric current output. For patients of the EA+CPB group, deep cervical plexus block was performed first followed by EA stimulation [10 Hz, (6 +/- 2) mA] of the bilateral LI 4 and PC 6 for 20 min. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and breathing frequency were detected using a multipurpose monitor. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol (Cor) contents were determined using chemiluminescence method, plasma epinephrine (E) level was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, glucose (Glu) assayed by oxidase method, and plasma C-reactive protein (CRP) level detected using immumofluorescence technique. (1) During surgery, the patients' SBP and HR of both sham and EA groups were increased significantly compared with their basic values (P < 0.05), but the levels of the increased SBP and HR of the EA group were obviously lower than those of the sham group (P < 0.05). (2) The levels of plasma ACTH during surgery and at the immediate time after surgery, Cor level at the immediate time after surgery, plasma E and Glu contents during surgery, at the immediate time and on day 1 after surgery, and plasma CRP at the immediate time, and on day 1 and 3 after surgery in the sham group were upregulated considerably (P < 0.05), while the levels of plasma ACTH, Cor, E, Glu and CRP in

  18. A comparison of intercostal and partial ulnar nerve transfers in restoring elbow flexion following upper brachial plexus injury (C5-C6+/-C7).

    PubMed

    Coulet, Bertrand; Boretto, Jorge G; Lazerges, Cyril; Chammas, Michel

    2010-08-01

    Restoring active elbow flexion is essential in the surgical management of C5-C6 +/- C7 brachial plexus palsies. This study compares the clinical results of 2 techniques to restore elbow flexion: the partial ulnar nerve transfer and the intercostal nerve transfer. Partial ulnar nerve transfer was performed in 23 patients, and intercostal nerve transfer was performed in 17 patients. For both techniques, the transfer to the musculocutaneous nerve was made at the same anatomical point. Age and preoperative delay were comparable between groups of patients. Biceps reinnervation time was significantly earlier (p = .001) in the ulnar nerve technique (mean, 5.1 mo) than the intercostal nerve technique (mean 9.9 mo). Ten of 17 patients recovered useful elbow flexion force (British Medical Research Council grade >M3) in the intercostal nerve transfer group, compared with 20 of 23 patients in the ulnar nerve transfer group. No patient who had surgery more than 6 months after the injury recovered useful elbow flexion force in the intercostal nerve transfer. Elbow flexion strength was better in patients less than 30 years old in the intercostal nerve group. No complications were observed in either group. This study shows that transferring fascicles of the ulnar nerve yields better results than intercostals nerve transfer for restoring elbow flexion. Moreover, preoperative delay and age are important preoperative prognostic factors for the intercostal nerves transfers. Therapeutic III. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. [Study of peripheral nerve injury in trauma patients].

    PubMed

    Castillo-Galván, Marina Lizeth; Martínez-Ruiz, Fernando Maximiliano; de la Garza-Castro, Oscar; Elizondo-Omaña, Rodrigo Enrique; Guzmán-López, Santos

    2014-01-01

    To determine the prevalence, location, mechanism, and characteristics of peripheral nerve injury (PNI) in trauma patients. A retrospective study of medical records with PNI diagnosis secondary to trauma in the period of 2008-2012. The following information was collected: gender, age, occupation, anatomic location, affected nerve, mechanism of injury, degree of injury, costs, and hospitalization time. The prevalence of PNI is 1.12%. The location of the nerve injury was 61% upper limb, the highest incidence was presented to the brachial plexus (35%) and ulnar nerve (18%). The mechanism of the lesion was sharp injury (19%). The PNI are commonly present in people of a productive age. Neurotmesis was the most frequent degree of lesion. The patients stayed at hospital 2.51 ± 1.29 days and the average cost was 12,474.00 Mexican pesos ± 5,595.69 (US$ 1,007.54 ± 452.21) for one nerve injury.

  20. Reducing the risk of shoulder dystocia and associated brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Gurewitsch, Edith D; Allen, Robert H

    2011-06-01

    Despite persisting controversy over shoulder dystocia prediction, prevention, and injury causation, the authors find considerable evidence in recent research in the field to recommend additional guidelines beyond the current American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists guidelines to improve clinical practice in managing patients at risk for experiencing shoulder dystocia. In this article, the authors offer health care providers information, practical direction, and advice on how to limit shoulder dystocia risk and, more importantly, to reduce adverse outcome risk. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lack of physician-patient communication as a key factor associated with malpractice litigation in neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Domino, Joseph; McGovern, Connie; Chang, Kate W C; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Yang, Lynda J S

    2014-02-01

    Perinatal disorders are prone to malpractice litigation. Neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) results from stretching the nerves in the perinatal period and may lead to paresis or paralysis and sensory loss in the affected arm. Little is known about the key factors associated with malpractice litigation by families of patients with NBPP and whether these factors reflect the practice environment or are inherent to the condition. In this study, the authors documented the percentage of families of NBPP patients at a specialty center that had filed a malpractice suit and described the key factors associated with that pursuit of legal action. The families/caregivers of 51 patients with NBPP who had presented to the University of Michigan Interdisciplinary Brachial Plexus Program participated in this study. A qualitative research design was applied using both a questionnaire to examine psychosocial factors and a dynamic tool to measure health outcomes from the patient perspective via parent proxy (Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System [PROMIS] assessment instruments). Statistical analysis included the Fisher exact test, chi-square test, and Student t-test. The study protocol was approved by the University of Michigan institutional review board. Forty-seven percent of the families pursued malpractice litigation. In comparing patient families that had pursued legal action with those that had not, significant differences were revealed in the perception that the sustained birth injury was unnecessary (p = 0.002), the information received in the perinatal period was inadequate (p = 0.003), family concerns were ignored in the perinatal period (p = 0.005), and family concerns were not adequately addressed (p < 0.001). Sixty-six percent of the families received external advice to pursue legal action. The PROMIS survey revealed significant group differences in depressive symptoms (p = 0.008), fatigue (p = 0.02), pain (p = 0.01), and anger (p = 0.004). In

  2. Recurrent brachial plexus neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Bradley, W G; Madrid, R; Thrush, D C; Campbell, M J

    1975-09-01

    The clinical, electrophysiological and pathological changes in 3 patients with recurrent attacks of non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy have been described. Two had recurrent attacks and a dominant family history of similar attacks, together with evidence of lesser degrees of nerve involvement outside the brachial plexus. In one patient the attacks were moderately painful, while in the other there was little or no pain. Only one showed undue slowing of motor nerve conduction during ischaemia, but in both cases the sural nerves had the changes of tomaculous neuropathy, with many sausage-shaped swellings of the myelin sheaths, and extensive segmental demyelination and remyelination. The third patient had two attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy which were both extremely painful. The clinical features were compatible with a diagnosis of neuralgic amuotrophy. In the second attack, there was vagus nerve involvement and the sural nerve showed evidence of healed extensive segmental demyelination. The various syndromes presenting with acute non-traumatic brachial plexus neuropathy are reviewed, and a tentative nonsological classification advanced. Most patients fall into the category of acute, painful paralysis with amyotrophy, with no family history and no evidence of lesions outside the brachial plexus. It is suggested that the term "neuralgic amyotrophy" be restricted to this group. Patients with features outside this clinical picture probably suffer from other disease entities presenting with brachial plexus neuropathy. The familial cases constitute one or more aetioliogical subgroups, differing from neuralgic amyotrophy in the frequency of recurrences, the relative freedom from pain in the attacks, the frequency of nerve lesions outside the brachial plexus, and of hypotelorism. Individual attacks of acute brachial plexus neuropathy, however, may be identical in patients with the different diseases, and further pathological and biochemical studies are

  3. Postoperative monitoring in free muscle transfers for reconstruction in brachial plexus injuries.

    PubMed

    Dodakundi, Chaitanya; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Soutetsu; Yonemura, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Yuki

    2012-03-01

    Free gracilis transfers are done for reanimation of the upper limb in traumatic total brachial plexus palsy. Because of buried nature of the free muscle and monitoring skin flap in the axillary or infraclavicular region, it is always a tricky situation for continuous and repeated monitoring to assess vascular status. Critical ischemia times vary between the muscle and monitoring skin flap because of which signs of ischemic changes in the monitoring skin flap are always delayed with respect to the muscle. We describe a novel method that uses the principle of evoked potentials from the muscle to assess the vascular status of the free muscle and detects vascular compromise early before the skin changes are apparent.

  4. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy--risk factors and predictors.

    PubMed

    Sibiński, Marcin; Synder, Marek

    2007-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a rare condition occurring in about 1 per thousand of live births. It is caused most often by traction during delivery, although in some cases clear evidence of direct injury to the nerves is not present. The aim of the study was to define risk factors for obstetric brachial plexus palsy and relate the chances of recovery to the severity of the injury. Two prospective databases of patient information and clinical assessment data were used for the study. The first database contained information about pregnancy, labour, severity of injury, operative procedures and coexisting disorders of 162 children. The second comprised information about clinical assessment of the affected limb in 76 patients. The mean age of patients at last follow-up was 6 years and 9 months. High birth weight, shoulder dystocia, forceps delivery and clavicle fracture were important risk factors in obstetric brachial plexus injury. Breech delivery was not associated with a higher incidence of nerve injuries despite literature data pointing to the contrary. A Caesarean incision reduced the risk of plexus palsy but did not eliminate it completely. In Narakas group 1 patients, recovery of biceps function occurred before the age of 4 months. The vast majority of the children will have complete recovery of the affected limb. In group III and IV, return to full function is very unlikely. Our results confirm that Narakas' classification, apart from being very popular for classifying severity of the pathology, is a strong predictor of outcome.

  5. Brachial plexus

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation problems that are often associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms ...

  6. Feasibility, efficacy, and safety of ultrasound-guided axillary plexus blockade in pediatric patients with epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Ingeborg; Gottschalk, Antje; Langer, Martin; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Ellger, Björn

    2016-04-01

    In patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa dystrophica (DEB), the most severe form of epidermolysis bullosa, trauma or friction cause separation of the skin from underlying tissue with consecutive painful blisters, scarifications, contractures, and pseudosyndactyly. To retain functionality of the hands surgical procedures are necessary. Anesthesia is challenging as difficult airways make general anesthesia risky. Regional anesthesia is considered controversial in patients with EB as accidental subcutaneous injections can cause severe blisters. As ultrasound-guided procedures became standard of care this might have changed however. In this case series, we describe feasibility, efficacy, and safety of ultrasound-guided plexus axillaris block in DEB patients undergoing hand surgery. We performed a retrospective analysis of the charts of all children with DEB undergoing hand surgery under plexus axillaris block and sedation between 2009 and 2013 in our institution. Nineteen procedures in nine children were performed. Induction of anesthesia (securing monitoring, sedation, plexus block) took a mean time of 34 min. Perioperative analgesia was adequate in all procedures. No complications such as airway incidents, conversion to general anesthesia, movement during surgery, incomplete block, or formation of new blisters were seen. Ultrasound-guided plexus axillaris block in DEB patients undergoing hand surgery in our institution has been feasible, effective, and safe. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. SU-F-R-06: Traumatic Brachial Plexus Injury Imaging, Developing a Coherent Clinical Protocol From Literature Review Through Practice

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D; France, E; Lambert, J; Hinkle, J

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Medical Physics teams can now play a critical role to help plan and provide studied approaches for traumatic brachial plexus MR imaging (tbpMRI). This is especially important for coordination with uncommon applications, since it is challenging to select the right modality, parameters, and train technologists on the essential components. For this work, we started with a review of the medical literature, performed crossover/volunteer studies to bring tbpMRI to practice with greater image QC and protocol management. Methods: To the best of our knowledge, we reviewed the known searchable domain for tbpMRI. We found 69 total articles since 2000. Articles were evaluated with our published protocol for literature management (LIMES3). Two physicists and two radiologists condensed the information from all articles into a knowledgebase. Results: The initial literature demonstrated great heterogeneity, which was a sign that this area needed greater consistency. Despite inconsistency and imprecision, we extracted the most relevant targets using our long-term experience with protocol development in MSK. We ran volunteers on six different magnets of various field strengths with multiple receiver coils, and rebuilt a coherent protocol for tbpMRI. Our radiologists rated LIMES3 work as superior. We have received referrals from the ER and have conducted four patient evaluations. Conclusion: Traumatic brachial plexus MRI has great possible benefits for patients. This work supports the complexity of tbpMRI scanning. As this is rarely performed, it requires a more diligent protocol workflow, coordination of caregivers, and education within multiple clinical departments. Choosing the correct imaging exam can be critical, as patients can have significant neuropathy and/or paralysis. The LIMES3 protocol is well liked at our institution, and forms the cornerstone of understanding for our work. Our literature management led to a better clinical protocol creation despite the diffuse

  8. Esophageal Cancer Related Gene-4 Is a Choroid Plexus-Derived Injury Response Gene: Evidence for a Biphasic Response in Early and Late Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Podvin, Sonia; Gonzalez, Ana-Maria; Miller, Miles C.; Dang, Xitong; Botfield, Hannah; Donahue, John E.; Kurabi, Arwa; Boissaud-Cooke, Matthew; Rossi, Ryan; Leadbeater, Wendy E.; Johanson, Conrad E.; Coimbra, Raul; Stopa, Edward G.; Eliceiri, Brian P.; Baird, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    By virtue of its ability to regulate the composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the choroid plexus (CP) is ideally suited to instigate a rapid response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) by producing growth regulatory proteins. For example, Esophageal Cancer Related Gene-4 (Ecrg4) is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a hormone-like peptide called augurin that is present in large concentrations in CP epithelia (CPe). Because augurin is thought to regulate senescence, neuroprogenitor cell growth and differentiation in the CNS, we evaluated the kinetics of Ecrg4 expression and augurin immunoreactivity in CPe after CNS injury. Adult rats were injured with a penetrating cortical lesion and alterations in augurin immunoreactivity were examined by immunohistochemistry. Ecrg4 gene expression was characterized by in situ hybridization. Cell surface augurin was identified histologically by confocal microscopy and biochemically by sub-cellular fractionation. Both Ecrg4 gene expression and augurin protein levels were decreased 24–72 hrs post-injury but restored to uninjured levels by day 7 post-injury. Protein staining in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, used as a control brain region, did not show a decrease of auguin immunoreactivity. Ecrg4 gene expression localized to CPe cells, and augurin protein to the CPe ventricular face. Extracellular cell surface tethering of 14 kDa augurin was confirmed by cell surface fractionation of primary human CPe cells in vitro while a 6–8 kDa fragment of augurin was detected in conditioned media, indicating release from the cell surface by proteolytic processing. In rat CSF however, 14 kDa augurin was detected. We hypothesize the initial release and proteolytic processing of augurin participates in the activation phase of injury while sustained Ecrg4 down-regulation is dysinhibitory during the proliferative phase. Accordingly, augurin would play a constitutive inhibitory function in normal CNS while down regulation of Ecrg4

  9. Comparison Between Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular and Interscalene Brachial Plexus Blocks in Patients Undergoing Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Taeha; Kil, Byung Tae; Kim, Jong Hae

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although supraclavicular brachial plexus block (SCBPB) was repopularized by the introduction of ultrasound, its usefulness in shoulder surgery has not been widely reported. The objective of this study was to compare motor and sensory blockades, the incidence of side effects, and intraoperative opioid analgesic requirements between SCBPB and interscalene brachial plexus block (ISBPB) in patients undergoing arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups (ISBPB group: n = 47; SCBPB group: n = 46). The side effects of the brachial plexus block (Horner's syndrome, hoarseness, and subjective dyspnea), the sensory block score (graded from 0 [no cold sensation] to 100 [intact sensation] using an alcohol swab) for each of the 5 dermatomes (C5–C8 and T1), and the motor block score (graded from 0 [complete paralysis] to 6 [normal muscle force]) for muscle forces corresponding to the radial, ulnar, median, and musculocutaneous nerves were evaluated 20 min after the brachial plexus block. Fentanyl was administered in 50 μg increments when the patients complained of pain that was not relieved by the brachial plexus block. There were no conversions to general anesthesia due to a failed brachial plexus block. The sensory block scores for the C5 to C8 dermatomes were significantly lower in the ISBPB group. However, the percentage of patients who received fentanyl was comparable between the 2 groups (27.7% [ISBPB group] and 30.4% [SCBPB group], P = 0.77). SCBPB produced significantly lower motor block scores for the radial, ulnar, and median nerves than did ISBPB. A significantly higher incidence of Horner's syndrome was observed in the ISBPB group (59.6% [ISBPB group] and 19.6% [SCBPB group], P < 0.001). No patient complained of subjective dyspnea. Despite the weaker degree of sensory blockade provided by SCBPB in comparison to ISBPB, opioid analgesic requirements are similar during arthroscopic shoulder surgery under

  10. The value of preoperative and intraoperative electromyography in the management of obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Chin, Kuen F; Di Mascio, Livio; Holmes, Karen; Misra, V Peter; Sinisi, Marco M

    2010-12-01

    The treatment of obstetric brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) with neuroma-in-continuity is controversial. The recent literature advocates excision of neuroma-in-continuity in OBPP and repair with nerve graft irrespective of its neurophysiological conductivity. This approach risks sacrificing the regenerating axons, and the result has not yet been proven to be superior to neurolysis alone. In this case report, the authors aim to outline their strategy of using the combination of preoperative and intraoperative clinical and neurophysiological findings to aid their decision making. The lack of upper trunk recovery and the unfavorable preoperative neurophysiological findings in a child with Narakas Group 4 OBPP at 5 months of age prompted an urgent exploration with the intention of performing neurotization. This procedure was abandoned and neurolysis was performed due to the favorable intraoperative neurophysiological findings. At 4 years of age, the child scored 12 of 15 on Mallet classification and has an excellent range of movement. No secondary operation was needed. The authors hope to highlight the idea that the surgical option for neurolysis alone should be kept open and that intraoperative electromyography can be a valuable tool to add to the surgeon's armamentarium.

  11. Cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury - bone marrow stromal cells and choroid plexus epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ide, Chizuka; Nakano, Norihiko; Kanekiyo, Kenji

    2016-09-01

    Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) enhanced the outgrowth of regenerating axons and promoted locomotor improvements of rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). BMSCs did not survive long-term, disappearing from the spinal cord within 2-3 weeks after transplantation. Astrocyte-devoid areas, in which no astrocytes or oligodendrocytes were found, formed at the epicenter of the lesion. It was remarkable that numerous regenerating axons extended through such astrocyte-devoid areas. Regenerating axons were associated with Schwann cells embedded in extracellular matrices. Transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs) also enhanced axonal regeneration and locomotor improvements in rats with SCI. Although CPECs disappeared from the spinal cord shortly after transplantation, an extensive outgrowth of regenerating axons occurred through astrocyte-devoid areas, as in the case of BMSC transplantation. These findings suggest that BMSCs and CPECs secret neurotrophic factors that promote tissue repair of the spinal cord, including axonal regeneration and reduced cavity formation. This means that transplantation of BMSCs and CPECs promotes "intrinsic" ability of the spinal cord to regenerate. The treatment to stimulate the intrinsic regeneration ability of the spinal cord is the safest method of clinical application for SCI. It should be emphasized that the generally anticipated long-term survival, proliferation and differentiation of transplanted cells are not necessarily desirable from the clinical point of view of safety.

  12. The Surgical Strategy to Correct the Rotational Imbalance of the Glenohumeral Joint after Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bahm, J.

    2016-01-01

    In upper brachial plexus birth injury, rotational balance of the glenohumeral joint is frequently affected and contracture in medial rotation of the arm develops, due to a severe palsy or insufficient recovery of the lateral rotators. Some of these children present with a severe glenohumeral joint contracture in the first months, although regular physiotherapy has been provided, a condition associated with a posteriorly subdislocated or dislocated humeral head. These conditions should be screened early by a pediatrician or specialized physiotherapist. Both aspects of muscular weakness affecting the lateral rotators and the initial or progressive glenohumeral deformity and/or subdislocation must be identified and treated accordingly, focusing on the reestablishment of joint congruence and strengthening of the lateral rotators to improve rotational balance, thus working against joint dysplasia and loss of motor function of the shoulder in a growing child. Our treatment strategy adapted over the last 20 years to results from retrospective studies, including biomechanical aspects on muscular imbalance and tendon transfers. With this review, we confront our actual concept to recent literature. PMID:28077955

  13. The Surgical Strategy to Correct the Rotational Imbalance of the Glenohumeral Joint after Brachial Plexus Birth Injury.

    PubMed

    Bahm, J

    2016-01-01

    In upper brachial plexus birth injury, rotational balance of the glenohumeral joint is frequently affected and contracture in medial rotation of the arm develops, due to a severe palsy or insufficient recovery of the lateral rotators. Some of these children present with a severe glenohumeral joint contracture in the first months, although regular physiotherapy has been provided, a condition associated with a posteriorly subdislocated or dislocated humeral head. These conditions should be screened early by a pediatrician or specialized physiotherapist. Both aspects of muscular weakness affecting the lateral rotators and the initial or progressive glenohumeral deformity and/or subdislocation must be identified and treated accordingly, focusing on the reestablishment of joint congruence and strengthening of the lateral rotators to improve rotational balance, thus working against joint dysplasia and loss of motor function of the shoulder in a growing child. Our treatment strategy adapted over the last 20 years to results from retrospective studies, including biomechanical aspects on muscular imbalance and tendon transfers. With this review, we confront our actual concept to recent literature.

  14. Surgical treatment for total root avulsion type brachial plexus injuries by neurotization: A prospective comparison study between total and hemicontralateral C7 nerve root transfer

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Yuan-Kun; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Chang, Chih-Han; Su, Fong-Chin; Hsiao, Chih-Kun; Tan, Jacqueline Siau-Woon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: We conducted a clinical study to evaluate the effects of neurotization, especially comparing the total contralateral C7 (CC7) root transfer to hemi-CC7 transfer, on total root avulsion brachial plexus injuries (BPI). Methods: Forty patients who received neurotization for BPI were enrolled in this prospective study. Group 1 (n = 20) received hemi-CC7 transfer for hand function, while group 2 (n = 20) received total-CC7 transfer. Additional neurotization included spinal accessory, phrenic, and intercostal nerve transfer for shoulder and elbow function. The results were evaluated with an average of 6 years follow-up. Results: Group 1 had fewer donor site complications (15%) than group 2 (45%); group 2 had significantly better hand M3 and M4 motor function (65%) than group 1 (30%; P = 0.02). There was no difference in sensory recovery. Significantly, better shoulder function was obtained by simultaneous neurotization on both suprascapular and axillary nerves. Conclusions: Total-CC7 transfer had better hand recovery but more donor complications than hemi-CC7. Neurotization on both supra-scapular and axillary nerves improved shoulder recovery. © 2013 The Authors. Microsurgery published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 34:91–101, 2014. PMID:23913440

  15. Pain Outcomes in Patients Undergoing CT-Guided Celiac Plexus Neurolysis for Intractable Abdominal Visceral Pain.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Mark R; Gabriel, Ryan T; Elbich, Jeffrey D; Wolfe, Luke G; Sydnor, Malcolm K

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess outcomes in patients who have undergone celiac plexus neurolysis (CPN) as treatment for refractory abdominal visceral pain at a tertiary care medical center. This study involved retrospective analysis of all patients who had undergone computed tomography (CT)-guided CPN over a 7-year period, as identified in the medical record. Cases were categorized into 1 of 3 groups-group 1: patients getting at least moderate improvement in pain but with improvements subsiding within 2 days; group 2: patients with some sustained pain relief but still requiring heavy doses of narcotics; group 3: patients with major or complete sustained reduction in pain where the narcotic dose was able to be reduced. One hundred thirty-eight cases were identified, 51 of which had no or insufficient follow-up, leaving 87 cases for analysis. Of the 87 cases, 31 (36%) were categorized as group 1, 21 (24%) as group 2, and 35 (40%) as group 3. There were no statistical differences in outcomes based on patient age, gender, time since diagnosis, or type of cancer. Documented postoperative complications were diarrhea (11 cases) and 1 case each of obtundation, hypotension, and presyncopal event. We conclude that patients undergoing CT-guided CPN for abdominal visceral pain achieve moderate or major short-term pain relief in a majority of cases. The procedure is safe with minimal complications.

  16. Intraoperative nerve action and compound motor action potential recordings in patients with obstetric brachial plexus lesions.

    PubMed

    Pondaag, Willem; van der Veken, Lieven P A J; van Someren, Paul J; van Dijk, J Gert; Malessy, Martijn J A

    2008-11-01

    A typical finding in supraclavicular exploration of infants with severe obstetric brachial plexus lesions (OBPLs) is a neuroma-in-continuity with the superior trunk and/or a root avulsion at C-5, C-6, or C-7. The operative strategy in these cases is determined by the intraoperative assessment of the severity of the lesion. Intraoperative nerve action potential (NAP) and evoked compound motor action potential (CMAP) recordings have been shown to be helpful diagnostic tools in adults, whereas their value in the intraoperative assessment of infants with OBPLs remains to be determined. Intraoperative NAPs and CMAPs were systematically recorded from damaged and normal nerves of the upper brachial plexus in a consecutive series of 95 infants (mean age 175 days) with OBPLs. A total of 599 intraoperative NAP and 836 CMAP recordings were analyzed. The severity of the nerve lesions was graded as normal, axonotmesis, neurotmesis, or root avulsion, based on surgical, clinical, histological, and radiographic criteria. The correlation of NAP and CMAP recordings with the severity of the lesion was assessed. The specificity of an absent NAP or CMAP to predict a severe lesion (neurotmesis or avulsion) was > 0.9. However, the sensitivity of an absent NAP or CMAP for predicting a severe lesion was low (typically < 0.3). The severity of the nerve lesion was related to CMAP and NAP amplitudes. Cutoff points useful for intraoperative decision making could not be found to differentiate between lesion types in individual patients. Intraoperative NAP and CMAP recordings do not assist in decision making in the surgical treatment of infants with OBPLs. The authors' findings in infants cannot be generalized to adults.

  17. Lower trunk of brachial plexus injury in the neonate rat: effects of timing repair.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Liverana; Pallini, Roberto; Romani, Rossana; Di Rocco, Federico; Ciampini, Alessandro; Gangitano, Carlo; Del Fa, Aurora; Fernandez, Eduardo

    2009-06-01

    After lesion of a peripheral nerve in neonatal mammals, motoneurons undergo a cell death. We wanted to ascertain if early surgery could influence such post-axotomy motoneuronal death and improve the functional outcome. In this study, we investigated the functional and anatomical results after immediate and delayed repair of the lower trunk of brachial plexus (BP) sectioned at birth in rats. In neonate rats, the lower trunk of the left BP was cut. This nerve trunk was repaired either immediately [immediately-reconstructed group of rats (IR), or 30 days after, tardy reconstructed group of rats (TR)]; in the third group of animals, the nerve was not repaired (noreconstructed group of rats, NoR). In each group of animals, functional studies were performed at 90 days of age using the grooming test and the walking tracks analysis. Histologic studies of the C7-T1 spinal cord and lower trunk of BP were performed at 30 and 90 days of age; the numbers of motoneuron and axon were counted. Functional recovery was related to the difference in motoneuron number between the injured and the uninjured sides of the spinal cord of the operated animals. On the one side, only in the rats in which the inferior trunk was immediately repaired, the difference in motoneuron number between the two sides of the spinal cord was not statistically significant; these animals showed a good axonal regeneration and function recovery. On the other side, in the rats in which the inferior trunk was left unrepaired or tardy repaired, the decrease in motoneuron number in the injured side compared with the uninjured side of the spinal cord was statistically significant; these animals showed no axonal regeneration and no function recovery. The results cited above suggest that an important role in restoration of good neurological function after section of the lower trunk of BP in neonate rats is played by early nerve repair. Good neurological function was related more to a quite numerical balance of

  18. Bilateral cysts in the choroid plexus in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Casteleijn, Niek F; Spithoven, Edwin M; Rookmaaker, Maarten B; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I; Gansevoort, Ron T

    2015-05-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a genetic systemic disorder, which is associated with cyst formation in several organs, renal function decline and a higher prevalence of intracranial aneurysms. We report a 52-year-old, otherwise healthy, man with ADPKD who had asymptomatic, bilateral, multiple cysts in the choroid plexus, which is an extremely rare abnormality. Recent evidence suggests that the polycystin proteins, which are dysfunctional in ADPKD, are found in ciliated choroid plexus cells that are involved with regulation of cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis. We hypothesize therefore that choroid plexus cysts may be part of the ADPKD phenotype, which has not been described before.

  19. Pain mechanisms involved and outcome in advanced cancer patients with possible indications for celiac plexus block and superior hypogastric plexus block.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Fulfaro, Fabio; Casuccio, Alessandra

    2002-01-01

    There is controversy about the role of neurolytic sympathetic blocks in advanced cancer, when pain syndromes may assume other characteristics, with a possible involvement of structures other than visceral. The aim of the present study was to assess the pain characteristics and the analgesic response of a consecutive sample of home care patients with pancreatic and pelvic pain, which would have possible indications for a celiac plexus block and a superior hypogastric block, respectively. From January 1999 to December 1999, 400 consecutive advanced cancer patients were surveyed for a prospective longitudinal survey. We considered only patients who had pancreatic cancer or pelvic cancer with pain. Thirty-six patients were surveyed: 22 patients had pelvic cancers and 14 had pancreatic cancer. Patients with pelvic cancers showed a longer survival than those with pancreatic cancer (P = 0.019). Patients with pelvic cancers more frequently showed a neuropathic component associated with a visceral or somatic mechanism than patients with pain due to pancreatic cancer (P = 0.019). When the pain mechanism was taken into consideration, patients with pelvic cancers with a neuropathic component showed worse pain relief than patients with pain due to pancreatic cancer (P = 0.040). Sympathetic procedures for pain conditions due to pancreatic and pelvic cancers should be intended as adjuvant techniques to reduce the analgesic consumption, and not as a panacea, given that multiple pain mechanisms are often involved because progression of disease is able to change the underlying pain mechanisms. Pancreatic pain seems to maintain visceral characteristics amenable to sympathetic block more than pain due to pelvic cancer.

  20. 3T MR tomography of the brachial plexus: structural and microstructural evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mallouhi, Ammar; Marik, Wolfgang; Prayer, Daniela; Kainberger, Franz; Bodner, Gerd; Kasprian, Gregor

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) neurography comprises an evolving group of techniques with the potential to allow optimal noninvasive evaluation of many abnormalities of the brachial plexus. MR neurography is clinically useful in the evaluation of suspected brachial plexus traumatic injuries, intrinsic and extrinsic tumors, and post-radiogenic inflammation, and can be particularly beneficial in pediatric patients with obstetric trauma to the brachial plexus. The most common MR neurographic techniques for displaying the brachial plexus can be divided into two categories: structural MR neurography; and microstructural MR neurography. Structural MR neurography uses mainly the STIR sequence to image the nerves of the brachial plexus, can be performed in 2D or 3D mode, and the 2D sequence can be repeated in different planes. Microstructural MR neurography depends on the diffusion tensor imaging that provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within the nerves of the brachial plexus, as well as on tractography to visualize the white matter tracts and to characterize their integrity. The successful evaluation of the brachial plexus requires the implementation of appropriate techniques and familiarity with the pathologies that might involve the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Coordination and balance in children with birth-related brachial plexus injury: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bellows, Doria; Bucevska, Marija; Verchere, Cynthia

    2015-01-01

    Objet : La plupart des enfants qui ont une grave lésion du plexus brachial reliée à la naissance (LPBRN) ont une déficience fonctionnelle, mais l'information au sujet de l'effet de la LPBRN sur la coordination et l'équilibre est toutefois limitée. L'étude visait à déterminer si les enfants qui ont une LPBRN montrent des déficiences de la coordination et de l'équilibre. Méthode : On a procédé à une étude de cohorte prospective portant sur 39 enfants ayant subi une LPBRN âgés de 5 à 15 ans. On a évalué l'amplitude du mouvement, la force, le mouvement actif, l'équilibre et la coordination de la motricité au moyen du test de Bruininks–Oseretsky de la maîtrise de la motricité (BOT-2) et du test d'évaluation du mouvement chez les enfants (MABC-2). On a aussi administré une mesure autodéclarée de l'incapacité physique, la version de l'échelle des activités pour la performance des enfants (ASKp). Résultats : Les participants ont obtenu une moyenne de 44,72 comme score composite de la coordination du corps BOT-2, qui peut varier de 20 à 80. Onze participants (28,2%) ont obtenu un résultat inférieur à la moyenne. Les participants ont obtenu un résultat moyen de 7,3 au sous-test de l'équilibre du test MABC-2, résultat qui peut varier de 1 à 19; 26 participants (66,7%) ont obtenu un résultat inférieur à la moyenne. Sur 39 participants, 25 (65,8%) ont obtenu un résultat ASKp indiquant une certaine incapacité (<95/100); il y avait une différence statistiquement significative au niveau de l'équilibre (p=0,007) entre ces 25 participants et ceux qui n'avaient pas d'incapacité (résultat ASKp de 95 à 100). Conclusions : La majorité des membres de la population à l'étude ont obtenu un résultat dans les catégories « à risque » ou « à difficultés importantes » au niveau de l'équilibre indiqué par le test MABC-2. Le rétablissement de l'équilibre peut constituer un traitement d'appoint valable pour les enfants

  2. Aspects of activities and participation of 7-8 year-old children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Spaargaren, Els; Ahmed, Jasmyn; van Ouwerkerk, Willem J R; de Groot, Vincent; Beckerman, Heleen

    2011-07-01

    Children with an obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) can experience problems in the performance of meaningful activities such as writing, bimanual activities, and participation in sports and leisure activities. To quantify the everyday functioning and participation of 7-8 year-old children with an OBPI, with special emphasis on writing, and to investigate associated characteristics. Parents of children with an OBPI were sent a self-report questionnaire regarding the school performance, writing abilities, bimanual hand use, and participation in sports and leisure activities of their child, assessed with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS sub-scale writing), the ABILHAND-kids, and the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE). Furthermore, questions were asked about socio-demographic variables, medical history, pain, and the use of assistive devices. Fifty three questionnaires were filled in (response 61%). According to the parents, 66% of their children were almost completely recovered, and 58% had a near normal arm function. Most of the children preferred to use their non-involved hand. More than 45% of the children complained about pain, and 39.6% had difficulties with writing, which resulted in a mean developmental delay of 8 months on the VABS sub-scale. Children with writing problems significantly more often had neurosurgery, were living with a single parent, more often received assistance at school, and had a significantly lower ABILHAND-kids score, compared to children with no writing problems. Large percentages of 7-8 year-old children with an OBPI experience difficulties with writing and have musculoskeletal pain. Restrictions in participation were less pronounced. Copyright © 2011 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Self-Concept and Emotional-Behavioral Functioning of Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Belfiore, Lori A.; Rosen, Carol; Sarshalom, Rachel; Grossman, Leslie; Sala, Debra A.; Grossman, John A. I.

    2016-01-01

    Background The reported incidence of brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI) is 0.87 to 2.2 per 1,000 live births. The psychological functioning, including self-concept and emotional-behavioral functioning, of children with BPBI has only been examined to a limited extent. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe the self-concept and emotional-behavioral functioning in children with BPBI from both the child's and parent's perspective. Methods Thirty-one children with BPBI, mean age 11 years 1 month, completed the Draw A Person: Screening Procedure for Emotional Disturbance (DAP:SPED) and Piers Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale (PHCSCS). The parents answered questions from the Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parent Rating Scales (BASC-2 PRS). Results The scores from the DAP:SPED drawings showed further evaluation was not strongly indicated in the majority of the children. The PHCSCS Total score demonstrated that the children had a strongly positive self-concept. The parental responses to the BASC-2 PRS indicated that few children were at risk or in the clinically significant range for the four composite scores and all of the component clinical or adaptive scales. Gender comparison revealed females exhibited greater anxiety than males. Conclusion Both children and parents reported a positive psychological well-being for the majority of the children. Parents had greater concerns about their child's social-emotional functioning, particularly anxiety. An interdisciplinary approach (occupational therapy evaluation, clinical observation, and parental interview) is necessary to determine the need for mental health referral. PMID:28077960

  4. The Impact of Radiotherapy Fields in the Treatment of Patients With Choroid Plexus Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazloom, Ali; Wolff, Johannes E.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive literature review and analysis of cases dealing with choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) to determine the optimal radiotherapy (RT) treatment field. Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English language articles from 1979 to 2008 was performed, yielding 33 articles with 56 patients who had available data regarding RT treatment field. The median age at diagnosis was 2.7 years (range, 1 month-53 years). Of 54 patients with data regarding type of surgery, 21 (38.9%) had complete resection. Chemotherapy was delivered to 27 (48%) as part of initial therapy. The RT treatment volume was the craniospinal axis in 38 (68%), whole brain in 9 (16%), and tumor/tumor bed in 9 (16%). Median follow-up for surviving patients was 40 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 59.5% and 37.2%, respectively. Complete resection (p = 0.035) and use of craniospinal irradiation (CSI; p = 0.025) were found to positively affect PFS. The 5-year PFS for patients who had CSI vs. whole brain and tumor/tumor bed RT were 44.2% and 15.3%. For the 19 patients who relapsed, 9 (47%) had a recurrence in the RT field, 6 (32%) had a recurrence outside the RT field, and 4 (21%) had a recurrence inside and outside the irradiated field. Conclusion: Patients with CPC who received CSI had better PFS compared with those receiving less than CSI. This study supports the use of CSI in the multimodality management of patients with CPC.

  5. Morphometric analysis of the effect of scapula stabilization on obstetric brachial plexus paralysis patients.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Mendoza, Ricardo; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Diawara, Norou

    2014-09-01

    Scapular position and size deficiency is evident in obstetric brachial plexus paralysis (OBPP) patients due to the absence of balanced muscular forces acting on the scapula. Scapula stabilization (SS) procedures aim to restore a balanced musculature and anatomic position and to augment shoulder function and enhance developmental potential. Retrospective chart review of 106 patients with OBPP between March 1979 and March 2007 was performed. Forty-one female and 27 male were included in the study. In 38 patients, the paralysis was global, 13 had Erb's paralysis with C7 root involvement; in 18 patients, the lesion was limited to C5 and C6. X-rays were evaluated, and scapula dimensions were manually measured at several stages. Shoulder abduction (SA) and external rotation (SER) outcomes were also recorded. Mean improvement was 85.68° in shoulder abduction and 36.74° in shoulder external rotation. SA and SER improvement was significantly better in those who underwent SS procedures compared to those who did not (mean improvement was increased by 9.15° and 8.54°, respectively). Improvement was noted in all scapular dimensions, in all groups, postoperatively. However, the mean improvement in scapular height, big width, small width, and oblique axis discrepancies was 4.92, 14.04, 12.66, and 13.89 %, respectively, higher in patients who underwent SS procedures compared to those who did not. Dimensional discrepancies and functional outcomes are improved by SS procedures. Maximal results are attained in patients who have undergone both primary and secondary shoulder reconstruction before age 2.

  6. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Romaña, M C; Rogier, A

    2013-01-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is considered to be the result of a trauma during the delivery, even if there remains some controversy surrounding the causes. Although most babies recover spontaneously in the first 3 months of life, a small number remains with poor recovery which requires surgical brachial plexus exploration. Surgical indications depend on the type of lesion (producing total or partial palsy) and particularly the nonrecovery of biceps function by the age of 3 months. In a global palsy, microsurgery will be mandatory and the strategy for restoration will focus first on hand reinnervation and secondarily on providing elbow flexion and shoulder stability. Further procedures may be necessary during growth in order to avoid fixed contractured deformities or to give or increase strength of important muscle functions like elbow flexion or wrist extension. The author reviews the history of obstetrical brachial plexus injury, epidemiology, and the specifics of descriptive and functional anatomy in babies and children. Clinical manifestations at birth are directly correlated with the anatomical lesion. Finally, operative procedures are considered, including strategies of reconstruction with nerve grafting in infants and secondary surgery to increase functional capacity at later ages. However, normal function is usually not recovered, particularly in total brachial plexus palsy.

  7. Hypoplasia of the trapezius and history of ipsilateral transient neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Min, William; Price, Andrew E; Alfonso, Israel; Ramos, Lorna; Grossman, John A I

    2011-03-01

    We present two children with hypoplasia of the left trapezius muscle and a history of ipsilateral transient neonatal brachial plexus palsy without documented trapezius weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging in these patients with unilateral left hypoplasia of the trapezius revealed decreased muscles in the left side of the neck and left supraclavicular region on coronal views, decreased muscle mass between the left splenius capitis muscle and the subcutaneous tissue at the level of the neck on axial views, and decreased size of the left paraspinal region on sagittal views. Three possibilities can explain the association of hypoplasia of the trapezius and obstetric brachial plexus palsy: increased vulnerability of the brachial plexus to stretch injury during delivery because of intrauterine trapezius weakness, a casual association of these two conditions, or an erroneous diagnosis of brachial plexus palsy in patients with trapezial weakness. Careful documentation of neck and shoulder movements can distinguish among shoulder weakness because of trapezius hypoplasia, brachial plexus palsy, or brachial plexus palsy with trapezius hypoplasia. Hence, we recommend precise documentation of neck movements in the initial description of patients with suspected neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Anterior humeral circumflex artery avulsion with brachial plexus injury following an isolated traumatic anterior shoulder dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rohi; Koris, Jacob; Wazir, Akhlaq; Srinivasan, Shyamsundar S

    2016-03-11

    A 70-year-old man presented to accident and emergency with an isolated anteriorly dislocated shoulder, in the absence of a concomitant fracture. There was no neurovascular deficit at presentation, and the shoulder was reduced under sedation, using the Kocher's technique. Following this, the patient developed signs of hypovolaemic shock. Clinical examination revealed an expanding fullness in the deltopectoral area, with compromise of the limb neurovascular status. CT imaging confirmed an expanding haematoma from the axillary vessels, restricting left lung expansion. Once resuscitated, the patient was transferred to theatre for exploration of the bleeding vessels. Intraoperative findings included an avulsed anterior circumflex humeral artery that was subsequently ligated. Postoperatively, the patient developed axillary, radial, median and ulnar nerve neuropraxia, which improved clinically prior to discharge. The patient was ultimately discharged home after a lengthy inpatient stay. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  9. Significant improvement in nerve conduction, arm length, and upper extremity function after intraoperative electrical stimulation, neurolysis, and biceps tendon lengthening in obstetric brachial plexus patients.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2015-04-19

    Progressive loss of extension and concomitant bony deformity of the elbow are results of persistent biceps contracture in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, if they do not fully recover. This adversely affects the growth and development and functions of the upper extremity. We have performed biceps tendon lengthening (BTL) using a Z-plasty technique on OBPI patients aged 4 years to adulthood, who had been diagnosed with biceps tendon fixed flexion contractures. Ulnar, radial, and median nerve decompression was also performed at the same sitting. Somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP) monitoring was performed by stimulating the median and ulnar nerves at the wrist and the radial nerve over the dorsum of the hand and recording the peripheral, cervical, and cortical responses. Seven children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy with an average age of 11 years (8.7-14.2 years) were included in this report. Mean follow-up time was 7.4 months (4-11 months). All the patients in this report had the elbow flexion contractures greater than 30°. Mean flexion contracture was 35° (30°-45°) preoperatively, which was improved to 0°-10° postoperatively with an average follow-up of 7 (4-11) months. This surgical procedure corrected the elbow flexion contractures, about an average of 25° and an improved length almost to normal, and improved the upper extremity functions. Neurophysiological data showed significant improvement in conduction of all three nerves tested after neurolysis. Further, median and radial nerve amplitude increase was statistically significant. Statistically significant improvement in biceps length as well as nerve conduction was observed after the surgery. None of the children in our study lost biceps function, although weakness of the biceps is both a short- and long-term risk associated with biceps lengthening.

  10. Electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy side promotes brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in the ischemic cerebral cortex of a rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zongjun; Wang, Lumin

    2012-07-25

    A rat model of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion was established by suture occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery. In situ hybridization results showed that the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic rat cerebral cortex increased after cerebral ischemia/ reperfusion injury. Low frequency continuous wave electroacupuncture (frequency 2-6 Hz, current intensity 2 mA) stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side increased the number of brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA-positive cells in the ischemic cerebral cortex 14 days after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury. At the same time, electroacupuncture stimulation of the healthy brachial plexus truck significantly decreased neurological function scores and alleviated neurological function deficits. These findings suggest that electroacupuncture stimulation of the brachial plexus trunk on the healthy (right) side can greatly increase brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression and improve neurological function.

  11. Exposure of the retroclavicular brachial plexus by clavicle suspension for birth brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Pondaag, Willem; Malessy, Martijn

    2014-06-01

    Surgical exploration and reconstruction of the brachial plexus requires adequate exposure beyond the zone of injury. In the case of extensive lesions, some authors advocate clavicle osteotomy for an extensile approach. Such an osteotomy introduces further morbidity and may impact upon the delicate nerve reconstruction. A new simple but effective method of clavicle elevation is described that provides access to the retroclavicular brachial plexus during exploration for birth brachial plexus palsy.

  12. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  13. The importance of the preoperative clinical parameters and the intraoperative electrophysiological monitoring in brachial plexus surgery.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2011-08-01

    The study aims to demonstrate the impact of some preoperative clinical parameters on the functional outcome of patients sustaining brachial plexus injuries, and to trace some commentaries about the use of intraoperative monitoring techniques. A retrospective study one hundred cases of brachial plexus surgery. The analysis regarding postoperative outcomes was performed by comparing the average of the final result of the surgery for each studied cohort. Direct electrical stimulation was used in all patients, EMG in 59%, SEPs in 37% and evoked NAPs in 19% of the cases. Patients in whom the motor function of the hand was totally or partially preserved before surgery, and those in whom surgery was delayed less than 6 months demonstrated significant (p<0.05) better outcomes. The preoperative parameters associated to favorable outcomes in reconstruction of the brachial plexus are a good post-traumatic status of the hand and a short interval between injury and surgery.

  14. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Community Living 330 C St., NW Washington DC Washington, DC 20201 https://acl.gov/Programs/NIDILRR/index.aspx ... for Community Living 330 C St., NW Washington DC Washington, DC 20201 https://acl.gov/Programs/NIDILRR/ ...

  15. Perinatal brachial plexus palsy

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, John; Watt, Joe; Olson, Jaret; Van Aerde, John

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND Perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is a flaccid paralysis of the arm at birth that affects different nerves of the brachial plexus supplied by C5 to T1 in 0.42 to 5.1 infants per 1000 live births. OBJECTIVES To identify antenatal factors associated with PBPP and possible preventive measures, and to review the natural history as compared with the outcome after primary or secondary surgical interventions. METHODS A literature search on randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses on the prevention and treatment of PBPP was performed. EMBASE, Medline, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library were searched until June 2005. Key words for searches included ‘brachial plexus’, ‘brachial plexus neuropathy’, ‘brachial plexus injury’, ‘birth injury’ and ‘paralysis, obstetric’. RESULTS There were no prospective studies on the cause or prevention of PBPP. Whereas birth trauma is said to be the most common cause, there is some evidence that PBPP may occur before delivery. Shoulder dystocia and PBPP are largely unpredictable, although associations of PBPP with shoulder dystocia, infants who are large for gestational age, maternal diabetes and instrumental delivery have been reported. The various forms of PBPP, clinical findings and diagnostic measures are described. Recent evidence suggests that the natural history of PBPP is not all favourable, and residual deficits are estimated at 20% to 30%, in contrast with the previous optimistic view of full recovery in greater than 90% of affected children. There were no randomized controlled trials on nonoperative management. There was no conclusive evidence that primary surgical exploration of the brachial plexus supercedes conservative management for improved outcome. However, results from nonrandomized studies indicated that children with severe injuries do better with surgical repair. Secondary surgical reconstructions were inferior to primary intervention, but could still improve arm

  16. Functioning free gracilis transfer to reconstruct elbow flexion and quality of life in global brachial plexus injured patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Yang, Jian-Tao; Fu, Guo; Li, Xiang-Ming; Qin, Ben-Gang; Hou, Yi; Qi, Jian; Li, Ping; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Gu, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    In the study, the functional recovery and relative comprehensive quality of life of cases of global brachial plexus treated with free functioning muscle transfers were investigated. Patients who received functioning gracilis muscle transfer between August 1999 and October 2014 to reconstruct elbow flexion, wrist and fingers extension were recruited. The mean age of the patients was 26.36 (range, 16–42) years. The mean period of time from gracilis transfer to the last follow-up was 54.5 months (range, 12–185 months). Muscle power, active range of motion of the elbow flexion, wrist extension, and total active fingers extension were recorded. SDS, SAS and DASH questionnaires were given to estimate patients’ quality of life. 35.71% reported good elbow flexion and 50.00% reported excellent elbow flexion. The average ROM of the elbow flexion was 106.5° (range, 0–142°) and was 17.00° (range, 0–72°) for wrist extension. The average DASH score was 51.14 (range, 17.5–90.8). The prevalence of anxiety and depression were 42.86% and 45.24%. Thrombosis and bowstringing were the most common short and long-term complications. Based on these findings, free gracilis transfer using accessory nerve as donor nerve is a satisfactory treatment to reconstruct the elbow flexion and wrist extension in global-brachial-plexus-injured patients. PMID:26935173

  17. Tolerance of the Brachial Plexus to High-Dose Reirradiation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Allen M; Yoshizaki, Taeko; Velez, Maria A; Mikaeilian, Argin G; Hsu, Sophia; Cao, Minsong

    2017-05-01

    To study the tolerance of the brachial plexus to high doses of radiation exceeding historically accepted limits by analyzing human subjects treated with reirradiation for recurrent tumors of the head and neck. Data from 43 patients who were confirmed to have received overlapping dose to the brachial plexus after review of radiation treatment plans from the initial and reirradiation courses were used to model the tolerance of this normal tissue structure. A standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy believed to be related to brachial plexus injury was utilized to screen for toxicity. Cumulative dose was calculated by fusing the initial dose distributions onto the reirradiation plan, thereby creating a composite plan via deformable image registration. The median elapsed time from the initial course of radiation therapy to reirradiation was 24 months (range, 3-144 months). The dominant complaints among patients with symptoms were ipsilateral pain (54%), numbness/tingling (31%), and motor weakness and/or difficulty with manual dexterity (15%). The cumulative maximum dose (Dmax) received by the brachial plexus ranged from 60.5 Gy to 150.1 Gy (median, 95.0 Gy). The cumulative mean (Dmean) dose ranged from 20.2 Gy to 111.5 Gy (median, 63.8 Gy). The 1-year freedom from brachial plexus-related neuropathy was 67% and 86% for subjects with a cumulative Dmax greater than and less than 95.0 Gy, respectively (P=.05). The 1-year complication-free rate was 66% and 87%, for those reirradiated within and after 2 years from the initial course, respectively (P=.06). The development of brachial plexus-related symptoms was less than expected owing to repair kinetics and to the relatively short survival of the subject population. Time-dose factors were demonstrated to be predictive of complications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Axillary artery injury as a complication of proximal humerus fractures.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, J A; Light, R; Lustrin, I

    1998-01-01

    Proximal humerus fractures are common injuries and represent approximately 5% of all fractures. These fractures are infrequently associated with neurovascular injuries. Brachial plexus injuries are uncommon, whereas axillary artery injuries are rare. A review of 19 previously reported cases of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture revealed that 84% occurred in patients older than 50 years, 53% were associated with brachial plexus injury, and 21% resulted in upper extremity amputation. This study describes a case of axillary artery injury after proximal humerus fracture and, on the basis of a literature review, offers suggestions for the early diagnosis and effective treatment of this uncommon injury.

  19. Single-needle celiac plexus block: is needle tip position critical in patients with no regional anatomic distortions?

    PubMed

    De Cicco, M; Matovic, M; Balestreri, L; Fracasso, A; Morassut, S; Testa, V

    1997-12-01

    The "single-needle" celiac plexus block is becoming a popular technique. Despite different approaches and methods used to place the needle, the success of the block depends on adequate spread of the injectate in the celiac area. In the present retrospective study, the influence of needle tip position in relation to the celiac artery on injectate spread was evaluated. Among 138 cancer patients subjected, via an anterior approach, to computed tomography (CT)-guided single-needle neurolytic celiac plexus block, a radiologist, blinded to the aim of the study, retrospectively selected 53 cases with normal anatomy of the celiac area as judged by CT. The decision was based on images obtained before the block. Patients were then classified into either group A (29 patients), in whom the needle tip was caudad to the celiac artery, and group B (24 patients), in whom it was cephalad. To evaluate CT patterns of neurolytic (mixed with contrast) spread, the celiac area was divided on the frontal plane into four quadrants: upper right and left and lower right and left, as related to the celiac artery. Patient assessments by visual analog scale were reviewed to evaluate the degree of pain relief. Pain relief 30 days after block was judged as long-lasting. The patterns of contrast spread in relation to the needle position and pain relief according to the number of quadrants with contrast were analyzed. The percentage of cases with four quadrants with contrast was higher when the needle tip was cephalad (58%, group B) than when it was caudad (14%, group A) to the celiac artery (P < 0.01). The percentage of patients with four and three quadrants with contrast was also higher in group B at 79% than in group A at 38% (P < 0.01). A significant difference in long-lasting pain relief was observed between patients with four quadrants with contrast (18 of 18, 100%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 81-100%) and patients with three quadrants with contrast (5 of 12, 42%; 95% CI, 15-72%) (P < 0

  20. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia.

  1. [Brachial plexus sleep palsy].

    PubMed

    Fourcade, G; Taieb, G; Renard, D; Labauge, P; Pradal-Prat, D

    2011-01-01

    Brachial plexus is rarely involved in "Saturday night palsy". A young man was admitted for numbness and weakness of his right upper limb after awaking from sleep. Neurophysiological studies, consistent with brachial plexopathy, revealed presence of proximal conduction blocks. Patient presented spontaneous clinical and neurophysiological improvement. Diagnosis of compressive brachial plexopathy needs to eliminate other causes of neuropathy with conduction block. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Proximal versus Distal Nerve Transfer for Biceps Reinnervation—A Comparative Study in a Rat’s Brachial Plexus Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Aleksandra M.; Lu, Johnny Chuieng-Yi; Chang, Tommy Naj-Jen; Fang, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background: The exact role of proximal and distal nerve transfers in reconstruction strategies of brachial plexus injury remains controversial. We compared proximal with distal nerve reconstruction strategies in a rat model of brachial plexus injury. Methods: In rats, the C6 spinal nerve with a nerve graft (proximal nerve transfer model, n = 30, group A) and 50% of ulnar nerve (distal nerve transfer model, n = 30, group B) were used as the donor nerves. The targets were the musculocutaneous nerve and the biceps muscle. Outcomes were recorded at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postoperatively. Outcome parameters included grooming test, biceps muscle weight, compound muscle action potentials, tetanic contraction force, and axonal morphology of the donor and target nerves. Results: The axonal morphology of the 2 donor nerves revealed no significant difference. Time interval analysis in the proximal nerve transfer group showed peak axon counts at 12 weeks and a trend of improvement in all functional and physiologic parameters across all time points with statistically significant differences for grooming test, biceps compound action potentials, tetanic muscle contraction force, and muscle weight at 16 weeks. In contrast, in the distal nerve transfer group, the only statistically significant difference was observed between the 4 and 8 week time points, followed by a plateau from 8 to 16 weeks. Conclusions: Outcomes of proximal nerve transfers are ultimately superior to distal nerve transfers in our experimental model. Possible explanations for the superior results include a reduced need for cortical adaptation and higher proportions of motor units in the proximal nerve transfers. PMID:28293499

  3. Fracture Dislocation of Shoulder with Brachial Plexus Palsy: A Case Report and Review of Management Options.

    PubMed

    Rathore, Sameer; Kasha, Srinivas; Yeggana, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    Injuries causing fracture dislocation of shoulder and brachial plexus palsy are extremely rare. As per authors' knowledge, three part fracture of proximal humerus with shoulder dislocation and brachial plexus palsy has not been reported in the literature. A 53 year old female sustained a three part fracture of right proximal humerus along with dislocation of shoulder joint and brachial plexus palsy following a fall from a flight of stairs. Fracture was managed by plating of proximal humerus and brachial palsy was followed up with electrodiagnostic studies and regular physiotherapy. Fracture united by three months and patient had near complete recovery of brachial palsy. Authors have discussed diagnostic modalities and management options in the article. Clinician should always look for clinical evidence of brachial plexus injury in patients with anterior shoulder dislocation. Signs of nerve injury with shoulder fracture dislocation are easily overlooked or incorrectly attributed to pain due to bony injury. Subsequent loss of shoulder function in elderly is often thought to be due to immobilization and stiffness. Clinical suspicion can help in diagnosing the often missed neurological injuries and can help in improving outcomes.

  4. Fracture Dislocation of Shoulder with Brachial Plexus Palsy: A Case Report and Review of Management Options

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Sameer; Kasha, Srinivas; Yeggana, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Injuries causing fracture dislocation of shoulder and brachial plexus palsy are extremely rare. As per authors’ knowledge, three part fracture of proximal humerus with shoulder dislocation and brachial plexus palsy has not been reported in the literature. Case presentation: A 53 year old female sustained a three part fracture of right proximal humerus along with dislocation of shoulder joint and brachial plexus palsy following a fall from a flight of stairs. Fracture was managed by plating of proximal humerus and brachial palsy was followed up with electrodiagnostic studies and regular physiotherapy. Fracture united by three months and patient had near complete recovery of brachial palsy. Authors have discussed diagnostic modalities and management options in the article. Conclusion: Clinician should always look for clinical evidence of brachial plexus injury in patients with anterior shoulder dislocation. Signs of nerve injury with shoulder fracture dislocation are easily overlooked or incorrectly attributed to pain due to bony injury. Subsequent loss of shoulder function in elderly is often thought to be due to immobilization and stiffness. Clinical suspicion can help in diagnosing the often missed neurological injuries and can help in improving outcomes. PMID:28819602

  5. Ultrasound evaluation of diaphragm function and its application in critical patients, mechanical ventilation and brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    de la Quintana Gordon, F de B; Nacarino Alcorta, B; Fajardo Pérez, M

    2017-03-23

    Before diaphragm ultrasonography, assessment of diaphragm function was very difficult due to the complex nature of its exploration. The use of this new technique has shed light on diagnostic problems and treatment with an improvement in final outcomes for critically ill patients, in whom the incidence of diaphragm weakness or dysfunction has been underestimated. Better knowledge of diaphragm function enables us earlier diagnosis by quantification of diaphragm contractile activity or evaluation of functional status after delivery of plexus block anaesthesia, facilitating therapeutic decisions. It is also being used as a guide in the process of weaning from mechanical ventilation or as the safest approach for braquial plexus block. In this review we present how to perform a systematic exploration of diaphragm function and its clinical implications. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Reanimation of elbow extension with intercostal nerves transfers in total brachial plexus palsies.

    PubMed

    Goubier, Jean-Noël; Teboul, Frédéric; Khalifa, Heba

    2011-01-01

    Restoration of flexion in the elbow is the priority in the management of brachial plexus injuries. Current techniques of reconstructions, combining both nerve grafting and nerve transfer, allow more extensive repair, with additional targets: shoulder, elbow extension, hand. The transfer of intercostal nerves onto the nerve of the triceps long head is used to restore elbow extension. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the results of this procedure, in total brachial plexus palsies with uninjured C5 and C6 roots. Eleven patients with total brachial plexus injury were reviewed 24 months in average after intercostal nerves transfer. The average age of the patients was twenty-nine years. The average time to surgery after occurrence of the injury was 5 months. Triceps re-innervation and strength of elbow extension were evaluated. The averaged time required for triceps re-innervation after intercostal nerve transfer was 9 months. Seven patients achieved M4 elbow extension according to the Medical Research Council grading system. Two patients achieved M3 elbow extension. Two patients had poor results (M2 and M0). Transfer of intercostal nerves onto the nerve of the triceps long head is a reliable procedure for the restoration of elbow extension in total brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Delineation of capillary dropout in the deep retinal capillary plexus using optical coherence tomography angiography in a patient with Purtscher's retinopathy exhibiting normal fluorescein angiography findings: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tokimitsu, Motoharu; Murata, Masako; Toriyama, Yuichi; Hirano, Takao; Iesato, Yasuhiro; Murata, Toshinori

    2016-07-19

    Fat embolism in the deep retinal capillary plexus is one of the reported mechanisms underlying central/paracentral scotoma in patients with Purtscher's retinopathy. Here we report the clear delineation of capillary dropout in the deep capillary plexus using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) in a chronic case of unexplained scotoma that developed after femoral fracture. The patient exhibited normal fluorescein angiography (FA) findings and a normal retinal appearance. A 42-year-old Japanese man with a history of bilateral, unexplained paracentral scotoma that developed after femoral fracture and pulmonary fat embolism due to a car accident 20 years ago was referred to our outpatient clinic. Initial ophthalmological examination revealed unremarkable retinal findings. Goldmann perimetry, FA, and full field electroretinography showed no pathological changes. Although fat embolism in the retinal vasculature was suspected, psychosomatic visual field defects could not be ruled out. We performed OCTA, which clearly delineated capillary dropout in the deep retinal capillary plexus. A final diagnosis of paracentral acute middle maculopathy secondary to Purtscher's retinopathy was made on the basis of this finding. Our findings suggest that OCTA clearly and noninvasively delineates the deep retinal capillary plexus and the superficial capillary plexus. Because conventional FA provides limited depth resolution, capillary dropout restricted within the deep capillary plexus cannot be detected, particularly when the superficial capillary plexus is well preserved. Thus, OCTA can be a useful tool for the detection of capillary dropout in the deep retinal capillary plexus.

  8. A histochemical study of the biceps brachii muscle cross-innervated by intercostal nerves. 6 cases of brachial plexus injuries operated with nerve-crossing.

    PubMed

    Kawai, H; Murase, T; Kawabata, H; Ohta, I; Masatomi, T; Ono, K; Nonaka, I

    1994-04-01

    Direct nerve-crossing of intercostal nerves from the lateral thorax to the musculocutaneous nerve was performed in 6 patients after spinal nerve root avulsion with brachial plexus palsy. Elbow flexion power was regained well enough to move against gravity and some resistance in all cases. The muscles were examined histochemically 4 (1-9) years after the operation. The intercostally-innervated biceps brachii muscle showed motor predominance of slow-twitch Type 1 fiber regeneration much more than that of fast-twitch Type 2 fiber in 5 of our patients. Our study suggests that the motor nerves of slow-twitch fibers may have priority in peripheral nerve regeneration over those of fast-twitch fibers.

  9. Surgical correction of ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy sequelae.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Praveen; Parekh, Harshil; Venkatramani, Hari; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-01-01

    Ulnar deviation deformity of the wrist in patients with birth brachial plexus palsy is an important cosmetic concern among the patients and their relatives; especially in the patients who have recovered the basic limb functions. Though there is ample literature available regarding the management of the shoulder deformity there is paucity of literature regarding management of wrist ulnar deviation deformity. We report our experience with correction of this deformity in five cases with isolated ulnar deviation deformity without forearm rotational deformity or weakness of the wrist muscles. All the patients underwent extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) to extensor carpi radialis longus (ECRL) tendon transfer. At a minimum of 18 months follow-up all the patients and their families were satisfied with the cosmetic appearance of the limb. Correction of the deformity improves the appearance of the limb, improves self-confidence of the child, and allows them to integrate well into the society. Interestingly, the patients expressed improvement in their grip strength and overall hand function after this surgery. The notable functions which improved were easy reach of the hand-to-mouth for feeding and easy handling of the things requiring bimanual activities. Although the main aim of this operation was to correct the appearance of the hand it was found to be also functionally useful by the patients and hence we are encouraged to report it for wider use. The results were maintained during the follow-up period of as long as 47 months.

  10. The current role of diagnostic imaging in the preoperative workup for refractory neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Wilson, Thomas J; DiPietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Ibrahim, Mohannad; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-08-01

    Despite recent improvements in perinatal care, the incidence of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains relatively common. CT myelography is currently considered to be the optimal imaging modality for evaluating nerve root integrity. Recent improvements in MRI techniques have made it an attractive alternative to evaluate nerve root avulsions (preganglionic injuries). We demonstrate the utility of MRI for the evaluation of normal and avulsed spinal nerve roots. We also show the utility of ultrasound in providing useful preoperative evaluation of the postganglionic brachial plexus in patients with NBPP.

  11. Results of surgical techniques for re-innervation of the triceps as additional procedures for patients with upper root injuries.

    PubMed

    Flores, L Pretto

    2013-03-01

    Patients with injuries restricted to the upper and middle trunks of the brachial plexus may obtain recovery of elbow extension via the lower trunk, which makes it difficult to assess the real effect of interventions to restore the triceps function in such cases. This study aimed to determine the impact of surgical strategies for re-innervation of the triceps in individuals with partial injuries of the brachial plexus. Patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 21 participants in whom the surgery included one technique for re-innervation of elbow extension. In this group, six different extra- or intra-plexal donors were targeted to one of the motor branches of the triceps muscle. Group 2 was composed of 24 controls in which the reconstruction did not include any intervention for recovering triceps function. The individuals who underwent intervention for re-innervation of the triceps obtained significantly better outcomes for elbow extension than the controls.

  12. Enlargement of choroid plexus in complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangyu; Hotta, Jaakko; Lehtinen, Maria K; Forss, Nina; Hari, Riitta

    2015-09-21

    The choroid plexus, located in brain ventricles, has received surprisingly little attention in clinical neuroscience. In morphometric brain analysis, we serendipitously found a 21% increase in choroid plexus volume in 12 patients suffering from complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) compared with age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. No enlargement was observed in a group of 8 patients suffering from chronic pain of other etiologies. Our findings suggest involvement of the choroid plexus in the pathogenesis of CRPS. Since the choroid plexus can mediate interaction between peripheral and brain inflammation, our findings pinpoint the choroid plexus as an important target for future research of central pain mechanisms.

  13. Surgical outcomes of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot wounds in adults

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The management of brachial plexus injuries due to gunshot wounds is a surgical challenge. Better surgical strategies based on clinical and electrophysiological patterns are needed. The aim of this study is to clarify the factors which may influence the surgical technique and outcome of the brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries. Methods Two hundred and sixty five patients who had brachial plexus lesions caused by gunshot injuries were included in this study. All of them were male with a mean age of 22 years. Twenty-three patients were improved with conservative treatment while the others underwent surgical treatment. The patients were classified and managed according to the locations, clinical and electrophysiological findings, and coexisting lesions. Results The wounding agent was shrapnel in 106 patients and bullet in 159 patients. Surgical procedures were performed from 6 weeks to 10 months after the injury. The majority of the lesions were repaired within 4 months were improved successfully. Good results were obtained in upper trunk and lateral cord lesions. The outcome was satisfactory if the nerve was intact and only compressed by fibrosis or the nerve was in-contunuity with neuroma or fibrosis. Conclusion Appropriate surgical techniques help the recovery from the lesions, especially in patients with complete functional loss. Intraoperative nerve status and the type of surgery significantly affect the final clinical outcome of the patients. PMID:19627573

  14. Ecrg4 expression and its product augurin in the choroid plexus: impact on fetal brain development, cerebrospinal fluid homeostasis and neuroprogenitor cell response to CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The content and composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is determined in large part by the choroid plexus (CP) and specifically, a specialized epithelial cell (CPe) layer that responds to, synthesizes, and transports peptide hormones into and out of CSF. Together with ventricular ependymal cells, these CPe relay homeostatic signals throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and regulate CSF hydrodynamics. One new candidate signal is augurin, a newly recognized 14 kDa protein that is encoded by esophageal cancer related gene-4 (Ecrg4), a putative tumor suppressor gene whose presence and function in normal tissues remains unexplored and enigmatic. The aim of this study was to explore whether Ecrg4 and its product augurin, can be implicated in CNS development and the response to CNS injury. Methods Ecrg4 gene expression in CNS and peripheral tissues was studied by in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR. Augurin, the protein encoded by Ecrg4, was detected by immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. The biological consequence of augurin over-expression was studied in a cortical stab model of rat CNS injury by intra-cerebro-ventricular injection of an adenovirus vector containing the Ecrg4 cDNA. The biological consequences of reduced augurin expression were evaluated by characterizing the CNS phenotype caused by Ecrg4 gene knockdown in developing zebrafish embryos. Results Gene expression and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that, the CP is a major source of Ecrg4 in the CNS and that Ecrg4 mRNA is predominantly localized to choroid plexus epithelial (CPe), ventricular and central canal cells of the spinal cord. After a stab injury into the brain however, both augurin staining and Ecrg4 gene expression decreased precipitously. If the loss of augurin was circumvented by over-expressing Ecrg4 in vivo, BrdU incorporation by cells in the subependymal zone decreased. Inversely, gene knockdown of Ecrg4 in developing zebrafish embryos caused

  15. The anesthetic considerations while performing supraclavicular brachial plexus block in emergency surgical patients using a nerve stimulator.

    PubMed

    Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur; Shetty, Pramal; Shetty, Rithesh; Shenoy, Sunil P

    2015-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is favored in patients who undergo emergency extremity (limb) surgery, and specifically so in the absence of fasting status. In the absence of ultrasonic guidance, the nerve stimulator still remains a valuable tool in performing a brachial block, but its use is difficult in an emergency surgical patient and greater cautious approach is essential. We identified the supraclavicular plexus by the nerve stimulation-motor response technique as follows. Anterior chest muscles contractions, diaphragmatic contraction, deltoid contractions, and posterior shoulder girdle muscle contractions when identified were taken as "negative response" with decreasing stimulating current. A forearm muscle contraction, especially "wrist flexion" and "finger flexion" at 0.5 mA of current was taken as "positive response." If no positive response was identified, the "elbow flexion" was considered as the final positive response for successful drug placement. The series of patients had difficulty for administering both general and regional anesthesia and we considered them as complex scenarios. The risk of the block failure was weighed heavily against the benefits of its success. The described series includes patients who had successful outcomes in the end and the techniques, merits, and risks are highlighted.

  16. The anesthetic considerations while performing supraclavicular brachial plexus block in emergency surgical patients using a nerve stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Tantry, Thrivikrama Padur; Shetty, Pramal; Shetty, Rithesh; Shenoy, Sunil P.

    2015-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is favored in patients who undergo emergency extremity (limb) surgery, and specifically so in the absence of fasting status. In the absence of ultrasonic guidance, the nerve stimulator still remains a valuable tool in performing a brachial block, but its use is difficult in an emergency surgical patient and greater cautious approach is essential. We identified the supraclavicular plexus by the nerve stimulation-motor response technique as follows. Anterior chest muscles contractions, diaphragmatic contraction, deltoid contractions, and posterior shoulder girdle muscle contractions when identified were taken as “negative response” with decreasing stimulating current. A forearm muscle contraction, especially “wrist flexion” and “finger flexion” at 0.5 mA of current was taken as “positive response.” If no positive response was identified, the “elbow flexion” was considered as the final positive response for successful drug placement. The series of patients had difficulty for administering both general and regional anesthesia and we considered them as complex scenarios. The risk of the block failure was weighed heavily against the benefits of its success. The described series includes patients who had successful outcomes in the end and the techniques, merits, and risks are highlighted. PMID:26417145

  17. Morphometric analysis of the association of primary shoulder reconstruction procedures with scapular growth in obstetric brachial plexus paralysis patients.

    PubMed

    Terzis, Julia K; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Mendoza, Ricardo; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Diawara, Norou

    2014-09-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus paralysis (OBPP) has been associated with shoulder deformities, scapular growth, and shoulder function impairment. The absence of balanced muscular forces acting on the scapula has been considered responsible for scapula dysplasia and impaired growth as compared with the normal side. Scapula growth impairment may also lead to shoulder and upper extremity dysfunction. This study aims at showing the association of primary nerve reconstruction with the restoration of scapular bone growth potential. This is a retrospective review of 73 patients with OBPP who underwent primary shoulder reconstruction. Patients were categorized for assessment and analysis into group A, global paralysis; group B, Erb's palsy; and group C, Erb's palsy with C7 root involvement. Scapular posteroanterior and lateral X-rays were obtained in which four scapula dimensions were manually measured. The growth discrepancy depending on the applied treatment was investigated. The highest improvement was noted in scapular height in the Erb's palsy group who underwent simultaneous neurotization of the suprascapular and axillary nerves. The oblique axis was more improved in the Erb's palsy group while both big and small widths were more improved in the Erb's palsy with C7 root involvement group in patients who underwent concomitant neurotization of the suprascapular and the axillary nerves. Functional improvement correlated positively with growth improvement in all groups and scapular dimensions. Scapula growth and shoulder function improvement were higher in patients with Erb's palsy. Simultaneous axillary and suprascapular nerve neurotization provided the best outcome in both functional and growth restoration.

  18. A multistate population-based analysis of linked maternal and neonatal discharge records to identify risk factors for neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael D; Goodyear, Shaun M; Leith, Wendy M

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the interaction and contribution of maternal and fetal risk factors associated with neonatal brachial plexus injury (BPI). In a case-control study, matched maternal and neonatal discharge records were accessed from US State Inpatient Databases for New Jersey (2010-2012), Michigan (2010-2011), and Hawaii (2010-2011). Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to evaluate associations between risk factors and BPI. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used to build predictive models, including two stratified models evaluating deliveries among obese and diabetic cohorts. Among 376 325 deliveries, BPI was diagnosed in 274 (0.1%). Significant BPI risk factors included maternal obesity (odds ratio [OR] 2.7, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.7-4.4), maternal diabetes (OR 4.6, 95% CI 3.0-7.0), use of forceps (OR 4.6, 95% CI 2.3-9.0), and vacuum assistance (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.7-3.3). After adjusting for shoulder dystocia and other predictive factors, cesarean reduced the risk of BPI by 88% (OR 0.1, 95% CI 0.07-0.2). When stratified by obesity and diabetes, the ORs for BPI increased significantly for macrosomia, forceps, and vacuum assistance. The analysis confirms and quantifies more precisely the impact of risk factors for neonatal BPI, and provides a reliable basis for evidence-based clinical decision-making models. © 2016 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  19. Shoulder Function and Bone Mineralization in Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury After Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation During Weight-Bearing Exercises.

    PubMed

    Elnaggar, Ragab Kamal

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation during weight-bearing exercises on shoulder function and bone mineral density (BMD) in children with obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI). This study was a randomized controlled trial. Forty-two children with OBPI were recruited. Their ages ranged from 3 to 5 years. They were randomly assigned either to control group (received a selected program) or study group (received the same program as the control group and neuromuscular electrical stimulation during weight bearing). Mallet grading system and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry were used to evaluate shoulder function and BMD respectively at entry and after intervention (3 months later). No significant differences of the outcome measures were detected at entry. Significant differences were observed within both groups when the pre and post treatment scores within each group were compared. Finally, significant differences favoring the study group were recorded when their post treatment scores were compared. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation during weight bearing exercises is an effective and simple method to improve shoulder function and BMD in children with OBPI.

  20. The effects of denervation, reinnervation, and muscle imbalance on functional muscle length and elbow flexion contracture following neonatal brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Weekley, Holly; Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Eismann, Emily; Wylie, Christopher; Cornwall, Roger

    2012-08-01

    The pathophysiology of paradoxical elbow flexion contractures following neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) is incompletely understood. The current study tests the hypothesis that this contracture occurs by denervation-induced impairment of elbow flexor muscle growth. Unilateral forelimb paralysis was created in mice in four neonatal (5-day-old) BPI groups (C5-6 excision, C5-6 neurotomy, C5-6 neurotomy/repair, and C5-T1 global excision), one non-neonatal BPI group (28-day-old C5-6 excision), and two neonatal muscle imbalance groups (triceps tenotomy ± C5-6 excision). Four weeks post-operatively, motor function, elbow range of motion, and biceps/brachialis functional lengths were assessed. Musculocutaneous nerve (MCN) denervation and reinnervation were assessed immunohistochemically. Elbow flexion motor recovery and elbow flexion contractures varied inversely among the neonatal BPI groups. Contracture severity correlated with biceps/brachialis shortening and MCN denervation (relative axon loss), with no contractures occurring in mice with MCN reinnervation (presence of growth cones). No contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening occurred following non-neonatal BPI, regardless of denervation or reinnervation. Neonatal triceps tenotomy did not cause contractures or biceps/brachialis shortening, nor did it worsen those following neonatal C5-6 excision. Denervation-induced functional shortening of elbow flexor muscles leads to variable elbow flexion contractures depending on the degree, permanence, and timing of denervation, independent of muscle imbalance. Copyright © 2012 Orthopaedic Research Society.

  1. Limited glenohumeral cross-body adduction in children with brachial plexus birth palsy: a contributor to scapular winging.

    PubMed

    Russo, Stephanie A; Loeffler, Bryan J; Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H; Richards, James G; Ashworth, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 1 of every 1000 live births results in life-long impairments because of a brachial plexus injury. The long-term sequelae of persistent injuries include glenohumeral joint dysplasia and glenohumeral internal rotation and adduction contractures. Scapular winging is also common, and patients and their families often express concern regarding this observed scapular winging. It is difficult for clinicians to adequately address these concerns without a satisfying explanation for why scapular winging occurs in children with brachial plexus birth palsy. This study examined our proposed theory that a glenohumeral cross-body abduction contracture leads to the appearance of scapular winging in children with residual brachial plexus birth palsy. Sixteen children with brachial plexus injuries were enrolled in this study. Three-dimensional locations of markers placed on the thorax, scapula, and humerus were recorded in the hand to mouth Mallet position. The unaffected limbs served as a control. Scapulothoracic and glenohumeral cross-body adduction angles were compared between the affected and unaffected limbs. The affected limbs demonstrated significantly greater scapulothoracic and significantly smaller glenohumeral cross-body adduction angles than the unaffected limbs. The affected limbs also exhibited a significantly lower glenohumeral cross-body adduction to scapulothoracic cross-body adduction ratio. The results of this study support the theory that brachial plexus injuries can lead to a glenohumeral cross-body abduction contracture. Affected children demonstrated increased scapulothoracic cross-body adduction that is likely a compensatory mechanism because of decreased glenohumeral cross-body adduction. These findings are unique and better define the etiology of scapular winging in children with brachial plexus injuries. This information can be relayed to patients and their families when explaining the appearance of scapular winging. Level II.

  2. Transscalene brachial plexus block: a new posterolateral approach for brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hoang C; Fath, Erwin; Wirtz, Sebastian; Bey, Tareg

    2007-09-01

    Depending on the approach to the upper brachial plexus, severe complications have been reported. We describe a novel posterolateral approach for brachial plexus block which, from an anatomical and theoretical point of view, seems to offer advantages. Twenty-seven patients were scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper arm or shoulder using this new transscalene brachial plexus block. The success rate was 85.2% for surgery. Two patients required additional analgesia with IV sufentanil. In two others, regional anesthesia was inadequate. The side effects of this technique included reversible recurrent laryngeal nerve blockade in two patients and a reversible Horner syndrome in one patient. Further studies are needed to compare the transscalene brachial plexus block with other approaches to the brachial plexus.

  3. Brachial plexus surgery: the role of the surgical technique for improvement of the functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2011-08-01

    The study aims to demonstrate the techniques employed in surgery of the brachial plexus that are associated to evidence-based improvement of the functional outcome of these patients. A retrospective study of one hundred cases of traumatic brachial plexus injuries. Comparison between the postoperative outcomes associated to some different surgical techniques was demonstrated. The technique of proximal nerve roots grafting was associated to good results in about 70% of the cases. Significantly better outcomes were associated to the Oberlin's procedure and the Sansak's procedure, while the improvement of outcomes associated to phrenic to musculocutaneous nerve and the accessory to suprascapular nerve transfer did not reach statistical significance. Reinnervation of the hand was observed in less than 30% of the cases. Brachial plexus surgery renders satisfactory results for reinnervation of the proximal musculature of the upper limb, however the same good outcomes are not usually associated to the reinnervation of the hand.

  4. Understanding Long-Term Outcomes and Patient Expectations Among Adolescents with Neonatal Brachial Plexus Palsy: A Qualitative and Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Squitieri, Lee; Larson, Bradley P.; Chang, Kate W-C.; Yang, Lynda J-S.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Quality of life (QOL) among adolescents with neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) is an important but unexplored topic. To date, few NBPP studies use comprehensive patient-reported outcome measures, and none specifically address the adolescent population. This study explores the long-term QOL and patient expectations among adolescents with NBPP using qualitative and quantitative approaches. Methods Eighteen adolescents with residual NBPP impairment between the ages of 10 to 17 years along with their parents were included in our study. Adolescents and their parents underwent separate one hour tape-recorded semi-structured interviews, which were audio recorded and transcribed. We also collected quantitative patient outcome measures to quantify the degree of each adolescent’s functional impairment and to increase our understanding of long-term quality of life and patient expectations. Results Thirteen females and five males with a mean age of 11.6 years participated in our study. Through qualitative analysis we identified the following factors contributing to overall QOL from the patient and parent perspective: social impact and peer acceptance, emotional adjustment, aesthetic concerns and body image, functional limitations, physical and occupational therapy, finances, pain, and family dynamics. Despite residual impairment, most adolescents and their parents reported a good overall QOL according to quantitative outcome measures, with adolescents reporting slightly higher QOL than their parents. However, both adolescents and their parents report relatively modest satisfaction with their current condition and express expectations for improvement in multiple areas. Discussion Understanding patient expectations and QOL in NBPP adolescents are essential for medical decision-making and advancing care. Our study results showed that functional and aesthetic factors were responsible for the majority of observed differences in QOL among NBPP adolescents. We also

  5. Adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block for amputation of lower limb in high-risk patient-a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Guang; Ding, Yan-Ling; Han, Ai-Ping; Hu, Chang-Qing; Hao, Shi; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Li, Yong-Wang; Liu, Hu; Han, Zhe; Guo, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The ischemia necrosis of limb frequently requires surgery of amputation. Lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block is an ideal intra-operative anesthetic and post-operative antalgic technique for patients of amputation, especially for high-risk patients who have severe cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. However, the duration of analgesia of peripheral nerve block is hardly sufficient to avoid the postoperative pain and the usage of opioids. In this case, a 79-year-old man, with multiple cerebral infarcts, congestive heart failure, atrial flutter and syncope, was treated with an above knee amputation because of ischemia necrosis of his left lower limb. Dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg was added to 0.33% ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block in this case for intra-operative anesthesia and post-operative analgesia. The sensory function was blocked fully for surgery and the duration of analgesia maintained 26 hours with haemodynamic stability and moderate sedation. The patient did not complain pain and require any supplementary analgesics after surgery. This case showed that adding 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block may be a feasible and safe technique for high-risk patients for lower limb surgery of amputation.

  6. Adding dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block for amputation of lower limb in high-risk patient-a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Guang; Ding, Yan-Ling; Han, Ai-Ping; Hu, Chang-Qing; Hao, Shi; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Li, Yong-Wang; Liu, Hu; Han, Zhe; Guo, De-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The ischemia necrosis of limb frequently requires surgery of amputation. Lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block is an ideal intra-operative anesthetic and post-operative antalgic technique for patients of amputation, especially for high-risk patients who have severe cardio-cerebrovascular diseases. However, the duration of analgesia of peripheral nerve block is hardly sufficient to avoid the postoperative pain and the usage of opioids. In this case, a 79-year-old man, with multiple cerebral infarcts, congestive heart failure, atrial flutter and syncope, was treated with an above knee amputation because of ischemia necrosis of his left lower limb. Dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg was added to 0.33% ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block in this case for intra-operative anesthesia and post-operative analgesia. The sensory function was blocked fully for surgery and the duration of analgesia maintained 26 hours with haemodynamic stability and moderate sedation. The patient did not complain pain and require any supplementary analgesics after surgery. This case showed that adding 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine for lumbar plexus and sciatic nerve block may be a feasible and safe technique for high-risk patients for lower limb surgery of amputation. PMID:26550393

  7. [Injuries in the elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hładki, Waldemar; Brongel, Leszek; Lorkowski, Jacek

    2006-01-01

    More and more higher development of civilisation causes constant lengthening of life in humans. Changes, which occur during growing old of organism predispose to increased risk of trauma. Financial cost of medical treatment of injuries in elderly are higher and higher. Degenerative disease of joints, osteoporosis, earlier body injuries and co-existing other diseases are important risk factors of trauma. Deficiencies of eyesight, hearing and prolonged time reaction are other strengthening risk of trauma. Falls and motor-vehicle accidents are the most frequent causes of trauma in elderly. Distal radius fracture, fracture of the proximal femur bone and compressive vertebral fracture of spine are typical fractures in the skeletal system. Head injuries are the most frequent cause of death in this group of patients. Limited functional reserves, especially in the respiratory and circulatory system brings difficulties in the treatment of even not dangerous injuries of chest and increases risks of infectious complications in respiratory system and finally may lead to organ failure. Elderly patients need more precise physical examination and diagnostics because essential information from the patient's history are often difficult to obtain. Indications to hospitalisation should be often widened even at not dangerous injuries, because the patients may demand intensive analgesic treatment and nursing. Necessity of care provided by other persons, poor care in household conditions, and inadequate social circumstances extend also indications to hospitalisation. There is a need to creation of nursing care departments for considerable group of injured persons who finished proper hospital-treatment, but because of the above-mentioned reasons cannot exist at home.

  8. Finger movement at birth in brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Benyahia, Mohamed; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the finger movement at birth is a better predictor of the brachial plexus birth injury. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective study reviewing pre-surgical records of 87 patients with residual obstetric brachial plexus palsy in study 1. Posterior subluxation of the humeral head (PHHA), and glenoid retroversion were measured from computed tomography or Magnetic resonance imaging, and correlated with the finger movement at birth. The study 2 consisted of 141 obstetric brachial plexus injury patients, who underwent primary surgeries and/or secondary surgery at the Texas Nerve and Paralysis Institute. Information regarding finger movement was obtained from the patient’s parent or guardian during the initial evaluation. RESULTS: Among 87 patients, 9 (10.3%) patients who lacked finger movement at birth had a PHHA > 40%, and glenoid retroversion < -12°, whereas only 1 patient (1.1%) with finger movement had a PHHA > 40%, and retroversion < -8° in study 1. The improvement in glenohumeral deformity (PHHA, 31.8% ± 14.3%; and glenoid retroversion 22.0° ± 15.0°) was significantly higher in patients, who have not had any primary surgeries and had finger movement at birth (group 1), when compared to those patients, who had primary surgeries (nerve and muscle surgeries), and lacked finger movement at birth (group 2), (PHHA 10.7% ± 15.8%; Version -8.0° ± 8.4°, P = 0.005 and P = 0.030, respectively) in study 2. No finger movement at birth was observed in 55% of the patients in this study group. CONCLUSION: Posterior subluxation and glenoid retroversion measurements indicated significantly severe shoulder deformities in children with finger movement at birth, in comparison with those lacked finger movement. However, the improvement after triangle tilt surgery was higher in patients who had finger movement at birth. PMID:23362472

  9. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  10. Morphometry of synaptophysin immunoreactive ganglion cells in Auerbach plexus in patients with colorectal cancer. Is this a new prognostic factor?

    PubMed

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E; Ciołkiewicz, Mariusz; Pogumirski, Józef; Sulkowski, Stanisław; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate morphometric parameters of synaptophysin (Syn-38) immunoreactive ganglion cells in colorectal cancer (within and at various distances from neoplastic infiltration) in postoperative material from 60 patients. We analysed the intensity of Syn-38 expression in Auerbach ganglion neurones, mean number of these cells in the ganglion, and their longitudinal and transverse diameters. The results showed a statistically significant reduction in the number of neurones in intramural ganglia of the large intestine located in neoplastic infiltration and in its close proximity. The size of ganglion cells was directly proportional to the distance from cancer infiltration and inversely proportional to Syn-38 content, which may be explained by degenerative changes and dysfunction of these cells. This correlation was significant in the case of cells with the cytoplasmatic Syn-38 immunoreactivity pattern, but did not refer to the cells with perimembranous pattern, which seemed to be undamaged. Morphometric analysis of synaptophysin immunoreactive ganglion cells in Auerbach plexus in colorectal cancer may be a new useful marker for the description of changes in the intestinal nervous system as well as a prognostic factor for colorectal cancer.

  11. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

  12. Early post-operative results after repair of traumatic brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Mohammad-Reda, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Treatment options for traumatic brachial plexus injuries include nerve grafting, or neurotization. The type of lesion and the reconstructive procedures affect functional results and postoperative pain relief. A total number of twenty five patients suffering from post-traumatic brachial plexus injury were included in the study. The patients underwent exploration and primary repair of the affected plexus, based on case by case policy. Spinal accessory nerve transfer to suprascapular nerve procedure regained 78.95% of functional muscle power, 10.50% of non functional muscle power and only 10.5 % of non innervated muscle. The Oberlin procedure regained 83.33% with elbow flexion muscle power, 16.67% with non functional muscle power. Intercostal nerve transfer to musculocutaneous nerve regained 62.5% with functional muscle power, 25% with non functional muscle power and only 12.5 % with non innervated muscle. The shoulder, elbow and wrist extension functions were significantly improved early post-operatively. In addition, the post-operative improvement of shoulder, elbow and wrist extension functions had significant negative correlations with the pre-operative elapsed time, and accompanied by a significant positive correlation with post-operative follow up period. Early intervention for traumatic brachial plexus palsy is recommended to get good results with pain relief.

  13. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  14. Relationship of the lumbar plexus branches to the lumbar spine: anatomical study with application to lateral approaches.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, Richard Isaiah; Gabel, Brandon; Jeyamohan, Shiveindra; Moisi, Marc; Chapman, Jens R; Hanscom, R David; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, Richard Shane

    2017-07-01

    Injuries to the lumbar plexus during lateral approaches to the spine are not uncommon and may result in permanent deficits. However, the literature contains few studies that provide landmarks for avoiding the branches of the lumbar plexus. The present anatomical study was performed to elucidate the course of these nerves in relation to lateral approaches to the lumbar spine. This is a quantitative anatomical cadaveric study. The lumbar plexus and its branches were dissected on 12 cadaveric sides. Metal wires were laid on the nerves along their paths on the posterior abdominal wall. Fluoroscopy was performed in the anteroposterior and lateral positions. The relationships between regional bony landmarks and the branches of the lumbar plexus were observed. When viewed laterally, the greatest concentration of nerves occurred from the posteroinferior aspect of L4, inferior along the posterior one-third of the body of L5, then at the level of the sacral promontory. On the basis of our study, approaches to the anterior two-thirds of the L4 vertebra and anterior third of L5 will result in the lowest chance of lumbar plexus nerve injury. In addition, lateral muscle dissection through the psoas major should be in a superior to inferior direction in order to minimize nerve injury. Laterally, the widest corridor between branches in the abdominal wall was between the subcostal and iliohypogastric nerves. The findings of our cadaveric study provide surgeons who approach the lateral lumbar spine with data that could decrease injuries to the branches of the lumbar plexus, thus lessening patient morbidity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Passage through the carotid sheath: An alternative path to the pre-spinal route for direct repair of contralateral C7 to the lower trunk in total brachial plexus root avulsion injury

    PubMed Central

    Doshi, Piyush Bhupendra; Bhatt, Yogesh Chimanbhai

    2016-01-01

    Context: In surgical management of global brachial plexus injuries, direct repair of contralateral C7 (cC7) to the anterior division of the lower trunk, can produce good extrinsic finger flexion. The pitfalls associated with the pre-spinal passage have, perhaps, proved to be a deterrent for using this technique routinely. Aims: The aim of this study is to demonstrate an alternative to pre-spinal route for cC7 transfer in brachial plexus avulsion injuries. Methods: We noted that the mobilised lower trunk, which reaches the level of the scalenus anterior by passage deep to the clavicle, can be brought to the suprasternal notch when brought out from below the clavicle. This area was dissected in two cadavres, and safe passage was found through the carotid sheath with the common carotid artery medially and the internal jugular vein with the vagus nerve laterally. The cC7 root dissected medial to the scalenus anterior muscle can be directly transferred along this path to the subcutaneous plane at the suprasternal notch. This study allowed us to execute a direct repair in ten clinical cases of global brachial plexus injuries. In each case, the passage was prepared rapidly and uneventfully. The repair was technically simple and could be performed comfortably using suitable fine suture materials. In none of these cases, did we need to shorten the humerus. Results: The clinical outcome of this technique is awaited. Conclusions: We advocate carotid sheath route to approximate the cC7 to the injured lower trunk in global palsies, as the risks associated with the pre-spinal route can be readily avoided. PMID:27833275

  16. Adult Peripheral Nerve Disorders—Nerve Entrapment, Repair, Transfer and Brachial Plexus Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ida K.; Mackinnon, Susan E.

    2011-01-01

    Learning Objectives After reviewing this article the reader should be able to: 1. Describe the pathophysiologic bases for nerve injury and how it applies to patient evaluation and management. 2. Realize the wide variety of injury patterns and associated patient complaint and physical findings associated with peripheral nerve pathology. 3. Evaluate and recommend further tests to aid in defining the diagnosis. 4. Specify treatment options and potential risks and benefits. Summary Peripheral nerve disorders comprise a gamut of problems ranging from entrapment neuropathy, to direct open traumatic injury and closed brachial plexus injury. The pathophysiology of injury defines the patient symptoms, exam findings and treatment options and is critical to accurate diagnosis and treatment. Goals of treatment include management of often associated pain and improvement of sensory and motor function. Understanding peripheral nerve anatomy is critical to adopting novel nerve transfer procedures, which may provide superior options for a variety of injury patterns. PMID:21532404

  17. The Effect of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine Compared to Propofol on Patients Hemodynamics as a Sedative in Brachial Plexus Block: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amarjeet; Sinha, Chandni; Kumar, Ajeet; Kumari, Poonam

    2017-01-01

    Background: The quest for an ideal sedative during regional anesthesia is on. Although propofol has been accepted as a sedative intraoperatively, it can be associated with troublesome hemodynamic changes. Dexmedetomidine is a new alpha 2 agonist used widely for sedation. Aims: In this study, we tried to compare equivalent doses of dexmedetomidine infusion with propofol with emphasis on their effect on the hemodynamics. Settings and Design: Prospective, single-blinded randomized controlled trial. Materials and Methods: In a single blinded study, 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I and II patients scheduled for forearm surgeries under brachial plexus block were randomized to receive either propofol (Group I) or dexmedetomidine (Group II) infusion. Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block was given in all the patients. After confirming adequate motor and sensory blockade, they were administered an initial loading dose of the drug over 10 min followed by a maintenance dose till the end of the surgery. The rate of infusion was titrated to maintain Ramsay sedation score of 2–4. Intraoperative hemodynamic and respiratory effects were documented along with surgeon and patient satisfaction. Any adverse effect such as hypotension, bradycardia, nausea, and vomiting was also noted. Statistical Analysis Used: The data collected were evaluated using Stata version 10. P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Heart rate decreased significantly in Group II (dexmedetomidine) while mean arterial pressure decreased significantly in Group I (propofol). There was no increase in the incidence of bradycardia or hypotension in either groups. Patient satisfaction score was significantly greater in Group II (dexmedetomidine) while surgeon satisfaction score was similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine at equivalent doses of propofol has a similar hemodynamic and respiratory effect, similar surgeon's satisfaction score, higher

  18. Axillary brachial plexus block duration with mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure. Case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mojica, V; Nieuwveld, D; Herrera, A E; Mestres, G; López, A M; Sala-Blanch, X

    2017-04-01

    Regional anaesthesia is commonly preferred for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation. Previous studies suggest a shorter block duration in patients with chronic renal failure, maybe because of the changes in regional blood flow. The aim of our study was to evaluate the duration of the axillary block with 1.5% mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure scheduled for AVF compared with healthy controls. Patients scheduled for AVF creation for the first time (GIRC) were included. They were compared with patients without renal failure (GC), with similar anthropometric characteristics. Ultrasound-guided axillary blocks with 20mL of 1.5% mepivacaine were performed on all patients. We evaluated onset time, humeral artery diameter and blood flow before and after the block, as well as the block duration. Twenty-three patients (GIRC: 12 and GC: 11) were included. No differences between groups were observed in block duration (GIRC: 227±43min vs GC: 229±27min; P=.781), or in onset time (GIRC: 13±5min vs GC: 12.2±3min; P=.477). The humeral blood flow before and after block was significantly lower in the GIRC (pre-block: GIRC: 52±21ml/min GC: 100±62ml/min; P=.034 and p ost block: GIRC: 130±57ml/min and GC: 274±182ml/min; P=.010). There was no significant correlation between the duration of the block and the preblock humeral blood flow (Spearman Rho: 0.106; P=.657) or the postblock humeral blood flow (Spearman Rho: 0.267; P=.254). The duration of the axillary block with 1.5% mepivacaine in patients with chronic renal failure was similar to that of the control patients. The duration of axillary brachial plexus block seems not to be related to changes in regional blood flow. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Lumbar plexus block surface landmarks as assessed by computed axial tomography in adult patients with scoliosis: a case series.

    PubMed

    Robards, Christopher B; Riutort, Kevin; Thomas, Colleen S; Porter, Steven B; Wang, R Doris; Clendenen, Steven R; Runyan, Brandon R; Greengrass, Roy A

    2015-04-01

    Lumbar plexus (LP) block is a common and useful regional anesthesia technique. Surface landmarks used to identify the LP in patients with healthy spines have been previously described, with the distance from the spinous process (SP) to the skin overlying the LP being approximately two-thirds the distance from the SP to the posterior superior iliac spine (PSIS) (SP-LP:SP-PSIS ratio). In scoliotic patients, rotation of the central neuraxis may make these surface landmarks unreliable, possibly leading to an increased block failure rate and an increased incidence of complications. The objective of the present study was to describe these surface landmarks of the LP in patients with scoliosis. We selected 47 patients with known thoracolumbar scoliotic disease from our institution's radiology archives. We measured bony landmark geometry, Cobb angle, and the LP location and depth. Additionally, we calculated the SP-LP:SP-PSIS ratio for both the concave and convex sides. In scoliotic patients (31 females and 16 males), the median (range) Cobb angle was 23 (8-54) degrees. The LP depth was 7.5 (5.7-10.7) cm on the concave side of the scoliotic spine and 7.6 (5.4-10.8) cm on the convex side, while the distance from the SP-LP was 3.4 (1.9-4.7) cm on the concave side and 3.7 (2.4-5.1) cm on the convex side. The SP-LP:SP-PSIS ratio was 0.61 (0.20-0.97) and 0.65 (0.45-0.98) on the concave and convex sides, respectively. None of these distances were significantly different between sides. In patients with scoliotic disease of the spine, there is wide variability in the bony surface landmarks. The location of the LP is generally more medial than expected when compared with both modified and traditional landmarks. A review of the imaging studies and the pre-procedural ultrasound assessment of the anatomy should be considered prior to needle puncture.

  20. Spectral characteristics of atrial electrograms in sinus rhythm correlates with sites of ganglionated plexuses in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Rivarola, Esteban Wisnivesky Rocca; Scanavacca, Mauricio; Ushizima, Mauro; Cestari, Idágene; Hardy, Carina; Lara, Sissy; Pisani, Cristiano; Sosa, Eduardo

    2011-08-01

    To verify whether spectral components of atrial electrograms (AE) during sinus rhythm (SR) correlate with cardiac ganglionated plexus (GP) sites. Thirteen patients undergoing atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation were prospectively enrolled. Prior to radio frequency application, endocardial AE were recorded with a sequential point-by-point approach. Electrical stimuli were delivered at 20 Hz, amplitude 100 V, and pulse width of 4 ms. A vagal response was defined as a high-frequency stimulation (HFS) evoked atrioventricular block or a prolongation of RR interval. Spectral analysis was performed on single AE during SR, sampling rate of 1000 Hz, Hanning window. Overall, 1488 SR electrograms were analysed from 186 different left atrium sites, 129 of them corresponding to negative vagal response sites, and 57 to positive response sites. The electrogram duration and the number of deflections were similar in positive and negative response sites. Spectral power density of sites with vagal response was lower between 26 and 83 Hz and higher between 107 and 200 Hz compared with negative response sites. The area between 120 and 170 Hz normalized to the total spectrum area was tested as a diagnostic parameter. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated that an area 120-170/area(total) value >0.14 identified vagal sites with 70.9% sensitivity and 72.1% specificity. Spectral analysis of AE during SR in sites that correspond to the anatomical location of the GP is feasible and may be a simpler method of mapping the cardiac autonomic nervous system, compared with the HFS technique.

  1. Anesthesia for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Bishwajit; Maung, Adrian A

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a wide spectrum of disease and disease severity. Because the primary brain injury occurs before the patient enters the health care system, medical interventions seek principally to prevent secondary injury. Anesthesia teams that provide care for patients with TBI both in and out of the operating room should be aware of the specific therapies and needs of this unique and complex patient population.

  2. Traumatic peripheral nerve injuries: epidemiological findings, neuropathic pain and quality of life in 158 patients.

    PubMed

    Ciaramitaro, Palma; Mondelli, Mauro; Logullo, Francesco; Grimaldi, Serena; Battiston, Bruno; Sard, Arman; Scarinzi, Cecilia; Migliaretti, Giuseppe; Faccani, Giuliano; Cocito, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were (1) epidemiological analysis of traumatic peripheral nerve injuries; (2) assessment of neuropathic pain and quality of life in patients affected by traumatic neuropathies. All consecutive patients with a diagnosis of traumatic neuropathies from four Italian centres were enrolled. Electromyography confirmed clinical level and site diagnosis of peripheral nerve injury. All patients were evaluated by disability scales, pain screening tools, and quality of life tests. 158 consecutive patients for a total of 211 traumatic neuropathies were analysed. The brachial plexus was a frequent site of traumatic injury (36%) and the radial, ulnar, and peroneal were the most commonly involved nerves with 15% of iatrogenic injuries. Seventy-two percent of the traumatic neuropathies were painful. Pain was present in 66% and neuropathic pain in 50% of all patients. Patients had worse quality of life scores than did the healthy Italian population. Moreover, there was a strong correlation between the quality of life and the severity of the pain, particularly neuropathic pain (Short Form-36 [SF-36] p < 0.005; Beck Depression Inventory [BDI] p < 0.0001). Traumatic neuropathies were more frequent in young males after road accidents, mainly in the upper limbs. Severe neuropathic pain and not only disability contributed to worsening the quality of life in patients with traumatic neuropathies.

  3. Fluoroscopy-guided Neurolytic Splanchnic Nerve Block for Intractable Pain from Upper Abdominal Malignancies in Patients with Distorted Celiac Axis Anatomy: An Effective Alternative to Celiac Plexus Neurolysis - A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Arif; Arora, Divesh

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: The pain from upper gastrointestinal malignancy leads to considerable morbidity. The celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolysis are good therapeutic options. Although splanchnic nerve neurolysis less frequently performed, but it has an edge over celiac plexus as it can be performed in patients with altered celiac plexus anatomy by enlarged lymph nodes. Methods: The fluoroscopy-guided splanchnic nerve neurolysis was done in about 21 patients with intractable upper abdominal pain with pain intensity of ≥7 in numerical rating scale (NRS) from upper gastrointestinal cancers with distorted celiac plexus anatomy from enlarged celiac lymph nodes as seen by computed tomography scan after positive diagnostic splanchnic nerve neurolysis. The demographic features, pain intensity, daily opioid dose, functional status and quality of life was measured at baseline and 1 week, 1 and 3 months after the procedure. Results: There was a significant improvement in pain intensity, opioid requirement, functional status, and physical components quality of life after the neurolysis (P < 0.05) and this improvement had continued till 3 months. There were also more than 50% reduction in pain intensity and significant decrease in opioid requirement in all the patients after neurolysis. Conclusion: The fluoroscopy-guided splanchnic nerve neurolysis results significant pain relief, decrease in opioid intake, improvement in functional status, and quality of life for up to 3 months in upper abdominal pain from gastrointestinal cancers in patients with distorted celiac lymph node anatomy not amenable to celiac plexus neurolysis. PMID:28827930

  4. Fluoroscopy-guided Neurolytic Splanchnic Nerve Block for Intractable Pain from Upper Abdominal Malignancies in Patients with Distorted Celiac Axis Anatomy: An Effective Alternative to Celiac Plexus Neurolysis - A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Arif; Arora, Divesh

    2017-01-01

    The pain from upper gastrointestinal malignancy leads to considerable morbidity. The celiac plexus and splanchnic nerve neurolysis are good therapeutic options. Although splanchnic nerve neurolysis less frequently performed, but it has an edge over celiac plexus as it can be performed in patients with altered celiac plexus anatomy by enlarged lymph nodes. The fluoroscopy-guided splanchnic nerve neurolysis was done in about 21 patients with intractable upper abdominal pain with pain intensity of ≥7 in numerical rating scale (NRS) from upper gastrointestinal cancers with distorted celiac plexus anatomy from enlarged celiac lymph nodes as seen by computed tomography scan after positive diagnostic splanchnic nerve neurolysis. The demographic features, pain intensity, daily opioid dose, functional status and quality of life was measured at baseline and 1 week, 1 and 3 months after the procedure. There was a significant improvement in pain intensity, opioid requirement, functional status, and physical components quality of life after the neurolysis (P < 0.05) and this improvement had continued till 3 months. There were also more than 50% reduction in pain intensity and significant decrease in opioid requirement in all the patients after neurolysis. The fluoroscopy-guided splanchnic nerve neurolysis results significant pain relief, decrease in opioid intake, improvement in functional status, and quality of life for up to 3 months in upper abdominal pain from gastrointestinal cancers in patients with distorted celiac lymph node anatomy not amenable to celiac plexus neurolysis.

  5. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy: reviewing the literature comparing the results of primary versus secondary surgery.

    PubMed

    Socolovsky, Mariano; Costales, Javier Robla; Paez, Miguel Domínguez; Nizzo, Gustavo; Valbuena, Sebastian; Varone, Ernesto

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus injuries (OBPP) are a relatively common stretch injury of the brachial plexus that occurs during delivery. Roughly 30 % of patients will not recover completely and will need a surgical repair. Two main treatment strategies have been used: primary surgery, consisting in exploring and reconstructing the affected portions of the brachial plexus within the first few months of the patient's life, and secondary procedures that include tendon or muscle transfers, osteotomies, and other orthopedic techniques. Secondary procedures can be done as the only surgical treatment of OBPP or after primary surgery, in order to minimize any residual deficits. Two things are crucial to achieving a good outcome: (1) the appropriate selection of patients, to separate those who will spontaneously recover from those who will recover only partially or not at all; and (2) a good surgical technique. The objective of the present review is to assess the published literature concerning certain controversial issues in OBPP, especially in terms of the true current state of primary and secondary procedures, their results, and the respective roles each plays in modern-day treatment of this complex pathology. Considerable published evidence compiled over decades of surgical experience favors primary nerve surgery as the initial therapeutic step in patients who do not recover spontaneously, followed by secondary surgeries for further functional improvement. As described in this review, the results of such treatment can greatly ameliorate function in affected limbs. For best results, multi-disciplinary teams should treat these patients.

  6. Radiation Therapy to the Plexus Brachialis in Breast Cancer Patients: Analysis of Paresthesia in Relation to Dose and Volume.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Steineck, Gunnar; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Karlsson, Per

    2015-06-01

    To identify volume and dose predictors of paresthesia after irradiation of the brachial plexus among women treated for breast cancer. The women had breast surgery with axillary dissection, followed by radiation therapy with (n=192) or without irradiation (n=509) of the supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs). The breast area was treated to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions, and 192 of the women also had 46 to 50 Gy to the SCLNs. We delineated the brachial plexus on 3-dimensional dose-planning computerized tomography. Three to eight years after radiation therapy the women answered a questionnaire. Irradiated volumes and doses were calculated and related to the occurrence of paresthesia in the hand. After treatment with axillary dissection with radiation therapy to the SCLNs 20% of the women reported paresthesia, compared with 13% after axillary dissection without radiation therapy, resulting in a relative risk (RR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.11). Paresthesia was reported by 25% after radiation therapy to the SCLNs with a V40 Gy ≥ 13.5 cm(3), compared with 13% without radiation therapy, RR 1.83 (95% CI 1.13-2.95). Women having a maximum dose to the brachial plexus of ≥55.0 Gy had a 25% occurrence of paresthesia, with RR 1.86 (95% CI 0.68-5.07, not significant). Our results indicate that there is a correlation between larger irradiated volumes of the brachial plexus and an increased risk of reported paresthesia among women treated for breast cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [LONG-TERM RESULTS OT SURGICAL ABLATION OF LEFT ATRIAL GANGLIONAR PLEXUS IN PATIENTS WITH CORONARY HEART DISEASE AND ATRIAL FIBRILLATION].

    PubMed

    Chernyavsky, A M; Rakhmonov, S S; Kareva, Yu E; Pak, I A

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated long-term results of epicardial radio-frequency ablation of anatomical zones of left atrial ganglionar plexuses (GP) during aortocoronary bypass surgery in patients with coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation (AF). In 2010-2012, radio-frequency ablation of GP was performed in 92 patients with AF. The patients were divided into 3 groups depending on the form of AF. Group 1 comprised patients with paroxysmal AF, group 2 with persistent AF, group 3 with long-standing persistent AF. Mean duration of observation was 14.4 ± 9.6 months. Radiofrequency ablation of GP anatomical zones combined with aortocoronary bypass surgery markedly improved the clinical and functional conditions of the patients and allowed to preserve the sinus rhythm for a long period in 78.6% and 39% of them presenting with paroxysmal and long-standing paroxysmal AF respectively.

  8. Cervical spine injuries in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Patrick; Jaindl, Manuela; Thalhammer, Gerhild; Dittrich, Stefan; Kutscha-Lissberg, Florian; Vecsei, Vilmos; Gaebler, Christian

    2007-02-01

    Cervical spine injuries are uncommon in pediatric trauma patients. Previous studies were often limited by the small numbers of patients available for evaluation. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and characteristics of pediatric cervical spine injuries at this Level 1 trauma center and to review the authors' experiences with documented cases. This study retrospectively analyzed the clinical records of all pediatric trauma patients with skeletal and/or nonskeletal injuries of the spine that were admitted to this Level 1 trauma center between 1980 and 2004. Those with significant injuries of the cervical spine were identified and included in this study. Pediatric patients were defined as patients younger than the age of 17 years. In addition, they were stratified by age into two study groups: group A included patients aged 8 years or fewer and group B contained patients from the ages of 9 to 16 years. We found 56 pediatric patients with injuries of the cervical spine that met criteria for inclusion. Thirty-one female and 25 male patients with an average age of 8.9 years (range, 1-16 years) sustained significant skeletal and/or nonskeletal injuries of the cervical spine and were entered in this study. Thirty patients (54%) were aged 8 years or fewer and entered into study group A, whereas 26 patients (46%) from the ages of 9 to 16 met criteria for inclusion in study group B. An analysis of data revealed that younger patients (group A) showed significantly more injuries of the upper cervical spine, whereas older children (group B) sustained significantly more injuries of the lower level. Spinal cord injuries without radiographic findings were only found in study group A. In addition, younger children were more likely injured by motor vehicle crashes, whereas older children more commonly sustained C-spine injuries during sports activities. Two-thirds of our patients showed neurologic deficits, and the overall mortality was 28%. The results of our

  9. Use of intercostal nerves for different target neurotization in brachial plexus reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lykissas, Marios G; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis P; Korompilias, Ananstasios V; Vekris, Marios D; Beris, Alexandros E

    2013-01-01

    Intercostal nerve transfer is a valuable procedure in devastating plexopathies. Intercostal nerves are a very good choice for elbow flexion or extension and shoulder abduction when the intraplexus donor nerves are not available. The best results are obtained in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients, when direct nerve transfer is performed within six months from the injury. Unlike the adult posttraumatic patients after median and ulnar nerve neurotization with intercostal nerves, almost all obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients achieve protective sensation in the hand and some of them achieve active wrist and finger flexion. Use in combination with proper muscles, intercostal nerve transfer can yield adequate power to the paretic upper limb. Reinnervation of native muscles (i.e., latissimus dorsi) should always be sought as they can successfully be transferred later on for further functional restoration. PMID:23878776

  10. Transfer of the phrenic nerve to the posterior division of the lower trunk to recover thumb and finger extension in brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Haodong; Hou, Chunlin; Chen, Aimin; Xu, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Hand function is severely impaired in cases of lower root avulsion. In the present study, the authors investigated the clinical effectiveness and safety of phrenic nerve transfer to the posterior division of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus to recover thumb and finger extension. Between 2004 and 2006, 10 patients with brachial plexus palsy underwent phrenic nerve transfer as part of a strategy for surgical reconstruction of their plexuses. The mean patient age of was 27.2 years (range 18-44 years), and the mean interval from injury to surgery was 5.7 months (range 3-9 months). The phrenic nerve was always transferred to the posterior division of the lower trunk. The follow-up of the patients ranged from 2.5 to 4.4 years, with an average follow-up length of 3.5 years. There were no major complications related to the surgery. Eight patients recovered to Grade 3 or better (Medical Research Council grade) in extensor digitorum strength, and 7 patients recovered to Grade 3 or better in extensor pollicis strength. None of the patients had any clinical signs or symptoms of respiratory insufficiency. Satisfactory thumb and finger extension can be achieved by phrenic nerve transfer to the posterior division of the lower trunk of the brachial plexus. This procedure is simple and less traumatic than that of transferring the phrenic nerve to the radial nerve. It is indicated in cases in which the brachial plexus is relatively intact at the division level.

  11. Optic radiation injury in a patient with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Sang Seok; Kim, Seong Ho; Kim, Oh Lyong; Kim, Min-Su; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on a patient who showed an optic radiation (OR) injury on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) following head trauma. The patient, who had suffered a traffic accident, underwent conservative management for diffuse axonal injury and contusions in the left midbrain, temporal lobe and anterior to mid-portion of left OR. He complained of right homonymous hemianopsia from the onset of TBI and right bilateral homonymous hemianopsia was detected at the 6-month Humphrey visual field test. A 20 year-old man with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and eight age-matched normal subjects were recruited for this study. The left OR of the patient showed a discontinuation around the mid-portion. The FA (fractional anisotropy) values of the posterior portions of left OR decreased over two standard deviations of normal controls, but the ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) values of these sites increased over two standard deviations of normal controls. Consequently, it was assumed that the main injury site of the left OR was located around the posterior portion of the left OR. This results suggest that DTI may be a useful technique for detection of an OR injury in patients with TBI.

  12. Progression of choroid plexus papilloma.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Rana S; Wang, Yi Yuen; McKelvie, Penny A; O'Brien, Brendan

    2013-12-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare neoplasms that arise from choroid plexus epithelium. The World Health Organization classification describes three histological grades. Grade I is choroid plexus papilloma, grade II is atypical choroid plexus papilloma and grade III is choroid plexus carcinoma. Progression between grades is rare but documented. We present two adult cases, a 53-year-old female and a 70-year-old male, who demonstrated clear interval histological progression from grade I choroid plexus papilloma to higher grades. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Double muscle transfer for upper extremity reconstruction following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Kuwata, N; Muramatsu, K; Hottori, Y; Kawai, S

    1999-11-01

    Recent interest in reconstruction of the upper limb following brachial plexus injuries has focused on the restoration of prehension following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. The authors use free muscle transfers for reconstruction of the upper limb to resolve the difficult problems in complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. This article describes the authors' updated technique--the double free muscle procedure. Reconstruction of prehension to achieve independent voluntary finger and elbow flexion and extension by the use of double free muscle and multiple nerve transfers following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus (nerve roots C5 to T1) is presented. The procedure involves transferring the first free muscle, neurotized by the spinal accessory nerve for elbow flexion and finger extension, a second free muscle transfer reinnervated by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves for finger flexion, and neurotization of the triceps brachii via its motor nerve by the third and fourth intercostal motor nerves to extend and stabilize the elbow. Restoration of hand sensibility is obtained via the suturing of sensory rami from the intercostal nerves to the median nerve. Secondary reconstruction, including arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb and glenohumeral joint, and tenolysis of the transferred muscle and distal tendons, improve the functional outcome. Based on the long-term result, selection of the patient, donor muscle, and donor motor nerve were indicated. Most patients were able to achieve prehensile functions such as holding a can and lifting a heavy box. This double free muscle transfer has provided prehension for patients with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus and has given them new hope to be able to use their otherwise useless limbs.

  14. Microanatomy of the brachial plexus roots and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Li-Yuan; Wang, Ai-Ping; Hong, Li; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Wang, Xian-Qin; Lv, Yun-Cheng; Peng, Tian-Hong

    2017-06-01

    To provide the anatomical basis of brachial plexus roots for the diagnosis and treatment of brachial plexus root avulsion injury. The morphological features of brachial plexus roots were observed and measured on 15 cervicothoracic spine of adult cadavers. The relationship of brachial plexus nerve roots and the surrounding tissues also were observed, as well as the blood supply of anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus. Origination of the nerve roots in the dorsal-ventral direction from the midline was fine-tuned at each level along the spinal cord. The minimum distance of the origin of the nerve root to midline was 2.2 mm at C 5, while the maximum was 3.1 mm at T 1. Inversely, the distance between the origin of the posterior root and the midline of the spinal cord gradually decreased, the maximum being 4.2 mm at C 5 and minimum 2.7 mm at T 1. Meanwhile, there was complicated fibrous connection among posterior roots of the brachial plexus. The C 5-6 nerve roots interlaced with tendons of the scalenus anterior and scalenus medius and fused with the transverse-radicular ligaments in the intervertebral foramina. However, these ligaments were not seen in C 7-8, and T 1. The blood supply of the anterior and posterior roots of the brachial plexus was from the segmental branches of the vertebral artery, deep cervical artery and ascending cervical artery, with a mean outer diameter of 0.61 mm. The systematic and comprehensive anatomic data of the brachial plexus roots provides the anatomical basis to diagnose and treat the brachial plexus root avulsion injury.

  15. Trauma injury in adult underweight patients

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Ching-Hua; Lai, Wei-Hung; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the injury characteristics, severity, and outcome between underweight and normal-weight patients hospitalized for the treatment of all kinds of trauma injury. This study was based on a level I trauma center Taiwan. The detailed data of 640 underweight adult trauma patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <18.5 kg/m2 and 6497 normal-weight adult patients (25 > BMI ≥ 18.5 kg/m2) were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2014. Pearson's chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, and independent Student's t-test were performed to compare the differences. Propensity score matching with logistic regression was used to evaluate the effect of underweight on mortality. Underweight patients presented a different bodily injury pattern and a significantly higher rate of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU) than did normal-weight patients; however, no significant differences in the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, injury severity score (ISS), in-hospital mortality, and hospital length of stay were found between the two groups. However, further analysis of the patients stratified by two major injury mechanisms (motorcycle accident and fall injury) revealed that underweight patients had significantly lower GCS scores (13.8 ± 3.0 vs 14.5 ± 2.0, P = 0.020), but higher ISS (10.1 ± 6.9 vs 8.4 ± 5.9, P = 0.005), in-hospital mortality (odds ratio, 4.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.69–11.35; P = 0.006), and ICU admittance rate (24.1% vs 14.3%, P = 0.007) than normal-weight patients in the fall accident group, but not in the motorcycle accident group. However, after propensity score matching, logistic regression analysis of well-matched pairs of patients with either all trauma, motorcycle accident, or fall injury did not show a significant influence of underweight on mortality. Exploratory data analysis revealed that underweight patients

  16. Transition from nerve stimulator to sonographically guided axillary brachial plexus anesthesia in hand surgery: block quality and patient satisfaction during the transition period.

    PubMed

    Luyet, Cédric; Constantinescu, Mihai; Waltenspül, Manuel; Luginbühl, Martin; Vögelin, Esther

    2013-05-01

    Sonographic guidance for peripheral nerve anesthesia has proven increasingly successful in clinical practice; however, fears that a change to sonographically guided regional anesthesia may impair the block quality and operating room work flow persist in certain units. In this retrospective cohort study, block quality and patient satisfaction during the transition period from nerve stimulator to sonographic guidance for axillary brachial plexus anesthesia in a tertiary referral center were investigated. Anesthesia records of all patients who had elective surgery of the wrist or hand during the transition time (September 1, 2006-August 25, 2007) were reviewed for block success, placement time, anesthesiologist training level, local anesthetic volume, and requirement of additional analgesics. Postoperative records were reviewed, and patient satisfaction was assessed by telephone interviews in matched subgroups. Of 415 blocks, 341 were sonographically guided, and 74 were nerve stimulator guided. Sonographically guided blocks were mostly performed by novices, whereas nerve stimulator-guided blocks were performed by advanced users (72.3% versus 14%; P < .001). Block performance times and success rates were similar in both groups. In sonographically guided blocks, significantly less local anesthetics were applied compared to nerve stimulator-guided blocks (mean ± SD, 36.1 ± 7.1 versus 43.9 ± 6.1 mL; P< .001), and less opioids were required (fentanyl, 66.1 ± 30 versus 90 ± 62 μg; P< .001). Interviewed patients reported significantly less procedure-related discomfort, pain, and prolonged procedure time when block placement was sonographically guided (2% versus 20%; P = .002). Transition from nerve stimulator to sonographic guidance for axillary brachial plexus blocks did not change block performance times or success rates. Patient satisfaction was improved even during the early institutional transition period.

  17. [Perinatal brachial plexus palsy].

    PubMed

    Macko, Jozef

    2010-08-01

    Upper limbs palsy as a result of affliction of plexus brachialis nervous bunch is disorder, whose frequency moves among 0.42-5.1 / 1000 liveborn children. Delivery mechanism itself certain weighty, no however only cause rising paralysis. Some way paralysis rise already intrauterinne, some way then at surgical childbirth per sectionem caeseream. Brachial plexus palsy isn't benign disorder. If isn't this disorder in time diagnosed and accordingly treated, child threatens late aftermath, especially significant limitation of limbs movement with functional consequencies.

  18. Traumatic injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients sustained traumatic injuries. Identification of risk factors of traumatic injuries that lead to hospital admissions and death in DM patients is crucial to set effective preventive strategies. We aimed to conduct a traditional narrative literature review to describe the role of hypoglycemia as a risk factor of driving and fall-related traumatic injuries. DM poses significant burden as a risk factor and predictor of worse outcomes in traumatic injuries. Although there is no consensus on the impact and clear hazards of hyperglycemia in comparison to the hypoglycemia, both extremes of DM need to be carefully addressed and taken into consideration for proper management. Moreover, physicians, patients, and concerned authorities should be aware of all these potential hazards to share and establish the right management plans. PMID:27162438

  19. Management of chronic pain in a patient with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease by sequential celiac plexus blockade, radiofrequency ablation, and spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Nathaniel; Sarria, Jose E

    2012-06-01

    Chronic pain frequently is associated with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and is a significant cause of morbidity. The classic approach to treat pain in patients with this disease starts with nonpharmacologic therapy and progresses to high-dose opioid therapy and more invasive procedures, including surgery. We present the case of a 43-year-old white woman presenting in our clinic with poorly controlled chronic left flank and epigastric pain secondary to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease despite high-dose opioids and multiple cyst decompression procedures. After temporarily successful management with celiac plexus neurolysis and intercostal nerve radiofrequency ablations for years, the next more permanent step was dorsal column neurostimulation, affording excellent analgesia with significantly improved quality of life to this day. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a clinical and electrophysiologic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Gopinath, M S; Bhatia, M; Mehta, V S

    2002-09-01

    Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy (OBPP) occurs as sequelae of birth-related trauma, antenatal and parturition related complications. It is associated with varying degrees of functional disability. Electrodiagnostic studies (EDS) are an adjunctive tool and help to localise and prognosticate the outcome of OBPP. Fourteen children, presenting with OBPP to the Clinical Neurophysiology Lab, were analyzed. Details of birth history were obtained, and EDS were performed to characterize the lesion. The age ranged from one month to one year. Ten had unilateral and four bilateral brachial palsy. On EDS, five had pan-plexus, six predominantly upper plexus and three lower plexus involvement. A poor re-innervation pattern on EMG correlated with inadequate recovery. OBPP, a condition associated with considerable disability, needs to be prevented. Electrodiagnostic studies are a useful adjunctive tool for characterizing the site of injury and prognostication.

  1. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  2. Blunt cardiac injury in trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury.

    PubMed

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V; Avery, Laura L; Novelline, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4) in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7), eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P < 0.001).

  3. Blunt Cardiac Injury in Trauma Patients with Thoracic Aortic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kaewlai, Rathachai; de Moya, Marc A.; Santos, Antonio; Asrani, Ashwin V.; Avery, Laura L.; Novelline, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Trauma patients with thoracic aortic injury (TAI) suffer blunt cardiac injury (BCI) at variable frequencies. This investigation aimed to determine the frequency of BCI in trauma patients with TAI and compare with those without TAI. All trauma patients with TAI who had admission electrocardiography (ECG) and serum creatine kinase-MB (CK-MB) from January 1999 to May 2009 were included as a study group at a level I trauma center. BCI was diagnosed if there was a positive ECG with either an elevated CK-MB or abnormal echocardiography. There were 26 patients (19 men, mean age 45.1 years, mean ISS 34.4) in the study group; 20 had evidence of BCI. Of 52 patients in the control group (38 men, mean age 46.9 years, mean ISS 38.7), eighteen had evidence of BCI. There was a significantly higher rate of BCI in trauma patients with TAI versus those without TAI (77% versus 35%, P < 0.001). PMID:22046549

  4. Triceps brachii reinnervation in primary reconstruction of the adult brachial plexus: experience in 25 cases.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2011-10-01

    Elbow flexion and shoulder abduction are the primary goals in brachial plexus surgery; however, reinnervation of the triceps is also an objective to be considered, as restoration of elbow extension improves the stabilization of the elbow and can provide a more powerful grasp. This study aims to demonstrate the author's experience with restoration of elbow extension function in cases of brachial plexus surgery in adults. Records of 25 patients sustaining traumatic brachial plexus injuries who were treated surgically with reinnervation of the triceps were reviewed. Nine techniques were employed, including posterior cord reconstruction and nerve transfers using donors such as the ipsilateral C7 root, phrenic nerve, medial pectoral nerve, intercostal nerves, the spinal accessory nerve, and a motor fascicle of the ulnar nerve. The targeted structure was the radial nerve or the branch to the long head of the triceps. Twenty-one subjects (83%) obtained triceps reinnervation, and good results (M3 or better) were observed in 19 cases (76%). M4 grade was noted in 36% of the cases, M3 grade in 40%, M2 grade in 8%, M1 grade in 8%, and M0 grade in 8% of the patients. The best outcomes were observed in the cases presenting a C5 to C7 palsy and those in which the nerve to the triceps was chosen as the transfer target. Reinnervation of the triceps can be achieved in most patients if adequate donor and recipient nerves are carefully selected based on an individual case-specific decision.

  5. Ultrasound anatomy of the brachial plexus nerves in the neurovascular bundle at the axilla in patients undergoing upper-extremity block anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ustuner, Evren; Yılmaz, Ayse; Özgencil, Enver; Okten, Feyhan; Turhan, Sanem Cakar

    2013-05-01

    Familiarity with the localization of the nerves in the neurovascular bundle that constitutes the axillary segment of the brachial plexus (BP) is important when applying ultrasound (US)-guided block anesthesia. Therefore in this study we aimed to delineate the anatomy of the median, radial, and ulnar nerves of the BP at the axilla with US and electrical stimulation. The study included 60 patients who were scheduled to undergo upper-arm surgery with axillary block anesthesia. Prior to anesthesia, ulnar, radial, and median nerves were localized with US using a 12-h quadrant identification system that placed the axillary artery (AA) in the middle. The nerves were then functionally tested using a neurostimulator. The radial nerve was mainly located in the 4-6 o'clock arc (posterior and posteromedial to AA) in 50 (83 %) of patients. Ulnar nerve was mainly at the 12-3 o'clock arc (anteromedial to AA) in 51 (85 %) of patients. Ulnar nerve showed a second peak at 9-10 o'clock quadrant (anterolateral to AA) in 11 % (7) of patients. Median nerve location was most common in the 12 and 9 o'clock arc (anterior and anterolateral to AA) in 53 (88 %) of the patients. Ultrasound is a useful tool for depicting BP anatomy in the axillary fossa prior to block anesthesia. Median, ulnar, and radial nerves form a highly consistent triangular pattern around the axillary artery that is easily recognizable with US.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Retrocrural versus Transaortic Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block for Pain Relief in Patients with Upper Abdominal Malignancy: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Saipriya; Agarwal, Anil; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep; Madabushi, Rajashree; Shamshery, Chetna; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare retrocrural versus transaortic techniques for neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) in patients suffering from upper abdominal malignancy. Methods: In this retrospective observational study between October 2013 and April 2015, 64 patients with inoperable upper abdominal malignancy received fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous NCPB in our institute. Their case files were reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups depending on the technique used to perform NCPB: retrocrural (Group R; n = 36) versus transaortic (Group T; n = 28). The primary outcome measure was pain as assessed with a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 10; the secondary outcome measures were morphine consumption per day (M), quality of life (QOL) as assessed by comparing the percent of positive responses in each group, and complications if any. These were noted and analyzed prior to intervention and then on day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3, and months 1, 2, 3, 6 following NCPB. Results: Patients in Group R had significantly reduced NRS pain scores at week 1, 2, 3, month 1 and 2 as compared to Group T (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption also reduced significantly in Group R at day 1, week 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.05). QOL was found to be comparable between the groups, and no major complications were noted. Conclusion: Retrocrural NCPB provides superior pain relief along with a reduction in morphine consumption as compared to transaortic NCPB in patients with pain due to upper abdominal malignancy. PMID:27559259

  7. Correction of elbow flexion contracture in late obstetric brachial plexus palsy through arthrodiatasis of the elbow (Ioannina method).

    PubMed

    Vekris, Marios D; Pafilas, Dimitrios; Lykissas, Marios G; Soucacos, Panayiotis N; Beris, Alexandros E

    2010-03-01

    Inadequate elbow extension is a recognized sequela after obstetric brachial plexus injury because of muscle imbalance and adversely affects the ability to perform sufficiently most daily living activities. The various methods that have been used to correct this deformity do not offer a satisfactory outcome in the long term and show a tendency for gradual recurrence. We present a new technique of a closed gradual arthrodiatasis using a unilateral hinged elbow external fixator. The technique was applied in 10 patients with elbow flexion contracture as a sequela of brachial plexus birth palsy. Loss of elbow extension measured 55 degrees at average. With a mean device application of 8.8 weeks all patients gained full elbow extension. No major complications were noted. All patients were satisfied with the outcome. This novel technique (closed gradual arthrodiatasis of the elbow joint) has a definite role in the treatment of elbow flexion contracture in late cases of obstetric palsy, given the otherwise limited surgical options.

  8. Injuries in Patients with Epilepsy and Some Factors Associated with Injury

    PubMed Central

    MOLLAOĞLU, Mukadder; BOLAYIR, Ertuğrul

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the study was to evaluate injuries in patients with epilepsy and some factors associated with injury. Methods This study included 126 epileptic patients who attended a neurology outpatient clinic of a hospital between March 2009 and March 2010. Data were collected using a patient information form and an injury evaluation form. The data were evaluated using percentage, mean and the Chi square test. Result 82.5% of patients have sustained injury due to an epileptic seizure. Soft tissue injuries were the most common (70.2%), followed by head injury (61.5%), dental and tongue injury (%58.6), burns (24%), and orthopaedic injury (21.2%). The most common site of burns were the upper extremities and the face (36% and 24%, respectively). Burns occurred during cooking in 32% of cases. Five patients had upper extremity fractures. Four patients faced the risk of bathtub drowning. The injuries usually occurred at home. The significant risk factors for injury were generalized tonic-clonic seizures and high frequency of seizures. Twenty-six patients were taken to the emergency unit due to an injury. Conclusion Injury is a common problem in patients with epilepsy. Dental and tongue injury was the most common seizure-related injury. The risk factors were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and high frequency of seizures. Patients with epilepsy can lead normal lives but certain precautions are needed to prevent seizure-related injuries.

  9. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques.

  10. Choroid plexus taurine transport.

    PubMed

    Keep, R F; Xiang, J

    1996-04-09

    The putative osmoregulatory agent, taurine, is lost from the brain during hypo-osmotic stress or ischemia, but the regulatory mechanisms involved in this loss have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we have examined taurine transport by the isolated rat choroid plexus, one element of the brain-blood interface, and examined how it may be regulated as part of brain volume regulation. Choroid plexus taurine uptake was Na- and Cl-dependent with a Vmax and Km of 6.5 +/- 0.3 pmol/mg/min and 232 +/- 33 microM. The latter is substantially greater than the normal CSF taurine concentration and this may be important in removing taurine released into the CSF during parenchymal cell swelling. Taurine uptake also appears calmodulin dependent as it was reduced by 84 and 91% in the presence of 25 microM trifluoperazine and 100 microM W-7, two calmodulin inhibitors. Taurine efflux from choroid plexus was stimulated by trifluoperazine, taurine, and hypo-osmotic stress. The latter two effects were reduced by niflumic acid, suggesting that taurine and hypo-osmotic stress act on the same pathway. The stimulation of efflux by hypo-osmotic stress decreased with time, whereas the effect of external taurine was sustained. If this efflux pathway is involved in the movement of taurine from choroid plexus to blood, these results suggest that changes in extracellular taurine may be more important than the direct effect of hypo-osmolality in the long-term loss of taurine from the brain.

  11. Onset Time of 2% Lidocaine and 0.5% Bupivacaine Mixture versus 0.5% Bupivacaine Alone using Ultrasound and Double Nerve Stimulation for Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Anesthesia in ESRD Patients Undergoing Arteriovenous Fistula Creation.

    PubMed

    Pongraweewan, Orawan; Inchua, Nipa; Kitsiripant, Chanatthee; Kongmuang, Benchawan; Tiwirach, Wannapa

    2016-05-01

    To reduce the onset of 0.5% bupivacaine by adding 2% lidocaine with 0.5% bupivacaine for ultrasound-guided and double stimulation technique at musculocutaneous and radial nerve for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Prospective randomized double-blinded, controlled trial study. 90 patients undergoing creation of arteriovenous fistula under ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block were randomized into 2 groups. Gr B (46 patients) received 0.5% bupivacaine 30 mL and Gr BL (44 patients) received mixture of 0.5% bupivacaine 20 mL and 2% lidocaine 10 mL. The onset of sensory block were assessed by response to pinprick (grading: 0 = no sensation, 1 = hypoesthesia, and 2 = normal sensation). Rescue analgesia during the operation, duration of sensory and motor blockade were recorded. Surgeon and patient satisfactions are also evaluated using 6-point scale (0 = dissatisfied to 5 = very satisfied). There were no significant difference in the onset time of either group. Duration of sensory and motor block was not different. Surgeons' and patients' satisfaction were also not significantly different between the groups. Mixing 2% lidocaine with 0.5% bupivacaine to the final concentration of 0.67%for lidocaine and 0.33% for bupivacaine does not reduce the onset of ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block.

  12. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient.

  13. Does Brachial Plexus Blockade Result in Improved Pain Scores After Distal Radius Fracture Fixation? A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Galos, David K; Taormina, David P; Crespo, Alexander; Ding, David Y; Sapienza, Anthony; Jain, Sudheer; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2016-05-01

    Distal radius fractures are very common injuries and surgical treatment for them can be painful. Achieving early pain control may help improve patient satisfaction and improve functional outcomes. Little is known about which anesthesia technique (general anesthesia versus brachial plexus blockade) is most beneficial for pain control after distal radius fixation which could significantly affect patients' postoperative course and experience. We asked: (1) Did patients receiving general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade have worse pain scores at 2, 12, and 24 hours after surgery? (2) Was there a difference in operative suite time between patients who had general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade, and was there a difference in recovery room time? (3) Did patients receiving general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade have higher narcotic use after surgery? (4) Do patients receiving general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade have higher functional assessment scores after distal radius fracture repair at 6 weeks and 12 weeks after surgery? A randomized controlled study was performed between February, 2013 and April, 2014 at a multicenter metropolitan tertiary-care referral center. Patients who presented with acute closed distal radius fractures (Orthopaedic Trauma Association 23A-C) were potentially eligible for inclusion. During the study period, 40 patients with closed, displaced, and unstable distal radius fractures were identified as meeting inclusion criteria and offered enrollment and randomization. Three patients (7.5%), all with concomitant injuries, declined to participate at the time of randomization as did one additional patient (2.5%) who chose not to participate, leaving a final sample of 36 participants. There were no dropouts after randomization, and analyses were performed according to an intention-to-treat model. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups, general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade, and among the 36 patients

  14. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Ding, Zi-hai; Xu, Xin Ming; Xu, Yong-qing

    2011-04-14

    Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative position to the lumbar plexus. 3D

  15. Ganglionated plexus ablation vs linear ablation in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for persistent/long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation: a randomized comparison.

    PubMed

    Pokushalov, Evgeny; Romanov, Alexandr; Katritsis, Demosthenes G; Artyomenko, Sergey; Shirokova, Natalya; Karaskov, Alexandr; Mittal, Suneet; Steinberg, Jonathan S

    2013-09-01

    The optimal ablation technique for persistent and long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) is unclear. Both linear lesion (LL) and ganglionated plexus (GP) ablation have been used in addition to pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), but no direct comparison of the 2 methods exists. The aim of this study is to assess the comparative safety and efficacy of 2 different ablation strategies-PVI+LL vs PVI+GP ablation -in patients with persistent or long-standing persistent AF. Two hundred sixty-four consecutive patients with persistent/long-standing persistent AF were randomly assigned to 2 different ablation schemes: PVI+LL (n = 132) and PVI+GP (n = 132) ablation. Consistent sinus rhythm (SR) off antiarrhythmic drug was assessed after follow-up of at least 3 years with the use of an implanted monitoring device. All procedural end points were acutely achieved. At 12 months after a single procedure, 47% of the patients treated with PVI+LL were in SR compared to 54% of the patients treated with PVI+GP (P = .29). At 3 years, 34% of the patients with PVI+LL and 49% of the patients with PVI+GP maintained SR (P = .035). Atrial flutter was more frequent in the PVI+LL group than in PVI+GP group (18% vs 6%; P = .002). After a second procedure in 78 patients of the PVI+LL group and 55 patients of the PVI+GP group, the long-term overall success rate was 52% and 68%, respectively (P = .006). PVI+GP ablation confers superior clinical results with less ablation-related left atrial flutter and reduced AF recurrence compared to PVI+LL ablation at 3 years of follow-up. © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  16. [Postoperative complications in patients with cervicothoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, E V; Pogodina, A N; Korovkina, E N

    2014-01-01

    The results of the diagnosis and treatment of 117 patients with cervicothoracic injuries were analyzed. Different complications were observed in 51 (43.6%) cases. The main reasons contributing to the development of complications included late diagnosis of lesions of trachea and esophagus, acute blood loss, inadequate hemostasis during surgery.

  17. Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Russ, Kirk B.; Stevens, Todd M; Singal, Ashwani K.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs commonly in patients with advanced cirrhosis and negatively impacts pre- and post-transplant outcomes. Physiologic changes that occur in patients with decompensated cirrhosis with ascites, place these patients at high risk of AKI. The most common causes of AKI in cirrhosis include prerenal injury, acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and the hepatorenal syndrome (HRS), accounting for more than 80% of AKI in this population. Distinguishing between these causes is particularly important for prognostication and treatment. Treatment of Type 1 HRS with vasoconstrictors and albumin improves short term survival and renal function in some patients while awaiting liver transplantation. Patients with HRS who fail to respond to medical therapy or those with severe renal failure of other etiology may require renal replacement therapy. Simultaneous liver kidney transplant (SLK) is needed in many of these patients to improve their post-transplant outcomes. However, the criteria to select patients who would benefit from SLK transplantation are based on consensus and lack strong evidence to support them. In this regard, novel serum and/or urinary biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, interleukins-6 and 18, kidney injury molecule-1, fatty acid binding protein, and endothelin-1 are emerging with a potential for accurately differentiating common causes of AKI. Prospective studies are needed on the use of these biomarkers to predict accurately renal function recovery after liver transplantation alone in order to optimize personalized use of SLK. PMID:26623266

  18. Magnetic stimulation of biceps after intercostal cross-innervation for brachial plexus palsy. A study of motor evoked potentials in 25 patients.

    PubMed

    Kawai, H; Murase, T; Shibuya, R; Kawabata, H; Yonenobu, K; Masatomi, T; Ono, K

    1994-07-01

    We studied the motor evoked potentials (MEP) in the biceps of 25 patients with traumatic brachial plexus palsy from root avulsion after cross-innervation by intercostal nerves. We used transcranial, transcervical and transthoracic magnetic stimulation at 8 to 235 months (mean 51) after transfer of intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. Biceps strength recovered to MRC grade 2 in eight patients, grade 3 in three and grade 4 in 14. The mean latency of the MEP in the normal biceps on transcranial stimulation was 12.5 +/- 1.3 ms and on transcervical stimulation 6.3 +/- 1.1 ms. After intercostal reinnervation the mean latency on transcranial stimulation was 21.7 +/- 4.5 ms and on transthoracic stimulation 11.6 +/- 3.8 ms. The latency of the biceps MEP after reinnervation by intercostal nerves on transcranial and transthoracic magnetic stimulation correlated well with the duration of follow-up and the latency of the MEP on transthoracic magnetic stimulation correlated significantly with muscle power.

  19. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  20. Lawn mower injuries in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Horn, Pamela L; Beebe, Allan C

    2009-01-01

    Lawn mower injuries are painful, devastating, and life-altering. Pediatric patients who sustain these injuries suffer various forms of physical trauma. Some are minor, but many others are disfiguring or even fatal. The psychological and social impact is far-reaching as well. These injuries have high rates of morbidity, include many days lost from school, and can cause financial loss for the parents due to the hospitalization and missed work. The primary objective with regards to lawn mower injuries is prevention that is accomplished by education. However, once the patient has been injured and admitted to the hospital, then immediate treatment with timely discharge is the main objective. Excellent wound care, acceptable cosmetic appearance, and infection prevention are the ultimate goals. Use of the Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) device has helped facilitate the end results. Psychological adjustment with regards to this traumatic event is also addressed immediately for both the patient and the caregivers. Inpatient and outpatient counseling and follow-up all play a role in this stressful time.

  1. Brachmann-Cornelia de Lange syndrome with a papilloma of the choroid plexus: analyses of molecular genetic characteristics of the patient and the tumor. A single-case study.

    PubMed

    de León, Fernando Chico-Ponce; Gordillo-Domínguez, Luis F; González-Carranza, Vicente; Torres-García, Samuel; García-Delgado, Constanza; Sánchez-Boiso, Adriana; Arenas-Huertero, Francisco; Perezpeña-Diazconti, Mario; Eguía-Aguilar, Pilar; Baqueiro-Hernández, César; Buenrostro-Márquez, Guillermo; Martínez-Rodríguez, Sonia; Dhellemmes, Patrick; Castro-Sierra, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    A 10-month-old girl with a Brachmann-Cornelia de Lange syndrome and a choroid plexus papilloma of the brain was studied at the Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez (HIMFG) in Mexico City. Presumptive papilloma of the third ventricle was evidenced on CT and MR images and removed. Pathological analysis confirmed its origin. A posterior radiosurgery was required due to a tumor relapse. Karyotypes (GTG bands) of the patient and her parents undertaken at HIMFG were normal. Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) analyses of blood DNA of the patient and her parents carried out at BlueGnome's Laboratory in Cambridge, UK, set in evidence amplification of genes SPNS2, GGT6, SMTNL2, PELP1, MYBBP1A, and ALOX15 in chromosome 17p of the patient. Since MYBBP1A is a proto-oncogene and ALOX15 participates in the development of cancer and metastases of tumors, further fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of these two genes were implemented at HIMFG. Amplification of the two genes was found in the tumor of the case under study but not in an unrelated papilloma of the choroid plexus. Further analyses of the association of choroid plexus papillomas with disorders of psycho-neural development and its relationship to molecular genetic modifications at chromosome 17p are now under way at HIMFG.

  2. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 106 cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals. PMID:25883625

  3. Human amniotic epithelial cell transplantation for the repair of injured brachial plexus nerve: evaluation of nerve viscoelastic properties.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Yang, Qi; Ji, Feng; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Zhao, Yan; Luo, Min

    2015-02-01

    The transplantation of embryonic stem cells can effectively improve the creeping strength of nerves near an injury site in animals. Amniotic epithelial cells have similar biological properties as embryonic stem cells; therefore, we hypothesized that transplantation of amniotic epithelial cells can repair peripheral nerve injury and recover the creeping strength of the brachial plexus nerve. In the present study, a brachial plexus injury model was established in rabbits using the C6 root avulsion method. A suspension of human amniotic epithelial cells was repeatedly injected over an area 4.0 mm lateral to the cephal and caudal ends of the C6 brachial plexus injury site (1 × 10(6) cells/mL, 3 μL/injection, 25 injections) immediately after the injury. The results showed that the decrease in stress and increase in strain at 7,200 seconds in the injured rabbit C6 brachial plexus nerve were mitigated by the cell transplantation, restoring the viscoelastic stress relaxation and creep properties of the brachial plexus nerve. The forepaw functions were also significantly improved at 26 weeks after injury. These data indicate that transplantation of human amniotic epithelial cells can effectively restore the mechanical properties of the brachial plexus nerve after injury in rabbits and that viscoelasticity may be an important index for the evaluation of brachial plexus injury in animals.

  4. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, A.N. Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients.

  5. Transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve to the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve without nerve graft in case of lower brachial plexus injuries: Anatomical and feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Pauchot, J; Assouline, U; Valmary-Degano, S; Constantinou, B; Obert, L; Lepage, D

    2017-09-01

    In the context of lower (C8-T1) brachial plexus injury, transfer of the lateral antebrachial cutaneous nerve (LABCN) to the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve (DBUN) with an interposed sural nerve graft has been proposed to restore sensitivity on the ulnar side of the hand. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of performing this transfer directly - without interposition of a nerve graft - by intraneural dissection of the DBUN. An anatomical study was performed with 20 upper limbs from adult human cadavers. The LABCN and the DBUN were dissected. The LABCN emerged from the lateral side of the biceps brachii muscle at an average of 2.6±0.4cm from the interepicondylar line and was 13.5±2.6cm long, on average. The DBUN arose from the ulnar nerve 8.2±1.6cm from the styloid process of the ulna. The maximum length of DBUN intraneural dissection relative to the ulnar nerve was 7.5±2.1cm, on average. The LABCN could be transferred to the DBUN in a tension-free manner with end-to-end suturing. Intraneural dissection of the DBUN allows LABCN nerve transfer without interposition of a graft. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic alterations of the levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, and interleukin-1β in rat primary motor cortex during transhemispheric functional reorganization after contralateral seventh cervical spinal nerve root transfer following brachial plexus avulsion injuries.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming-Jie; Li, Shuang; Yang, Chen-Song; Wang, Xu-Jia; Chang, Shi-Min; Sun, Gui-Xin

    2017-03-22

    The transfer of a contralateral healthy seventh cervical spinal nerve root (cC7) to the recipient nerve in the injured side is considered a reliable and effective procedure for restoration of the physiological functions of an injured hand after brachial plexus root avulsion injury (BPAI). Growing evidence shows that the transhemispheric cortical reorganization is induced after cC7 nerve transfer surgery. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism. Proinflammatory cytokines reportedly play an important role in the neural plasticity. We hypothesize that proinflammatory cytokines are involved in the transhemispheric functional reorganization after cC7 transfer. In the present study, we investigated the level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in the rat primary motor cortex after cC7 transfer following BPAI by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results showed that, in the sham group, no statistical significance was observed between the level of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β at each time point after the operation compared with that at day 0, respectively. However, in the unrepaired and repaired groups, the level of TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β changed dynamically. The study is the first to provide evidence for the involvement of proinflammatory cytokines in transhemispheric functional reorganization after cC7 transfer following BPAI, which are useful for understanding the underlying mechanism.

  7. Bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dragu, A; Horch, R E; Wirth, S; Ingianni, G

    2009-01-01

    Whereas cases of unilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis have been sufficiently described and discussed in the literature cases of bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis are extremely rare and so far have not been mentioned and discussed satisfactorily. We present a case of bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis in an 8-months-old white boy. We performed a neurotisation of the Nervus suprascapularis with the Nervus accessorius and an Oberlin procedure on both sides in two operative steps. In an early follow-up 6 months after the second operation and intensive physiotherapy the little patient was able to crawl with the active help of both arms. Bilateral obstetric brachial plexus paralysis is a very rare incidence in infants. An interdisciplinary approach including paediatrics, plastic surgeons, neurosurgeons, neurologists, radiologists and physiotherapists is essential for the success of treatment strategies in such cases.

  8. Causes of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Daniel T

    2011-01-01

    The causes of brachial plexus palsy in neonates should be classified according to their most salient associated feature. The causes of brachial plexus palsy are obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, familial congenital brachial plexus palsy, maternal uterine malformation, congenital varicella syndrome, osteomyelitis involving the proximal head of the humerus or cervical vertebral bodies, exostosis of the first rib, tumors and hemangioma in the region of the brachial plexus, and intrauterine maladaptation. Kaiser Wilhelm syndrome, neonatal brachial plexus palsy due to placental insufficiency, is probably not a cause of brachial plexus palsy. Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy, the most common alleged cause of neonatal brachial plexus palsy, occurs when the forces generated during labor stretch the brachial plexus beyond its resistance. The probability of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy is directly proportional to the magnitude, acceleration, and cosine of the angle formed by the direction of the vector of the stretching force and the axis of the most vulnerable brachial plexus bundle, and inversely proportional to the resistance of the must vulnerable brachial plexus bundle and of the shoulder girdle muscles, joints, and bones. Since in most nonsurgical cases neither the contribution of each of these factors to the production of the obstetrical brachial plexus palsy nor the proportion of traction and propulsion contributing to the stretch force is known, we concur with prior reports that the term of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy should be substituted by the more inclusive term of birth-related brachial plexus palsy.

  9. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  10. Functional results of conservative therapy accompanied by interscalane brachial plexus block and patient-controlled analgesia in cases with frozen shoulder.

    PubMed

    Yilmazlar, Aysun; Türker, Gürkan; Atici, Teoman; Bilgen, Sadik; Bilgen, Omer Faruk

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacy of simultaneous interscalene block and catheter analgesia applied as an aid to conservative treatment in improving shoulder functions in patients with frozen shoulder. Three patients (2 women, 1 man; mean age 47 years) with frozen shoulder underwent conservative treatment including manipulation under interscalene brachial plexus block and subsequent rehabilitation under catheter analgesia to improve shoulder range of motion and function. Following manipulation under interscalene block, the patients were hospitalized for 15 to 28 days (mean 21 days) for an exercise program performed by a physiotherapist and orthopedist at least twice a day under interscalene catheter analgesia. Thirty minutes before each rehabilitation session, patient-controlled analgesia was administered via a pain relief pump. Active and passive range of motion (ROM) were measured and the severity of pain was rated using a visual analog scale (VAS) prior to and following interscalene block, during the exercise program, and at the end of the treatment. Functional assessments were made before and after treatment using the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA) Shoulder Scale. The exercise program under interscalene analgesia was performed until pain-free and sufficient active movements were obtained, with at least 80% improvement in active and passive motion, a VAS score of 0-2, and an UCLA score of >27. Compared to pretreatment values, the ROM values showed remarkable increases at the end of the treatment. Active ROM reached at least 30 degrees external rotation, 40 degrees internal rotation, 150 degrees flexion, 45 degrees extension, and 100 degrees abduction in all cases. On presentation, the VAS scores of all cases were 10 for both active and passive movements, whereas they ranged from 0 to 2 on discharge. The mean UCLA score increased from 12.3 to 30.3 after treatment. Immediately after the interscalene block, two patients exhibited signs of Horner's syndrome

  11. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. The analysis of the intra-surgical view of the obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Gosk, Jerzy; Rutowski, Roman; Rabczyński, Jerzy

    2005-01-01

    The surgical intervention is necessary in about 20% of all cases of the perinatal brachial plexus palsy. In this study the intra-surgical view and the applied microsurgical techniques were analysed. The clinical material consisted of 49 children with the obstetric brachial plexus palsy treated operatively, on which the following changes were found intra-surgically: compression of the brachial plexus in 21 cases and injuries with discontinuity of the elements of the brachial plexus in 28 cases. The following surgical procedures were performed: neurolysis - 31 cases, direct neurorrhaphy - 7 cases, 2 - 4 sural nerve grafting from 2 to 3 cm - 4 cases, extra-anatomical extra-plexual reconstruction - 6 cases, extra-anatomical intra-plexual reconstruction - 1 case. In all cases the intra-surgical view motivated the operative intervention. The most important problem in treatment of the obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a separate group of children who need a surgical intervention.

  13. Admission patterns in pediatric trauma patients with isolated injuries.

    PubMed

    Farach, Sandra M; Danielson, Paul D; Amankwah, Ernest K; Chandler, Nicole M

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric trauma patients presenting with stable, isolated injuries are often admitted to the trauma service for initial management. The purpose of this study was to evaluate admission patterns in trauma patients with isolated injuries and compare outcomes based on admitting service. The institutional trauma registry was retrospectively reviewed for patients presenting from January 2007-December 2012. A total of 3417 patients were admitted to a surgical service and further reviewed. Patients with isolated injuries were further stratified by admission to the general trauma service (GTS, n = 738) versus admission to the subspecialty surgical trauma service (STS, n = 2251). When compared to patients admitted to GTS, patients admitted to STS with isolated injuries were significantly younger, were more likely to present with injury severity scores ranging from 9-14, Glasgow coma scale ≥ 13, had shorter emergency room length of stay, were more likely to undergo surgery within 24 h, and had fewer computed tomography scans performed. There were no missed injuries in patients with isolated injuries admitted to STS (with 5% having a GTS consult) compared with one missed injury in those admitted to GTS. Patients with isolated injuries admitted to an STS were found to have significantly lower complication rates (0.6% versus 2.2%, P < 0.01). Pediatric trauma patients presenting with stable, isolated injuries may be efficiently and safely managed by nontrauma services without an increase in missed injuries or complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Limb preference in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lynda J-S; Anand, Praveen; Birch, Rolfe

    2005-07-01

    Brachial plexus palsy affects children differently than adults. In children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, motor development must depend on nervous system adaptation. Previous studies report sensory plasticity in these children. This noninvasive study provides support for neural plasticity (the general ability of the brain to reorganize neural pathways based on new experiences) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy by considering upper limb preference. As in the general population, we expect that 90% of children would prefer their right upper limb. However, only 17% of children affected by right obstetric brachial plexus palsy prefer the right upper limb for overall movement; children with left obstetric brachial plexus palsy did not significantly differ from the general population in upper limb preference. This study also provides the first evidence of a significant correlation between actual task performance and select obstetric brachial plexus palsy outcome measurement systems, thereby justifying the routine use of these outcome measurement systems as a reflection of the practical utility of the affected limb to the patient.

  15. Microsurgical reconstruction of obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Gu, Yu-Dong; Wang, Huan

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of obstetric brachial plexus palsy is not declining. Heavy birth weight of the infant and breech delivery are considered two important risk factors and Caesarean section delivery seems to be a protective factor. There are two clinical appearances, that is, paralysis of the upper roots and that of total roots, and Klumpke's palsy involving the C8 and T1 roots is rarely seen. Computed tomography myelography (CTM) is still the best way of visualizing nerve roots. Surgical intervention is needed for 20-25% of all patients and clinical information is decisive for the indication of surgery. Most often, a conducting neuroma of the upper trunk is encountered, and it is believed that neuroma resection followed by microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus gives the best results. Copyright 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. Microsurgery, 2008.

  16. Choroid plexus acinar adenoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rembao-Bojórquez, Daniel; Vega, Rosalba; Bermúdez-Maldonado, Luis; Gutiérrez, Ramón; Salinas, Citlaltepetl; Tena-Suck, Martha

    2007-06-01

    Mucus-secreting adenomas or acinar adenoma of the choroid plexus are very rare. We report the case of a 79-year-old male with a 3-year history of occipital headaches with vomiting, ataxia and cerebellar signs. He was first seen due to difficulty while walking. He was admitted to the hospital with significant tumor expansion and clinical deterioration. CT and MRI revealed obstructive hydrocephalus secondary to a large fourth ventricular cyst mass, which enhanced markedly on contrast administration. Pathological findings were consistent with an acinar choroid plexus adenoma. The tumor was attached to the ependymal lining and was strongly adhered to the walls and floor of the IV ventricle. Post-operative bleeding complicated partial removal of this tumor. The patient died 6 h after surgery.

  17. Traumatic brain injury is under-diagnosed in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Anu; Turkka, Jukka; Salonen, Oili; Ahoniemi, Eija; Alaranta, Hannu

    2007-10-01

    To investigate the occurrence and severity of traumatic brain injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury. Cross-sectional study with prospective neurological, neuropsychological and neuroradiological examinations and retrospective medical record review. Thirty-one consecutive, traumatic spinal cord injury patients on their first post-acute rehabilitation period in a national rehabilitation centre. The American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine diagnostic criteria for mild traumatic brain injury were applied. Assessments were performed with neurological and neuropsychological examinations and magnetic resonance imaging 1.5T. Twenty-three of the 31 patients with spinal cord injury (74%) met the diagnostic criteria for traumatic brain injury. Nineteen patients had sustained a loss of consciousness or post-traumatic amnesia. Four patients had a focal neurological finding and 21 had neuropsychological findings apparently due to traumatic brain injury. Trauma-related magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were detected in 10 patients. Traumatic brain injury was classified as moderate or severe in 17 patients and mild in 6 patients. The results suggest a high frequency of traumatic brain injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and stress a special diagnostic issue to be considered in this patient group.

  18. Addition of a third field significantly increases dose to the brachial plexus for patients undergoing tangential whole-breast therapy after lumpectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Stanic, Sinisa; Mathai, Mathew; Mayadev, Jyoti S.; Do, Ly V.; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-07-01

    Our goal was to evaluate brachial plexus (BP) dose with and without the use of supraclavicular (SCL) irradiation in patients undergoing breast-conserving therapy with whole-breast radiation therapy (RT) after lumpectomy. Using the standardized Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines delineation, we contoured the BP for 10 postlumpectomy breast cancer patients. The radiation dose to the whole breast was 50.4 Gy using tangential fields in 1.8-Gy fractions, followed by a conedown to the operative bed using electrons (10 Gy). The prescription dose to the SCL field was 50.4 Gy, delivered to 3-cm depth. The mean BP volume was 14.5 {+-} 1.5 cm{sup 3}. With tangential fields alone, the median mean dose to the BP was 0.57 Gy, the median maximum dose was 1.93 Gy, and the irradiated volume of the BP receiving 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 0%. When the third (SCL field) was added, the dose to the BP was significantly increased (P = .01): the median mean dose to the BP was 40.60 Gy, and the median maximum dose was 52.22 Gy. With 3-field RT, the median irradiated volume of the BP receiving 40, 45, and 50 Gy was 83.5%, 68.5%, and 24.6%, respectively. The addition of the SCL field significantly increases dose to the BP. The possibility of increasing the risk of BP morbidity should be considered in the context of clinical decision making.

  19. Choroid plexus cysts and aneuploidy.

    PubMed Central

    Peleg, D; Yankowitz, J

    1998-01-01

    The association of choroid plexus cysts with fetal aneuploidy, particularly trisomy 18, was first noted in 1986. Through the years there have been numerous reports on this subject, but no consensus has been reached with regard to chromosomal risk. In this review, we attempt to summarise published reports on second trimester choroid plexus cysts, with an emphasis on the strengths and weaknesses of each report. Based on these reports, additional malformations are a significant risk factor for aneuploidy and an indication for determination of fetal karyotype. The management of isolated choroid plexus cysts remains controversial. PMID:9678699

  20. Axillary arteriovenous fistula after axillary plexus block.

    PubMed

    Gong, Dao-Jun; Yuan, Hai-Jun; Zhang, Zhong-Heng

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the case of a 51-year-old man who had an axillary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) as a complication of an axillary plexus block that was performed for internal fixation for a right forefinger phalanx fracture 4 years previously. While performing the axillary plexus block, a 22-gauge needle was placed inside the axillary sheath by observing the pulsations of the axillary artery. A pulsatile mass was found in the right axilla 1 day after the block was performed. Apart from this soft mass, the patient had no symptoms of vascular nerve damage. As the mass gradually increased in size, it became painful. During the past 3 months, in particular, the patient experienced repeated attacks of intermittent sharp pain and requested surgery. Digital subtraction angiography, performed 4 years after the axillary block, showed a tumor-like dilation was developing in both the right axillary artery and vein, almost simultaneously. Thus, the diagnosis of AVF was confirmed. The false aneurysm sac was excised and lateral repair of the axillary artery and vein was carried out under general anesthesia. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. The possible occurrence of an AVF after axillary plexus block should be kept in mind, because early diagnosis and treatment are necessary to avoid development of AVF and false aneurysm.

  1. Missed diagnosis of traumatic brain injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhanu; Bradbury, Cheryl; Mikulis, David; Green, Robin

    2014-04-01

    To determine the frequency of missed acute care traumatic brain injury diagnoses in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury, and to examine risk factors for missed traumatic brain injury diagnosis. Prospective magnetic resonance imaging and neuro-psychological assessment plus retrospective medical record review, including computed tomography. Ninety-two adults with traumatic spinal cord injury recruited from a large, tertiary spinal cord injury program, initially referred from urban teaching hospitals with neurotrauma facilities. Diagnosis of traumatic brain injury made with clinical neurological indices (i.e., Glasgow Coma Scale, post-traumatic amnesia, and loss of consciousness), neuroimaging (computed tomography and structural magnetic resonance imaging), and neuropsychological tests of attention and speed of processing, memory, and executive function; all measures were validated on a case-by-case basis to rule out confounds. Missed traumatic brain injury diagnoses were made via acute care medical record review and were corroborated by patient/family report where possible. The frequency of missed traumatic brain injury diagnoses in our sample was 58.5%. Missed traumatic brain injury diagnoses were more frequent in injuries sustained outside of a motor vehicle collision (MVC), with 75.0% of acute care traumatic brain injury diagnoses missed in non-MVC patients vs. 42.9% missed in MVC patients. Among patients with non-MVC injuries, a comparable percentage of missed traumatic brain injury diagnoses were observed in patients with cervical (79%) and sub-cervical injuries (80%). In more than half of the traumatic spinal cord injury patients referred for in-patient rehabilitation, acute care diagnoses of traumatic brain injury were missed. A risk factor for missed diagnosis was an injury caused by a mechanism other than an MVC (e.g., falls, assaults), perhaps due to reduced expectations of traumatic brain injury in non-MVC patients. In our research study, we

  2. Xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Pear, B.L.

    1984-08-01

    Uncommon tumefactions known as xanthogranulomas can occur throughout the body. Some appear to develop as benign or malignant neoplasms. An even less familiar xanthogranuloma occurs within the choroid plexus. Most are tiny plaques only a few millimeters in diameter. However, they can present as masses of significant size within the glomus. When large and unilateral, they are included in the differential diagnosis of choroid plexus tumors. A computed tomographic (CT) study of such a tumor is presented.

  3. Qualitative dermatoglyphic traits in brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Polovina, Svetislav; Milicić, Jasna; Cvjeticanin, Miljenko; Proloscić, Tajana Polovina

    2007-12-01

    It has been considered for many years that the cause of perinatal brachial plexus palsy (PBPP) is excessive lateral traction applied to the fetal head at delivery, in association with anterior shoulder dystocia, but this do not explain all cases of brachial plexus palsy. The incidence found in several family members could be suggestive for inheritance with variable expression. The aim of this study was to prove early found confirmations of genetic predisposition for PBPP In the previous studies, the quantitative dermatoglyphic analysis showed some differences in digito-palmar dermatoglyphs between patients with PBPP and healthy controls. Now this qualitative analysis will try to determine hereditary of those diseases. We analyzed digito-palmar dermatoglyphics from 140 subjects (70 males and 70 females) diagnosed with PBPP and 400 phenotypically healthy adults (200 males and 200 females) from Zagreb area as control group. The results of Chi-square test showed statistically significant differences for frequencies of patterns on fingers in females between the groups observed. Statistically significant differences were found on palms in III and IV interdigital areas in both males and females and in thenar and I interdigital area only in females. As it was found in previous researches on quantitative dermatoglyphic traits, more differences are found between females with PBPP and control group, than between males. The fact, that the main presumed cause of PBPP is obstetrical trauma, it could be associated with congenital variability in formation of brachial plexus.

  4. Comparison between Conventional and Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block in Upper Limb Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Honnannavar, Kiran Abhayakumar; Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh Shivangouda

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Brachial plexus blockade is a time-tested technique for upper limb surgeries. The classical approach using paresthesia technique is a blind technique and may be associated with a higher failure rate and injury to the nerves and surrounding structures. To avoid some of these problems, use of peripheral nerve stimulator and ultrasound techniques were started which allowed better localization of the nerve/plexus. Ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block has improved the success rate of the block with excellent localization as well as improved safety margin. Hence, this study was planned for comparing the efficacy of conventional supraclavicular brachial plexus block with ultrasound-guided technique. Subjects and Methods: After obtaining the Institutional ethical committee approval and patient consent total of 60 patients were enrolled in this prospective randomized study and were randomly divided into two groups: US (Group US) and C (Group C). Both groups received 0.5% bupivacaine. The amount of local anesthetic injected calculated according to the body weight and was not crossing the toxic dosage (injection bupivacaine 2 mg/kg). The parameters compared between the two groups were lock execution time, time of onset of sensory and motor block, quality of sensory and motor block success rates were noted. The failed blocks were supplemented with general anesthesia. Results: Demographic data were comparable in both groups. The mean time taken for the procedure to administer a block by eliciting paresthesia is less compared to ultrasound, and it was statistically significant. The mean time of onset of motor block, sensory blockade, the duration of sensory and motor blockade was not statistically significant. The success rate of the block is more in ultrasound group than conventional group which was not clinically significant. The incidence of complications was seen more in conventional method. Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance is the safe and

  5. Demonstration of myenteric plexus abnormalities in genetic diseases by a microdissection technique: preliminary studies.

    PubMed

    Galvis, D A; Nakazato, Y; Wells, T R; Landing, B H

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-eight specimens of esophagus, small intestine, or colon from 45 patients, predominantly infants and children, with 30 different genetic diseases were analyzed by a microdissection technique for the following abnormalities of the Auerbach (myenteric) plexus: (1) abnormality of the pattern of the nervous network of the plexus, (2) abnormal fraction of neural tissue in the plane of the plexus, (3) abnormal size or appearance of the cytoplasm of the neurons of the plexus, and (4) abnormal number of neurons in the ganglia of the plexus. Seven of 8 specimens of esophagus from patients with neuronal storage diseases (infantile Niemann-Pick disease, Jansky-Bielschowsky disease, etc.) showed an increased fraction of neural tissue in the plane of the plexus, whereas 2 of 3 patients with Cockayne syndrome showed a reduced fraction, with abnormally slender interganglionic fibers. The fraction of neural tissue in the plane of the plexus was also abnormal at one or more levels in patients with adrenoleukodystrophy, ataxia telangiectasia, Krabbe disease, and juvenile metachromatic leukodystrophy. Abnormality of neuron size and cytology was seen in several neuronal lipidoses, including Jansky-Bielschowsky and Sandhoff diseases and juvenile GM2 gangliosidosis, with the most striking neuronal enlargement noted in infantile Niemann-Pick disease. Abnormalities of plexus mass or pattern, as well as those of neuronal cytoplasm and neuron number, offer improved insight into possible mechanisms producing gastrointestinal tract dysfunction (swallowing difficulty, gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, etc) in patients with genetic disorders.

  6. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; dos Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira; Pozzobon, Adriane; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Ângela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. PMID:25741102

  7. Ultrasound localization of the sacral plexus using a parasacral approach.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Alon Y; Joshi, Rama; Uskova, Anna; Chelly, Jacques E

    2009-06-01

    In this report, we describe the feasibility of locating the sacral plexus nerve using a parasacral approach and an ultrasound-guided technique. The parasacral region using a curved probe (2-5 MHz) was scanned in 17 patients in search of the medial border of the ischial bone and the lateral border of the sacrum, which represent the limit of the greater sciatic foramen. In addition, attempts were made to identify the piriformis muscles and the gluteal arteries. The sacral plexus was identified at the level of the sciatic foramen as a round hyperechoic structure. The gluteal arteries were identified in 10 of 17 patients, but we failed to positively identify the piriformis muscle in any patient. To confirm localization of the sacral plexus, an insulated needle attached to a nerve stimulator was advanced and, in each case, a sacral plexus motor response was elicited (plantar flexion-12, dorsal flexion-1, hamstring muscle stimulation-3, gastrocnemius muscle stimulation-1-not recorded) at a current between 0.2 and 0.5 mA. No complications were observed. This report confirms the feasibility of using ultrasound to locate the sacral plexus using a parasacral approach.

  8. Aphasic disorder in patients with closed head injury.

    PubMed Central

    Levin, H S; Grossman, R G; Kelly, P J

    1976-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of 50 patients with closed head injury disclosed that anomic errors and word finding difficulty were prominent sequelae as nearly half of the series had defective scores on tests of naming and/or word association. Aphasic disturbance was associated with severity of brain injury as reflected by prolonged coma and injury of the brain stem. PMID:1011017

  9. Epidemiologic change of patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Dae Hyun; Yu, Su Jin; Yang, Hea Eun; Yoon, Seo Yeon

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the epidemiologic change of patients with spinal cord injury who were admitted to a Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, during 1987-1996 and 2004-2008. Medical records of 629 patients with spinal cord injury admitted to the Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, from 2004 to 2008 were collected and reviewed retrospectively. The male-to-female ratio decreased to 2.86:1, the mean age at injury increased, nontraumatic etiology increased, traffic accident remained to be the most common in traumatic spinal cord injury, and falling increased significantly. Tumor was the most common etiology in nontraumatic spinal cord injury, tetraplegia and incomplete injuries occurred more than paraplegia and complete injuries, indwelling catheter was the most common voiding method, and the duration of hospitalization decreased. Many trends changed in epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

  10. Outcomes of Transferring a Healthy Motor Fascicle From the Radial Nerve to a Branch for the Triceps to Recover Elbow Extension in Partial Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2017-03-01

    Triceps reinnervation is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus for cases with upper roots injuries, and a number of different techniques have been developed in order to restore elbow extension in such cases. To demonstrate the surgical outcomes associated with the technique of transferring a single healthy motor fascicle from the radial nerve of the affected arm to a branch innervating 1 of the 3 heads of the triceps. A retrospective study of 13 adult patients sustaining an upper trunk syndrome associated with total elbow extension palsy who underwent the proposed technique as part of the surgical planning for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Outcomes scored as M4 for elbow extension were noted in 9 cases (70%), M3 in 3 (23%), and M1 in 1 subject (7%). No patient considered the postoperative strength for carpal or finger extension as impaired. There were no differences in outcomes by using a fascicle activating carpal or finger extension as donor, as well as regarding the use of the branch to the medial or lateral head of the triceps as the recipient. The technique of transferring a healthy motor fascicle from the radial nerve of the affected side to one of its nonfunctional motor branches to the triceps is an effective and safe procedure for recovering elbow extension function in patients sustaining partial injuries of the brachial plexus.

  11. Radionuclide assessment of heterotopic ossification in spinal cord injury patients

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, V.

    1983-01-01

    Whole body /sup 99m/T-pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained and correlated with skeletal radiographs for detection of heterotopic ossification in 135 spinal injury patients. There were 40 patients with recent injury (less than 6 months) and 95 with injury of over 6 months duration. Heterotopic new bone was detected on the bone scan in 33.7% of 95 patients with spinal cord injuries of more than 6 months duration and 30% of 40 patients with injuries of less than 6 months. The radionuclide scan was found to be useful in detection of heterotopic ossification at its early stage and in its differentiation from other complications in spinal cord injury patients.

  12. Traumatic intracranial injury in intoxicated patients with minor head trauma.

    PubMed

    Easter, Joshua S; Haukoos, Jason S; Claud, Jonathan; Wilbur, Lee; Hagstrom, Michelle Tartalgia; Cantrill, Stephen; Mestek, Michael; Symonds, David; Bakes, Katherine

    2013-08-01

    Studies focusing on minor head injury in intoxicated patients report disparate prevalences of intracranial injury. It is unclear if the typical factors associated with intracranial injury in published clinical decision rules for computerized tomography (CT) acquisition are helpful in differentiating patients with and without intracranial injuries, as intoxication may obscure particular features of intracranial injury such as headache and mimic other signs of head injury such as altered mental status. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of intracranial injury following minor head injury (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≥14) in intoxicated patients and to assess the performance of established clinical decision rules in this population. This was a prospective cohort study of consecutive intoxicated adults presenting to the emergency department (ED) following minor head injury. Historical and physical examination features included those from the Canadian CT Head Rule, National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS), and New Orleans Criteria. All patients underwent head CT. A total of 283 patients were enrolled, with a median age of 40 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 28 to 48 years) and median alcohol concentration of 195 mmol/L (IQR = 154 to 256 mmol/L). A total of 238 of 283 (84%) were male, and 225 (80%) had GCS scores of 15. Clinically important injuries (injuries requiring admission to the hospital or neurosurgical follow-up) were identified in 23 patients (8%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 5% to 12%); one required neurosurgical intervention (0.4%, 95% CI = 0% to 2%). Loss of consciousness and headache were associated with clinically important intracranial injury on CT. The Canadian CT Head Rule had a sensitivity of 70% (95% CI = 47% to 87%) and NEXUS criteria had a sensitivity of 83% (95% CI = 61% to 95%) for clinically important injury in intoxicated patients. In this study, the prevalence of clinically important injury in intoxicated

  13. Brachial plexus palsy following a training run with a heavy backpack.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, Robert; Sheena, Y; Simpson, C; Power, D

    2014-12-01

    A 23-year-old male British soldier developed a progressive sensory loss and weakness in his right arm during a 12 km training run with a load of approximately 70 kg. There was no recovery of his symptoms within 3 months and both MRI and USS did not demonstrate a site of compression within the brachial plexus. An infraclavicular brachial plexus exploration was performed 11 months after injury that indicated an ischaemic neuropathy with post-injury fibrosis. Injuries of the brachial plexus secondary to carrying a heavy backpack during prolonged periods of exercise are rare, particularly in the infraclavicular region. Cases such as this highlight that training regimens within the military population should be appraised due to the risk of similar injuries occurring. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  14. Intermittent claudication due to ischaemia of the lumbosacral plexus

    PubMed Central

    Wohlgemuth, W.; Rottach, K.; Stoehr, M

    1999-01-01

    The distinct clinical syndrome of exercise induced ischaemia of the lumbosacral plexus is not a widely known cause for intermittent claudication. Eight patients with the mentioned syndrome were investigated clinically, neurophysiologically, and with imaging techniques. The clinical examination showed a typical exercise induced sequence of symptoms: pain, paraesthesia, and sensory and motor deficits. The underlying vascular conditions were high grade stenoses or occlusions of the arteries supplying the lumbosacral plexus. Spinal stenosis could be excluded in all cases. Five patients received successful interventional radiological therapy. The syndrome can be diagnosed clinically and successful therapy is possible by interventional radiology.

 PMID:10567501

  15. Effects of Patient Pre-Injury and Injury Characteristics on Acute Rehabilitation Outcomes for Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, John D.; Horn, Susan D.; Barrett, Ryan S.; Smout, Randall J.; Bogner, Jennifer; Hammond, Flora M.; Brandstater, Murray E.; Majercik, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine associations of patient and injury characteristics with outcomes at inpatient rehabilitation discharge and 9 months post-discharge for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) Design Prospective, longitudinal observational study Setting 10 inpatient rehabilitation centers (9 US, 1 Canada) Participants Consecutive patients (n=2130) enrolled between 2008 and 2011, admitted for inpatient rehabilitation after index TBI injury, and divided into 5 subgroups based on rehabilitation admission FIM Cognitive score Interventions Not applicable Main Outcome Measures Rehabilitation length of stay, discharge to home, and FIM at discharge and 9 months post-discharge. Results Severity indices increased explained variation in outcomes beyond that accounted for by patient characteristics. FIM Motor scores were generally the most predictable. Higher functioning subgroups had more predictable outcomes then subgroups with lower cognitive function at admission. Age at injury, time from injury to rehabilitation admission, and functional independence at rehabilitation admission were the most consistent predictors across all outcomes and subgroups. Conclusions Findings from previous studies of the relationships among patient and injury characteristics and rehabilitation outcomes were largely replicated. Discharge outcomes were most strongly associated with injury severity characteristics; while predictors of functional independence at 9 months post-discharge included both patient and injury characteristics. PMID:26212398

  16. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion.

  17. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion. PMID:26834329

  18. Primary Brachial Plexus Tumors: Clinical Experiences of 143 Cases.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaotian; Yang, Jianyun; Chen, Lin; Yu, Cong; Kondo, Tadashi

    2016-09-01

    Primary brachial plexus tumors are extremely rare and the treatment is challengeable. Our aim is to share the experiences in the treatment of primary brachial plexus tumors. A retrospective analysis of 143 patients with primary brachial plexus tumors was made in our department from January 2001 to December 2012. The clinical presentation of the patients, the characteristics and pathological results of the tumors and the prognosis were described. Seventy-eight males and sixty-five female were enrolled. The mean age was 48.17 years old. A palpable mass was the most common clinical presentation occurred in 129 patients. The trunks of the brachial plexus were the locations where the tumors originated with high possibility, with 68 cases. Benign tumors were composed of 119 schwannomas and 12 neurofibromas, while malignant tumors were composed of 8 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, 2 malignant granular cell tumors, 1 synovial sarcoma and 1 peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Appropriate surgical method, radiotherapy and chemotherapy were used according to the condition during operation, preoperative examinations and pathological result. The survival rate was 50.00% with a 3-year follow-up. Local recurrence happened in 7 patients. Five patients presented Metastasis. Appropriate surgical method is the key for the treatment of different brachial plexus tumors. Surgery has a great effect on the treatment of benign tumors. For malignant tumors, adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy should be used according to the pathological result. The general prognosis for malignant brachial plexus tumors is less than ideal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation Therapy to the Plexus Brachialis in Breast Cancer Patients: Analysis of Paresthesia in Relation to Dose and Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Steineck, Gunnar; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Karlsson, Per

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To identify volume and dose predictors of paresthesia after irradiation of the brachial plexus among women treated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The women had breast surgery with axillary dissection, followed by radiation therapy with (n=192) or without irradiation (n=509) of the supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs). The breast area was treated to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions, and 192 of the women also had 46 to 50 Gy to the SCLNs. We delineated the brachial plexus on 3-dimensional dose-planning computerized tomography. Three to eight years after radiation therapy the women answered a questionnaire. Irradiated volumes and doses were calculated and related to the occurrence of paresthesia in the hand. Results: After treatment with axillary dissection with radiation therapy to the SCLNs 20% of the women reported paresthesia, compared with 13% after axillary dissection without radiation therapy, resulting in a relative risk (RR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.11). Paresthesia was reported by 25% after radiation therapy to the SCLNs with a V{sub 40} {sub Gy} ≥ 13.5 cm{sup 3}, compared with 13% without radiation therapy, RR 1.83 (95% CI 1.13-2.95). Women having a maximum dose to the brachial plexus of ≥55.0 Gy had a 25% occurrence of paresthesia, with RR 1.86 (95% CI 0.68-5.07, not significant). Conclusion: Our results indicate that there is a correlation between larger irradiated volumes of the brachial plexus and an increased risk of reported paresthesia among women treated for breast cancer.

  20. Choroid plexus papillomas: advances in molecular biology and understanding of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C; Bloch, Orin; Sun, Matthew Z; Kaur, Gurvinder; Auguste, Kurtis I; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-03-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare, benign tumors originating from the choroid plexus. Although generally found within the ventricular system, they can arise ectopically in the brain parenchyma or disseminate throughout the neuraxis. We sought to review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular biology and oncogenic pathways associated with this disease. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted to identify manuscripts discussing the clinical, molecular, and genetic features of choroid plexus papillomas. Articles concerning diagnosis, treatment, and long-term patient outcomes were also reviewed. The introduction of atypical choroid plexus papilloma as a distinct entity has increased the need for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. Advances in immunohistochemical staining have improved our ability to differentiate choroid plexus papillomas from other intracranial tumors or metastatic lesions using combinations of key markers and mitotic indices. Recent findings have implicated Notch3 signaling, the transcription factor TWIST1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand pathway in choroid plexus papilloma tumorigenesis. A combination of commonly occurring chromosomal duplications and deletions has also been identified. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be considered for recurrent or metastatic lesions. While generally considered benign, these tumors possess a complex biology that sheds insight into other choroid plexus tumors, particularly malignant choroid plexus carcinomas. Improving our understanding of the molecular biology, genetics, and oncogenic pathways associated with this tumor will allow for the development of targeted therapies and improved outcomes for patients with this disease.

  1. Ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block versus local infiltration anesthesia for arteriovenous fistula creation at the forearm for hemodialysis in patients with chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, WH; El Fawal, SM; Shoukry, AA; Sabek, EAS; Malak, WFA

    2017-01-01

    Background: The primary failure rate for arteriovenous fistula (AVF) creation under local anesthesia for hemodialysis is about 30%. Axillary brachial plexus block (BPB) may improve blood flow through blood vessels used in fistula creation; it may improve the AVF blood flow and thus may reduce the primary failure rate after 3 months. Methods: Hundred and forty patients with chronic renal failure scheduled for AVF creation for hemodialysis were divided into two equal groups; Group 1 (AxBP-G) received ultrasound (US) guided axillary BPB, and Group 2 (LI-G) received local infiltration. We recorded the measurements of the brachial and radial arteries before and after anesthesia and the AVF blood flow in both groups at three different time points. Furthermore, the primary failure rate was recorded in each group and compared. Results: After anesthesia, the mean radial artery blood flow in the AxBP-group was 3.52 ml/min more than the LI-group, and the brachial artery diameter was also 0.68 mm more than in the LI-group, both differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05). There were significant increases (P < 0.05) in the AVF blood flow in the AxBP-group more than the LI-group with mean differences of 29.6, 69.8, and 27.2 ml/min at 4 h, 1 week, and 3 months, respectively. The overall mean of AVF blood flow was 42.21 ml/min more in the AxBP group than the LI-group a difference which is statistically significant (P < 0.001). The primary failure rate was 17% in the AxBP group versus 30% in the LI-group; however, this difference is not significant statistically (P = 0.110). Conclusion: The US-guided axillary block increases AVF blood flow significantly more than local infiltration and nonsignificantly decreases the primary failure rate of the AVF after 3 months. PMID:28217059

  2. Assessment and management of patients with ankle injuries.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennie

    2014-08-19

    Foot and ankle injuries are common and can have a significant effect on an individual's daily activities. Nurses have an important role in the assessment, management, ongoing care and support of patients with ankle injuries. An understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the ankle enables nurses to identify significant injuries, which may result in serious complications, and communicate effectively with the multidisciplinary team to improve patient care and outcomes.

  3. Injury patterns in patients who "talk and die".

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Kemp, S; Kullas, K; Hitos, K; Dexter, M A

    2013-12-01

    Despite advances in the quality of and access to cerebral imaging, patients with mild head injuries still deteriorate and die in neurotrauma units. The term "talk and die" was first used by Reilly et al. to describe a subset of patients with head injuries who died following what was initially thought to be only a mild traumatic brain injury. A retrospective review of a database from a major Australian trauma center was performed to identify 25 patients who met the "talk and die" criteria between January 2000 and December 2009. The medical records of these patients and their imaging studies were analyzed to identify potentially preventable factors and injury patterns in this group of patients. The factors analyzed included age, modality of injury, therapeutic narcotic usage, seizures, and hyponatremia. Two groups of patients are described herein based on intracranial pathology, with statistically significant differences in age, mechanism, and coagulopathy identified. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Abdominal injury patterns in patients with seatbelt signs requiring laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Seema; Adileh, Mohamed; Almogy, Gidon; Bala, Miklosh

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We analyzed our series of patients with seatbelt signs (bruising) that underwent laparotomy in order to correlate injury pattern with clinical course and outcome. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with seatbelt signs presenting to the level 1 Trauma Unit between 2005 and 2010 was performed. We evaluated the nature of injuries during laparotomy associated with seatbelt signs and their treatment and complications. Results: There were 41 patients, 25 (61%) male, with a median age of 26 years. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 25 (range 6–66) and overall mortality was 10% (four patients). Patients were classified into three groups according to time from injury to surgery. Median time to surgery for the immediate group (n = 12) was 1.05 h, early group (n = 22) was 2.7 h, and delayed group (n = 7) was 19.5 h. Patients in the immediate group tended to have solid organ injuries; whereas, patients in the delayed group had bowel injury. Patients with solid organ injuries were found to be more seriously injured and had higher mortality (P < 0.01) and morbidity compared with patients with the “classic” bowel injury pattern associated with a typical seatbelt sign. Conclusion: Our data suggest that there is a cohort of patients with seatbelt injury who have solid organ injury requiring urgent intervention. Solid organ injuries associated with malpositioned seatbelts lying higher on the abdomen tend to result in hemodynamic instability necessitating immediate surgery. They have more postoperative complications and a greater mortality. Seatbelt signs should be accurately documented after any car crash. PMID:25400391

  5. [Treatment of early and late obstetric brachial plexus palsy].

    PubMed

    Degliūte, Ramune; Pranckevicius, Sigitas; Cekanauskas, Emilis; Buinauskiene, Jūrate; Kalesinskas, Romas Jonas

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review and to analyze treatment patterns of early and late obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Eighty-one children with early and late obstetric brachial plexus palsy were treated in the Department of Pediatric Orthopedics and in the Postintensive Care Unit within the period 1988-2002. Children were classified into 2 groups according to age: Ist group (67 newborns) was treated conservatively, and IInd group (14 children with late obstetric brachial plexus palsy with deformity) underwent operative treatment. Active hand movements and innervation were evaluated before and after treatment. Thirty newborns had full recovery, 32 newborns had incomplete recovery, and in 5 cases no improvement was seen. Fourteen children with late obstetric brachial plexus palsy underwent the following operations: rotation osteotomy of the humerus was performed in 10 cases, lengthening of biceps and brachialis muscle tendons--in 6 cases, transposition of triceps muscle tendon--in 1 case, transposition of pectoralis major tendon--in 3 cases and flexor carpi transposition--in 1 case. There was an improvement in active hand movements after operative treatment and rehabilitation. According to our experience, in most cases newborns recover spontaneously or after conservative treatment. Secondary reconstructive surgery of late brachial plexus palsy can improve the condition of these patients.

  6. The natural history and management of brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Buterbaugh, Kristin L; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-12-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is an upper extremity paralysis that occurs due to traction injury of the brachial plexus during childbirth. Approximately 20 % of children with brachial plexus birth palsy will have residual neurologic deficits. These permanent and significant impacts on upper limb function continue to spur interest in optimizing the management of a problem with a highly variable natural history. BPBP is generally diagnosed on clinical examination and does not typically require cross-sectional imaging. Physical examination is also the best modality to determine candidates for microsurgical reconstruction of the brachial plexus. The key finding on physical examination that determines need for microsurgery is recovery of antigravity elbow flexion by 3-6 months of age. When indicated, both microsurgery and secondary shoulder and elbow procedures are effective and can substantially improve functional outcomes. These procedures include nerve transfers and nerve grafting in infants and secondary procedures in children, such as botulinum toxin injection, shoulder tendon transfers, and humeral derotational osteotomy.

  7. Acute traumatic cervical cord injury in patients with os odontoideum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Jian; Chu, Tongwei; Li, Changqing; Ren, Xianjun; Wang, Weidong

    2010-10-01

    We retrospectively reviewed acute cervical cord injury after minor trauma in 10 patients with os odontoideum. Their clinical history, neurological symptoms, radiological investigations, follow-up period, American Spinal Injury Association impairment classification and motor score were reviewed. Before their traumatic injury, three patients were asymptomatic and seven reported myelopathic symptoms, including four patients with neck pain, two patients with unsteadiness and one patient with dizziness. Falls were the most common cause of injury (n=6), followed by minor motor vehicle accidents (n=3) and assault (n=1). MRI and dynamic cervical lateral radiographs showed that all patients had atlantoaxial instability and cord compression. Most patients had spinal cord thinning and hyperintensity on T2-weighted MRI. Spinal cord compression was posterior (n=5), or both anterior and posterior (n=5). All patients underwent posterior rigid screw fixation and fusion, including atlantoaxial fusion (n=8) and occipitocervical fusion (n=2). We conclude that patients with asymptomatic or myelopathic atlantoaxial instability secondary to os odontoideum are at risk for acute spinal cord injury after minor traumatic injury. Fixation and fusion should be undertaken as prophylactic treatment for patients at risk of developing myelopathy and to avoid the neurological deterioration associated with acute traumatic cervical cord injury. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Massive hemothorax: A rare complication after supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shiv Kumar; Katyal, Surabhi; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Pawan

    2014-01-01

    Plexus block is the preferred anesthesia plan for upper limb surgeries. Among the known complications, hematoma formation following the vascular trauma is often occur but this complication is frequently underreported. We present a case where a massive hemothorax developed post operatively in a patient who underwent resection of giant cell tumor of the right hand radius bone followed by arthroplasty under brachial plexus block using supraclavicular approach. This case report attempts to highlight the essence of remaining vigilant postoperatively for first initial days after brachial plexus block, especially after failed or multiple attempts. Ultrasound guided technique in combination with nerve stimulator has proven to be more reliable and safer than traditional techniques. PMID:25886347

  9. An overlooked association of brachial plexus palsy: diaphragmatic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Karabiber, Hamza; Ozkan, K Ugur; Garipardic, Mesut; Parmaksiz, Gonul

    2004-01-01

    Diaphragmatic paralysis in newborns is related to brachial plexus palsy. It can be overlooked if thorough examination isn't done. We present a two-weeks-old baby with a birth weight of 3800 grams who had a left-sided brachial plexus palsy and torticollis with an undiagnosed left diaphragmatic paralysis even though he was examined by different physicians several times. The role of physical examination, the chest x-rays of patients with brachial paralysis and the treatment modalities of diaphragmatic paralysis due to obstetrical factors are discussed.

  10. Pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia following lightning: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Menka

    2015-01-01

    Neurological complications following lightning are rare and occur in form of temporary neurological deficits of central origin. Involvement of peripheral nervous system is extremely rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Isolated unilateral pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia has never been reported in the literature. Steroids have long been used for treatment of neuropraxia. However, their use in lightning neural injury is unique and requires special mention. We report a rare case of lightning-induced unilateral complete flaccid paralysis along with sensory loss in a young patient. Lightning typically causes central nervous involvement in various types of motor and sensory deficit. Surprisingly, the nerve conduction study showed the involvement of peripheral nervous system involvement. Steroids were administered and there was significant improvement in neurological functions within a short span of days. Patients' functions in the affected limb were normal in one month. Our case was interesting since it is the first such case in the literature where lightning has caused such a rare instance of unilateral pan-brachial plexus lesion. Such cases when seen, raises the possibility of more common central nervous system pathology rather than peripheral involvement. However, such lesions can be purely benign forms of peripheral nerve neuropraxia, which can be managed by steroid treatment without leaving any long-term neurological deficits.

  11. [Choroid plexus tumours in childhood: Experience in Sant Joan de Déu hospital].

    PubMed

    Del Río-Pérez, Clara Maria; Suñol-Capella, Mariona; Cruz-Martinez, Ofelia; Garcia-Fructuoso, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Choroid plexus tumours are rare, with a peak incidence in the first two years of life. The most common location is the lateral ventricle in children, while in adults it is the fourth ventricle. The most common clinical manifestation is the signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension. They are histologically classified as plexus papilloma, atypical plexus papilloma, and plexus carcinoma. A review is presented on choroid plexus tumours treated in the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu between 1980 and 2014. A total of 18 patients have been treated. An analysis was made of the demographic, clinical, histological data, treatment, and recurrences. The treatment of choice is complete resection, accompanied by adjuvant therapy in carcinomas. In atypical papillomas, the use of adjuvant therapies is controversial, reserving radiation therapy for recurrences. Papillomas have a good outcome, whereas atypical papillomas and carcinomas outcome is poor.

  12. Rhomboid nerve transfer to the suprascapular nerve for shoulder reanimation in brachial plexus palsy: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Goubier, J-N; Teboul, F

    2016-10-01

    Recovery of shoulder function is a real challenge in cases of partial brachial plexus palsy. Currently, in C5-C6 root injuries, transfer of the long head of the triceps brachii branch is done to revive the deltoid muscle. Spinal accessory nerve transfer is typically used for reanimation of the suprascapular nerve. We propose an alternative technique in which the nerve of the rhomboid muscles is transferred to the suprascapular nerve. A 33-year-old male patient with a C5-C6 brachial plexus injury with shoulder and elbow flexion palsy underwent surgery 7 months after the injury. The rhomboid nerve was transferred to the suprascapular nerve and the long head of the triceps brachii branch to the axillary nerve for shoulder reanimation. A double transfer of fascicles was performed, from the ulnar and median nerves to the biceps brachii branch and brachialis branch, respectively, for elbow flexion. At 14 months' follow-up, elbow flexion was rated M4. Shoulder elevation was 85 degrees and rated M4, and external rotation was 80 degrees and rated M4. After performing a cadaver study showing that transfer of the rhomboid nerve to the suprascapular nerve is technically possible, here we report and discuss the clinical outcomes of this new transfer technique.

  13. The rabbit brachial plexus as a model for nerve repair surgery--histomorphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; DziĘgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Kuryszko, Jan; Gosk, Jerzy; Bocheńska, Aneta

    2015-02-01

    One of the most devastating injuries to the upper limb is trauma caused by the avulsion. The anatomical structure of the rabbit's brachial plexus is similar to the human brachial plexus. The aim of our study was to analyze the microanatomy and provide a detailed investigation of the rabbit's brachial plexus. The purpose of our research project was to evaluate the possibility of utilizing rabbit's plexus as a research model in studying brachial plexus injury. Studies included histomorphometric analysis of sampled ventral branches of spinal nerves C5, C6, C7, C8, and Th1, the cranial trunk, the medial part of the caudal trunk, the lateral part of the caudal trunk and peripheral nerve. Horizontal and vertical analysis was done considering following features: the axon diameter, fiber diameter and myelin sheath. The number of axons, nerve area, myelin fiber density and minimal diameter of myelin fiber, minimal axon diameter and myelin area was marked for each element. The changes between ventral branches of spinal nerves C5-Th1, trunks and peripheral nerve in which the myelin sheath, axon diameter and fiber diameter was assessed were statistically significant. It was found that the g-ratio has close value in the brachial plexus as in the peripheral nerve. The peak of these parameters was found in nerve trunks, and then decreased coherently with the nerves travelling peripherally. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Musculoskeletal injuries resulting from patient handling tasks among hospital workers.

    PubMed

    Pompeii, Lisa A; Lipscomb, Hester J; Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Dement, John M

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate musculoskeletal injuries and disorders resulting from patient handling prior to the implementation of a "minimal manual lift" policy at a large tertiary care medical center. We sought to define the circumstances surrounding patient handling injuries and to identify potential preventive measures. Human resources data were used to define the cohort and their time at work. Workers' compensation records (1997-2003) were utilized to identify work-related musculoskeletal claims, while the workers' description of injury was used to identify those that resulted from patient handling. Adjusted rate ratios were generated using Poisson regression. One-third (n = 876) of all musculoskeletal injuries resulted from patient handling activities. Most (83%) of the injury burden was incurred by inpatient nurses, nurses' aides and radiology technicians, while injury rates were highest for nurses' aides (8.8/100 full-time equivalent, FTEs) and smaller workgroups including emergency medical technicians (10.3/100 FTEs), patient transporters (4.3/100 FTEs), operating room technicians (3.1/100 FTEs), and morgue technicians (2.2/100 FTEs). Forty percent of injuries due to lifting/transferring patients may have been prevented through the use of mechanical lift equipment, while 32% of injuries resulting from repositioning/turning patients, pulling patients up in bed, or catching falling patients may not have been prevented by the use of lift equipment. The use of mechanical lift equipment could significantly reduce the risk of some patient handling injuries but additional interventions need to be considered that address other patient handling tasks. Smaller high-risk workgroups should not be neglected in prevention efforts.

  15. Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Iplikcioglu, A C; Bek, S; Gökduman, C A; Bikmaz, K; Cosar, M

    2006-06-01

    Diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus (DVHCP) is a rare condition which is characterized by the presence of diffuse enlargement of the entire choroid plexus throughout the length of the choroidal fissure and overproduction of CSF. The diagnosis of diffuse villous hyperplasia of choroid plexus can be established by the MR demonstration of diffusely large, contrast enhanced choroid plexus in the cases of overproduction hydrocephalus. Although some authors recommend choroid plexus excision or coagulation, ventriculo-atrial shunt insertion is a simple and effective treatment modality in cases of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus. In this report we present a case of diffuse villous hyperplasia of the choroid plexus and a short review of the literature. To our knowledge, in the CT and MRI era only 5 cases of DVHCP cases have been reported.

  16. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  17. Do all patients with left costal margin injuries require radiographic evaluation for intraabdominal injury?

    PubMed

    Holmes, James F; Ngyuen, Hien; Jacoby, Robert C; McGahan, John P; Bozorgchami, Hormozd; Wisner, David H

    2005-09-01

    We determine whether all patients with pain or tenderness to the left lower ribs after blunt traumatic injury require abdominal computed tomography (CT) scanning for the detection of splenic injury. This was a prospective, observational cohort of all blunt-trauma patients who had pain or tenderness to the left lower ribs and presented to the emergency department (ED) of a Level I trauma center. Patients were enrolled if they had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score greater than 13 and pain or tenderness to the left lower ribs (ribs 7 to 12). Patients with pain or tenderness to the left lower ribs were considered to have pleuritic pain if the pain increased with inspiration or cough. All hemodynamically stable patients underwent abdominal CT scanning for detection of intraabdominal injuries. Data forms collecting information on the medical history and physical examination of all patients were completed before radiographic imaging. Patients with left lower rib pain or tenderness were considered to have "isolated" left lower rib injury if they were without all of the following: ED or out-of-hospital systolic blood pressure less than 90 mm Hg, abdominal or flank tenderness, pelvic or femur fractures, and gross hematuria. Eight hundred seventy-five patients had left lower rib pain or tenderness, 63 (7.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 5.6% to 9.1%) patients had splenic injuries, and 20 (2.3%; 95% CI 1.4% to 3.5%) patients had left renal injuries. Five hundred seventy-four patients had additional indications for abdominal imaging, leaving 301 patients with "isolated" left lower rib injury. Of the 301 patients, 9 (3.0%; 95% CI 1.4% to 5.6%) had splenic injuries. All 9 patients had a pleuritic component to their rib tenderness, and 3 (33%) patients underwent splenectomy. A small but important percentage of patients with pain or tenderness to the left lower ribs has splenic injuries. All patients with splenic injury had pleuritic pain.

  18. Characteristics and clinical outcome in patients after popliteal artery injury.

    PubMed

    Lang, Nikolaus W; Joestl, Julian B; Platzer, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of popliteal artery injury (PAI) caused by blunt or penetrating mechanism is demanding. Concomitant injuries and prolonged ischemia are the major causes of lower extremity morbidity and poor rates of limb salvage. This study assessed the amputation rate and, subsequently, the therapeutic management and clinical outcomes regarding the affect of concomitant injuries among patients with PAI in a setting of central European trauma care. Sixty-four patients (20 female and 44 male), with an average age of 44 years (range, 17-79 years) at the time of injury, were evaluated for clinical characteristics, concomitant injuries, complications, amputation rates, and functional outcome after traumatic PAI. The mechanism of injury was blunt trauma in 35 patients (54.7%) and penetrating trauma in 29 (45.3%). The Mangled Extremity Severity Score and the Injury Severity Score were assessed initially and the modified Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Score at 12 months after the primary surgery. Thirty patients (47%) returned to their normal activity level within 1 year after trauma, and 16 (25%) were limited in their daily activity or suffered from chronic pain symptoms. Within the blunt trauma group 26 of 35 patients (74%) sustained severe concomitant injuries, whereas two of 29 patients (7%) in the penetrating group showed severe concomitant injuries (P < .046). Eleven patients (17%) had to undergo revision surgery due to their associated injuries. The median modified FIM score was 10.3, whereas patients with blunt trauma had significantly lower FIM score (P < .0082). The median Mangled Extremity Severity Score was 6 points (range, 6-16 points). Primary or secondary amputation was required in 18 patients (28%) due to failure of revascularization. Patients who sustained blunt trauma had significantly higher amputation rates than those with penetrating injuries (P < .035). Clinical outcome and limb salvage of patients with PAI were influenced by the mechanism of

  19. Sleep and dreaming disturbances in closed head injury patients.

    PubMed

    Prigatano, G P; Stahl, M L; Orr, W C; Zeiner, H K

    1982-01-01

    Single night sleep recordings in closed head injury patients 6 to 59 months after injury revealed less stage 1 and a greater number of awakenings compared to age matched controls. Neither the time spent in REM sleep nor the Wechsler Memory Quotient were related to complaints of decreased or absent dreaming following injury. The proportion of REM and number of awakenings, however, showed a moderate relationship to certain behavioural problems.

  20. Lateral approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, DK; Sahu, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    A lateral approach described by Volker Hempel and Dr. Dilip Kotharihas been further studied, evaluated and described in detail in the present study. The aim of this study was to evaluate lateral approach of supraclavicular brachial plexus block, mainly in terms of successes rate and complication rate. The study was conducted in secondary level hospital and tertiary level hospital from 2004 to 2008. It was a prospective nonrandomized open-level study. Eighty-two patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 65 years with ASA Grade I and II scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper limb below the midarm, were selected for this new lateral approach of brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, any complications and need for supplement anaesthesia were observed. Success and complication rate were calculated in percentage. Average onset and duration of sensory and motor block was calculated as mean ± SD and percentage. Out of 82 patients, 75 (92%) have got successful block with no significant complication in any case. PMID:20885867

  1. Anatomy of the psoas muscle and lumbar plexus with respect to the surgical approach for lateral transpsoas interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Bogner, Eric A; Herzog, Richard J; Huang, Russel C

    2011-04-01

    Lateral transpsoas interbody fusion (LTIF) is a minimally invasive technique that permits interbody fusion utilizing cages placed via a direct lateral retroperitoneal approach. We sought to describe the locations of relevant neurovascular structures based on MRI with respect to this novel surgical approach. We retrospectively reviewed consecutive lumbosacral spine MRI scans in 43 skeletally mature adults. MRI scans were independently reviewed by two readers to identify the location of the psoas muscle, lumbar plexus, femoral nerve, inferior vena cava and right iliac vein. Structures potentially at risk for injury were identified by: a distance from the anterior aspect of the adjacent vertebral bodies of <20 mm, representing the minimum retraction necessary for cage placement, and extension of vascular structures posterior to the anterior vertebral body, requiring anterior retraction. The percentage of patients with neurovascular structures at risk for left-sided approaches was 2.3% at L1-2, 7.0% at L2-3, 4.7% at L3-4 and 20.9% at L4-5. For right-sided approaches, this rose to 7.0% at L1-2, 7.0% at L2-3, 9.3% at L3-4 and 44.2% at L4-5, largely because of the relatively posterior right-sided vasculature. A relationship between the position of psoas muscle and lumbar plexus is described which allows use of the psoas position as a proxy for lumbar plexus position to identify patients who may be at risk, particularly at the L4-5 level. Further study will establish the clinical relevance of these measurements and the ability of neurovascular structures to be retracted without significant injury.

  2. Acute kidney injury in the pregnant patient.

    PubMed

    Nwoko, Rosemary; Plecas, Darko; Garovic, Vesna D

    2012-12-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is costly and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. An understanding of the renal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy is essential for proper evaluation, diagnosis, and management of AKI. As in the general population, AKI can occur from prerenal, intrinsic, and post-renal causes. Major causes of pre-renal azotemia include hyperemesis gravidarum and uterine hemorrhage in the setting of placental abruption. Intrinsic etiologies include infections from acute pyelonephritis and septic abortion, bilateral cortical necrosis, and acute tubular necrosis. Particular attention should be paid to specific conditions that lead to AKI during the second and third trimesters, such as preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, acute fatty liver of pregnancy, and TTP-HUS. For each of these disorders, delivery of the fetus is the recommended therapeutic option, with additional therapies indicated for each specific disease entity. An understanding of the various etiologies of AKI in the pregnant patient is key to the appropriate clinical management, prevention of adverse maternal outcomes, and safe delivery of the fetus. In pregnant women with pre-existing kidney disease, the degree of renal dysfunction is the major determining factor of pregnancy outcomes, which may further be complicated by a prior history of hypertension.

  3. Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 clinically distinct subgroups

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Christian; Sill, Martin; Ruland, Vincent; Witten, Anika; Hartung, Stefan; Kordes, Uwe; Jeibmann, Astrid; Beschorner, Rudi; Keyvani, Kathy; Bergmann, Markus; Mittelbronn, Michel; Pietsch, Torsten; Felsberg, Jörg; Monoranu, Camelia M.; Varlet, Pascale; Hauser, Peter; Olar, Adriana; Grundy, Richard G.; Wolff, Johannes E.; Korshunov, Andrey; Jones, David T.; Bewerunge-Hudler, Melanie; Hovestadt, Volker; von Deimling, Andreas; Pfister, Stefan M.; Paulus, Werner; Capper, David; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Choroid plexus tumors are intraventricular neoplasms derived from the choroid plexus epithelium. A better knowledge of molecular factors involved in choroid plexus tumor biology may aid in identifying patients at risk for recurrence. Methods Methylation profiles were examined in 29 choroid plexus papillomas (CPPs, WHO grade I), 32 atypical choroid plexus papillomas (aCPPs, WHO grade II), and 31 choroid plexus carcinomas (CPCs, WHO grade III) by Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 Bead Chip Array. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified 3 subgroups: methylation cluster 1 (pediatric CPP and aCPP of mainly supratentorial location), methylation cluster 2 (adult CPP and aCPP of mainly infratentorial location), and methylation cluster 3 (pediatric CPP, aCPP, and CPC of supratentorial location). In methylation cluster 3, progression-free survival (PFS) accounted for a mean of 72 months (CI, 55-89 mo), whereas only 1 of 42 tumors of methylation clusters 1 and 2 progressed (P< .001). On stratification of outcome data according to WHO grade, all CPCs clustered within cluster 3 and were associated with shorter overall survival (mean, 105 mo [CI, 81-128 mo]) and PFS (mean, 55 mo [CI, 36-73 mo]). The aCPP of methylation cluster 3 also progressed frequently (mean, 69 mo [CI, 44-93 mo]), whereas no tumor progression was observed in aCPP of methylation clusters 1 and 2 (P< .05). Only 1 of 29 CPPs recurred. Conclusions Methylation profiling of choroid plexus tumors reveals 3 distinct subgroups (ie, pediatric low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 1], adult low-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 2], and pediatric high-risk choroid plexus tumors [cluster 3]) and may provide useful prognostic information in addition to histopathology. PMID:26826203

  4. Pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia following lightning: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar; Jha, Menka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Neurological complications following lightning are rare and occur in form of temporary neurological deficits of central origin. Involvement of peripheral nervous system is extremely rare and only a few cases have been described in the literature. Isolated unilateral pan-brachial plexus neuropraxia has never been reported in the literature. Steroids have long been used for treatment of neuropraxia. However, their use in lightning neural injury is unique and requires special mention. Case Description: We report a rare case of lightning-induced unilateral complete flaccid paralysis along with sensory loss in a young patient. Lightning typically causes central nervous involvement in various types of motor and sensory deficit. Surprisingly, the nerve conduction study showed the involvement of peripheral nervous system involvement. Steroids were administered and there was significant improvement in neurological functions within a short span of days. Patients’ functions in the affected limb were normal in one month. Conclusion: Our case was interesting since it is the first such case in the literature where lightning has caused such a rare instance of unilateral pan-brachial plexus lesion. Such cases when seen, raises the possibility of more common central nervous system pathology rather than peripheral involvement. However, such lesions can be purely benign forms of peripheral nerve neuropraxia, which can be managed by steroid treatment without leaving any long-term neurological deficits. PMID:25883854

  5. Grafting the C5 root to the musculocutaneous nerve partially restores hand sensation in complete palsies of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio

    2012-08-01

    In complete brachial plexus palsy, we have hypothesized that grafting to the musculocutaneous nerve should restore some hand sensation because the musculocutaneous nerve can drive hand sensation directly or via communication with the radial and median nerves. To investigate sensory recovery in the hand and forearm after C5 root grafting to the musculocutaneous nerve in patients with a total brachial plexus injury. Eleven patients who had recovered elbow flexion after musculocutaneous nerve grafting from a preserved C5 root and who had been followed for a minimum of 3 years were screened for sensory recovery in the hand and forearm. Six matched patients who had not undergone surgery served as controls. Methods of assessment included testing for pain sensation using Adson forceps, cutaneous pressure threshold measurements using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, and the static 2-point discrimination test. Deep sensation was evaluated by squeezing the first web space, and thermal sensation was assessed using warm and cold water. All grafted patients recovered sensation in a variable territory extending from just over the thenar eminence to the entire lateral forearm and hand. Seven patients were capable of perceiving 2-0 monofilament pressure on the thenar eminence, palm, and dorsoradial aspect of the hand. All could differentiate warm and cold water. None recovered 2-point discrimination. None of the patients in the control group recovered any kind of sensation in the affected limb. Grafting the musculocutaneous nerve can restore nociceptive sensation on the radial side of the hand.

  6. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  7. Traumatic aortic injuries associated with major visceral vascular injuries in major blunt trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Cao, Ignacio; Gulías, Daniel; Muñiz, Javier; Herrera-Noreña, José M; Cuenca, José J

    2012-07-01

    The objectives of this study were to report the clinical and radiological characteristics and outcomes of a series of acute traumatic aortic injuries (ATAIs) with associated injury to major aortic abdominal visceral branches (MAAVBs). From January 2000 to August 2011, 10 consecutive major blunt trauma patients with associated ATAI and injury to MAAVBs (group A) and 42 major blunt trauma patients presenting only an ATAI without MAAVB injuries (group B) were admitted to our institution. Overall in-hospital mortality was 32.7%. In-hospital mortality in group A was 40% and in group B it was 31% (p = 0.86). Observed in-hospital mortality was slightly lower than the expected in-hospital mortality in both groups. Mean peak creatine phosphokinase was significantly higher in group A than in group B patients (23,008 ± 33,400 vs. 3,970 ± 3,495 IU/L; p < 0.001). Acute renal injury occurred in 50% of group A and in 26.2% of group B patients. Hemodiafiltration was required in 30% of group A and in 9.5% of group B patients. Median follow-up time was 64 months (range = 1-130 months). Group A survival was 60% at 1, 5 and 10 years. Group B survival was 69% at 1 year and 63.3% at 5 and 10 years (p = 0.15). Aortic injuries associated with MAAVB injuries in major trauma patients seem to present in a different clinical scenario. These patients present increased risk of rhabdomyolysis, visceral ischemia, and acute renal failure, as well as higher in-hospital mortality. A multidisciplinary approach combining endovascular and open surgical techniques for a staged treatment of these life-threatening aortic and MAAVB injuries is mandatory in this critical subset of trauma patients.

  8. Choroid plexus cyst and chordoid glioma. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hanbali, F; Fuller, G N; Leeds, N E; Sawaya, R

    2001-06-15

    Several types of mass lesions may occur in the third and lateral ventricles. Typically they arise from the lining of the ventricular cavity or from contiguous structures, by extension into the ventricle. The authors describe two patients, each of whom presented with a different rare lesion of the ventricular system. The first was a 53-year-old woman with a history of hypertension who sustained a blunt traumatic injury to the occipital region and subsequently developed a progressively worsening right-sided headache. Radiological examinations over the next 2 years revealed an enlarged right lateral ventricle and, ultimately, a choroid plexus cyst in its anterior and middle third, near the foramen of Monro, which is a rare location for these lesions. The cyst was removed en bloc, and follow-up examinations showed a significant improvement in her headache and a minimal differences in size between right and left ventricles. The authors also describe a 57-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and an old mycardial infarct, who presented to an outside institution with a progressively worsening headache, generalized malaise, and loss of olfactory sensation. Diagnostic imaging revealed a 1.5-cm oval lesion centered in the lamina terminalis region, an open craniotomy was performed, and evaluation of a biopsy sample demonstrated the mass to be a chordoid glioma of the third ventricle, a recently described glioma subtype. Two days after surgery, he suffered a left parietal stroke and an anterior mycardial infarction. After convalescing, he presented to The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center for radiotherapy and follow up; 7 months later he was readmitted complaining of headache, short-term memory loss, and worsening confusion and disorientation. Neuroimaging revealed progression of the tumor (now 2 cm in diameter), which was removed by gross-total resection. His headache resolved immediately, and 2 months later his only complaint was of episodes of

  9. Iatrogenic patient injuries in otology during a 10-year period: review of national patient insurance charts.

    PubMed

    Helmiö, Päivi; Saarinen, Riitta; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija; Lehtonen, Lasse; Blomgren, Karin

    2017-09-14

    To assess patient injury characteristics and contributing factors in otology. Data on the accepted patient-injury claims involving otorhinolaryngology (ORL), closed between 2001 and 2011, from the Finnish Patient Insurance Centre registry was retrieved. We included all injuries concerning otology, with evaluation and classification of their causes and types. During the 10-year study period, a total of 44 claims were accepted as compensated patient injuries in otology. From a total of 233 patient injuries in all ORL, this amounted to 19%. In outpatient care, occurred 12 (27%) injuries and in surgical procedures 32 (73%). Five (11%) patients were children. Errors in surgical technique were identified as the primary cause of the injury in 22 (69%) operation-related cases. Failure to remove all auricular tampons or packing in postoperative control was a contributing factor in 4 (13%) injuries, a facial nerve was damaged in 9 (28%) operations, and in 12 (38%) patients, the injury resulted in severe hearing loss or deafness. Six patients (21%) needed one or more re-operations related to the injury, of which two were due to an incomplete primary operation. Typical compensated patient injuries in operative otology resulted from common complications of common operations in high volume centres.

  10. [Differential diagnostics of diseases of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Ritter, C; Wunderlich, G; Macht, S; Schroeter, M; Fink, G R; Lehmann, H C

    2014-02-01

    Progressive, atrophic, asymmetrically distributed flaccid paresis of arm and hand muscles represents a frequent symptom of neuromuscular diseases that can be attributed to injury of the arm nerves, the plexus or the cervical roots. A timely and exact diagnosis is mandatory; however, the broad spectrum of differential diagnoses often represents a diagnostic challenge. A large variety of neuromuscular disorders need to be considered, encompassing autoimmune mediated inflammatory neuropathic conditions, such as multifocal motor neuropathy, as well as chronic degenerative and nerve compression disorders. This review provides an overview of the most frequent disorders of the upper plexus and cervical roots and summarizes the characteristic clinical features as well as electrodiagnostic and laboratory test results. In addition the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging and sonography is discussed.

  11. Enteral Nutrition for TBI Patients in the Rehabilitation Setting: Associations with Patient Pre-injury and Injury Characteristics and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Susan D.; Kinikini, Merin; Moore, Linda W.; Hammond, Flora M.; Brandstater, Murray E.; Smout, Randall J.; Barrett, Ryan S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the association of enteral nutrition (EN) with patient pre-injury and injury characteristics and outcomes for patients receiving inpatient brain injury rehabilitation. Design Prospective observational study using propensity scores to isolate the effect of EN Setting 9 rehabilitation centers in the US Participants Patients (n=1701) admitted for first full inpatient rehabilitation after a TBI index injury Interventions Not applicable Main Outcome Measures Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at rehabilitation discharge, length of stay (LOS), weight loss, and presence of infections. Results There were many significant differences in pre-injury and injury characteristics for patients who received EN compared to patients who did not. After matching patients with a propensity score >40% for the likely use of EN, patients with greater than 25% of their rehabilitation stay receiving EN with either standard or high protein formulas (greater than 20% of calories coming from protein) had better FIM Motor and FIM Cognitive scores at rehabilitation discharge and less weight loss than similar patients not receiving EN. Conclusions For patients receiving inpatient rehabilitation following TBI and matched on a propensity to use EN of >40%, clinicians should strongly consider, when possible, EN for at least 25% of the patient’s stay and especially with a formula that contains at least 20% protein rather than a standard formula. PMID:26212401

  12. Posterior sternoclavicular joint injuries in skeletally immature patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jared T; Nasreddine, Adam Y; Black, Eric M; Bae, Donald S; Kocher, Mininder S

    2014-06-01

    Posterior injuries to the sternoclavicular (SC) joint are uncommon. In the skeletally immature (SI) population, these injuries have been described as either dislocations of the SC joint or fractures of the medial clavicular physis. The current literature and standardized test questions state that a posterior SC injury, in a SI patient, is more likely a physeal fracture than a SC joint dislocation. However, this injury characterization is based on case reports or small case series. The purpose of this study is to characterize posterior SC injuries in SI patients in terms of the prevalence of dislocation versus medial clavicle physeal fracture. A retrospective review was performed of 48 SI patients treated for posterior SC joint injuries over a 20-year period with a mean age of 15.4 years (range, 13 to 18 y). Forty patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation as their definitive treatment and 8 patients were treated exclusively with closed reduction. Patients treated operatively were utilized in determining the prevalence of SC joint dislocation versus physeal fracture. All patients treated operatively underwent primary repair without reconstruction. Twenty (50%), of the 40 patients treated operatively had a true SC joint dislocation and 20 patients (50%) had a medial clavicle physeal fracture. Twenty-two (46%) of the 48 total patients had an attempted closed reduction of which only 8 (36%) were successful. Among the 14 unsuccessful closed reductions, 12 (86%) were true dislocations (P<0.001). All successful closed reductions occurred in patients within 24 hours from injury. Eleven of the 48 (23%) patients' injuries were missed on initial presentation. Posterior SC joint dislocation and medial clavicular physeal fracture both occur with roughly equivalent prevalence in patients with an open medial physis. An attempted closed reduction may be more successful if performed within 24 hours after injury. Patients who fail attempts at closed reduction are more

  13. Motor Cortex Neuroplasticity Following Brachial Plexus Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Dimou, Stefan; Biggs, Michael; Tonkin, Michael; Hickie, Ian B.; Lagopoulos, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In the past decade, research has demonstrated that cortical plasticity, once thought only to exist in the early stages of life, does indeed continue on into adulthood. Brain plasticity is now acknowledged as a core principle of brain function and describes the ability of the central nervous system to adapt and modify its structural organization and function as an adaptive response to functional demand. In this clinical case study we describe how we used neuroimaging techniques to observe the functional topographical expansion of a patch of cortex along the sensorimotor cortex of a 27-year-old woman following brachial plexus transfer surgery to re-innervate her left arm. We found bilateral activations present in the thalamus, caudate, insula as well as across the sensorimotor cortex during an elbow flex motor task. In contrast we found less activity in the sensorimotor cortex for a finger tap motor task in addition to activations lateralized to the left inferior frontal gyrus and thalamus and bilaterally for the insula. From a pain perspective the patient who had experienced extensive phantom limb pain (PLP) before surgery found these sensations were markedly reduced following transfer of the right brachial plexus to the intact left arm. Within the context of this clinical case the results suggest that functional improvements in limb mobility are associated with increased activation in the sensorimotor cortex as well as reduced PLP. PMID:23966938

  14. Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in Patients From Kashan, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Fakharian, Esmaeil; Mohammadzadeh, Mahdi; Behdadmehr, Shirin; Sabri, Hamid Reza; Mirzadeh, Azadeh Sadat; Mohammadzadeh, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a worldwide problem, especially in countries with high incidence of road traffic accidents such as Iran. Patients with a single occurrence of TBI have been shown to be at increased risk to sustain future TBI. Objectives The aim of this study was to present the incidence and characteristics of repeated TBI (RTBI) in Iranian patients. Patients and Methods During one year, all admitted TBI patients with prior TBI history were enrolled into the study. In each patient, data such as age, gender, past medical history, injury cause, anatomic site of injury, TBI severity, clinical findings and CT scan findings were collected. Results RTBI comprised 2.5% of TBI cases (41 of 1629). The incidence of RTBI per 100,000 individuals per years was 9.7. The main cause of RTBI was road traffic accident (68.3%); 9.7 % of cases had preexisting seizure/epilepsy disorder; 36.6% of patients with RTBI had pervious ICU admission due to severe TBI. Ten patients had Glasgow coma scale (GCS) ≤ 13 (24.4%). Seizure was seen in seven patients (17.1%). Thirty-nine percent of patients with RTBI had associated injuries. Eleven patients had abnormal CT scan findings (26.9%). Conclusions Considering the high incidence of trauma in developing countries, RTBI may also be more common compared with that of developed countries. This mandates a newer approach to preventive strategies, particularly in those with a previous experience of head injury. PMID:28180123

  15. Permanent brachial plexus birth palsy does not impair the development and function of the spine and lower limbs.

    PubMed

    Kirjavainen, Mikko O; Remes, Ville M; Peltonen, Jari; Helenius, Ilkka J; Rautakorpi, Sanna M; Vähäsarja, Vesa J; Pöyhiä, Tiina H; Nietosvaara, Yrjänä

    2009-11-01

    Permanent brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) impairs the function of the affected upper limb. Avulsion type root injuries may damage the cervical spinal cord. Whether abnormal function of an upper limb affected by BPBP has any observable effects on the development of the locomotion system and overall motor function has not been clarified in depth. A total of 111 patients who had undergone brachial plexus surgery for BPBP in infancy were examined after a mean follow-up time of 13 (5-32) years. Patients' physical activities were recorded by a questionnaire. No significant inequalities in leg length were found and the incidence of structural scoliosis (1.7%) did not differ from that of the reference population. Nearly half of the patients (43%) had asynchronous motion of the upper limbs during gait, which was associated with impaired upper limb function. Data obtained from the completed questionnaires indicated that only few patients were unable to participate in normal activities such as: bicycling, cross-country skiing or swimming. Not surprisingly, 71% of the patients reported problems related to the affected upper limb, such as muscle weakness and/or joint stiffness during the aforementioned activities.

  16. Aortic injuries in crush trauma patients: different mechanism, different management.

    PubMed

    Mosquera, Victor X; Marini, Milagros; Muñiz, Javier; Lopez-Perez, José M; Gulías, Daniel; Cuenca, José J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to report the clinical and radiological characteristics and early and long-term survival of a series of acute traumatic aortic injuries (ATAI) in crush trauma patients, and to compare such data with our last 30 years experience managing ATAI in deceleration non-crush trauma patients. From January 1980 to December 2010, 5 consecutive ATAI in crush trauma and 69 in non-crush trauma patients were admitted at our institution. ISS, RTS and TRISS scores were similar in both groups. Overall in-hospital mortality was 24.3%. There was no in-hospital mortality in crush patients and 26.1% in non-crush patients (p=0.32). All aortic-related complications occurred in non-crush patients. Median follow-up was 129 months (range 3-350 months). Non-crush group survival was 76.8% at 1 year, 73.6% at 5 years, and 71.2%% at 10 years. There was no mortality during follow-up in the crush group. Mean (SD) peak creatine phosphokinase was significantly higher in crush group than in non-crush group: 7598 (3690) IU/L vs. 3645 (2506) IU/L; p=0.041. Incidence of acute renal injury was higher in crush trauma patients (100% vs. 36.2%; p=0.018). Low-severity injuries were more common in crush trauma patients (100% in crush patients vs. 43.5% in non-crush patients, p=0.04). Aortic injuries in crush thoracic trauma patients seem to present in a different clinical scenario from aortic injuries in high-speed thoracic trauma thus requiring distinct considerations. When planning the initial management of aortic injuries in crush trauma, the increased risk of rhabdomiolysis and subsequent acute renal failure, as well as a tendency to develop lower-risk aortic wall injuries, must be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High-Frequency Percussive Ventilation in Patients with Inhalation Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    patients (18). and several studies have demonstrated decreased pul- The pathophysiology of inhalation injury is complex monary shunt flow with the...was maintained formation which obstructs moderate sized airways, lead- in each patient. ing to distal atelectasis , or a ball valve effect, leading to...for inhalation the versatility of high-freauency jet ventilation was not injury should be the reversal of these pathophysiologic utilized (i.e

  18. MRI of the Brachial Plexus: Modified Imaging Technique Leading to a Better Characterization of Its Anatomy and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Carlos; Mailley, Kathleen; del Carpio O’Donovan, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    Summary Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of the brachial plexus due to its superior soft tissue resolution and multiplanar capabilities. The evaluation of the brachial plexus however represents a diagnostic challenge for the clinician and the radiologist. The imaging assessment of the brachial plexus, in particular, has been traditionally challenging due to the complexity of its anatomy, its distribution in space and due to technical factors. Herein, we describe a modified technique used in our institution for the evaluation of the brachial plexus which led to a substantial decrease in scanning time and to better visualization of all the segments of the brachial plexus from the roots to the branches, in only one or two images, facilitating therefore the understanding of the anatomy and the interpretation of the study. To our knowledge, we are the first group to describe this technique of imaging the brachial plexus. We illustrate the benefit of this modified technique with an example of a patient with a lesion in the proximal branches of the left brachial plexus that was clinically suspected but missed on conventional brachial plexus imaging for six consecutive years. In addition, we review the common and infrequent benign and malignant pathology that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:24355190

  19. Hyphema due to blunt injury: a review of 118 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ulagantheran, V; Ahmad Fauzi, M S; Reddy, S C

    2010-01-01

    AIM To determine the causes, associated ocular findings and visual acuity on presentation, complications and visual outcome following treatment in patients of hyphema due to blunt injury METHODS A retrospective study was performed in 118 patients with hyphema due to blunt injury admitted in University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The gender, age, race, cause of blunt injury resulting in hyphema, eye involved, vision at admission, other associated ophthalmological findings, complications and visual outcome were noted from the case records of patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS programme. RESULTS Males were more predominantly affected (93.2%). Two-thirds of patients (67.8%) were aged below 30 years. Sports related injury (38.1%) was the most common cause for hyphema. Hyphema disappeared within 5 days in 66.9% of patients. Iris injuries were very commonly associated in the form of mydriasis, sphincter tear and iridodialysis. Associated vitreous haemorrhage was noted in 11.9% of patients. During the hospital stay, secondary haemorrhage was observed in 3.4% of patients. The best corrected vision of 6/18 or better was noted in 85.4% of patients at the last follow-up. The follow-up of these subjects was very poor and thus the incidence of secondary glaucoma could not be established. Moderate blood staining of cornea occurred in 0.8% of patients. CONCLUSION Sports related injury is the most common cause of hyphema in Malaysia. Good visual recovery, without serious complications, is possible with appropriate and in-time treatment in hyphema patients due to blunt injury. PMID:22553571

  20. Tertiary survey in trauma patients: avoiding neglected injuries.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Caio; Yonamine, Alexandre Maris; Faria, Carlos Eduardo Nunes; Filho, Marco Antonio Machado; Christian, Ralph Walter; Mercadante, Marcelo Tomanik

    2014-11-01

    Medical personnel in trauma centres in several countries have realised that undiagnosed injuries are common and are now focussing their attention on reducing the incidence of these injuries. Tertiary survey is a simple and easy approach to address the issue of undiagnosed injuries in trauma patients. Tertiary survey consists of reevaluating patients 24 hours after admission by means of an anamnesis protocol, physical examination, review of complementary tests and request for new tests when necessary. To show the importance of tertiary survey in trauma patients for diagnosing injuries undetected at the time of initial survey. A standardised protocol was used to perform a prospective observational study with patients admitted through the emergency department, Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma, Santa Casa de São Paulo. The patients were reevaluated 24 hours after admission or after recovering consciousness. New physical examinations were performed, tests performed on admission were reassessed and new tests were requested, when necessary. Between February 2012 and February 2013, 526 patients were evaluated, 81 (15.4%) were polytraumatised, and 445 (84.6%) had low-energy trauma. A total of 57 new injuries were diagnosed in 40 patients, 61.4% of which affected the lower limb. Diagnosis of 11 new injuries (19.3%) resulted in changes in procedure. The application of the protocol for tertiary survey proved to be easy, inexpensive and beneficial to patients (particularly polytraumatised patients) because it enabled identification of important injuries that were not detected on admission in a large group of patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Acute and chronic facial pain due to injured neural plexus of the upper teeth].

    PubMed

    Kubilius, Ricardas; Sabalys, Gintautas; Guzeviciene, Vesta

    2002-01-01

    The general causes of upper dental plexus injury are tooth disturbances and the periodontal tissues diseases, the pathology of maxillary sinus, various traumatically manipulations in the area of tooth and maxilla as well. The main symptom of upper tooth neural plexus injury is acute and chronic pain in the alveolar sprout of maxilla, gums or in the area of singly tooth, which rarely spreads into neighboring maxillofacial areas. The authors recommend that the acute pain syndrome would be called the inflammation of upper tooth plexus, and the chronic pain syndrome--plexopathia of upper tooth. Study presents the differential diagnosis according to character of facial pain syndrome and the data of sensority disorders research and investigation of pain thresholds as well. The recommendations for treatment tactic and methods of analyzed indispositions are suggested.

  2. [Secondary replacement operations for reconstruction of elbow joint function after lesion of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Berger, A; Hierner, R; Becker, M H

    1997-07-01

    Elbow flexion plays a key role in the overall function of the upper extremity. In the case of unilateral complete brachial plexus lesion, restoration of elbow flexion will dramatically increase the patient's chances of regaining bimanual prehension. Furthermore, depending on the type of reconstruction, stability of the glenohumeral joint as well as some supination function of the forearm can be restored to a varying degree at the same time. Depending on the level of brachial plexus lesion and/or reinnervation, different reconstructive procedures are available. In order to select the best treatment option for the patient it is necessary to known the extent of the lesion of the brachial plexus and/or ventral upper arm muscles, to time the operation appropriately, to be aware of all treatment possibilities and to recall the special problems of tendon transfer for brachial plexus patients. Our concept is based on our experience with more than 1100 patients presenting a brachial plexus lesion between 1981 and 1996 and treated in our institution. There were 528 operative revisions of the brachial plexus. Some 225 patients underwent secondary muscle/tendon transfers. In 35 patients elbow flexion was reconstructed by bipolar latissimus dorsi transfer (n = 10), triceps-to-biceps transfer (n = 15), modified flexor/pronator muscle mass proximalization (n = 6) and the multiple-stage free functional muscle transfer after intercostal nerve transfer (n = 4).

  3. Missed injuries and unplanned readmissions in pediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pamela M; Yu, Jennifer; Keller, Martin S

    2017-03-01

    We sought to determine the incidence and characteristics of missed injuries and unplanned readmissions at a Level-1 pediatric trauma center. We conducted a retrospective review of all trauma patients who presented to our ACS-verified Level-1 pediatric trauma center from 2009 to 2014. Overall, there were 27 readmissions and 27 missed injuries (0.38%). Patients who were unplanned readmissions had a greater Injury Severity Score (ISS) (8.6 vs 5.2, p=0.03), had longer hospitalizations (4.9 vs 2.5days, p=0.02), and were more likely to have required operative intervention (51.9% vs 32.3%, p=0.04). Similarly, patients identified with missed injuries had a higher ISS (15.2 vs 5.2, p<0.0001), greater length of stay (12.7 vs 2.5days, p<0.0001), and were also more likely to be intubated (25.9% vs 3.6%, p<0.0001) or require critical care (48.1% vs 10.3%, p<0.0001). Seven missed injuries were in patients who were deemed nonaccidental trauma (25.9%) and significantly altered their hospital course while 10 patients (37%) required operative intervention. On multivariate analysis, only ISS was found to be an independent risk factor for readmissions and missed injuries. Missed injuries and unplanned readmissions were rare occurrences among our pediatric patient population. These events, however, did result in longer hospitalizations and additional procedures. Patients with multisystem injuries and compromised physical exam are at higher risk. IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ocular Injuries in Patients of Zygomatico-Complex (ZMC) Fractures.

    PubMed

    Malik, Altaf Hussain; Shah, Aijaz A; Ahmad, Irshad; Shah, Babar Ai

    2017-06-01

    Mid face injuries commonly destroy the integrity of the orbital skeleton, and are frequently complicated by injury to the eye, ranging between 2.7 and 90.6 % as reported in literature. The eye injuries range from simple subconjunctival haemorrhage to globe rupture. The paper aims to study the types of ocular injuries in patients with ZMC fractures. A study of 67 patients, who had sustained facial trauma sufficient to lead to a facial bone fracture, was undertaken in the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Govt Dental College, Srinagar from 2008 to 2014 and the patients received a comprehensive examination by an ophthalmologist within 1 week of injury. All the patients sustaining confirmed ZMC fracture were examined by an ophthalmologist for any associated ocular injury. A thorough ophthalmologic examination included assessment of visual acuity, pupillary reactivity, anterior and posterior segment examination and extraocular motility. The variables reviewed included patient's gender, mechanism of injury, visual acuity, pupillary reactivity, extra ocular motility, presence or absence of diplopia, ocular and orbital findings, and intraorbital hypoesthesia. The most common etiology of trauma was RTA (64.1 %), followed by falls (14.9 %) in our study. In our study 83.5 % of the patients were males. Minor ocular injuries such as subconjunctival haemorrhage and corneal injury accounted for most of the cases. Subconjunctival haemorrhage was the most common injury, present in 86.5 % of the cases. Hyphema was present 13.4 %, vitreous haemorrhage 2.98 %, retinal haemorrhage 1.49 %, corneal abrasion 4.47 %, mydriasis 1.49 %, choroidal rupture 5.97 %, retinal detachment 2.98 %, decreased visual activity 13.4 %, retinal tear and angle recession was present 7.46 % times. ZMC fractures are associated with higher incidence of ocular injuries. The incidence of traumatic optic neuropathy and other ocular injuries warrants a prompt ophthalmologic examination of

  5. The risks of minor head injury in the warfarinised patient.

    PubMed

    Volans, A P

    1998-05-01

    The risk factors affecting intracranial haemorrhage in warfarinised patients are described and an attempt made to calculate the risk of haemorrhage in warfarinised patients with minor head injuries. Using the data from studies of patients with spontaneous haemorrhage while taking warfarin, guidelines for treatment and given and the likely outcome predicted.

  6. The risks of minor head injury in the warfarinised patient.

    PubMed Central

    Volans, A P

    1998-01-01

    The risk factors affecting intracranial haemorrhage in warfarinised patients are described and an attempt made to calculate the risk of haemorrhage in warfarinised patients with minor head injuries. Using the data from studies of patients with spontaneous haemorrhage while taking warfarin, guidelines for treatment and given and the likely outcome predicted. PMID:9639176

  7. Treatment consent capacity in patients with traumatic brain injury across a range of injury severity

    PubMed Central

    Triebel, K.L.; Martin, R.C.; Novack, T.A.; Dreer, L.; Turner, C.; Pritchard, P.R.; Raman, R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate medical decision-making capacity (MDC) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) across a range of injury severity. Methods: We evaluated MDC cross-sectionally 1 month after injury in 40 healthy controls and 86 patients with TBI stratified by injury severity (28 mild [mTBI], 15 complicated mild [cmTBI], 43 moderate/severe [msevTBI]). We compared group performance on the Capacity to Consent to Treatment Instrument and its 5 consent standards (expressing choice, reasonable choice, appreciation, reasoning, understanding). Capacity impairment ratings (no impairment, mild/moderate impairment, severe impairment) on the consent standards were also assigned to each participant with TBI using cut scores referenced to control performance. Results: One month after injury, the mTBI group performed equivalently to controls on all consent standards. In contrast, the cmTBI group was impaired relative to controls on the understanding standard. No differences emerged between the mTBI and cmTBI groups. The msevTBI group was impaired on almost all standards relative to both control and mTBI groups, and on the understanding standard relative to the cmTBI group. Capacity compromise (mild/moderate or severe impairment ratings) on the 3 clinically complex standards (understanding, reasoning, appreciation) occurred in 10%–30% of patients with mTBI, 50% of patients with cmTBI, and 50%–80% of patients with msevTBI. Conclusions: One month following injury, MDC is largely intact in patients with mTBI, but is impaired in patients with cmTBI and msevTBI. Impaired MDC is prevalent in acute TBI and is strongly related to injury severity. PMID:22496195

  8. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  9. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  10. Incidence of early posterior shoulder dislocation in brachial plexus birth palsy.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Lars B; Erichs, Kristina; Andersson, Charlotte; Thornqvist, Catharina; Backman, Clas; Düppe, Henrik; Lindqvist, Pelle; Forslund, Marianne

    2007-12-16

    Posterior dislocation of the shoulder in brachial plexus birth palsy during the first year of life is rare but the incidence increases with age. The aim was to calculate the incidence of these lesions in children below one year of age. The incidence of brachial plexus birth lesion and occurrence of posterior shoulder dislocation was calculated based on a prospective follow up of all brachial plexus patients at an age below one in Malmö municipality, Sweden, 2000-2005. The incidence of brachial plexus birth palsy was 3.8/1000 living infants and year with a corresponding incidence of posterior shoulder dislocation (history, clinical examination and x-ray) during the first year of 0.28/1000 living infants and year, i.e. 7.3% of all brachial plexus birth palsies. All children with a brachial plexus birth lesion (incidence 3.8 per thousand) should be screened, above the assessment of neurological recovery, during the first year of life for posterior dislocation of the shoulder (incidence 0.28 per thousand) since such a condition may occur in 7% of children with a brachial plexus birth lesion.

  11. Accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus: tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariano Paiva; Magalhães, Edno; de Farias Cascudo, Elialba; Jogaib, Marco Antonio Dias; da Silva, Marcelo Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent venous catheterizations occur in approximately 9% of lumbar epidural anesthetic procedures with catheter placement and, if not promptly recognized, can result in fatal consequences. The objective of this report is to describe a case of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus and its recording by computed tomography with contrast injection through the catheter. A female patient in her sixties, physical status II (ASA), underwent conventional cholecystectomy under balanced general anesthesia and an epidural with catheter for postoperative analgesia. During surgery, there was clinical suspicion of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus because of blood backflow through the catheter, confirmed by the administration of a test dose through the catheter. After the surgery, a CT scan was obtained after contrast injection through the catheter. Contrast was observed all the way from the skin to the azygos vein, passing through anterior and posterior epidural venous plexuses and intervertebral vein. It is possible to identify the actual placement of the epidural catheter, as well as to register an accidental catheterization of the epidural venous plexus, using computed tomography with contrast injection through the epidural catheter. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. [Accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus: tomographic analysis].

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariano Paiva; Magalhães, Edno; Cascudo, Elialba de Farias; Jogaib, Marco Antonio Dias; Silva, Marcelo Carneiro da

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent venous catheterizations occur in approximately 9% of lumbar epidural anesthetic procedures with catheter placement and, if not promptly recognized, can result in fatal consequences. The objective of this report is to describe a case of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus and its recording by computed tomography with contrast injection through the catheter. A female patient in her sixties, physical status II (ASA), underwent conventional cholecystectomy under balanced general anesthesia and an epidural with catheter for postoperative analgesia. During surgery, there was clinical suspicion of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus because of blood backflow through the catheter, confirmed by the administration of a test dose through the catheter. After the surgery, a CT scan was obtained after contrast injection through the catheter. Contrast was observed all the way from the skin to the azygos vein, passing through anterior and posterior epidural venous plexuses and intervertebral vein. It is possible to identify the actual placement of the epidural catheter, as well as to register an accidental catheterization of the epidural venous plexus, using computed tomography with contrast injection through the epidural catheter. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Does CT Angiography Matter for Patients with Cervical Spine Injuries?

    PubMed

    Hagedorn, John C; Emery, Sanford E; France, John C; Daffner, Scott D

    2014-06-04

    Cervical injury can be associated with vertebral artery injury. This study was performed to determine the impact of computed tomography (CT) angiography of the head and neck on planning treatment of cervical spine fracture, if these tests were ordered appropriately, and to estimate cost and associated exposure to radiation and contrast medium. This retrospective review included all patients who underwent CT of the cervical spine and CT angiography of the head and neck from January 2010 to August 2011 at one institution. Patients were divided into those with and those without cervical spine fracture seen on CT of the cervical spine. We determined if the CT angiography of the head and neck was positive for vascular injury in the patients with a cervical fracture. Vascular injury treatment and alterations in surgical fracture treatment due to positive CT angiography of the head and neck were recorded. A scan was deemed appropriate if it had been ordered per established institutional protocol. Of the 381 patients who underwent CT angiography of the head and neck, 126 had a cervical injury. Sixteen of the CT angiography studies were appropriately ordered for non-spinal indications, and twenty-three were inappropriately ordered. The CT angiography was positive for one patient for whom the imaging was off protocol and one for whom the indication was non-spinal. Nineteen patients had positive CT angiography of the head and neck; no patient underwent surgical intervention for a vascular lesion. Eleven patients underwent surgical intervention for a cervical fracture; the operative plan was changed because of vascular injury in one case. The CT angiography was positive for eleven of forty-eight patients who had sustained a C2 fracture; this group accounted for eleven of the nineteen positive CT angiography studies. Noncontiguous injuries occurred in nineteen patients; three had positive CT angiography of the head and neck. The approximate charge for the CT angiography was

  14. Associated injuries in patients with facial fractures: a review of 604 patients

    PubMed Central

    Béogo, Rasmané; Dakouré, Patrick; Savadogo, Léon Blaise; Coulibaly, Antoine Toua; Ouoba, Kampadilemba

    2013-01-01

    Facial fractures may be associated with concomitant lesions of other parts of body with some of these injuries being life-threatening. This retrospective study reports the types of associated injury and the factors influencing their occurrence, in patients with facial fractures. In 18.2% of 604 patients, one associated injury at least was recorded. The most common associated injury was cranial trauma (9.9%), followed by limbs fractures (9.1%), chest trauma (2%), spine injury (0.5%) and eye ball rupture (0.5%). A poly trauma was recorded in 3.2% of the patients who had sustained a cerebral trauma, a spinal injury or a thoracic trauma. Death occurred in two patients (0.3%) who had respectively a spinal injury and a chest trauma. The occurrence of associated injuries correlated significantly with the fracture type with solitary mandibular fracture being a significant predictor of associated injuries. Although not statistically significant, multiple facial fractures and violence were more associated with concomitant injuries. The findings of this study recall the need for initial full examination of the trauma patients particularly victims of violence, patients presenting with multiple facial fractures or single facial bone fracture involving the mandible, the trauma patients? multidisciplinary management as well as trauma prevention. PMID:24778756

  15. Early Dynamics of Cerebrospinal CD14+ Monocytes and CD15+ Granulocytes in Patients after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Postl, Lukas Kurt; Bogner, Viktoria; Beirer, Marc; Kanz, Karl Georg; Egginger, Christoph; Schmitt-Sody, Markus; Biberthaler, Peter; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) the analysis of neuroinflammatory mechanisms gained increasing interest. In this context certain immunocompetent cells might play an important role. Interestingly, in the actual literature there exist only a few studies focusing on the role of monocytes and granulocytes in TBI patients. In this regard it has recently reported that the choroid plexus represents an early, selective barrier for leukocytes after brain injury. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the very early dynamics of CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocyte in CSF of patients following severe TBI with regard to the integrity of the BBB. Cytometric flow analysis was performed to analyze the CD14+ monocyte and CD15+ granulocyte population in CSF of TBI patients. The ratio of CSF and serum albumin as a measure for the BBB's integrity was assessed in parallel. CSF samples of patients receiving lumbar puncture for elective surgery were obtained as controls. Overall 15 patients following severe TBI were enrolled. 10 patients were examined as controls. In patients, the monocyte population as well as the granulocyte population was significantly increased within 72 hours after TBI. The BBB's integrity did not have a significant influence on the cell count in the CSF. PMID:26568661

  16. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p < 0.0001). Death alone and major adverse kidney events after discharge were most common in the pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both

  17. Ultrasonographic evaluation of brachial plexus tumors in five dogs.

    PubMed

    Rose, Scott; Long, Craig; Knipe, Marguerite; Hornof, Bill

    2005-01-01

    Five dogs with unilateral thoracic limb lameness, neurologic deficits, muscle atrophy, and pain, or a combination of these signs, were examined using ultrasonograghy. Large, hypoechoic tubular masses that displaced vessels and destroyed the normal architecture were found in each dog. The affected axilla of each patient was then imaged with computed tomography or magnetic resonance to fully assess the extent of the masses. We describe the use of ultrasound in screening patients for brachial plexus tumors.

  18. The enteric nervous system and the musculature of the colon are altered in patients with spina bifida and spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    den Braber-Ymker, Marjanne; Lammens, Martin; van Putten, Michel J A M; Nagtegaal, Iris D

    2017-02-01

    Neurogenic bowel dysfunction occurs in a large percentage of adult patients with spina bifida (SB) and spinal cord injury (SCI), significantly affecting their quality of life. Although bowel motility is autonomously regulated by the enteric nervous system (ENS), disruption of the modulation of the ENS by extrinsic innervation as present in many patients with SB and SCI might lead to motility disorders. In order to gain insight in the pathophysiology, we studied histological changes of the neuromuscular structures in the colon of SB and SCI patients. Archival colon tissue blocks from SB (n = 13) and SCI (n = 34) patients were collected nationwide in The Netherlands and compared with control samples (n = 16). Histological (semiquantitative) evaluation of the ENS, the network of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), and the muscularis propria was performed using hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid Schiff, and elastic von Gieson staining, and immunohistochemistry with antibodies against HuC/D, calretinin, S100, CD117, α-smooth muscle actin, and desmin. Compared to controls, SB and SCI patients showed neuronal loss and decreased nerve fiber density in the myenteric plexus. Lower nerve fiber density was significantly more often found in patients with severe bowel dysfunction. Other major findings were loss of ICCs around the myenteric plexus and fibrosis in the longitudinal muscle layer. Altered histology of the ENS may explain abnormal intestinal motility in SB and SCI patients. Furthermore, loss of myenteric nerve fibers (including enteric glial cells) may play a major role in the development of severe motility complaints.

  19. Spinal anaesthesia with adjunctive intrathecal morphine versus continuous lumbar plexus blockade: a randomised comparison for analgesia after hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, M J; Danesh-Clough, T K

    2015-07-01

    Following elective total hip replacement, both continuous lumbar plexus blockade and spinal anaesthesia (with adjunctive intrathecal morphine) have shown early outcome benefits over opioid analgesia and single-injection nerve block. However, the two techniques have not been compared in a prospective randomised manner. Our study examined 50 patients undergoing elective hip joint replacement who were randomised to receive spinal anaesthesia (with adjunctive intrathecal morphine 0.1 mg) or patient-controlled continuous lumbar plexus blockade. All surgery was conducted under general anaesthesia. Measured outcomes included numerically rated postoperative pain, supplemental opioid consumption and indices of mobilisation together with complications. Results show that block placement time was marginally shorter for the spinal group (5 versus 7 minutes, P=0.01). The primary outcome, worst pain on movement/mobilisation during the first 24 hours, was not statistically significantly different between groups. Patients in the lumbar plexus group were given more intraoperative opioid and rescue morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit (median = 4 versus 0 mg, P <0.001), with correspondingly higher pain scores (median 5/10 versus 0/10, P <0.001). Pain scores during the subsequent 24 hours were similar between groups, but more patients in the spinal group were given rescue morphine (5 versus 0, P=0.02). Physiotherapy mobilisation indices appeared similar between groups. More spinal group patients reported pruritus (12 versus 5, P=0.01), but antiemetic requirements, episodes of disorientation, arterial oxygen desaturation and falls were all similar between groups. Postoperative symptoms suggestive of neurological irritation or injury did not differ between groups. We found that following elective hip joint replacement, compared to continuous lumbar plexus blockade, spinal anaesthesia incorporating adjunctive intrathecal morphine did not result in a statistically significant

  20. Patients' views on outcome following head injury: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Paul Graham; Prior, Lindsay; Deb, Shoumitro; Lewis, Glyn; Mayle, Wendy; Burrow, Caroline E; Bryant, Eleanor

    2005-01-01

    Background Head injuries are a common occurrence, with continuing care in the years following injury being provided by primary care teams and a variety of speciality services. The literature on outcome currently reflects areas considered important by health-care professionals, though these may differ in some respects from the views of head injured individuals themselves. Our study aimed to identify aspects of outcome considered important by survivors of traumatic head injury. Methods Thirty-two individuals were interviewed, each of whom had suffered head injury between one and ten years previously from which they still had residual difficulties. Purposive sampling was used in order to ensure that views were represented from individuals of differing age, gender and level of disability. These interviews were fully transcribed and analysed qualitatively by a psychologist, a sociologist and a psychiatrist with regular meetings to discuss the coding. Results Aspects of outcome mentioned by head injury survivors which have received less attention previously included: specific difficulties with group conversations; changes in physical appearance due to scarring or weight change; a sense of loss for the life and sense of self that they had before the injury; and negative reactions of others, often due to lack of understanding of the consequences of injury amongst both family and general public. Conclusion Some aspects of outcome viewed as important by survivors of head injury may be overlooked by health professionals. Consideration of these areas of outcome and the development of suitable interventions should help to improve functional outcome for patients. PMID:16048645

  1. Ultrasound-guided posterior approach to brachial plexus for the treatment of upper phantom limb syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tognù, A; Borghi, B; Gullotta, S; White, P F

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the case is to report the clinical value of the ultrasound-guided posterior approach to the brachial plexus in the treatment of phantom limb syndrome after an upper extremity amputation. The author experienced ultrasound guidance as sole technique to localize the brachial plexus for the purpose of placing a catheter for continuous infusion of a local anesthetic in a patient where standard landmark-based nerve stimulation for placement of a continuous perineural block was not possible.

  2. Biomarker Evidence of Axonal Injury in Neuroasymptomatic HIV-1 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Price, Richard W.; Hagberg, Lars; Fuchs, Dietmar; Rosengren, Lars; Nilsson, Staffan; Zetterberg, Henrik; Gisslén, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Background Prevalence of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-1 infected patients is reported to be high. Whether this is a result of active HIV-related neurodegeneration is unclear. We examined axonal injury in HIV-1 patients by measuring the light subunit of neurofilament protein (NFL) in CSF with a novel, sensitive method. Methods With a cross-sectional design, CSF concentrations of neurofilament protein light (NFL) (marker of neuronal injury), neopterin (intrathecal immunoactivation) and CSF/Plasma albumin ratio (blood-brain barrier integrity) were analyzed on CSF from 252 HIV-infected patients, subdivided into untreated neuroasymptomatics (n = 200), HIV-associated dementia (HAD) (n = 14) and on combinations antiretroviral treatment (cART) (n = 85), and healthy controls (n = 204). 46 HIV-infected patients were included in both treated and untreated groups, but sampled at different timepoints. Furthermore, 78 neuroasymptomatic patients were analyzed before and after treatment initiation. Results While HAD patients had the highest NFL concentrations, elevated CSF NFL was also found in 33% of untreated neuroasymptomatic patients, mainly in those with blood CD4+ cell counts below 250 cells/μL. CSF NFL concentrations in the untreated neuroasymptomatics and treated groups were equivalent to controls 18.5 and 3.9 years older, respectively. Neopterin correlated with NFL levels in untreated groups while the albumin ratio correlated with NFL in both untreated and treated groups. Conclusions Increased CSF NFL indicates ongoing axonal injury in many neuroasymptomatic patients. Treatment decreases NFL, but treated patients retain higher levels than controls, indicating either continued virus-related injury or an aging-like effect of HIV infection. NFL correlates with neopterin and albumin ratio, suggesting an association between axonal injury, neuroinflammation and blood-brain barrier permeability. NFL appears to be a sensitive biomarker of subclinical and

  3. Choroid plexus cyst development and growth following ventricular shunting.

    PubMed

    Binning, Mandy J; Couldwell, William T

    2008-01-01

    Choroid plexus cysts are typically incidental, asymptomatic cysts. They have been reported to hemorrhage and grow, causing symptoms of obstruction. However, growth and multiplication has not been reported following ventriculoperitoneal shunt procedures. A 66-year-old woman initially underwent a suboccipital retrosigmoid craniotomy for resection of a large petroclival meningioma. Preoperatively, the patient had hydrocephalus. After surgery the patient required a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Two years after the initial shunting procedure, imaging demonstrated significant growth of new bilateral choroid plexus cysts as compared with pre-shunt imaging. Post-shunt imaging also demonstrated evidence of diffuse dural enhancement characteristic of intracranial hypotension. Despite radiographic growth and multiplication of the cysts, the patient was clinically asymptomatic and had a good neurological outcome.

  4. Transfer of the intercostal nerves to the nerve of the long head of the triceps to recover elbow extension in brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Goubier, Jean-Noel; Teboul, Frédéric

    2007-06-01

    Restoration of elbow flexion is the first goal in brachial plexus injuries. The current procedures using nerve grafts and nerve transfers authorize more extensive repairs, with different possible targets: shoulder, elbow extension, and hand. Elbow extension is important to stabilize the elbow without the contralateral hand and allows achieving a useful grasp. The transfer of the intercostal nerves to the nerve of the long head of the triceps may restore this function in brachial plexus palsies. Furthermore, in case of C5 to C7 palsy, this transfer spares the radial nerve and gives a chance to spontaneous triceps recovery by the reinnervation from C8 root. Moreover, in case of absence or insufficient (M0 to M2 according to Medical Research Council scoring) recovery of elbow flexion strength by nerve surgery, the reinnervated triceps can be transferred. We present the technique of intercostal nerve transfer to the long head of the triceps branch to restore elbow extension in brachial plexus palsy. Results concerning 10 patients are presented.

  5. Evaluation and Management of Patients with Inhalation Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    and wheezing, are often ( de- effect f early atelectasis consequent to occlusion of the layed onset (2). Conversely, the presence of carbonaceous small...least in part the atelectasis that tation, may produce a falsely negative scan if the scan is occurs in patients with inhalation injury. The adminis...injury makes the maintenance of form the more sophisticated tests and the essentiality of ventilation and prevention of atelectasis a primary din

  6. Prooxidant-antioxidant balance in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ehsaei, Mohamadreza; Khajavi, Mehdi; Arjmand, Mohammad Hassan; Abuee, Mohammad Ali; Ghayour-Mobarhan, Majid; Hamidi Alamdari, Daryoush

    2015-03-01

    Brain trauma is an important cause of mortality and disability among young people worldwide. One of the mechanisms of post-traumatic secondary brain damage is related to free radical release and oxidative stress (OS). OS is the consequence of an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants in favor of pro-oxidants. This imbalance may lead to macromolecule damage including lipid peroxidation, protein crosslinking, DNA damage and changes in growth and function of cells in brain. Free radical release and subsequent lipid peroxidation are early events following neural tissues injury and are associated with hypo-perfusion, edema, and disruption of axonal guidance. In this study, we determined the prooxidant-antioxidant balance (PAB) in patients with brain injury, and its correlation with number of demographic and clinical parameters. Sera from 98 patients with traumatic brain and 100 healthy subjects were collected. The serum PAB was measured. Age, sex, GCS (Glasgow coma scale), mechanism of injury, brain lesions found on CT scan and lesions in other parts of the body, caused by trauma, were determined. A significantly higher PAB value was observed in the patient group (138.97 ± 15.9 HK unit) compared to the controls (60.82 ± 12.6 HK) (P = 0.001). In the patient group, there was no significant correlation of PAB with GCS, brain lesion characteristic, mechanism of injury, other accompanying traumatic injury, age and gender. When patients were classified into three groups according to GCS: group 1 (GCS>13, n = 28, PAB serum value = 138.51 ± 62.66 HK), group 2 (GCS between 8 and 12, n = 29, PAB serum value = 162.7 ± 50.6 HK) and group 3 (GCS <8, n = 41, PAB serum value = 155.56 ± 58.21 HK); there was no significant difference between groups. The serum PAB values were higher in patients with traumatic brain injury, although this was not associated with the extent of injury.

  7. A mixed choroid plexus papilloma and ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Seong Ik; Kim, Seung-Ki; Kim, In One; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-04-01

    We report a novel case of a mixed choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) and ependymoma with cartilaginous differentiation. This kind of mixed tumor has not been previously reported in the English literature. The patient was a 5-year-old girl, who presented with a 1-week history of fever and numbness of the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium revealed a heterogeneously enhancing mass in the occipital horn of the left lateral ventricle. Histologically, the tumor showed an intermixed CPP area and a low-grade papillary ependymoma-like area, which was studded with cartilage islands and psammoma bodies. In many foci, direct transition of CPP and ependymoma was observed, but there were no high-grade features. We report this novel case, describe the unique microscopic and immunohistochemical features, and speculate on the pathogenesis.

  8. Intrafacility transportation of patients with acute brain injury.

    PubMed

    Tu, Hsinfen

    2014-06-01

    Patients with acute brain injury (ABI) frequently require diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in the areas located outside of the intensive care unit. Transports can be risky for critically ill patients with ABI. Secondary brain injury can occur during the transport from causes such as ischemia, hypotension, hypoxia, hypercapnia, and cerebral edema. Preparation and implementation of preventive procedures including pretransport assessment, monitoring during transport, and posttransport examination and documentation for transports of patients with ABI deem to be necessary. The purpose of this article is to review the typical risks associated with the transports of the patients with ABI out of the intensive care unit and to propose the strategies that can be used to minimize the risks of secondary brain injury.

  9. Perioperative Evaluation of Patient Outcomes after Severe Acid Corrosive Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ming-Ho; Wu, Han-Yun

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed 64 patients with perforation or full-thickness injury of the alimentary tract after acid ingestion. Based on our classification of laparotomy findings, there were class I (n = 15); class II (n = 13); class III (n = 16); and class IV (n = 20). Study parameters were preoperative laboratory data, gastric perforation, associated visceral injury, and extension of the injury. End points of the study were the patients' mortality and length of hospital stay. All these patients underwent esophagogastrectomy with (n = 16) or without (n = 24) concomitant resection, esophagogastroduodenojejunectomy with (n = 4) or without (n = 13) concomitant resection, and laparotomy only (n = 7). Concomitant resections were performed on the spleen (n = 10), colon (n = 2), pancreas (n = 1), gall bladder (n = 1), skipped areas of jejunum (n = 4), and the first portion of the duodenum (n = 4). The study demonstrates five preoperative risk factors, female gender, shock status, shock index, pH value, and base deficit, and four intraoperative risk factors, gastric perforation, associated visceral injury, injury beyond the pylorus, and continuous involvement of the jejunum over a length of 50 cm. The overall mortality rate was 45.3%, which increased significantly with advancing class of corrosive injury. PMID:26582190

  10. [Reflection around the return home of a head injury patient].

    PubMed

    Mouling, Virginie; Lambert, Marie; Charlier, Nathalie; Fonseca, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    The rehabilitation of people having suffered a head injury requires an inter-disciplinary perspective. Understanding the family dynamics as well as assessing the patient's resources and limits help professionals organise the necessary support to guide the patient and their family towards social reintegration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Medical admission of elderly trauma patients with isolated injuries.

    PubMed

    Self, Michael; Mangram, Alicia; Dunn, Ernest

    2007-09-01

    We sought to evaluate the outcomes of trauma patients admitted to medical services rather than to the general trauma team, particularly those elderly patients with isolated injuries of a specialty nature. Over the 2-year retrospective study period, 3017 trauma patients were admitted. The trauma service directed care in 2740 (90.8%) of this group versus the 277 (9.2%) admitted to medical services (MS). The patients in each group were then classified according to age younger than 55 years or older than 55 years (elderly). Of the 277 patients admitted to the MS, 177 (63.8%) were elderly compared with only 13 per cent of the trauma service group. Smaller proportions (16.9%) of the elderly medical patients were admitted to the intensive care unit as compared with the trauma group (22.1%). There was a higher morbidity rate, 41.9 per cent, in the trauma service group as compared with the MS group, 20 per cent. No patients on the MS underwent a laparotomy for intraabdominal injuries nor were there any missed injuries of a general surgical nature. Allowing elderly trauma patients with isolated specialty injuries to be managed by the MS is not associated with increased morbidity or mortality.

  12. Predictive factors of open globe injury in patients requiring vitrectomy.

    PubMed

    Pimolrat, Weeraya; Choovuthayakorn, Janejit; Watanachai, Nawat; Patikulsila, Direk; Kunavisarut, Paradee; Chaikitmongkol, Voraporn; Ittipunkul, Nimitr

    2014-01-01

    To determine the outcomes and predictive factors of patients with open globe injury requiring pars plana vitrectomy (PPV). The medical records of 114 patients age 10 years or older who had undergone PPV due to ocular trauma, with at least 6 months follow up, were retrospectively reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 42 (SD14) years, with males accounting for 89% of the cases. Penetrating eye injury was the most common injury mechanism (43%) with most injuries occurring secondary to work related incidents (54%). After surgical interventions, 78% of the patients had visual improvement of one or more Snellen lines, while no light perception occurred in 10%. Anatomical attachment was achieved in 87% of eyes at the final follow up. Logistic regression analysis showed that the presence of a relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) was a significant predictive factor of visual outcome, while initial retinal detachment was a significant predictor of anatomical outcome. Pupillary reaction is an important presenting ocular sign in estimating the post-vitrectomy poor visual outcome for open globe injury. Vision was restored and improved in more than half of the patients in this study; however, long-term sequelae should be monitored. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Restoration of prehension with the double free muscle technique following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. Indications and long-term results.

    PubMed

    Doi, K; Muramatsu, K; Hattori, Y; Otsuka, K; Tan, S H; Nanda, V; Watanabe, M

    2000-05-01

    Recent interest in reconstruction of the upper limb following brachial plexus injuries has focused on the restoration of prehension following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. Double free muscle transfer was performed in patients who had complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. After initial exploration of the brachial plexus and (if possible) repair of the fifth cervical nerve root, the first free muscle, used to restore elbow flexion and finger extension, is transferred and reinnervated by the spinal accessory nerve. The second free muscle, transferred to restore finger flexion, is reinnervated by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves. The motor branch of the triceps brachii is reinnervated by the third and fourth intercostal nerves to restore elbow extension. Hand sensibility is restored by suturing of the sensory rami of the intercostal nerves to the median nerve or the ulnar nerve component of the medial cord. Secondary reconstructive procedures, such as arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb, shoulder arthrodesis, and tenolysis of the transferred muscle and the distal tendons, may be required to improve the functional outcome. The early results were evaluated in thirty-two patients who had had reconstruction with use of the double free muscle procedure. Twenty-six of these patients were followed for at least twenty-four months (mean duration, thirty-nine months) after the second free muscle transfer, and they were assessed with regard to the long-term outcome as well. Satisfactory (excellent or good) elbow flexion was restored in twenty-five (96 percent) of the twenty-six patients and satisfactory prehension (more than 30 degrees of total active motion of the fingers), in seventeen (65 percent). Fourteen patients (54 percent) could position the hand in space, negating simultaneous flexion of the elbow, while moving the fingers at least 30 degrees and could use the reconstructed hand for activities requiring the use of two hands, such

  14. Airway management of patients with traumatic brain injury/C-spine injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Yong

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is usually combined with cervical spine (C-spine) injury. The possibility of C-spine injury is always considered when performing endotracheal intubation in these patients. Rapid sequence intubation is recommended with adequate sedative or analgesics and a muscle relaxant to prevent an increase in intracranial pressure during intubation in TBI patients. Normocapnia and mild hyperoxemia should be maintained to prevent secondary brain injury. The manual-in-line-stabilization (MILS) technique effectively lessens C-spine movement during intubation. However, the MILS technique can reduce mouth opening and lead to a poor laryngoscopic view. The newly introduced video laryngoscope can manage these problems. The AirWay Scope® (AWS) and AirTraq laryngoscope decreased the extension movement of C-spines at the occiput-C1 and C2-C4 levels, improving intubation conditions and shortening the time to complete tracheal intubation compared with a direct laryngoscope. The Glidescope® also decreased cervical movement in the C2-C5 levels during intubation and improved vocal cord visualization, but a longer duration was required to complete intubation compared with other devices. A lightwand also reduced cervical motion across all segments. A fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided nasal intubation is the best method to reduce cervical movement, but a skilled operator is required. In conclusion, a video laryngoscope assists airway management in TBI patients with C-spine injury.

  15. Airway management of patients with traumatic brain injury/C-spine injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is usually combined with cervical spine (C-spine) injury. The possibility of C-spine injury is always considered when performing endotracheal intubation in these patients. Rapid sequence intubation is recommended with adequate sedative or analgesics and a muscle relaxant to prevent an increase in intracranial pressure during intubation in TBI patients. Normocapnia and mild hyperoxemia should be maintained to prevent secondary brain injury. The manual-in-line-stabilization (MILS) technique effectively lessens C-spine movement during intubation. However, the MILS technique can reduce mouth opening and lead to a poor laryngoscopic view. The newly introduced video laryngoscope can manage these problems. The AirWay Scope® (AWS) and AirTraq laryngoscope decreased the extension movement of C-spines at the occiput-C1 and C2-C4 levels, improving intubation conditions and shortening the time to complete tracheal intubation compared with a direct laryngoscope. The Glidescope® also decreased cervical movement in the C2-C5 levels during intubation and improved vocal cord visualization, but a longer duration was required to complete intubation compared with other devices. A lightwand also reduced cervical motion across all segments. A fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided nasal intubation is the best method to reduce cervical movement, but a skilled operator is required. In conclusion, a video laryngoscope assists airway management in TBI patients with C-spine injury. PMID:26045922

  16. Cognitive performance in multiple trauma patients 3 years after injury.

    PubMed

    Finset, A; Anke, A W; Hofft, E; Roaldsen, K S; Pillgram-Larsen, J; Stanghelle, J K

    1999-01-01

    Patients with sequelae from multiple trauma commonly display cognitive disturbances, specifically in the areas of attention and memory. This study was designed to assess cognitive functioning 3 years after severe multiple trauma and to investigate how cognitive performance is related to head injury severity and psychological distress respectively. Sixty-eight multiple trauma patients were tested with a screening battery consisting of six neuropsychological tasks 3 years after injury. A measure of psychological distress (20-item General Health Questionnaire, or GHQ-20) was also administered. Patients who neither showed signs of reduced consciousness on admission to the hospital nor reported significant psychological distress at follow-up tended to have normal test performance. In five of the six tasks, cognitive impairment was related to the severity of the traumatic brain injury as measured by the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS). In both attention span tasks, patients designated as cases by the GHQ had significantly lower scores than noncase patients. These bivariate relationships were upheld in multiple regression analyses, in which age, sex, and GCS and GHQ scores were entered as independent variables. When patients with severe head injuries were excluded from the analyses, GCS scores still contributed to the variance in tests of verbal attention span and delayed recall, but performance on attentional tasks was more strongly related to psychological distress than to GCS scores. Cognitive deficits in multiple trauma patients were related both to the severity of the traumatic brain injury and to the degree of psychological distress. The strength of the association between brain injury as indicated by GCS scores and cognitive performance differed between different tasks. Neuropsychological testing may assist in differentiating primary organic from secondary psychogenic impairments.

  17. Giant choroid plexus cyst as an accidental finding in an older man.

    PubMed

    Bozić, Boris; Rotim, Kresimir; Houra, Karlo

    2008-01-01

    Choroid plexus cysts (CPC) are usually found at the end of the second trimester of pregnancy. Sometimes they can be accidentally and found on prenatal ultrasound examinations. Vast majority of CPC resolve spontaneously by 28th weeks gestation. In the older aged group the choroid plexus cysts are extremely rare pathomorphologic medical entity. Since they are almost always asymptomatic, they are therefore accidentally found on brain magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) scans. They are usually located in the lateral ventricles and measure around 2 cm in diameter. We present a case of a 75-year-old male with a giant choroid plexus cyst whose leading symptom was excruciating headache refractory to previous conservative therapy. He underwent surgery when osteoplastic craniotomy was performed with cyst fenestration and ablation. His recovery was uneventful with total regression of headaches. Reviewing the recent literature we did not find such a case considering the patients age and the size of the choroid plexus cyst.

  18. Mobilization of the obese patient and prevention of injury.

    PubMed

    Walden, Christine M; Bankard, Scott B; Cayer, Bradford; Floyd, William B; Garrison, Herbert G; Hickey, Todd; Holfer, Linda D; Rotondo, Michael F; Pories, Walter J

    2013-10-01

    Obese patients are difficult to transport between emergency departments, imaging facilities, operating rooms, intensive care units, acute care units, and rehabilitation facilities. Each move, along with turning, bathing, and access to bathrooms, poses risks of injury to patients and personnel. Similarly, inadequate mobilization raises the risk of pressure ulcers. The costs can be prohibitive. On 6 pilot units, mobilization of patients was delegated to trained lift team technicians who covered the units in pairs, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, to assist with moving and lifting of patients weighing 200 pounds or more, with a Braden Scale score of 18 or less and/or the presence of pressure ulcers. In fiscal year 2012, hospital-acquired pressure ulcers on pilot units decreased by 43% (from 61 to 35). Patient handling-related employee injuries on pilot units decreased by 38.5% (from 13 to 8). Employee satisfaction related to organizational commitment to employee safety and impact on job satisfaction was positively impacted by implementation of the lift team. With the reduction in employee injuries and the fall in the prevalence of pressure ulcers, the adoption of the lift team program decreased costs by $493,293.00. Implementation of lift teams on pilot nursing units decreased patient handling-related employee injuries, resulting in sharp improvements in quality patient care and reduced costs.

  19. A practical approach to enlargement of nerves, plexuses and roots.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, Satish V; Yadav, Rakhil S; Soni, Girish

    2015-04-01

    Detecting enlargement of accessible nerves is very helpful in assessing patients with peripheral nerve disorders, as only a few types of neuropathy lead to nerve thickening. The three leading causes are leprosy, hereditary motor and sensory neuropathies (types 1 and 3) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathies. MRI, neurography and ultrasonography allow assessment of clinically inaccessible portions of deep-seated nerves, plexuses and roots. As a result, isolated proximal segment thickenings, as found in chronic inflammatory sensory polyradiculopathy, can now be better evaluated and managed. Similarly, focal nerve enlargements due to infection, inflammation, infiltration and neoplasm are being identified and treated effectively. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of patients with enlarged peripheral nerves, plexuses and roots, including cranial nerves. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Obstetric brachial plexus palsy following routine versus difficult deliveries.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Amel A F

    2014-07-01

    Previous bio-engineering studies showed that intrapartum peak forces applied by the clinician were lower in routine deliveries than difficult deliveries. A total of 751 cases of obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included and divided into two groups: group I (248 patients) were born following routine deliveries and group II (503 patients) were born following difficult deliveries. Both groups were compared regarding the type of palsy and the rate of good/poor spontaneous motor recovery from the palsy. Group I subjects were more likely to have upper Erb palsy whereas those in group II were more likely to develop total palsy (P < .0001). The percentage of newborns with poor functional recovery was significantly higher (P < .05) in group II with regards to shoulder, wrist, and hand function. It was concluded that higher peak forces applied by the clinician in difficult deliveries affect the type of obstetric brachial plexus palsy. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Neuroendoscopic removal of large choroid plexus cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Ho; Lee, Sang Weon; Ko, Jun Kyeong; Choi, Byeong Gwan; Cha, Seung Heon; Song, Geun Seong; Choi, Chang Hwa

    2005-04-01

    Choroid plexus cysts (CPCs) are the most common neuroepithelial cysts, occurring in more than 50% of some autopsy series. They are typically small and asymptomatic and are discovered incidentally in older patients, usually in the trigone of the lateral ventricle. Symptomatic CPCs (usually exceptionally large, 2-8 cm) are rare. The authors report a case of large symptomatic choroid plexus cyst, located in the trigone of the right lateral ventricle in a 26-yr-old man who presented with headache and vomiting. The patient underwent endoscopic removal through a burr hole placed 3 cm from the midline and just behind the hair line. The histological examination of the cyst wall was consistent with choroid epithelium. Despite of postoperative intraventricular hemorrhage and catheter infection, he discharged home without neurologic deficits. The endoscopic fenestration rather than excision should be considered as the first surgical procedure because the goal of treatment is shrinkage of the cyst until normal cerebrospinal fluid flow is restored.

  2. Provider perceptions of patient psychosocial needs after orofacial injury.

    PubMed

    Zazzali, James L; Marshall, Grant N; Shetty, Vivek; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R; Sinha, Uttam K; Rayburn, Nadine R

    2007-08-01

    Vulnerable populations are at particular risk for developing psychosocial sequelae after they experience orofacial injury. To enhance understanding of awareness, perspectives, and beliefs regarding attendant psychosocial issues, surgeons who provide orofacial injury care to indigent patients were surveyed. We surveyed 26 oral and maxillofacial surgeons and 15 otolaryngology surgeons at a large, urban, Level 1 trauma center. The survey, which measured providers' perceptions of pertinent contextual elements and patients' psychosocial needs after assaultive orofacial injury, was based on semistructured interviews with 15 oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The overall survey response rate was 85.4% (35 of 41). Respondents ranked interpersonal violence as the dominant cause of orofacial injury among patients. Anxiety (eg, post-traumatic stress), depression, and legal issues were the most significant psychosocial sequelae identified by respondents. Alcohol abuse, drug abuse, and homelessness were identified as the most important contributors to orofacial reinjury and patient noncompliance with postsurgical instructions. Less than half of respondents (44.7%) believed that patients' problems with depression, anxiety, or substance abuse were currently addressed in an adequate way in the hospital. The vast majority (94.7%) believed that a psychosocial aftercare program was needed, and most agreed that such a program would decrease the risk of reinjury and would promote patient compliance with aftercare instructions and return for scheduled follow-up care. Respondents identified the specialty mental health service in their hospital or a community-based setting as the preferred locations for such a program, and they indicated that lack of financial resources and trained personnel were the most significant barriers to implementation of such a program within the setting of trauma services. Surgeons who provide care to indigent patients with orofacial injury perceive a great need

  3. The elderly patient with spinal injury: treat or transfer?

    PubMed

    Barmparas, Galinos; Cooper, Zara; Haider, Adil H; Havens, Joaquim M; Askari, Reza; Salim, Ali

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to delineate whether elderly patients with spinal injuries benefit from transfers to higher level trauma centers. Retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank 2007 to 2011, including patients > 65 (y) with any spinal fracture and/or spinal cord injury from a blunt mechanism. Patients who were transferred to level I and II centers from other facilities were compared to those admitted and received their definitive treatment at level III or other centers. Of 3,313,117 eligible patients, 43,637 (1.3%) met inclusion criteria: 19,588 (44.9%) were transferred to level I-II centers, and 24,049 (55.1%) received definitive treatment at level III or other centers. Most of the patients (95.8%) had a spinal fracture without a spinal cord injury. Transferred patients were more likely to require an intensive care unit admission (48.5% versus 36.0%, P < 0.001) and ventilatory support (16.1% versus 13.3%, P < 0.001). Mortality for the entire cohort was 7.7% (8.6% versus 7.1%, P < 0.001) and significantly higher, at 21.7% for patients with a spinal cord injury (22.3% versus 21.0%, P < 0.001). After adjusting for all available covariates, there was no difference in the adjusted mortality between patients transferred to higher level centers and those treated at lower level centers (adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval]: 1.05 [0.95-1.17], P = 0.325). Transfer of elderly patients with spinal injuries to higher level trauma centers is not associated with improved survival. Future studies should explore the justifications used for these transfers and focus on other outcome measures such as functional status to determine the potential benefit from such practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inpatient rehabilitation following burn injury: patient demographics and functional outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sliwa, James A; Heinemann, Allen; Semik, Patrick

    2005-10-01

    To identify demographic characteristics of burn patients referred for inpatient rehabilitation, the benefits of rehabilitation in this population, and factors that influence functional outcome. Retrospective chart review. Free-standing rehabilitation hospital. Patients (N=129) admitted for inpatient rehabilitation after a burn injury. Comprehensive inpatient rehabilitation. Demographic data and the FIM instrument on admission and discharge for all patients. Linear measures of functional status derived by Rasch analysis of the FIM showed significant improvements from admission to discharge for all patients. There was no correlation between total body surface area (TBSA), premorbid psychiatric alcohol or drug abuse history, and change between admission and discharge FIM score. There was a significant correlation between TBSA burn and age and between TBSA and length of stay. Burn patients referred for inpatient rehabilitation are either older or have large TBSA burns. All patients made significant functional improvements and consequently inpatient rehabilitation can be considered an important component of care after a burn injury.

  5. International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Committee report: the role of nerve transfers in the treatment of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Kozin, Scott H; Malessy, Martijn J; Clarke, Howard M

    2015-06-01

    Nerve transfers have gained popularity in the treatment of adult brachial plexus palsy; however, their role in the treatment of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains unclear. Brachial plexus palsies in infants differ greatly from those in adults in the patterns of injury, potential for recovery, and influences of growth and development. This International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand committee report on NBPP is based upon review of the current literature. We found no direct comparisons of nerve grafting to nerve transfer for primary reconstruction of NBPP. Although the results contained in individual reports that use each strategy for treatment of Erb palsy are similar, comparison of nerve transfer to nerve grafting is limited by inconsistencies in outcomes reported, by multiple confounding factors, and by small numbers of patients. Although the role of nerve transfers for primary reconstruction remains to be defined, nerve transfers have been found to be effective and useful in specific clinical circumstances including late presentation, isolated deficits, failed primary reconstruction, and multiple nerve root avulsions. In the case of NBPP more severe than Erb palsy, nerve transfers alone are inadequate to address all of the deficits and should only be considered as adjuncts if maximal re-innervation is to be achieved. Surgeons who commit to care of infants with NBPP need to avoid an over-reliance on nerve transfers and should also have the capability and inclination for brachial plexus exploration and nerve graft reconstruction. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dorsal Scapular Artery Variations and Relationship to the Brachial Plexus, and a Related Thoracic Outlet Syndrome Case

    PubMed Central

    Verenna, Anne-Marie A.; Alexandru, Daniela; Karimi, Afshin; Brown, Justin M.; Bove, Geoffrey M.; Daly, Frank J.; Pastore, Anthony M.; Pearson, Helen E.; Barbe, Mary F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Knowledge of the relationship of the dorsal scapular artery (DSA) with the brachial plexus is limited. Objective We report a case of a variant DSA path, and revisit DSA origins and under-investigated relationship with the plexus in cadavers. Methods The DSA was examined in a male patient and 106 cadavers. Results In the case, we observed an unusual DSA compressing the lower plexus trunk, that resulted in intermittent radiating pain and paresthesia. In the cadavers, the DSA originated most commonly from the subclavian artery (71%), with 35% from the thyrocervical trunk. Nine sides of eight cadavers (seven females) had two DSA branches per side, with one branch from each origin. The most typical DSA path was a subclavian artery origin before passing between upper and middle brachial plexus trunks (40% of DSAs), versus between middle and lower trunks (23%), or inferior (4%) or superior to the plexus (1%). Following a thyrocervical trunk origin, the DSA passed most frequently superior to the plexus (23%), versus between middle and lower trunks (6%) or upper and middle trunks (4%). Bilateral symmetry in origin and path through the brachial plexus was observed in 13 of 35 females (37%) and 6 of 17 males (35%), with the most common bilateral finding of a subclavian artery origin and a path between upper and middle trunks (17%). Conclusion Variability in the relationship between DSA and trunks of the brachial plexus has surgical and clinical implications, such as diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome. PMID:28077957

  7. Brachial plexus impingement: an unusual complication of bilateral breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Berry, M G; Stanek, J J

    2008-03-01

    Breast augmentation is one of the most commonly performed aesthetic procedures, with many studies documenting the early and long-term complications that might be expected. This report describes the case of an active young woman who experienced severe pain, particularly with movement. Surgical exploration showed the cause of this pain to be impingement of the patient's lower brachial plexus by the mammary prosthesis. Such a complication has not, to the authors' knowledge, been reported previously.

  8. Submental Intubation in Patients with Complex Maxillofacial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Yuseon; Kang, Seong Sik; Kim, Minsoo; Son, Hee Jeong; Park, Jaewoo; Kim, Jeong-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Airway management in patients with complex maxillofacial injuries is a challenge to anesthesiologists. Submental intubation is a useful technique that is less invasive than tracheostomy in securing the airways where orotracheal and nasotracheal intubation cannot be performed. This procedure avoids the use of tracheostomy and bypasses its associated morbidities. A flexible and kink-resistant reinforced endotracheal tube with detachable universal connector is commonly used for submental intubation. Herein, we report cases involving submental intubation using a reinforced endotracheal tube with a non-detachable universal connector in patients with complex maxillofacial injuries. PMID:27924286

  9. Lack of evidence of the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants (under the age of two years) diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Bialocerkowski, Andrea; Gelding, Bronwyn

    2006-12-01

    Background  Obstetric brachial plexus palsy, which occurs in 1-3 per 1000 live births, results from traction and/or compression of the brachial plexus in utero, during descent through the birth canal or during delivery. This results in a spectrum of injuries that range in extent of damage and severity and can lead to a lifelong impairment and functional difficulties associated with the use of the affected upper limb. Most infants diagnosed with obstetric brachial plexus palsy receive treatment, such as surgery to the brachial plexus, physiotherapy or occupational therapy, within the first months of life. However, there is controversy regarding the most effective form of management. This review follows on from our previous systematic review which investigated the effectiveness of primary conservative management in infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. This systematic review focuses on the effects of primary surgery. Objectives  The objective of this review was to systematically assess and collate all available evidence on effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy. Search strategy  A systematic literature search was performed using 13 databases: TRIP, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, Proquest 5000, Evidence Based Medicine Reviews, Expanded Academic ASAP, Meditext, Science Direct, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, Proquest Digital Dissertations, Open Archives Initiative Search Engine, the Australian Digital Thesis program. Those studies that were reported in English and published between July 1992 to June 2004 were included in this review. Selection criteria  Quantitative studies that investigated the effectiveness of primary brachial plexus surgery for infants with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were eligible for inclusion into this review. This excluded studies where infants were solely managed conservatively or with pharmacological agents, or underwent surgery for the management of

  10. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction.

  11. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Wu, Dianxiu; Li, Rui; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Cui, Shusen

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dissolved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C5–T1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to investigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration following brachial plexus root avulsion. PMID:25206605

  12. Cause of death for patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    DeVivo, M J; Kartus, P L; Stover, S L; Rutt, R D; Fine, P R

    1989-08-01

    An epidemiologic study of 5131 patients sustaining spinal cord injuries between 1973 and 1980 was conducted to determine and characterize the leading causes of death in this population. Patients who were studied had been admitted to one of seven federally designated regional spinal cord injury care systems and they survived for at least 24 hours after injury. When follow-up was terminated, 459 patients (9%) had died. Overall, the leading cause of death was pneumonia, followed by other subsequent unintentional injuries and suicides. The highest ratios of actual to expected deaths were for septicemia, pulmonary emboli, and pneumonia. Pneumonia was the leading cause of death among quadriplegics and persons at least 55 years of age, while among paraplegics and persons who were less than 55 years of age, subsequent unintentional injuries and suicides were the leading causes of death. While there is conclusive evidence that mortality rates for spinal-cord injured persons have declined dramatically since the end of World War II, many cause-specific mortality rates remain substantially above normal.

  13. Clinical review: Traumatic brain injury in patients receiving antiplatelet medication

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    As the population ages, emergency physicians are confronted with a growing number of trauma patients receiving antithrombotic and antiplatelet medication prior to injury. In cases of traumatic brain injury, pre-injury treatment with anticoagulants has been associated with an increased risk of posttraumatic intracranial haemorrhage. Since high age itself is a well-recognised risk factor in traumatic brain injury, this population is at special risk for increased morbidity and mortality. The effects of antiplatelet medication on coagulation pathways in posttraumatic intracranial haemorrhage are not well understood, but available data suggest that the use of these agents increases the risk of an unfavourable outcome, especially in cases of severe traumatic brain injury. Standard laboratory investigations are insufficient to evaluate platelet activity, but new assays for monitoring platelet activity have been developed. Commonly used interventions to restore platelet activity include platelet transfusion and application of haemostatic drugs. Nevertheless, controlled clinical trials have not been carried out and, therefore, clinical practice guidelines are not available. In addition to the risks of the acute trauma, patients are at risk for cardiac events such as life-threatening stent thrombosis if antiplatelet therapy is withdrawn. In this review article, we summarize the pathophysiologic mechanisms of the most commonly used antiplatelet agents and analyse results of studies on the effects of this treatment on patients with traumatic brain injury. Additionally, we focus on opportunities to counteract antiplatelet effects in those patients as well as on considerations regarding the withdrawal of antiplatelet therapy. In those chronically ill patients, an interdisciplinary approach involving intensivists, neurosurgeons as well as cardiologists is often mandatory. PMID:22839302

  14. Scapular deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a new finding

    PubMed Central

    Paizi, Melia

    2007-01-01

    While most obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients recover arm and hand function, the residual nerve weakness leads to muscle imbalances about the shoulder which may cause bony deformities. In this paper we describe abnormalities in the developing scapula and the glenohumeral joint. We introduce a classification for the deformity which we term Scapular Hypoplasia, Elevation and Rotation. Multiple anatomic parameters were measured in bilateral CT images and three-dimensional CT reconstruction of the shoulder girdle of 30 obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients (age range 10 months–10.6 years). The affected scapulae were found to be hypoplastic by an average of 14% while the ratio of the height to the width of the body of scapula (excluding acromion) were not significantly changed, the acromion was significantly elongated by an average of 19%. These parameters as well as subluxation of the humeral head (average 14%) and downward rotation in the scapular plane were found to correlate with the area of scapula visible over the clavicle. This finding provides a classification tool for diagnosis and objective evaluation of the bony deformity and its severity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients. PMID:17262175

  15. Scapular deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: a new finding.

    PubMed

    Nath, Rahul K; Paizi, Melia

    2007-03-01

    While most obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients recover arm and hand function, the residual nerve weakness leads to muscle imbalances about the shoulder which may cause bony deformities. In this paper we describe abnormalities in the developing scapula and the glenohumeral joint. We introduce a classification for the deformity which we term Scapular Hypoplasia, Elevation and Rotation. Multiple anatomic parameters were measured in bilateral CT images and three-dimensional CT reconstruction of the shoulder girdle of 30 obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients (age range 10 months-10.6 years). The affected scapulae were found to be hypoplastic by an average of 14% while the ratio of the height to the width of the body of scapula (excluding acromion) were not significantly changed, the acromion was significantly elongated by an average of 19%. These parameters as well as subluxation of the humeral head (average 14%) and downward rotation in the scapular plane were found to correlate with the area of scapula visible over the clavicle. This finding provides a classification tool for diagnosis and objective evaluation of the bony deformity and its severity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy patients.

  16. Utility of electrodiagnostic testing and computed tomography myelography in the preoperative evaluation of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Vanderhave, Kelly L; Bovid, Karen; Alpert, Hilary; Chang, Kate Wan-Chu; Quint, Douglas J; Leonard, James A; Yang, Lynda J S

    2012-03-01

    cases in which both CTM and EDSs gave concordant results, the sensitivity for both modalities combined was 50.0% (CI 0.237-0.763) for avulsion and 80.8% (CI 0.621-0.915) for rupture. Overall, EDSs were most useful in identifying ruptures, particularly in the upper plexus, whereas CTM was most sensitive in identifying avulsions in the lower plexus. Knowledge of the spinal nerve integrity is critical for early management of patients with NBPP. Surgical management, in the form of nerve repair/reconstruction, and optimal prognostication of NBPP depend on the accurate diagnosis of the level and type of lesion. Both EDSs and CTM scans must always be interpreted in the context of a comprehensive evaluation of the patient. They provide supplemental information (in addition to the physical examination) for early detection of nerve root rupture and avulsion injuries, aiding surgical decision making and preoperative planning for NBPP. Continued advances in imaging, EDSs, and microsurgical nerve repair techniques will allow surgeons to achieve greater success for functional recovery in management of NBPP.

  17. [Ipsilateral brachial plexus C7 root transfer. Presentation of a case and a literature review].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique; Ramírez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The C7 root in brachial plexus injuries has been used since 1986, since the first description by Gu at that time. This root can be used completely or partially in ipsilateral or contralateral lesions of the brachial plexus. A review of the literature and the case report of a 21-month-old girl with stab wounds to the neck and section of the C5 root of the right brachial plexus are presented. A transfer of the anterior fibres of the ipsilateral C7 root was performed. At 9 months there was complete recovery of abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Visual dysfunction is underestimated in patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Berthold-Lindstedt, Märta; Ygge, Jan; Borg, Kristian

    2017-04-06

    More than 50% of human cerebral activity is related to vision. Visual impairments are therefore common after acquired brain injury, although they are often overlooked. In order to evaluate the prevalence of visual deficits in our Out-patient Brain Injury Program, a structured screening questionnaire, the Visual Interview, was administered. A total of 170 patients with acquired brain injury, mean age 47 years, who were enrolled in the programme during 2010-12, underwent the Visual Interview. The interview consists of 18 questions concerning visual impairment and was performed on admission. The different types of visual impairment were compared with regard to sex and diagnosis. Fifty-four percent of the patients reported visual changes, mainly reading difficulties, photosensitivity, blurred vision and disorders of the visual field. Sixteen patients who did not experience visual changes also reported visual symptoms in 4-9 questions. Only slight differences were noted in the occurrence of visual symptoms when correlated with sex or diagnosis. Visual impairments are common after acquired brain injury, but some patients do not define their problems as vision-related. A structured questionnaire, covering the most common visual symptoms, is helpful for the rehabilitation team to facilitate assessment of visual changes.

  19. Caring for patients with traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta.

    PubMed

    Collins, Angela Smith; Dinsmore, David

    2007-01-01

    Trauma is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States, with blunt traumatic injuries of the thoracic aorta continuing to occur despite the increased use of seatbelts and airbags. Emerging from crash analysis are effective interventions and provides increased awareness of the occult nature of these types of injuries. This article describes those interventions that healthcare providers must embed throughout the continuum of care for patients experiencing thoracic aortic injuries. Outcomes will be dependent upon the healthcare provider's knowledge of the physics of the event and the urgency of the diagnosis, as well as the ability to assess and manage all the variables involved. Current procedural issues are delineated and case studies are used to illustrate the processes of care needed by these patients.

  20. [Neuropsychological course of patients with craniocerebral injuries in rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Callegari, S; Pierobon, A; Viola, L; Mastretta, E; Majani, G

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to describe a neuropsychological assessment and intervention model in Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients. The theoretical and methodological frameworks are described and the following diagnostic and rehabilitative flowchart is fully explained: 1. first visit with patient and his relatives; 2. clinical and testing assessment; 3. diagnostic balance and its communication to patient and his relatives; 4. neuropsychological rehabilitation and psychological counseling. Whenever necessary, patient's relatives are involved. Furthermore, TBI patients' health related quality of life is outlined as an important clinical and scientific issue deserving more attention, in spite of the objective methodological difficulties which its evaluation implies.

  1. Cystic choroid plexus papilloma in the cavum septum pellucidum.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Alexander; Kalhorn, Stephen P; Mikolaenko, Irina; Wisoff, Jeffrey H

    2009-12-01

    A choroid plexus papilloma is a rare CNS neoplasm arising from the neuroepithelial lining of the choroid plexus. A third ventricular location of a choroid plexus papilloma is rare compared with the more common sites in the lateral and fourth ventricles. Cystic choroid plexus papilloma represents an infrequent subtype that may present diagnostic ambiguity. The authors present a case of cystic choroid plexus papilloma within a cavum septum pellucidum that radiographically mimicked neurocysticercosis.

  2. Utility of ultrasound in noninvasive preoperative workup of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Somashekar, Deepak K; Di Pietro, Michael A; Joseph, Jacob R; Yang, Lynda J-S; Parmar, Hemant A

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasound has been utilized in the evaluation of compressive and traumatic peripheral nerve pathology. To determine whether US can provide comprehensive evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in the setting of neonatal brachial plexus palsy and whether this information can be used to guide preoperative nerve reconstruction strategies. In this retrospective cohort study, preoperative brachial plexus ultrasonography was performed in 52 children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy who were being considered for surgery. The 33 children who had surgery compose the patient cohort. The presence and location of post-ganglionic neuromas were evaluated by US and compared to the surgical findings. US evaluation of shoulder muscle atrophy was conducted as an indirect way to assess the integrity of nerves. Finally, we correlated glenohumeral joint laxity to surgical and clinical management. Ultrasound correctly identified 21 of 25 cases of upper trunk and middle trunk neuroma involvement (84% sensitivity for each). It was 68% sensitive and 40% specific in detection of lower trunk involvement. US identified shoulder muscle atrophy in 11 of 21 children evaluated; 8 of these 11 went on to nerve transfer procedures based upon the imaging findings. US identified 3 cases of shoulder joint laxity of the 13 children evaluated. All 3 cases were referred for orthopedic evaluation, with 1 child undergoing shoulder surgery and another requiring casting. Ultrasound can provide useful preoperative evaluation of the post-ganglionic brachial plexus in children with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

  3. Early glycemic control in critically ill patients with burn injury.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Claire V; Coffey, Rebecca; Cook, Charles H; Gerlach, Anthony T; Miller, Sidney F

    2011-01-01

    Glucose management in patients with burn injury is often difficult because of their hypermetabolic state with associated hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, and insulin resistance. Recent studies suggest that time to glycemic control is associated with improved outcomes. The authors sought to determine the influence of early glycemic control on the outcomes of critically ill patients with burn injury. A retrospective analysis was performed at the Ohio State University Medical Center. Patients hospitalized with burn injury were enrolled if they were admitted to the intensive care unit between March 1, 2006, and February 28, 2009. Early glycemic control was defined as the achievement of a mean daily blood glucose of ≤150 mg/dl for at least two consecutive days by postburn day 3. Forty-six patients made up the study cohort with 26 achieving early glycemic control and 20 who did not. The two groups were similar at baseline with regard to age, pre-existing diabetes, APACHE II score and burn size and depth. There were no differences in number of surgical interventions, infectious complications, or length of stay between patients who achieved or failed early glycemic control. Failure of early glycemic control was, however, associated with significantly higher mortality both by univariate (35.0 vs 7.7%, P = .03) and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio 6.754 [1.16-39.24], P = .03) adjusting for age, TBSA, and inhalation injury. Failure to achieve early glycemic control in patients with burn injury is associated with an increased risk of mortality. However, further prospective controlled trials are needed to establish causality of this association.

  4. The radio-radial nerve transfer for elbow extension restoration in C5 to C7 nerve root injury.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro Pretto

    2012-01-01

    Extension of the elbow is required to oppose gravity; however, activation of the triceps brachii is frequently underestimated during the surgical planning for brachial plexus injuries. This report aims to describe a novel technique of distal nerve transfer designed for elbow extension reconstruction in patients sustaining a C5-C7 nerve root injury. We report a patient sustaining a brachial plexus injury with triceps palsy and preserved finger extension motion; after careful intraneural dissection of the radial nerve, a fascicle innervating the extensor digitorum communis muscle was sectioned, derouted and connected to a motor branch to the lateral head of the triceps. Eleven months after surgery, elbow extension strength scored MRC M4. No deficits on finger extension were observed. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Patients with Spinal Cord Injuries Favor Administration of Methylprednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Rosenbluth, Jeffrey; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) for treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has been associated with both benefits and adverse events. MPSS administration was the standard of care for acute SCI until recently when its use has become controversial. Patients with SCI have had little input in the debate, thus we sought to learn their opinions regarding administration of MPSS. A summary of the published literature to date on MPSS use for acute SCI was created and adjudicated by 28 SCI experts. This summary was then emailed to 384 chronic SCI patients along with a survey that interrogated the patients’ neurological deficits, communication with physicians and their views on MPSS administration. 77 out of 384 patients completed the survey. 28 respondents indicated being able to speak early after injury and of these 24 reported arriving at the hospital within 8 hours of injury. One recalled a physician speaking to them about MPSS and one patient reported choosing whether or not to receive MPSS. 59.4% felt that the small neurological benefits associated with MPSS were ‘very important’ to them (p<0.0001). Patients had ‘little concern’ for potential side-effects of MPSS (p = 0.001). Only 1.4% felt that MPSS should not be given to SCI patients regardless of degree of injury (p<0.0001). This is the first study to report SCI patients’ preferences regarding MPSS treatment for acute SCI. Patients favor the administration of MPSS for acute SCI, however few had input into whether or not it was administered. Conscious patients should be given greater opportunity to decide their treatment. These results also provide some guidance regarding MPSS administration in patients unable to communicate. PMID:26789007

  6. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  7. Self-Injurious Behavior in Correctional and Noncorrectional Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillbrand, Marc

    1993-01-01

    Examined prevalence and selected correlates of self-injurious behavior (SIB) among inmates (n=23) referred for treatment to maximum-security forensic hospital, non-SIB inmates (n=23), and noncorrections SIB patients (n=30). Found two distinct patterns of SIB: pattern consistent with conceptualization of SIB as expression of generalized behavioral…

  8. Hemispheric Visual Attentional Imbalance in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlovskaya, Marina; Groswasser, Zeev; Keren, Ofer; Mordvinov, Eugene; Hochstein, Shaul

    2007-01-01

    We find a spatially asymmetric allocation of attention in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) despite the lack of obvious asymmetry in neurological indicators. Identification performance was measured for simple spatial patterns presented briefly to a locus 5 degrees into the left or right hemifield, after precuing attention to the same…

  9. Hemispheric Visual Attentional Imbalance in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlovskaya, Marina; Groswasser, Zeev; Keren, Ofer; Mordvinov, Eugene; Hochstein, Shaul

    2007-01-01

    We find a spatially asymmetric allocation of attention in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) despite the lack of obvious asymmetry in neurological indicators. Identification performance was measured for simple spatial patterns presented briefly to a locus 5 degrees into the left or right hemifield, after precuing attention to the same…

  10. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  11. Soft-tissue damage and segmental instability in adult patients with cervical spinal cord injury without major bone injury.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takeshi; Ueta, Takayoshi; Mori, Eiji; Yugue, Itaru; Kawano, Osamu; Takao, Tsuneaki; Sakai, Hiroaki; Okada, Seiji; Shiba, Keiichiro

    2012-12-01

    A retrospective imaging and clinical study. To evaluate the extraneural soft-tissue damage and its clinical relevance in patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) without major bone injury. To date, various kinds of cervical discoligamentous injuries have been demonstrated on magnetic resonance images in patients with SCI without bony injury. However, it has not been clear whether these magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities are actually related to spinal segmental instability and the patients' neurological status. Eighty-eight adult patients with acute traumatic cervical SCI without major bone injury were examined by flexion-extension lateral radiographs and magnetic resonance images within 2 days after trauma. We excluded patients with flexion recoil injury; therefore, most of the patients included were considered to have sustained a hyperextension injury. Instability of the injured cervical segment was defined when there was more than 3.5-mm posterior translation and/or more than a 11° difference in the intervertebral angle between the site of interest and adjacent segments. The neurological status was evaluated according to the American Spinal Injury Association motor score. On magnetic resonance images, the damage to the anterior longitudinal ligament and intervertebral disc were apparent in 44 and 37 patients, respectively. Various degrees of prevertebral fluid collection (prevertebral hyperintensity) were demonstrated in 76 patients. These magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities were significantly associated with initial cervical segmental instability as judged by flexion-extension radiographs. Interestingly, the American Spinal Injury Association motor score had a significant association with either magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities or segmental instability but not with the cervical canal diameter. A considerable proportion of the patients with traumatic cervical SCI without major bone injury were shown to have various types of

  12. [Indications for computed tomography in patients with mild head injuries].

    PubMed

    Boran, Burak O; Barut, Nehir; Akgün, Cem; Celikoğlu, Erhan; Bozbuğa, Mustafa

    2005-07-01

    To identify clinical parameters that may be associated with intracranial lesions in patients with mild head injuries, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores of 15 but without any focal neurological deficit. All head trauma patients admitted to the emergency room within 3 months with GCS scores of 15 (n = 371) were evaluated. Patients with focal neurological deficits, penetrating or multiple traumas, gun shot wounds were not evaluated. Mean age of 222 male and 149 female patients was 22.4 years. Frequency of intracranial lesions detected in CT was higher in patients older than 60 years of age. A significant difference was not found between both genders. Detection rate of abnormalities was higher after motorway accidents. Loss of consciousness and post-traumatic fits were associated with higher rates of pathological sequelae. A significant difference was not found between patients with or without headache, nausea, and vomiting. Sensitivity and specificity of cranial x-ray were estimated to be 38.2% and 93.2% when compared with cranial CT respectively. The incidence of intracranial lesions in patients with mild head injuries, GCS scores of 15, younger than 60 years of age, and without any focal neurological deficits, loss of consciousness, post-traumatic fits, gun shot wound, and penetrating injury is 0.6%.