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Sample records for plexus injury patient

  1. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Brachial Plexus Injuries Information Page Synonym(s): Erb's Palsy Table of Contents ( ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Brachial Plexus Injuries? The brachial plexus is a network of nerves ...

  2. Brachial Plexus Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the shoulder, arm, and hand. Brachial plexus injuries are caused by damage to those nerves. Symptoms ... sensation in the arm or hand Brachial plexus injuries can occur as a result of shoulder trauma, ...

  3. Diagnostic Value and Surgical Implications of the 3D DW-SSFP MRI On the Management of Patients with Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gang; Fu, Guo; Gu, Li-Qiang; Li, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Jia-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (3D DW-SSFP) of high-resolution magnetic resonance has emerged as a promising method to visualize the peripheral nerves. In this study, the application value of 3D DW-SSFP brachial plexus imaging in the diagnosis of brachial plexus injury (BPI) was investigated. 33 patients with BPI were prospectively examined using 3D DW-SSFP MR neurography (MRN) of brachial plexus. Results of 3D DW-SSFP MRN were compared with intraoperative findings and measurements of electromyogram (EMG) or somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for each injured nerve root. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus has enabled good visualization of the small components of the brachial plexus. The postganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 26 patients, while the preganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 22 patients. Pseudomeningoceles were commonly observed in 23 patients. Others finding of MRN of brachial plexus included spinal cord offset (in 16 patients) and spinal cord deformation (in 6 patients). As for the 3D DW-SSFP MRN diagnosis of preganglionic BPI, the sensitivity, the specificity and the accuracy were respectively 96.8%, 90.29%, and 94.18%. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus improve visualization of brachial plexus and benefit to determine the extent of injury. PMID:27782162

  4. Sensory disturbances and pain complaints after brachial plexus root injury: a prospective study involving 150 adult patients.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio; Loure Iro Chaves, Daniel Preissler

    2011-02-01

    After injury of the brachial plexus, sensory disturbance in the affected limb varies according to the extent of root involvement. The goal of this study was to match sensory assessments and pain complaints with findings on CT myelo scans and surgical observations. One hundred fifty patients with supraclavicular stretch injury of the brachial plexus were operated upon within an average of 5.4 months of trauma. Preoperatively, upper limb sensation was evaluated using Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments. Pain complaints were recorded for each patient. With lesions affecting the upper roots of the brachial plexus, hand sensation was largerly preserved. Sensory disturbances were identified over a longitudinal bundle on the lateral arm and forearm. In C8-T1 root injuries, diminished protective sensation was observed on the ulnar aspect of the hand. If the C7 root also was injured, sensation in the long finger was impaired. Eighty-four percent of our 64 patients with total palsy reported pain, versus just 47% of our 72 patients with upper type palsies. This rate dropped to 29% in the 14 patients with a lower-type palsy. C8 and T1, when injured, always were avulsed from the cord; when avulsion of these roots was the only nerve injury, pain was absent. Hand sensation was largely preserved in patients with partial injuries of the brachial plexus, particularly on the radial side. Even when T1 was the only preserved root, hand sensation was mostly spared. This indicates that overlapping of the dermatomal zones seems much more widespread than previously reported.

  5. Brachial plexus injury in newborns

    MedlinePlus

    ... palsy; Obstetrical brachial plexus palsy; Birth-related brachial plexus palsy; Neonatal brachial plexus palsy; NBPP ... The nerves of the brachial plexus can be affected during a ... may be caused by: The infant's head and neck pulling toward the ...

  6. Brachial plexus injuries in neonates: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Mason, David C; Ciervo, Carman A

    2009-02-01

    Neonates and infants with brachial plexus injuries are typically treated using splinting, range-of-motion exercise, and, in more severe cases, nerve reconstruction. However, myofascial release--a common osteopathic manipulative treatment technique that has been used to manage thoracic outlet syndrome in adults--may provide effective, noninvasive management of brachial plexus injuries in neonates and infants. While emphasizing the importance of good communication with parents of affected patients, the authors review brachial plexus anatomy, describe diagnostic examinations, and outline a comprehensive treatment strategy. PMID:19269939

  7. Injury mechanisms in supraclavicular stretch injuries of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Soldado, Francisco; Ghizoni, Marcos F; Bertelli, Jayme

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mechanisms involved in stretch injuries of the brachial plexus. One hundred and fifty consecutive patients with supraclavicular brachial plexus injuries (BPI) were asked about the mechanism of injury during the actual injury event, particularly about the type of trauma to their shoulder, shoulder girdle and head. Fifty-seven of the patients provided enough information about their accident to allow for analysis of the shoulder trauma. The injury mechanism for all patients having upper root or total palsy (n=46) was described as a direct vertical impact to the shoulder. In 44 of these patients, the trauma followed a motorcycle accident and, in most of them, the patient hit a fixed vertical structure before falling to the ground. The injury mechanism for the lower root palsy cases (n=11) was variable. The most frequent mechanism was forceful anterior shoulder compression by a car seat belt. We found that injury mechanisms differed significantly from the ones commonly discussed in published studies. PMID:27117025

  8. MUSCLE TRANSFER FROM TRICEPS TO BICEPS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC INJURY OF THE UPPER TRUNK OF THE BRACHIAL PLEXUS

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Fabiano Inúcio de; Saito, Mateus; Kimura, Luiz Koiti; Júnior, Rames Mattar; Zumiotti, Arnaldo Valdir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the results from transposition of the triceps for elbow flexion in patients with chronic and complete injury to the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Methods: This was a retrospective study, including only patients who had biceps grade 0 and triceps grade 5, who underwent anterior transfer of the triceps muscle, performed between 1998 and 2005. The affected side, sex, type of accident, strength of elbow flexion, complications and patient satisfaction were investigated in 11 cases. Results: 10 patients were male; the age range was from 24 to 49 years, with a mean of 33.7 years. The minimum time between injury and surgery was 21 months (range 21-74 months). The left side was affected in eight cases, and the right only in three. Good results were obtained in 10 patients, who acquired elbow flexion strength of grade 3 (two cases) and grade 4 (eight cases), while one evolved unfavorably with grade 2 strength. Two cases had complications (initial compartment syndrome and insufficient tensioning). All the patients said that they were satisfied with the procedure. Conclusion: Anterior transposition of the triceps muscle provided patient satisfaction in all cases except one, attaining strength grade 4 in eight cases, grade 3 in two cases and grade 2 in one case. PMID:27022572

  9. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies. PMID:27547727

  10. Reduced functional connectivity within the primary motor cortex of patients with brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Fraiman, D; Miranda, M F; Erthal, F; Buur, P F; Elschot, M; Souza, L; Rombouts, S A R B; Schimmelpenninck, C A; Norris, D G; Malessy, M J A; Galves, A; Vargas, C D

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at the effects of traumatic brachial plexus lesion with root avulsions (BPA) upon the organization of the primary motor cortex (M1). Nine right-handed patients with a right BPA in whom an intercostal to musculocutaneous (ICN-MC) nerve transfer was performed had post-operative resting state fMRI scanning. The analysis of empirical functional correlations between neighboring voxels revealed faster correlation decay as a function of distance in the M1 region corresponding to the arm in BPA patients as compared to the control group. No differences between the two groups were found in the face area. We also investigated whether such larger decay in patients could be attributed to a gray matter diminution in M1. Structural imaging analysis showed no difference in gray matter density between groups. Our findings suggest that the faster decay in neighboring functional correlations without significant gray matter diminution in BPA patients could be related to a reduced activity in intrinsic horizontal connections in M1 responsible for upper limb motor synergies.

  11. Effect of Co-Morbid Conditions on Persistent Neuropathic Pain after Brachial Plexus Injury in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudakshetrin, Pongparadee; Chotisukarat, Haruthai; Mandee, Sahatsa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Neuropathic pain (NeuP) associated with traumatic brachial plexus injury (BPI) can be severe, persistent, and resistant to treatment. Moreover, comorbidity associated with NeuP may worsen the pain and quality of life. This study compared persistent NeuP after BPI between patients with and without co-morbid conditions (psychiatric dysfunction and other painful conditions) and tramadol usage as a second-line agent in combination with an antiepileptic and/or antidepressant during a 2-year follow-up. Methods The medical records of patients diagnosed with BPI referred to a pain center between 2006 and 2010 were reviewed for 2 years retrospectively. Data regarding patient demographics, injury and surgical profiles, characteristics of NeuP and its severity, and treatment received were compared between patients with and without manifesting co-morbid conditions. The NeuP and pain intensity assessments were based on the DN4 questionnaire and a numerical rating scale, respectively. Results Of the 45 patients studied, 24 patients presented with one of the following co-morbid conditions: myofascial pain (21%), psychiatric disorder (17%), phantom limb pain (4%), complex regional pain syndrome (21%), and insomnia (37%). Tramadol was required by 20 patients with co-morbidity and, 9 patients without co-morbidity (p<0.001). The mean pain score after 2 years was higher in patients with co-morbidity than in those without co-morbidity (p<0.05). Conclusions Persistent pain following BPI was more common in patients manifesting other painful conditions or psychiatric co-morbidity. A higher proportion of the patients in the co-morbid group required tramadol as a second-line of agent for pain relief.

  12. Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery for Failed Serial Casting Patients With Elbow Flexion Contractures Following Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of surgical outcomes of biceps tendon lengthening (BTL) surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients with elbow flexion contractures, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Background: Serial casting and splinting have been shown to be effective in correcting elbow flexion contractures in OBPI. However, the possibilities of radial head dislocations and other complications have been reported in serial casting and splinting. Literature indicates surgical intervention when such nonoperative techniques and range-of-motion exercises fail. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the contractures of the affected elbow and improvement in arm length to more normal after BTL in these patients, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Methods and Patients: Ten OBPI patients (6 girls and 4 boys) with an average age of 11.2 years (4-17.7 years) had BTL surgery after unsuccessful serial casting. Results: Mean elbow flexion contracture was 40° before and 37° (average) after serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was reduced to 8° (0°-20°) post-BTL surgical procedure with an average follow-up of 11 months. This was 75% improvement and statistically significant (P < .001) when compared to 7% insignificant (P = .08) improvement after serial casting. Conclusion: These OBPI patients in our study had 75% significant reduction in elbow flexion contractures and achieved an improved and more normal length of the affected arm after the BTL surgery when compared to only 7% insignificant reduction and no improvement in arm length after serial casting. PMID:27648115

  13. Biceps Tendon Lengthening Surgery for Failed Serial Casting Patients With Elbow Flexion Contractures Following Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assessment of surgical outcomes of biceps tendon lengthening (BTL) surgery in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients with elbow flexion contractures, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Background: Serial casting and splinting have been shown to be effective in correcting elbow flexion contractures in OBPI. However, the possibilities of radial head dislocations and other complications have been reported in serial casting and splinting. Literature indicates surgical intervention when such nonoperative techniques and range-of-motion exercises fail. Here, we demonstrated a significant reduction of the contractures of the affected elbow and improvement in arm length to more normal after BTL in these patients, who had unsuccessful serial casting. Methods and Patients: Ten OBPI patients (6 girls and 4 boys) with an average age of 11.2 years (4-17.7 years) had BTL surgery after unsuccessful serial casting. Results: Mean elbow flexion contracture was 40° before and 37° (average) after serial casting. Mean elbow flexion contracture was reduced to 8° (0°-20°) post-BTL surgical procedure with an average follow-up of 11 months. This was 75% improvement and statistically significant (P < .001) when compared to 7% insignificant (P = .08) improvement after serial casting. Conclusion: These OBPI patients in our study had 75% significant reduction in elbow flexion contractures and achieved an improved and more normal length of the affected arm after the BTL surgery when compared to only 7% insignificant reduction and no improvement in arm length after serial casting.

  14. Bed wise cost analysis of in-patient treatment of brachial plexus injury at a Level I trauma Center in India

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nityanand; Gupta, Deepak; Mahapatra, Ashok; Harshvardhan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to calculate, in monetary terms, total cost incurred by a Level I trauma center in providing in-patient care to brachial plexus injury patients during their preoperative and the postoperative stay. Subjects and Methods: All patients of brachial plexus injury admitted and discharged between January and December 2010 were included in the study. Total cost per bed was calculated under several cost heads in pre- and post-operative ward care. Intra-operative costs were excluded. Results: A total of 69 patients were admitted in the year 2010. Of these 60 were operated and the rest were planned conservative management. The total cost incurred by the trauma center in providing in-patient care to patients admitted in the ward, excluding high dependency unit, came out to be Rs. 3,650.00/patient/bed/day. Of this Rs. 2,234.645, the maximum amount was incurred in providing manpower alone. The average preoperative wait was 12 days (maximum 41 days and minimum 1-day). The average postoperative stay was 2 days. Total cost incurred in the preoperative period was Rs. 2,975,125 (US$ 59392) or Rs. 43,117/patient (US$ 861). It was Rs. 386,948 (US$ 7724) in the postoperative period (Rs. 6,449 or US$ 129/patient). Nine patients were not operated and had waited from 2 to 12 days before finally being planned for observant treatment. This itself cost the hospital Rs. 226,328 (US$ 4518). Conclusion: By just reducing the preoperative length of stay to 1-day the cost can be brought down by 93% for brachial plexus injury patients alone and the beds can be used to admit more critical patients. PMID:25126124

  15. Axillary artery pseudoaneurysm resulting in brachial plexus injury in a patient taking new oral anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Monem, Mohammed; Iskandarani, Mohamad Khalid; Gokaraju, Kishan

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the case of an independent 80-year-old Caucasian woman, being treated with new oral anticoagulants for a previous deep vein thrombosis, who had fallen on her right shoulder. She made a delayed presentation to the emergency department with a wrist drop in her right dominant hand. She had right arm bruising with good distal pulses but had a global neurological deficit in the hand. Plain radiographs of the shoulder, humerus, elbow, forearm and wrist demonstrated no fractures. MRI showed a significant right axillary lesion distorting the surrounding soft tissues, including the brachial plexus, and CT with contrast confirmed this to be a large axillary pseudoaneurysm. This was treated with an endovascular stent resulting in slightly improved motor function, but the significant residual deficit required subsequent rehabilitation to improve right upper limb function. PMID:27535738

  16. Brachial Plexus Injury from CT-Guided RF Ablation Under General Anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar, Sridhar Sonnenberg, Eric van; Silverman, Stuart G.; Tuncali, Kemal; Flanagan, Hugh L.; Whang, Edward E.

    2005-06-15

    Brachial plexus injury in a patient under general anesthesia (GA) is not uncommon, despite careful positioning and, particularly, awareness of the possibility. The mechanism of injury is stretching and compression of the brachial plexus over a prolonged period. Positioning the patient within the computed tomography (CT) gantry for abdominal or chest procedures can simulate a surgical procedure, particularly when GA is used. The potential for brachial plexus injury is increased if the case is prolonged and the patient's arms are raised above the head to avoid CT image degradation from streak artifacts. We report a case of profound brachial plexus palsy following a CT-guided radiofrequency ablation procedure under GA. Fortunately, the patient recovered completely. We emphasize the mechanism of injury and detail measures to combat this problem, such that radiologists are aware of this potentially serious complication.

  17. Penile erectile dysfunction after brachial plexus root avulsion injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Guo; Qin, Bengang; Jiang, Li; Huang, Xijun; Lu, Qinsen; Zhang, Dechun; Liu, Xiaolin; Zhu, Jiakai; Zheng, Jianwen; Li, Xuejia; Gu, Liqiang

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that some male patients suffering from brachial plexus injury, particularly brachial plexus root avulsion, show erectile dysfunction to varying degrees. However, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated the erectile function after establishing brachial plexus root avulsion models with or without spinal cord injury in rats. After these models were established, we administered apomorphine (via a subcutaneous injection in the neck) to observe changes in erectile function. Rats subjected to simple brachial plexus root avulsion or those subjected to brachial plexus root avulsion combined with spinal cord injury had significantly fewer erections than those subjected to the sham operation. Expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase did not change in brachial plexus root avulsion rats. However, neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression was significantly decreased in brachial plexus root avulsion + spinal cord injury rats. These findings suggest that a decrease in neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression in the penis may play a role in erectile dysfunction caused by the combination of brachial plexus root avulsion and spinal cord injury. PMID:25422647

  18. Central Adaptation following Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Simon, Neil G; Franz, Colin K; Gupta, Nalin; Alden, Tord; Kliot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Brachial plexus trauma (BPT) often affects young patients and may result in lasting functional deficits. Standard care following BPT involves monitoring for clinical and electrophysiological evidence of muscle reinnervation, with surgical treatment decisions based on the presence or absence of spontaneous recovery. Data are emerging to suggest that central and peripheral adaptation may play a role in recovery following BPT. The present review highlights adaptive and maladaptive mechanisms of central and peripheral nervous system changes following BPT that may contribute to functional outcomes. Rehabilitation and other treatment strategies that harness or modulate these intrinsic adaptive mechanisms may improve functional outcomes following BPT. PMID:26409073

  19. Use of quantitative intra-operative electrodiagnosis during partial ulnar nerve transfer to restore elbow flexion: the treatment of eight patients following a brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, O; Sunagawa, T; Yokota, K; Nakashima, Y; Shinomiya, R; Nakanishi, K; Ochi, M

    2011-03-01

    The transfer of part of the ulnar nerve to the musculocutaneous nerve, first described by Oberlin, can restore flexion of the elbow following brachial plexus injury. In this study we evaluated the additional benefits and effectiveness of quantitative electrodiagnosis to select a donor fascicle. Eight patients who had undergone transfer of a simple fascicle of the ulnar nerve to the motor branch of the musculocutaneous nerve were evaluated. In two early patients electrodiagnosis had not been used. In the remaining six patients, however, all fascicles of the ulnar nerve were separated and electrodiagnosis was performed after stimulation with a commercially available electromyographic system. In these procedures, recording electrodes were placed in flexor carpi ulnaris and the first dorsal interosseous. A single fascicle in the flexor carpi ulnaris in which a high amplitude had been recorded was selected as a donor and transferred to the musculocutaneous nerve. In the two patients who had not undergone electrodiagnosis, the recovery of biceps proved insufficient for normal use. Conversely, in the six patients in whom quantitative electrodiagnosis was used, elbow flexion recovered to an M4 level. Quantitative intra-operative electrodiagnosis is an effective method of selecting a favourable donor fascicle during the Oberlin procedure. Moreover, fascicles showing a high-amplitude in reading flexor carpi ulnaris are donor nerves that can restore normal elbow flexion without intrinsic loss.

  20. Recent advances in the management of brachial plexus injuries

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Management of brachial plexus injury is a demanding field of hand and upper extremity surgery. With currently available microsurgical techniques, functional gains are rewarding in upper plexus injuries. However, treatment options in the management of flail and anaesthetic limb are still evolving. Last three decades have witnessed significant developments in the management of these injuries, which include a better understanding of the anatomy, advances in the diagnostic modalities, incorporation of intra-operative nerve stimulation techniques, more liberal use of nerve grafts in bridging nerve gaps, and the addition of new nerve transfers, which selectively neurotise the target muscles close to the motor end plates. Newer research works on the use of nerve allografts and immune modulators (FK 506) are under evaluation in further improving the results in nerve reconstruction. Direct reimplantation of avulsed spinal nerve roots into the spinal cord is another area of research in brachial plexus reconstruction. PMID:25190913

  1. Electroacupuncture attenuates neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenyu; Tang, Hailiang; Zhou, Junming; Gu, Yudong

    2014-07-15

    Electroacupuncture has traditionally been used to treat pain, but its effect on pain following brachial plexus injury is still unknown. In this study, rat models of an avulsion injury to the left brachial plexus root (associated with upper-limb chronic neuropathic pain) were given electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Quchi (LI11), Hegu (LI04), Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). After electroacupuncture therapy, chronic neuropathic pain in the rats' upper limbs was significantly attenuated. Immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression of β-endorphins in the arcuate nucleus was significantly increased after therapy. Thus, experimental findings indicate that electroacupuncture can attenuate neuropathic pain after brachial plexus injury through upregulating β-endorphin expression. PMID:25221593

  2. Cost analysis of brachial plexus injuries: variability of compensation by insurance companies before and after surgery.

    PubMed

    Felici, N; Zaami, S; Ciancolini, G; Marinelli, E; Tagliente, D; Cannatà, C

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic paralysis of the brachial plexus is an extremely disabling pathology. The type of trauma most frequently suffered by this group of patients is due to motorcycle injuries. It therefore affects a population of young patients. In the majority of cases, these patients receive compensation for permanent damage from insurance companies. Surgery of the brachial plexus enables various forms of functional recovery, depending on the number of roots of the brachial plexus involved in the injury. The aim of this study is to compare the functional deficit and the extent of the related compensation before and after surgical intervention, and to evaluate the saving in economic terms (understood as the cost of compensation paid by insurance companies) obtainable through surgical intervention. The authors analysed the functional recovery obtained through surgery in 134 patients divided into 4 groups on the basis of the number of injured roots. The levels of compensation payable to the patient before surgical intervention, and 3 years after, were then compared. The results showed that the saving obtainable through surgical treatment of brachial plexus injuries may exceed 65% of the economic value of the compensation that would have been attributable to the same patients if they had not undergone surgical treatment.

  3. Idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis after laparoscopic treatment of endometriosis: a complication that may mimic position-related brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Minas, Vasileios; Aust, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 37-year-old woman who developed idiopathic brachial plexus neuritis, also referred to as Parsonage-Turner syndrome, after laparoscopic excision of endometriosis. The differential diagnosis between this non-position-related neuritis and brachial plexus injury is discussed. The aim of this report was to raise awareness on this distressing postoperative complication. PMID:24183278

  4. [Surgical treatment of the plexus brachialis injury using long-lasting electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Tsymbaliuk, V I; Tretiak, I B; Tsymbaliuk, Iu V

    2013-06-01

    The results of surgical treatment were analyzed in 103 patients, suffering consequences of the plexus brachialis injury, using the system for long-lasting electrostimulation, called "Henci 3M". The system of a domestic manufacture is an individual one, permits to perform the direct electrostimulation seances in a home conditions several times a day for a long time. There were positive results noted: an enhancement in volume and strength of movements in upper extremity of various degree, restoration of sensitivity and disappearance or reduction of a pain syndrome intensity in 90.6% of patients. Long-lasting electrostimulation permits more effectively and valuably to restore a plexus brachialis function in its traumatic injury. PMID:23987034

  5. [Surgical treatment of the plexus brachialis injury using long-lasting electrostimulation].

    PubMed

    Tsymbaliuk, V I; Tretiak, I B; Tsymbaliuk, Iu V

    2013-06-01

    The results of surgical treatment were analyzed in 103 patients, suffering consequences of the plexus brachialis injury, using the system for long-lasting electrostimulation, called "Henci 3M". The system of a domestic manufacture is an individual one, permits to perform the direct electrostimulation seances in a home conditions several times a day for a long time. There were positive results noted: an enhancement in volume and strength of movements in upper extremity of various degree, restoration of sensitivity and disappearance or reduction of a pain syndrome intensity in 90.6% of patients. Long-lasting electrostimulation permits more effectively and valuably to restore a plexus brachialis function in its traumatic injury.

  6. Sensory Evaluation of the Hands in Children with Brachial Plexus Birth Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmgren, Tove; Peltonen, Jari; Linder, Tove; Rautakorpi, Sanna; Nietosvaara, Yrjana

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine sensory changes of the hand in brachial plexus birth injury (BPBI). Ninety-five patients (43 females, 52 males) comprising two age groups, 6 to 8 years (mean age 7y 6mo) and 12 to 14 years (mean age 13y 2mo), were included. Sixty-four had upper (cervical [C] 5-6), 19 upper and middle (C5-7), and 12 had total…

  7. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer. PMID:27144951

  8. Phrenic Nerve Transfer for Reconstruction of Elbow Extension in Severe Brachial Plexus Injuries.

    PubMed

    Flores, Leandro P; Socolovsky, Mariano

    2016-09-01

    Background Restoring elbow extension is an important objective to pursue when repairing the brachial plexus in patients with a flail arm. Based upon the good results obtained using the phrenic nerve to restore elbow flexion and shoulder stability, we hypothesized that this nerve could also be employed to reconstruct elbow extension in patients with severe brachial plexus injuries. Methods A retrospective study of 10 patients in which the phrenic nerve targeted the radial nerve (7 patients) or the branch to the long head of the triceps (3 patients) as a surgical strategy for reconstruction of the brachial plexus. Results The mean postoperative follow-up time was 34 months. At final follow-up, elbow extension graded as M4 was measured in three patients, Medical Research Council MRC M3 in five patients, and M2 in one patient, while one patient experienced no measurable recovery (M0). No patient complained or demonstrated any signs of respiratory insufficiency postoperatively. Conclusions The phrenic nerve is a reliable donor for reanimation of elbow extension in such cases, and the branch to the long head of the triceps should be considered as a better target for the nerve transfer.

  9. Does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries?

    PubMed

    Healey, Scott; O'Neill, Bridie; Bilal, Haris; Waterworth, Paul

    2013-07-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'does retraction of the sternum during median sternotomy result in brachial plexus injuries or peripheral neuropathies?' Altogether 58 papers were found using the reported search, of which 12 represented the best evidence to answer the question. The authors, date, journal and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers were tabulated. Caudal placement of the retractor or relieving the pressure superiorly by removing the upper blades of a retractor (P = 0.02) and use of a caudally placed symmetrical retractor has been shown to reduce neuropathy. Positioning of the patient with 'hands up' positioning showed significant reduction in the incidence of brachial plexus injuries. Furthermore, how wide the retractor is opened and use of an asymmetrical retractor for internal mammary artery (IMA) harvesting are also important factors in quantifying risk of postoperative neuropathy. Wider sternal retraction and longer bypass time did increase the risk of developing postoperative neuropathy. Three asymmetrical retractors were looked at that demonstrates the Delacroix-Chevalier to be the safest (P < 0.05). We conclude that median sternotomy risks brachial plexus injury and where possible the sternum should be opened as small a distance as possible with symmetrical retractor and using a caudally placed retractor.

  10. Electrodiagnosis in traumatic brachial plexus injury.

    PubMed

    Mansukhani, K A

    2013-01-01

    Electrodiagnosis (EDX) is a useful test to accurately localize the site, determine the extent, identify the predominant pathophysiology, and objectively quantify the severity of brachial plexopathies. It can also be used to examine muscles not easily assessed clinically and recognize minimal defects. Post-operatively and on follow up studies, it is important for early detection of re-innervation. It can be used intra-operatively to assess conduction across a neuroma, which would help the surgeon to decide further course of action. Localization of the site of the lesion can be very challenging as there may be multiple sites of involvement and hence the electroneuromyographic evaluation must be adequate. The unaffected limb also needs to be examined for comparison. The final impression must be co-related with the type and severity of injury.

  11. The Impact of Pediatric Brachial Plexus Injury on Families

    PubMed Central

    Allgier, Allison; Overton, Myra; Welge, Jeffrey; Mehlman, Charles T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact on families of children with brachial plexus injuries in order to best meet their clinical and social needs. Methods Our cross-sectional study included families with children between the ages of 1 and 18 with birth or non-neonatal brachial plexus injuries (BPI). The consenting parent or guardian completed a demographic questionnaire and the validated Impact on Family Scale during a single assessment. Total scores can range from 0-100, with the higher the score indicating a higher impact on the family. Factor analysis and item-total correlations were used to examine structure, individual items, and dimensions of family impact. Results One hundred two caregivers participated. Overall, families perceived various dimensions of impact on having a child with a BPI. Total family impact was 43. The 2 individual items correlating most strongly with the overall total score were from the financial dimension of the Impact on Family Scale. The strongest demographic relationship was traveling nationally for care and treatment of the BPI. Severity of injury was marginally correlated with impact on the family. Parent-child agreement about the severity of the illness was relatively high. Conclusion Caretakers of children with a BPI perceived impact on their families in the form of personal strain, family/social factors, financial stress, and mastery. A multidisciplinary clinical care team should address the various realms of impact on family throughout the course of treatment. Level of Evidence II Prognostic PMID:25936738

  12. Outcome following spinal accessory to suprascapular (spinoscapular) nerve transfer in infants with brachial plexus birth injuries.

    PubMed

    Ruchelsman, David E; Ramos, Lorna E; Alfonso, Israel; Price, Andrew E; Grossman, Agatha; Grossman, John A I

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the value of distal spinal accessory nerve (SAN) transfer to the suprascapular nerve (SSN) in children with brachial plexus birth injuries in order to better define the application and outcome of this transfer in these infants. Over a 3-year period, 34 infants with brachial plexus injuries underwent transfer of the SAN to the SSN as part of the primary surgical reconstruction. Twenty-five patients (direct repair, n = 20; interposition graft, n = 5) achieved a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Fourteen children underwent plexus reconstruction with SAN-to-SSN transfer at less than 9 months of age, and 11 underwent surgical reconstruction at the age of 9 months or older. Mean age at the time of nerve transfer was 11.6 months (range, 5-30 months). At latest follow-up, active shoulder external rotation was measured in the arm abducted position and confirmed by review of videos. The Gilbert and Miami shoulder classification scores were utilized to report shoulder-specific functional outcomes. The effects of patient age at the time of nerve transfer and the use of interpositional nerve graft were analyzed. Overall mean active external rotation measured 69.6°; mean Gilbert score was 4.1 and the mean Miami score was 7.1, corresponding to overall good shoulder functional outcomes. Similar clinical and shoulder-specific functional outcomes were obtained in patients undergoing early (<9 months of age, n = 14) and late (>9 months of age, n = 11) SAN-to-SSN transfer and primary plexus reconstruction. Nine patients (27%) were lost to follow-up and are not included in the analysis. Optimum results were achieved following direct transfer (n = 20). Results following the use of an interpositional graft (n = 5) were rated satisfactory. No patient required a secondary shoulder procedure during the study period. There were no postoperative complications. Distal SAN-to-SSN (spinoscapular) nerve transfer is a reliable

  13. Brachial plexus injury with emphasis on axillary nerve paralysis after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Chon, Soon-Ho; Suk Choi, Matthew Seung

    2006-12-01

    Thoracic sympathicotomy for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis with the use of 2 mm thoracoscope and instruments is a simple and safe procedure. Nerve paralysis of any type after thoracic sympathicotomy is an extremely rare event. We report a 44-year-old woman who developed brachial plexus injury of her left arm after thoracoscopic sympathicotomy for axillary hyperhidrosis. The lesion involved the whole arm. All nerves of the brachial plexus except the axillary nerve recovered quickly. An axillary nerve type lesion was observed for 7 weeks, until the patient fully recovered all functions of her arm. The mechanism is believed not to be caused by the procedure itself, but by dorsal overextension of the abducted arm during the operation. PMID:17277662

  14. Occult rib fractures and brachial plexus injury following median sternotomy for open-heart operations.

    PubMed

    Baisden, C E; Greenwald, L V; Symbas, P N

    1984-09-01

    The incidence and the sites of rib fractures during open-heart operations through a median sternotomy incision were studied in 36 consecutive patients divided into two groups. In Group 1 (24 patients), a conventional Ankeney retractor was used to expose the heart, and in Group 2 (12 patients), a similar retractor was used but with its uppermost pair of blades removed. Thorough physical examinations and preoperative and postoperative chest roentgenograms were obtained, and postoperative bone scans were done in all patients. No rib fractures were detected on the routine chest roentgenograms in patients in either group. Bone scans, however, showed 44 rib fractures (15 of the first rib, 13 of the second rib, 4 of the third rib, 6 of the fourth rib, 3 of the fifth rib, and 3 of the sixth rib) in 16 patients in Group 1. Six patients in Group 2 had 9 rib fractures (2 of the first rib, 4 of the second rib, and 1 each of the third, fifth, and sixth ribs). None of the patients in Group 2 had brachial plexus injury and neither of the first rib fractures in this group were located posteriorly, whereas 3 patients in Group 1 had both brachial plexus injury and posterior first rib fractures.

  15. Restoration and protection of brachial plexus injury: hot topics in the last decade

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kaizhi; Lv, Zheng; Liu, Jun; Zhu, He; Li, Rui

    2014-01-01

    Brachial plexus injury is frequently induced by injuries, accidents or birth trauma. Upper limb function may be partially or totally lost after injury, or left permanently disabled. With the development of various medical technologies, different types of interventions are used, but their effectiveness is wide ranging. Many repair methods have phasic characteristics, i.e., repairs are done in different phases. This study explored research progress and hot topic methods for protection after brachial plexus injury, by analyzing 1,797 articles concerning the repair of brachial plexus injuries, published between 2004 and 2013 and indexed by the Science Citation Index database. Results revealed that there are many methods used to repair brachial plexus injury, and their effects are varied. Intervention methods include nerve transfer surgery, electrical stimulation, cell transplantation, neurotrophic factor therapy and drug treatment. Therapeutic methods in this field change according to the hot topic of research. PMID:25374596

  16. Changes in Spinal Cord Architecture after Brachial Plexus Injury in the Newborn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korak, Klaus J.; Tam, Siu Lin; Gordon, Tessa; Frey, Manfred; Aszmann, Oskar C.

    2004-01-01

    Obstetric brachial plexus palsy is a devastating birth injury. While many children recover spontaneously, 20-25% are left with a permanent impairment of the affected limb. So far, concepts of pathology and recovery have focused on the injury of the peripheral nerve. Proximal nerve injury at birth, however, leads to massive injury-induced…

  17. Nerve Transfers in Birth Related Brachial Plexus Injuries: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed

    Davidge, Kristen M; Clarke, Howard M; Borschel, Gregory H

    2016-05-01

    This article reviews the assessment and management of obstetrical brachial plexus palsy. The potential role of distal nerve transfers in the treatment of infants with Erb's palsy is discussed. Current evidence for motor outcomes after traditional reconstruction via interpositional nerve grafting and extraplexal nerve transfers is reviewed and compared with the recent literature on intraplexal distal nerve transfers in obstetrical brachial plexus injury. PMID:27094890

  18. Extended Long-Term (5 Years) Outcomes of Triangle Tilt Surgery in Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the "extended" long-term (5 years) functional outcomes in obstetric brachial plexus injury (OBPI) patients, who underwent triangle tilt surgery between February 2005 and January 2008. Methods: Twenty two children (9 girls and 13 boys, mean age at surgery was 5.8 years; ranging 2.1-11.8 years old), who initially presented with medial rotation contracture and scapula deformity secondary to obstetric brachial plexus injury were included in this study. Functional movements were evaluated pre-operatively, and 5 years following triangle tilt surgery by modified Mallet scale. Results: Here, we report long-term (5 years) follow-up of triangle tilt surgery for 22 OBPI patients. Upper extremity functional movements such as, external rotation (2.5±0.6 to 4.1±0.8, p<0.0001), hand-to-spine (2.6±0.6 to 3.4±1.1, p<0.005), hand-to-neck (2.7±0.7 to 4.3±0.7, p<0.0001), hand-to-mouth (2.3±0.9 (92º±33) to 4.2±0.5 (21º±16), p<0.0001), and supination (2.6±1.1 (-8.2º ±51) to 4.1±0.7 (61±32)) were significantly improved (p<0.0001), and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years). Total modified Mallet functional score was also shown to improve from 14.1±2.7 to 20.3±2.5. Conclusions: The triangle tilt surgery improved all shoulder functions significantly, and maintained over the extended long-term (5 years) in these patients. PMID:23730369

  19. Brachial plexus injury management in military casualties: who, what, when, why, and how.

    PubMed

    Chambers, James A; Hiles, Claire L; Keene, Brian P

    2014-06-01

    The Global War on Terrorism has achieved an unprecedented 90% casualty survival rate because of far forward surgical support, rapid transport, and body armor. Despite the remarkable protection body armor affords, peripheral nerve injuries continue to occur. The brachial plexus in particular is still susceptible to penetrating trauma through the axilla as well as blunt mechanisms. We report 1,818 individuals with reported cases of peripheral nerve injury, 97 of which had brachial plexus injury incident from Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom. We suspect that true prevalence is higher as initial focus on vascular and orthopedic reconstruction in complex shoulder injuries may overlook brachial plexus lesions. Accordingly, emergency physicians, general and orthopedic trauma surgeons, and vascular surgeons should all consider the possibility of brachial plexus and other peripheral nerve injury for early and appropriate referral to surgeons (plastic, orthopedic, or neurosurgical) for further evaluation and reconstruction. The latter group should be familiar with appropriate modern diagnostic and initial as well as salvage therapeutic options.

  20. Hand Function in Children with an Upper Brachial Plexus Birth Injury: Results of the Nine-Hole Peg Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Immerman, Igor; Alfonso, Daniel T.; Ramos, Lorna E.; Grossman, Leslie A.; Alfonso, Israel; Ditaranto, Patricia; Grossman, John A. I.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate hand function in children with Erb upper brachial plexus palsy. Method: Hand function was evaluated in 25 children (eight males; 17 females) with a diagnosed upper (C5/C6) brachial plexus birth injury. Of these children, 22 had undergone primary nerve reconstruction and 13 of the 25 had undergone…

  1. Balance Impairments after Brachial Plexus Injury as Assessed through Clinical and Posturographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Lidiane; Lemos, Thiago; Silva, Débora C.; de Oliveira, José M.; Guedes Corrêa, José F.; Tavares, Paulo L.; Oliveira, Laura A.; Rodrigues, Erika C.; Vargas, Claudia D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether a sensorimotor deficit of the upper limb following a brachial plexus injury (BPI) affects the upright balance. Design: Eleven patients with a unilateral BPI and 11 healthy subjects were recruited. The balance assessment included the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), the number of feet touches on the ground while performing a 60 s single-leg stance and posturographic assessment (eyes open and feet placed hip-width apart during a single 60 s trial). The body weight distribution (BWD) between the legs was estimated from the center of pressure (COP) lateral position. The COP variability was quantified in the anterior-posterior and lateral directions. Results: BPI patients presented lower BBS scores (p = 0.048) and a higher frequency of feet touches during the single-leg stance (p = 0.042) compared with those of the healthy subjects. An asymmetric BWD toward the side opposite the affected arm was shown by 73% of BPI patients. Finally, higher COP variability was observed in BPI patients compared with healthy subjects for anterior-posterior (p = 0.020), but not for lateral direction (p = 0.818). Conclusions: This study demonstrates that upper limb sensorimotor deficits following BPI affect body balance, serving as a warning for the clinical community about the need to prevent and treat the secondary outcomes of this condition. PMID:26834610

  2. Patient Injuries?

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    An injured patient may be the last thing dentists want to think about. However, in reality, patients can be injured during dental treatment or as the result of an incident such as a slip and fall in the office. Treatment-related injuries can run the gamut and include burns, lacerations, swallowed objects and allergic reactions, according to The Dentists Insurance Company.

  3. Assessment of variation in depth of brachial plexus using ultrasound for supraclavicular brachial plexus block in patients undergoing elective upper limb surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mistry, Tuhin; Mangal, Vandana; Sharma, Gaurav; Agrawal, Aachu

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Supraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus may be associated with complications such as pneumothorax, inadvertent vascular puncture, inter-scalene block and neurovascular injuries. The present study was conceived to find out the variation in depth of brachial plexus to suggest the minimum length of needle required to effectively perform the block, thus preventing possible complications. Methods: After approval from our Institutional Ethical Committee, informed and written consent was obtained from each of the ninety American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II patients recruited, of either sex in the age group of 20–50 years. Supraclavicular fossa was scanned using a high-frequency linear probe, and the distances (shortest distance [SD] from skin to the most superficial neural element and longest distance [LD] from skin to the most deep neural element) were measured using on-screen callipers on optimal frozen image. Pearson correlation was used to find out the relation between these two distances and demographic parameters. Results: Mean SD was 0.60 ± 0.262 cm, and mean LD was found to be 1.34 ± 0.385 cm. We observed significant correlation between these two distances with weight and body mass index (BMI). Conclusion: Significant correlation was observed between SD and LD with weight and BMI. We suggest that a needle with a shaft length of 3 cm will be sufficient to reach the sheath of the brachial plexus during performance of the block. PMID:27330200

  4. Percutaneous t2 and t3 radiofrequency sympathectomy for complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury: a case series.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chee Kean; Phui, Vui Eng; Nizar, Abd Jalil; Yeo, Sow Nam

    2013-10-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury is often severe, debilitating and difficult to manage. Percuteneous radiofrequency sympathectomy is a relatively new technique, which has shown promising results in various chronic pain disorders. We present four consecutive patients with complex regional pain syndrome secondary to brachial plexus injury for more than 6 months duration, who had undergone percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy after a diagnostic block. All four patients experienced minimal pain relief with conservative treatment and stellate ganglion blockade. An acceptable 6 month pain relief was achieved in all 4 patients where pain score remained less than 50% than that of initial score and all oral analgesics were able to be tapered down. There were no complications attributed to this procedure were reported. From this case series, percutaneous T2 and T3 radiofrequency sympathectomy might play a significant role in multi-modal approach of CRPS management.

  5. Arthroscopic Release of Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder Complicated With Shoulder Dislocation and Brachial Plexus Injury.

    PubMed

    Nunez, Fiesky A; Papadonikolakis, Anastasios; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of brachial plexus injury after shoulder dislocation or arthroscopic shoulder surgery is low. Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is an uncommon but painful condition that can develop after nerve injury. Historically, CRPS has been difficult to treat and therapeutic efforts are sometimes limited to ameliorating symptoms. However, if a dystrophic focus can be identified, the condition can be addressed with surgical exploration for potential neurolysis or nerve repair. The present article reports on a case of type II CRPS that developed in the postoperative setting of arthroscopic shoulder surgery complicated with simple shoulder dislocation. PMID:27518297

  6. Brachial plexus (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that originate from the neck region and branch off to give rise ... movement in the upper limb. Injuries to the brachial plexus are common and can be debilitating. If the ...

  7. Therapeutic application of electrical stimulation and constraint induced movement therapy in perinatal brachial plexus injury: A case report.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Jamie; Baker, Lucinda L

    2015-01-01

    Infants and children with perinatal brachial plexus injury (PBPI) have motion limitations in the shoulder, elbow, forearm and hand that are dependent on the level of injury and degree of recovery. The injury and subsequent recovery period occur during critical periods of central and spinal neural development placing infants and children at-risk for developmental disregard and disuse of the affected arm and hand. A case report outlines the therapy and surgical interventions provided in the first 2 years of life for a child with global PBPI and a positive Horner's sign. Electrical stimulation and constraint induced movement therapy provided sequentially were effective therapy interventions. Neurosurgery to repair the brachial plexus was performed at an optimal time period.(2) The Assisting Hand Assessment,(12) Modified Mallet(13) and Active Movement Scale(14) are effective outcome measures in PBPI and served as valuable guides for therapy intervention. Oxford Level of Evidence: 3b; Individual Case Control Study.

  8. MICROSURGICAL TRANSFER OF THE GRACILIS MUSCLE FOR ELBOW FLEXION IN BRACHIAL PLEXUS INJURY IN ADULTS: RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF EIGHT CASES

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Luiz Koiti; do Nascimento, Alexandre Tadeu; Capócio, Roberto; Mattar, Rames; Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Wei, Teng Hsiang; Torres, Luciano Ruiz; Moya, Fernando Munhoz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treating brachial plexus injuries is a major challenge, especially lesions that are presented late, with more than 12 months of evolution. We retrospectively analyzed patients who underwent one of the possibilities for attempting to restore the function of upper limbs affected under such conditions: microsurgical transfer of the gracilis muscle for elbow flexion. Methods: Eight patients were included, divided into two groups: one in which the procedure consisted of neurorrhaphy of the muscle flap with sural nerve grafting and anastomosis more distally; and the other, in which the neurorrhaphy was performed directly on the spinal accessory nerve, with anastomosis in thoracoacromial vessels. Results: We found a significant difference between the groups. A greater number of satisfactory results (75% M4) were found among patients who underwent direct neurorrhaphy, whereas the procedure using grafts for neurorrhaphy was less successful (25% M4). Conclusion: Patients who underwent microsurgical functional transfer of the gracilis muscle in which vascular anastomoses were performed in thoracoacromial vessels presented better functional outcomes than shown by those whose anastomoses were in the brachial artery with subsequent use of a nerve graft. PMID:27027050

  9. Choroid Plexus

    MedlinePlus

    ... spread widely via the cerebrospinal fluid. Choroid plexus papilloma is a rare, benign (noncancerous) tumor. Choroid plexus ... the malignant (cancerous) form of the choroid plexus papilloma. Choroid plexus carcinoma occurs primarily in children. Location ...

  10. Post-operative brachial plexus neuropraxia: A less recognised complication of combined plastic and laparoscopic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Jimmy

    2014-01-01

    This presentation is to increase awareness of the potential for brachial plexus injury during prolonged combined plastic surgery procedures. A case of brachial plexus neuropraxia in a 26-year-old obese patient following a prolonged combined plastic surgery procedure was encountered. Nerve palsy due to faulty positioning on the operating table is commonly seen over the elbow and popliteal fossa. However, injury to the brachial plexus has been a recently reported phenomenon due to the increasing number of laparoscopic and robotic procedures. Brachial plexus injury needs to be recognised as a potential complication of prolonged combined plastic surgery. Preventive measures are discussed. PMID:25593443

  11. Cellular reactions of the choroid plexus induced by peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Klusáková, Ilona; Solár, Peter; Kuklová, Adéla; Dubový, Petr

    2016-08-15

    The choroid plexus (CP) of brain ventricles forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid (blood-CSF) barrier that is involved in many diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS). We used ED1 and ED2 immunostaining to investigate epiplexus cell changes in rat CP after chronic constriction injury (CCI). In contrast to naïve CP, the CP of sham-operated rats showed an increase in the number of ED1+ cells of a similar magnitude during all periods of survival up to 3 weeks, while the number of ED2+ increased only at 3 days from operation. In comparison to naïve and sham-operated animals, the number of ED1+ and ED2+ cells in the epiplexus position increased with the duration of nerve compression. We detected no or negligible cell proliferation in the CP after sham- or CCI-operation. This suggests that increased number of ED1+ and ED2+ cells in the epiplexus position of the CP is derived from peripheral monocytes passing through altered blood-CSF barrier. The changes in epiplexus cells indicate that the CP reacts to tissue injury after the surgical approach itself and that the response to peripheral nerve lesion is greater. This suggests a role for an altered blood-CSF barrier allowing for propagation of signal molecules from damaged tissue and nerve to the CNS. PMID:27291457

  12. Knee megaprosthesis: a salvage solution for severe open and complex distal femoral fracture associated with an ipsilateral brachial plexus injury (a case report with literature review).

    PubMed

    Ennaciri, Badr; Vasile, Christian; Lebredonchel, Thierry; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; Montbarbon, Eric; Beaudouin, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Complex distal femoral fractures in the young patient often occur as a result of high velocity trauma. Timely recognition and treatment is everything in such a situation, and it needs a robust staged management pathway to optimize the chance of limb preservation. We report a case of a motorcyclist admitted to the department of orthopedics at Chambery hospital, France, with a complex comminuted and open distal femoral fracture of the left leg, associated with a brachial plexus injury to the ipsilateral upper limb. On arrival to the emergency department, damage control stabilization and surgery was commenced, debridement of contaminated non-viable tissue, abundant antiseptic lavage and application of external fixation coupled with the use of antibiotic spacer. Following normalization of inflammatory markers and ensuring no clinical signs of infection, subsequent management consisted of joint reconstruction to achieve a functional knee. The external fixator and femoral spacer was removed and a modular megaprosthesis was implanted with a lateral gastrocnemius flap to cover the exposed knee joint and reinforce the extensor apparatus. Nerve graft to the left brachial plexus injury was performed at University Hospital of Grenoble. Our patient entered an intensive rehabilitation program and at 1 year follow-up achieved good knee function and sensation to the left upper limb. PMID:26421102

  13. Bilateral brachial plexus blocks in a patient of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy with hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Pai, Rohini V Bhat; Hegde, Harihar V; Santhosh, McB; Roopa, S; Deshpande, Shrinivas S; Rao, P Raghavendra

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) is a challenge to anesthesiologists due to the complex pathophysiology involved and various perioperative complications associated with it. We present a 50-year-old man, a known case of HOCM, who successfully underwent emergency haemostasis, and debridement of the traumatically amputated right upper limb and the contused lacerated wound on the left forearm under bilateral brachial plexus blocks. His co-morbidities included hypertension (in hypertensive crisis) and diabetes mellitus. He was full stomach and also had an anticipated difficult airway. The management included invasive pressure monitoring and labetalol infusion for emergent control of blood pressure. The regional anaesthesia technique required careful consideration to the dosage of local anaesthetics and staggered performance of brachial plexus blocks on each of the upper limbs to avoid local anaesthetic toxicity. Even though bilateral brachial plexus blocks are rarely indicated, it seemed to be the most appropriate anaesthetic technique in our patient. With careful consideration of the local anaesthetic toxicity and meticulous technique, bilateral brachial plexus blocks can be successfully performed in those patients where general anaesthesia is deemed to be associated with higher risk.

  14. A Novel Approach to Brachial Plexus Catheter Management: A Brachial Plexus Test Dose for Phrenic Nerve Paralysis and Patient-Controlled, Demand-Only Dosing for a Patient With Extreme Obesity.

    PubMed

    Meier, Adam W; Lin, Shin-E; Hanson, Neil A; Auyong, David B

    2016-09-15

    A 53-year-old woman with extreme obesity (body mass index = 82 kg/m) presented for an open reduction and internal fixation of the proximal humerus. This report describes the novel management of her continuous brachial plexus catheter in the setting of her comorbidities. Phrenic nerve paralysis from brachial plexus blocks can cause clinically significant dyspnea in obese patients. Brachial plexus catheters can be used effectively for these patients with some modification to routine management. We detail our use of a short-acting chloroprocaine test dose for phrenic paralysis and demand-only dosing to provide effective analgesia while avoiding respiratory complications associated with these blocks. PMID:27464944

  15. Use of contralateral spinal accessory nerve for ipsilateral suprascapular neurotization in global brachial plexus injury: a new technique.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Deb, Prabal

    2016-01-01

    Nerve transfer between the spinal accessory nerve (SAN) and the suprascapular nerve (SSN) is a standard technique in shoulder reanimation. In cases of global brachial plexus injury, donor nerves are few and at times severely traumatized owing to extensive traction forces. This precludes the application of standard nerve transfer techniques. The authors offer the use of the contralateral SAN as an additional option in the reinnervation of an injured SSN in such circumstances. To the best of their knowledge, this is the first successful attempt of this technique to be reported in the literature.

  16. Clinical aspects of patients with traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus following surgical treatment☆

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Frederico Barra; Kwae, Mário Yoshihide; da Silva, Ricardo Pereira; Porto, Celmo Celeno; Magalhães, Daniel de Paiva; Paulino, Matheus Veloso

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate sociodemographic and clinical aspects of patients undergoing operations due to traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus. Method This was a retrospective study in which the medical files of a convenience sample of 48 patients operated between 2000 and 2010 were reviewed. The following were evaluated: (1) range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand, in degrees; (2) grade of strength of the shoulder, elbow and wrist/hand; (3) sensitivity; and (4) visual analogue scale (VAS) (from 0 to 10). The Student's t, chi-square, Friedman, Wilcoxon and Kruskal–Wallis tests were used (p < 0.05). Results The patients’ mean age was 30.6 years; 60.4% of them had suffered motorcycle accidents and 52.1%, multiple trauma. The mean length of time until surgery was 8.7 months (range: 2–48). Thirty-one patients (64.6%) presented complete rupture of the plexus. The frequent operation was neurosurgery in 39 cases (81.3%). The ROM achieved was ≥30° in 20 patients (41.6%), with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 73° (p = 0.001). Thirteen (27.1%) already had shoulder strength ≥M3 (p = 0.001). Twenty-seven patients (56.2%) had elbow flexion ≥80°, with a range from 30° to 160° and mean of 80.6° (p < 0.001). Twenty-two had strength ≥M3 (p < 0.001). Twenty-two patients (45.8%) had wrist extension ≥30° starting from flexion of 45°, with a range from 30° to 90° and mean of 70° (p = 0.003). Twenty-seven (56.3%) presented wrist/hand extension strength ≥M3 (p = 0.002). Forty-five (93.8%) had hypoesthesia and three (6.2%) had anesthesia (p = 0.006). The initial VAS was 4.5 (range: 1.0–9.0) and the final VAS was 3.0 (range: 1.0–7.0) (p < 0.001). Conclusion Traumatic lesions of the brachial plexus were more prevalent among young adults (21–40 years), men, people living in urban areas, manual workers and motorcycle accidents, with multiple trauma and total rupture of the plexus. Neurosurgery, with a second

  17. Sustained choroid plexus function in human elderly and Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Spector, Reynold; Johanson, Conrad E

    2013-09-24

    We and other investigators have postulated deterioration of essential choroid plexus (CP) functions in some elderly and especially Alzheimer's disease patients based on apparent anatomical, histological and pathological changes in CP. We have termed this putative phenomenon CP failure. By focusing on four essential energy-requiring CP functions, specifically ascorbic acid (AA) and folate transport from blood into CSF, transthyretin synthesis and secretion into CSF, and electrolyte/acid-base balance in CSF, we were able to evaluate the hypothesis of CP failure by reviewing definitive human data. In both healthy elderly and Alzheimer's disease patients, the CP functions normally to transport AA and folates actively from blood into CSF, synthesize and secrete transthyretin into CSF, and maintain CSF acid-base balance and ion concentrations. These human CSF compositional data provide no support for the notion of CP failure in elderly humans and Alzheimer's disease patients.

  18. Neurotization of free gracilis transfer with the brachialis branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion in lower trunk brachial plexus injury: an anatomical study and case report

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Zou, Xue-jun; Fu, Guo; Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Li, Xiang-Ming; Hou, Yi; Qi, Jian; Li, Ping; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Gu, Li-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the feasibility of using free gracilis muscle transfer along with the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion in lower trunk brachial plexus injury according to an anatomical study and a case report. METHODS: Thirty formalin-fixed upper extremities from 15 adult cadavers were used in this study. The distance from the point at which the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve originates to the midpoint of the humeral condylar was measured, as well as the length, diameter, course and branch type of the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve. An 18-year-old male who sustained an injury to the left brachial plexus underwent free gracilis transfer using the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve as the donor nerve to restore finger and thumb flexion. Elbow flexion power and hand grip strength were recorded according to British Medical Research Council standards. Postoperative measures of the total active motion of the fingers were obtained monthly. RESULTS: The mean length and diameter of the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve were 52.66±6.45 and 1.39±0.09 mm, respectively, and three branching types were observed. For the patient, the first gracilis contraction occurred during the 4th month. A noticeable improvement was observed in digit flexion one year later; the muscle power was M4, and the total active motion of the fingers was 209°. CONCLUSIONS: Repairing injury to the lower trunk of the brachial plexus by transferring the brachialis muscle branch of the musculocutaneous nerve to the anterior branch of the obturator nerve using a tension-free direct suture is technically feasible, and the clinical outcome was satisfactory in a single surgical patient. PMID:27166768

  19. Esophageal Cancer Related Gene-4 Is a Choroid Plexus-Derived Injury Response Gene: Evidence for a Biphasic Response in Early and Late Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Podvin, Sonia; Gonzalez, Ana-Maria; Miller, Miles C.; Dang, Xitong; Botfield, Hannah; Donahue, John E.; Kurabi, Arwa; Boissaud-Cooke, Matthew; Rossi, Ryan; Leadbeater, Wendy E.; Johanson, Conrad E.; Coimbra, Raul; Stopa, Edward G.; Eliceiri, Brian P.; Baird, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    By virtue of its ability to regulate the composition of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the choroid plexus (CP) is ideally suited to instigate a rapid response to traumatic brain injury (TBI) by producing growth regulatory proteins. For example, Esophageal Cancer Related Gene-4 (Ecrg4) is a tumor suppressor gene that encodes a hormone-like peptide called augurin that is present in large concentrations in CP epithelia (CPe). Because augurin is thought to regulate senescence, neuroprogenitor cell growth and differentiation in the CNS, we evaluated the kinetics of Ecrg4 expression and augurin immunoreactivity in CPe after CNS injury. Adult rats were injured with a penetrating cortical lesion and alterations in augurin immunoreactivity were examined by immunohistochemistry. Ecrg4 gene expression was characterized by in situ hybridization. Cell surface augurin was identified histologically by confocal microscopy and biochemically by sub-cellular fractionation. Both Ecrg4 gene expression and augurin protein levels were decreased 24–72 hrs post-injury but restored to uninjured levels by day 7 post-injury. Protein staining in the supraoptic nucleus of the hypothalamus, used as a control brain region, did not show a decrease of auguin immunoreactivity. Ecrg4 gene expression localized to CPe cells, and augurin protein to the CPe ventricular face. Extracellular cell surface tethering of 14 kDa augurin was confirmed by cell surface fractionation of primary human CPe cells in vitro while a 6–8 kDa fragment of augurin was detected in conditioned media, indicating release from the cell surface by proteolytic processing. In rat CSF however, 14 kDa augurin was detected. We hypothesize the initial release and proteolytic processing of augurin participates in the activation phase of injury while sustained Ecrg4 down-regulation is dysinhibitory during the proliferative phase. Accordingly, augurin would play a constitutive inhibitory function in normal CNS while down regulation of Ecrg4

  20. Brachial plexus

    MedlinePlus

    The brachial plexus is a group of nerves that run from the lower neck through the upper shoulder area. These ... Damage to the brachial plexus nerves can cause muscle and sensation problems that are often associated with pain in the same area. Symptoms may ...

  1. Redefining the coccygeal plexus.

    PubMed

    Woon, Jason T K; Stringer, Mark D

    2014-03-01

    The coccygeal plexus is variably described in anatomy texts and has rarely been studied despite the idiopathic nature of coccydynia in up to one-third of affected patients. The plexus was therefore investigated using a combination of microdissection and histology. The distal sacrum and coccyx in continuity with ischiococcygeus were removed en bloc from 16 embalmed cadavers (mean age 78 ± 10 years, 7 females) with no local disease. Ten specimens underwent microdissection of the coccygeal plexus and the remaining six were examined histologically after staining with hematoxylin and eosin and S100 immunohistochemistry to demonstrate nerve fibers. The coccygeal plexus is formed within ischiococcygeus from the ventral rami of S4, S5, and Co1 with a contribution (gray rami communicantes) from the sacral sympathetic trunk. It gives rise to anococcygeal nerves which pierce ischiococcygeus and the sacrospinous ligament to supply the subcutaneous tissue on the dorsal aspect of the coccyx. Some branches from the plexus pass medially anterior to the coccyx. The coccycgeal plexus is formed within ischiococcygeus rather than on its pelvic surface and appears to supply skin in the anococcygeal region. It probably also contributes to the innervation of ischiococcygeus, the sacrospinous ligament, coccygeal ligaments, and periosteum. It deserves to be considered as a potential pain generator that may be implicated in some patients with coccydynia.

  2. The Impact of Radiotherapy Fields in the Treatment of Patients With Choroid Plexus Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mazloom, Ali; Wolff, Johannes E.; Paulino, Arnold C.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive literature review and analysis of cases dealing with choroid plexus carcinoma (CPC) to determine the optimal radiotherapy (RT) treatment field. Methods and Materials: A PubMed search of English language articles from 1979 to 2008 was performed, yielding 33 articles with 56 patients who had available data regarding RT treatment field. The median age at diagnosis was 2.7 years (range, 1 month-53 years). Of 54 patients with data regarding type of surgery, 21 (38.9%) had complete resection. Chemotherapy was delivered to 27 (48%) as part of initial therapy. The RT treatment volume was the craniospinal axis in 38 (68%), whole brain in 9 (16%), and tumor/tumor bed in 9 (16%). Median follow-up for surviving patients was 40 months. Results: The 5-year overall survival and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 59.5% and 37.2%, respectively. Complete resection (p = 0.035) and use of craniospinal irradiation (CSI; p = 0.025) were found to positively affect PFS. The 5-year PFS for patients who had CSI vs. whole brain and tumor/tumor bed RT were 44.2% and 15.3%. For the 19 patients who relapsed, 9 (47%) had a recurrence in the RT field, 6 (32%) had a recurrence outside the RT field, and 4 (21%) had a recurrence inside and outside the irradiated field. Conclusion: Patients with CPC who received CSI had better PFS compared with those receiving less than CSI. This study supports the use of CSI in the multimodality management of patients with CPC.

  3. Postfixed Brachial Plexus Radiculopathy Due to Thoracic Disc Herniation in a Collegiate Wrestler: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Scott A.; Doberstein, Scott T.; Rushlow, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1–T2 disc herniation. Background: A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Differential Diagnosis: Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. Treatment: The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1–T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Uniqueness: Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. Conclusions: The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1–T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for

  4. Large cervicothoracic myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with brachial plexus invasion: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xiaotian; Yang, Jianyun; Chen, Lin; Yu, Cong

    2016-01-01

    Myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma is a rare sarcoma that develops in patients of all ages, which usually presents as a slow-growing painless mass in the distal extremities. To date, myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with invasion of the brachial plexus has rarely been reported in the literature. In this study, a case of large cervicothoracic sarcoma, which invaded the brachial plexus, is presented. The patient reported no sensory disturbance or dyskinesia. The tumor was completely resected without injury of the brachial plexus. The postoperative histological diagnosis was myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma. Follow-up examination performed 24 months after surgery revealed no tumor recurrence and no sensory disturbance or dyskinesia was reported. This study presents a rare case of large myxoinflammatory fibroblastic sarcoma with brachial plexus invasion that was successfully managed by surgery. PMID:27588121

  5. Contralateral Spinal Accessory Nerve Transfer: A New Technique in Panavulsive Brachial Plexus Palsy.

    PubMed

    Zermeño-Rivera, Jaime; Gutiérrez-Amavizca, Bianca Ethel

    2015-06-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion results from excessive stretching and can occur secondary to motor vehicle accidents, mainly in motorcyclists. In a 28-year-old man with panavulsive brachial plexus palsy, we describe an alternative technique to repair brachial plexus avulsion and to stabilize and preserve shoulder function by transferring the contralateral spinal accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve. We observed positive clinical and electromyographic results in sternocleidomastoid, trapezius, supraspinatus, infraspinatus, pectoralis, triceps, and biceps, with good outcome and prognosis for shoulder function at 12 months after surgery. This technique provides a unique opportunity for patients suffering from severe brachial plexus injuries and lacking enough donor nerves to obtain shoulder stability and mobility while avoiding bone fusion and preserving functionality of the contralateral shoulder with favorable postoperative outcomes.

  6. Permanent upper trunk plexopathy after interscalene brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Avellanet, Merce; Sala-Blanch, Xavier; Rodrigo, Lidia; Gonzalez-Viejo, Miguel A

    2016-02-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) has been widely used in shoulder surgical procedures. The incidence of postoperative neural injury has been estimated to be as high as 3 %. We report a long-term neurologic deficit after a nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. A 55 year-old male, with right shoulder impingement syndrome was scheduled for elective surgery. The patient was given an oral dose of 10 mg of diazepam prior to the nerve stimulator assisted brachial plexus block. The patient immediately complained, as soon as the needle was placed in the interscalene area, of a sharp pain in his right arm and he was sedated further. Twenty-four hours later, the patient complained of severe shoulder and arm pain that required an increased dose of analgesics. Severe peri-scapular atrophy developed over the following days. Electromyography studies revealed an upper trunk plexus injury with severe denervation of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles together with a moderate denervation of the biceps brachii muscle. Chest X-rays showed a diaphragmatic palsy which was not present post operatively. Pulmonary function tests were also affected. Phrenic nerve paralysis was still present 18 months after the block as was dysfunction of the brachial plexus resulting in an inability to perform flexion, abduction and external rotation of the right shoulder. Severe brachial plexopathy was probably due to a local anesthetic having been administrated through the perineurium and into the nerve fascicles. Severe brachial plexopathy is an uncommon but catastrophic complication of IBPB. We propose a clinical algorithm using ultrasound guidance during nerve blocks as a safer technique of regional anesthesia. PMID:25744163

  7. Validating the RTOG-Endorsed Brachial Plexus Contouring Atlas: An Evaluation of Reproducibility Among Patients Treated by Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Sun K.; Hall, William H.; Mathai, Mathew; Dublin, Arthur B.; Gupta, Vishal; Purdy, James A.; Chen, Allen M.

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate interobserver variability for contouring the brachial plexus as an organ-at-risk (OAR) and to analyze its potential dosimetric consequences in patients treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed brachial plexus contouring atlas, three radiation oncologists independently delineated the OAR on treatment planning computed-tomography (CT) axial scans from 5 representative patients undergoing IMRT to a prescribed dose of 70 Gy for head-and-neck cancer. Dose-volume histograms for the brachial plexus were calculated, and interobserver differences were quantified by comparing various dosimetric statistics. Qualitative analysis was performed by visually assessing the overlapping contours on a single beam's eye view. Results: Brachial plexus volumes for the 5 patients across observers were 26 cc (18-35 cc), 25 cc (21-30 cc), 29 cc (28-32 cc), 29 cc (23-38 cc), and 29 cc (23-34 cc). On qualitative analysis, minimal variability existed except at the inferolateral portion of the OAR, where slight discrepancies were noted among the physicians. Maximum doses to the brachial plexus ranged from 71.6 to 72.6 Gy, 75.2 to 75.8 Gy, 69.1 to 71.0 Gy, 76.4 to 76.9 Gy, and 70.6 to 71.4 Gy. Respective volumes receiving doses greater than 60 Gy (V60) were 8.6 to 10.9 cc, 6.2 to 8.1 cc, 8.2 to 11.6 cc, 8.3 to 10.5 cc, and 5.6 to 9.8 cc. Conclusion: The RTOG-endorsed brachial plexus atlas provides a consistent set of guidelines for contouring this OAR with essentially no learning curve. Adoption of these contouring guidelines in the clinical setting is encouraged.

  8. Bone age in children with obstetrical brachial plexus palsy: effect of peripheral nerve injury on skeletal maturation.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Fügen; Cömert, Didem; Gökkaya, Nilüfer Kutay Ordu; Ozbudak, Sibel Demir; Uysal, Hilmi

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effect of peripheral nerve injury on the skeletal maturation process. The bone ages of the affected and unaffected hand-wrists of 42 children with obstetrical brachial palsy were determined according to the Greulich and Pyle atlas. In 23 patients, the bone ages of the both sides were identical (bone-age-symmetrical group), in 19 patients the bone age of the affected side was delayed (bone-age-delayed group). The mean bone age of the affected side was delayed 0.48 ± 0.25 years that of the unaffected side (P = .000), and the delay of bone age was inversely correlated with chronological age (R (2) = .45, P < .02) in the bone-age-delayed group. Skeletal retardation can be recognized after appearance of ossification centers by plain radiography, dating from the third month of life, in early infancy. Thus, bone age determination method might be helpful for predicting potential future limb shortness.

  9. Torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Justice, Denise; Vanaman, Monique M; Nelson, Virginia S; Yang, Lynda J-S

    2011-11-01

    We investigate the incidence of torticollis associated with neonatal brachial plexus palsy, whether the severity of brachial plexus palsy affects outcomes and the rate of recovery. We performed a retrospective review of 128 consecutive neonatal brachial plexus palsy patients evaluated at the University of Michigan from 2005-2009. Patients were followed for at least 3 months, with regular physical examinations and imaging. Forty-three percent presented concurrently with torticollis. Significant differences were evident in mean age at first brachial plexus examination, suggesting that patients with concurrent torticollis present earlier for clinical examination. Recovery from torticollis was evident in 62% of patients by 23 ± 12 weeks with conservative management. No statistically significant differences were evident between torticollis and nontorticollis groups after reviewing their severity of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (Narakas score), recovery from neonatal brachial plexus palsy (biceps function at 6 months), need for nerve repair or reconstructive procedures, or infant, maternal, or other factors associated with labor. Results suggest that although torticollis occurs with increased frequency in children with brachial plexus palsy, its presence is not related to severity and does not affect the probability of recovery from brachial plexus palsy. Conservative management for torticollis yields reasonable recovery.

  10. Prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following continuous interscalene brachial plexus block: A case report.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Helen Ki; Kim, Byung-Gun; Jung, Jong Kwon; Kwon, Hee Uk; Yang, Chunwoo; Won, Jonghun

    2016-06-01

    Interscalene brachial plexus block provides effective anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery. One of the disadvantages of this technique is the risk of hemidiaphragmatic paresis, which can occur as a result of phrenic nerve block and can cause a decrease in the pulmonary function, limiting the use of the block in patients with reduced functional residual capacity or a preexisting pulmonary disease. However, it is generally transient and is resolved over the duration of the local anesthetic's action.We present a case of a patient who experienced prolonged hemidiaphragmatic paresis following a continuous interscalene brachial plexus block for the postoperative pain management of shoulder surgery, and suggest a mechanism that may have led to this adverse effect.Nerve injuries associated with peripheral nerve blocks may be caused by several mechanisms. Our findings suggest that perioperative nerve injuries can occur as a result of combined mechanical and chemical injuries. PMID:27310984

  11. Lumbosacral plexus delineation, dose distribution, and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tunio, Mutahir; Al Asiri, Mushabbab; Bayoumi, Yasser; Abdullah O Balbaid, Ali; AlHameed, Majid; Gabriela, Stanciu Laura; Amir O Ali, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the dose distribution to the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) in patients with cervical cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Materials and methods After meeting eligibility criteria, 50 patients with cervical cancer were selected who were treated with IMRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and the LSP was contoured. Mean volume; percentages of LSP volume absorbing 40, 50, 55, and 60 Gy (V30, V40, V50, V55, and V60) and point doses (P1, P2, P3, P4, P5, P6, P7, P8, P9, and P10); and RILSP incidence were calculated. Results At 60 months of follow-up, four patients (8%) were found to have grade 2/3 RILSP. The mean maximal LSP dose in patients with RILSP was 59.6 Gy compared with 53.9 Gy in patients without RILSP (control; P=0.04). The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 in patients with RILSP versus control were 61.8% versus 52.8%, 44.4% versus 27.7%, 8.0% versus 0.3% and 1.8% versus 0%, respectively (P=0.01, 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively). Conclusion The delineation of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce the risk for RILSP. The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 for LSP should be less than 55%, 30%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively; however, further studies are warranted. PMID:25565862

  12. Thoracic BB injuries in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, L G; Radhakrishnan, J; Gordon, R T; Shah, M R; Lain, K Y; Messersmith, R N; Roettger, R H; Norwood, S H

    1995-03-01

    Penetrating thoracic injury from BB shot remains an innocuous event in most patients, but factors including location, proximity, gun type, and patient weight may identify groups at risk. The following cases demonstrate morbidity and mortality in two patients, and this experience may suggest the need for reassessment of this injury.

  13. MR-guided Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Ablation: An Evaluation of Effect and Injection Spread Pattern in Cancer Patients with Celiac Tumor Infiltration

    SciTech Connect

    Akural, Etem; Ojala, Risto O.; Jaervimaeki, Voitto; Kariniemi, Juho; Tervonen, Osmo A.; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto

    2013-04-15

    ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, the initial accuracy, and the effects of the MR-guided neurolytic celiac plexus ablation as a method to treat cancer-induced chronic abdominal pain. Thirteen celiac plexus ablations were performed for 12 patients. A 0.23-T open MRI scanner with optical navigation was used for procedural guidance. As an adjunct to the MR-guided needle positioning, the needle location was confirmed with saline injection and consequent MR imaging (STIR sequence). The spread of the ablative injection material (alcohol-lidocaine mix) was observed by repeating this sequence after the therapeutic injection. Pain scores from seven patients (eight ablations) were used to assess the therapy effect. MR guidance allowed adequate needle positioning and visualization of injection material in all cases. The rest pain scores significantly decreased from 4 (median) at baseline to 1 (median) at 2 weeks (p < 0.05). Average and worst pain experienced during the past week were significantly lower at the 2-week time point compared with the baseline (p < 0.05). However, the intervention did not result in reduction of opioid use at 2 weeks.MR guidance is an accurate and safe method for celiac plexus ablation with positive therapeutic effect.

  14. Popliteal vasculature injuries in paediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, S A; Roberts, D C; Clarke, N M P

    2012-10-01

    Popliteal-artery injuries in the paediatric-trauma patient are uncommon, difficult to diagnose and with prolonged ischaemia lead to substantial complications. We report three cases of popliteal-vasculature injury in paediatric-trauma patients with diverse mechanisms of injury: blunt trauma, penetrating injury and a Salter-Harris I fracture. We present a range of the significant sequelae that can result from paediatric popliteal-artery injury, both physically and psychologically. It is imperative that clinicians have a high index of suspicion when confronted with paediatric patients with trauma around the knee and that popliteal-vasculature injuries are diagnosed early. If insufficiencies are detected, further imaging should be considered, but surgical exploration should not be delayed in the presence of ischaemia.

  15. Dose–Volume Modeling of Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Findings From a Prospective Screening Protocol

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Daly, Megan E.; Cui, Jing; Hall, William H.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Phillips, Theodore L.; Farwell, D. Gregory; Purdy, James A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Data from a prospective screening protocol administered for patients previously irradiated for head-and-neck cancer was analyzed to identify dosimetric predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred fifty-two patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck were prospectively screened from August 2007 to April 2013 using a standardized self-administered instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from radiation therapy was 40 months (range, 6-111 months). A total of 177 patients (50%) underwent neck dissection. Two hundred twenty-one patients (63%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Fifty-one patients (14%) reported brachial plexus-related neuropathic symptoms with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), and motor weakness and/or muscle atrophy (25%). The 3- and 5-year estimates of freedom from brachial plexus-associated neuropathy were 86% and 81%, respectively. Clinical/pathological N3 disease (P<.001) and maximum radiation dose to the ipsilateral brachial plexus (P=.01) were significantly associated with neuropathic symptoms. Cox regression analysis revealed significant dose–volume effects for brachial plexus-associated neuropathy. The volume of the ipsilateral brachial plexus receiving >70 Gy (V70) predicted for symptoms, with the incidence increasing with V70 >10% (P<.001). A correlation was also observed for the volume receiving >74 Gy (V74) among patients treated without neck dissection, with a cutoff of 4% predictive of symptoms (P=.038). Conclusions: Dose–volume guidelines were developed for radiation planning that may limit brachial plexus-related neuropathies.

  16. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed Central

    de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; de Paula, Emygdio José Leomil; Junior, Rames Mattar; de Camargo, Olavo Pires

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury. PMID:23644864

  17. What has changed in brachial plexus surgery?

    PubMed

    Rezende, Marcelo Rosa de; Silva, Gustavo Bersani; Paula, Emygdio José Leomil de; Mattar Junior, Rames; Camargo, Olavo Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Brachial plexus injuries, in all their severity and complexity, have been extensively studied. Although brachial plexus injuries are associated with serious and often definitive sequelae, many concepts have changed since the 1950s, when this pathological condition began to be treated more aggressively. Looking back over the last 20 years, it can be seen that the entire approach, from diagnosis to treatment, has changed significantly. Some concepts have become better established, while others have been introduced; thus, it can be said that currently, something can always be offered in terms of functional recovery, regardless of the degree of injury. Advances in microsurgical techniques have enabled improved results after neurolysis and have made it possible to perform neurotization, which has undoubtedly become the greatest differential in treating brachial plexus injuries. Improvements in imaging devices and electrical studies have allowed quick decisions that are reflected in better surgical outcomes. In this review, we intend to show the many developments in brachial plexus surgery that have significantly changed the results and have provided hope to the victims of this serious injury.

  18. Imaging and Quantification of Subbasal Nerve Plexus in Healthy Volunteers and Diabetic Patients with or without Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hovakimyan, Marine; Peschel, Sabine; Harder, Volker; Schober, Hans-Christof; Kundt, Guenther; Baltrusch, Simone; Guthoff, Rudolf F.; Stachs, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Background The alterations of subbasal nerve plexus (SBP) innervation and corneal sensation were estimated non-invasively and compared with the values in healthy volunteers. Additionally, this study addressed the relation of SBP changes to the retinal status, glycemic control and diabetes duration. Methodology/Principal Findings Eighteen eyes of diabetic patients with peripheral diabetic neuropathy aged 68.8±8.8 years and twenty eyes of healthy volunteers aged 66.3±13.3 yrs. were investigated with in vivo confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). An adapted algorithm for image analysis was used to quantify the morphological and topological properties of SBP. These properties were correlated to incidence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) and corneal sensation (Cochet-Bonnet esthesiometer). The developed algorithm allows a fully automated analysis of pre-segmented SBP structures. Altogether, 10 parameters were analysed, and all of them revealed significant differences between diabetic patients and healthy volunteers. The nerve fibre density, total fibre length and nerve branches were found to be significantly lower in patients with diabetes than those of control subjects (nerve fibre density 0.006±0.002 vs. 0.020±0.007 mm/mm2; total fibre length 6223±2419 vs. 19961±6553 µm; nerve branches 25.3±28.6 vs. 141.9±85.7 in healthy volunteers). Also the corneal sensation was significantly lower in diabetic group when compared to controls (43±11 vs. 59±18 mm). There was found no difference in SBP morphology or corneal sensation in the subgroups with (DR) or without (NDR) diabetic retinopathy. Conclusions/Significance SBP parameters were significantly reduced in diabetic patients, compared to control group. Interestingly, the SBP impairment could be shown even in the diabetic patients without DR. Although automatic adapted image analysis simplifies the evaluation of in vivo CLSM data, image acquisition and quantitative analysis should be optimised for the everyday

  19. Choroid plexus calcification: clinical, neuroimaging and histopathological correlations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, Ileana; Udriştoiu, I; Marinescu, D

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is recognized as a psychiatric disorder that causes the most pronounced disturbances of cognition and social integration. In the etiopathogenesis of the disease, genetic, neurobiological and vascular factors are involved. Functional integrity of the brain can be correlated with the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the dysfunction of this barrier is an indicator that suggests neurodevelopmental abnormalities, injuries of various etiologies and dysfunctions within the small vessels of the brain that disrupt the calcium homeostasis. Neuroimaging shows that in patients with poor evolution, cognitive dysfunction and therapeutic resistance, the presence of choroid plexus calcification associated with hippocampal, frontal, temporoparietal and cerebellar atrophies. Antipsychotics with high capacity to block D2 dopamine receptors (haloperidol model) can aggravate apoptotic mechanisms of the brain areas involved in cognition and disrupts the functional integrity of the BBB due to decreased of choroid plexus blood flow because of the narrowing of cerebral small vessels. Choroid plexus calcification may be a predictive indicator of poor evolution or of a neurodegenerative type. PMID:23771083

  20. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods - We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results - We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6-3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3-6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3-28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation - Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  1. Patient injuries in primary total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Helkamaa, Teemu; Hirvensalo, Eero; Huhtala, Heini; Remes, Ville

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Although the results of primary total hip replacements (THRs) are generally excellent, sometimes serious complications arise. Some of these severe complications are considered to be patient injuries. We analyzed primary THR-related patient injuries in a nationwide setting. Patients and methods We evaluated all the primary THR-related patient injury claims in Finland between 2008 and 2010. We used the original medical records and 2 nationwide registries, the Care Register for Social Welfare and Health Care and the Patient Injury Claim Register. Results We identified 563 claims, 44% of which were compensated (n = 250). Of these 250 compensated claims, 79% were considered to be avoidable (treatment injuries) and 21% were severe unexpected infections (with a preoperative infection risk of less than 2%). The most common type of technical error was cup malposition (31%). High-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume ≥ 400) had a lower patient injury rate. In lower-volume hospitals (with an annual primary THR volume of < 400), the relative risks (RRs) of patient injury for any reason, due to technical errors, or because of cup malposition were 2-fold (95% CI: 1.6–3.1), 4-fold (95% CI: 2.3–6.2), and 9-fold (95% CI: 3–28), respectively, compared to high-volume hospitals. Interpretation Our study provides the first comprehensive nationwide data on THR-related patient injury types. Hospital volume was associated with the quality and quantity of errors detected. An annual hospital volume of ≥ 400 primary THRs was established as a protective factor against patient injuries. PMID:26808350

  2. Brachial plexus anesthesia: an analysis of options.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. L.

    1993-01-01

    There are multiple sites at which the brachial plexus block can be induced in selecting regional anesthesia for upper extremity surgical patients. The most frequently used blocks are axillary, infraclavicular, supraclavicular, and interscalene. One must understand brachial plexus anatomy to use these blocks effectively, as well as the practical clinical differences between the blocks. Axillary brachial plexus block is most effective for surgical procedures distal to the elbow. This block is induced at a distance from both the centroneuraxis and the lung; thus, complications in those areas are avoided. Infraclavicular block is often the most effective method of maintaining a continuous block of the brachial plexus, since the catheter is easily secured to the anterior chest. Supraclavicular block provides anesthesia of the entire upper extremity in the most consistent, time-efficient manner of any brachial plexus technique; however, the block needle is necessarily positioned near the lung during injection. Interscalene block is especially effective for surgical procedures involving the shoulder or upper arm because the roots of the brachial plexus are most easily blocked with this technique. The final needle tip position with this block is potentially near the centroneuraxis and arteries perfusing the brain, thus careful aspiration of the needle and incremental injection are important. In summary, when an understanding of branchial plexus anatomy is combined with proper block technique and a patient- and procedure-specific balancing of risk-benefit, our patients and colleagues will be coadvocates of our branchial plexus regional blocks. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7825342

  3. [Celiac plexus block: value of x-ray computed guidance].

    PubMed

    Ducable, G; Menguy, E; Jouini, S; Moisan, Y; Genevois, A; Lestrat, J P; Winckler, C

    1991-01-01

    Celiac plexus block is a good alternative of pain treatment in upper abdominal pain. Neurolysis of the celiac plexus by the percutaneous posterior route used CT guidance in 8 patients. Pain relief was obtained in 5 of 7 patients (70 per cent); no complication occurred. PMID:1759698

  4. Traumatic injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients sustained traumatic injuries. Identification of risk factors of traumatic injuries that lead to hospital admissions and death in DM patients is crucial to set effective preventive strategies. We aimed to conduct a traditional narrative literature review to describe the role of hypoglycemia as a risk factor of driving and fall-related traumatic injuries. DM poses significant burden as a risk factor and predictor of worse outcomes in traumatic injuries. Although there is no consensus on the impact and clear hazards of hyperglycemia in comparison to the hypoglycemia, both extremes of DM need to be carefully addressed and taken into consideration for proper management. Moreover, physicians, patients, and concerned authorities should be aware of all these potential hazards to share and establish the right management plans. PMID:27162438

  5. Traumatic injuries in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Mekkodathil, Ahammed; Al-Thani, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased in-hospital morbidity and mortality in patients sustained traumatic injuries. Identification of risk factors of traumatic injuries that lead to hospital admissions and death in DM patients is crucial to set effective preventive strategies. We aimed to conduct a traditional narrative literature review to describe the role of hypoglycemia as a risk factor of driving and fall-related traumatic injuries. DM poses significant burden as a risk factor and predictor of worse outcomes in traumatic injuries. Although there is no consensus on the impact and clear hazards of hyperglycemia in comparison to the hypoglycemia, both extremes of DM need to be carefully addressed and taken into consideration for proper management. Moreover, physicians, patients, and concerned authorities should be aware of all these potential hazards to share and establish the right management plans. PMID:27162438

  6. Maxillofacial injuries in the pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Haug, R H; Foss, J

    2000-08-01

    Approximately 22 million children are injured in the United States annually. Children are uniquely susceptible to craniofacial trauma because of their greater cranial-mass-to-body ratio. The pediatric population sustains 1% to 14.7% of all facial fractures. The majority of these injuries are encountered by boys (53.7% - 80%) who are involved in motor vehicle accidents (up to 80.2%). The incidence of other systemic injury concomitant to facial trauma is significant (10.4% - 88%). The management of the pediatric patient with maxillofacial injury should take into consideration the differences in anatomy and physiology between children and adults, the presence of concomitant injury, the particular stage in growth and development (anatomic, physiologic, and psychologic), and the specific injuries and anatomic sites that the injuries affect. This comprehensive review, based on the last 25 years of the world's English-speaking surgical literature, presents current thoughts on the anatomic and physiologic differences between adults and children, a synopsis of childhood growth and development, and an overview of state-of-the-art management of the pediatric patient who has sustained maxillofacial injury.

  7. Co-infusion of autologous adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells, a viable therapy for post-traumatic brachial plexus injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Thakkar, Umang G; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is emerging as a viable approach in regenerative medicine. A 31-year-old male with brachial plexus injury had complete sensory-motor loss since 16 years with right pseudo-meningocele at C5-D1 levels and extra-spinal extension up to C7-D1, with avulsion on magnetic resonance imaging and irreversible damage. We generated adipose tissue derived neuronal differentiated mesenchymal stem cells (N-AD-MSC) and bone marrow derived hematopoietic stem cells (HSC-BM). Neuronal stem cells expressed β-3 tubulin and glial fibrillary acid protein which was confirmed on immunofluorescence. On day 14, 2.8 ml stem cell inoculum was infused under local anesthesia in right brachial plexus sheath by brachial block technique under ultrasonography guidance with a 1.5-inch-long 23 gauge needle. Nucleated cell count was 2 × 10 4 /μl, CD34+ was 0.06%, and CD45-/90+ and CD45-/73+ were 41.63% and 20.36%, respectively. No untoward effects were noted. He has sustained recovery with re-innervation over a follow-up of 4 years documented on electromyography-nerve conduction velocity study. PMID:25116721

  8. Range of motion and strength after surgery for brachial plexus birth palsy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is little information about the range of motion (ROM) and strength of the affected upper limbs of patients with permanent brachial plexus birth palsy. Patients and methods 107 patients who had brachial plexus surgery in Finland between 1971 and 1998 were investigated in this population-based, cross-sectional, 12-year follow-up study. During the follow-up, 59 patients underwent secondary procedures. ROM and isometric strength of the shoulders, elbows, wrists, and thumbs were measured. Ratios for ROM and strength between the affected and unaffected sides were calculated. Results 61 patients (57%) had no active shoulder external rotation (median 0° (-75–90)). Median active abduction was 90° (1–170). Shoulder external rotation strength of the affected side was diminished (median ratio 28% (0–83)). Active elbow extension deficiency was recorded in 82 patients (median 25° (5–80)). Elbow flexion strength of the affected side was uniformly impaired (median ratio 43% (0–79)). Median active extension of the wrist was 55° (-70–90). The median ratio of grip strength for the affected side vs. the unaffected side was 68% (0–121). Patients with total injury had poorer ROM and strength than those with C5–6 injury. Incongruity of the radiohumeral joint and avulsion were associated with poor strength values. Interpretation ROM and strength of affected upper limbs of patients with surgically treated brachial plexus birth palsy were reduced. Patients with avulsion injuries and/or consequent joint deformities fared worst. PMID:21142823

  9. Chronic prostatitis in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Wyndaele, J J

    1985-06-01

    Six spinal cord injury patients with chronic prostatitis were reviewed, all of whom had been treated with an indwelling Foley catheter during the phase of spinal shock. The 3 glass urine specimen test, the bladder wash-out test, a study of antibody coated bacteria and urethrography had limited diagnostic value. A specific diagnostic 5 glass specimen test proved to be useful and reliable. Longterm antibiotic treatment was successful in only one patient. Injection of antibiotics into the prostate gland was ineffective in the five patients in whom it was carried out. During a follow up from 1 to 5 years urological complications were rare in all five patients who remained infected.

  10. Lawn mower injuries in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Horn, Pamela L; Beebe, Allan C

    2009-01-01

    Lawn mower injuries are painful, devastating, and life-altering. Pediatric patients who sustain these injuries suffer various forms of physical trauma. Some are minor, but many others are disfiguring or even fatal. The psychological and social impact is far-reaching as well. These injuries have high rates of morbidity, include many days lost from school, and can cause financial loss for the parents due to the hospitalization and missed work. The primary objective with regards to lawn mower injuries is prevention that is accomplished by education. However, once the patient has been injured and admitted to the hospital, then immediate treatment with timely discharge is the main objective. Excellent wound care, acceptable cosmetic appearance, and infection prevention are the ultimate goals. Use of the Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) device has helped facilitate the end results. Psychological adjustment with regards to this traumatic event is also addressed immediately for both the patient and the caregivers. Inpatient and outpatient counseling and follow-up all play a role in this stressful time.

  11. Brachial Plexus-Associated Neuropathy After High-Dose Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Hall, William H.; Li, Judy; Beckett, Laurel; Farwell, D. Gregory; Lau, Derick H.; Purdy, James A.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To identify clinical and treatment-related predictors of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Three hundred thirty patients who had previously completed radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer were prospectively screened using a standardized instrument for symptoms of neuropathy thought to be related to brachial plexus injury. All patients were disease-free at the time of screening. The median time from completion of radiation therapy was 56 months (range, 6-135 months). One-hundred fifty-five patients (47%) were treated by definitive radiation therapy, and 175 (53%) were treated postoperatively. Radiation doses ranged from 50 to 74 Gy (median, 66 Gy). Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was used in 62% of cases, and 133 patients (40%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Forty patients (12%) reported neuropathic symptoms, with the most common being ipsilateral pain (50%), numbness/tingling (40%), motor weakness, and/or muscle atrophy (25%). When patients with <5 years of follow-up were excluded, the rate of positive symptoms increased to 22%. On univariate analysis, the following factors were significantly associated with brachial plexus symptoms: prior neck dissection (p = 0.01), concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.01), and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001). Cox regression analysis confirmed that both neck dissection (p < 0.001) and radiation maximum dose (p < 0.001) were independently predictive of symptoms. Conclusion: The incidence of brachial plexus-associated neuropathies after radiation therapy for head-and-neck cancer may be underreported. In view of the dose-response relationship identified, limiting radiation dose to the brachial plexus should be considered when possible.

  12. Microsurgical treatment of peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Dolene, V

    1977-01-01

    In the period from 1972 to 1976, 536 patients with injuries of the peripheral nerves were treated at the Neurosurgical University Clinic Lyublyana. The treatment was performed according to the principles of microsurgery. Preoperative and postoperative supervision included EMG, electroneurography and nerve conduction speed. Subdivision: N. facialis 6, plexus brachialis 78, n. radialis 58, n. medianus 189, n. ulnaris 212, n. ischiadicus 17, n. femoralis 3, n. tibialis 12, n. fibularis 37. On the plexus brachialis 50 funiculolyses and 28 raphies were carried out. Immobilisation for 10 days. The length of the transplants showed no negative influence. After-observation was necessary for three and more years, especially in case of plexus injuries. Complete restoration was only found in children. Sensitivity in 80% more than Seddon III, 17% III and 3% less than III. Motor function in 60% IV, 20% III, 12% II and 8% less than II.

  13. Open Anterior Release of the Superior Transverse Scapular Ligament for Decompression of the Suprascapular Nerve During Brachial Plexus Surgery.

    PubMed

    Elzinga, Kate E; Curran, Matthew W T; Morhart, Michael J; Chan, K Ming; Olson, Jaret L

    2016-07-01

    Reconstruction of the suprascapular nerve (SSN) after brachial plexus injury often involves nerve grafting or a nerve transfer. To restore shoulder abduction and external rotation, a branch of the spinal accessory nerve is commonly transferred to the SSN. To allow reinnervation of the SSN, any potential compression points should be released to prevent a possible double crush syndrome. For that reason, the authors perform a release of the superior transverse scapular ligament at the suprascapular notch in all patients undergoing reconstruction of the upper trunk of the brachial plexus. Performing the release through a standard anterior open supraclavicular approach to the brachial plexus avoids the need for an additional posterior incision or arthroscopic procedure. PMID:27113908

  14. Comparative Evaluation of Retrocrural versus Transaortic Neurolytic Celiac Plexus Block for Pain Relief in Patients with Upper Abdominal Malignancy: A Retrospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Saipriya; Agarwal, Anil; Dhiraaj, Sanjay; Gautam, Sujeet K; Khuba, Sandeep; Madabushi, Rajashree; Shamshery, Chetna; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare retrocrural versus transaortic techniques for neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB) in patients suffering from upper abdominal malignancy. Methods: In this retrospective observational study between October 2013 and April 2015, 64 patients with inoperable upper abdominal malignancy received fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous NCPB in our institute. Their case files were reviewed and the patients were divided into two groups depending on the technique used to perform NCPB: retrocrural (Group R; n = 36) versus transaortic (Group T; n = 28). The primary outcome measure was pain as assessed with a numeric rating scale (NRS) from 0 to 10; the secondary outcome measures were morphine consumption per day (M), quality of life (QOL) as assessed by comparing the percent of positive responses in each group, and complications if any. These were noted and analyzed prior to intervention and then on day 1, weeks 1, 2, 3, and months 1, 2, 3, 6 following NCPB. Results: Patients in Group R had significantly reduced NRS pain scores at week 1, 2, 3, month 1 and 2 as compared to Group T (P < 0.05). Morphine consumption also reduced significantly in Group R at day 1, week 1, 2, and 3 (P < 0.05). QOL was found to be comparable between the groups, and no major complications were noted. Conclusion: Retrocrural NCPB provides superior pain relief along with a reduction in morphine consumption as compared to transaortic NCPB in patients with pain due to upper abdominal malignancy. PMID:27559259

  15. Pulmonary embolism following celiac plexus block and neurolysis

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Miles S.; Kelly, Seth M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of acute pain in chronic disease requires the physician to choose from an arsenal of pain management techniques tailored to the individual patient. Celiac plexus block and neurolysis are commonly employed for the management of chronic abdominal pain, especially in debilitating conditions such as cancer or chronic pancreatitis. The procedure is safe, well tolerated, and produces few complications. We present a case of pulmonary embolism following a celiac plexus block and neurolysis procedure. Further study is required to determine if celiac plexus ablation, alone or in combination with other risk factors, may contribute to increased risk for pulmonary embolism in patients seeking treatment for chronic upper abdominal pain conditions. PMID:27365890

  16. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  17. A Prospective Randomized Double Blind Placebo Controlled Trial on the Efficacy of Ethanol Celiac Plexus Neurolysis in Patients with Operable Pancreatic and Periampullary Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Harish; Lengel, Harry B; Sell, Naomi M; Baiocco, Joseph A; Kennedy, Eugene P; Yeo, Theresa P; Burrell, Sherry A; Winter, Jordan M; Hegarty, Sarah; Leiby, Benjamin E.; Yeo, Charles J

    2015-01-01

    Background Ethanol celiac plexus neurolysis (ECPN) has been shown to be effective in reducing cancer-related pain in patients with locally advanced pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma (PPA). This study examined its efficacy in patients undergoing PPA resection. Study Design 485 patients participated in this prospective, randomized, double blind placebo controlled trial. Patients were stratified by preoperative pain and disease resectability. They received either ECPN (50% ethanol) or 0.9% normal saline placebo control. The primary endpoint was short and long-term pain and secondary endpoints included postoperative morbidity, QOL and overall survival. Results Data from 467 patients were analyzed. The primary endpoint, the percentage of PPA patients experiencing a worsening of pain compared to preoperative baseline for resectable patients, was not different between the ethanol and saline groups in either the resectable/pain stratum (22% vs 18%, RR 1.23 (0.34, 4.46)), or the resectable/no pain stratum (37% vs 34%, RR 1.10 (0.67, 1.81)). On multivariable analysis of resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) patients, there was a significant reduction in pain in the resectable/pain group, suggesting that surgical resection of the malignancy alone (independent of ECPN) decrements pain to a significant degree. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated a significant reduction in pain following surgical resection of PPA. However the addition of ECPN did not synergize to result in a further reduction in pain, and in fact its effect may have been masked by surgical resection. Given this, we cannot recommend the use of ECPN to mitigate cancer related pain in resectable PPA patients. PMID:25667135

  18. Diaphragmatic injuries: recognition and management in sixty-two patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, J C; Wilson, S E

    1991-12-01

    Between 1979 and 1989, 62 patients were treated for traumatic injury of the diaphragm. Forty-five had penetrating injuries following stab wounds or gunshot wounds, and 17 had diaphragmatic tears from motor-vehicle and auto-pedestrian accidents. Forty-one patients sustained left-sided injuries; 20 patients sustained right sided injuries; and one patient sustained bilateral ruptures. All patients underwent exploratory laparotomy and diagnosis was confirmed at surgery. Diaphragmatic injury was suspected in only 17 (27%) patients preoperatively. The chest radiograph showed nonspecific abnormalities in 48 (77%) patients and was diagnostic in 15 (24%) patients. Six patients had diagnostic peritoneal lavage; five were positive and one was negative. Computerized tomography (CT) of the lower thorax and abdomen was performed on 11 (18%) patients, but not one scan was diagnostic. Fluoroscopy in two patients was helpful. All patients had other associated injuries. The liver, spleen, or stomach were frequently injured in association with penetrating diaphragmatic lacerations. Bony fractures, splenic injuries, and head trauma were more commonly found with blunt diaphragmatic ruptures. The average hospital stay for the penetrating injuries was 11 days and for blunt trauma was 16 days. The operative mortalities was 2 per cent for penetrating injuries and 12 per cent for blunt injuries. PMID:1746800

  19. Influence of religiosity on the quality of life and on pain intensity in chronic pancreatitis patients after neurolytic celiac plexus block: case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Basiński, Andrzej; Stefaniak, Tomasz; Stadnyk, Magdalena; Sheikh, Arfan; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M

    2013-03-01

    The quality of life in patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) is reduced due to their suffering of high levels of pain. It has been presented that quality of life can also be linked to religiosity and/or spirituality. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of religious practices on the quality of life and on the subjective level of pain in CP patients. Ninety-two patients (37 women and 55 men) with chronic pancreatitis were treated invasively for pain with neurolytic celiac plexus block (NCPB). The religiosity of the patients was recorded and served as a dichotomizer. Group 1 was for patients who claimed to have no contact with the church or to have very sporadic contact (N = 35 patients). Group 2 was for patients who claimed to have deep faith and were regular participants at church activities (N = 57 patients). Visual analogue scale was used to assess pain, while the quality of life was measured by using QLQ C-30 questionnaire adapted for chronic pancreatitis patients in Polish population. The patients were assessed prior to the pain-relieving intervention and subsequently 2 and 8 weeks after it. The intensity of pain was reduced in both groups significantly after performing the NCPB. Patients who declared a deep faith reported higher level of pain on the VAS scale prior to intervention than non-religious patients. Quality of life in both groups of patients significantly improved after NCPB. Following NCPB, global quality of life in patients who declared higher religiosity/church attendance was significantly higher (79.88) than for those patients who have no contact or sporadic contact with the church (44.21, P < 0.05). NCPB resulted in significant reduction of pain and increase in quality of life in both groups of patients with CP. Nevertheless, in the group declaring higher religiosity/church attendance, reported pain was higher, but, despite that, quality of life better. It may be concluded that religious practices might serve as an additional

  20. Dorsal root entry zone lesions (Nashold's procedure) for pain relief following brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D G; Sheehy, J P

    1983-01-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion is an important cause of severe intractable pain, particularly in young motor cyclists. The pain usually develops soon after the injury. In a minority of cases severe pain persists and is refractory to management. Nineteen patients are reviewed in whom dorsal root entry zone lesions have been produced for pain relief. The operative technique is described. Early post-operative motor or sensory disturbance in the ipsilateral leg have been temporary side effects, with mild persisting deficits in a minority. Sixteen cases have had significant persisting pain relief. The maximum follow-up period is 2 1/2 years. Images PMID:6644316

  1. Supplementary motor area deactivation impacts the recovery of hand function from severe peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-Chen; Liu, Han-Qiu; Hua, Xu-Yun; Shen, Yun-Dong; Xu, Wen-Dong; Xu, Jian-Guang; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2016-04-01

    Although some patients have successful peripheral nerve regeneration, a poor recovery of hand function often occurs after peripheral nerve injury. It is believed that the capability of brain plasticity is crucial for the recovery of hand function. The supplementary motor area may play a key role in brain remodeling after peripheral nerve injury. In this study, we explored the activation mode of the supplementary motor area during a motor imagery task. We investigated the plasticity of the central nervous system after brachial plexus injury, using the motor imagery task. Results from functional magnetic resonance imaging showed that after brachial plexus injury, the motor imagery task for the affected limbs of the patients triggered no obvious activation of bilateral supplementary motor areas. This result indicates that it is difficult to excite the supplementary motor areas of brachial plexus injury patients during a motor imagery task, thereby impacting brain remodeling. Deactivation of the supplementary motor area is likely to be a serious problem for brachial plexus injury patients in terms of preparing, initiating and executing certain movements, which may be partly responsible for the unsatisfactory clinical recovery of hand function. PMID:27212933

  2. Avulsion of the brachial plexus in a great horned owl (Bubo virginaus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, M.P.; Stauber, E.; Thomas, N.J.

    1989-01-01

    Avulsion of the brachial plexus was documented in a Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus). A fractured scapula was also present. Cause of these injuries was not known but was thought to be due to trauma. Differentiation of musculoskeletal injury from peripheral nerve damage can be difficult in raptors. Use of electromyography and motor nerve conduction velocity was helpful in demonstrating peripheral nerve involvement. A brachial plexus avulsion was suspected on the basis of clinical signs, presence of electromyographic abnormalities in all muscles supplied by the nerves of the brachial plexus and absence of median-ulnar motor nerve conduction velocities.

  3. Thermoablation of Liver Metastases: Efficacy of Temporary Celiac Plexus Block

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, A.N. Schaefer, M.; Werk, M.; Pech, M.; Wieners, G.; Cho, C.; Ricke, J.

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the efficacy of celiac plexus block during thermoablation of liver metastases. Methods. Fifty-five consecutive patients underwent thermoablation therapy of liver tumors by laser-induced thermotherapy. Twenty-nine patients received a temporary celiac plexus block, 26 patients acted as control group. In both groups fentanyl and midazolam were administered intravenously upon request of the patient. The duration of the intervention, consumption of opiates, and individual pain sensations were documented. Results. No complications resulting from the celiac plexus block were recorded. Celiac plexus block significantly reduced the amount of pain medication used during thermoablation therapy of liver tumors (with block, 2.45 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight; without block, 3.58 {mu}g fentanyl per kg body weight, p < 0.05; midazolam consumption was not reduced) in patients with metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule. For metastases farther away from the capsule no significant differences in opiate consumption were seen. Celiac plexus block reduced the time for thermoablation significantly (178 min versus 147 min, p < 0.05) no matter how far the metastases were from the liver capsule. Average time needed to set the block was 12 min (range 9-15 min); additional costs for the block were marginal. As expected (as pain medications were given according to individual patients' needs) pain indices did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion. In patients with liver metastases {<=}5 mm from the liver capsule, celiac plexus block reduces the amount of opiates necessary, simplifying patient monitoring. In addition celiac plexus block reduces intervention time, with positive effects on overall workflow for all patients.

  4. Radionuclide assessment of heterotopic ossification in spinal cord injury patients

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, V.

    1983-01-01

    Whole body /sup 99m/T-pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained and correlated with skeletal radiographs for detection of heterotopic ossification in 135 spinal injury patients. There were 40 patients with recent injury (less than 6 months) and 95 with injury of over 6 months duration. Heterotopic new bone was detected on the bone scan in 33.7% of 95 patients with spinal cord injuries of more than 6 months duration and 30% of 40 patients with injuries of less than 6 months. The radionuclide scan was found to be useful in detection of heterotopic ossification at its early stage and in its differentiation from other complications in spinal cord injury patients.

  5. Dosimetric benefits of placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hailan; Lu, Heming; Yuan, Hong; Huang, Huixian; Wei, Yinglin; Zhang, Yanxian; Liu, Xu

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether placing dose constraints on the brachial plexus (BP) could provide dosimetric benefits in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Planning CT images for 30 patients with NPC treated with definitive IMRT were retrospectively reviewed. Target volumes, the BP and other critical structures were delineated; two separate IMRT plans were designed for each patient: one set no restrictions for the BP; the other considered the BP as a critical structure for which a maximum dose limit of ≤66 Gy was set. No significant differences between the two plans were observed in the conformity index, homogeneity index, maximum dose to the planning target volumes (PTVs), minimum dose to the PTVs, percentages of the volume of the PTVnx and PTVnd receiving more than 110% of the prescribed dose, or percentages of the volume of the PTVs receiving 95% and > 93% of the prescribed dose. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose, mean dose, V45, V50, V54, V60, V66 and V70 to the BP. Dose constraints significantly reduced the maximum dose to the BP, V45, V60 and V66 in both N0-1 and N2-3 disease; however, the magnitude of the dosimetric gain for each parameter between N0-1 and N2-3 disease was not significantly different, except for the V60 and V66. In conclusion, placing dose constraints on the BP can significantly decrease the irradiated volume and dose, without compromising adequate dose delivery to the target volume.

  6. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion.

  7. The effect of severing a normal S1 nerve root to use for reconstruction of an avulsed contralateral lumbosacral plexus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L; F Zhang; Yang, D; Chen, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using the intact S1 nerve root as a donor nerve to repair an avulsion of the contralateral lumbosacral plexus. Two cohorts of patients were recruited. In cohort 1, the L4-S4 nerve roots of 15 patients with a unilateral fracture of the sacrum and sacral nerve injury were stimulated during surgery to establish the precise functional distribution of the S1 nerve root and its proportional contribution to individual muscles. In cohort 2, the contralateral uninjured S1 nerve root of six patients with a unilateral lumbosacral plexus avulsion was transected extradurally and used with a 25 cm segment of the common peroneal nerve from the injured leg to reconstruct the avulsed plexus. The results from cohort 1 showed that the innervation of S1 in each muscle can be compensated for by L4, L5, S2 and S3. Numbness in the toes and a reduction in strength were found after surgery in cohort 2, but these symptoms gradually disappeared and strength recovered. The results of electrophysiological studies of the donor limb were generally normal. Severing the S1 nerve root does not appear to damage the healthy limb as far as clinical assessment and electrophysiological testing can determine. Consequently, the S1 nerve can be considered to be a suitable donor nerve for reconstruction of an avulsed contralateral lumbosacral plexus.

  8. The Swedish system for compensation of patient injuries.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Henry

    2010-05-01

    Since 1975 Sweden has had a patient insurance system to compensate patients for health-related injuries. The system was initially based on a voluntary patient insurance solution, but in 1997 it was replaced by the Patient Insurance Act. The current Act covers both physical and mental injuries. Although about 9,000-10,000 cases are processed in Sweden annually, compensation is paid in barely half of these cases. In the Swedish patient injury claim processing system, the Patient Claims Panel is the authority that plays an important role in ensuring fair and consistent application of the Act.

  9. Abdominal injury patterns in patients with seatbelt signs requiring laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Seema; Adileh, Mohamed; Almogy, Gidon; Bala, Miklosh

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We analyzed our series of patients with seatbelt signs (bruising) that underwent laparotomy in order to correlate injury pattern with clinical course and outcome. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with seatbelt signs presenting to the level 1 Trauma Unit between 2005 and 2010 was performed. We evaluated the nature of injuries during laparotomy associated with seatbelt signs and their treatment and complications. Results: There were 41 patients, 25 (61%) male, with a median age of 26 years. Median injury severity score (ISS) was 25 (range 6–66) and overall mortality was 10% (four patients). Patients were classified into three groups according to time from injury to surgery. Median time to surgery for the immediate group (n = 12) was 1.05 h, early group (n = 22) was 2.7 h, and delayed group (n = 7) was 19.5 h. Patients in the immediate group tended to have solid organ injuries; whereas, patients in the delayed group had bowel injury. Patients with solid organ injuries were found to be more seriously injured and had higher mortality (P < 0.01) and morbidity compared with patients with the “classic” bowel injury pattern associated with a typical seatbelt sign. Conclusion: Our data suggest that there is a cohort of patients with seatbelt injury who have solid organ injury requiring urgent intervention. Solid organ injuries associated with malpositioned seatbelts lying higher on the abdomen tend to result in hemodynamic instability necessitating immediate surgery. They have more postoperative complications and a greater mortality. Seatbelt signs should be accurately documented after any car crash. PMID:25400391

  10. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus. PMID:26860655

  11. High resolution neurography of the brachial plexus by 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Rollán, C; Michelin, G; Nogués, M

    2016-01-01

    The study of the structures that make up the brachial plexus has benefited particularly from the high resolution images provided by 3T magnetic resonance scanners. The brachial plexus can have mononeuropathies or polyneuropathies. The mononeuropathies include traumatic injuries and trapping, such as occurs in thoracic outlet syndrome due to cervical ribs, prominent transverse apophyses, or tumors. The polyneuropathies include inflammatory processes, in particular chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, Parsonage-Turner syndrome, granulomatous diseases, and radiation neuropathy. Vascular processes affecting the brachial plexus include diabetic polyneuropathy and the vasculitides. This article reviews the anatomy of the brachial plexus and describes the technique for magnetic resonance neurography and the most common pathologic conditions that can affect the brachial plexus.

  12. Limb preference in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lynda J-S; Anand, Praveen; Birch, Rolfe

    2005-07-01

    Brachial plexus palsy affects children differently than adults. In children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy, motor development must depend on nervous system adaptation. Previous studies report sensory plasticity in these children. This noninvasive study provides support for neural plasticity (the general ability of the brain to reorganize neural pathways based on new experiences) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy by considering upper limb preference. As in the general population, we expect that 90% of children would prefer their right upper limb. However, only 17% of children affected by right obstetric brachial plexus palsy prefer the right upper limb for overall movement; children with left obstetric brachial plexus palsy did not significantly differ from the general population in upper limb preference. This study also provides the first evidence of a significant correlation between actual task performance and select obstetric brachial plexus palsy outcome measurement systems, thereby justifying the routine use of these outcome measurement systems as a reflection of the practical utility of the affected limb to the patient. PMID:15876521

  13. Injury of the Arcuate Fasciculus in the Dominant Hemisphere in Patients With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Young; Shin, So Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about injury of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere in patients with mild TBI, using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). We recruited 25 patients with injury of the left AF among 64 right-handed consecutive patients with mild TBI and 20 normal control subjects. DTTs of the left AF were reconstructed, and fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fiber number of the AF were measured. Among 64 consecutive patients, 25 (39%) patients showed injury of the left AF. The patient group showed lower FA value and fiber number with higher ADC value than the control group (P < 0.05). On K-WAB evaluation, aphasia quotient and language quotient were 95.9 ± 4.1 (range 85–100) and 95.0 ± 5.4 (range 80–100), respectively. However, 23 (92.0%) of 25 patients complained of language-related symptoms after TBI; paraphasia in 12 (48.0%) patients, deficits of comprehension in 4 (16.0%) patients, deficits of speech production in 1 (4.0%) patient, and >2 language symptoms in 6 (24.0%) patients. We found that a significant number (39%) of patients with mild TBI had injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere and these patients had mild language deficit. These results suggest that DTT could provide useful information in detecting injury of the AF and evaluation of the AF using DTT would be necessary even in the case of a patient with mild TBI who complains of mild language deficit. PMID:26945425

  14. Serum sodium disorders in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Bezerra, Douglas Alexandre França; Amorim, Robson Luis Oliveira; Figueiredo, Eberval Gadelha; Tavares, Wagner Malago; De Andrade, Almir Ferreira; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2011-01-01

    Sodium disorders are the most common and most poorly understood electrolyte disorders in neurological patients. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of sodium disorders and its association with different traumatic brain injuries. This prospective study was conducted in 80 patients diagnosed with moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries. All patients underwent cerebral computed tomography. Incidence of sodium disorders, presence of injuries in the first computed tomography after traumatic brain injury, and level of consciousness were analyzed. Patients that presented other potential causes of sodium disorders and systemic trauma were excluded from the study. The incidence of sodium disturbances was 45%: 20 patients presented hypernatremia and 16 hyponatremia. Refers to all patients with sodium disturbances 53% were detected in the first sample. We recorded at least one measurement <125 mEq/L in 50% of the patients with hyponatremia. A greater incidence of sodium disorders was found in patients with subdural, intracerebral hematoma and with diffuse axonal injury. The incidence of sodium disorders among the patients with diffuse lesions was greater than in the group of patients with brain contusion (P = 0.022). The incidence of sodium disorders is higher in patients with diffuse traumatic brain injuries. No association was found between focal lesions and proportion of sodium disorders. PMID:21941440

  15. Celiac plexus block: an anatomical study and simulation using computed tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Gabriela Augusta Mateus; Lopes, Paulo Tadeu Campos; dos Santos, Ana Maria Pujol Vieira; Pozzobon, Adriane; Duarte, Rodrigo Dias; Cima, Alexandre da Silveira; Massignan, Ângela

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze anatomical variations associated with celiac plexus complex by means of computed tomography simulation, assessing the risk for organ injury as the transcrural technique is utilized. Materials and Methods One hundred eight transaxial computed tomography images of abdomen were analyzed. The aortic-vertebral, celiac trunk (CeT)-vertebral, CeT-aortic and celiac-aortic-vertebral topographical relationships were recorded. Two needle insertion pathways were drawn on each of the images, at right and left, 9 cm and 4.5 cm away from the midline. Transfixed vital organs and gender-related associations were recorded. Results Aortic-vertebral - 45.37% at left and 54.62% in the middle; CeT-vertebral - T12, 36.11%; T12-L1, 32.4%; L1, 27.77%; T11-T12, 2.77%; CeT-aortic - 53.7% at left and 46.3% in the middle; celiac-aortic-vertebral - L-l, 22.22%; M-m, 23.15%; L-m, 31.48%; M-l, 23.15%. Neither correspondence on the right side nor significant gender-related associations were observed. Conclusion Considering the wide range of abdominal anatomical variations and the characteristics of needle insertion pathways, celiac plexus block should not be standardized. Imaging should be performed prior to the procedure in order to reduce the risks for injuries or for negative outcomes to patients. Gender-related anatomical variations involved in celiac plexus block should be more deeply investigated, since few studies have addressed the subject. PMID:25741102

  16. [Amyothropic neuralgy of lumbosacral plexus - case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Amyothropic neuralgy is a rare disease witch unknown etiopathogenesis. The main popular theory says that inflammatory and immunomodulatory process is connected with that disease. Diagnosis is made after exclusion of other causes of plexus lumbosacralis damage. The main symptom is neuropathic pain after which there is observed muscle weakness and atrophy. ENG/EMG study and MRI are made to confirm the diagnosis. In this study we described a case of 52 years old female with lower limbs paresis, who was diagnosed few years after first symptoms. Limb paresis was preluded by lumbar pain. MRI study revealed central spinal disc herniations on L1-2, L2-3, L3-4 levels with dura matter compression, L4-5 spinal disc right lateral herniation and synovial cyst. MRI of both lumbar plexuses was also normal. EMG study revealed features of bilateral, chronic damage of lower legs nerves on lumbar plexus level. Patient was treated with physiotherapy and gabapentin with dose of 2x600mg per day. PMID:25771520

  17. International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Committee report: the role of nerve transfers in the treatment of neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Tse, Raymond; Kozin, Scott H; Malessy, Martijn J; Clarke, Howard M

    2015-06-01

    Nerve transfers have gained popularity in the treatment of adult brachial plexus palsy; however, their role in the treatment of neonatal brachial plexus palsy (NBPP) remains unclear. Brachial plexus palsies in infants differ greatly from those in adults in the patterns of injury, potential for recovery, and influences of growth and development. This International Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand committee report on NBPP is based upon review of the current literature. We found no direct comparisons of nerve grafting to nerve transfer for primary reconstruction of NBPP. Although the results contained in individual reports that use each strategy for treatment of Erb palsy are similar, comparison of nerve transfer to nerve grafting is limited by inconsistencies in outcomes reported, by multiple confounding factors, and by small numbers of patients. Although the role of nerve transfers for primary reconstruction remains to be defined, nerve transfers have been found to be effective and useful in specific clinical circumstances including late presentation, isolated deficits, failed primary reconstruction, and multiple nerve root avulsions. In the case of NBPP more severe than Erb palsy, nerve transfers alone are inadequate to address all of the deficits and should only be considered as adjuncts if maximal re-innervation is to be achieved. Surgeons who commit to care of infants with NBPP need to avoid an over-reliance on nerve transfers and should also have the capability and inclination for brachial plexus exploration and nerve graft reconstruction. PMID:25936735

  18. Xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Pear, B.L.

    1984-08-01

    Uncommon tumefactions known as xanthogranulomas can occur throughout the body. Some appear to develop as benign or malignant neoplasms. An even less familiar xanthogranuloma occurs within the choroid plexus. Most are tiny plaques only a few millimeters in diameter. However, they can present as masses of significant size within the glomus. When large and unilateral, they are included in the differential diagnosis of choroid plexus tumors. A computed tomographic (CT) study of such a tumor is presented.

  19. [Ipsilateral brachial plexus C7 root transfer. Presentation of a case and a literature review].

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique; Ramírez, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The C7 root in brachial plexus injuries has been used since 1986, since the first description by Gu at that time. This root can be used completely or partially in ipsilateral or contralateral lesions of the brachial plexus. A review of the literature and the case report of a 21-month-old girl with stab wounds to the neck and section of the C5 root of the right brachial plexus are presented. A transfer of the anterior fibres of the ipsilateral C7 root was performed. At 9 months there was complete recovery of abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. PMID:23474130

  20. The Triage of Injured Patients: Mechanism of Injury, Regardless of Injury Severity, Determines Hospital Destination.

    PubMed

    Staudenmayer, Kristan; Wang, N Ewen; Weiser, Thomas G; Maggio, Paul; Mackersie, Robert C; Spain, David; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-04-01

    The target rate for trauma undertriage is <5 per cent, but rates are as high as 30 to 40 per cent in many trauma systems. We hypothesized that high undertriage rates were due to the tendency to undertriage injured elderly patients and a growing elderly population. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all hospital visits in California using the Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development Database over a 5-year period. All hospital admissions and emergency department visits associated with injury were longitudinally linked. The primary outcome was triage pattern. Triage patterns were stratified across three dimensions: age, mechanism of injury, and access to care. A total of 60,182 severely injured patients were included in the analysis. Fall-related injuries were frequently undertriaged compared with injuries from motor vehicle collisions (MVCs) and penetrating trauma (52% vs 12% and 10%, respectively). This pattern was true for all age groups. Conversely, MVCs and penetrating traumas were associated with high rates of overtriage (>70% for both). In conclusion, in contrast to our hypothesis, we found that triage is largely determined by mechanism of injury regardless of injury severity. High rates of undertriage are largely due to the undertriage of fall-related injuries, which occurs in both younger and older adults. Patients injured after MVCs and penetrating trauma victims are brought to trauma centers regardless of injury severity, resulting in high rates of overtriage. These findings suggest an opportunity to improve trauma system performance. PMID:27097630

  1. Radiation Therapy to the Plexus Brachialis in Breast Cancer Patients: Analysis of Paresthesia in Relation to Dose and Volume

    SciTech Connect

    Lundstedt, Dan; Gustafsson, Magnus; Steineck, Gunnar; Sundberg, Agnetha; Wilderäng, Ulrica; Holmberg, Erik; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Karlsson, Per

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: To identify volume and dose predictors of paresthesia after irradiation of the brachial plexus among women treated for breast cancer. Methods and Materials: The women had breast surgery with axillary dissection, followed by radiation therapy with (n=192) or without irradiation (n=509) of the supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs). The breast area was treated to 50 Gy in 2.0-Gy fractions, and 192 of the women also had 46 to 50 Gy to the SCLNs. We delineated the brachial plexus on 3-dimensional dose-planning computerized tomography. Three to eight years after radiation therapy the women answered a questionnaire. Irradiated volumes and doses were calculated and related to the occurrence of paresthesia in the hand. Results: After treatment with axillary dissection with radiation therapy to the SCLNs 20% of the women reported paresthesia, compared with 13% after axillary dissection without radiation therapy, resulting in a relative risk (RR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02-2.11). Paresthesia was reported by 25% after radiation therapy to the SCLNs with a V{sub 40} {sub Gy} ≥ 13.5 cm{sup 3}, compared with 13% without radiation therapy, RR 1.83 (95% CI 1.13-2.95). Women having a maximum dose to the brachial plexus of ≥55.0 Gy had a 25% occurrence of paresthesia, with RR 1.86 (95% CI 0.68-5.07, not significant). Conclusion: Our results indicate that there is a correlation between larger irradiated volumes of the brachial plexus and an increased risk of reported paresthesia among women treated for breast cancer.

  2. Transforming care for patients with spinal cord injury in Haiti.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Fiona

    Patients with spinal cord injury in Haiti previously had a poor prognosis. This article features a case study showing how care was transformed after the earthquake in 2010 by providing simple bladder care.

  3. Hyphema due to blunt injury: a review of 118 patients

    PubMed Central

    Ulagantheran, V; Ahmad Fauzi, M S; Reddy, S C

    2010-01-01

    AIM To determine the causes, associated ocular findings and visual acuity on presentation, complications and visual outcome following treatment in patients of hyphema due to blunt injury METHODS A retrospective study was performed in 118 patients with hyphema due to blunt injury admitted in University of Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. The gender, age, race, cause of blunt injury resulting in hyphema, eye involved, vision at admission, other associated ophthalmological findings, complications and visual outcome were noted from the case records of patients. The data were analyzed using SPSS programme. RESULTS Males were more predominantly affected (93.2%). Two-thirds of patients (67.8%) were aged below 30 years. Sports related injury (38.1%) was the most common cause for hyphema. Hyphema disappeared within 5 days in 66.9% of patients. Iris injuries were very commonly associated in the form of mydriasis, sphincter tear and iridodialysis. Associated vitreous haemorrhage was noted in 11.9% of patients. During the hospital stay, secondary haemorrhage was observed in 3.4% of patients. The best corrected vision of 6/18 or better was noted in 85.4% of patients at the last follow-up. The follow-up of these subjects was very poor and thus the incidence of secondary glaucoma could not be established. Moderate blood staining of cornea occurred in 0.8% of patients. CONCLUSION Sports related injury is the most common cause of hyphema in Malaysia. Good visual recovery, without serious complications, is possible with appropriate and in-time treatment in hyphema patients due to blunt injury. PMID:22553571

  4. Acetabular Labral Tears in Patients with Sports Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Chan; Cha, Soo-Min

    2009-01-01

    Background We wanted to investigate acetabular labral tears and their correlation with femoroacetabular impingement in patients with sports injury. Methods Among 111 patients who were diagnosed with the acetabular labral tears after arthroscopic treatment from January 2004 to December 2007, we selected 41 patients with sports injury. There were 12 cases of Taekwondo injury, 5 of golf injury, 4 of soccer injury, 3 of gymnastics injury, 2 of Hapkido injury, 2 of aerobics injury, 2 of rock-climbing injury, 2 of fitness training injury and 9 of other sports injuries. We checked the subtypes of acetabular labral tears and the accompanying femoroacetabular impingement. For the cases with accompanying femoroacetabular impingement, we investigated the subtypes according to the types of sports, gender and age. At last follow-up, we checked the Harris Hip Score (HHS), the Hip Outcome Score (HOS) sports scale and the percentage of patients who returned to their sports activity. Results The average age of symptomatic onset was 26 years (range, 12 to 65 years). The ratio of males to females was 29 : 12. An average duration of the hip pain was 17 months (range, 1 to 60 months). The degenerative type of acetabular labral tears was the most prevalent with 32 cases (78%), and there were 9 cases (22%) of the partial tear type. Thirty cases (73%) were accompanied by femoroacetabular impingement. The average age of the 23 cases (56%) of the cam-type was 23 years (range, 12 to 48 years), and it was more likely to occur in men (87%) and for people practicing martial arts such as Taekwondo or Hapkido. An average age of the 5 cases (12%) of the pincer-type was 26 (range, 16 to 43 years), it usually occurred in women (60%) and for non-martial arts such as golf and gymnastics. There were 2 cases of the mixed type (cam + pincer-type). At 27 months follow-up, the HHS was 61 to 92 points, the HOS sports scale increased 43 to 75%, and the rate of returning to sports was 71%. Conclusions In

  5. Choroid plexus papillomas: advances in molecular biology and understanding of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Safaee, Michael; Oh, Michael C; Bloch, Orin; Sun, Matthew Z; Kaur, Gurvinder; Auguste, Kurtis I; Tihan, Tarik; Parsa, Andrew T

    2013-03-01

    Choroid plexus papillomas are rare, benign tumors originating from the choroid plexus. Although generally found within the ventricular system, they can arise ectopically in the brain parenchyma or disseminate throughout the neuraxis. We sought to review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular biology and oncogenic pathways associated with this disease. A comprehensive PubMed literature review was conducted to identify manuscripts discussing the clinical, molecular, and genetic features of choroid plexus papillomas. Articles concerning diagnosis, treatment, and long-term patient outcomes were also reviewed. The introduction of atypical choroid plexus papilloma as a distinct entity has increased the need for accurate histopathologic diagnosis. Advances in immunohistochemical staining have improved our ability to differentiate choroid plexus papillomas from other intracranial tumors or metastatic lesions using combinations of key markers and mitotic indices. Recent findings have implicated Notch3 signaling, the transcription factor TWIST1, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand pathway in choroid plexus papilloma tumorigenesis. A combination of commonly occurring chromosomal duplications and deletions has also been identified. Surgical resection remains the standard of care, although chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be considered for recurrent or metastatic lesions. While generally considered benign, these tumors possess a complex biology that sheds insight into other choroid plexus tumors, particularly malignant choroid plexus carcinomas. Improving our understanding of the molecular biology, genetics, and oncogenic pathways associated with this tumor will allow for the development of targeted therapies and improved outcomes for patients with this disease.

  6. Management of superior sagittal sinus injury encountered in traumatic head injury patients: Analysis of 15 cases

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Sanjay K.; Senapati, Satya Bhusan; Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Das, Srikant

    2015-01-01

    Background: Significant dural sinus injury occurs in 1.5- 5% of all head injuries and injury to superior sagittal sinus accounts for 70-80% of these. Its management is also a challenging issue to every neurosurgeon. Materials and Methods: In a period of one year (Aug 2011 to july2012) out of 549 cases of head injuries operated in our department analysis of 15 cases (2.73%) shown to have superior sagittal sinus injury. Three dimensional reconstruction of skull bone during CT scan helped us to diagnose possible dural sinus injury pre-operatively. Results: SSS injury was due to direct impact of fracture segment (5 cases), extension of fracture line over sinus area (4 cases) or due to coronal suture diastases (6 cases). Injury to anterior third of sagittal sinus occurred in 12 cases (80%) and injury to middle third occurred in 3 cases (20%). Small tear over superior sagittal sinus was found in 7 cases (46.66%) and was managed with Gelfoam® compression only and in two cases (13.33%) were large tear, which was managed with sinoraphy. In four cases (36.34%) hitch stitches over Gelfoam® to adjacent bone given and in rest two cases (13.33%) a strip of bone was left over the sinus area and bilateral hitch stitches were applied. Conclusion: Injury to SSS in traumatic head injury patient though rarely encountered during surgery, the management is challenging to every neurosurgeon. Preoperative suspicion and combination of surgical techniques rather than one single technique may be effective in decreasing the sinus related mortality rate. PMID:25767570

  7. In-hospital injuries of medical and surgical patients: the predictive effect of a prior injury.

    PubMed

    Groves, J E; Lavori, P W; Rosenbaum, J F

    1992-01-01

    Four hundred three consecutive injury victims admitted via emergency ward over a 3-month period were tracked with 403 contemporaneous controls with medical illness and blindly assessed for in-hospital accidents. There was a high frequency of "incidents" (n = 161 in 107 patients, mainly falls and medication errors), but injury victim admissions resembled medically ill controls when compared by the Kaplan-Meier method for cumulative probability of occurrence of an in-hospital incident. Accelerated failure/time models using the Weibull method to compute average times from admission to incident showed little difference between groups. Admission type (injury victim vs. control) did not predict psychiatric consultation, incident type, or multiple incidents in hospital. Although the injury group had a larger proportion of males and lower mean age, stratification to control for age and sex did not significantly discriminate injury victims from controls in production of incidents: Over all risk of incidents was random. By studying patients during a hospital stay, the effects of differences in individual environment and drug and alcohol intoxication are largely factored out; under these conditions the predictive effect of a prior injury becomes insignificant. In-hospital injury is associated with host factors long known to promote falls: increasing age, debility-cum-mobility, and central nervous system depressant medication.

  8. Ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block.

    PubMed

    Ranganath, Anil; Srinivasan, Karthikeyan Kallidaikurichi; Iohom, Gabriella

    2014-09-01

    The axillary brachial plexus block is the most widely performed upper limb block. It is relatively simple to perform and one of the safest approaches to brachial plexus block. With the advent of ultrasound technology, there is a marked improvement in the success rate of the axillary block. This review will focus on the technique of ultrasound guided axillary brachial plexus block. PMID:25110766

  9. [Choroid plexus tumours in childhood: Experience in Sant Joan de Déu hospital].

    PubMed

    Del Río-Pérez, Clara Maria; Suñol-Capella, Mariona; Cruz-Martinez, Ofelia; Garcia-Fructuoso, Gemma

    2016-01-01

    Choroid plexus tumours are rare, with a peak incidence in the first two years of life. The most common location is the lateral ventricle in children, while in adults it is the fourth ventricle. The most common clinical manifestation is the signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension. They are histologically classified as plexus papilloma, atypical plexus papilloma, and plexus carcinoma. A review is presented on choroid plexus tumours treated in the Hospital Sant Joan de Déu between 1980 and 2014. A total of 18 patients have been treated. An analysis was made of the demographic, clinical, histological data, treatment, and recurrences. The treatment of choice is complete resection, accompanied by adjuvant therapy in carcinomas. In atypical papillomas, the use of adjuvant therapies is controversial, reserving radiation therapy for recurrences. Papillomas have a good outcome, whereas atypical papillomas and carcinomas outcome is poor.

  10. A new rat model of neuropathic pain: complete brachial plexus avulsion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Yuzhou, Liu; Yingjie, Zhou; Jie, Lao; Xin, Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Brachial plexus avulsion (BPA) is one of the major injuries in motor vehicle accidents and may result in neuropathic pain. Accumulating evidence suggests that 30-80% of BPA developed neuropathic pain in human. In our study, complete brachial plexus avulsion (C5-T1) rats model leads to the results that 37.5% of rats had long-lasting (up to 6 months) mechanical allodynia and cold allodynia. We observed the activation of astrocyte and microglial in cervical spinal cord after BPA. Complete brachial plexus avulsion mimics human nerve root traction injury following traffic accidents. The complete BPA rat model approach human injuries and can be used for further investigations. PMID:25596440

  11. Infection prevention and treatment in patients with major burn injuries.

    PubMed

    Rowley-Conwy, G

    Infection is a significant challenge in burn care, particularly for those patients who have major burn injuries. This article aims to review the literature and establish best practice in prevention and treatment of infection in patients with major burns. The article considers the causes and clinical features of wound infection, and examines systemic and local methods of prevention and treatment. PMID:21138123

  12. [Reflection around the return home of a head injury patient].

    PubMed

    Mouling, Virginie; Lambert, Marie; Charlier, Nathalie; Fonseca, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    The rehabilitation of people having suffered a head injury requires an inter-disciplinary perspective. Understanding the family dynamics as well as assessing the patient's resources and limits help professionals organise the necessary support to guide the patient and their family towards social reintegration.

  13. [Reflection around the return home of a head injury patient].

    PubMed

    Mouling, Virginie; Lambert, Marie; Charlier, Nathalie; Fonseca, Dolores

    2016-05-01

    The rehabilitation of people having suffered a head injury requires an inter-disciplinary perspective. Understanding the family dynamics as well as assessing the patient's resources and limits help professionals organise the necessary support to guide the patient and their family towards social reintegration. PMID:27155279

  14. Early Dynamics of Cerebrospinal CD14+ Monocytes and CD15+ Granulocytes in Patients after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Postl, Lukas Kurt; Bogner, Viktoria; van Griensven, Martijn; Beirer, Marc; Kanz, Karl Georg; Egginger, Christoph; Schmitt-Sody, Markus; Biberthaler, Peter; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig

    2015-01-01

    In traumatic brain injury (TBI) the analysis of neuroinflammatory mechanisms gained increasing interest. In this context certain immunocompetent cells might play an important role. Interestingly, in the actual literature there exist only a few studies focusing on the role of monocytes and granulocytes in TBI patients. In this regard it has recently reported that the choroid plexus represents an early, selective barrier for leukocytes after brain injury. Therefore the aim of this study was to evaluate the very early dynamics of CD14+ monocytes and CD15+ granulocyte in CSF of patients following severe TBI with regard to the integrity of the BBB. Cytometric flow analysis was performed to analyze the CD14+ monocyte and CD15+ granulocyte population in CSF of TBI patients. The ratio of CSF and serum albumin as a measure for the BBB's integrity was assessed in parallel. CSF samples of patients receiving lumbar puncture for elective surgery were obtained as controls. Overall 15 patients following severe TBI were enrolled. 10 patients were examined as controls. In patients, the monocyte population as well as the granulocyte population was significantly increased within 72 hours after TBI. The BBB's integrity did not have a significant influence on the cell count in the CSF. PMID:26568661

  15. Perioperative Evaluation of Patient Outcomes after Severe Acid Corrosive Injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming-Ho; Wu, Han-Yun

    2015-01-01

    We reviewed 64 patients with perforation or full-thickness injury of the alimentary tract after acid ingestion. Based on our classification of laparotomy findings, there were class I (n = 15); class II (n = 13); class III (n = 16); and class IV (n = 20). Study parameters were preoperative laboratory data, gastric perforation, associated visceral injury, and extension of the injury. End points of the study were the patients' mortality and length of hospital stay. All these patients underwent esophagogastrectomy with (n = 16) or without (n = 24) concomitant resection, esophagogastroduodenojejunectomy with (n = 4) or without (n = 13) concomitant resection, and laparotomy only (n = 7). Concomitant resections were performed on the spleen (n = 10), colon (n = 2), pancreas (n = 1), gall bladder (n = 1), skipped areas of jejunum (n = 4), and the first portion of the duodenum (n = 4). The study demonstrates five preoperative risk factors, female gender, shock status, shock index, pH value, and base deficit, and four intraoperative risk factors, gastric perforation, associated visceral injury, injury beyond the pylorus, and continuous involvement of the jejunum over a length of 50 cm. The overall mortality rate was 45.3%, which increased significantly with advancing class of corrosive injury. PMID:26582190

  16. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockade for the Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribbers, G. M.; Geurts, A. C. H.; Rijken, R. A. J.; Kerkkamp, H. E. M.

    1997-01-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome (RSD) is a neurogenic pain syndrome characterized by pain, vasomotor and dystrophic changes, and often motor impairments. This study evaluated the effectiveness of brachial plexus blockade with local anaesthetic drugs as a treatment for this condition. Three patients responded well; three did not. (DB)

  17. Patients With Isolated PCL Injuries Improve From Surgery as Much as Patients With ACL Injuries After 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Owesen, Christian; Sivertsen, Einar Andreas; Engebretsen, Lars; Granan, Lars-Petter; Årøen, Asbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reports on outcome after posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) reconstruction often contain both isolated PCL and combined knee ligament injuries. This makes it difficult to conclude on the outcome after reconstruction of isolated PCL injuries. Purpose: To investigate the outcome after PCL reconstruction in patients with an isolated PCL injury and to compare this with the outcome of patients treated with reconstruction after isolated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Seventy-one patients with an isolated PCL injury that was reconstructed surgically and who had registered in the Norwegian Knee Ligament Registry between 2004 and 2010 were included in this study. Patients with isolated ACL reconstructions (n = 9661) who had registered in the same period were included for comparison. Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was used as the patient-reported outcome measure. Preoperative and 2-year postoperative KOOS scores were compared. Changes in KOOS score reported by the PCL patients were compared with changes reported by the ACL patients. Results: At the 2-year postoperative follow-up of the PCL-reconstructed patients, the patient-reported outcome was improved, measured by KOOS as follows: pain, 15.1 (95% CI, 8.5-21.8; P < .001); symptoms, 0.9 (95% CI, –6.6 to 8.3; P = .82); activities of daily living, 13.2 (95% CI, 6.6-13.9; P < .001); sports, 20.7 (95% CI, 11.8-29.4; P < .001); and quality of life, 26.6 (95% CI, 18.9-34.2; P < .001). According to the KOOS, the incremental improvements were similar for PCL and ACL patients. Time from injury to surgery was longer for the PCL patients compared with ACL patients (median, 21.5 vs 8.0 months; P < .001). Conclusion: Patients undergoing PCL reconstruction can expect the same improvements in KOOS score as patients undergoing ACL reconstruction. However, PCL patients start out with an inferior score on average and consequently end up

  18. Hyperglycemia: A Predictor of Death in Severe Head Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kafaki, Simin Babaie; Alaedini, Kamaledin; Qorbani, Ashkan; Asadian, Leila; Haddadi, Kaveh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Management of hyperglycemia during an acute sickness in adults is accompanied by improved outcomes. We have designed a prospective study with meticulous attention to exclude all diabetes patients by checking hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) to avoid the ill-effects of hyperglycemia in patients with traumatic head injury admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS This prospective study included adults with traumatic primary brain injury with a Glasgow coma score of ≤8 necessitating mechanical ventilation treated in the period 2012–2015. After screening 311 patients, 220 were included in the study. Both blood glucose and HbA1c levels of all the patients at admission, as well as blood glucose level after 72 hours, were obtained from the records. The patients were later grouped based on their admission blood glucose levels (<200 mg/dL or ≥200 mg/dL). Injury severity score (ISS) was documented for every patient. As a final point, the outcomes were determined based on the hospital length of stay (HLS) and ICU length of stay (ILS), plusmortality rates. RESULTS About 39% (n = 85) of patients were admitted with hyperglycemia during the study period. The mortality rate in patients with glucose ≥200 mg/dL was 65.8% (N = 56), against 23.7% (N = 32) in the group with glucose <200 mg/dL, with mortality rising as the blood glucose level increased (P = 0.014). CONCLUSIONS We conclude that admission hyperglycemia is related with increased mortality rate in head injury patients, and comprehensive treatment of hyperglycemia can improve the outcome of severe head injury patients. PMID:27695379

  19. Injury of the Mammillothalamic Tract in Patients with Thalamic Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyeok Gyu; Lee, Han Do; Jang, Sung Ho

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Injury of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT) has been suggested as one of the plausible pathogenic mechanisms of memory impairment in patients with thalamic hemorrhage; however, it has not been clearly demonstrated so far. We attempted to investigate whether injury of the MTT documented by diffusion tensor tractography following thalamic hemorrhage correlates with cognitive impairment. Methods: We recruited 22 patients with a thalamic hemorrhage and 20 control subjects. MTTs were reconstructed using the probabilistic tractography method. Patients were classified into two subgroups: reconstructed group, patients whose MTT was reconstructed in the affected hemisphere, and non-reconstructed group, patients whose MTT was not reconstructed. Results: Mammillothalamic tract was reconstructed in 5 (22.7%, reconstructed group) patients in the affected hemisphere and was not reconstructed in the remaining 17 patients (77.3%, non-reconstructed group). In addition, the MTT was not reconstructed even in the unaffected hemisphere in four patients (23.5%) in non-reconstructed group. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity values of the affected hemisphere in reconstructed group also did not show significant differences from those in the unaffected hemisphere of reconstructed group and the control group (p > 0.05). However, the tract volume of the affected hemisphere in reconstructed group was significantly lower than that of the unaffected hemisphere in reconstructed group and the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A large portion of patients with thalamic hemorrhage appeared to suffer severe injury of the ipsilesional MTT (77.3%) and 18.2% of them appeared to suffer severe injury even in the contralesional MTT. In addition, the remaining 22.7% of patients who had preserved integrity of the ipsilesional MTT appeared to suffer partial injury of the ipsilesional MTT. PMID:24795611

  20. Hyperglycemia: A Predictor of Death in Severe Head Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kafaki, Simin Babaie; Alaedini, Kamaledin; Qorbani, Ashkan; Asadian, Leila; Haddadi, Kaveh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Management of hyperglycemia during an acute sickness in adults is accompanied by improved outcomes. We have designed a prospective study with meticulous attention to exclude all diabetes patients by checking hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c or glycated hemoglobin) to avoid the ill-effects of hyperglycemia in patients with traumatic head injury admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS This prospective study included adults with traumatic primary brain injury with a Glasgow coma score of ≤8 necessitating mechanical ventilation treated in the period 2012–2015. After screening 311 patients, 220 were included in the study. Both blood glucose and HbA1c levels of all the patients at admission, as well as blood glucose level after 72 hours, were obtained from the records. The patients were later grouped based on their admission blood glucose levels (<200 mg/dL or ≥200 mg/dL). Injury severity score (ISS) was documented for every patient. As a final point, the outcomes were determined based on the hospital length of stay (HLS) and ICU length of stay (ILS), plusmortality rates. RESULTS About 39% (n = 85) of patients were admitted with hyperglycemia during the study period. The mortality rate in patients with glucose ≥200 mg/dL was 65.8% (N = 56), against 23.7% (N = 32) in the group with glucose <200 mg/dL, with mortality rising as the blood glucose level increased (P = 0.014). CONCLUSIONS We conclude that admission hyperglycemia is related with increased mortality rate in head injury patients, and comprehensive treatment of hyperglycemia can improve the outcome of severe head injury patients.

  1. Outcome of isolated fetal choroid plexus cyst detected in prenatal sonography among infertile patients referred to Royan Institute: A 3-year study

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Shohreh; Ahmadi, Firoozeh; Javam, Maryam; Vosough Taghi dizaj, Ahmad; Niknejad, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have assessed the correlation of fetal choroid plexus cyst (CPC) and the risk of congenital anomalies, but few ones have discussed isolated CPC (with no other abnormal sonographic finding). Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the outcome of isolated fetal choroid plexus cyst and to specify its clinical significance. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out at Royan Institute in Tehran, Iran, between April 2009 and December 2012. All prenatal sonographies in this period of time were assessed using a computerized database and fetuses who had isolated CPC were recruited in the study. Sonography reports, mother serum screening test results, fetal echocardiography and amniocentesis were evaluated until birth. A follow-up phone call was made to all individuals to learn about the neonatal outcomes. Results: Overall, 6240 prenatal sonographies were performed in this setting during this period. Isolated CPC was detected in 64 fetuses. The results of double test (N=30), triple test (N=5) and fetal echocardiography (N =24) were normal. Quadruple test result showed 3 abnormal out of 29 cases that all had normal karyotypes. Four samples were dropped out due to premature rupture of membranes (N=3) and intrauterine fetal death (N=1). It was found that the outcomes of all remaining fetuses (N=60) were normal and no anomaly ones were seen until birth. Conclusion: Isolated CPC is a benign regressive condition with no clinical significance. PMID:26568762

  2. Lateral approach for supraclavicular brachial plexus block

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, DK; Sahu, Anjana

    2010-01-01

    A lateral approach described by Volker Hempel and Dr. Dilip Kotharihas been further studied, evaluated and described in detail in the present study. The aim of this study was to evaluate lateral approach of supraclavicular brachial plexus block, mainly in terms of successes rate and complication rate. The study was conducted in secondary level hospital and tertiary level hospital from 2004 to 2008. It was a prospective nonrandomized open-level study. Eighty-two patients of both sexes, aged between 18 and 65 years with ASA Grade I and II scheduled to undergo elective major surgery of the upper limb below the midarm, were selected for this new lateral approach of brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor block, any complications and need for supplement anaesthesia were observed. Success and complication rate were calculated in percentage. Average onset and duration of sensory and motor block was calculated as mean ± SD and percentage. Out of 82 patients, 75 (92%) have got successful block with no significant complication in any case. PMID:20885867

  3. Airway management of patients with traumatic brain injury/C-spine injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Yong

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is usually combined with cervical spine (C-spine) injury. The possibility of C-spine injury is always considered when performing endotracheal intubation in these patients. Rapid sequence intubation is recommended with adequate sedative or analgesics and a muscle relaxant to prevent an increase in intracranial pressure during intubation in TBI patients. Normocapnia and mild hyperoxemia should be maintained to prevent secondary brain injury. The manual-in-line-stabilization (MILS) technique effectively lessens C-spine movement during intubation. However, the MILS technique can reduce mouth opening and lead to a poor laryngoscopic view. The newly introduced video laryngoscope can manage these problems. The AirWay Scope® (AWS) and AirTraq laryngoscope decreased the extension movement of C-spines at the occiput-C1 and C2-C4 levels, improving intubation conditions and shortening the time to complete tracheal intubation compared with a direct laryngoscope. The Glidescope® also decreased cervical movement in the C2-C5 levels during intubation and improved vocal cord visualization, but a longer duration was required to complete intubation compared with other devices. A lightwand also reduced cervical motion across all segments. A fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided nasal intubation is the best method to reduce cervical movement, but a skilled operator is required. In conclusion, a video laryngoscope assists airway management in TBI patients with C-spine injury.

  4. Airway management of patients with traumatic brain injury/C-spine injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is usually combined with cervical spine (C-spine) injury. The possibility of C-spine injury is always considered when performing endotracheal intubation in these patients. Rapid sequence intubation is recommended with adequate sedative or analgesics and a muscle relaxant to prevent an increase in intracranial pressure during intubation in TBI patients. Normocapnia and mild hyperoxemia should be maintained to prevent secondary brain injury. The manual-in-line-stabilization (MILS) technique effectively lessens C-spine movement during intubation. However, the MILS technique can reduce mouth opening and lead to a poor laryngoscopic view. The newly introduced video laryngoscope can manage these problems. The AirWay Scope® (AWS) and AirTraq laryngoscope decreased the extension movement of C-spines at the occiput-C1 and C2-C4 levels, improving intubation conditions and shortening the time to complete tracheal intubation compared with a direct laryngoscope. The Glidescope® also decreased cervical movement in the C2-C5 levels during intubation and improved vocal cord visualization, but a longer duration was required to complete intubation compared with other devices. A lightwand also reduced cervical motion across all segments. A fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided nasal intubation is the best method to reduce cervical movement, but a skilled operator is required. In conclusion, a video laryngoscope assists airway management in TBI patients with C-spine injury. PMID:26045922

  5. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, Du Hwan; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-04-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  6. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  7. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review

    PubMed Central

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  8. Pancreatic injury in patients with septic shock: A literature review.

    PubMed

    Chaari, Anis; Abdel Hakim, Karim; Bousselmi, Kamel; Etman, Mahmoud; El Bahr, Mohamed; El Saka, Ahmed; Hamza, Eman; Ismail, Mohamed; Khalil, Elsayed Mahmoud; Kauts, Vipin; Casey, William Francis

    2016-07-15

    Sepsis and septic shock are life threatening condition associated with high mortality rate in critically-ill patients. This high mortality is mainly related to the inadequacy between oxygen delivery and cellular demand leading to the onset of multiorgan dysfunction. Whether this multiorgan failure affect the pancreas is not fully investigated. In fact, pancreatic injury may occur because of ischemia, overwhelming inflammatory response, oxidative stress, cellular apoptosis and/or metabolic derangement. Increased serum amylase and/or lipase levels are common in patients with septic shock. However, imaging test rarely reveal significant pancreatic damage. Whether pancreatic dysfunction does affect the prognosis of patients with septic shock or not is still a matter of debate. In fact, only few studies with limited sample size assessed the clinical relevance of the pancreatic injury in this group of patients. In this review, we aimed to describe the epidemiology and the physiopathology of pancreatic injury in septic shock patients, to clarify whether it requires specific management and to assess its prognostic value. Our main finding is that pancreatic injury does not significantly affect the outcome in septic shock patients. Hence, increased serum pancreatic enzymes without clinical features of acute pancreatitis do not require further imaging investigations and specific therapeutic intervention. PMID:27559431

  9. Urinary Markers of Tubular Injury in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gebreweld, Angesom

    2016-01-01

    Renal disease is a common complication of HIV-infected patients, associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events, progression to AIDS, AIDS-defining illness, and mortality. Early and accurate identification of renal disease is therefore crucial to improve patient outcomes. The use of serum creatinine, along with proteinuria, to detect renal involvement is essentially to screen for markers of glomerular disease and may not be effective in detecting earlier stages of renal injury. Therefore, more sensitive and specific markers are needed in order to early identify HIV-infected patients at risk of renal disease. This review article summarizes some new and important urinary markers of tubular injury in HIV-infected patients and their clinical usefulness in the renal safety follow-up of TDF-treated patients. PMID:27493802

  10. Pain in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Finnerup, Nanna Brix

    2013-12-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) often have chronic pain, which may have a major impact on their quality of life. The purpose of this article is to present an update on the classification of SCI pain, recent advances in the understanding of underlying mechanisms, and current evidence-based treatment of SCI pain. The paper also discusses difficulties in assessing pain after SCI, both in the clinic and in preclinical research. While we continue to increase our understanding of underlying mechanisms, treatment is still unsatisfactory, and there is an unmet need to improve pain relief. We need to improve preclinical assessment of pain-like behavior in central pain models, and improve the clinical assessment of pain and our understanding of the interaction with cognitive, emotional, and social factors. In future studies on mechanisms and treatment, we need to acknowledge the different phenotypes of chronic SCI pain.

  11. Patients with Spinal Cord Injuries Favor Administration of Methylprednisolone

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Christian A.; Kundu, Bornali; Rosenbluth, Jeffrey; Hawryluk, Gregory W. J.

    2016-01-01

    Methylprednisolone sodium succinate (MPSS) for treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has been associated with both benefits and adverse events. MPSS administration was the standard of care for acute SCI until recently when its use has become controversial. Patients with SCI have had little input in the debate, thus we sought to learn their opinions regarding administration of MPSS. A summary of the published literature to date on MPSS use for acute SCI was created and adjudicated by 28 SCI experts. This summary was then emailed to 384 chronic SCI patients along with a survey that interrogated the patients’ neurological deficits, communication with physicians and their views on MPSS administration. 77 out of 384 patients completed the survey. 28 respondents indicated being able to speak early after injury and of these 24 reported arriving at the hospital within 8 hours of injury. One recalled a physician speaking to them about MPSS and one patient reported choosing whether or not to receive MPSS. 59.4% felt that the small neurological benefits associated with MPSS were ‘very important’ to them (p<0.0001). Patients had ‘little concern’ for potential side-effects of MPSS (p = 0.001). Only 1.4% felt that MPSS should not be given to SCI patients regardless of degree of injury (p<0.0001). This is the first study to report SCI patients’ preferences regarding MPSS treatment for acute SCI. Patients favor the administration of MPSS for acute SCI, however few had input into whether or not it was administered. Conscious patients should be given greater opportunity to decide their treatment. These results also provide some guidance regarding MPSS administration in patients unable to communicate. PMID:26789007

  12. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  13. [Conservative therapy in rehabilitating patients with eye injuries].

    PubMed

    Verigo, E N; Kuznetsova, I A; Romanova, I Iu; Orlova, E N; Kapitonov, Iu A

    2002-01-01

    The authors offer recommendations on the choice and use of optimal clinically tried drugs in ophthalmic traumatology with consideration for posttraumatic changes, doses, and mechanism of action. The recommendations are based on the clinical observations of 16,000 patients treated at department of ocular injuries, reconstructive surgery, and ocular prosthetics of Helmholtz Institute of Ocular Diseases in Moscow.

  14. Patient positioning and prevention of injuries in patients undergoing laparoscopic and robot-assisted urologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Sukhu, Troy; Krupski, Tracey L

    2014-04-01

    Positioning injuries in the perioperative period are one of the inherent risks of surgery, but particularly in robot-assisted urologic surgery, and can result in often unrecognized morbidity. Injuries such as upper or lower extremity peripheral neuropathies occur via neural mechanisms and injuries such as compartment syndrome, rhabdomyolysis, ischemic optic neuropathy, and acute arterial occlusion occur via vascular mechanisms. The risk of injury may be exacerbated by operative and patient-related risk factors. Patient-related risk factors include ASA class and BMI, while surgery-related risk factors include physical orientation of the patient and operative length. These injuries can be prevented or reduced by joint effort of the surgeon, anesthesiologist, and operating room staff.

  15. Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy for Children with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy: Two Single-Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buesch, Francisca Eugster

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this pilot study was to investigate the feasibility of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) in children with obstetric brachial plexus palsy and receive preliminary information about functional improvements. Two patients (age 12 years) with obstetric brachial plexus palsy were included for a 126-h home-based CIMT…

  16. Inter-hemispheric plasticity in patients with median nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Lotta; Nyman, Torbjörn; Hansson, Thomas; Brismar, Tom; Engström, Maria

    2016-08-15

    Peripheral nerve injuries result in reorganization within the contralateral hemisphere. Furthermore, recent animal and human studies have suggested that the plastic changes in response to peripheral nerve injury also include several areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere. The objective of this study was to map the inter-hemispheric plasticity in response to median nerve injury, to investigate normal differences in contra- and ipsilateral activation, and to study the impact of event-related or blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design on ipsilateral activation. Four patients with median nerve injury at the wrist (injured and epineurally sutured >2 years earlier) and ten healthy volunteers were included. 3T fMRI was used to map the hemodynamic response to brain activity during tactile stimulation of the fingers, and a laterality index (LI) was calculated. Stimulation of Digits II-III of the injured hand resulted in a reduction in contralateral activation in the somatosensory area SI. Patients had a lower LI (0.21±0.15) compared to healthy controls (0.60±0.26) indicating greater ipsilateral activation of the primary somatosensory cortex. The spatial dispersion of the coordinates for areas SI and SII was larger in the ipsilateral than in the contralateral hemisphere in the healthy controls, and was increased in the contralateral hemisphere of the patients compared to the healthy controls. There was no difference in LI between the event-related and blocked paradigms. In conclusion, patients with median nerve injury have increased ipsilateral SI area activation, and spatially more dispersed contralateral SI activation during tactile stimulation of their injured hand. In normal subjects ipsilateral activation has larger spatial distribution than the contralateral. Previous findings in patients performed with the blocked fMRI paradigm were confirmed. The increase in ipsilateral SI activation may be due to an interhemispheric disinhibition associated with

  17. Spinal anaesthesia with adjunctive intrathecal morphine versus continuous lumbar plexus blockade: a randomised comparison for analgesia after hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, M J; Danesh-Clough, T K

    2015-07-01

    Following elective total hip replacement, both continuous lumbar plexus blockade and spinal anaesthesia (with adjunctive intrathecal morphine) have shown early outcome benefits over opioid analgesia and single-injection nerve block. However, the two techniques have not been compared in a prospective randomised manner. Our study examined 50 patients undergoing elective hip joint replacement who were randomised to receive spinal anaesthesia (with adjunctive intrathecal morphine 0.1 mg) or patient-controlled continuous lumbar plexus blockade. All surgery was conducted under general anaesthesia. Measured outcomes included numerically rated postoperative pain, supplemental opioid consumption and indices of mobilisation together with complications. Results show that block placement time was marginally shorter for the spinal group (5 versus 7 minutes, P=0.01). The primary outcome, worst pain on movement/mobilisation during the first 24 hours, was not statistically significantly different between groups. Patients in the lumbar plexus group were given more intraoperative opioid and rescue morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit (median = 4 versus 0 mg, P <0.001), with correspondingly higher pain scores (median 5/10 versus 0/10, P <0.001). Pain scores during the subsequent 24 hours were similar between groups, but more patients in the spinal group were given rescue morphine (5 versus 0, P=0.02). Physiotherapy mobilisation indices appeared similar between groups. More spinal group patients reported pruritus (12 versus 5, P=0.01), but antiemetic requirements, episodes of disorientation, arterial oxygen desaturation and falls were all similar between groups. Postoperative symptoms suggestive of neurological irritation or injury did not differ between groups. We found that following elective hip joint replacement, compared to continuous lumbar plexus blockade, spinal anaesthesia incorporating adjunctive intrathecal morphine did not result in a statistically significant

  18. Endogenous lipoid pneumonia in a cachectic patient after brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji; Mu, Jiao; Lin, Wei; Dong, Hongmei

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous lipoid pneumonia (EnLP) is an uncommon non-life-threatening inflammatory lung disease that usually occurs in patients with conditions such as lung cancers, primary sclerosing cholangitis, and undifferentiated connective tissue disease. Here we report a case of EnLP in a paralytic and cachectic patient with bronchopneumonia after brain injury. A 40-year-old man experienced a severe brain injury in an automobile accident. He was treated for 1 month and his status plateaued. However, he became paralyzed and developed cachexia and ultimately died 145 days after the accident. Macroscopically, multifocal yellowish firm nodules were visible on scattered gross lesions throughout the lungs. Histologically, many foam cells had accumulated within the alveoli and alveolar walls accompanied by a surrounding interstitial infiltration of lymphocytes. The findings were in accordance with a diagnosis of EnLP. Bronchopneumonia was also noted. To our knowledge, there have been few reports of EnLP associated with bronchopneumonia and cachexia after brain injury. This uncommon pathogenesis should be well recognized by clinicians and forensic pathologists. The case reported here should prompt medical staff to increase the nutritional status and fight pulmonary infections in patients with brain injury to prevent the development of EnLP. PMID:26097618

  19. Correlating MDCT Liver Injury Grade and Clinical Outcome in Patients Without Significant Extra-hepatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravi; Kumar, Atin; Baliyan, Vinit; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Amit; Kumar, Subodh; Misra, M C

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to correlate multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) grading with clinical severity and outcome in liver trauma patients without significant extrahepatic injury. Over a period of 2 years (2011-2013), all patients showing evidence of liver injury on contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) abdomen and without significant extrahepatic trauma were prospectively included in the study. Correlation between the CT injury grade and outcome in terms of mortality, duration of ICU/hospital stay, fluid and blood requirements, need for intervention and complications were assessed. The significance of the difference in mortality, duration of ICU/hospital stay, fluid requirement and blood requirements among the patients with various injury grades was assessed by Kruskal-Wallis test. The significance of the difference in need for intervention and complications among the patients with various injury grades was assessed by Fisher's exact test. A total of 198 patients were found to have evidence of hepatic injury on CECT. Out of 198 patients, 117 had insignificant extrahepatic trauma. The overall mean age for these 117 patients was 25.74 ± 15.53 (age range 2-84 years). Death rates according to AAST grades were 0 % in grades II and III, 6.89 % in grade IV and 9.09 % in grade V (p = 0.053). The mean ICU and total hospital stay for grade II was 1.32 and 5.91 days, for grade III was 1.76 and 8.48, for grade IV was 2.86 and 10.31 days and for grade V was 6.54 and 12 days, respectively (p = 0.0001 for ICU, p = 0.0003 for total stay). Mean input and fluid deficit according to various grades were 8634/2607 ml for grade II, 9535/2555 ml for grade III, 15,549/6242 ml for grade IV and 19,958/8280 ml for grade V (p value input-0.0016, output-input (fluid deficit)-0.0001). Average unit of RBC and sum of the blood products transfused were 1.73 and 2.26 for grade II, 2.18 and 2.72 for grade III, 3.03 and 6.27 for grade IV, 6.85 and 38.12 for grade V

  20. Respiratory Management in the Patient with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras Vázquez, Rita; Rascado Sedes, Pedro; Montoto Marqués, Antonio; Ferreiro Velasco, M. Elena

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) often lead to impairment of the respiratory system and, consequently, restrictive respiratory changes. Paresis or paralysis of the respiratory muscles can lead to respiratory insufficiency, which is dependent on the level and completeness of the injury. Respiratory complications include hypoventilation, a reduction in surfactant production, mucus plugging, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Vital capacity (VC) is an indicator of overall pulmonary function; patients with severely impaired VC may require assisted ventilation. It is best to proceed with intubation under controlled circumstances rather than waiting until the condition becomes an emergency. Mechanical ventilation can adversely affect the structure and function of the diaphragm. Early tracheostomy following short orotracheal intubation is probably beneficial in selected patients. Weaning should start as soon as possible, and the best modality is progressive ventilator-free breathing (PVFB). Appropriate candidates can sometimes be freed from mechanical ventilation by electrical stimulation. Respiratory muscle training regimens may improve patients' inspiratory function following a SCI. PMID:24089664

  1. Assessment of Hyperactive Reflexes in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactive reflexes are commonly observed in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) but there is a lack of convenient and quantitative characterizations. Patellar tendon reflexes were examined in nine SCI patients and ten healthy control subjects by tapping the tendon using a hand-held instrumented hammer at various knee flexion angles, and the tapping force, quadriceps EMG, and knee extension torque were measured to characterize patellar tendon reflexes quantitatively in terms of the tendon reflex gain (Gtr), contraction rate (Rc), and reflex loop time delay (td). It was found that there are significant increases in Gtr and Rc and decrease in td in patients with spinal cord injury as compared to the controls (P < 0.05). This study presented a convenient and quantitative method to evaluate reflex excitability and muscle contraction dynamics. With proper simplifications, it can potentially be used for quantitative diagnosis and outcome evaluations of hyperreflexia in clinical settings. PMID:25654084

  2. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  3. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury in patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Galeiras, Rita; Mourelo, Mónica; Pértega, Sonia; Lista, Amanda; Ferreiro, Mª Elena; Salvador, Sebastián; Montoto, Antonio; Rodríguez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (SCIs) exhibit factors that, in other populations, have been associated with rhabdomyolysis. Purpose: The aim of the study is to determine the incidence of rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute traumatic SCI admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), as well as the development of secondary acute kidney injury and associated factors. Study Design and Setting: This was an observational, retrospective study. Patient Sample: All adult patients admitted to the ICU with acute traumatic SCI who presented rhabdomyolysis, diagnosed through creatine phosphokinase (CPK) levels >500 IU/L. Outcome Measures: Incidence of rhabdomyolysis and subsequent renal dysfunction was calculated. Materials and Methods: Data about demographic variables, comorbidity, rhabdomyolysis risk factors, and variables involving SCI, severity scores, and laboratory parameters were obtained from clinical records. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify renal injury risk factors. Results: In 2006–2014, 200 patients with acute SCI were admitted to ICU. Of these, 103 had rhabdomyolysis (incidence = 51.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.3%–58.7%). The most typical American Spinal Injury Association classification was A (70.3%). The injury severity score was 30.3 ± 12.1 and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score was 5.6 ± 3.3 points. During their stay, 57 patients (55.3%; 95% CI: 45.2%–65.4%) presented renal dysfunction (creatinine ≥1.2 mg/dL). In the multivariate analysis, variables associated with renal dysfunction were creatinine at admission (odds ratio [OR] = 9.20; P = 0.006) and hemodynamic SOFA score the day following admission (OR = 1.33; P = 0.024). Creatinine was a better predictor of renal dysfunction than the peak CPK value during the rhabdomyolysis (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve: 0.91 vs. 0.63, respectively). Conclusions: Rhabdomyolysis is a frequent condition in patients

  4. Embolization of Isolated Lumbar Artery Injuries in Trauma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Sofocleous, Constantinos T. Hinrichs, Clay R.; Hubbi, Basil; Doddakashi, Satish; Bahramipour, Philip; Schubert, Johanna

    2005-12-15

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the angiographic findings and results of embolotherapy in the management of lumbar artery trauma. Methods. All patients with lumbar artery injury who underwent angiography and percutaneous embolization in a state trauma center within a 10-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Radiological information and procedural reports were reviewed to assess immediate angiographic findings and embolization results. Long-term clinical outcome was obtained by communication with the trauma physicians as well as with chart review. Results. In a 10-year period, 255 trauma patients underwent abdominal aortography. Eleven of these patients (three women and eight men) suffered a lumbar artery injury. Angiography demonstrated active extravasation (in nine) and/or pseudoaneurysm (in four). Successful selective embolization of abnormal vessel(s) was performed in all patients. Coils were used in six patients, particles in one and gelfoam in five patients. Complications included one retroperitoneal abscess, which was treated successfully. One patient returned for embolization of an adjacent lumbar artery due to late pseudoaneurysm formation. Conclusions. In hemodynamically stable patients, selective embolization is a safe and effective method for immediate control of active extravasation, as well as to prevent future hemorrhage from an injured lumbar artery.

  5. A mixed choroid plexus papilloma and ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yujin; Kim, Seong Ik; Kim, Seung-Ki; Kim, In One; Park, Sung-Hye

    2016-04-01

    We report a novel case of a mixed choroid plexus papilloma (CPP) and ependymoma with cartilaginous differentiation. This kind of mixed tumor has not been previously reported in the English literature. The patient was a 5-year-old girl, who presented with a 1-week history of fever and numbness of the right lower limb. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain with gadolinium revealed a heterogeneously enhancing mass in the occipital horn of the left lateral ventricle. Histologically, the tumor showed an intermixed CPP area and a low-grade papillary ependymoma-like area, which was studded with cartilage islands and psammoma bodies. In many foci, direct transition of CPP and ependymoma was observed, but there were no high-grade features. We report this novel case, describe the unique microscopic and immunohistochemical features, and speculate on the pathogenesis. PMID:26670168

  6. Patients' perspectives of a spinal cord injury unit.

    PubMed

    Nelson, A L

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an ethnographic description of the subculture of a spinal cord injury (SCI) unit. The research method was qualitative, combining ethnographic interviews, participant observation, and document review. A 30 bed SCI facility on the west coast was selected as the setting for this ethnographic description. The developmental research sequence model (Spradley, 1980) and grounded theory (Glaser & Strauss, 1967) were used for data analysis. Findings indicate optimal rehabilitation is a creative and individualized process of reintegration. Reintegration prepares the individual for coping with physical limitations, architectural barriers, and societal prejudices while simultaneously making the person feel intact and valued. Successful reintegration promotes a "fit" between the newly injured spinal cord patient and the home environment. The patient learns to compensate for the physical limitations of the spinal cord injury in a manner that promotes safety, comfort, and personal worth. Successful reintegration assures the newly injured SCI patient returns to a viable occupation, feels physically attractive, participates in a rich, full social life, and maintains family ties. Four phases of reintegration emerged: buffering, transcending, toughening, and launching. Buffering is the nurturing and protective process of lessening, absorbing, or protecting the newly injured SCI patient against the shock of multiple ramifications of the injury and the indignities of being a patient; Transcending is the process of helping SCI patients recognize and rise above culturally imposed limitations and negative beliefs about people with disabilities. The "toughening up" process focuses on compensating for physical limitations, gaining independence, and maintaining social interactions without "using the disability." Launching is the process of (1) exposing rehabilitation patients to the real world, (2) exploring the range of options for living in the

  7. An Analysis of Inhalation Injury Diagnostic Methods and Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jessica A; Ching, Yiu-Hei; Shivers, Steven C; Karlnoski, Rachel A; Payne, Wyatt G; Smith, David J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient outcomes according to the method of diagnosing burn inhalation injury. After approval from the American Burn Association, the National Burn Repository Dataset Version 8.0 was queried for patients with a diagnosis of burn inhalation injury. Subgroups were analyzed by diagnostic method as defined by the National Burn Repository. All diagnostic methods listed for each patient were included, comparing mortality, hospital days, intensive care unit (ICU) days, and ventilator days (VDs). Z-tests, t-tests, and linear regression were used with a statistical significance of P value of less than .05. The database query yielded 9775 patients diagnosed with inhalation injury. The greatest increase in mortality was associated with diagnosis by bronchoscopy or carbon monoxide poisoning. A relative increase in hospital days was noted with diagnosis by bronchoscopy (9 days) or history (2 days). A relative increase in ICU days was associated with diagnosis according to bronchoscopy (8 days), clinical findings (2 days), or history (2 days). A relative increase in VDs was associated with diagnosis by bronchoscopy (6 days) or carbon monoxide poisoning (3 days). The combination of diagnosis by bronchoscopy and clinical findings increased the relative difference across all comparison measures. The combination of diagnosis by bronchoscopy and carbon monoxide poisoning exhibited decreased relative differences when compared with bronchoscopy alone. Diagnosis by laryngoscopy showed no mortality or association with poor outcomes. Bronchoscopic evidence of inhalation injury proved most useful, predicting increased mortality, hospital, ICU, and VDs. A combined diagnosis determined by clinical findings and bronchoscopy should be considered for clinical practice. PMID:26594867

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, D S; Bruce, S K; Jimenez, E M; Schick, D G; Morrow, J W; Montgomerie, J Z

    1982-01-01

    The prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization of patients with spinal cord injury was studied annually from 1976 to 1980. The urethra, perineum, rectum, drainage bag, and urine of patients on the spinal cord injury service were cultured. A total of 224 men and 32 women were studied. Most patients were managed with an external urinary collection system or padding, with or without intermittent catheterization. P. aeruginosa was cultured from one or more body sites (urethra, perineum, or rectum) in 65% of men and 18% of women. Drainage bags on the beds were frequently colonized with P. aeruginosa (73%). Significant bacteriuria with P. aeruginosa was present in 19% of the men and 13% of the women. P. aeruginosa colonization of body sites in men was closely associated with the use of an external urinary collection system. Significantly greater urethral and perineal colonization was found in men using an external urinary collection system. P. aeruginosa serotype 11 was the predominant serotype for the first 3 years, and the number of patients colonized with serotype 11 increased with length of hospital stay. The prevalence of serotype 11 significantly decreased in the last 2 years. The antibiotic susceptibility of the strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from these patients did not change in the 5 years, except that there was increasing susceptibility to carbenicillin in later years. This increasing susceptibility to carbenicillin was a reflection of a decreased prevalence of serotype 11 in these patients, since serotype 11 was more resistant than other serotypes to carbenicillin. PMID:6818251

  9. Neurologic injury in snowmobiling

    PubMed Central

    Plog, Benjamin A.; Pierre, Clifford A.; Srinivasan, Vasisht; Srinivasan, Kaushik; Petraglia, Anthony L.; Huang, Jason H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Snowmobiles are increasingly popular recreational, all-terrain utility vehicles that require skill and physical strength to operate given their inherent maneuverability, acceleration, and top speed capabilities. These same characteristics increase the risk of injury with the operation of these vehicles, particularly neurological injury. We characterize our series of 107 patients involved in snowmobiling accidents. Methods: From January 2004 to January 2012, all snowmobiling-related injuries referred to our regional trauma center were reviewed. Information had been recorded in the hospital's trauma registry and medical records were retrospectively reviewed for data pertaining to the injuries, with particular emphasis on neurological injuries and any associated details. Results: A total of 107 patients were identified. Ninety percent of injured riders were male. The mean age was 34.4 years (range 10-70), with 7% younger than age 16. The mean Injury Severity Score was 12.0 ± 0.69 (range 1-34). Although not documented in all patients, alcohol use was found in 7.5% of the patients and drug use found in one patient. Documentation of helmet use was available for only 31 of the patients; of which 13% were not helmeted. Causes included being thrown, flipped, or roll-over (33%), striking a stationary object (27%), being struck by a snowmobile (9%), striking another snowmobile (5.5%) or a car, train, or truck (5.5%), being injured by the machine itself (9%), other (2%) or unspecified (18%). Head injuries occurred in 35% patients, including concussion, subarachnoid hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, contusion, and facial/skull fracture. Spinal fractures occurred in 21% of the patients. Fractures to the thoracic spine were the most common (50%), followed by the cervical (41%) and lumbar (36%) spine. There were also three brachial plexus injuries, one tibial nerve injury, and one internal carotid artery dissection. Average length of stay was 4.98 ± 0.56 days

  10. [Objective assessment of trauma severity in patients with spleen injuries].

    PubMed

    Alekseev, V S; Ivanov, V A; Alekseev, S V; Vaniukov, V P

    2013-01-01

    The work presents an analysis of condition severity of 139 casualties with isolated and combined spleen injuries on admission to a surgical hospital. The assessment of condition severity was made using the traditional gradation and score scale VPH-SP. The degree of the severity of combined trauma of the spleen was determined by the scales ISS. The investigation showed that the scale ISS and VPH-SP allowed objective measurement of the condition severity of patients with spleen trauma. The score assessment facilitated early detection of the severe category of the patients, determined the diagnostic algorithm and the well-timed medical aid. PMID:23808228

  11. [Thromboprophylaxis in multiple trauma and head injury patients].

    PubMed

    Colomina, M J; Mora, L; Ciércoles, E

    2011-12-01

    Venous thromboembolic disease (VTD) is a frequent condition with serious clinical consequences and elevated mortality related to underdiagnosis or undertreatment, especially in patients with multiple trauma. The incidence of VTD in these patients ranges from 5% to 58% and thromboprophylaxis is considered essential for proper management. Traditionally, pelvic and lower extremity fractures, head injury, and prolonged immobilization have been cited as risk factors for VTD; however, how these factors combine with others to predict high risk is still unclear. The best way to approach VTD prophylaxis in multiple trauma patients is currently unclear. Both mechanical and pharmacologic means are available. The main clinical practice guidelines recommend thromboprophylaxis with low-molecular weight heparin, which can be started 48 hours after trauma, unless patients are still bleeding, in which case mechanical compression is recommended in spite of the limited effectiveness of that measure. Compression is maintained until the risk of hemorrhage has diminished. There is insufficient evidence to support routine use of ultrasound imaging or venography. In patients with head injury who are at risk for intracranial bleeding, the use of low-molecular weight heparin should be delayed until risk disappears but mechanical prophylaxis (compression) can be considered according to clinical status.

  12. Outcome Assessments of Patients with Posttraumatic "Ultra-Time Vascular Injuries" of the Extremities.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Feng; Fang, Qiong-Xuan; Zhan, Hong-Yan; Wang, Fan; Cao, Wei; Zhao, Gang

    2015-12-07

    The management of posttraumatic vascular injury that presents after 8 h, or "ultra-time vascular injury", is daunting, and inciting recognition of this injury is vital. We retrospectively analyzed 29 patients with ultra-time vascular injuries to determine the patients' demographic characteristics and identify the determinants for amputation and disability. The age distribution of the high-risk population was from 18 years to 40 years, which indicated that these patients had plenty of productive life remaining. Injuries to the lower limbs (79.31%) were over four times more common than injuries to the upper limbs (17.24%), and open and blunt injuries occurred most commonly. The overall rate of limb salvage was 82.76% (24/29) and limb function is excellent in 45.83% (11/24) of the patients. The remaining patients experienced different degrees of disability in their limbs, which was determined by the anatomic location of the injury, and the presence of a combined arterial and venous injury, nerve injury, and complex soft tissue injury, as well as the occurrence of compartment syndrome. Hence, we recommend limb-salvage treatment for patients with traumatic ultra-time vascular injuries, particularly for those aged between 18 years and 40 years. Furthermore, we encourage the development of limb-salvage techniques for ultra-time vascular injuries.

  13. Valproic acid protects neurons and promotes neuronal regeneration after brachial plexus avulsion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Wu, Dianxiu; Li, Rui; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Cui, Shusen

    2013-01-01

    Valproic acid has been shown to exert neuroprotective effects and promote neurite outgrowth in several peripheral nerve injury models. However, whether valproic acid can exert its beneficial effect on neurons after brachial plexus avulsion injury is currently unknown. In this study, brachial plexus root avulsion models, established in Wistar rats, were administered daily with valproic acid dissolved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) or normal water. On days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 28 after avulsion injury, tissues of the C5–T1 spinal cord segments of the avulsion injured side were harvested to investigate the expression of Bcl-2, c-Jun and growth associated protein 43 by real-time PCR and western blot assay. Results showed that valproic acid significantly increased the expression of Bcl-2 and growth associated protein 43, and reduced the c-Jun expression after brachial plexus avulsion. Our findings indicate that valproic acid can protect neurons in the spinal cord and enhance neuronal regeneration following brachial plexus root avulsion. PMID:25206605

  14. A cadaveric microanatomical study of the fascicular topography of the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sumit; Prasad, G Lakshmi; Lalwani, Sanjeev

    2016-08-01

    OBJECT Mapping of the fascicular anatomy of the brachial plexus could provide the nerve surgeon with knowledge of fascicular orientation in spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. This knowledge might improve the surgical outcome of nerve grafting in brachial plexus injuries by anastomosing related fascicles and avoiding possible axonal misrouting. The objective of this study was to map the fascicular topography in the spinal nerves of the brachial plexus. METHODS The entire right-sided brachial plexus of 25 adult male cadavers was dissected, including all 5 spinal nerves (C5-T1), from approximately 5 mm distal to their exit from the intervertebral foramina, to proximal 1 cm of distal branches. All spinal nerves were tagged on the cranial aspect of their circumference using 10-0 nylon suture for orientation. The fascicular dissection of the C5-T1 spinal nerves was performed under microscopic magnification. The area occupied by different nerve fascicles was then expressed as a percentage of the total cross-sectional area of a spinal nerve. RESULTS The localization of fascicular groups was fairly consistent in all spinal nerves. Overall, 4% of the plexus supplies the suprascapular nerve, 31% supplies the medial cord (comprising the ulnar nerve and medial root of the median nerve [MN]), 27.2% supplies the lateral cord (comprising the musculocutaneous nerve and lateral root of the MN), and 37.8% supplies the posterior cord (comprising the axillary and radial nerves). CONCLUSIONS The fascicular dissection and definitive anatomical localization of fascicular groups is feasible in plexal spinal nerves. The knowledge of exact fascicular location might be translatable to the operating room and can be used to anastomose related fascicles in brachial plexus surgery, thereby avoiding the possibility of axonal misrouting and improving the results of plexal reconstruction.

  15. Knee Function Assessment in Patients With Meniscus Injury

    PubMed Central

    Naimark, Micah B.; Kegel, Gary; O’Donnell, Thomas; Lavigne, Stephanie; Heveran, Chelsea; Crawford, Dennis C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Outcomes of meniscus surgery are typically assessed with patient questionnaires that help capture symptoms and functional limitations but may not provide an accurate representation of underlying joint health. There are currently no performance-based measures of knee function in patients with symptomatic meniscus injury. Purpose: To assess the reproducibility, response to partial meniscectomy, and correlation with patient-reported questionnaire outcomes of novel performance-based knee function tests. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A battery of 9 tests for activities that require knee movements essential for everyday living was developed. Intra- and interrater reproducibility was assessed in 50 meniscus tear patients completing the battery at 2 preoperative assessments with either the same or different examiners. Response to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was evaluated in 35 of these patients 6 weeks after surgery. Subjects also completed the Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) questionnaires pre- and postoperatively. Results: The intrarater intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were excellent for all tests (ICC > 0.8). Interrater ICC > 0.8 was observed for step-down, stair descent, star lunges, and timed treadmill travel. Performance on all tests improved significantly with surgery (P < .05), with the greatest improvement in sit-to-stand and stair ascent and descent. A greater percentage response to surgery was seen on questionnaire outcomes (20%-65%) than on performance-based tests (3%-15%). Moderate to poor correlations existed between the KOOS activities of daily living subscale and the performance-based tests (all ICCs ≤ 0.4). Conclusion: Performance-based knee function tests demonstrated good reproducibility and responsiveness in patients undergoing partial meniscectomy. Clinical Relevance: As both patient perception and functional

  16. Amputation Following Hand Escharotomy in Patients with Burn Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Scott M.; Choo, Joshua; Cooney, Damon; Moore, Alyssa L.; Sebens, Matt; Neumeister, Michael W.; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hand burns are commonly seen in patients with burn injury. In the past, focus was on lifesaving measures, but with advances in burn care during the last century, the paradigm shifted to digital salvage and eventually to functional digital salvage. Good outcomes are heavily dependent on the care that is rendered during the initial management of the burn. Methods: A retrospective medical record review was conducted through the Central Illinois Regional Burn Center Patient Registry. Patients with burn injury treated with upper extremity and hand escharotomy between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2005, were included in the study. Results: We identified a total of 34 patients with 57 burned hands. Six hands required delayed amputation of digits despite recognition of neurovascular compromise and escharotomy, yielding a 10% amputation rate. No correlation could be drawn with regard to total body surface area, age, or sex. Conclusion: Important principles in the acute phase include early splinting, recognition of the need for escharotomy and complete escharotomy when necessary, early excision and grafting, and involvement of occupational therapy for splinting and to guide both active and passive exercises. Although uncommon, some extremity burns may require subsequent amputation despite prompt attention and optimal treatment. In our case series, the need for amputation after successful escharotomies of salvageable digits was associated with full-thickness and electrical burns. PMID:26977219

  17. Neuroendocrine abnormalities in patients with traumatic brain injury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, X. Q.; Wade, C. E.

    1991-01-01

    This article provides an overview of hypothalamic and pituitary alterations in brain trauma, including the incidence of hypothalamic-pituitary damage, injury mechanisms, features of the hypothalamic-pituitary defects, and major hypothalamic-pituitary disturbances in brain trauma. While hypothalamic-pituitary lesions have been commonly described at postmortem examination, only a limited number of clinical cases of traumatic hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction have been reported, probably because head injury of sufficient severity to cause hypothalamic and pituitary damage usually leads to early death. With the improvement in rescue measures, an increasing number of severely head-injured patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction will survive to be seen by clinicians. Patterns of endocrine abnormalities following brain trauma vary depending on whether the injury site is in the hypothalamus, the anterior or posterior pituitary, or the upper or lower portion of the pituitary stalk. Injury predominantly to the hypothalamus can produce dissociated ACTH-cortisol levels with no response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and a limited or failed metopirone test, hypothyroxinemia with a preserved thyroid-stimulating hormone response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone, low gonadotropin levels with a normal response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone, a variable growth hormone (GH) level with a paradoxical rise in GH after glucose loading, hyperprolactinemia, the syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH), temporary or permanent diabetes insipidus (DI), disturbed glucose metabolism, and loss of body temperature control. Severe damage to the lower pituitary stalk or anterior lobe can cause low basal levels of all anterior pituitary hormones and eliminate responses to their releasing factors. Only a few cases showed typical features of hypothalamic or pituitary dysfunction. Most severe injuries are sufficient to damage both structures and produce a mixed endocrine picture

  18. Tracheal decannulation protocol in patients affected by traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-04-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing. PMID:25992074

  19. Tracheal Decannulation Protocol in Patients Affected by Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zanata, Isabel de Lima; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Hirata, Gisela Carmona

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The frequency of tracheostomy in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) contrasts with the lack of objective criteria for its management. The study arose from the need for a protocol in the decision to remove the tracheal tube. Objective To evaluate the applicability of a protocol for tracheal decannulation. Methods A prospective study with 20 patients, ranging between 21 and 85 years of age (average 33.55), 4 of whom were women (20%) and 16 were men (80%). All patients had been diagnosed by a neurologist as having TBI, and the anatomical region of the lesion was known. Patients were evaluated following criteria for tracheal decannulation through a clinical evaluation protocol developed by the authors. Results Decannulation was performed in 12 (60%) patients. Fourteen (70%) had a score greater than 8 on the Glasgow Coma Scale and only 2 (14%) of these were not able to undergo decannulation. Twelve (60%) patients maintained the breathing pattern with occlusion of the tube and were successfully decannulated. Of the 20 patients evaluated, 11 (55%) showed no signs suggestive of tracheal aspiration, and of these, 9 (82%) began training on occlusion of the cannula. The protocol was relevant to establish the beginning of the decannulation process. The clinical assessment should focus on the patient's condition to achieve early tracheal decannulation. Conclusion This study allowed, with the protocol, to establish six criteria for tracheal decannulation: level of consciousness, respiration, tracheal secretion, phonation, swallowing, and coughing. PMID:25992074

  20. Elements of renal injury in patients with erysipelas.

    PubMed

    Velciov, Silvia; Gluhovschi, Gh; Feier, V; Curescu, Manuela; Trandafirescu, Virginia; Petrică, Ligia; Gluhovschi, Cristina; Bob, F; Bozdog, Gh; Gadalean, Florica; Florescu, Carmen; Bobu, Maria; Chiliban, Andreea

    2010-01-01

    Erysipelas is an infectious disease caused by group A beta hemolytical streptococci which may produce renal lesions, most frequently glomerular disease. Renal injury although known is less studied in practice. Rarely bioptical exams have been performed, thus the problem of the relationship erysipelas glomerular disease is practically not solved. The aim of this study was a cross-sectional analysis of renal involvement produced by erysipelas in two departments where patients with erysipelas are diagnosed and treated: Dermatology and Infectious Diseases. We investigated 166 patients (86M, 80F; mean age 61.66 +/- 18.42) with erysipelas hospitalized in the Departments of Dermatology (55 patients-33%) and Infectious Diseases (111 patients-66%) during 2005-2009. The diagnosis was established on clinical and biological data. In these patients clinical and biological exam has been performed. We assessed GFR and urinalysis (hematuria and proteinuria). The control group consisted of 110 apparently healthy persons. Of the 166 patients with erysipelas we found asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in 82 (47%), isolated proteinuria in 19 (11%) patients and proteinuria associated with hematuria in 21 (13%) patients, and isolated hematuria in 38 (23%) patients. We did not find patients with nephrotic or nephritic syndrome. In the control group we found asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in 25 (23%) of the patients. A statistically significant difference was between the two groups (p < 0.01). Asymptomatic urinary abnormalities have been more frequent in patients with erysipelas from the Infectious Diseases Department compared to those from the Dermatology Department. A statistically significant difference has been found (p < 0.03). In patients with recurrent erysipelas (43 patients-26%) we found asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in 26 (54%) of the patients compared to the presence of asymptomatic urinary abnormalities in patients with acute erysipelas in 56 out of 123 (46%). Mean

  1. Retrospective Cohort Analysis of Chest Injury Characteristics and Concurrent Injuries in Patients Admitted to Hospital in the Wenchuan and Lushan Earthquakes in Sichuan, China

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong; Zhao, Yong-Fan

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare retrospectively the characteristics of chest injuries and frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients after earthquakes of different seismic intensity. Methods We compared the cause, type, and body location of chest injuries as well as the frequencies of other, concurrent injuries in patients admitted to our hospital after the Wenchuan and Lushan earthquakes in Sichuan, China. We explored possible relationships between seismic intensity and the causes and types of injuries, and we assessed the ability of the Injury Severity Score, New Injury Severity Score, and Chest Injury Index to predict respiratory failure in chest injury patients. Results The incidence of chest injuries was 9.9% in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake and 22.2% in the less intensive Lushan earthquake. The most frequent cause of chest injuries in both earthquakes was being accidentally struck. Injuries due to falls were less prevalent in the stronger Wenchuan earthquake, while injuries due to burial were more prevalent. The distribution of types of chest injury did not vary significantly between the two earthquakes, with rib fractures and pulmonary contusions the most frequent types. Spinal and head injuries concurrent with chest injuries were more prevalent in the less violent Lushan earthquake. All three trauma scoring systems showed poor ability to predict respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries. Conclusions Previous studies may have underestimated the incidence of chest injury in violent earthquakes. The distributions of types of chest injury did not differ between these two earthquakes of different seismic intensity. Earthquake severity and interval between rescue and treatment may influence the prevalence and types of injuries that co-occur with the chest injury. Trauma evaluation scores on their own are inadequate predictors of respiratory failure in patients with earthquake-related chest injuries. PMID

  2. Acute Alcohol Use and Injury Patterns in Young Adult Prehospital Patients.

    PubMed

    Barton, David J; Tift, Frank W; Cournoyer, Lauren E; Vieth, Julie T; Hudson, Korin B

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine if acute alcohol consumption is associated with differences in injury pattern among young adult patients with traumatic injuries presenting to emergency medical services (EMS). A cross-sectional, retrospective review of prehospital patient care reports (PCRs) was conducted evaluating injured patients who presented to a collegiate EMS agency from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2012. Included patients were age 18-24 y and sustained an injury within the previous 24 h. PCRs were reviewed independently by two abstractors to determine if the patient was documented to have acutely consumed alcohol proximate to his/her injury. Primary and secondary sites of regional body injury were recorded. Injury severity was recorded using the Revised Trauma Score (RTS). The association between primary injury site and acute alcohol use was assessed using a chi-square test. Multiple logistic regression was used to control for sex in predicting injury type. Of 440 injured patients, 135 (30.6%) had documented alcohol use prior to injury. Acute alcohol consumption altered the overall pattern of regional injury (p < 0.001). Alcohol users were more likely to present with injury secondary to assault, fall/trip, and unknown mechanism of injury (p < 0.001, all comparisons). RTS scores were statistically lower in the alcohol group (p < 0.001), although the clinical significance of this is unclear. Controlling for sex, acute alcohol consumption predicted increased risk of head/neck injury 5.59-fold (p < 0.001). Acute alcohol use in collegiate EMS patients appears to alter injury patterns in young adults and increases risk of head/neck injury. EMS providers in similar agencies should consider these trends when assessing and treating injured college-aged patients. PMID:27002348

  3. Profile of patients with chemical injury and sensitivity.

    PubMed Central

    Ziem, G; McTamney, J

    1997-01-01

    Patients reporting sensitivity to multiple chemicals at levels usually tolerated by the healthy population were administered standardized questionnaires to evaluate their symptoms and the exposures that aggravated these symptoms. Many patients were referred for medical tests. It is thought that patients with chemical sensitivity have organ abnormalities involving the liver, nervous system (brain, including limbic, peripheral, autonomic), immune system, and porphyrin metabolism, probably reflecting chemical injury to these systems. Laboratory results are not consistent with a psychologic origin of chemical sensitivity. Substantial overlap between chemical sensitivity, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome exists: the latter two conditions often involve chemical sensitivity and may even be the same disorder. Other disorders commonly seen in chemical sensitivity patients include headache (often migraine), chronic fatigue, musculoskeletal aching, chronic respiratory inflammation (rhinitis, sinusitis, laryngitis, asthma), attention deficit, and hyperactivity (affected younger children). Less common disorders include tremor, seizures, and mitral valve prolapse. Patients with these overlapping disorders should be evaluated for chemical sensitivity and excluded from control groups in future research. Agents whose exposures are associated with symptoms and suspected of causing onset of chemical sensitivity with chronic illness include gasoline, kerosene, natural gas, pesticides (especially chlordane and chlorpyrifos), solvents, new carpet and other renovation materials, adhesives/glues, fiberglass, carbonless copy paper, fabric softener, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, carpet shampoos (lauryl sulfate) and other cleaning agents, isocyanates, combustion products (poorly vented gas heaters, overheated batteries), and medications (dinitrochlorobenzene for warts, intranasally packed neosynephrine, prolonged antibiotics, and general anesthesia with petrochemicals). Multiple

  4. Profile of patients with chemical injury and sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ziem, G; McTamney, J

    1997-03-01

    Patients reporting sensitivity to multiple chemicals at levels usually tolerated by the healthy population were administered standardized questionnaires to evaluate their symptoms and the exposures that aggravated these symptoms. Many patients were referred for medical tests. It is thought that patients with chemical sensitivity have organ abnormalities involving the liver, nervous system (brain, including limbic, peripheral, autonomic), immune system, and porphyrin metabolism, probably reflecting chemical injury to these systems. Laboratory results are not consistent with a psychologic origin of chemical sensitivity. Substantial overlap between chemical sensitivity, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome exists: the latter two conditions often involve chemical sensitivity and may even be the same disorder. Other disorders commonly seen in chemical sensitivity patients include headache (often migraine), chronic fatigue, musculoskeletal aching, chronic respiratory inflammation (rhinitis, sinusitis, laryngitis, asthma), attention deficit, and hyperactivity (affected younger children). Less common disorders include tremor, seizures, and mitral valve prolapse. Patients with these overlapping disorders should be evaluated for chemical sensitivity and excluded from control groups in future research. Agents whose exposures are associated with symptoms and suspected of causing onset of chemical sensitivity with chronic illness include gasoline, kerosene, natural gas, pesticides (especially chlordane and chlorpyrifos), solvents, new carpet and other renovation materials, adhesives/glues, fiberglass, carbonless copy paper, fabric softener, formaldehyde and glutaraldehyde, carpet shampoos (lauryl sulfate) and other cleaning agents, isocyanates, combustion products (poorly vented gas heaters, overheated batteries), and medications (dinitrochlorobenzene for warts, intranasally packed neosynephrine, prolonged antibiotics, and general anesthesia with petrochemicals). Multiple

  5. Clinical and immunologic approach to patients with alleged environmental injury

    SciTech Connect

    Salvaggio, J.E. )

    1991-06-01

    Many of the challenging clinical evaluations facing today's practitioner and particularly today's allergist involve suspected hidden environmental exposure, not only to traditional allergens that induce classic symptoms of IgE-mediated disease, but to a wide range of simple chemicals encountered in trace amounts that may be associated with multisystemic symptoms including behavioral and neurologic manifestations. In the litigious social climate in which we live, the increased number of disability and personal injury claims and the ambiguous posturing by the legal profession often dictate a new set of diagnostic rules and norms. These must be considered by allergists and other practitioners in evaluating patients with polysomatic complaints allegedly due to trace environmental contaminants and with little or no identifiable pathology by gross or microscopic examination of tissues or laboratory data. These patients may have been declared totally disabled and may be seeking or receiving large amounts of personal injury compensation. Furthermore, they may be under treatment with multiple unproven diagnostic and therapeutic modalities and properly controlled challenge procedures may be necessary to prove or disprove the necessity for these diagnostic tests and therapies. With the ever increasing industrialization of our environment, it is likely that patients with these problems, who present for evaluation, will increase in number. It is therefore prudent for the practitioner to consider sound, comprehensive approaches to diagnoses and management of these conditions and above all to allay morbid fears of clinically relevant disease or immune system dysfunction based on results of isolated laboratory test findings. 83 references.

  6. Mental Trauma Experienced by Caregivers of patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Syed Hassan, Syed Tajuddin; Jamaludin, Husna; Abd Raman, Rosna; Mohd Riji, Haliza; Wan Fei, Khaw

    2013-01-01

    Context As with care giving and rehabilitation in chronic illnesses, the concern with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), is that the caregivers are so overwhelmingly involved in caring and rehabilitation of the victim that in the process they become traumatized themselves. This review intends to shed light on the hidden and silent trauma sustained by the caregivers of severe brain injury survivors. Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is the highest contributor of TBI or DAI. The essence of trauma is the infliction of pain and suffering and having to bear the pain (i.e. by the TBI survivor) and the burden of having to take care and manage and rehabilitate the TBI survivor (i.e. by the TBI caregiver). Moreover many caregivers are not trained for their care giving task, thus compounding the stress of care giving and rehabilitating patients. Most research on TBI including DAI, focus on the survivors and not on the caregivers. TBI injury and its effects and impacts remain the core question of most studies, which are largely based on the quantitative approach. Evidence Acquisition Qualitative research can better assess human sufferings such as in the case of DAI trauma. While quantitative research can measure many psychometric parameters to assess some aspects of trauma conditions, qualitative research is able to fully reveal the meaning, ramification and experience of TBI trauma. Both care giving and rehabilitation are overwhelmingly demanding; hence , they may complicate the caregivers’ stress. However, some positive outcomes also exist. Results Caregivers involved in caring and rehabilitation of TBI victims may become mentally traumatized. Posttraumatic recovery of the TBI survivor can enhance the entire family’s closeness and bonding as well as improve the mental status of the caregiver. Conclusions A long-term longitudinal study encompassing integrated research is needed to fully understand the traumatic experiences of

  7. General surgery problems in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Charney, K J; Juler, G L; Comarr, A E

    1975-09-01

    Twenty-four patients with spinal cord injuries were studied to correlate their responses to intra-abdominal disease with the level and completeness of the cord lesion. Patients with complete cervical lesions and lesions of the upper part of the thoracic region (C-4 to T-6) usually responded by early noniocalized abdominal pain associated with signs of autonomic dysreflexia. As the disease progressed to involve the parietal peritoneum, these patients were more capable of localizing pain to the corresponding dermatome, whereas patients with incomplete lesions were able to localize their pain earlier. Patients with lumbar lesions and lesions of the lower part of the thoracic region (T-7 to L-3) were able to localize their pain earlier than those with lesions located higher in the thoracic region. All patients had delayed diagnoses except those with hemorrhage of the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract. Irrespective of level of cord lesion, increased pulse rate was themost prominent objective acute intra-abdominal pathologic finding. Shoulder pain in the quadriplegic is a most helpful sign. PMID:1080412

  8. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment.

  9. Neurinomas of the brachial plexus: case report.

    PubMed

    Forte, A; Gallinaro, L S; Bertagni, A; Montesano, G; Prece, V; Illuminati, G

    1999-01-01

    Neurinomas, also referred to as neurilemmomas and schwannomas, are rare benign tumours of the peripheral nerves, a low proportion of which arise from the brachial plexus. Authors report a case of an ancient schwannoma arising from the brachial plexus. The tumour, usually asymptomatic, may cause sensory radicular symptoms, or rarely motor deficits in the involved arm. Enucleation of the tumour from the nerve without damage to any of the fascicles is the correct treatment. PMID:10710825

  10. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Paolo; Tonon, Marta; Pilutti, Chiara; Morando, Filippo; Piano, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common and life-threatening complication in patients with cirrhosis. Recently, new criteria for the diagnosis of AKI have been proposed in patients with cirrhosis by the International Club of Ascites. Almost all types of bacterial infections can induce AKI in patients with cirrhosis representing its most common precipitating event. The bacterial infection-induced AKI usually meets the diagnostic criteria of hepatorenal syndrome (HRS). Well in keeping with the "splanchnic arterial vasodilation hypothesis", it has been stated that HRS develops as a consequence of a severe reduction of effective circulating volume related to splanchnic arterial vasodilation and to an inadequate cardiac output. Nevertheless, the role of bacterial infections in precipitating organ failures, including renal failure, is enhanced when their course is characterized by the development of a systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), thus, when sepsis occurs. Sepsis has been shown to be capable to induce "per se" AKI in animals as well as in patients conditioning also the features of renal damage. This observation suggests that when precipitated by sepsis, the pathogenesis and the clinical course of AKI also in patients with cirrhosis may differentiate to a certain extent from AKI with another or no precipitating factor. The purpose of this review is to describe the features of AKI precipitated by bacterial infections and to highlight whether infection and/or the development of SIRS may influence its clinical course, and, in particular, the response to treatment.

  11. Barriers to implementing intermittent catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients in Northwest Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, U.K.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M; Singh, Gurpreet; Oo, Tun; Hughes, Peter L

    2011-01-01

    Intermittent catheterisation is the preferred method of managing the neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury. However, spinal cord physicians experienced problems when trying to implement an intermittent catheterisation regime in some spinal cord injury patients in the northwest of England. We present illustrative cases to describe practical difficulties encountered by patients while trying to adopt an intermittent catheterisation regime. Barriers to intermittent catheterisation are (1) caregivers or nurses are not available to carry out five or six catheterisations a day; (2) lack of time to perform intermittent catheterisations; (3) unavailability of suitable toilet facilities in public places, including restaurants and offices; (4) redundant prepuce in a male patient, which prevents ready access to urethral meatus; (5) urethral false passage; (6) urethral sphincter spasm requiring the use of flexible-tip catheters and á-adrenoceptor-blocking drugs; (7) reluctance to perform intermittent catheterisation in patients >60 years by some health professionals; and (8) difficulty in accessing the urethral meatus for catheterisation while the patient is sitting up, especially in female patients. These cases demonstrate the urgent need for provision of trained caregivers who can perform intermittent catheterisation, and improvement in public facilities that are suitable for performing catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients. Further, vigilance should be exercised during each catheterisation in order to prevent complications, such as urethral trauma and consequent false passages. Health professionals should make additional efforts to implement intermittent catheterisation in female spinal cord injury patients and in those >60 years. PMID:21218264

  12. Barriers to implementing intermittent catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients in Northwest Regional Spinal Injuries Centre, Southport, U.K.

    PubMed

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M; Singh, Gurpreet; Oo, Tun; Hughes, Peter L

    2011-01-05

    Intermittent catheterisation is the preferred method of managing the neurogenic bladder in patients with spinal cord injury. However, spinal cord physicians experienced problems when trying to implement an intermittent catheterisation regime in some spinal cord injury patients in the northwest of England. We present illustrative cases to describe practical difficulties encountered by patients while trying to adopt an intermittent catheterisation regime. Barriers to intermittent catheterisation are (1) caregivers or nurses are not available to carry out five or six catheterisations a day; (2) lack of time to perform intermittent catheterisations; (3) unavailability of suitable toilet facilities in public places, including restaurants and offices; (4) redundant prepuce in a male patient, which prevents ready access to urethral meatus; (5) urethral false passage; (6) urethral sphincter spasm requiring the use of flexible-tip catheters and á-adrenoceptor-blocking drugs; (7) reluctance to perform intermittent catheterisation in patients >60 years by some health professionals; and (8) difficulty in accessing the urethral meatus for catheterisation while the patient is sitting up, especially in female patients. These cases demonstrate the urgent need for provision of trained caregivers who can perform intermittent catheterisation, and improvement in public facilities that are suitable for performing catheterisation in spinal cord injury patients. Further, vigilance should be exercised during each catheterisation in order to prevent complications, such as urethral trauma and consequent false passages. Health professionals should make additional efforts to implement intermittent catheterisation in female spinal cord injury patients and in those >60 years.

  13. Recovery of nerve injury-induced alexia for Braille using forearm anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Björkman, Anders; Rosén, Birgitta; Lundborg, Göran

    2008-04-16

    Nerve injuries in the upper extremity may severely affect hand function. Cutaneous forearm anaesthesia has been shown to improve hand sensation in nerve-injured patients. A blind man who lost his Braille reading capability after an axillary plexus injury was treated with temporary cutaneous forearm anaesthesia. After treatment sensory functions of the hand improved and the patient regained his Braille reading capability. The mechanism behind the improvement is likely unmasking of inhibited or silent neurons, but after repeated treatment sessions at increasing intervals the improvement has remained at 1-year follow-up, implying a structural change in the somatosensory cortex.

  14. Early Trajectory of Psychiatric Symptoms after Traumatic Brain Injury: Relationship to Patient and Injury Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Emma K.T.; Bagiella, Emilia; Arenth, Patricia; Dikmen, Sureyya; Hesdorffer, Dale C.; Novack, Thomas A.; Ricker, Joseph H.; Zafonte, Ross

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Psychiatric disturbance is common and disabling after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Few studies have investigated the trajectory of psychiatric symptoms in the first 6 months postinjury, when monitoring and early treatment might prevent persistent difficulties. The aim of this study was to examine the trajectory of psychiatric symptoms 1–6 months post-TBI, the patient/injury characteristics associated with changes, and characteristics predictive of persisting symptoms. A secondary analysis was performed on data from a clinical trial with three data collection points. Across eight centers, 872 participants with complicated mild to severe TBI were administered the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) at 30, 90, and 180 days postinjury. Mixed-effects models were used to assess longitudinal changes in the BSI Global Severity Index (GSI). Multi-variate logistic regression was used to assess predictors of clinically significant GSI elevations persisting to 6 months post-TBI. In general, GSI scores improved over time. Women improved faster than men; race/ethnicity was also significantly associated with rate of change, with Hispanics showing the most and African Americans the least improvement. Clinically significant psychiatric symptoms (caseness) occurred in 42% of the sample at 6 months, and more than one type of symptom was common. Significant predictors of caseness included African American race, age from 30 to 60 years, longer post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) duration, pre-TBI unemployment, and pre-TBI risky alcohol use. Findings indicate that psychiatric symptoms are common in the first 6 months post-TBI and frequently extend beyond the depression and anxiety symptoms that may be most commonly screened. Patients with longer PTA and preinjury alcohol misuse may need more intensive monitoring for symptom persistence. PMID:24237113

  15. Preventable deaths in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Chun; Song, Kyoung Jun; Shin, Sang Do; Lee, Seung Chul; Park, Ju Ok; Holmes, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study is to evaluate the rate of and etiology for preventable deaths in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Methods We conducted a retrospective, multicenter review of patients with TBIs who died within 7 days of their traumatic event from June 2008 to May 2009. Three board certified emergency physicians independently reviewed every case using a structured survey format. Cases were considered preventable deaths only if all physicians independently agreed the death was preventable. Management errors contributing to the preventable death were determined. Results Forty-one patients who died from TBI were eligible. Preventable deaths were identified in nine (22%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11 to 28) cases. Fifty-six management errors were identified including 36 (64%; 95% CI, 50 to 77) in the emergency department and 13 (23%; 95% CI, 13 to 36) in the prehospital phase. Thirty (54%; 95% CI, 40 to 67) management errors were process-related, and 26 (46%; 95% CI, 33 to 60) were structure-related. Conclusion An important and measurable rate of preventable mortality occurs in the initial care of TBI patients. Errors were common and most occurred in the emergency department. In addition, errors were common in the prehospital phase but did not always lead to mortality. When analyzed by type of problem, both process-related and structure-related errors occurred in similar proportions.

  16. Intestinal Microbiota in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gursel, Ihsan; Yilmaz, Bilge; Gursel, Mayda

    2016-01-01

    Human intestinal flora comprises thousands of bacterial species. Growth and composition of intestinal microbiota is dependent on various parameters, including immune mechanisms, dietary factors and intestinal motility. Patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently display neurogenic bowel dysfunction due to the absence of central nervous system control over the gastrointestinal system. Considering the bowel dysfunction and altered colonic transit time in patients with SCI, we hypothesized the presence of a significant change in the composition of their gut microbiome. The objective of this study was to characterize the gut microbiota in adult SCI patients with different types of bowel dysfunction. We tested our hypothesis on 30 SCI patients (15 upper motor neuron [UMN] bowel syndrome, 15 lower motor neuron [LMN] bowel syndrome) and 10 healthy controls using the 16S rRNA sequencing. Gut microbial patterns were sampled from feces. Independent of study groups, gut microbiota of the participants were dominated by Blautia, Bifidobacterium, Faecalibacterium and Ruminococcus. When we compared all study groups, Roseburia, Pseudobutyrivibrio, Dialister, Marvinbryantia and Megamonas appeared as the genera that were statistically different between groups. In comparison to the healthy group, total bacterial counts of Pseudobutyrivibrio, Dialister and Megamonas genera were significantly lower in UMN bowel dysfunction group. The total bacterial count of Marvinbryantia genus was significantly lower in UMN bowel dysfunction group when compared to the LMN group. Total bacterial counts of Roseburia, Pseudobutyrivibrio and Megamonas genera were significantly lower in LMN bowel dysfunction group when compared to healthy groups. Our results demonstrate for the first time that butyrate-producing members are specifically reduced in SCI patients when compared to healthy subjects. The results of this study would be of interest since to our knowledge, microbiome-associated studies

  17. [Epidemiology of acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients in China].

    PubMed

    Lang, Xiabing; Yang, Yi; Chen, Jianghua

    2016-03-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a disease spectrum ranging from minimal elevation of serum creatinine to complete renal failure. It is significantly associated with increased mortality, length of hospital stay and medical care cost. With the increasing awareness of the importance of AKI, several high quality and multicenter epidemiological studies have been published recently in China. However, the results differ a lot due to the differences in regional economic development, the selection of target population and testing indicators, the disease definition and study strategies. The reported incidence of AKI in China is much lower than that in the developed countries. This article will analyze the current status and the problems facing AKI epidemiological studies of hospitalized patients with our own data and those from literature. The article intends to clarify the burden of AKI,to increase the awareness of AKI among clinicians and policy makers for achieving the goal of "zero by 2025" in China. PMID:27273996

  18. Characteristics of nasal injuries incurred during sports activities: analysis of 91 patients.

    PubMed

    Cannon, C Ron; Cannon, Rob; Young, Kevin; Replogle, William; Stringer, Scott; Gasson, Elizabeth

    2011-08-01

    Nasal injuries are among the most common sports injuries. We conducted a prospective, observational study of 91 patients, aged 7 to 60 years (mean: 18.3), who had sustained a nasal injury while engaging in a sport, exercise, or other recreational physical activity. We found that a substantial proportion of these injuries occurred in females (29.7% of cases). A high percentage of injuries (86.8%) occurred in those who had been participating in a noncontact sport; the sport most often implicated was basketball (26.4%). Also, injuries were more common during organized competition as opposed to recreational play (59.3 vs. 40.7%). Of the 91 nasal injuries, 59 (64.8%) were fractures, most of which were treated with a closed reduction. Almost all of the patients in this study (92.3%) were able to return to their sport. We conclude that most sports-related nasal fractures are not preventable.

  19. Axillary brachial plexus block--an underused technique in the accident and emergency department.

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, C A; Bowden, D F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare axillary brachial plexus block and Bier's block as methods of providing upper limb anaesthesia. METHODS: Axillary brachial plexus or Bier's blocks were performed on all patients requiring upper limb anaesthesia in a three month period. For Bier's block, a single cuff tourniquet and 3 mg/kg 0.5% prilocaine were used. For axillary plexus block, 40 ml 1% lignocaine with adrenaline (1:200,000) were used, given by perivascular or transarterial technique. Prospective analysis was made of time to complete limb anaesthesia, type of procedure performed, and duration of limb anaesthesia. Patient perception of analgesia and satisfaction with the method of anaesthesia was assessed using a 10 point visual analogue scale. RESULTS: 75 patients underwent procedures requiring upper limb anaesthesia; 39 received axillary plexus block and 36 Bier's block. 72% of Bier's blocks and 77% of axillary plexus provided complete anaesthesia without the need for supplemental analgesia. The median time to onset of anaesthesia was 10 min for Bier's block and 32.5 min for axillary block (P < 0.001). The median duration of anaesthesia was 15 min for Bier's block and 240 min for axillary block (P < 0.001). Mean scores for analgesia were 9.7 for axillary blocks and 8.8 for Bier's block (P < 0.001). 87% of the axillary block group were completely satisfied with the method of anaesthesia, compared with 56% of the Bier's block group. CONCLUSIONS: Brachial plexus blocks are an alternative form of providing upper limb anaesthesia in the accident and emergency department. They are relatively simple to perform, well tolerated by patients, and have the advantage of providing prolonged analgesia without the need for additional medication. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9248910

  20. Recognition of vascular injury in the trauma patient.

    PubMed

    Baker, M S

    1990-05-01

    Medical personnel should be able to recognize vascular injuries. Knowing the key signs of ischemia, namely pallor, pulselessness, pain, paresis, and paresthesia and the soft signs of vascular injury will help to prevent limb loss.

  1. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0515).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey... Collection. Abstract: Information collected on VA Form 10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord...

  2. Acute kidney injury in critically ill cancer patients: an update.

    PubMed

    Lameire, Norbert; Vanholder, Raymond; Van Biesen, Wim; Benoit, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cancer represent a growing group among actual ICU admissions (up to 20 %). Due to their increased susceptibility to infectious and noninfectious complications related to the underlying cancer itself or its treatment, these patients frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI). A wide variety of definitions for AKI are still used in the cancer literature, despite existing guidelines on definitions and staging of AKI. Alternative diagnostic investigations such as Cystatin C and urinary biomarkers are discussed briefly. This review summarizes the literature between 2010 and 2015 on epidemiology and prognosis of AKI in this population. Overall, the causes of AKI in the setting of malignancy are similar to those in other clinical settings, including preexisting chronic kidney disease. In addition, nephrotoxicity induced by the anticancer treatments including the more recently introduced targeted therapies is increasingly observed. However, data are sometimes difficult to interpret because they are often presented from the oncological rather than from the nephrological point of view. Because the development of the acute tumor lysis syndrome is one of the major causes of AKI in patients with a high tumor burden or a high cell turnover, the diagnosis, risk factors, and preventive measures of the syndrome will be discussed. Finally, we will briefly discuss renal replacement therapy modalities and the emergence of chronic kidney disease in the growing subgroup of critically ill post-AKI survivors. PMID:27480256

  3. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request... spinal cord patients' satisfaction with VA rehabilitation and health care system. Affected Public... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title:...

  4. Relation between injury of the periaqueductal gray and central pain in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Park, So Min; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a pivotal role in pain modulation. We attempted to examine the relation between injury of the PAG and central pain in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-one patients with mild TBI with central pain and 31 healthy control subjects were recruited for this study. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used for evaluation of central pain. The region of interest was defined for the PAG and the fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured. The FA value was significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference in the ADC value was observed between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). VAS score of the patient group showed significant moderate negative correlation with the FA (r = −0.38), while no significant correlation was observed between VAS score and the ADC value (P < 0.05). We demonstrated injury of the PAG in patients with central pain following mild TBI and the degree of injury of the PAG was closely related to the degree of central pain. PMID:27368020

  5. Relation between injury of the periaqueductal gray and central pain in patients with mild traumatic brain injury: Observational study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Park, So Min; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-06-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) plays a pivotal role in pain modulation. We attempted to examine the relation between injury of the PAG and central pain in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI).Sixty-one patients with mild TBI with central pain and 31 healthy control subjects were recruited for this study. Visual analog scale (VAS) was used for evaluation of central pain. The region of interest was defined for the PAG and the fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were measured.The FA value was significantly lower in the patient group than in the control group (P < 0.05). However, no significant difference in the ADC value was observed between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). VAS score of the patient group showed significant moderate negative correlation with the FA (r = -0.38), while no significant correlation was observed between VAS score and the ADC value (P < 0.05).We demonstrated injury of the PAG in patients with central pain following mild TBI and the degree of injury of the PAG was closely related to the degree of central pain.

  6. Above Elbow Amputation Under Brachial Plexus Block at Supraclavicular and Interscalene Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Hassan; Yadagiri, Manjula; Macrosson, Duncan; Majeed, Amer

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The brachial plexus block is a commonly performed procedure in the anesthetic practice today. It is performed for analgesia as well as anesthesia for upper limb procedures. It has been used for amputation and replantation surgeries of the upper limb. Case presentation: We present the case of a 68-year-old gentleman who had brachial plexus block at supraclavicular and interscalene levels as the sole anesthetic for undergoing above elbow amputation. He was deemed to be very high risk for a general anesthetic as he suffered from severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and a very poor exercise tolerance (NYHA Class III). The supraclavicular brachial plexus block was supplemented with an interscalene brachial plexus block due to inadequate surgical anesthesia encountered with the former. The procedure was successfully completed under regional anesthesia. Conclusions: The brachial plexus block can be performed at different levels in the same patient to achieve desired results, while employing sound anatomical knowledge and adhering to the maximum safe dose limit of the local anesthetic. PMID:26705518

  7. Decreased FOXJ1 expression and its ciliogenesis programme in aggressive ependymoma and choroid plexus tumours.

    PubMed

    Abedalthagafi, Malak S; Wu, Michael P; Merrill, Parker H; Du, Ziming; Woo, Terri; Sheu, Shu-Hsien; Hurwitz, Shelley; Ligon, Keith L; Santagata, Sandro

    2016-03-01

    Well-differentiated human cancers share transcriptional programmes with the normal tissue counterparts from which they arise. These programmes broadly influence cell behaviour and function and are integral modulators of malignancy. Here, we show that the master regulator of motile ciliogenesis, FOXJ1, is highly expressed in cells along the ventricular surface of the human brain. Strong expression is present in cells of the ependyma and the choroid plexus as well as in a subset of cells residing in the subventricular zone. Expression of FOXJ1 and its transcriptional programme is maintained in many well-differentiated human tumours that arise along the ventricle, including low-grade ependymal tumours and choroid plexus papillomas. Anaplastic ependymomas as well as choroid plexus carcinomas show decreased FOXJ1 expression and its associated ciliogenesis programme genes. In ependymomas and choroid plexus tumours, reduced expression of FOXJ1 and its ciliogenesis programme are markers of poor outcome and are therefore useful biomarkers for assessing these tumours. Transitions in ciliogenesis define distinct differentiation states in ependymal and choroid plexus tumours with important implications for patient care. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26690880

  8. Comparision of nerve stimulator and ultrasonography as the techniques applied for brachial plexus anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Brachial plexus block is useful for upper extremity surgery, and many techniques are available. The aim of our study was to compare the efficacy of axillary brachial plexus block using an ultrasound technique to the peripheral nerve stimulation technique. Methods 60 patients scheduled for surgery of the forearm or hand were randomly allocated into two groups (n = 30 per group). For Group 1; US, and for Group 2 PNS was applied. The quality and the onset of the sensorial and motor blockade were assessed. The sensorial blockade, motor blockade time and quality of blockade were compared among the cases. Results The time needed to perform the axillary brachial plexus block averaged is similar in both groups (p > 0.05). Although not significant statistically, it was observed that the sensory block had formed earlier in Group 1 (p > 0.05). But the degree of motor blockade was intenser in Group 1 than in Group 2 (p < 0.05). Conclusions Ultrasound offers a new possibility for identifiying the nerves of the brachial plexus for regional anesthesia. The ultrasound-guided axillary brachial plexus block is a safe method with faster onset time and better quality of motor blockade compared to peripheral nerve stimulation technique. PMID:21255404

  9. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-01

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury. PMID:25624828

  10. Brachial Plexus Block for Cancer-Related Pain: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Zinboonyahgoon, Nantthasorn; Vlassakov, Kamen; Abrecht, Christ R; Srinivasan, Suresh; Narang, Sanjeet

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic brachial plexopathy (NBP) is caused by a cancerous infiltration into the brachial plexus, presenting often as severe pain in the affected upper extremity. Such pain can be resistant to medical treatment. Invasive interventions such as brachial plexus neurolysis with phenol or cordotomy may result in severe complications including permanent neurological damage and death. Continuous brachial plexus and paravertebral block with local anesthetic have been reported to successfully control pain from NBP, but these techniques are logistically challenging and frequently have catheter-related complications. We report a series of patients who received single-shot brachial plexus blocks with a mixture of local anesthetic and corticosteroid (bupivacaine 0.25% with methyl-prednisolone 20-120 mg) for the treatment of refractory cancer-related pain in the brachial plexus territory, mostly from NBP. Theoretically, such blocks could provide immediate analgesia from the local anesthetic and a longer-lasting analgesia from the slow-release steroids. Responders reported a sustained decrease in their pain (lasting from 2 weeks to 10 months), a significant decrease in their opioid and non-opioid (ketamine, gabapentin) consumption, overall satisfaction with the block, and unchanged or improved function of their limb. The ideal candidate for this procedure is a patient who has pain that is predominantly neuropathic from a lesion within the brachial plexus and with anatomy amenable to ultrasound-guided nerve block. Our case series suggests that, in the appropriately selected patient, this technique can safely and effectively alleviate pain from NBP. The procedure is simple, spares limb function, and can be diagnostic, predicting response to more complex procedures. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using this technique for NBP.

  11. Valproic acid protection against the brachial plexus root avulsion-induced death of motoneurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dianxiu; Li, Qiang; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Wu, Guangzhi; Cui, Shusen

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the role of valproic acid (VPA) in protecting motoneuron after brachial plexus root avulsion was investigated in adult rats. Sixty rats were used in this study, and underwent the brachial plexus root avulsion injury, which was created by using a micro-hemostat forceps to pull out brachial plexus root from the intervertebral foramen. The animals were divided into two groups, VPA group administered with VPA dissolved in drinking water (300 mg/kg) daily, and control group had drinking water every day. The spinal cords (C5-T1) were harvested at day 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 28 for immunohistochemistry analysis, TUNEL staining, Nissl staining, and electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that with VPA administration, the survival of motoneurons was promoted and the cell apoptosis was inhibited. The number of c-Jun and Bcl-2 positive motoneurons was increased immediately after avulsion both in control and VPA group, however, the percent of c-Jun positive motoneurons was decreased and the percent of Bcl-2 positive motoneurons was increased by VPA treatment significantly. Our results indicated that motoneurons were protected by VPA against cell death induced by brachial plexus root avulsion through c-Jun inhibition and Bcl-2 induction. PMID:23843283

  12. Predictors of Hypopituitarism in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Silva, Paula P B; Bhatnagar, Saurabha; Herman, Seth D; Zafonte, Ross; Klibanski, Anne; Miller, Karen K; Tritos, Nicholas A

    2015-11-15

    Hypopituitarism may often occur in association with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Identification of reliable predictors of pituitary dysfunction is of importance in order to establish a rational testing approach. We searched the records of patients with TBI, who underwent neuroendocrine evaluation in our institution between 2007 and 2013. One hundred sixty-six adults (70% men) with TBI (median age: 41.6 years; range: 18-76) were evaluated at a median interval of 40.4 months (0.2-430.4).Of these, 31% had ≥1 pituitary deficiency, including 29% of patients with mild TBI and 35% with moderate/severe TBI. Growth hormone deficiency was the most common deficiency (21%); when body mass index (BMI)-dependent cutpoints were used, this was reduced to 15%. Central hypoadrenalism occurred in10%, who were more likely to have suffered a motor vehicle accident (MVA, p = 0.04), experienced post-traumatic seizures (p = 0.04), demonstrated any intracranial hemorrhage (p = 0.05), petechial brain hemorrhages (p = 0.017), or focal cortical parenchymal contusions (p = 0.02). Central hypothyroidism occurred in 8% and central hypogonadism in 12%; the latter subgroup had higher BMI (p = 0.03), were less likely to be working after TBI (p = 0.002), and had lower Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scores (p = 0.03). Central diabetes insipidus (DI) occurred in 6%, who were more likely to have experienced MVA (p < 0.001) or sustained moderate/severe TBI (p < 0.001). Patients with MVA and those with post-traumatic seizures, intracranial hemorrhage, petechial brain hemorrhages, and/or focal cortical contusions are at particular risk for serious pituitary dysfunction, including adrenal insufficiency and DI, and should be referred for neuroendocrine testing. However, a substantial proportion of patients without these risk factors also developed hypopituitarism. PMID:26413767

  13. Prolonged bradycardia, asystole and outcome of high spinal cord injury patients: Risk factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; Rhaman, M. A.; Raza, Ali; Shabana, Adel; Malstrom, Mahommad Faisal; Al-Sulaiti, Ghanem

    2016-01-01

    Background: High spinal cord injury (HSCI) is one of the devastating traumatic injuries. 80% of these patients are young male, and 93% will have major neurological disabilities. There is a paucity of literature about prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. The aim of this study was to know the prevalence, risk factors, precipitating factors for prolonged bradycardia in the HSCI patients. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital, with spinal cord injury above level of dorsal (D4) were enrolled in this study prospectively. Patient's demographic data, mechanism, level and type of spinal injury, associated injuries, injury severity score (ISS), spinal shock, vasopressors used, time of occurrence of bradycardia, treatment for bradycardia, precipitating as well as risk factors and outcome were recorded. Results: During the study period, a total of 138 patients were admitted to the ICU with HSCI. Majority of patients were male. The most frequently associated injury in these patients was skeletal fractures (38.4%). Most common complication was pneumonia 56 (41%). Forty-five (33%) of the total patients had prolonged bradycardia; 87% of these patients had pneumonia when bradycardia occurred. 53.4% had cardiac asystole. 29 (21%) patients had bradycardia at the time of endotracheal suctioning, whereas 27 (20%) patients developed bradycardia at the time of positioning. Majority of the patients were managed conservatively. Those HSCI patients who developed prolonged bradycardia, their ISS score was statistically higher, ICU and hospital stay was significantly higher compared with those HSCI patient who did not have prolonged bradycardia. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypotension on admission; pneumonia, and tracheostomy were risk factors for the development of prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. Conclusion: Prolonged bradycardia was associated with significantly higher incidence of asystole

  14. Prolonged bradycardia, asystole and outcome of high spinal cord injury patients: Risk factors and management

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nissar; Rhaman, M. A.; Raza, Ali; Shabana, Adel; Malstrom, Mahommad Faisal; Al-Sulaiti, Ghanem

    2016-01-01

    Background: High spinal cord injury (HSCI) is one of the devastating traumatic injuries. 80% of these patients are young male, and 93% will have major neurological disabilities. There is a paucity of literature about prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. The aim of this study was to know the prevalence, risk factors, precipitating factors for prolonged bradycardia in the HSCI patients. Materials and Methods: All patients who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary hospital, with spinal cord injury above level of dorsal (D4) were enrolled in this study prospectively. Patient's demographic data, mechanism, level and type of spinal injury, associated injuries, injury severity score (ISS), spinal shock, vasopressors used, time of occurrence of bradycardia, treatment for bradycardia, precipitating as well as risk factors and outcome were recorded. Results: During the study period, a total of 138 patients were admitted to the ICU with HSCI. Majority of patients were male. The most frequently associated injury in these patients was skeletal fractures (38.4%). Most common complication was pneumonia 56 (41%). Forty-five (33%) of the total patients had prolonged bradycardia; 87% of these patients had pneumonia when bradycardia occurred. 53.4% had cardiac asystole. 29 (21%) patients had bradycardia at the time of endotracheal suctioning, whereas 27 (20%) patients developed bradycardia at the time of positioning. Majority of the patients were managed conservatively. Those HSCI patients who developed prolonged bradycardia, their ISS score was statistically higher, ICU and hospital stay was significantly higher compared with those HSCI patient who did not have prolonged bradycardia. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypotension on admission; pneumonia, and tracheostomy were risk factors for the development of prolonged bradycardia in HSCI patients. Conclusion: Prolonged bradycardia was associated with significantly higher incidence of asystole

  15. Functional and genetic analysis of choroid plexus development in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Henson, Hannah E.; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Taylor, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The choroid plexus, an epithelial-based structure localized in the brain ventricle, is the major component of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The choroid plexus produces the cerebrospinal fluid and regulates the components of the cerebrospinal fluid. Abnormal choroid plexus function is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation in the choroid plexus epithelium, and hydrocephaly. In this study, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model system to understand the genetic components of choroid plexus development. We generated an enhancer trap line, Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the choroid plexus epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent tracers, we demonstrated that the zebrafish choroid plexus possesses brain barrier properties such as tight junctions and transporter activity. Thus, we have established zebrafish as a functionally relevant model to study choroid plexus development. Using an unbiased approach, we performed a forward genetic dissection of the choroid plexus to identify genes essential for its formation and function. Using Et(cp:EGFP)sj2, we isolated 10 recessive mutant lines with choroid plexus abnormalities, which were grouped into five classes based on GFP intensity, epithelial localization, and overall choroid plexus morphology. We also mapped the mutation for two mutant lines to chromosomes 4 and 21, respectively. The mutants generated in this study can be used to elucidate specific genes and signaling pathways essential for choroid plexus development, function, and/or maintenance and will provide important insights into how these genetic mutations contribute to disease. PMID:25426018

  16. Functional and genetic analysis of choroid plexus development in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Henson, Hannah E; Parupalli, Chaithanyarani; Ju, Bensheng; Taylor, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The choroid plexus, an epithelial-based structure localized in the brain ventricle, is the major component of the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier. The choroid plexus produces the cerebrospinal fluid and regulates the components of the cerebrospinal fluid. Abnormal choroid plexus function is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, tumor formation in the choroid plexus epithelium, and hydrocephaly. In this study, we used zebrafish (Danio rerio) as a model system to understand the genetic components of choroid plexus development. We generated an enhancer trap line, Et(cp:EGFP) (sj2), that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the choroid plexus epithelium. Using immunohistochemistry and fluorescent tracers, we demonstrated that the zebrafish choroid plexus possesses brain barrier properties such as tight junctions and transporter activity. Thus, we have established zebrafish as a functionally relevant model to study choroid plexus development. Using an unbiased approach, we performed a forward genetic dissection of the choroid plexus to identify genes essential for its formation and function. Using Et(cp:EGFP) (sj2), we isolated 10 recessive mutant lines with choroid plexus abnormalities, which were grouped into five classes based on GFP intensity, epithelial localization, and overall choroid plexus morphology. We also mapped the mutation for two mutant lines to chromosomes 4 and 21, respectively. The mutants generated in this study can be used to elucidate specific genes and signaling pathways essential for choroid plexus development, function, and/or maintenance and will provide important insights into how these genetic mutations contribute to disease. PMID:25426018

  17. Encephalomyeloneuropathy with ganglionitis of the myenteric plexuses in the absence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Horoupian, D S; Kim, Y

    1982-06-01

    A 55-year-old woman presented with rapidly progressive brainstem dysfunction which led to death within a month. She also had constipation for three weeks, and barium enema showed ileus. Subacute encephalomyelitis predominantly involving the medulla and pons correlated with the patient's initial symptoms. In addition, ganglionitis of the myenteric plexuses explained the constipation and ileus. Ganglioradiculoneuropathy was another finding. The presence of abundant neuronophagia in the brainstem, dorsal root ganglia, and myenteric plexuses raised the speculation that a putative virus, toxic agent, or immune reaction possessed special affinity for neurons and ganglion cells. The neuropathological findings were similar to paraneoplastic changes, but no neoplasm was found.

  18. Risk of venous thromboembolism in patients with splenic injury and splenectomy. A nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiun-Nong; Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Lin, Ming-Chia; Lai, Chung-Hsu; Lin, Hsi-Hsun; Yang, Chih-Hui; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The spleen is a crucial organ in humans. However, little is known about the association of venous thromboembolism (VTE) with splenic injury and splenectomy in trauma patients. The aim of this study was to determine the subsequent risk of VTE following splenic injury and splenectomy. A nationwide retrospective cohort study was conducted by analysing data from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. We included 6,162 splenic injury patients (3,033 splenectomised and 3,129 nonsplenectomised patients) and 24,648 comparison patients who were selected by frequency match based on sex, age, and the index year during 2000-2006. All patients were followed until the occurrence of VTE, 31 December, 2011, death, or withdrawal from the insurance program. The age of patients with splenic injury was 41.93 ± 16.44 years. The incidence rates of VTE were 11.81, 8.46, and 5.21 per 10,000 person-years in the splenic injury patients with splenectomy, splenic injury patients without splenectomy, and comparison patients, respectively. Compared with the comparison cohort, splenic injury patients with splenectomy exhibited a 2.21-fold risk of VTE (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-3.43), whereas those without splenectomy exhibited a 1.71-fold risk of VTE (95% CI, 1.05-2.80). The overall incidence rate of VTE was 1.97-fold higher in the splenic injury cohort than the comparison cohort (95% CI, 1.38-2.81). Although splenectomy increased the risk of VTE 1.35-fold compared with no splenectomy, the difference was not statistically significant (95% CI, 0.74-2.45). These results may alert physicians and patients to the complications of splenic injury and splenectomy.

  19. [The anterior sonographic-guided celiac plexus blockade. Review and personal observations].

    PubMed

    Zenz, M; Kurz-Müller, K; Strumpf, M; May, B

    1993-04-01

    The coeliac plexus block is an approved method for the relief of upper abdominal pain due to cancer of the upper intra-abdominal viscera or to chronic pancreatitis. While there are many reports concerning the posterior approach to the coeliac plexus block, little attention has been given the anterior approach. There are two ways of implementing the anterior approach to the coeliac plexus: CT-guided and the ultrasound guided approach. METHODS. The ultrasonic-guided anterior approach to the coeliac plexus block is used with the patient in the supine position. The aorta and discharge of the truncus coeliacus or the a. lienalis respectively, are ultrasonographically presented at two levels. After setting local cutaneous and subcutaneous anaesthesia, a 15-cm-long 25 G-needle is introduced into the epigastrium. The point of the needle is--ultrasonographically guided--inserted into the pre-aortic area near the discharge of the truncus coeliacus. The position of the needle point is ultrasonographically controlled on two levels. For the enforcement of a diagnostic coeliac plexus block after careful aspiration on two levels, 10 ml of bupivacaine 0.5% is injected. The spread of the solution is evaluated by ultrasound. If the needle position is correct; a few minutes later the patient has a feeling of warmth in the upper abdominal region. For the enforcement of a neurolytic coeliac plexus block 10 ml ethanol 96% and 10 ml prilocaine 1% can be administered. The two solutions are applied as small volumes in permanent succession. Thus the burning pain, which is often observed after the injection of alcohol, is avoided. RESULTS. In the literature there are only a few reports, about the results and side-effects after use of the anterior approach in the coeliac plexus block. The results of these investigations and our own show total pain relief or at least good pain reduction by at best 85%. The reduction in pain achieved continues in as many as 60% of the treated patients. There is

  20. Inhalation injury in burn patients: establishing the link between diagnosis and prognosis.

    PubMed

    You, Kicheol; Yang, Hyeong-Tae; Kym, Dohern; Yoon, Jaechul; HaejunYim; Cho, Yong-Suk; Hur, Jun; Chun, Wook; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2014-12-01

    This study was to re-evaluate inhalation injury as a prognostic factor in burn patients and to determine the factors that should be considered when refining the definition of inhalation injury. A total of 192 burn patients (152 men, 40 women; mean age, 46.1±13.8 years) who were suspected to have an inhalation injury and underwent bronchoscopy between January 2010 and June 2012 were included in this prospective observational study. All patients underwent bronchoscopy within 24h of sustaining the burn. The bronchoscopic findings were classified as normal, mild, moderate, and severe. Mechanical ventilation was administered, when required. Age, percentage of TBSA burned, ABSI score, requirement of mechanical ventilation and PF ratio, but not inhalation injury, COHb level, and bronchoscopic grades, significantly differed between the survivors and non-survivors (p<0.05). Mechanical ventilation (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 9.787) and severe inhalation injury on bronchoscopy (adjusted OR: 45.357) were independent predictors of mortality on multivariate logistic regression analysis. Inhalation injury diagnosed through history does not predict mortality from burns. Other components such as severity of inhalation injury determined using bronchoscopy, and administration of mechanical ventilation might help predict the morbidity and mortality of burn patients with inhalation injury and all of the factors should be considered when the definition of inhalation injury is refined.

  1. Head injury in very young children: mechanisms, injury types, and ophthalmologic findings in 100 hospitalized patients younger than 2 years of age.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, A C; Alario, A J; Lewander, W J; Schut, L; Sutton, L N; Seidl, T S; Nudelman, S; Budenz, D; Hertle, R; Tsiaras, W

    1992-08-01

    Head injury in the youngest age group is distinct from that occurring in older children or adults because of differences in mechanisms, injury thresholds, and the frequency with which the question of child abuse is encountered. To analyze some of these characteristics in very young children, the authors prospectively studied 100 consecutively admitted head-injured patients 24 months of age or younger who were drawn from three institutions. Mechanism of injury, injury type, and associated injuries were recorded. All patients underwent ophthalmologic examination to document the presence of retinal hemorrhages. An algorithm incorporating injury type, best history, and associated findings was used to classify each injury as inflicted or accidental. The results confirmed that most head injuries in children younger than 2 years of age occurred from falls, and while different fall heights were associated with different injury types, most household falls were neurologically benign. Using strict criteria, 24% of injuries were presumed inflicted, and an additional 32% were suspicious for abuse, neglect, or social or family problems. Intradural hemorrhage was much more likely to occur from motor vehicle accidents and inflicted injury than from any other mechanism, with the latter being the most common cause of mortality. Retinal hemorrhages were seen in serious accidental head injury but were most commonly encountered in inflicted injury. The presence of more serious injuries associated with particular mechanisms may be related to a predominance of rotational rather than translational forces acting on the head. PMID:1641278

  2. Characteristics of Dysphagia in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Comparison With Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Kyung; Yeom, Jiwoon; Lee, Woo Hyung; Seo, Han Gil; Oh, Byung-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) with those of dysphagic stroke patients. Methods Forty-one patients with TBI were selected from medical records (between December 2004 to March 2013) and matched to patients with stroke (n=41) based on age, sex, and disease duration. Patients' swallowing characteristics were analyzed retrospectively using a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) and compared between both groups. Following thorough review of medical records, patients who had a history of diseases that could affect swallowing function at the time of the study were excluded. Dysphagia characteristics and severity were evaluated using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Outcome Measurement System swallowing scale, clinical dysphagia scale, and the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale. Results There was a significant difference in radiological lesion location (p=0.024) between the two groups. The most common VFSS finding was aspiration or penetration, followed by decreased laryngeal elevation and reduced epiglottis inversion. Swallowing function, VFSS findings, or quantified dysphagia severity showed no significant differences between the groups. In a subgroup analysis of TBI patients, the incidence of tube feeding was higher in patients with surgical intervention than in those without (p=0.011). Conclusion The swallowing characteristics of dysphagic patients after TBI were comparable to those of dysphagic stroke patients. Common VFSS findings comprised aspiration or penetration, decreased laryngeal elevation, and reduced epiglottis inversion. Patients who underwent surgical intervention after TBI were at high risk of tube feeding requirement. PMID:27446779

  3. Multiple injuries after earthquakes: a retrospective analysis on 1,871 injured patients from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Multiple injuries have been highlighted as an important clinical dimension of the injury profile following earthquakes, but studies are scarce. We investigated the pattern and combination of injuries among patients with two injuries following the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. We also described the general injury profile, causes of injury and socio-demographic characteristics of the injured patients. Methods A retrospective hospital-based analysis of 1,871 earthquake injured patients, totaling 3,177 injuries, admitted between 12 and 31 May 2008 to the People's Hospital of Deyang city (PHDC). An electronic, webserver-based database with International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-10-based classification of earthquake-related injury diagnoses (IDs), anatomical sites and additional background variables of the inpatients was used. We analyzed this dataset for injury profile and number of injuries per patient. We then included all patients (856) with two injuries for more in-depth analysis. Possible spatial anatomical associations were determined a priori. Cross-tabulation and more complex frequency matrices for combination analyses were used to investigate the injury profile. Results Out of the 1,871 injured patients, 810 (43.3%) presented with a single injury. The rest had multiple injuries; 856 (45.8%) had two, 169 (9.0%) patients had three, 32 (1.7%) presented with four injuries, while only 4 (0.2%) were diagnosed with five injuries. The injury diagnoses of patients presenting with two-injuries showed important anatomical intra-site or neighboring clustering, which explained 49.1% of the combinations. For fractures, the result was even more marked as spatial clustering explained 57.9% of the association pattern. The most frequent combination of IDs was a double-fracture, affecting 20.7% of the two-injury patients (n = 177). Another 108 patients (12.6%) presented with fractures associated with crush injury and organ-soft tissue injury. Of the 3

  4. Characteristics of Patients Injured in Road Traffic Accidents According to the New Injury Severity Score

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Soo; Kim, Yeo Hyung; Yun, Jae Sung; Jung, Sang Eun; Chae, Choong Sik

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of patients involved in road traffic accidents according to the New Injury Severity Score (NISS). Methods In this study, medical records of 1,048 patients admitted at three hospitals located in different regions between January and December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Only patients who received inpatient treatments covered by automobile insurance during the period were included. Accidents were classified as pedestrian, driver, passenger, motorcycle, or bicycle; and the severity of injury was assessed by the NISS. Results The proportion of pedestrian traffic accident (TA) was the highest, followed by driver, passenger, motorcycle and bicycle TA. The mean NISS was significantly higher in pedestrian and motorcycle TAs and lower in passenger TA. Analysis of differences in mean hospital length of stay (HLS) according to NISS injury severity revealed 4.97±4.86 days in the minor injury group, 8.91±5.93 days in the moderate injury group, 15.46±11.16 days in the serious injury group, 24.73±17.03 days in the severe injury group, and 30.86±34.03 days in the critical injury group (p<0.05). Conclusion The study results indicated that higher NISS correlated to longer HLS, fewer home discharges, and increasing mortality. Specialized hospitals for TA patient rehabilitation are necessary to reduce disabilities in TA patients. PMID:27152279

  5. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hui-yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-ping; Tao, Lu-yang

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  6. Mismatch negativity, social cognition, and functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hui-Yan; Li, Qiang; Chen, Xi-Ping; Tao, Lu-Yang

    2015-04-01

    Mismatch negativity is generated automatically, and is an early monitoring indicator of neuronal integrity impairment and functional abnormality in patients with brain injury, leading to decline of cognitive function. Antipsychotic medication cannot affect mismatch negativity. The present study aimed to explore the relationships of mismatch negativity with neurocognition, daily life and social functional outcomes in patients after brain injury. Twelve patients with traumatic brain injury and 12 healthy controls were recruited in this study. We examined neurocognition with the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised China, and daily and social functional outcomes with the Activity of Daily Living Scale and Social Disability Screening Schedule, respectively. Mismatch negativity was analyzed from electroencephalogram recording. The results showed that mismatch negativity amplitudes decreased in patients with traumatic brain injury compared with healthy controls. Mismatch negativity amplitude was negatively correlated with measurements of neurocognition and positively correlated with functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. Further, the most significant positive correlations were found between mismatch negativity in the fronto-central region and measures of functional outcomes. The most significant positive correlations were also found between mismatch negativity at the FCz electrode and daily living function. Mismatch negativity amplitudes were extremely positively associated with Social Disability Screening Schedule scores at the Fz electrode in brain injury patients. These experimental findings suggest that mismatch negativity might efficiently reflect functional outcomes in patients after traumatic brain injury. PMID:26170824

  7. Structural abnormalities of the myenteric (Auerbach's) plexus in familial dysautonomia (Riley-Day syndrome) as demonstrated by flat-mount preparation of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    Ariel, I; Wells, T R

    1985-01-01

    The esophageal and gastric myenteric (Auerbach's) plexus were studied by a flat-mount preparation in 3 patients with familial dysautonomia. In 1 patient a typical esophageal network was found in the stomach. In another patient both esophageal and gastric plexus patterns were significantly different from normal. These changes, by producing abnormal nervous stimulation, may explain disturbed motility of the esophagus and stomach in familial dysautonomia.

  8. Luxation de l’épaule compliquée de paralysie du plexus brachial

    PubMed Central

    Lukulunga, Loubet Unyendje; Moussa, Abdou Kadri; Mahfoud, Mustapha; EL Bardouni, Ahmed; Berrada, Mohamed Saleh; El Yaacoubi, Moradh

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent l'observation d'une paralysie totale du plexus brachial survenue trois mois après un épisode de luxation antéro-interne sous coracoïdienne associée à une fracture du trochiter chez une patiente âgée de 88 ans. PMID:25426187

  9. Results of wrist extension reconstruction in C5-8 brachial plexus palsy by transferring the pronator quadratus motor branch to the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle.

    PubMed

    Bertelli, Jayme Augusto; Ghizoni, Marcos Flávio; Tacca, Cristiano Paulo

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT The objective of this study was to report the results of pronator quadratus (PQ) motor branch transfers to the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) motor branch to reconstruct wrist extension in C5-8 root lesions of the brachial plexus. METHODS Twenty-eight patients, averaging 24 years of age, with C5-8 root injuries underwent operations an average of 7 months after their accident. In 19 patients, wrist extension was impossible at baseline, whereas in 9 patients wrist extension was managed by activating thumb and wrist extensors. When these 9 patients grasped an object, their wrist dropped and grasp strength was lost. Wrist extension was reconstructed by transferring the PQ motor to the ECRB motor branch. After surgery, patients were followed for at least 12 months, with final follow-up an average of 22 months after surgery. RESULTS Successful reinnervation of the ECRB was demonstrated in 27 of the 28 patients. In 25 of the patients, wrist extension scored M4, and in 2 it scored M3. CONCLUSIONS In C5-8 root injuries, wrist extension can be predictably reconstructed by transferring the PQ motor branch to reinnervate the ECRB.

  10. Suppression of Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 levels in patients with fluorine bone injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenpeng; Xu, Jian; Liu, Kejian; Liu, Xiaoli; Li, Changcheng; Cui, Caiyan; Zhang, Yuzeng; Li, Huabing

    2013-05-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for the role of Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 as the antagonists of Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathway, which suppresses bone formation through inhibiting osteoblastic function. To get deep-inside information about the expression of the antagonists in patients with fluorine bone injury, a case-control study was conducted in two counties in Hubei Province. Urinary and serum fluoride were significantly higher in patients with fluorine bone injury than in healthy controls. Additionally, patients with fluorine bone injury had significantly lower serum Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 levels compared with healthy controls (P<0.001). Serum Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 levels were significantly correlated with serum fluoride in all studied subjects (n=186). Low Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 levels were associated with a significantly increased risk of fluorine bone injury. In conclusion, serum Sclerostin and Dickkopf-1 might be used as important markers of bone metabolism change and potential therapeutic targets to treat fluorine bone injury.

  11. Monitoring of Intracranial Pressure in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawthorne, Christopher; Piper, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Since Monro published his observations on the nature of the contents of the intracranial space in 1783, there has been investigation of the unique relationship between the contents of the skull and the intracranial pressure (ICP). This is particularly true following traumatic brain injury (TBI), where it is clear that elevated ICP due to the underlying pathological processes is associated with a poorer clinical outcome. Consequently, there is considerable interest in monitoring and manipulating ICP in patients with TBI. The two techniques most commonly used in clinical practice to monitor ICP are via an intraventricular or intraparenchymal catheter with a microtransducer system. Both of these techniques are invasive and are thus associated with complications such as hemorrhage and infection. For this reason, significant research effort has been directed toward development of a non-invasive method to measure ICP. The principle aims of ICP monitoring in TBI are to allow early detection of secondary hemorrhage and to guide therapies that limit intracranial hypertension (ICH) and optimize cerebral perfusion. However, information from the ICP value and the ICP waveform can also be used to assess the intracranial volume–pressure relationship, estimate cerebrovascular pressure reactivity, and attempt to forecast future episodes of ICH. PMID:25076934

  12. Morphological structure and variations of lumbar plexus in human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Yasar, Soner; Kaya, Serdar; Temiz, Cağlar; Tehli, Ozkan; Kural, Cahit; Izci, Yusuf

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study is to study the anatomy of lumbar plexus on human fetuses and to establish its morphometric characteristics and differences compared with adults. Twenty lumbar plexus of 10 human fetal cadavers in different gestational ages and genders were dissected. Lumbar spinal nerves, ganglions, and peripheral nerves were exposed. Normal anatomical structure and variations of lumbar plexus were investigated and morphometric analyses were performed. The diameters of lumbar spinal nerves increased from L1 to L4. The thickest nerve forming the plexus was femoral nerve, the thinnest was ilioinguinal nerve, the longest nerve through posterior abdominal wall was iliohypogastric nerve, and the shortest nerve was femoral nerve. Each plexus had a single furcal nerve and this arose from L4 nerve in all fetuses. No prefix or postfix plexus variation was observed. In two plexuses, L1 nerve was in the form of a single branch. Also, in two plexuses, genitofemoral nerve arose only from L2 nerve. Accessory obturator nerve was observed in four plexuses. According to these findings, the morphological pattern of the lumbar plexus in the fetus was found to be very similar to the lumbar plexus in adults. PMID:22696243

  13. Altered Cerebellar White Matter Integrity in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in the Acute Stage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongqiu; Wu, Wenzhong; Liu, Yongkang; Wang, Tianyao; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhou, Guoxing; Chen, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Imaging studies of traumatic brain injury demonstrate that the cerebellum is often affected. We aim to examine fractional anisotropy alteration in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients in cerebellum-related white matter tracts. Materials and Methods This prospective study included 47 mild traumatic brain injury patients in the acute stage and 37 controls. MR imaging and neurocognitive tests were performed in patients within 7 days of injury. White matter integrity was examined by using diffusion tensor imaging. We used three approaches, tract-based spatial statistics, graphical-model-based multivariate analysis, and region-of-interest analysis, to detect altered cerebellar white matter integrity in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Results Results from three analysis methods were in accordance with each other, and suggested fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle and the pontine crossing tract was changed in the acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients, relative to controls (adjusted p-value < 0.05). Higher fractional anisotropy in the middle cerebellar peduncle was associated with worse performance in the fluid cognition composite (r = -0.289, p-value = 0.037). Conclusion Altered cerebellar fractional anisotropy in acute-phase mild traumatic brain injury patients is localized in specific regions and statistically associated with cognitive deficits detectable on neurocognitive testing. PMID:26967320

  14. Rare case of a liposarcoma in the brachial plexus.

    PubMed

    Kosutic, D; Gajanan, K

    2016-09-01

    Introduction A liposarcoma is a rare cancer of connective tissues that resemble fat cells under light microscopy. Case History A 73-year old female patient presented to our tertiary cancer centre with an eight-year history of a large, slow-growing painless mass in the right axilla. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a lipomatous, well-circumscribed mass of dimension 30 × 16 × 10cm extending towards the right clavicle and causing deformation to the right chest wall and right breast. Surgery revealed a large tumour that had stretched all three cords of the brachial plexus. Histopathology was consistent with a diagnosis of a low-grade liposarcoma. After a period of neuropraxia, the patient returned to normal activities 4 months after surgery. Conclusions Although extremely rare, low-grade liposarcomas of the brachial plexus should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a slow-growing axillary mass. Referral to a tertiary sarcoma centre is essential for an appropriate diagnosis, adequate treatment, and long-term follow-up. PMID:27241607

  15. Paramedics' and pre-hospital physicians' assessments of anatomic injury in trauma patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The pre-hospital assessment of a blunt trauma is difficult. Common triage tools are the mechanism of injury (MOI), vital signs, and anatomic injury (AI). Compared to the other tools, the clinical assessment of anatomic injury is more subjective than the others, and, hence, more dependent on the skills of the personnel. The aim of the study was to estimate whether the training and qualifications of the personnel are associated with the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury and the completion of pre-hospital procedures indicated by local guidelines. Methods Adult trauma patients met by a trauma team at Helsinki University Trauma Centre during a 12-month period (n = 422) were retrospectively analysed. To evaluate the accuracy of prediction of anatomic injury, clinically assessed pre-hospital injuries in six body regions were compared to injuries assessed at hospital in two patient groups, the patients treated by pre-hospital physicians (group 1, n = 230) and those treated by paramedics (group 2, n = 190). Results The groups were comparable in respect to age, sex, and MOI, but the patients treated by physicians were more severely injured than those treated by paramedics [ISS median (interquartile range) 16 (6-26) vs. 6 (2-10)], thus rendering direct comparison of the groups ineligible. The positive predictive values (95% confidence interval) of assessed injury were highest in head injury [0,91 (0,84-0,95) in group 1 and 0,86 (0,77-0,92) in group 2]. The negative predictive values were highest in abdominal injury [0,85 (0,79-0,89) in group 1 and 0,90 (0,84-0,93) in group 2]. The measurements of agreement between injuries assessed pre- and in-hospitally were moderate in thoracic and extremity injuries. Substantial kappa values (95% confidence interval) were achieved in head injury, 0,67 (0,57-0,77) in group 1 and 0,63 (0,52-0,74) in group 2. The rate of performing the pre-hospital procedures as indicated by the local instructions was 95-99%, except for

  16. Burn injury in epileptic patients: an experience in a tertiary institute.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, M S; Ahmad, I; Khan, A H; Fahud Khurram, M; Haq, A

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, types and severity of burn injuries, including sites involved, morbidities, operative procedures, and their outcomes, to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries in epileptic patients. This retrospective study was conducted at our centre between February 2008 and January 2012. The study included 54 patients who sustained burn injuries due to epileptic seizures, accounting for 1.3% of all burn admissions. All patients, irrespective of the severity of their injuries, were admitted to our centre, assessed, treated and educated regarding specific preventive measures. All study data were evaluated from patient medical records. Causes of burn injury were as follows: scald burns (30), contact with hot surfaces (12), electrical burns in the bathroom (6), and flame burns (6). Second degree burns were the most common (18 out of 54 patients) and third degree burns were the least common. Upper limb and trunk were the most common sites involved (36 out of 54 patients). Thirty patients required surgical intervention whereas the remainder was conservatively managed. Most of the injuries occurred in the age group between 30-37 years. Injuries occurred predominantly in females [42 females, 12 males; F:M=3.5:1]. The study revealed that patients with epilepsy should be categorized as a high risk group considering the sudden and unpredictable attack of epileptic seizures leading to loss of consciousness and accidental burn injuries. Early surgical intervention and targeting of all epileptic patients for education and instituting the specific preventive measures gives good outcomes. PMID:26170789

  17. Burn injury in epileptic patients: an experience in a tertiary institute

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, M.S.; Ahmad, I.; Khan, A.H.; Fahud Khurram, M.; Haq, A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The objective of this study was to evaluate the incidence, types and severity of burn injuries, including sites involved, morbidities, operative procedures, and their outcomes, to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries in epileptic patients. This retrospective study was conducted at our centre between February 2008 and January 2012. The study included 54 patients who sustained burn injuries due to epileptic seizures, accounting for 1.3% of all burn admissions. All patients, irrespective of the severity of their injuries, were admitted to our centre, assessed, treated and educated regarding specific preventive measures. All study data were evaluated from patient medical records. Causes of burn injury were as follows: scald burns (30), contact with hot surfaces (12), electrical burns in the bathroom (6), and flame burns (6). Second degree burns were the most common (18 out of 54 patients) and third degree burns were the least common. Upper limb and trunk were the most common sites involved (36 out of 54 patients). Thirty patients required surgical intervention whereas the remainder was conservatively managed. Most of the injuries occurred in the age group between 30-37 years. Injuries occurred predominantly in females [42 females, 12 males; F:M=3.5:1]. The study revealed that patients with epilepsy should be categorized as a high risk group considering the sudden and unpredictable attack of epileptic seizures leading to loss of consciousness and accidental burn injuries. Early surgical intervention and targeting of all epileptic patients for education and instituting the specific preventive measures gives good outcomes. PMID:26170789

  18. Evaluation of Injuries Caused by Penetrating Chest Traumas in Patients Referred to the Emergency Room.

    PubMed

    Aghaei Afshar, M; Mangeli, F; Nakhaei, A

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the frequency of different injuries caused by penetrating chest traumas, and also the cause and type of trauma and its accompanying injuries. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study, carried out on all patients referred to the emergency room of Shahid Bahonar Hospital, Kerman, from March 2000 to September 2008, due to penetrating chest trauma. The required information including age, sex, cause of trauma, type and site of injury, and accompanying injury was obtained and used to fill out a questionnaire and then was analyzed. 828 patients were included in the study; most of them were in the age range of 20-29. Of the patients, 97.6 % were males. The most frequent cause of trauma was stabbing, and the most frequent injuries following the trauma were pneumothorax and hemothorax. Orthopedic trauma was the most frequent accompanying injury. The most commonly used diagnostic method was plain chest radiography. In 93 % of the patients, the chest tube was placed and thoracotomy was performed for 97 % of the patients. Shahid Bahonar Hospital is a referral Trauma Centre and treats large number of chest trauma patients. Most patients need only chest tube placement as a definitive treatment. PMID:26246700

  19. Relationship Among Anal Sphincter Injury, Patulous Anal Canal, and Anal Pressures in Patients with Anorectal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, David; Harvey, Doris M.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Bharucha, Adil E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The anal sphincters and puborectalis are routinely imaged with an endoanal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coil, which does not assess co-aptation of the anal canal at rest. Using a MRI torso coil, we identified a patulous anal canal in some patients with anorectal disorders. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between anal sphincter and puborectalis injury, a patulous anal canal, and anal pressures. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 119 patients who underwent MRI and manometry analysis of anal anatomy and pressures, respectively, from February 2011 through March 2013 at the Mayo Clinic. Anal pressures were determined by high-resolution manometry, anal sphincter and puborectalis injury was determined by endoanal MRI, and anal canal integrity was determined by torso MRI. Associations between manometric and anatomical parameters were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Results Fecal incontinence (55 patients, 46%) and constipation (36 patients. 30%) were the main indications for testing; 49 patients (41%) had a patulous anal canal, which was associated with injury to more than 1 muscle (all P≤.001) and internal sphincter (P<.01), but not puborectalis (P=.09) or external sphincter (P=.06) injury. Internal (P<.01) and external sphincter injury (P=.02) and a patulous canal (P<.001), but not puborectalis injury, predicted anal resting pressure. A patulous anal canal was the only significant predictor (P<.01) of the anal squeeze pressure increment. Conclusions Patients with anorectal disorders commonly have a patulous anal canal, associated with more severe anal injury, anal resting pressure, and squeeze pressure increment. It is therefore important to identify patulous anal canal because it appears to be a marker of not only anal sphincter injury but disturbances beyond sphincter injury, such as damage to the anal cushions or anal denervation. PMID:25869638

  20. Dyschloremia Is a Risk Factor for the Development of Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Min; Li, Guangxi; Sarvottam, Kumar; Wang, Shengyu; Thongprayoon, Charat; Dong, Yue; Gajic, Ognjen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, although its impact has not been well studied. We investigated the epidemiology of dyschloremia and its associations with the incidence of acute kidney injury and other intensive care unit outcomes. Material and Methods This is a single-center, retrospective cohort study at Mayo Clinic Hospital—Rochester. All adult patients admitted to intensive care units from January 1st, 2006, through December 30th, 2012 were included. Patients with known acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease stage 5 before intensive care unit admission were excluded. We evaluated the association of dyschloremia with ICU outcomes, after adjustments for the effect of age, gender, Charlson comorbidity index and severity of illness score. Results A total of 6,025 patients were enrolled in the final analysis following the implementation of eligibility criteria. From the cohort, 1,970 patients (33%) developed acute kidney injury. Of the total patients enrolled, 4,174 had a baseline serum chloride. In this group, 1,530 (37%) had hypochloremia, and 257 (6%) were hyperchloremic. The incidence of acute kidney injury was higher in hypochloremic and hyperchloremic patients compared to those with a normal serum chloride level (43% vs.30% and 34% vs. 30%, respectively; P < .001). Baseline serum chloride was lower in the acute kidney injury group vs. the non-acute kidney injury group [100 mmol/L (96–104) vs. 102 mmol/L (98–105), P < .0001]. In a multivariable logistic regression model, baseline serum chloride of ≤94 mmol/L found to be independently associated with the risk of acute kidney injury (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1–2.6; P = .01). Discussion Dyschloremia is common in critically ill patients, and severe hypochloremia is independently associated with an increased risk of development of acute kidney injury. PMID:27490461

  1. Injury Risk Spikes While Cancer Patients Seek Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical and drug therapy complications, accidents and self-harm To use the sharing features on this page, ... 8,300 injuries from accidents or intentional self-harm, the study findings showed. The risk for medical- ...

  2. [Optimization of medical-diagnostic process in patients with traumatic brain injury during early rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Cherednichenko, T V; Popov, A V

    2012-01-01

    The problem of cardiovascular disease and cancer, the effects of traumatic brain injury is now one of the major health and social problems. Every year in Ukraine registered 200 thousand cases of the victims of traumatic brain injury. Of these, 30% of people then have persistent signs of disability that results in a disability, sometimes painful existence the patient and his relatives. Therefore, in order to bring man back into society after a traumatic brain injury, to the rehabilitation phase of treatment, immediately after the stabilization of the patient.

  3. Simultaneous cesarean delivery and craniotomy in a term pregnant patient with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Mohamed Mohamed; Badran, Basma Abed; Eisa, Ahmed Amin; Barakat, Rafik Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The management of pregnant patients with traumatic brain injury is challenging. A multidisciplinary team approach is mandatory, and management should be individualized according to the type and extent of injury, maternal status, gestational age, and fetal status. We report a 27-year-old term primigravida presenting after head injury with Glasgow coma scale score 11 and anisocoria. Depressed temporal bone fracture and acute epidural hematoma were diagnosed, necessitating an urgent neurosurgery. Her fetus was viable with no signs of distress and no detected placental abnormalities. Cesarean delivery was performed followed by craniotomy in the same setting under general anesthesia with good outcome of the patient and her baby. PMID:25829914

  4. Impaired Cerebral Autoregulation during Head Up Tilt in Patients with Severe Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Riberholt, Christian Gunge; Olesen, Niels Damkjær; Thing, Mira; Juhl, Carsten Bogh; Mehlsen, Jesper; Petersen, Tue Hvass

    2016-01-01

    Early mobilization is of importance for improving long-term outcome for patients after severe acquired brain injury. A limiting factor for early mobilization by head-up tilt is orthostatic intolerance. The purpose of the present study was to examine cerebral autoregulation in patients with severe acquired brain injury and a low level of consciousness. Fourteen patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance and fifteen healthy volunteers were enrolled. Blood pressure was evaluated by pulse contour analysis, heart rate and RR-intervals were determined by electrocardiography, middle cerebral artery velocity was evaluated by transcranial Doppler, and near-infrared spectroscopy determined frontal lobe oxygenation in the supine position and during head-up tilt. Cerebral autoregulation was evaluated as the mean flow index calculated as the ratio between middle cerebral artery mean velocity and estimated cerebral perfusion pressure. Patients with acquired brain injury presented an increase in mean flow index during head-up tilt indicating impaired autoregulation (P < 0.001). Spectral analysis of heart rate variability in the frequency domain revealed lower magnitudes of ~0.1 Hz spectral power in patients compared to healthy controls suggesting baroreflex dysfunction. In conclusion, patients with severe acquired brain injury and orthostatic intolerance during head-up tilt have impaired cerebral autoregulation more than one month after brain injury. PMID:27168188

  5. Incidence of cervical spine injury in patients with gunshot wounds to the head.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, F R; Gonzalez, P; Beitler, A; Sterling-Scott, R; Fleming, A W

    1994-06-01

    Cervical spine immobilization is standard during the early stages of prehospital and hospital care of patients with blunt head injury. However, the need for cervical spine immobilization in patients with gunshot wounds to the head has not been addressed. To determine the incidence and types of cervical spine injury in this group, we retrospectively examined the records of 308 consecutive patients who had computed tomographic (CT) scans of the head to evaluate brain injury after gunshot wounds. Of the 266 patients with data adequate for review, 157 (59%) had a complete lateral x-ray film of the cervical spine. Of these 157, 105 had wounds limited to the calvaria, and none had cervical spine injury. Of 52 patients with complete lateral x-ray films and wounds not limited to the calvaria, 5 (10%) had cervical spine or spinal cord injury. Of the 192 patients who had CT-proven intracranial injury, 86 (45%) required immediate intubation before x-ray films were obtained, and 67 (35%) died. We conclude that cervical spine immobilization may not be required during endotracheal intubation of brain-injured gunshot victims with wounds limited to the calvaria.

  6. Mirror Asymmetry of Category and Letter Fluency in Traumatic Brain Injury and Alzheimer's Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capitani, Erminio; Rosci, Chiara; Saetti, Maria Cristina; Laiacona, Marcella

    2009-01-01

    In this study we contrasted the Category fluency and Letter fluency performance of 198 normal subjects, 57 Alzheimer's patients and 57 patients affected by traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim was to check whether, besides the prevalence of Category fluency deficit often reported among Alzheimer's patients, the TBI group presented the opposite…

  7. Effect of older age on treatment decisions and outcomes among patients with traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Rivers, Carly S.; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Tsai, Eve C.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Attabib, Najmedden; Kwon, Brian K.; Christie, Sean D.; Fehlings, Michael G.; Finkelstein, Joel; Hurlbert, R. John; Townson, Andrea; Parent, Stefan; Drew, Brian; Chen, Jason; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Older people are at increased risk of traumatic spinal cord injury from falls. We evaluated the impact of older age (≥ 70 yr) on treatment decisions and outcomes. Methods: We identified patients with traumatic spinal cord injury for whom consent and detailed data were available from among patients recruited (2004–2013) at any of the 31 acute care and rehabilitation hospitals participating in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry. Patients were assessed by age group (< 70 v. ≥ 70 yr). The primary outcome was the rate of acute surgical treatment. We used bivariate and multivariate regression models to assess patient and injury-related factors associated with receiving surgical treatment and with the timing of surgery after arrival to a participating centre. Results: Of the 1440 patients included in our study cohort, 167 (11.6%) were 70 years or older at the time of injury. Older patients were more likely than younger patients to be injured by falling (83.1% v. 37.4%; p < 0.001), to have a cervical injury (78.0% v. 61.6%; p = 0.001), to have less severe injuries on admission (American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade C or D: 70.5% v. 46.9%; p < 0.001), to have a longer stay in an acute care hospital (median 35 v. 28 d; p < 0.005) and to have a higher in-hospital mortality (4.2% v. 0.6%; p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis did not show that age of 70 years or more at injury was associated with a decreased likelihood of surgical treatment (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.22–1.07). An unplanned sensitivity analysis with different age thresholds showed that a threshold of 65 years was associated with a decreased chance of surgical treatment (OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.19–0.80). Older patients who underwent surgical treatment had a significantly longer wait time from admission to surgery than younger patients (37 v. 19 h; p < 0.001). Interpretation: We found chronological age to be a factor influencing

  8. A survey of the management of needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Burrows, L A; Padkin, A

    2010-09-01

    The Human Tissue Act 2004 and Mental Capacity Act 2005 resulted in a change in the management of needlestick injuries sustained from incapacitated patients. It appears unlawful to test for blood-borne viruses without a patient's consent for the sole benefit of the healthcare worker. This survey of intensive care units within England, Wales and Northern Ireland investigated how needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients had been managed within the previous year. Of the 225 intensive care units surveyed, 99 (44%) responded. Sixty-two (62.6%) reported a needlestick injury to a healthcare worker from an incapacitated patient. Thirty-six (64.3%) patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. Sixteen (25.8%) patients tested positive for blood-borne viruses. Only 19 (30.6%) healthcare workers took post-exposure prophylaxis following the injury. These results show that needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients are common and that the majority of patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent.

  9. A survey of the management of needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Burrows, L A; Padkin, A

    2010-09-01

    The Human Tissue Act 2004 and Mental Capacity Act 2005 resulted in a change in the management of needlestick injuries sustained from incapacitated patients. It appears unlawful to test for blood-borne viruses without a patient's consent for the sole benefit of the healthcare worker. This survey of intensive care units within England, Wales and Northern Ireland investigated how needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients had been managed within the previous year. Of the 225 intensive care units surveyed, 99 (44%) responded. Sixty-two (62.6%) reported a needlestick injury to a healthcare worker from an incapacitated patient. Thirty-six (64.3%) patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. Sixteen (25.8%) patients tested positive for blood-borne viruses. Only 19 (30.6%) healthcare workers took post-exposure prophylaxis following the injury. These results show that needlestick injuries from incapacitated patients are common and that the majority of patients were tested for blood-borne viruses without consent. PMID:21198483

  10. Relationship between trauma-induced coagulopathy and progressive hemorrhagic injury in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Tian, Heng-Li

    2016-06-01

    Progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) can be divided into coagulopathy-related PHI and normal coagu- lation PHI. Coagulation disorders after traumatic brain injuries can be included in trauma-induced coagulopathy (TIC). Some studies showed that TIC is associated with PHI and increases the rates of disability and mortality. In this review, we discussed some mechanisms in TIC, which is of great importance in the development of PHI, including tissue factor (TF) hypothesis, protein C pathway and thrombocytopenia. The main mechanism in the relation of TIC to PHI is hypocoagulability. We also reviewed some coagulopathy parameters and proposed some possible risk factors, predictors and therapies. PMID:27321300

  11. Does Ligamentous Laxity Protect Against Chondral Injury in Patients with Patellofemoral Instability?

    PubMed Central

    Redler, Lauren H.; Mayer, Gabrielle M.; Kalbian, Irene L.; Nguyen, Joseph; Stein, Beth E. Shubin; Strickland, Sabrina M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Hypermobility may be a risk factor for musculoskeletal injuries during sports participation. However, we have seen a low incidence of chondral injuries requiring treatment in patients undergoing medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction for patellofemoral instability. It is unknown if patients with ligamentous laxity, who are at an increased risk for patellofemoral instability, are somewhat protected from chondral injury. We hypothesize in patients undergoing MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability, patients with ligamentous laxity will be less likely to have chondral defects requiring surgical intervention. Methods: 171 patients (32 male, 139 female) average age 22 years (range 11-57) with patellofemoral instability were rated with the Beighton-Horan (BH) scale for constitutional ligamentous laxity (0-9). Preoperative MRIs were evaluated (chondral injury present/absent, size of chondral injury, Outerbridge grade) and intra-operative arthroscopic findings noted (chondral injury present/absent, size of chondral injury, Outerbridge grade, surgical intervention yes/no, type of surgical intervention) of 79 non-lax (BH<6) and 92 ligamentously lax patients (BH≥6) (LAX) undergoing MPFL reconstruction. Anatomic measurements were documented for each patient including: tibial tubercle-trochlear groove (TT-TG) distance, Caton-Deschamps (C/D) ratio for patellar height, and the Dejour classification of trochlear dysplasia. Surgical interventions included chondroplasty, microfracture, particulated juvenile cartilage implantation (DeNovo, Zimmer, Warsaw, IN), osteochondral fracture fixation or osteochondral allograft transplantation (OATS). Results: 58/171 (33.9%) required a surgical intervention for a chondral defect: chondroplasty 29/58 (50%), microfracture 16/58 (27.6%), particulated juvenile cartilage implantation 18/58 (31%), osteochondral fracture fixation 2/58 (3.5%), and OATS 2/58 (3.5%). There was no difference in the proportion of

  12. Embedded-structure template for electronic records affects patient note quality and management for emergency head injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Sonoo, Tomohiro; Iwai, Satoshi; Inokuchi, Ryota; Gunshin, Masataka; Kitsuta, Yoichi; Nakajima, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Along with article-based checklists, structured template recording systems have been reported as useful to create more accurate clinical recording, but their contributions to the improvement of the quality of patient care have been controversial. An emergency department (ED) must manage many patients in a short time. Therefore, such a template might be especially useful, but few ED-based studies have examined such systems. A structured template produced according to widely used head injury guidelines was used by ED residents for head injury patients. The study was conducted by comparing each 6-month period before and after launching the system. The quality of the patient notes and factors recorded in the patient notes to support the head computed tomography (CT) performance were evaluated by medical students blinded to patient information. The subject patients were 188 and 177 in respective periods. The numbers of patient notes categorized as “CT indication cannot be determined” were significantly lower in the postintervention term (18% → 9.0%), which represents the patient note quality improvement. No difference was found in the rates of CT performance or CT skip without clearly recorded CT indication in the patient notes. The structured template functioned as a checklist to support residents in writing more appropriately recorded patient notes in the ED head injury patients. Such a template customized to each clinical condition can facilitate standardized patient management and can improve patient safety in the ED. PMID:27749590

  13. Injury patterns in patients presenting with a recurrent anterior cruciate ligament tear following primary reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sayampanathan, Andrew A.; Bin Abd Razak, Hamid Rahmatullah; Chong, Hwei Chi; Tan, Hwee-Chye Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft rupture or a primary ACL injury in the contralateral knee is one of the greatest concerns of patients following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). Our study describes the epidemiology and presence of concomitant meniscal injuries of patients with a graft rupture following primary ACLR or a primary rupture of the contralateral ACL following primary ACLR of the ipsilateral knee. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 42 patients who underwent a second ACLR. ACLR was performed using the ipsilateral semitendinosus and gracilis autograft. Variables extracted included the presence of concomitant MM and LM injuries intra-operatively, the patients’ level of intensity of sport (light, moderate, strenuous), duration of rehabilitation and mechanism of injury (contact, non-contact). Results Twenty-four (57.1%) patients had graft rupture of a previously reconstructed ACL of which 20 (83.3%) were male and 18 (42.9%) patients had a primary ACL tear of the contralateral knee following ACLR of the ipsilateral knee of which 18 (100%) were male. Patient who sustained a graft rupture were younger (29.5 vs. 31.9 years), had a higher body mass index (BMI) (26.42 vs. 25.10 kg/m2) and had a longer time before re-injury (6.18 vs. 4.94 years). Concomitant meniscal injury rates were comparable in both groups and the medial meniscus was injured more often. Conclusions This study describes the demographics of 2nd ACL injuries in the Asian population. Additional studies that investigate the differences in knee anatomy of Asians and Caucasians and their impact on ACL injuries should be performed. PMID:27429958

  14. Classification and Epidemiology of Traumatic Dentoalveolar Injuries in Dogs and Cats: 959 Injuries in 660 Patient Visits (2004-2012).

    PubMed

    Soukup, Jason W; Hetzel, Scott; Paul, Annie

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the epidemiology of traumatic dentoalveolar injuries (TDI) in dogs and cats and to evaluate the applicability of a human classification system for TDI in dogs and cats. All patients diagnosed with a TDI were identified from the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Veterinary Medicine Dentistry and Oral Surgery Service case log and the hospital patient processing software. The study population consisted of 621 dogs and cats, in a total of 660 patient visits from 2004 to 2012, admitted for oral treatment and subsequently diagnosed with at least one TDI Medical records including diagnostic imaging studies were reviewed to group the injury according to a classification system used in humans for TDI. Patient signalment, tooth injured, and number of injuries per patient were recorded and tabulated. The overall prevalence of TDI was 26.2%. The mean +/- SD number of TDI per patient was 1.45 +/- 0.85. All 14 classes of TDI recognized by the classification system utilized in humans were identified, and all (100%) TDI identified in this study were classifiable using this system. Enamel-dentin-pulp fracture was the most common TDI (49.6%). The most commonly injured teeth were the mandibular or maxillary canine teeth (35.5%). The most common age for dogs and cats with TDI were 3-6 years (33.0%) and 7-10 years (31.3%). With a frequency of 1 in 4 animals, TDI are common and represent a significant pet health concern. Most TDI are considered severe and require timely, and sometimes immediate, treatment. The adoption and utilization of a complete classification system, such as the one used in this study, is recommended in order to improve future epidemiological study of TDI in animals.

  15. Clinical observation of peripheral nerve injury in 2 patients with cancer after radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Li; Jia, Ting-zhen; Zhang, Shu-lan; Wang, Mo-pei; Ma, Li-Wen; Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Aim of the study This study aims to analyze the clinical manifestations and sequelae of peripheral nerve radiation damage of two cases of cancer patients after radiotherapy at the corresponding sites in clinical practice and to summarize experiences and lesions in order to provide a reference for future tumor radiotherapy. Material and methods Some data of two cases of patients, such as doses of radiotherapy, clinical manifestations and damage occurrence time, were collected and examinations were conducted to define diagnosis. Afterwards, therapies and follow-up were conducted. Results Case 1 (rectal cancer) was diagnosed as mild left lower extremity nerve damage. After the symptomatic treatment, the disease condition was improved, and there was no tumor recurrence sign. Case 2 (breast cancer) was diagnosed as left brachial plexus damage, and left upper extremity movement function was lost completely. While the analgesic treatment was conducted, anti-tumor relevant treatments were being carried out. Conclusions Radiotherapy can cause different extents of radioactive nerve damage. In practice, it is necessary to constantly improve the radiotherapy technology level and actively prevent the occurrence of complications. Once symptoms appear, the diagnosis and treatment should be conducted as early as possible in order to avoid aggravating damage to cause dysfunction and cause lifetime pain to patients. PMID:23788990

  16. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (P<0.01) and significant decrease of theta power P<0.05). Corneal nerves were damaged in corneas of retinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands. PMID:27592207

  17. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-09-04

    BACKGROUND In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. RESULTS The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (P<0.01) and significant decrease of theta power P<0.05). Corneal nerves were damaged in corneas of retinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands.

  18. Association of Electroencephalography (EEG) Power Spectra with Corneal Nerve Fiber Injury in Retinoblastoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianliang; Sun, Juanjuan; Diao, Yumei; Deng, Aijun

    2016-01-01

    Background In our clinical experience we discovered that EEG band power may be correlated with corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. This study aimed to investigate biomarkers obtained from electroencephalography (EEG) recordings to reflect corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients. Material/Methods Our study included 20 retinoblastoma patients treated at the Department of Ophthalmology, Affiliated Hospital of Weifang Medical University between 2010 and 2014. Twenty normal individuals were included in the control group. EEG activity was recorded continuously with 32 electrodes using standard EEG electrode placement for detecting EEG power. A cornea confocal microscope was used to examine corneal nerve injury in retinoblastoma patients and normal individuals. Spearman rank correlation analysis was used to analyze the correlation between corneal nerve injury and EEG power changes. The sensitivity and specificity of changed EEG power in diagnosis of corneal nerve injury were also analyzed. Results The predominantly slow EEG oscillations changed gradually into faster waves in retinoblastoma patients. The EEG pattern in retinoblastoma patients was characterized by a distinct increase of delta (P<0.01) and significant decrease of theta power P<0.05). Corneal nerves were damaged in corneas of retinoblastoma patients. Corneal nerve injury was positively correlated with delta EEG spectra power and negatively correlated with theta EEG spectra power. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity by compounding in the series were 60% and 67%, respectively. Conclusions Changes in delta and theta of EEG appear to be associated with occurrence of corneal nerve injury. Useful information can be provided for evaluating corneal nerve damage in retinoblastoma patients through analyzing EEG power bands. PMID:27592207

  19. Traumatic lumbar hernias: do patient or hernia characteristics predict bowel or mesenteric injury?

    PubMed

    Mellnick, Vincent M; Raptis, Constantine; Lonsford, Chad; Lin, Michael; Schuerer, Douglas

    2014-06-01

    Traumatic lumbar hernias are rare but important injuries to diagnose in blunt abdominal trauma, both because of delayed complications of the hernia itself and because of well-documented association with bowel and mesenteric injuries. No study to our knowledge has determined whether specific features of the hernia-size of the wall defect, inferior or superior location, or the side of the hernia-bear any predictive value on the presence of underlying bowel and mesenteric injury. A retrospective query of the radiology information system yielded 21 patients with lumbar hernias which were diagnosed on CT. These were reviewed by three radiologists to confirm the presence of an acute lumbar hernia and to determine the size and location of the hernia. The patients' medical records were reviewed to determine the presence of operatively confirmed bowel and/or mesenteric injuries, which occurred in 52 % of patients. A significant (p < 0.001) difference was found in the frequency of bowel and/or mesenteric injury with hernia defects greater than 4.0 cm (100 %) and those less than 4.0 cm (17 %). Larger hernias also resulted in more procedures (p = 0.042) and a trend towards longer ICU stay, but no difference in injury severity score (ISS) or overall hospital stay. No significant difference was seen in the frequency of bowel and/or mesenteric injuries based on side or location of the hernia, though distal colonic injuries were more commonly seen with left-sided hernias (50 %) compared to right-sided hernias (18 %). Although based on a small patient population, these results suggest that larger traumatic lumbar hernias warrant particularly close evaluation for an underlying bowel and/or mesenteric injury.

  20. Death and disability from agricultural injuries in Wisconsin: a 12-year experience with 739 patients.

    PubMed

    Cogbill, T H; Steenlage, E S; Landercasper, J; Strutt, P J

    1991-12-01

    During a 12-year period, 739 patients were admitted to a referral trauma center as the result of injuries incurred while farming. There were 608 (82%) male patients and 131 female patients. Ages ranged from 1 to 89 years including 160 patients (22%) less than 16 years old and 78 patients (11%) more than 65 years old. The injury mechanism was a farm animal in 225 (30%), farm machinery in 168 (23%), a tractor in 120 (16%), a fall in 77 (10%), a power take-off in 47 (7%), a cornpicker in 42 (6%), and miscellaneous in 60 (8%). There were 16 (2%) deaths attributable to the agricultural accident. Tractors were involved in eight of these deaths, falls in four, power take-offs in three, and farm machinery in one. Furthermore, 159 (22%) patients were left with significant permanent disability including orthopedic problems in 131 patients, neurologic deficits in 22, and pulmonary disability in 6. Agricultural trauma is frequent and diverse with unique injury mechanisms. Life-threatening injuries are often seen and permanent disability is common. Effective injury prevention must focus on farmer education, additional mandatory safety features on agricultural equipment, and appropriate design of rural trauma systems. PMID:1749035

  1. [Medical and social characteristics of patients with septic complications of the closed thoracic injury].

    PubMed

    Danielian, Sh N; Godkov, M A; Abakumov, M M; Zubareva, O V; Saprin, A A

    2013-01-01

    231 cases of septic complications after the closed thoracic injury were analyzed. All patients were divided into groups according to the injury mechanism and inhabitancy. Patients with medico-social deviations, as well as patients with hemocontact infections, mental insanity and social deviations were marked out. The leading mechanisms of the closed thoracic injury were: fall from a height (34.2%), assault and battery (24.7%) and automobile accident (16.4%). 51.1% of patients were reported to have any medico-social deviations. Among the patients with socially important infections, the distribution was as follows: persons with no fixed abode (50%), incomers from the near-abroad countries (36.4%), victims of assault (28.1%) and pedestrians (21.4%).

  2. Choroid plexus in developmental and evolutionary perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bill, Brent Roy; Korzh, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The blood-cerebrospinal fluid boundary is present at the level of epithelial cells of the choroid plexus. As one of the sources of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), the choroid plexus (CP) plays an important role during brain development and function. Its formation has been studied largely in mammalian species. Lately, progress in other model animals, in particular the zebrafish, has brought a deeper understanding of CP formation, due in part to the ability to observe CP development in vivo. At the same time, advances in comparative genomics began providing information, which opens a possibility to understand further the molecular mechanisms involved in evolution of the CP and the blood-cerebrospinal fluid boundary formation. Hence this review focuses on analysis of the CP from developmental and evolutionary perspectives. PMID:25452709

  3. Morphometric Atlas Selection for Automatic Brachial Plexus Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Van de Velde, Joris; Wouters, Johan; Vercauteren, Tom; De Gersem, Werner; Duprez, Fréderic; De Neve, Wilfried; Van Hoof, Tom

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of atlas selection based on different morphometric parameters, on the accuracy of automatic brachial plexus (BP) segmentation for radiation therapy planning. The segmentation accuracy was measured by comparing all of the generated automatic segmentations with anatomically validated gold standard atlases developed using cadavers. Methods and Materials: Twelve cadaver computed tomography (CT) atlases (3 males, 9 females; mean age: 73 years) were included in the study. One atlas was selected to serve as a patient, and the other 11 atlases were registered separately onto this “patient” using deformable image registration. This procedure was repeated for every atlas as a patient. Next, the Dice and Jaccard similarity indices and inclusion index were calculated for every registered BP with the original gold standard BP. In parallel, differences in several morphometric parameters that may influence the BP segmentation accuracy were measured for the different atlases. Specific brachial plexus-related CT-visible bony points were used to define the morphometric parameters. Subsequently, correlations between the similarity indices and morphometric parameters were calculated. Results: A clear negative correlation between difference in protraction-retraction distance and the similarity indices was observed (mean Pearson correlation coefficient = −0.546). All of the other investigated Pearson correlation coefficients were weak. Conclusions: Differences in the shoulder protraction-retraction position between the atlas and the patient during planning CT influence the BP autosegmentation accuracy. A greater difference in the protraction-retraction distance between the atlas and the patient reduces the accuracy of the BP automatic segmentation result.

  4. Grossly calcified choroid plexus concealing foramen of Monro meningiomas as an unusual cause of obstructive hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Fujimura, Miki; Tominaga, Teiji

    2016-01-01

    Various intraventricular tumors can present with calcifications; however, the choroid plexus can also have physiological calcifications. This is the first case report of meningiomas located at the bilateral foramen of Monro (FOM), concealed by a grossly calcified choroid plexus, presenting with obstructive hydrocephalus. A 60-year-old woman with disturbed consciousness was admitted by ambulance. Head computed tomography revealed significantly high-density lesions that smoothly extended from the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricles to the third ventricle. They occupied both sides of the FOM, resulting in obstructive hydrocephalus. The diagnostic endoscopic biopsy was performed using a flexible neuroendoscopic system, and an egg shell-like grossly calcified choroid plexus was found to smoothly extend toward the FOM. Resection was not selected because the calcified lesions had tightly adhered to the veins and fornix; therefore, the patient underwent ventriculo-peritoneal shunting. The lesions were histologically identified as psammomatous meningiomas with low proliferation potential (the Ki-67 labeling index was lower than 1%). She was discharged 10 days after surgery without neurological deficits. As calcifications can have tumoral and nontumoral origins, we considered neuroendoscopic exploration to be essential in order to achieve an accurate diagnosis and select optimal management. PMID:26889294

  5. Notch receptors in human choroid plexus tumors.

    PubMed

    Beschorner, R; Waidelich, J; Trautmann, K; Psaras, T; Schittenhelm, J

    2013-08-01

    Notch signaling plays a role in development and formation of the normal choroid plexus (nCP), and in formation of various tumors in humans. Activation of Notch3 has been reported to promote tumor growth in invasive gliomas and to initiate formation of choroid plexus tumors (CPT) in mice. We investigated the expression of all currently known Notch receptors (Notch 1-4) in 55 samples of nCP and 88 CPT, including 61 choroid plexus papillomas (CPP), 22 atypical CPP and 5 choroid plexus carcinomas by immunohistochemistry. Notch expression was semiquantitatively evaluated separately for membranous/cytoplasmic and for nuclear staining. In addition, we examined Her2 expression (EGFR2, Her2/neu, ErbB2, CD340) because of its functional link to Notch signaling. All samples were negative for Notch3. Membranous/cytoplasmic expression of Notch1 (p<0.0001) and Notch4 (p=0.046) was significantly higher, whereas Notch2 expression was significantly lower (p<0.0001) in nCP compared to CPT. Nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and -4 was significantly higher in CPT compared to nCP (p<0.0001 each). Expression of Notch2 and Notch4 showed a shift from a prevailing membranous/cytoplasmic expression in nCP to a predominant nuclear expression in CPT. Her2 was weakly expressed in 42/84 CPT but only in 2/53 nCP (p=0.0001) and positively correlated with nuclear expression of Notch1, -2 and 4 in CPT. In summary, a shift between membranous/cytoplasmic (non-canonical signaling pathway) and nuclear expression (canonical signaling pathway) of Notch1, -2 and -4 and upregulation of Her2 indicate neoplastic transformation in human CP and may reveal new therapeutic approaches.

  6. Choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christian; Mergl, June; Gehring, Erica; Paulus, Werner; Martineau, Daniel; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We report herein a choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). This case was positive for choroid plexus tumor marker Kir7.1 on immunohistochemistry. These results and the high conservation of Kir7.1 across species at the amino acid sequence level strongly suggest that antibodies directed against Kir7.1 not only can be employed for the diagnosis of choroid plexus tumors in cetaceans, but are also likely to be diagnostically useful in other animal species.

  7. Bilateral common peroneal nerve injury after pediatric cardiothoracic surgery: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Setty, G.; Saleem, R.; Harijan, P.; Khan, A.; Hussain, N.

    2014-01-01

    Nerve injuries after thoracic and cardiovascular surgery have been reported but generally concern the brachial plexus, phrenic nerve, recurrent laryngeal, and facial nerve. Common peroneal nerve injury (CPNI) following cardiopulmonary bypass has been reported in adults (4); however bilateral injury is extremely uncommon. Age, low body weight, co-morbidities such as peripheral arteriosclerotic disease, diabetes mellitus, and arrhythmias were associated with CPNI following cardiothoracic surgery in adults. Common peroneal nerve injury (CPNI) following cardiopulmonary by-pass has been reported in adults; however, bilateral injury is extremely uncommon. The superficial course of CPN makes it vulnerable to traction or compression. We report a 5-year-old girl manifesting with bilateral CPNI following prolonged cardiopulmonary by-pass. To the best of our knowledge, she is the first pediatric patient presenting with bilateral CPNI following cardiothoracic surgery and cardiopulmonary by-pass. PMID:25624938

  8. Injury of the Arcuate Fasciculus in the Dominant Hemisphere in Patients With Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Ah Young; Shin, So Min

    2016-03-01

    Little is known about injury of the arcuate fasciculus (AF) in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). We investigated injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere in patients with mild TBI, using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). We recruited 25 patients with injury of the left AF among 64 right-handed consecutive patients with mild TBI and 20 normal control subjects. DTTs of the left AF were reconstructed, and fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fiber number of the AF were measured. Among 64 consecutive patients, 25 (39%) patients showed injury of the left AF. The patient group showed lower FA value and fiber number with higher ADC value than the control group (P < 0.05). On K-WAB evaluation, aphasia quotient and language quotient were 95.9 ± 4.1 (range 85-100) and 95.0 ± 5.4 (range 80-100), respectively. However, 23 (92.0%) of 25 patients complained of language-related symptoms after TBI; paraphasia in 12 (48.0%) patients, deficits of comprehension in 4 (16.0%) patients, deficits of speech production in 1 (4.0%) patient, and >2 language symptoms in 6 (24.0%) patients. We found that a significant number (39%) of patients with mild TBI had injury of the AF in the dominant hemisphere and these patients had mild language deficit. These results suggest that DTT could provide useful information in detecting injury of the AF and evaluation of the AF using DTT would be necessary even in the case of a patient with mild TBI who complains of mild language deficit. PMID:26945425

  9. Analysis of patients with bodyboarding injuries transported by physician-staffed emergency helicopter

    PubMed Central

    Omori, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Akihiko; Oode, Yasumasa; Itoi, Akira; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Yanagawa, Youichi

    2015-01-01

    Context: There have been no reports that have studied the characteristics specific to bodyboard injuries. Aims: To clarify characteristics to bodyboard injuries. Settings and Design: A retrospective medical chart review. Materials and Methods: A medical chart review was retrospectively performed for all patients with spinal cord injuries transported via physician-staffed emergency helicopters between January 2009 and October 2013. The subjects were divided into two groups based on whether they had a spinal cord injury induced by bodyboarding (Bodyboard group, n = 14) or not (Control group, n = 14). Statistical Analysis Used: Using a χ2-test, Mann-Whitney U-test and non-paired Student's t-test. Results: All but one of the subjects had spinal canal stenosis. The age of the patients in the Bodyboard group was younger than that of the Control group. The ratio of males and Glasgow Coma Scale of the Bodyboard group were higher than those on the Control group. The spinal cord injury induced by bodyboarding typically occurred after impacts of the head or face with the sea bottom while the subject was being buffeted by the waves. The severity of the spinal cord injury in the Bodyboard group was lower than that in the Control group. Conclusion: Bodyboarding tended to induce spinal cord injuries after the head or face collided with the sea bottom, and was more common in middle-aged males during the summer season, and was associated with a favorable outcome. PMID:25709252

  10. Effects of Manual Therapy on Bowel Function of Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chunying; Ye, Miao; Huang, Qiuchen

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to observe the effects of manual therapy on bowel function of patients with spinal cord injury. [Subjects] The participants were 20 patients with spinal cord injury. [Methods] Manual therapy was applied to the intestine and along the colon ascendens, transverse colon, colon descendens and colon sigmoidem on the surface of abdomen. The results before and after 60 sessions (5 times/week, continued for 12 weeks) of manual therapy were compared. [Results] It was found that there were significant effects both on shortening of bowel time and decreasing dosage of glycerine enema every time patients needed to excrete. [Conclusion] Manual therapy had significant effects on bowel function of patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:24259830

  11. Noninvasive transcutaneous bionic baroreflex system prevents severe orthostatic hypotension in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masayoshi; Murayama, Yoshinori; Chishaki, Akiko; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    Central baroreflex failure in patients with spinal cord injury results in serious orthostatic hypotension. We examined if transcutaneous electrical stimulation regulates arterial pressure in those patients. We identified skin regions capable of increasing arterial pressure and determined respective transfer function. Using the transfer function, we designed the feedback regulator (i.e., bionic baroreflex system) to control arterial pressure. Orthostatic stress decreased arterial pressure profoundly. Activation of bionic regulator restored and maintained arterial pressure at pre-specified levels. We conclude that the transcutaneous bionic system is noninvasive and capable of stabilizing arterial pressure in patients with spinal cord injury.

  12. Learning From No-Fault Treatment Injury Claims to Improve the Safety of Older Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Katharine Ann

    2015-01-01

    New Zealand’s treatment injury compensation claims data set provides an uncommon no-fault perspective of patient safety incidents. Analysis of primary care claims data confirmed medication as the leading threat to the safety of older patients in primary care and drew particular attention to the threat posed by antibiotics. For most injuries there was no suggestion of error. The no-fault perspective reveals the greatest threat to the safety of older patients in primary care to be, not error, but the risk posed by treatment itself. To improve patients’ safety, in addition to reducing error, clinicians need to reduce patients’ exposure to treatment risk, where appropriate. PMID:26371269

  13. The evaluation of physical exam findings in patients assessed for suspected burn inhalation injury.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jessica A; Shah, Jehan L; Doran, Cody J; Chen, Henian; Payne, Wyatt G; Smith, David J

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the utility of singed nasal hair (SN), carbonaceous sputum (CS), and facial burns (FB) as indicators of burn inhalation injury, when compared to the accepted standard of bronchoscopic diagnosis of inhalation injury. An institutional review board approved, retrospective review was conducted. All patients were suspected to have burn inhalation injury and subsequently underwent bronchoscopic evaluation. Data collected included: percent burn TBSA, burn injury mechanism, admission physical exam findings (SN, CS, FB), and bronchoscopy findings. Thirty-five males and twelve females met inclusion criteria (n = 47). Bronchoscopy was normal in 31 patients (66%). Data were analyzed as all patients and in subgroups according to burn TBSA and an enclosed space mechanism of injury. Physical exam findings (SN, CS, FB) were evaluated individually and in combination. Overall, the sensitivities, specificities, positive predictive values, and negative predictive values calculated were poor and inconsistent, and they did not improve within subgroup analysis or when physical findings were combined. Further statistical analysis suggested the physical findings, whether in isolation or in combination, have poor discrimination between patients that have and do not have inhalation injury (AUC < 0.7, P > .05) and poor agreement with the diagnosis made by bronchoscopy (κ < 0.4, P > .05). This remained true in the subgroup analysis as well. Our data demonstrated the findings of SN, CS, and FB are unreliable evidence for inhalation injury, even in the context of an enclosed space mechanism of injury. Thus, these physical findings are not absolute indicators for intubation and should be interpreted as one component of the history and physical.

  14. Nerve Injury in Patients Following Hip and Knee Arthroplasties and Knee Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yacub, Jennifer N.; Rice, J. Bradford; Dillingham, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the reporting of lower limb neuropathy within 90 days of surgery for patients undergoing hip arthroplasty, knee arthroplasty or knee arthroscopy. Design This was a retrospective study utilizing data from the 1998 MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounter Database (The MEDSTAT Group) to identify lower limb neuropathy following these surgeries. The sample was selected within the first nine months of 1998 using ICD-9 and CPT codes for hip and knee surgical procedures. Lower limb nerve injuries as determined by ICD-9 codes within 90 days post surgery were the main outcome measures. The influence of diabetes on the rates of nerve injuries following surgery was also examined. Results 14,979 patients underwent these surgical procedures, 10 of whom were reported to have sustained a nerve injury post surgery (0.07%). A majority (53.1%) of the sample was male and the largest age groups consisted of those aged 45–54 years (27.0%) and those aged 55–64 years (27.7%). Nerve injury occurred at a rate of 0.03% after hip arthroplasty, 0.01% following knee arthroplasty and 0.02% within three months of arthroscopic knee surgery. Overall, nerve injuries were two times more prevalent in the diabetic vs. non-diabetic population (0.11% vs. 0.06%); however, this difference did not meet conventional levels of statistical significance. Specific to knee arthroplasty, there were ten-fold differences in nerve injury rates between diabetics and non-diabetics, 0.11% vs. 0.01% respectively (p ≤ 0.01) – although the overall risks were small. Conclusion Nerve injuries following hip and knee arthroplasty, and knee arthroscopy were rare in a large population of patients younger than 65 years. Although the overall rates were low, there was an increased occurrence of nerve injuries in the diabetic population. This information is useful when counseling patients and benchmarking surgical complication rates. PMID:19620828

  15. Injury of the mammillothalamic tract in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage: a retrospective diffusion tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Choi, Byung Yeon; Kim, Seong Ho; Chang, Chul Hoon; Jung, Young Jin; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Objective Few studies have reported on injury of the mammillothalamic tract (MTT) in patients with stroke. However, no study in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) has been reported. Using diffusion tensor tractography, we attempted to investigate injury of the MTT in patients with SAH. Methods We recruited 16 patients with SAH and 15 control participants. DTI was obtained at 5.7±1.5 weeks after onset and reconstruction of the MTT was performed using the probabilistic tractography method. The fractional anisotropy (FA) value and tract number of the MTT and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score were determined. Values of FA and tract volume showing a decrement of more than two SDs that of normal control were defined as abnormal. Results The FA value and tract volume in the patient group were significantly lower than those in the control group (p<0.05). In addition, MMSE showed strong (r=0.67, p=0.005) positive correlation with tract volume without correlation with FA. In the individual analysis, 16 MTTs of 32 MTTs in 16 patients showed abnormalities of the MTT in terms of the FA value, the tract volume or the presence of a reconstructed MTT. As a result, 10 (62.5%) of 16 patients showed abnormality of the MTT in at least one hemisphere. Conclusions We found that patients with SAH showed injury of the MTT and this injury showed correlation with cognitive dysfunction. PMID:25052176

  16. Time Perception in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Study Comparing Different Methodologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mioni, G.; Mattalia, G.; Stablum, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated time perception in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Fifteen TBI patients and 15 matched healthy controls participated in the study. Participants were tested with durations above and below 1s on three different temporal tasks that involved time reproduction, production, and discrimination tasks. Data…

  17. Prior History of Back Pain in Patients with Compensable and Non-Compensable Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellecchia, Geraldine L.

    1993-01-01

    Data were collected retrospectively from insurance information forms and histories of 111 patients (ages 14-84) referred to physical therapy for evaluation of back and/or neck pain. Analysis indicated that patients with compensable (work-related or motor vehicle accident) injuries infrequently acknowledged prior episodes of back or neck pain. (JDD)

  18. Role of decompressive surgery in the management of severe head injuries: prognostic factors and patient selection.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Tanju; Akyuz, Mahmut; Kazan, Saim; Tuncer, Recai

    2005-11-01

    Decompressive surgery or craniectomy (DC) is a treatment option, which should be considered when the intracranial pressure (ICP) cannot be treated by conservative methods. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the benefits of decompressive craniectomy in patients with intractable posttraumatic intracranial hypertension and to evaluate the patient selection criteria for this management protocol. In this study, 100 patients with severe head injuries were involved. All patients were treated according to the European Brain Injury Consortium (EBIC) guidelines for severe head injuries and were assessed based on individual initial Glasgow Coma Scores (GCS), age, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), presence of systemic injury, changes in ICP, presence of mass lesion and the right timing for DC. All patients presented with a GCS of 8 or below. Based on their initial GCS, the patients were divided in two groups of 60 (group I with GCS 4-5) and 40 (group II with GCS 6-8) in each, respectively. Prognosis was evaluated according to the (GOS). After treatment with DC, 84 of the patients (84%) showed unfavorable and 16 (16%) showed favorable outcomes. In group I, 58 patients (96.6%) showed unfavorable and two (3.4%) showed favorable outcomes. In group II, 26 (65%) patients showed unfavorable and 14 (25%) showed favorable outcomes. The importance of initial GCS and age in patient outcomes were statistically significant. The presence of systemic injuries or mass lesions in outcomes were not statistically significant. Based on our findings, we conclude that patients with Glasgow Coma Scores of 6-8 are the best candidates for DC treatment.

  19. [Continuous lumbar plexus block sets in France. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Lascurain, P; Breining, T; Labbani, L; Le Gourrier, L; Lupescu, R; Gaertner, E

    2003-12-01

    The undeniable postoperative analgesia brought by the lumbar plexus block among patients scheduled for major surgery of the hip or knee justifies, the setting of a catheter to allow a continues analgesia more durable. Having drawn aside the difficulties of the daily practice (in allusion to the number of blocks carried out per day) and anatomical variations, the failure of the perineural catheter setting is in direct relationship with the material used by the anaesthesiologists for neurostimulation. The presentation of a case report describes a failure of catheter introduction due to the canula in deep continuous blocks, and the advantages and disadvantages of the various sets of neurostimulation. The authors conclude that the sets with the "catheter through the needle" are to be recommended, particularly the stimulating Tuohy needle.

  20. [Livid discoloration of the hand as complication during plexus anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Varelmann, D; Hostmann, F; Stüber, F; Schroeder, S

    2004-05-01

    During axillary brachial plexus block for hand surgery, the axillary artery was accidentally punctured. After skin disinfection of the operation site a livid discoloration of the hand appeared. The initial intention of stopping surgery and performing an angiography for clarification of the suspicion of a vessel lesion was dismissed after recording the pulse at the wrist and all fingertips employing a pulsoximeter. Further investigation showed that the livid discoloration of the hand was a product of the interaction of the octenidin solution used for pre-operative hand disinfection with the polyvidone-iodine solution used for surgical skin disinfection. This case report shows that interactions of topically administered pharmaceuticals have to be taken into consideration. Lack of knowledge might lead to unnecessary and unjustified diagnostic procedures which imply additional costs and dangers for the patient.

  1. Patients Immobilized with a Long Spine Board Rarely Have Unstable Thoracolumbar Injuries.

    PubMed

    Clemency, Brian M; Bart, Joseph A; Malhotra, Abhigyan; Klun, Taylor; Campanella, Veronica; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Most Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocols require spine immobilization with both a cervical collar and long spine board for patients with suspected spine injuries. The goal of this research was to determine the prevalence of unstable thoracolumbar spine injuries among patients receiving prehospital spine immobilization: a 4-year retrospective review of adult subjects who received prehospital spine immobilization and were transported to a trauma center. Prehospital and hospital records were linked. Data was reviewed to determine if spine imaging was ordered, whether acute thoracolumbar fractures, dislocations, or subluxations were present. Thoracolumbar injuries were classified as unstable if operative repair was performed. Prehospital spine immobilization was documented on 5,593 unique adult subjects transported to the study hospital. A total of 5,423 (97.0%) prehospital records were successfully linked to hospital records. The subjects were 60.2% male, with a mean age of 40.6 (SD = 17.5) years old. An total of 5,286 (97.4%) subjects had sustained blunt trauma. Hospital providers ordered imaging to rule out spine injury in 2,782 (51.3%) cases. An acute thoracolumbar fracture, dislocation, or subluxation was present in 233 (4.3%) cases. An unstable injury was present in 29 (0.5%) cases. No unstable injuries were found among the 951 subjects who were immobilized following ground level falls. Hospital providers ordered at least one spine x-ray or CT in most patients, and a thoracolumbar imaging in half of all patients immobilized. Only 0.5% of patients who received prehospital spine immobilization had an unstable thoracolumbar spine injury.

  2. Patients Immobilized with a Long Spine Board Rarely Have Unstable Thoracolumbar Injuries.

    PubMed

    Clemency, Brian M; Bart, Joseph A; Malhotra, Abhigyan; Klun, Taylor; Campanella, Veronica; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Most Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocols require spine immobilization with both a cervical collar and long spine board for patients with suspected spine injuries. The goal of this research was to determine the prevalence of unstable thoracolumbar spine injuries among patients receiving prehospital spine immobilization: a 4-year retrospective review of adult subjects who received prehospital spine immobilization and were transported to a trauma center. Prehospital and hospital records were linked. Data was reviewed to determine if spine imaging was ordered, whether acute thoracolumbar fractures, dislocations, or subluxations were present. Thoracolumbar injuries were classified as unstable if operative repair was performed. Prehospital spine immobilization was documented on 5,593 unique adult subjects transported to the study hospital. A total of 5,423 (97.0%) prehospital records were successfully linked to hospital records. The subjects were 60.2% male, with a mean age of 40.6 (SD = 17.5) years old. An total of 5,286 (97.4%) subjects had sustained blunt trauma. Hospital providers ordered imaging to rule out spine injury in 2,782 (51.3%) cases. An acute thoracolumbar fracture, dislocation, or subluxation was present in 233 (4.3%) cases. An unstable injury was present in 29 (0.5%) cases. No unstable injuries were found among the 951 subjects who were immobilized following ground level falls. Hospital providers ordered at least one spine x-ray or CT in most patients, and a thoracolumbar imaging in half of all patients immobilized. Only 0.5% of patients who received prehospital spine immobilization had an unstable thoracolumbar spine injury. PMID:27002350

  3. Ischemic brain injury in hemodialysis patients: which is more dangerous, hypertension or intradialytic hypotension?

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Christopher W; Goldsmith, David J

    2015-06-01

    Abnormalities of cognitive function and high levels of depression incidence are characteristic of hemodialysis patients. Although previously attributed to the humoral effects of uremia, it is becoming increasingly appreciated that many elements of the overall disease state in CKD patients contribute to functional disturbances and physical brain injury. These factors range from those associated with the underlying primary diseases (cardiovascular, diabetes etc.) to those specifically associated with the requirement for dialysis (including consequences of the hemodialysis process itself). They are, however, predominantly ischemic threats to the integrity of brain tissue. These evolving insights are starting to allow nephrologists to appreciate the potential biological basis of dependency and depression in our patients, as well as develop and test new therapeutic approaches to this increasingly prevalent and important issue. This review aims to summarize the current understanding of brain injury in this setting, as well as examine recent advances being made in the modification of dialysis-associated brain injury. PMID:25853331

  4. Risk of Encountering Dorsal Scapular and Long Thoracic Nerves during Ultrasound-guided Interscalene Brachial Plexus Block with Nerve Stimulator

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Dong; Yu, Jae Yong; Shim, Junho; Heo, Hyun Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, ultrasound has been commonly used. Ultrasound-guided interscalene brachial plexus block (IBPB) by posterior approach is more commonly used because anterior approach has been reported to have the risk of phrenic nerve injury. However, posterior approach also has the risk of causing nerve injury because there are risks of encountering dorsal scapular nerve (DSN) and long thoracic nerve (LTN). Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of encountering DSN and LTN during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Methods A total of 70 patients who were scheduled for shoulder surgery were enrolled in this study. After deciding insertion site with ultrasound, awake ultrasound-guided IBPB with nerve stimulator by posterior approach was performed. Incidence of muscle twitches (rhomboids, levator scapulae, and serratus anterior muscles) and current intensity immediately before muscle twitches disappeared were recorded. Results Of the total 70 cases, DSN was encountered in 44 cases (62.8%) and LTN was encountered in 15 cases (21.4%). Both nerves were encountered in 10 cases (14.3%). Neither was encountered in 21 cases (30.4%). The average current measured immediately before the disappearance of muscle twitches was 0.44 mA and 0.50 mA at DSN and LTN, respectively. Conclusions Physicians should be cautious on the risk of injury related to the anatomical structures of nerves, including DSN and LTN, during ultrasound-guided IBPB by posterior approach. Nerve stimulator could be another option for a safer intervention. Moreover, if there is a motor response, it is recommended to select another way to secure better safety. PMID:27413483

  5. The choroid plexuses and their impact on developmental neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Pia A

    2014-01-01

    During brain development the neural stem cells are regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic sources. One site of origin of extrinsic regulation is the developing choroid plexuses, primely situated inside the cerebral ventricles. The choroid plexuses are very active in terms of both secretion and barrier function as soon as they appear during development and control the production and contents of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This suggests that regulated secretion of signaling molecules from the choroid plexuses into CSF can regulate neural stem cell behavior (as they are in direct contact with CSF) and thereby neurogenesis and brain development. Here, choroid plexus development, particularly with regards to molecular regulation and specification, is reviewed. This is followed by a review and discussion of the role of the developing choroid plexuses in brain development. In particular, recent evidence suggests a region-specific reciprocal regulation between choroid plexuses and the neural stem cells. This is accomplished by site-specific secretion of signaling molecules from the different choroid plexuses into CSF, as well as brain region specific competence of the neural stem cells to respond to the signaling molecules present in CSF. In conclusion, although in its infancy, the field of choroid plexus regulation of neurogenesis has already and will likely continue to shed new light on our understanding of the control and fine-tuning of overall brain development.

  6. The choroid plexuses and their impact on developmental neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pia A.

    2014-01-01

    During brain development the neural stem cells are regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic sources. One site of origin of extrinsic regulation is the developing choroid plexuses, primely situated inside the cerebral ventricles. The choroid plexuses are very active in terms of both secretion and barrier function as soon as they appear during development and control the production and contents of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This suggests that regulated secretion of signaling molecules from the choroid plexuses into CSF can regulate neural stem cell behavior (as they are in direct contact with CSF) and thereby neurogenesis and brain development. Here, choroid plexus development, particularly with regards to molecular regulation and specification, is reviewed. This is followed by a review and discussion of the role of the developing choroid plexuses in brain development. In particular, recent evidence suggests a region-specific reciprocal regulation between choroid plexuses and the neural stem cells. This is accomplished by site-specific secretion of signaling molecules from the different choroid plexuses into CSF, as well as brain region specific competence of the neural stem cells to respond to the signaling molecules present in CSF. In conclusion, although in its infancy, the field of choroid plexus regulation of neurogenesis has already and will likely continue to shed new light on our understanding of the control and fine-tuning of overall brain development. PMID:25386116

  7. Effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, F.M.; Mayhan, W.G.; Williams, J.K.; Heistad, D.D. )

    1988-02-01

    The goal of this study was to examine effects of vasoactive stimuli on blood flow to choroid plexus. The authors used microspheres to measure blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum in anesthetized dogs and rabbits. A critical assumption of the microsphere method is that microspheres do not pass through arteriovenous shunts. Blood flow values obtained with simultaneous injection of 15- and 50-{mu}m microspheres were similar, which suggest that shunting of 15-{mu}m microspheres was minimal. Blood flow to choroid plexus under control conditions was 287 {plus minus} 26 (means {plus minus} SE) ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in dogs and 385 {plus minus} 73 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} 100 g{sup {minus}1} in rabbits. Consecutive measurements under control conditions indicated that values for blood flow are reproducible. Adenosine did not alter blood flow to cerebrum but increased blood flow to choroid plexus two- to threefold in dogs and rabbits. Norepinephrine and phenylephrine did not affect blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum but decreased blood flow to choroid plexus by {approx} 50%. The authors suggest that (1) the microsphere method provides reproducible valid measurements of blood flow to the choroid plexus in dogs and rabbits and (2) vasoactive stimuli may have profoundly different effects on blood flow to choroid plexus and cerebrum.

  8. Telocytes in meninges and choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Popescu, B O; Gherghiceanu, M; Kostin, S; Ceafalan, L; Popescu, L M

    2012-05-16

    Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified type of interstitial cells present in a wide variety of organs in humans and mammals (www.telocytes.com). They are characterized by a small cell body, but extremely long cell processes - telopodes (Tp), and a specific phenotype. TCs establish close contacts with blood capillaries, nerve fibers and stem cells. We report here identification of TCs by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence in rat meninges and choroid plexus/subventricular zone, in the vicinity of putative stem cells. The presence of TCs in brain areas involved in adult neurogenesis might indicate that they have a role in modulation of neural stem cell fate.

  9. Rehabilitation outcomes in patients with early and two-stage reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sade, Ilgin; İnanir, Murat; Şen, Suzan; Çakmak, Esra; Kablanoğlu, Serkan; Selçuk, Barin; Dursun, Nigar

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to assess rehabilitation outcomes for early and two-stage repair of hand flexor tendon injuries. The secondary purpose of this study was to compare the findings between treatment groups. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Early repair (n=14) and two-stage repair (n=9) groups were included in a rehabilitation program that used hand splints. This retrospective evaluated patients according to their demographic characteristics, including age, gender, injured hand, dominant hand, cause of injury, zone of injury, number of affected fingers, and accompanying injuries. Pain, range of motion, and grip strength were evaluated using a visual analog scale, goniometer, and dynamometer, respectively. [Results] Both groups showed significant improvements in pain and finger flexion after treatment compared with baseline measurements. However, no significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups. Similar results were obtained for grip strength and pinch grip, whereas gross grip was better in the early tendon repair group. [Conclusion] Early and two-stage reconstruction of patients with flexor tendon injuries can be performed with similarly favorable responses and effective rehabilitation programs.

  10. Rehabilitation outcomes in patients with early and two-stage reconstruction of flexor tendon injuries

    PubMed Central

    Sade, Ilgin; İnanir, Murat; Şen, Suzan; Çakmak, Esra; Kablanoğlu, Serkan; Selçuk, Barin; Dursun, Nigar

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The primary aim of this study was to assess rehabilitation outcomes for early and two-stage repair of hand flexor tendon injuries. The secondary purpose of this study was to compare the findings between treatment groups. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-three patients were included in this study. Early repair (n=14) and two-stage repair (n=9) groups were included in a rehabilitation program that used hand splints. This retrospective evaluated patients according to their demographic characteristics, including age, gender, injured hand, dominant hand, cause of injury, zone of injury, number of affected fingers, and accompanying injuries. Pain, range of motion, and grip strength were evaluated using a visual analog scale, goniometer, and dynamometer, respectively. [Results] Both groups showed significant improvements in pain and finger flexion after treatment compared with baseline measurements. However, no significant differences were observed between the two treatment groups. Similar results were obtained for grip strength and pinch grip, whereas gross grip was better in the early tendon repair group. [Conclusion] Early and two-stage reconstruction of patients with flexor tendon injuries can be performed with similarly favorable responses and effective rehabilitation programs. PMID:27630400

  11. Further validation of the Motivation for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Questionnaire (MOT-Q) in patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Boosman, Hileen; van Heugten, Caroline M; Winkens, Ieke; Smeets, Sanne M J; Visser-Meily, Johanna M A

    2016-01-01

    The Motivation for Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitation Questionnaire (MOT-Q) evaluates motivation for rehabilitation in four subscales: Interest in rehabilitation, Lack of anger, Lack of denial, and Reliance on professional help. The objective of this study was to further validate the MOT-Q in 122 inpatients and 92 outpatients with acquired brain injury (ABI). The main measures were motivation for rehabilitation (MOT-Q), self-awareness (Patient Competency Rating Scale), and treatment motivation (Visual Analogue Scale). The MOT-Q showed adequate feasibility in terms of few items with missing responses and few undecided responses. We found no floor or ceiling effects, and significant item-total MOT-Q correlations for 29 of 31 items. Internal consistency was good for the MOT-Q total and acceptable to good for the subscales. The MOT-Q scores were significantly intercorrelated except for the subscales Lack of denial and Reliance on professional help in the inpatient group. The MOT-Q total and subscales were significantly associated with treatment motivation. The Lack of denial subscale showed no significant association with treatment motivation and no to moderate significant associations with self-awareness. In conclusion, the overall MOT-Q is a valid instrument to assess motivation for rehabilitation in patients with ABI. Further research is needed to examine the validity of the subscales.

  12. [Helicopter transportation of a sedated, mechanically ventilated patient with cervical cord injury].

    PubMed

    Kato, Hideya; Nishiwaki, Yuko; Hosoi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoto; Hirata, Masashi

    2013-09-01

    We report helicopter transportation of a sedated, mechanically ventilated patient with cervical cord injury. A 20-year-old male sustained traumatic injury to the cervical spinal cord during extracurricular activities in a college. On arrival at the hospital, a halo vest was placed on the patient and tracheostomy was performed. On the 38th hospital day, he was transported a distance of 520km by helicopter to a specialized hospital in Fukuoka for medical repatriation. Cabin space was narrow. Since power supply and carrying capacity were limited, battery-driven and portable medical devices were used. In consideration for patient's psychological stress, he was sedated with propofol. RSS (Ramsay sedation scale) scores were recorded to evaluate whether the patient was adequately sedated during helicopter transportation. Prior to transport, we rehearsed the sedation using bispectral index monitoring (BIS) in the hospital to further ensure the patient's safety during the transport. PMID:24063142

  13. Devastating injuries in healthcare workers: description of the crisis and legislative solution to the epidemic of back injury from patient lifting.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Hudson, Mary Anne; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Winters, Kathryne L; Britt, L D; Cox, Mary Jude; Becker, Daniel G; McLaughlin, Joseph K; Gubler, K Dean; Zomerschoe, Thomas S P; Latimer, Mary F; Zura, Robert D; Paulsen, Nona S; Long, William B; Brodie, Barbara M; Berenson, Susan; Langenburg, Scott E; Borel, Lise; Jenson, Danielle B; Chang, Dillon E; Chitwood, W Randolph; Roberts, Thomas H; Martin, Mara J; Miller, Anna; Werner, Charles L; Taylor, Peyton T; Lancaster, Jeanette; Kurian, Marina S; Falwell, Jerry L; Falwell, Reverend Jerry

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a crisis in healthcare, disabling back injuries in US healthcare workers. In addition, outlined is the proven solution of safe, mechanized, patient lifting, which has been shown to prevent these injuries. A "Safe Patient Handling--No Manual Lift" policy must be immediately instituted throughout this country. Such a policy is essential to halt hazardous manual patient lifting, which promotes needless disability and loss of healthcare workers, pain and risk of severe injury to patients, and tremendous waste of financial resources to employers and workers' compensation insurance carriers. Healthcare workers consistently rank among top occupations with disabling back injuries, primarily from manually lifting patients. Back injury may be the single largest contributor to the nursing shortage. Reported injuries to certified nursing assistants are three to four times that of registered nurses. A national healthcare policy for "Safe Patient Handling--No Manual Lift" is urgently needed to address this crisis. Body mechanics training is ineffective in prevention of back injury with patient lifting. Mandated use of mechanical patient lift equipment has proven to prevent most back injury to nursing personnel and reduce pain and injury to patients associated with manual lifting. With the national epidemic of morbid obesity in our country, innovative devices are available for use in emergency medical systems and hospitals for patient lifting and transfer without injury to hospital personnel. The US healthcare industry has not voluntarily taken measures necessary to reduce patient handling injury by use of mechanical lift devices. US healthcare workers who suffer disabling work-related back injuries are limited to the fixed, and often inadequate, relief which they may obtain from workers' compensation. Under workers' compensation law, healthcare workers injured lifting patients may not sue their employer for not providing mechanical lift

  14. Risk-factor differences for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in Mexican psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Fresán, Ana; Camarena, Beatriz; González-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos Alfonso; Juárez-Rojop, Isela E; López-Narváez, Lilia; González-Ramón, Alicia E; Hernández-Díaz, Yazmín

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study compared sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities with substance use, and impulsivity features in three groups of psychiatric patients – suicide attempters, nonsuicidal self-injury, and nonsuicidal without self-injury – to determine the predictive factors for nonsuicidal self-injury or suicide behavior. Patients and methods Demographic features and self-reported substance use were assessed in 384 Mexican psychiatric patients. Impulsivity features were evaluated using the Plutchik Impulsivity Scale. Comparison analyses between groups were performed and a logistic regression model used to determine the factors associated with nonsuicidal with self-injury behavior and suicidal behavior. Results Different predictive factors were observed for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior. Females were more likely to present nonsuicidal self-injury behaviors (odds ratio [OR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18–0.93; P=0.03). For suicide attempters, the factors associated were younger age (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85–0.93; P<0.001), less than 6 years of schooling (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.06–0.6; P=0.004), and higher impulsivity traits, such as self-control (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.03–1.36; P=0.01), planning of future actions (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66–0.95; P=0.01), and physiological behavior (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.01–1.78; P=0.03). Conclusion Our results show that in a Mexican population, impulsivity features are predictors for suicide attempts, but not for self-injury. Other factors related to sociocultural background and individual features (such as personality) may be involved in this behavioral distinction, and should be studied in future research aimed at better understanding of both self-harmful behaviors. PMID:27462155

  15. Risk taking in hospitalized patients with acute and severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fecteau, Shirley; Levasseur-Moreau, Jean; García-Molina, Alberto; Kumru, Hatiche; Vergara, Raúl Pelayo; Bernabeu, Monste; Roig, Teresa; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Tormos, José Maria

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation can improve cognitive deficits observed in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, despite rehabilitation, the ability of making a choice often remains impaired. Risk taking is a daily activity involving numerous cognitive processes subserved by a complex neural network. In this work we investigated risk taking using the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) in patients with acute TBI and healthy controls. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI will take less risk at the BART as compared to healthy individuals. We also predicted that within the TBI group factors such as the number of days since the injury, severity of the injury, and sites of the lesion will play a role in risk taking as assessed with the BART. Main findings revealed that participants with TBI displayed abnormally cautious risk taking at the BART as compared to healthy subjects. Moreover, healthy individuals showed increased risk taking throughout the task which is in line with previous work. However, individuals with TBI did not show this increased risk taking during the task. We also investigated the influence of three patients' characteristics on their performance at the BART: Number of days post injury, Severity of the head injury, and Status of the frontal lobe. Results indicate that performance at the BART was influenced by the number of days post injury and the status of the frontal lobe, but not by the severity of the head injury. Reported findings are encouraging for risk taking seems to naturally improve with time postinjury. They support the need of conducting longitudinal prospective studies to ultimately identify impaired and intact cognitive skills that should be trained postinjury. PMID:24386232

  16. Longitudinal study of bone loss in chronic spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Karapolat, Inanc; Karapolat, Hale Uzumcugil; Kirazli, Yesim; Capaci, Kazim; Akkoc, Yesim; Kumanlioglu, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This prospective longitudinal study evaluated the changes in bone metabolism markers and bone mineral density of spinal cord injury patients over 3 years. We also assessed the relationships among the bone mineral density, bone metabolism, and clinical data of spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] We assessed the clinical data (i.e., immobilization due to surgery, neurological status, neurological level, and extent of lesion) in 20 spinal cord injury patients. Bone mineral density, and hormonal and biochemical markers of the patients were measured at 0, 6, 12, and 36 months. [Results] Femoral neck T score decreased significantly at 36 months (p < 0.05). Among the hormonal markers, parathyroid hormone and vitamin D were significantly elevated, while bone turnover markers (i.e., deoxypyridinoline and osteocalcin) were significantly decreased at 12 and 36 months (p < 0.05). [Conclusion] Bone mineral density of the femoral neck decreases significantly during the long-term follow-up of patients with spinal cord injury due to osteoporosis. This could be due to changes in hormonal and bone turnover markers. PMID:26157234

  17. The selection of the appropriate computer interface device for patients with high cervical cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Goo; Lee, Bum-Suk; Lim, Sung Eun; Kim, Dong-A; Hwang, Sung Il; Yim, You-Lim; Park, Jeong Mi

    2013-06-01

    In order to determine the most suitable computer interfaces for patients with high cervical cord injury, we report three cases of applications of special input devices. The first was a 49-year-old patient with neurological level of injury (NLI) C4, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (ASIA)-A. He could move the cursor by using a webcam-based Camera Mouse. Moreover, clicking the mouse could only be performed by pronation of the forearm on the modified Micro Light Switch. The second case was a 41-year-old patient with NLI C3, ASIA-A. The SmartNav 4AT which responds according to head movements could provide stable performance in clicking and dragging. The third was a 13-year-old patient with NLI C1, ASIA-B. The IntegraMouse enabling clicking and dragging with fine movements of the lips. Selecting the appropriate interface device for patients with high cervical cord injury could be considered an important part of rehabilitation. We expect the standard proposed in this study will be helpful. PMID:23869346

  18. Pulmonary Resection for Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer in Patients With Prior Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Brunworth, Louis S; Dharmasena, Dharson; Virgo, Katherine S; Johnson, Frank E

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: We sought to determine the clinical course of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who subsequently developed bronchogenic carcinoma and underwent pulmonary resection. Methods: A nationwide retrospective study was conducted of all veterans at Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Centers for fiscal years 1993–2002 who were diagnosed with SCI, subsequently developed non–small cell lung cancer, and were surgically treated with curative intent. Inclusion criteria included American Spinal Injury Association type A injury (complete loss of neural function distal to the injury site) and traumatic etiology. Data were compiled from national Department of Veterans Affairs data sets and supplemented by operative reports, pathology reports, progress notes, and discharge summaries. Results: Seven patients met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were considered evaluable. Five (71%) had one or more comorbid conditions in addition to their SCIs. All 7 underwent pulmonary lobectomy. Postoperative complications occurred in 4 patients (57%). Two patients died postoperatively on days 29 and 499, yielding a 30-day mortality rate of 14% and an in-hospital mortality rate of 29%. Conclusions: This seems to be the only case study in the English language literature on this topic. Patients with SCI who had resectable lung cancer had a high incidence of comorbid conditions. Those who underwent curative-intent surgery had high morbidity and mortality rates. Available evidence suggests that SCI should be considered a risk factor for adverse outcomes in major surgery of all types, including operations for primary lung cancer. PMID:16739556

  19. A Case Report of Spinal Cord Injury Patient From a High Velocity Gunshot Wound to the Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Juyong; Kim, Je Ho

    2013-01-01

    We report on operational and rehabilitation management, as well as the outcome, of a patient who with sustained spinal cord injury from a high velocity gunshot wound to the lumbar spine. More specifically, a patient with a gunshot wound to the spine is more likely to sustain a complete injury and have a poor prognosis. As such, there should be concerns regarding associated and extended injuries related to bullet fragmentation as well as the possibility of long-term sequelae. PMID:23526072

  20. Orthopedic Injuries: Protocols to Prevent and Manage Patient Falls.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Lynn C; Revell, Maria A

    2015-12-01

    Health care organizations must adopt a culture of safety and implement effective fall prevention protocols. The teach-back method is a useful strategy for health providers to determine patient understanding of information taught to maintain a safe environment and prevent falls. Purposeful rounding is a proactive approach to ensure that patient assessments are accurate and research supports that patients use the call light less when nurses participate in hourly rounding. This article provides the reader with evidence-based fall prevention interventions, tips for using the teach-back method, and fall prevention tools to safely care for patients of all ages.

  1. Effects of robot training on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Gu, Rui; Zhou, Yue; Hu, Chunying

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) and robot-assisted rehabilitation (RAT) on bowel function in patients with spinal cord injury with respect to defecation time and defecation drug dose (enema). [Subjects] Twenty-four patients with spinal cord injury participated in the study. All subjects had an incomplete injury ranging from level T8 to L2. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into BWSTT and RAT groups. Walking training was provided to both groups for 20 minutes, four times a week, for one month. The defecation time and enema dose were measured before and after the experiment. [Results] The RAT group showed significant shortening of defecation time and decrease of enema dose. [Conclusion] The results demonstrated that significantly better improvement in bowel function can be achieved with RAT. PMID:26157223

  2. Brain MRI volumetry in a single patient with mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Ross, David E; Castelvecchi, Cody; Ochs, Alfred L

    2013-01-01

    This letter to the editor describes the case of a 42 year old man with mild traumatic brain injury and multiple neuropsychiatric symptoms which persisted for a few years after the injury. Initial CT scans and MRI scans of the brain showed no signs of atrophy. Brain volume was measured using NeuroQuant®, an FDA-approved, commercially available software method. Volumetric cross-sectional (one point in time) analysis also showed no atrophy. However, volumetric longitudinal (two points in time) analysis showed progressive atrophy in several brain regions. This case illustrated in a single patient the principle discovered in multiple previous group studies, namely that the longitudinal design is more powerful than the cross-sectional design for finding atrophy in patients with traumatic brain injury.

  3. Psychobiology of posttraumatic stress disorder in pediatric injury patients: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Langeland, Willie; Olff, Miranda

    2008-01-01

    Research suggests that about a quarter to a third of children with traffic-related injuries develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Early symptoms of PTSD have been found to predict poor mental and physical outcome in studies of medically injured children. However, these symptoms are rarely recognized by physicians who provide emergency care for these children. In addition, there is insufficient knowledge about predictors of posttraumatic stress symptoms in this specific pediatric population. Early identification of those children at particular risk is needed to target preventive interventions appropriately. After some introducing remarks on the classification and the nature of posttraumatic stress reactions, current research findings on psychological and biological correlates of PTSD in pediatric injury patients are presented. The particular focus in this paper is on the neurobiological mechanisms that influence psychological responses to extreme stress and the development of PTSD. Continued study of the psychobiology of trauma and PTSD in pediatric injury patients, both in terms of neurobiology and treatment is needed.

  4. Hypothalamic-Amygdalar-Brainstem Volume Reduction in a Patient with Narcolepsy Secondary to Diffuse Axonal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Walid; Sugihara, Genichi; Oishi, Naoya; Kubota, Manabu; Ubukata, Shiho; Murai, Toshiya; Ueda, Keita

    2015-01-01

    A 17-year-old male with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) was referred to our psychiatric clinic with a diagnosis of depression. However, further investigation indicated that he had narcolepsy without cataplexy secondary to DAI. We assessed regional volume alterations in the patient; MRI analysis showed a significant decrease in the volume of the hypothalamus, left amygdala, and brainstem. Our findings add to further understanding of the structural basis of secondary narcolepsy, and may provide basis for future neuroimaging studies on sleep disturbances in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Citation: Yassin W, Sugihara G, Oishi N, Kubota M, Ubukata S, Murai T, Ueda K. Hypothalamic-amygdalar-brainstem volume reduction in a patient with narcolepsy secondary to diffuse axonal injury. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(5):581–582. PMID:25665696

  5. Injuries and allegations of oral rape: A retrospective review of patients presenting to a London sexual assault referral centre.

    PubMed

    Brew-Graves, Emmeline; Morgan, Louise

    2015-08-01

    A retrospective review was carried out of patients seen at the Haven sexual assault referral centre in South East London between January 2009 and September 2010 to determine the frequency and nature of oral injuries found in people reporting oral rape. Ninety five eligible patients were identified and relevant information was extracted from standardised Haven forms completed during forensic medical examination. The main outcome measures were prevalence, type and location of oral injury. Eighteen (19%) were found to have sustained an oral injury. The most common injury was abrasions, followed by bruising and petechiae. The lips were the most common site of injury followed by the soft palate and the inside of the cheeks. It was concluded that injuries in the mouth were not common after an allegation of oral rape. Injuries were minor and did not require treatment.

  6. Fibrosis of the Choroid Plexus Filtration Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Parratt, John D. E.; Kirwan, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    We report a previously undescribed inflammatory lesion consisting of deposition of activated complement (C3d and C9neo) in association with major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC2)-positive activated microglia in choroid plexus villi exhibiting classical fibrous thickening of the pericapillary filtration membrane. The proportion of villi affected ranged from 5% to 90% in 56 adult subjects with diseases of the CNS and 11 subjects with no preexisting disease of the CNS. In 3 of the 4 children studied, 2% or less of examined villi showed stromal thickening, complement deposition, and the presence of MHC2-positive microglia; in adults, the proportion of villi affected increased with age. Other features of the lesion included loss of capillaries and failure by macrophages to clear extracellular particulate electron-dense material by clathrin-mediated phagocytosis. This choroid plexus lesion may relate pathogenetically to age-related macular degeneration and to Alzheimer disease, 2 other conditions with no known risk factors other than increasing age. All 3 conditions are characterized by the presence of damaged capillaries, inflammatory extracellular aggregates of mixed molecular composition and defective clearance of the deposits by macrophages. PMID:27444353

  7. Diminished supraspinal pain modulation in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shivshil; Yang, Eric; Canlas, Bryan; Kadokana, Mawj; Heald, Jason; Davani, Ariea; Song, David; Lin, Lisa; Polston, Greg; Tsai, Alice; Lee, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic pain conditions are highly prevalent in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Supraspinal diffuse axonal injury is known to dissociate brain functional connectivity in these patients. The effect of this dissociated state on supraspinal pain network is largely unknown. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study was conducted to compare the supraspinal pain network in patients with mild traumatic brain injury to the gender and age-matched healthy controls with the hypothesis that the functional connectivities of the medial prefrontal cortices, a supraspinal pain modulatory region to other pain-related sensory discriminatory and affective regions in the mild traumatic brain injury subjects are significantly reduced in comparison to healthy controls. Results The mild traumatic brain injury group (N = 15) demonstrated significantly (P < 0.01, cluster threshold > 150 voxels) less activities in the thalamus, pons, anterior cingulate cortex, insula, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and medial prefrontal cortices than the healthy control group (N = 15). Granger Causality Analyses (GCA) indicated while the left medial prefrontal cortices of the healthy control group cast a noticeable degree of outward (to affect) causality inference to multiple pain processing related regions, this outward inference pattern was not observed in the mild traumatic brain injury group. On the other hand, only patients’ bilateral anterior cingulate cortex received multiple inward (to be affected) causality inferences from regions including the primary and secondary somatosensory cortices and the inferior parietal lobe. Resting state functional connectivity analyses indicated that the medial prefrontal cortices of the mild traumatic brain injury group demonstrated a significantly (P < 0.01, F = 3.6, cluster size > 150 voxels) higher degree of functional connectivity to the inferior parietal lobe, premotor and secondary somatosensory cortex

  8. Beneficial effect of cerebrolysin on moderate and severe head injury patients: result of a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wong, G K C; Zhu, X L; Poon, W S

    2005-01-01

    Cerebrolysin is used as a neurotrophic agent for the treatment of ischemic stroke and Alzheimer's Disease. Exploratory studies in patients with post-acute traumatic brain injury have shown that this treatment might help improve recovery. Aim of this study was to investigate whether addition of Cerebrolysin to the initial treatment regimen of moderate and severe head injury patients would improve their outcome. At 6 months, 67% of the patients (Cerebrolysin group) attained good outcome (GOS 3-5). The study group was compared with the historical cohort of patients from the hospital trauma data bank, with age, sex and admitting GCS matching. More patients tended to a good outcome in the Cerebrolysin group (P = 0.065). No significant side-effect requiring cessation of Cerebrolysin was noted. It can be concluded that the use of Cerebrolysin as part of the initial management of moderate and severe head injury is safe and well tolerated. The results suggest that Cerebrolysin is beneficial in regard to the outcome in these patients, especially in elderly patients.

  9. Ultrasound-guided Continuous Axillary Brachial Plexus Block Using a Nerve Stimulating Catheter: EpiStim® Catheter

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Kyoung; Kim, Jung Eun; Kim, Se Hee; Yeo, Gwi Eun

    2015-01-01

    Brachial plexus block (BPB) under ultrasound guidance has come to be widely used. However, nerve injury has been reported following ultrasound-guided BPB. We hypothesized that BPB under ultrasound guidance in conjunction with real-time electrical nerve stimulation would help us prevent nerve injury and do more successful procedure. Here, we report the successful induction and maintenance of ultrasound-guided BPB and the achievement of good peri- and postoperative pain control using a conductive catheter, the EpiStim®. PMID:26495085

  10. Plasma B-Endorphin Levels in Patients with Self-Injurious Behavior and Stereotypy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Curt A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    B-endorphin and cortisol concentrations were examined in the plasma of mentally retarded adults who displayed symptoms of self-injurious behavior (SIB) (N=9), stereotypy (N=17), or SIB plus stereotypy (N=14). Compared to matched controls, patients with SIB plus stereotypy had elevated b-endorphin plasma, while cortisol levels were identical for…

  11. Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (Lisat-9): Reliability and Validity for Patients with Acquired Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boonstra, Anne M.; Reneman, Michiel F.; Stewart, Roy E.; Balk, Gerlof A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminant validity of the Dutch version of the life satisfaction questionnaire (Lisat-9 DV) to assess patients with an acquired brain injury. The reliability study used a test-retest design, and the validity study used a cross-sectional design. The setting was the general rehabilitation…

  12. The Prevalence, Etiologic Agents and Risk Factors for Urinary Tract Infection Among Spinal Cord Injury Patients

    PubMed Central

    Togan, Turhan; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Durukan, Elif; Arslan, Hande

    2014-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with spinal cord injury and 22% of patients with acute spinal cord injury develop UTI during the first 50 days. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, etiologic agents and risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in patients with spinal cord injury. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective investigation of spinal cord injury patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic urinary tract infections in Baskent University Medical Faculty Ayas Rehabilitation Center and Ankara Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Center between January 2008 and December 2010. The demographic status, clinical and laboratory findings of 93 patients with spinal cord injury were analyzed in order to determine the risk factors for asymptomatic or symptomatic bacteriuria Results: Sixty three (67.7%) of 93 patients had asymptomatic bacteriuria and 21 (22.6%) had symptomatic urinary tract infection. Assessment of the frequency of urinary bladder emptying methods revealed that 57 (61.3%) of 93 patients employed permanent catheters and 24 (25.8%) employed clean intermittent catheterization. One hundred and thirty-five (48.0%) of 281 strains isolated form asymptomatic bacteriuria attacks and 16 (66.6%) of 24 strains isolated from symptomatic urinary tract infection attacks, totaling 151 strains, had multidrug resistance (P > 0.05). One hundred (70.4%) of 142 Escherichia coli strains and 19 (34.5%) of 55 Klebsiella spp strains proliferated in patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria; 8 (80%) of 10 E. coli strains and 4 (80%) of 5 Klebsiella spp. strains were multidrug resistant. Conclusions: The most common infectious episode among spinal cord injury patients was found to be urinary tract ınfection. E. coli was the most common microorganism isolated from urine samples. Antibiotic use in the previous 2 weeks or 3 months

  13. Interleukin-6 in the injured patient. Marker of injury or mediator of inflammation?

    PubMed Central

    Biffl, W L; Moore, E E; Moore, F A; Peterson, V M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effects of interleukin (IL)-6 in the injured patient are examined in an attempt to clarify the potential pathophysiologic role of IL-6 in the response to injury. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Interleukin-6 is an integral cytokine mediator of the acute phase response to injury and infection. However, prolonged and excessive elevations of circulating IL-6 levels in patients after trauma, burns, and elective surgery have been associated with complications and mortality. The mechanistic role of IL-6 in mediating these effects is unclear. METHODS: A review of current literature is performed to summarize the origins, mechanisms of action, and biologic effects of IL-6 and to characterize the IL-6 response to injury. RESULTS: Interleukin-6 is a multifunctional cytokine expressed by a variety of cells after a multitude of stimuli, under complex regulatory control mechanisms. The IL-6 response to injury is uniquely consistent and related to the magnitude of the insult. Moreover, the early postinjury IL-6 response correlates with complications as well as mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Interleukin-6 appears to play an active role in the postinjury immune response, making it an attractive therapeutic target in attempts to control hyperinflammatory provoked organ injury. Images Figure 2. PMID:8916880

  14. Liver Manipulation Causes Hepatocyte Injury and Precedes Systemic Inflammation in Patients Undergoing Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Derikx, Joep P. M.; Buurman, Wim A.; Peters, Wilbert H. M.; Roelofs, Hennie M. J.; Wigmore, Stephen J.; Dejong, Cornelis HC

    2007-01-01

    Background Liver failure following liver surgery is caused by an insufficient functioning remnant cell mass. This can be due to insufficient liver volume and can be aggravated by additional cell death during or after surgery. The aim of this study was to elucidate the causes of hepatocellular injury in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods Markers of hepatocyte injury (AST, GSTα, and L-FABP) and inflammation (IL-6) were measured in plasma of patients undergoing liver resection with and without intermittent inflow occlusion. To study the separate involvement of the intestines and the liver in systemic L-FABP release, arteriovenous concentration differences for L-FABP were measured. Results During liver manipulation, liver injury markers increased significantly. Arterial plasma levels and transhepatic and transintestinal concentration gradients of L-FABP indicated that this increase was exclusively due to hepatic and not due to intestinal release. Intermittent hepatic inflow occlusion, anesthesia, and liver transection did not further enhance arterial L-FABP and GSTα levels. Hepatocyte injury was followed by an inflammatory response. Conclusions This study shows that liver manipulation is a leading cause of hepatocyte injury during liver surgery. A potential causal relation between liver manipulation and systemic inflammation remains to be established; but since the inflammatory response is apparently initiated early during major abdominal surgery, interventions aimed at reducing postoperative inflammation and related complications should be started early during surgery or beforehand. PMID:17668263

  15. The Change in Nutritional Status in Traumatic Brain Injury Patients: A Retrospective Descriptive Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masha'al, Dina A.

    There is a high prevalence in malnutrition among traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to the hypermetabolism and hypercatabolism which develop post injury. Traumatic brain injury patients are different, even among themselves, in their energy requirements and response to nutritional therapy. This implies that there are other factors that affect the energy intake of these patients and enhance the incidence of malnutrition. This dissertation study examines the nutritional status of TBI patients upon admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and during their hospital stay to describe baseline status, detect changes in nutritional status over 7 days, and identify the factors affecting the adequacy of energy intake and the change in nutritional status as a consequence. Anthropometric measurements, biomedical measurements, measures of severity of illness, daily health status, level of brain injury severity, and other data were collected from the medical records of 50 patients, who were ≥ 18 years old, mechanically ventilated in the first 24 hours of ICU admission, and had a Glasgow Coma Scale score between 3-12. These data were used to examine the previous relationships. Although there was no statistically significant change found in body mass index and weight, there was a significant change detected in other nutritional markers, including hemoglobin, albumin, and total lymphocyte levels over the 7 days of ICU and hospital stay. No significant relationship was found between the adequacy of energy intake and total prescribed energy, severity of illness, level of brain injury severity, daily health status, patient age, intracranial pressure, or time of feeding initiation. Findings may be used to develop and test interventions to improve nutritional status during the acute phase of TBI. This will lay a foundation for health care providers, including nurses, to establish standards for practice and nutrition protocols to assure optimal nutrition assessment and intervention in a

  16. A New Injury Severity Score for Predicting the Length of Hospital Stay in Multiple Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Oveis; Tabibzadeh Dezfuli, Seyed Ashkan; Namazi, Seyed Shojaeddin; Dehghan Khalili, Maryam; Saeedi, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals under 40 and is the third main cause for death throughout the world. Objectives: This study was designed to compare our modified injury scoring systems with the current injury severity score (ISS) from the viewpoint of its predictive value to estimate the duration of hospitalization in trauma patients. Patients and Methods: This analytical cross-sectional study was performed at the general referral trauma center of Bandar-Abbas in southern Iran from March 2009 to March 2010. The study population consisted of all the trauma patients referred to the emergency department (ED). Demographic data, type and severity of injury, duration of admission, Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and revised trauma score (RTS) were recorded. The injury severity score (ISS) and NISS were calculated. The length of hospital stay was recorded during the patients follow-up and compared with ISS, NISS and modified injury scoring systems. Results: Five hundred eleven patients (446 males (87.3%) and 65 females (12.7%)) were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 22 ± 4.2 for males and 29.15 ± 3.8 for females. The modified NISS had a relatively strong correlation with the length of hospitalization (r = 0.79). The formula below explains the length of hospitalization according to MNISS score. Duration of hospitalization was 0.415 + (2.991) MNISS. Duration of hospitalization had a strong correlation with MISS (r = 0.805, R2: 0.65). Duration of hospitalization was 0.113 + (7.915) MISS. Conclusions: This new suggested scale shows a better value to predict patients’ length of hospital stay compared to ISS and NISS. However, future studies with larger sample sizes and more confounding factors such as prehospital procedures, intubation and other procedures during admission, should be designed to examine these scoring systems and confirm the results of our study. PMID:27218048

  17. Alterations of acute phase reaction and cytokine production in patients following severe burn injury.

    PubMed

    Dehne, Marius G; Sablotzki, Armin; Hoffmann, Andreas; Mühling, Jörg; Dietrich, Friedrich E; Hempelmann, Gunter

    2002-09-01

    To determine the acute immunologic reaction, mediated by cytokines, interleukines (ILs) and growth factors and the susceptibility to infections and sepsis after severe burn injury a prospective, single unit, longitudinal study of acute phase reactants and mediators who performed. After approval by the ethics committee of our hospital, we investigated the plasma concentrations of IL-2, -6, -8, -10, and -13, the soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R), and the acute phase proteins procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) at admission and every 3 days in 24 patients over a time course of 28 days after thermal injury and categorized by percent burn: < or =30% (group 1; n=12) and >30% (group 2; n=12). Shortly after burn injury we found higher concentrations of IL-2, -6, -10 and PCT in those patients >30% TBSA. During the study period, we found significant higher levels of acute phase proteins, IL-6 and -8 in patients >30% TBSA. The incidence of SIRS and MODS was three times increased in patients >30% TBSA. Our results show different patterns of cytokines and acute phase proteins in patients with different burned surface areas over a long time and continuous monitoring of a more distinct inflammatory response in these patients.

  18. Delayed regaining of gait ability in a patient with brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Kwon, Hyeok Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Little is known about delay in regaining gait ability at a chronic stage after brain injury. In this study, we report on a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. Methods and results: A 40-year-old male patient diagnosed with viral encephalitis underwent comprehensive rehabilitation until 2 years after onset. However, he could not even sit independently and presented with severe physical deconditioning and severe ataxia. To understand his neurological state, 4 neural tracts related to gait function were reconstructed, and based on the state of these neural tracts, we decided that the patient had the neurological potential to walk independently. Therefore, we assumed that the main reasons for gait inability in this patient were severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Consequently, the patient underwent the following intensive rehabilitative therapy: administration of drugs for control of ataxia (topiramate, clonazepam, and propranolol) and movement therapy for physical conditioning and gait training. As a result, after 2 months of rehabilitation, he was able to walk independently on an even floor, with improvement of severe physical deconditioning and truncal ataxia. Conclusion: We described the rehabilitation program in a single patient who regained the gait ability during 2 months of intensive rehabilitation starting 2 years after a brain injury. PMID:27661035

  19. Brachial plexus birth palsy: Management during the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Abid, A

    2016-02-01

    Brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) is defined as an injury to any nerve root of the brachial plexus during difficult delivery. BPBP is relatively rare; its incidence has remained constant over the last few decades, mostly due to unpredictable risk factors, such as shoulder dystocia. Both diagnosis and assessment of spontaneous recovery is based on clinical examination. Electromyography is difficult to interpret in the newborn and is therefore not meaningful. MRI of the cervical spine requires sedation or general anesthesia. Searching for a pre-ganglion tear prior to surgery is indicted. Prognosis depends on the level of the injury (pre- or post-ganglion), size and severity of the post-ganglion tears, speed of recovery, and quality of initial management. Although spontaneous recovery is frequent, some children suffer various degrees of sequelae, up to complete loss of function of the affected upper limb. Recent publications have improved general knowledge and indications for surgery. However, some aspects, such as indication and timing of nerve repair continue to be debated. PMID:26774906

  20. Choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas).

    PubMed

    Thomas, Christian; Mergl, June; Gehring, Erica; Paulus, Werner; Martineau, Daniel; Hasselblatt, Martin

    2016-07-01

    We report herein a choroid plexus papilloma in a beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas). This case was positive for choroid plexus tumor marker Kir7.1 on immunohistochemistry. These results and the high conservation of Kir7.1 across species at the amino acid sequence level strongly suggest that antibodies directed against Kir7.1 not only can be employed for the diagnosis of choroid plexus tumors in cetaceans, but are also likely to be diagnostically useful in other animal species. PMID:27216722

  1. Psammoma bodies - friends or foes of the aging choroid plexus.

    PubMed

    Jovanović, Ivan; Ugrenović, Sladjana; Vasović, Ljiljana; Petrović, Dragan; Cekić, Sonja

    2010-06-01

    Psammoma bodies are structures classified in the group of dystrophic calcifications, which occur in some kind of tumors and in choroid plexus during the aging process. Despite early discovery of their presence in choroid plexus stroma, mechanisms responsible for their formation remained unclear. Their presence in some kind of tumors was even more extensively studied, but significant breakthrough in the field of their etiology was not attained, too. However, till today correlation between their presence in tumors and aging is not established. Also, there are not any data about structural differences between ones found in tumors and ones found in choroid plexus. This might points to the assumption that besides the aging, some other causes might be involved in their formation in choroid plexus. Furthermore, it is contradictory that forms, like psammoma bodies, present in such malignant formations as tumors, represent quite benign phenomenon in choroid plexus. Literature data and the results of our previous researches revealed that there might be connections between, these, on the first sight quite different processes. Firstly, psammoma bodies are present in stroma of tumors with predominantly papillomatous morphology, which is present in choroid plexus, too. Initial forms of psammoma bodies might be formed in fibrovascular core of choroid plexus villi, similarly like in tumors papillae of papillary thyroid cancer. Their further growth leads to the progressive destruction of both tumors papillae and choroidal villi. Choroid plexus stroma is characterized by the fenestrated blood vessels presence, which are similar to newly formed vessels in tumors. This makes it vulnerable to the noxious agents from circulation. It can contain lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells and myofibroblasts in cases with psammoma bodies, similarly to tumors stroma which is in activated, proinflammatory state. So, all these facts can suggest that similar processes can lead to psammoma

  2. Coronary slow flow and acute coronary syndrome in a patient with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Aktoz, Meryem; Tatli, Ersan; Barutcu, Ahmet; Ozkalayci, Flora; Umit, Elif; Altun, Armagan

    2011-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with acute coronary syndrome due to coronary slow flow after spinal cord injury. Data regarding the causes and clinical manifestations of coronary slow flow are inconclusive, but the autonomic nervous system is believed to be at least a contributing factor. The predominant vagal activity causes vasodilation and hemostasis, which can lead to acute coronary syndrome. We hereby call attention to hyperactive parasympathetic tonicity, which can lead to coronary slow flow and acute coronary syndrome in acute spinal cord injury patients. PMID:21841878

  3. Surgical Decision Making for the Elderly Patients in Severe Head Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Jae-Jun; Yoon, Seok-Man; Oh, Jae-Sang; Bae, Hack-Gun; Doh, Jae-Won

    2014-01-01

    Objective Age is a strong predictor of mortality in traumatic brain injuries. A surgical decision making is difficult especially for the elderly patients with severe head injuries. We studied so-called 'withholding a life-saving surgery' over a two year period at a university hospital. Methods We collected data from 227 elderly patients. In 35 patients with Glasgow Coma Score 3-8, 28 patients had lesions that required operation. A life-saving surgery was withheld in 15 patients either by doctors and/or the families (Group A). Surgery was performed in 13 patients (Group B). We retrospectively examined the medical records and radiological findings of these 28 patients. We calculated the predicted probability of 6 month mortality (IPM) and 6 month unfavorable outcome (IPU) to compare the result of decision by the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) calculator. Results Types of the mass lesion did not affect on the surgical decision making. None of the motor score 1 underwent surgery, while all patients with reactive pupils underwent surgery. Causes of injury or episodes of hypoxia/hypotension might have affected on the decision making, however, their role was not distinct. All patients in the group A died. In the group B, the outcome was unfavorable in 11 of 13 patients. Patients with high IPM or IPU were more common in group A than group B. Wrong decisions brought futile cares. Conclusion Ethical training and developing decision-making skills are necessary including shared decision making. PMID:25024822

  4. Septic versus non-septic acute kidney injury in critically ill patients: characteristics and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Marília Galvão; Dantas, João Gabriel Athayde de Oliveira; Levi, Talita Machado; Rocha, Mário de Seixas; de Souza, Sérgio Pinto; Boa-Sorte, Ney; de Moura, Carlos Geraldo Guerreiro; Cruz, Constança Margarida Sampaio

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to describe and compare the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury. Methods This study evaluated an open cohort of 117 critically ill patients with acute kidney injury who were consecutively admitted to an intensive care unit, excluding patients with a history of advanced-stage chronic kidney disease, kidney transplantation, hospitalization or death in a period shorter than 24 hours. The presence of sepsis and in-hospital death were the exposure and primary variables in this study, respectively. A confounding analysis was performed using logistic regression. Results No significant differences were found between the mean ages of the groups with septic and non-septic acute kidney injury [65.30±21.27 years versus 66.35±12.82 years, respectively; p=0.75]. In the septic and non-septic acute kidney injury groups, a predominance of females (57.4% versus 52.4%, respectively; p=0.49) and Afro-descendants (81.5% versus 76.2%, respectively; p=0.49) was observed. Compared with the non-septic patients, the patients with sepsis had a higher mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score [21.73±7.26 versus 15.75±5.98; p<0.001)] and a higher mean water balance (p=0.001). Arterial hypertension (p=0.01) and heart failure (p<0.001) were more common in the non-septic patients. Septic acute kidney injury was associated with a greater number of patients who required dialysis (p=0.001) and a greater number of deaths (p<0.001); however, renal function recovery was more common in this group (p=0.01). Sepsis (OR: 3.88; 95%CI: 1.51-10.00) and an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score >18.5 (OR: 9.77; 95%CI: 3.73-25.58) were associated with death in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Sepsis was an independent predictor of death. Significant differences were found between the characteristics and clinical outcomes of patients with septic versus non-septic acute kidney

  5. Early and Late Acute Kidney Injury in Severely Burned Patients

    PubMed Central

    Witkowski, Wojciech; Kawecki, Marek; Surowiecka-Pastewka, Agnieszka; Klimm, Wojciech; Szamotulska, Katarzyna; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Background This study evaluated factors influencing early and late occurrence of AKI in severely burned patients and assessed the relationship between time of occurrence of AKI and mortality of AKI patients. Material/Methods Renal function was evaluated at 3 time points: at admission, at the critical point or middle point of hospitalization, and at the endpoint for which death or a discharge from the center was considered. AKI criteria were: decrease in GFR of less than 60 ml/min at admission, decrease in GFR of more than 75% compared to baseline, and decrease in the daily diuresis of less than 500 ml/24 h. Results At admission, 15.1% of the patients had eGFR <60 ml/min. AKI occurred in 38.5% of cases. The occurrence of AKI was associated with: elderly age (p<0.001), female sex (p=0.017), overweight and obesity (p=0.055); extent and depth of burns, respiratory failure, low protein concentration (for all p<0.001), low blood pressure (p=0.014), and high WBC (p=0.010). Early AKI was detected in 28% of patients. Mortality was 100% with the initial GFR ≥60, 100% with the initial GFR <60 and early deterioration of renal function, 80% with the initial GFR <60 and late worsening, and 60% with the initial GFR <60 and no worsening. Late AKI was observed in 10% of patients and mortality in this group was 79.2%. Mortality in the entire group with AKI was 88.0% versus 24.5%. Conclusions The frequent occurrence of AKI, especially early, worsens the prognosis for survival. Assessment of renal function should be included in the prognostic scales for burned patients. PMID:27746455

  6. Clinical analysis of cause, treatment and prognosis in acute kidney injury patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Li; Wu, Hao; Zou, Hongbin; Du, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by an abrupt decline in renal function, resulting in an inability to secrete waste products and maintain electrolyte and water balance, and is associated with high risks of morbidity and mortality. This study retrospectively analyzed clinical data, treatment, and prognosis of 271 hospitalized patients (172 males and 99 females) diagnosed with AKI from December, 2008 to December, 2011. In addition, this study explored the association between the cause of AKI and prognosis, severity and treatment of AKI. The severity of AKI was classified according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria. Renal recovery was defined as a decrease in a serum creatinine level to the normal value. Prerenal, renal, and postrenal causes accounted for 36.5% (99 patients), 46.5% (126 patients) and 17.0% (46 patients), respectively, of the incidence of AKI. Conservative, surgical, and renal replacement treatments were given to 180 (66.4%), 30 (11.1%) and 61 patients (22.5%), respectively. The overall recovery rate was 21.0%, and the mortality rate was 19.6%. Levels of Cl(-), Na(+) and carbon dioxide combining power decreased with increasing severity of AKI. Cause and treatment were significantly associated with AKI prognosis. Likewise, the severity of AKI was significantly associated with cause, treatment and prognosis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that respiratory injury and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) were associated with AKI patient death. Cause, treatment and AKIN stage are associated with the prognosis of AKI. Respiratory injury and MODS are prognostic factors for death of AKI patients.

  7. Improvement of verbal fluency in patients with diffuse brain injury over time

    PubMed Central

    Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; de Paula Guirado, Vinícius Monteiro; Baldivia, Beatriz; Núñes, Monica Domiano; Amorim, Robson Luis Oliveira; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; de Lucia, Mara Cristina Souza; de Andrade, Almir Ferreira; Paiva, Wellingson Silva

    2014-01-01

    Background Diffuse axonal injury (DAI), a common cause of neurological sequelae in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), is considered one of the most prevalent forms of primary neuronal injury in patients with severe TBI. Cognitive deficits induced by DAI can persist over time, especially following moderate or severe injuries. The aim of the present study was to compare verbal fluency (VF) performance at 6 and 12 months after the trauma in a same group of patients with DAI. Methods Eighteen patients with moderate to severe DAI and 17 healthy volunteers were enrolled. All DAI participants had sustained a TBI at least 6 months prior to the start of the study, were between 18 and 50 years of age, and had at least 4 years of education. The VF test was administered within an extensive neuropsychological test battery. We evaluated the same patients at 6 months (DAI1 group) and 12 months (DAI2 group) and compared the results of neuropsychological tests with a control group of healthy volunteers who were matched to patients for sex, age, and educational level. Results In comparison to controls, the DAI1 group produced significantly fewer words. The DAI2 group produced significantly more semantic words than DAI1 (P<0.05) and demonstrated a trend towards the production of more clusters for letter A (P=0.09) and total words generated in a phonemic test (P=0.09). No significant differences were observed between DAI2 and the control group in the total number of words generated in phonetic FAS or semantic fluency scores. Conclusion The present findings may be useful in the construction of a management plan for long-term TBI rehabilitation that considers the trauma of each patient. Further, our results suggest the VF test is a suitable instrument for the assessment of cognitive difficulties following TBI. PMID:25028551

  8. Clinical analysis of cause, treatment and prognosis in acute kidney injury patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Zhang, Li; Wu, Hao; Zou, Hongbin; Du, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by an abrupt decline in renal function, resulting in an inability to secrete waste products and maintain electrolyte and water balance, and is associated with high risks of morbidity and mortality. This study retrospectively analyzed clinical data, treatment, and prognosis of 271 hospitalized patients (172 males and 99 females) diagnosed with AKI from December, 2008 to December, 2011. In addition, this study explored the association between the cause of AKI and prognosis, severity and treatment of AKI. The severity of AKI was classified according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN) criteria. Renal recovery was defined as a decrease in a serum creatinine level to the normal value. Prerenal, renal, and postrenal causes accounted for 36.5% (99 patients), 46.5% (126 patients) and 17.0% (46 patients), respectively, of the incidence of AKI. Conservative, surgical, and renal replacement treatments were given to 180 (66.4%), 30 (11.1%) and 61 patients (22.5%), respectively. The overall recovery rate was 21.0%, and the mortality rate was 19.6%. Levels of Cl(-), Na(+) and carbon dioxide combining power decreased with increasing severity of AKI. Cause and treatment were significantly associated with AKI prognosis. Likewise, the severity of AKI was significantly associated with cause, treatment and prognosis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis found that respiratory injury and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) were associated with AKI patient death. Cause, treatment and AKIN stage are associated with the prognosis of AKI. Respiratory injury and MODS are prognostic factors for death of AKI patients. PMID:24586237

  9. Understanding Why Patients Return to the Emergency Department after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury within 72 Hours

    PubMed Central

    Ganti, Latha; Conroy, Lauren M.; Bodhit, Aakash; Daneshvar, Yasamin; Patel, Pratik Shashikant; Ayala, Sarah; Kuchibhotla, Sudeep; Hatchitt, Kelsey; Pulvino, Christa; Peters, Keith R.; Lottenberg, Lawrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although there are approximately 1.1 million case presentations of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in the emergency department (ED) each year, little data is available to clinicians to identify patients who are at risk for poor outcomes, including 72-hour ED return after discharge. An understanding of patients at risk for ED return visits during the hyperacute phase following head injury would allow ED providers to develop clinical interventions that reduce its occurrence and improve outcomes. Methods This institutional review board-approved consecutive cohort study collected injury and outcome variables on adults with the purpose of identifying positive predictors for 72-hour ED return visits in mTBI patients. Results Of 2,787 mTBI patients, 145 (5%) returned unexpectedly to the ED within 72 hours of hospital discharge. Positive predictors for ED return visits included being male (p=0.0298), being black (p=0.0456), having a lower prehospital Glasgow Coma Score (p=0.0335), suffering the injury due to a motor vehicle collision (p=0.0065), or having a bleed on head computed tomography (CT) (p=0.0334). ED return visits were not significantly associated with age, fracture on head CT, or symptomology following head trauma. Patients with return visits most commonly reported post-concussion syndrome (43.1%), pain (18.7%), and recall for further clinical evaluation (14.6%) as the reason for return. Of the 124 patients who returned to the ED within 72 hours, one out of five were admitted to the hospital for further care, with five requiring intensive care unit stays and four undergoing neurosurgery. Conclusion Approximately 5% of adult patients who present to the ED for mTBI will return within 72 hours of discharge for further care. Clinicians should identify at-risk individuals during their initial visits and attempt to provide anticipatory guidance when possible. PMID:25987933

  10. Cerebral perfusion pressure, microdialysis biochemistry and clinical outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is a major cause of death and disability. It has been postulated that brain metabolic status, intracranial pressure (ICP) and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) are related to patients' outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CPP, ICP and microdialysis parameters and clinical outcome in TBIs. Results Thirty four individuals with severe brain injury hospitalized in an intensive care unit participated in this study. Microdialysis data were collected, along with ICP and CPP values. Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) was used to evaluate patient outcome at 6 months after injury. Fifteen patients with a CPP greater than 75 mmHg, L/P ratio lower than 37 and Glycerol concentration lower than 72 mmol/l had an excellent outcome (GOS 4 or 5), as opposed to the remaining 19 patients. No patient with a favorable outcome had a CPP lower than 75 mmHg or Glycerol concentration and L/P ratio greater than 72 mmol/l and 37 respectively. Data regarding L/P ratio and Glycerol concentration were statistically significant at p = 0.05 when patients with favorable and unfavorable outcome were compared. In a logistic regression model adjusted for age, sex and Glasgow Coma Scale on admission, a CPP greater than 75 mmHg was marginally statistically significantly related to outcome at 6 months after injury. Conclusions Patients with favorable outcome had certain common features in terms of microdialysis parameters and CPP values. An individualized approach regarding CPP levels and cut -off points for Glycerol concentration and L/P ratio are proposed. PMID:22168902

  11. Vertebral artery injury in a patient with fractured C4 vertebra.

    PubMed

    Banić, Tihomir; Banić, Morana; Cvjetko, Ivan; Somun, Nenad; Bilić, Vide; Vidjak, Vinko; Pavić, Vladimir; Coc, Ivan; Kokić, Tomislav; Kejlal, Zvonko

    2014-09-01

    Vertebral artery injuries due to cervical spine trauma, although rarely described in the literature, are relatively common. While most of them will remain asymptomatic, a small percentage of patients may suffer life threatening complications. We report a case of the right vertebral artery injury in a patient with fracture of C4 vertebra, successfully treated with endovascular approach. A 78-year-old male patient was hospitalized for cervical spine injury caused by falling off the tractor. Radiological assessment revealed fracture of C4 vertebra with proximal two-thirds of C4 body dislocated five millimeters dorsally. Significant swelling of soft prevertebral tissues distally of C2 segment was also present. During emergency surgery using standard anterior approach for cervical spine, excessive bleeding started from the injured right vertebral artery. Bleeding was stopped by tamponade with oxidized regenerated cellulose sheet and C4-C5 anterior fixation; then partial reduction of displacement was done. Fifteen days later, after angiography, endovascular repair of the right vertebral artery was performed using percutaneous stent graft. Follow up computed tomography scan angiography showed valid stent patency without contrast extravasation. In cases of cervical spine trauma, surgeon should always be prepared to manage injury of vertebral artery. Bleeding can primarily be stopped by hemostatic packing, and definitive repair can be successfully achieved by endovascular approach using percutaneous stent graft. PMID:25509251

  12. Predicting outcome after traumatic brain injury: practical prognostic models based on large cohort of international patients

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate practical prognostic models for death at 14 days and for death or severe disability six months after traumatic brain injury. Design Multivariable logistic regression to select variables that were independently associated with two patient outcomes. Two models designed: “basic” model (demographic and clinical variables only) and “CT” model (basic model plus results of computed tomography). The models were subsequently developed for high and low-middle income countries separately. Setting Medical Research Council (MRC) CRASH Trial. Subjects 10 008 patients with traumatic brain injury. Models externally validated in a cohort of 8509. Results The basic model included four predictors: age, Glasgow coma scale, pupil reactivity, and the presence of major extracranial injury. The CT model also included the presence of petechial haemorrhages, obliteration of the third ventricle or basal cisterns, subarachnoid bleeding, midline shift, and non-evacuated haematoma. In the derivation sample the models showed excellent discrimination (C statistic above 0.80). The models showed good calibration graphically. The Hosmer-Lemeshow test also indicated good calibration, except for the CT model in low-middle income countries. External validation for unfavourable outcome at six months in high income countries showed that basic and CT models had good discrimination (C statistic 0.77 for both models) but poorer calibration. Conclusion Simple prognostic models can be used to obtain valid predictions of relevant outcomes in patients with traumatic brain injury. PMID:18270239

  13. [Pressure sore in patients with spinal cord injuries].

    PubMed

    Colin, D; Lebastard, N

    1995-10-15

    Pressure sore is a frequent and severe complication in spinal cord injured patients because of many specific risk factors. The patient must be responsible for his prevention program. An early and continuous education enables him to know the occurrence mechanisms of pressure sore and manage himself this prevention. A regular inspection of the risk areas is necessary and every beginning sore must lead to ask an advice from a specialist and to practice a complete check up. Wound healing may be obtained by an early and adequate treatment. If it is not the case surgical operation is necessary provided that a careful nursing is assured.

  14. Predictors of intramedullary lesion expansion rate on MR images of patients with subaxial spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Le, Elizabeth; Aarabi, Bizhan; Hersh, David S; Shanmuganathan, Kathirkamanthan; Diaz, Cara; Massetti, Jennifer; Akhtar-Danesh, Noori

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Studies of preclinical spinal cord injury (SCI) in rodents indicate that expansion of intramedullary lesions (IMLs) seen on MR images may be amenable to neuroprotection. In patients with subaxial SCI and motor-complete American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) Grade A or B, IML expansion has been shown to be approximately 900 μm/hour. In this study, the authors investigated IML expansion in a cohort of patients with subaxial SCI and AIS Grade A, B, C, or D. METHODS Seventy-eight patients who had at least 2 MRI scans within 6 days of SCI were enrolled. Data were analyzed by regression analysis. RESULTS In this cohort, the mean age was 45.3 years (SD 18.3 years), 73 patients were injured in a motor vehicle crash, from a fall, or in sport activities, and 77% of them were men. The mean Injury Severity Score (ISS) was 26.7 (SD 16.7), and the AIS grade was A in 23 patients, B in 7, C in 7, and D in 41. The mechanism of injury was distraction in 26 patients, compression in 22, disc/osteophyte complex in 29, and Chance fracture in 1. The mean time between injury onset and the first MRI scan (Interval 1) was 10 hours (SD 8.7 hours), and the mean time to the second MRI scan (Interval 2) was 60 hours (SD 29.6 hours). The mean IML lengths of the first and second MR images were 38.8 mm (SD 20.4 mm) and 51 mm (SD 36.5 mm), respectively. The mean time from the first to the second MRI scan (Interval 3) was 49.9 hours (SD 28.4 hours), and the difference in IML lengths was 12.6 mm (SD 20.7 mm), reflecting an expansion rate of 366 μm/ hour (SD 710 μm/hour). IML expansion in patients with AIS Grades A and B was 918 μm/hour (SD 828 μm/hour), and for those with AIS Grades C and D, it was 21 μm/hour (SD 304 μm/hour). Univariate analysis indicated that AIS Grade A or B versus Grades C or D (p < 0.0001), traction (p= 0.0005), injury morphology (p < 0.005), the surgical approach (p= 0.009), vertebral artery injury (p= 0.02), age (p < 0.05), ISS (p < 0

  15. [Spinal cord injury in patients over 65 years of age].

    PubMed

    Varela-Lage, Cristina; Alcobendas-Maestro, Mónica; Luque-Ríos, Inmaculada; Esclarín-De Ruz, Ana; Talavera-Díaz, Francisco; Ceruelo-Abajo, Silvia

    2015-06-01

    Introduccion. La poblacion de mayores de 65 años activos fisicamente continua en aumento, lo que condiciona un mayor riesgo de caidas y de lesion medular en un rango de edad con importante presencia de patologia cronica. Objetivo. Revisar la incidencia, el tipo de lesion, las complicaciones asociadas y los resultados funcionales de las lesiones medulares ocurridas en pacientes mayores de 65 años. Pacientes y metodos. Estudio descriptivo retrospectivo en lesionados medulares agudos mayores de 65 años ingresados en el Hospital Nacional de Paraplejicos desde enero de 2010 hasta diciembre de 2011. Las variables del estudio fueron datos demograficos y de lesion, antecedentes personales, complicaciones ocurridas durante el ingreso y capacidad funcional al alta medida con las escalas Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM III) y Walking Index Spinal Cord Injury (WISCI). Resultados. Se incluyeron 111 individuos con una media de edad de 72,5 años. La incidencia anual fue de 17,3 pacientes/100 ingresos. El 33,3% eran lesiones cervicales y fueron incompletas el 66,7%. La etiologia medica fue mas frecuente que la traumatica. El 5% no presentaba otras enfermedades intercurrentes. El 97% sufrio algun tipo de complicacion. La media alcanzada para la SCIM III fue de 42 puntos y el 35% consiguio capacidad de marcha. Conclusiones. En los ultimos años se ha producido un aumento de lesion medular en mayores de 65 años, en los que la etiologia traumatica no es superior a la medica; mas frecuentemente son lesiones incompletas que asocian mayor comorbilidad que la poblacion general, y se consiguen resultados funcionales mas pobres a pesar de las mejoras neurologicas.

  16. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries. PMID:26334286

  17. Medical Efforts and Injury Patterns of Military Hospital Patients Following the 2013 Lushan Earthquake in China: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Peng; Tang, Bihan; Liu, Yuan; Liu, Xu; Liu, Zhipeng; Lv, Yipeng; Zhang, Lulu

    2015-08-31

    The aim of this paper is to investigate medical efforts and injury profiles of victims of the Lushan earthquake admitted to three military hospitals. This study retrospectively investigated the clinical records of 266 admitted patients evacuated from the Lushan earthquake area. The 2005 version of the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS-2005) was used to identify the severity of each injury. Patient demographic data, complaints, diagnoses, injury types, prognosis, means of transportation, and cause of injury were all reviewed individually. The statistical analysis of the study was conducted primarily using descriptive statistics. Of the 266 patients, 213 (80.1%) were admitted in the first two days. A total of 521 injury diagnoses were recorded in 266 patients. Earthquake-related injuries were primarily caused by buildings collapsing (38.4%) and victims being struck by objects (33.8%); the most frequently injured anatomic sites were the lower extremities and pelvis (34.2%) and surface area of the body (17.9%). Fracture (41.5%) was the most frequent injury, followed by soft tissue injury (27.5%), but crush syndrome was relatively low (1.2%) due to the special housing structures in the Lushan area. The most commonly used procedure was suture and dressings (33.7%), followed by open reduction and internal fixation (21.9%).The results of this study help formulate recommendations to improve future disaster relief and emergency planning in remote, isolated, and rural regions of developing countries.

  18. Exogenous lactate infusion improved neurocognitive function of patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Bisri, Tatang; Utomo, Billy A.; Fuadi, Iwan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies showed a better recovery of cognitive function after administration of exogenous lactate during moderate-severe traumatic brain injury. However, the study evaluating lactate effect on mild traumatic brain injury is still limited. Aims: To evaluate the effect of exogenous lactate on cognitive function in mild traumatic brain injury patients. Settings and Design: Prospective, single blind, randomized controlled study on 60 mild traumatic brain injury patients who were undergoing neurosurgery. Materials and Methods: Subjects were randomly assigned into hyperosmolar sodium lactate (HSL) group or hyperosmolar sodium chloride (HSS) group. Patients in each group received either intravenous infusion of HSL or NaCl 3% at 1.5 ml/KgBW within 15 min before neurosurgery. During the surgery, patients in both groups received maintenance infusion of NaCl 0.9% at 1.5 ml/KgBW/hour. Statistical Analysis: Cognitive function, as assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score at 24 h, 30 and 90 days post-surgery, was analyzed by Anova repeated measures test. Results: The MMSE score improvement was significantly better in HSL group than HSS group (P < 0.001). In HSL group the MMSE score improved from 16.00 (13.75-18.00) at baseline to 21.00 (18.75-22.00); 25.00 (23.75-26.00); 28.00 (27.00-29.00) at 24 h, 30, 90 days post-surgery, respectively. In contrast, in HSS group the MMSE score almost unchanged at 24 h and only slightly increased at 30 and 90 days post-surgery. Conclusions: Hyperosmolar sodium lactate infusion during mild traumatic brain injury improved cognitive function better than sodium chloride 3%. PMID:27057222

  19. Eye Injuries at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Stories Español Eye Health / Tips & Prevention Eye Injuries Sections Preventing Eye Injuries Recognizing and Treating Eye ... Sports Eye Injuries by the Numbers — Infographic Eye Injuries at Home Reviewed by: Brenda Pagan-Duran MD ...

  20. [ANALYSIS OF A LETHAL OUTCOME RISK AFTER TRAUMA IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN POLYSYSTEMIC INJURY].

    PubMed

    Guryev, S O; Solovyov, O S; Tanasiyenko, P V

    2016-02-01

    Abstract The data, concerning clinic--epidemiologic and clinic--nosological characteristic of a HIV-infected injured persons in polytrauma were adduced. There was established, that polysystemic injuries (PSI) in a HIV-infected persons occur in a younger injured patients, a trauma environment is quite a speciphic one (criminal trauma prevails), as well as mechanism of the injury occurrence (falling down is much more freqent), and the risk of a lethal outcome is determined by predominantly cranial, thoracic and abdominal components of injury. A lethal outcome occurrence risk in HIV-infected injured persons in PSI in accordance to the age signs and traumagenesis is lesser, than in a control body. It is necessary to prolong the investigations, concerning studying this phenomenon and other peculiarities of a traumatic disease in HIV-infected injured persons in polytrauma. PMID:27244924

  1. Clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging of the shoulder of patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Alex Pereira; Terrabuio Junior, Alberto Antonio; Pimenta, Ciro Jabur; Medina, Giovanna Ignácio Subirá; Rimkus, Carolina de Medeiros; Cliquet Júnior, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the shoulder of this group of patients using magnetic resonance imaging to detect clinical and subclinical disorders and establish a rehabilitation program. Methods Nine patients with spinal cord injury followed in the Laboratory of Biomechanics and Rehabilitation of the Locomotive System at HC/UNICAMP were divided into two groups according to the presence of paraplegia and tetraplegia and were clinically assessed for correlation with the imaging exams. Results Normal results were found in 41% of the shoulders. Most common injuries were tendinopathy of the supraspinatus and acromioclavicular joint degeneration. Eighty percent of injured shoulders had combined lesions. Conclusion A great variety of causes of shoulder pain was identified in paraplegic and tetraplegic subjects. Routine clinical assessment and imaging studies of the shoulder may contribute to the evolution of rehabilitation and reduction of pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Level of Evidence II, Development of Diagnostic Criteria on Consecutive Patients, With Universally Applied Reference "Gold" Standard. PMID:24453620

  2. Pediatric blunt trauma resulting in major arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Milas, Zvonimir L; Dodson, Thomas F; Ricketts, Richard R

    2004-05-01

    Ten children, aged 4 to 14 years, sustaining blunt arterial trauma from motor vehicle collisions (6), bicycle accidents (2), and falls (2) were identified over a 10-year period. The arteries injured included the common iliac (3), abdominal aorta (2), carotid (2), brachial (2), and the subclavian, renal, and femoral artery (1 each). One patient had three arterial injuries. Six patients had associated injuries including a pelvic and lumbar spine fracture, Horner's syndrome, liver laceration, skull fracture, open humerus fracture, small bowel serosal tear, and a brachial plexus injury. Definitive diagnosis was made using arteriography (6), computed tomography (CT) scan (2), and physical examination (2). The types of arterial injuries found included incomplete transection, complete transection with pseudo-aneurysm formation, traumatic arteriovenous (AV) fistulas, complete occlusion, and dissection. Repair was accomplished by hypogastric artery interposition or bypass grafting, synthetic grafting with polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), reverse saphenous vein grafting, or primary repair, depending on the circumstances. An AV fistula between the carotid artery and cavernous sinus was embolized. All grafts remained patent with exception of the aorto-renal bypass graft at follow-up ranging from 1 month to 3 years. The principles for repairing vascular injuries in children are slightly different than those in adults. Every effort should be made to use autogenous tissue such as the hypogastric artery or saphenous vein for repair if possible. If not, PTFE grafts can be used, although the long-term patency of these grafts in growing children is not known. PMID:15156954

  3. National trends in burn and inhalation injury in burn patients: results of analysis of the nationwide inpatient sample database.

    PubMed

    Veeravagu, Anand; Yoon, Byung C; Jiang, Bowen; Carvalho, Carla M; Rincon, Fred; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Jallo, Jack; Ratliff, John K

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was describe national trends in prevalence, demographics, hospital length of stay (LOS), hospital charges, and mortality for burn patients with and without inhalational injury and to compare to the National Burn Repository. Burns and inhalation injury cause considerable mortality and morbidity in the United States. There remains insufficient reporting of the demographics and outcomes surrounding such injuries. The National Inpatient Sample database, the nation's largest all-payer inpatient care data repository, was utilized to select 506,628 admissions for burns from 1988 to 2008 based on ICD-9-CM recording. The data were stratified based on the extent of injury (%TBSA) and presence or absence of inhalational injury. Inhalation injury was observed in only 2.2% of burns with <20% TBSA but 14% of burns with 80 to 99% TBSA. Burn patients with inhalation injury were more likely to expire in-hospital compared to those without (odds ratio, 3.6; 95% confidence interval, 2.7-5.0; P < .001). Other factors associated with higher mortality were African-American race, female sex, and urban practice setting. Patients treated at rural facilities and patients with hyperglycemia had lower mortality rates. Each increase in percent of TBSA of burns increased LOS by 2.5%. Patients with burns covering 50 to 59% of TBSA had the longest hospital stay at a median of 24 days (range, 17-55). The median in-hospital charge for a burn patient with inhalation injury was US$32,070, compared to US$17,600 for those without. Overall, patients who expired from burn injury accrued higher in-hospital charges (median, US$50,690 vs US$17,510). Geographically, California and New Jersey were the states with the highest charges, whereas Vermont and Maryland were states with the lowest charges. The study analysis provides a broad sampling of nationwide demographics, LOS, and in-hospital charges for patients with burns and inhalation injury.

  4. Dental treatment injuries in the Finnish Patient Insurance Centre in 2000-2011.

    PubMed

    Karhunen, Sini; Virtanen, Jorma I

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Patient Insurance Centre in Finland reimburses patients who sustained injuries associated with medical and dental care without having to demonstrate malpractice. The aim was to analyse all dental injuries claimed through the Patient Insurance Centre over a 12-year period in order to identify factors affecting reimbursement of claims. Methods This study investigated all dental patient insurance claims in Finland during 2000-2011. The injury cases were grouped as (K00-K08) according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Calendar year, claimant's age and gender, dental disease group and health service sector were the explanatory factors and the outcome was the decision of a claim. Multiple logistic regression modelling was used in the statistical analyses. Results The total number of decisions related to dental claims at the PIC in 2000-2011 was 7662, of which women claimed a clear majority (72%). Diseases of the pulp and periapical tissues (K04) and dental caries (K02) were the major disease groups (both 29%). Of the claims 40% were eligible for reimbursement, 27% were classified as insignificant or unavoidable injuries and 32% were rejected for other reasons. The proportion of reimbursed claims declined during the period. Patients from the private sector were more likely to be eligible for compensation than were those from the public sector (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.71-2.10). Conclusions The number of dental patient insurance claims in Finland clearly rose, while the proportion of reimbursed claims declined. More claims received compensation in the private sector than in the public sector.

  5. [Deep Vein Thrombosis Prophylaxis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury].

    PubMed

    Silva, Vinícius Trindade Gomes da; Iglesio, Ricardo; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Siqueira, Mario Gilberto; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: O risco de trombose venosa profunda encontra-se aumentado em doentes vítimas de traumatismo cranioencefálico, mas a profilaxia da trombose venosa profunda se confronta com o possível risco de piora de lesões hemorrágicas relacionados ao traumatismo cranioencefálico. Neste artigo apresentamos uma revisão crítica do tema e propomos um protocolo de profilaxia para estes doentes.Material e Métodos: Foi realizada uma pesquisa na base de dados Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, e Scielo de janeiro de 1998 a janeiro de 2014 com a expressão de busca âÄúdeep venous thrombosis and prophylaxis and traumatic brain injuryâÄù. Foram encontrados 44 artigos usando os termos MeSH definidos. Destes foram selecionados 23 artigos, usando como critérios: publicação em inglês ou português, fase aguda do traumatismo cranioencefálico moderado e grave, profilaxia mecânica não invasiva ou química.Resultados: O traumatismo cranioencefálico é um fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. A chance de trombose venosa profunda é 2,59 vezes maior em doentes com traumatismo cranioencefálico. A prevalência de trombose venosa profunda e embolia pulmonar em doentes que sofreram traumatismo cranioencefálico é de 20%, podendo atingir 30% dos doentes em alguns estudos.Discussão e Conclusão: As diversas formas de traumatismo de forma isolada constituem fator de risco para trombose venosa profunda e tromboembolismo pulmonar. Ensaios clínicos são necessários para estabelecer a eficácia da profilaxia e o melhor momento de iniciar medicação para trombose venosa profunda em doentes com traumatismo craniencefálico.

  6. Perioperative management of the pediatric patient with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bhalla, Tarun; Dewhirst, Elisabeth; Sawardekar, Amod; Dairo, Olamide; Tobias, Joseph D

    2012-07-01

    TBI and its sequelae remain a major healthcare issue throughout the world. With an improved understanding of the pathophysiology of TBI, refinements of monitoring technology, and ongoing research to determine optimal care, the prognosis of TBI continues to improve. In 2003, the Society of Critical Care Medicine published guidelines for the acute management of severe TBI in infants, children, and adolescents. As pediatric anesthesiologists are frequently involved in the perioperative management of such patients including their stabilization in the emergency department, familiarity with these guidelines is necessary to limit preventable secondary damage related to physiologic disturbances. This manuscript reviews the current evidence-based medicine regarding the care of pediatric patients with TBI as it relates to the perioperative care of such patients. The issues reviewed include those related to initial stabilization, airway management, intra-operative mechanical ventilation, hemodynamic support, administration of blood and blood products, positioning, and choice of anesthetic technique. The literature is reviewed regarding fluid management, glucose control, hyperosmolar therapy, therapeutic hypothermia, and corticosteroids. Whenever possible, management recommendations are provided.

  7. Intensity of Renal Support in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The optimal intensity of renal-replacement therapy in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury is controversial. METHODS We randomly assigned critically ill patients with acute kidney injury and failure of at least one nonrenal organ or sepsis to receive intensive or less intensive renal-replacement therapy. The primary end point was death from any cause by day 60. In both study groups, hemodynamically stable patients underwent intermittent hemodialysis, and hemodynamically unstable patients underwent continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration or sustained low-efficiency dialysis. Patients receiving the intensive treatment strategy underwent intermittent hemodialysis and sustained low-efficiency dialysis six times per week and continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration at 35 ml per kilogram of body weight per hour; for patients receiving the less-intensive treatment strategy, the corresponding treatments were provided thrice weekly and at 20 ml per kilogram per hour. RESULTS Baseline characteristics of the 1124 patients in the two groups were similar. The rate of death from any cause by day 60 was 53.6% with intensive therapy and 51.5% with less-intensive therapy (odds ratio, 1.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 1.40; P = 0.47). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the duration of renalreplacement therapy or the rate of recovery of kidney function or nonrenal organ failure. Hypotension during intermittent dialysis occurred in more patients randomly assigned to receive intensive therapy, although the frequency of hemodialysis sessions complicated by hypotension was similar in the two groups. CONCLUSIONS Intensive renal support in critically ill patients with acute kidney injury did not decrease mortality, improve recovery of kidney function, or reduce the rate of nonrenal organ failure as compared with less-intensive therapy involving a defined dose of intermittent hemodialysis three times per week and continuous renal

  8. Hsp72 Is a Novel Biomarker to Predict Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Buenrostro, Luis E.; Salas-Nolasco, Omar I.; Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; Casas-Aparicio, Gustavo; Irizar-Santana, Sergio; Pérez-Villalva, Rosalba; Bobadilla, Norma A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Acute kidney injury (AKI) complicates the course of disease in critically ill patients. Efforts to change its clinical course have failed because of the fail in the early detection. This study was designed to assess whether heat shock protein (Hsp72) is an early and sensitive biomarker of acute kidney injury (AKI) compared with kidney injury molecule (Kim-1), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), and interleukin-18 (IL-18) biomarkers. Methods A total of 56 critically ill patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. From these patients, 17 developed AKI and 20 were selected as controls. In AKI patients, Kim-1, IL-18, NGAL, and Hsp72 were measured from 3 days before and until 2 days after the AKI diagnosis and in no-AKI patients at 1, 5 and 10 days after admission. Biomarker sensitivity and specificity were determined. To validate the results obtained with ROC curves for Hsp72, a new set of critically ill patients was included, 10 with AKI and 12 with no-AKI patients. Results Urinary Hsp72 levels rose since 3 days before the AKI diagnosis in critically ill patients; this early increase was not seen with any other tested biomarkers. Kim-1, IL-18, NGAL, and Hsp72 significantly increased from 2 days before AKI and remained elevated during the AKI diagnosis. The best sensitivity/specificity was observed in Kim-1 and Hsp72: 83/95% and 100/90%, respectively, whereas 1 day before the AKI diagnosis, the values were 100/100% and 100/90%, respectively. The sensibility, specificity and accuracy in the validation test for Hsp72 were 100%, 83.3% and 90.9%, respectively. Conclusions The biomarker Hsp72 is enough sensitive and specific to predict AKI in critically ill patients up to 3 days before the diagnosis. PMID:25313566

  9. Significance of Intracranial Pressure Monitoring after Early Decompressive Craniectomy in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-ryeong; Yang, Seung-Ho; Sung, Jae-hoon; Lee, Sang-won

    2014-01-01

    Objective Early decompressive craniectomy (DC) has been used as the first stage treatment to prevent secondary injuries in cases of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Postoperative management is the major factor that influences outcome. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of postoperative management, using intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and including consecutive DC on the other side, on the two-week mortality in severe TBI patients treated with early DC. Methods Seventy-eight patients with severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score <9] underwent early DC were retrospectively investigated. Among 78 patients with early DC, 53 patients were managed by conventional medical treatments and the other, 25 patients were treated under the guidance of ICP monitoring, placed during early DC. In the ICP monitoring group, consecutive DC on the other side were performed on 11 patients due to a high ICP of greater than 30 mm Hg and failure to respond to any other medical treatments. Results The two-week mortality rate was significantly different between two groups [50.9% (27 patients) and 24% (6 patients), respectively, p=0.025]. After adjusting for confounding factors, including sex, low GCS score, and pupillary abnormalities, ICP monitoring was associated with a 78% lower likelihood of 2-week mortality (p=0.021). Conclusion ICP monitoring in conjunction with postoperative treatment, after early DC, is associated with a significantly reduced risk of death. PMID:24570814

  10. Clinical impact of RehaCom software for cognitive rehabilitation of patients with acquired brain injury.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Elízabeth; Bringas, María Luisa; Salazar, Sonia; Rodríguez, Daymí; García, María Eugenia; Torres, Maydané

    2012-10-01

    We describe the clinical impact of the RehaCom computerized cognitive training program instituted in the International Neurological Restoration Center for rehabilitation of brain injury patients. Fifty patients admitted from 2008 through 2010 were trained over 60 sessions. Attention and memory functions were assessed with a pre- and post-treatment design, using the Mini-Mental State Examination, Wechsler Memory Scale and Trail Making Test (Parts A and B). Negative effects were assessed, including mental fatigue, headache and eye irritation. The program's clinical usefulness was confirmed, with 100% of patients showing improved performance in trained functions. PMID:23154316

  11. The Initial Systolic Time Interval in patients with spinal cord injury measured with impedance cardiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Martinsen, Ørjan G.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Janssen, Thomas W. J.; Meijer, Jan H.

    2012-12-01

    The Initial Systolic Time Interval (ISTI), obtained from the electrocardiogram and impedance cardiogram, is considered to be a measure for the time delay between the electrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This time delay is influenced by the sympathetic nerve system. Therefore, an observational study was performed in a group of patients (SCI) with spinal cord injuries. The relationship between the ISTI and the total heart cycle (RR-interval) was established by varying the RR-interval using an exercise stimulus to increase the heart rate. The slope of this relationship was observed to be significantly higher in the SCI-group as compared with a control group, although there was no difference in ISTI in the range of common heart rates during the test between the groups. This slope and the ISTI was observed to be significantly different in an acute patient having a recent spinal cord injury at a high level. Because of the variety in injury levels and incompleteness of the injuries further, more specific research is necessary to draw decisive conclusions with respect to the contribution of autonomic nervous control on the ISTI in SCI, although the present observations are notable.

  12. Uncommon presentation of choroid plexus papilloma in an infant

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Sharad; Sharma, Vivek; Singh, Kulwant; Ghosh, Amrita; Gupta, Praveen Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Choroid plexus tumors are relatively rare primary brain tumors that arise from the epithelial differentiated tissue, majority being well-differentiated papillomas. In adults, fourth ventricle and in children, lateral ventricles are the most common site of these tumors. We reported a case of choroid plexus papilloma in the temporal horn of lateral ventricle in a female child who presented with the uncommon symptoms of sudden intraventricular hemorrhage and multiple episodes of seizure without symptoms of raised intracranial tension. PMID:27195037

  13. [Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma of the brachial plexus].

    PubMed

    Giner, Javier; Isla, Alberto; Hernández, Borja; Nistal, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Myxoid/round cell liposarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma that is extremely rare in the brachial plexus. We report a case of a myxoid/round cell liposarcoma originating in the brachial plexus that was surgically resected and evolved well, with no deficit or recurrence after 2 years of follow-up. To date, there has been no other case of this sarcoma in the literature. PMID:25126709

  14. The influence of immediate physiotherapy in the out-patient management of acute knee injuries: a controlled study.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, M A; Venner, R M; Ford, I; Todd, B D

    1990-01-01

    All patients who presented to our Accident & Emergency Department over a 6-month period with an acute knee injury were randomly assigned to receive either immediate physiotherapy or not prior to further follow up at an out-patient clinic. Patients with trivial injuries not requiring follow up and patients with severe injuries requiring immediate admission were excluded from the study. Patients not immediately referred for physiotherapy could be referred if this was thought necessary at later follow up. There was no statistical difference in the number of outpatient follow up appointments or the length of time to discharge from the clinic between the groups. Those patients referred for physiotherapy immediately had a significantly greater number of total attendances at the physiotherapy department. However more patients in the 'no physiotherapy' group ultimately required arthroscopy for suspected meniscal injury. We conclude that a blanket referral of all acute knee injury patients is unjustified and wasteful of resources. However physiotherapy may be indicated in patients initially suspected of having meniscal injury. PMID:2099163

  15. The Ascending Reticular Activating System in a Patient With Severe Injury of the Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Han Do

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We reported on the ascending reticular activating system (ARAS) finding of a patient in whom severe injury of the cerebral cortex was detected following a hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HIBI). A 67-year-old female patient who suffered from HIBI induced by cardiac arrest after surgery for lumbar disc herniation underwent cardiopulmonary resuscitation approximately 20 to 30 minutes after cardiac arrest. The patient exhibited impaired alertness, with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 4 (eye opening: 2, best verbal response: 1, and best motor response: 1). Approximately 3 years after onset, she began to whimper sometimes and showed improved consciousness, with a GCS score of 10 (eye opening: 4, best verbal response: 2, and best motor response: 4) and Coma Recovery Scale-Revised score of 9 (auditory function: 1, visual function: 1, motor function: 2, verbal function: 2, communication: 1, and arousal: 2). Results of diffusion tensor tractography for the upper connectivity of the ARAS showed decreased neural connectivity to each cerebral cortex in both hemispheres. The right lower ARAS between the pontine reticular formation and the thalamic intralaminar nuclei (ILN) was thinner compared with the left side. Severe injury of the upper portion of the ARAS between the thalamic ILN and cerebral cortex was demonstrated in a patient with some level of consciousness. PMID:26496328

  16. Nutritional status, assessment, requirements and adequacy of traumatic brain injury patients.

    PubMed

    Daradkeh, Ghazi; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Al-Adawi, S Samir; Subash, Selvaraju; Mahmood, Lubna; Kumar, Parvathy R

    2014-10-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) has been considered as a serious public health problem. Each year, traumatic brain injuries are contributing to a substantial number of cases of permanent disability and deaths and it can be classified according to the severity into penetrating and closed head injury. Symptoms, beside to be unconscious can be defined as vomiting, nausea, headache, dizziness, lack of motor coordination, difficulty in balancing, blurred vision and lightheadedness, bad taste in the mouth, ringing in the ears, fatigue and lethargy as well as changes in sleep patterns. The brain is known to be the functional regulator for all the metabolic activities inside the body and TBI patients mostly have a complex metabolic alterations including aberrant cellular metabolism, abnormal metabolic processes, changes in hormones functions and inflammatory cascade. The TBI patient's status needed to be assessed medically and nutritionally since the medical status of the patients can affect the nutrition part. Data from the four assessment tools are needed to be correctly used and interpreted in order to make a proper nutritional diagnosis, clinical assessment, biochemistry as well as anthropometric measurements. Regardless the methods used for assessing TBI patients, having adequate intake and medical care can lead to a reduction in hospital costs, numbers of day hospitalized, numbers of hours of mechanical ventilation and in the overall infection rates.

  17. Optic Nerve Injury in a Patient with Chronic Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Hazin, Ribhi; Elia, Christopher J.; Putruss, Maria; Bazzi, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    Manipulation of the optic nerve can lead to irreversible vision changes. We present a patient with a past medical history of skin allergy and allergic conjunctivitis (AC) who presented with insidious unexplained unilateral vision loss. Physical exam revealed significant blepharospasm, mild lid edema, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, afferent pupillary defect, and slight papillary hypertrophy. Slit lamp examination demonstrated superior and inferior conjunctival scarring as well as superior corneal scarring but no signs of external trauma or neurological damage were noted. Conjunctival cultures and cytologic evaluation demonstrated significant eosinophilic infiltration. Subsequent ophthalmoscopic examination revealed optic nerve atrophy. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to vigorous itching of the affected eye for many months. Given the presenting symptoms, history, and negative ophthalmological workup, it was determined that the optic nerve atrophy was likely secondary to digital pressure from vigorous itching. Although AC can be a significant source of decreased vision via corneal ulceration, no reported cases have ever described AC-induced vision loss of this degree from vigorous itching and chronic pressure leading to optic nerve damage. Despite being self-limiting in nature, allergic conjunctivitis should be properly managed as extreme cases can result in mechanical compression of the optic nerve and compromise vision. PMID:25317346

  18. Quantifying Quadriceps Muscle Strength in Patients With ACL Injury, Focal Cartilage Lesions, and Degenerative Meniscus Tears

    PubMed Central

    Eitzen, Ingrid; Grindem, Hege; Nilstad, Agnethe; Moksnes, Håvard; Risberg, May Arna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Reduced quadriceps strength influences knee function and increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis. Thus, it is of significant clinical relevance to precisely quantify strength deficits in patients with knee injuries. Purpose: To evaluate isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength torque values, assessed both from peak torque and at specific knee flexion joint angles, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury, focal cartilage lesions, and degenerative meniscus tears. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Data were synthesized from patients included in 3 previously conducted research projects: 2 prospective cohort studies and 1 randomized controlled trial. At the time of inclusion, all patients were candidates for surgery. Isokinetic concentric quadriceps muscle strength measurements (60 deg/s) were performed at baseline (preoperative status) and after a period of progressive supervised exercise therapy (length of rehabilitation period: 5 weeks for ACL injury, 12 weeks for cartilage lesions and degenerative meniscus). Outcome measures were peak torque and torque at specific knee flexion joint angles from 20° to 70°. All patients had unilateral injuries, and side-to-side deficits were calculated. For comparisons between and within groups, we utilized 1-way analysis of variance and paired t tests, respectively. Results: In total, 250 patients were included. At baseline, cartilage patients had the most severe deficit (39.7% ± 24.3%; P < .001). Corresponding numbers for ACL and degenerative meniscus subjects were 21.7% (±13.2%) and 20.7% (±16.3%), respectively. At retest, there was significant improvement in all groups (P < .001), with remaining deficits of 24.7% (±18.5%) for cartilage, 16.8% (±13.9%) for ACL, and 3.3% (±17.8%) for degenerative meniscus. Peak torque was consistently measured at 60° of knee flexion, whereas the largest mean deficits were measured at 30° at baseline and 70° at retest for the

  19. Acute complications and outcomes of acute head injury in adult patients with haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Núñez, Maria A; Borobia, Alberto M; García-Erce, Jose A; Martí de Gracia, Milagros; Pérez-Perilla, Patricia; Quintana-Díaz, Manuel

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study is to describe the clinical and epidemiological characteristics, complications and outcome of patients with haemophilia and acute head injury (AHI) at the emergency department (ED), and develop a protocol to prevent early and late complications. This is a retrospective cohort study including all patients with haemophilia and AHI admitted to the ED. We identified 26 patients with AHI. A computed tomography scan was carried out on all patients at admission, and again on two patients (with neurosurgical complications) 48 h later. The discharge diagnosis was as follows: 3.8% subdural haematoma, 3.8% cerebellar epidural haematoma and 92.3% uncomplicated AHI. We propose the following protocol: a computed tomography scan upon arrival and another within 48 h post-AHI, unless there is an absence of clinical symptoms. In addition, all patients must self-administer a clotting factor as soon as possible and be observed in the ED for at least 48 h.

  20. Intermittent catheterization failure and an approach to bladder rehabilitation in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Perkash, I

    1978-01-01

    Forty-six patients with spinal injury with dysfunctional neurogenic bladder were analyzed. Fourteen patients on prolonged intermittent catheterization from 12 weeks to more than 1 year did not develop a balanced bladder, 14 patients had indwelling catheters after intermittent catheterization failed elsewhere and 18 patients on external condom drainage presented with difficult voiding and repeated infections. There were 16 quadriplegics (1 incomplete), 21 paraplegics, and 9 incomplete cauda equina lesions. Urologic and urodynamic evaluation revealed detrusor-sphincter dyssynergia in 15 patients, vesicoureteral reflux in 10, and areflexic bladders in 11. Five patients over the age of 55 years showed slight enlargement of the prostrate. Some degree of bladder neck fibrosis was suspected in 26. More than one urologic pathology was encountered in the same patient. Transurethral sphincterotomy was carried out in 38 patients and only one transurethral resection of the prostrate (TURP) in an incomplete quadriplegic patient. In seven patients with no obvious urodynamic abnormality, a balanced bladder was achieved with intermittent catheterization; however, one of these patients needed a transurethral sphincterotomy on subsequent admission. A balanced bladder was achieved in all patients except the one with incomplete quadriplegia. Significant improvement in vesicoureteral reflux and relief from autonomic dysreflexic symptoms were recorded in all patients. PMID:619856

  1. Detecting Migraine in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Using Three Different Headache Measures.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kirsten; Tinawi, Simon; Lamoureux, Julie; Feyz, Mitra; de Guise, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic migraine may represent an important subtype of headache among the traumatic brain injury (TBI) population and is associated with increased recovery times. However, it is underdiagnosed in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). This study examined the effectiveness of the self-administered Nine-Item Screener (Nine-Item Screener-SA), the Headache Impact Test- 6 (HIT-6), the 3-Item Migraine Screener, and the Rivermead Post-Concussion Questionnaire (RPQ) at discriminating between mTBI patients with (n = 23) and without (n = 20) migraines. The Nine-Item Screener demonstrated significant differences between migraine patients with and without migraine on nearly every question, especially on Question 9 (disability), sensitivity: 0.95 and specificity: 0.65 (95% CI, 0.64-0.90). The HIT-6 demonstrated significant differences between migraine and no-migraine patients on disability and pain severity, with disability having a sensitivity of 0.70 and specificity of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-0.83). Only Question 3 of the 3-Item ID Migraine Screener (photosensitivity) showed significant differences between migraine and no-migraine patients, sensitivity: 0.84 and specificity: 0.55 (CI, 0.52-0.82). The RPQ did not reveal greater symptoms in migraine patients compared with those without. Among headache measures, the Nine-Item Screener-SA best differentiated between mTBI patients with and without migraine. Disability may best identify migraine sufferers among the TBI population.

  2. [Peculiarities of neuro-psychological and autonomic disorders in patients with remote consequences of closed craniocerebral injury].

    PubMed

    Glebova, O S

    2007-01-01

    62 patients who had undergone mild craniocerebral injury have taken part in the study. All patients had a complex examination before the treatment. This examination included together with laboratory and instrumental methods the following scales: vegetovascular Vein's scale for a patient and physician, feeling scale (psychological scale). All patients received the following treatment: analgetics, vasoactive agents, tranquilizers, vitamins of the group B, magnesium sulfate, biostimulants, amino acids, physiotherapy, acupuncture, Patients of the first group received additionally noofen and patients of the second group received aminalon. The duration of the treatment was about two months. Positive dynamics of the course of the disease was noted in patients with late closed craniocerebral injury effect after a complex treatment including nootropic agents was done. However noofen was more effective in patients with closed craniocerebral injury late effect who had asthenic syndrome and vegetative disorders.

  3. Management of a Patient With Faciocervical Burns and Inhalational Injury Due to Hydrofluoric Acid Exposure.

    PubMed

    Yuanhai, Zhang; Xingang, Wang; Liangfang, Ni; Chunmao, Han

    2014-05-01

    Hydrofluoric acid, a highly dangerous substance, can cause tissue damage and systemic toxicity by its unique mechanisms. Many cases of severe faciocervical burns due to hydrofluoric acid exposure are lethal. Herein, we present a case of 37-year-old man who suffered from hydrofluoric acid burns to his face, anterior neck, lips, and nasal cavity. On admission, this patient coughed with much sputum, and the chest auscultation detected rough breath sounds, wheezes, and very weak heart sounds, indicating possible inhalation injury. This case highlights the extreme complexity of managing this kind of injury. Timely and accurate wound treatment and respiratory tract care, as well as active systematic support treatment, played vital roles in the management of this patient.

  4. Abdominal ultrasonography findings in patients with spinal cord injury in Korea.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Park, Chang-il; Kim, Sang Hyun; Yang, Eun Joo; Kim, Eun Joo; Rha, Dong Wook

    2006-10-01

    This is a retrospective study of 500 patients with spinal cord injury who underwent abdominal ultrasonography as a routine screening test from 2000 to 2003. We analyzed the results according to the different abdominal organ systems. Among the 500 cases, 226 (45.2%) showed abnormal findings. 98 cases of abnormal findings in the liver included 75 of fatty liver and 13 of mass. The 88 cases of abnormal findings in the bladder included 56 of bladder wall thickening, 14 of cystitis and 10 of urinary stone. The 35 cases of abnormal findings in the kidney included 19 of renal cyst and 6 of pelvic dilatation. The 35 cases with gallbladder abnormalities included 19 with gallstones and 11 with biliary sludge. Excluding the cases with bladder wall thickening, there were still 170 cases with abnormal ultrasonographic findings. Abdominal sonography seems to be a useful tool in detecting hidden intraabdominal pathologies in patients with spinal cord injury.

  5. Long-Term Blood Pressure Control Effect of Celiac Plexus Block with Botulinum Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Lim, Dae Hwan; Lee, Ju Ho; Chang, Kiyuk; Koo, Jung Min; Park, Hue Jung

    2016-01-01

    Celiac plexus block (CPB) is one of the main treatment options for patients resistant to conventional antihypertensive drugs. We present a case of resistant hypertension (RHTN) that was treated with CPB using botulinum toxin. An 18-year-old male patient with RHTN, who suffered from persistent hypertension even after combination therapy and a renal denervation procedure, was referred to our pain center for CPB. CPB using botulinum toxin following the use of only local anesthetics resulted in control of systolic blood pressure (BP) at ~150 mmHg for at least three months. PMID:26907344

  6. Structural integrity of medial temporal lobes of patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Holli-Helenius, Kirsi; Luoto, Teemu M; Brander, Antti; Wäljas, Minna; Iverson, Grant L; Ohman, Juha

    2014-07-01

    Post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) is an acute characteristic of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the duration of PTA is commonly used to estimate the severity of brain injury. In the context of mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), PTA is an essential part of the routine clinical assessment. Macroscopic lesions in temporal lobes, especially hippocampal regions, are thought to be connected to memory loss. However, conventional neuroimaging has failed to reveal neuropathological correlates of PTA in MTBI. Texture analysis (TA) is an image analysis technique that quantifies the minor MRI signal changes among image pixels and, therefore, the variations in intensity patterns within the image. The objective of this work was to apply the TA technique to MR images of MTBI patients and control subjects, and to assess the microstructural damage in medial temporal lobes of patients with MTBI with definite PTA. TA was performed for fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images of 50 MTBI patients and 50 age- and gender-matched controls in the regions of the amygdala, hippocampus, and thalamus. It was hypothesized that 1) there would be statistically significant differences in TA parameters between patients with MTBIs and controls, and 2) the duration of PTA would be related to TA parameters in patients with MTBI. No significant textural differences were observed between patients and controls in the regions of interest (p>0.01). No textural features were observed to correlate with the duration of PTA. Subgroup analyses were conducted on patients with PTA of>1 h, (n=33) and compared the four TA parameters to the age- and gender-matched controls (n=33). The findings were similar. This study did not reveal significant textural changes in medial temporal structures that could be related to the duration of PTA.

  7. Neurogenic bowel dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Awad, Richard A

    2011-12-14

    Exciting new features have been described concerning neurogenic bowel dysfunction, including interactions between the central nervous system, the enteric nervous system, axonal injury, neuronal loss, neurotransmission of noxious and non-noxious stimuli, and the fields of gastroenterology and neurology. Patients with spinal cord injury, myelomeningocele, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson's disease present with serious upper and lower bowel dysfunctions characterized by constipation, incontinence, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction and altered visceral sensitivity. Spinal cord injury is associated with severe autonomic dysfunction, and bowel dysfunction is a major physical and psychological burden for these patients. An adult myelomeningocele patient commonly has multiple problems reflecting the multisystemic nature of the disease. Multiple sclerosis is a neurodegenerative disorder in which axonal injury, neuronal loss, and atrophy of the central nervous system can lead to permanent neurological damage and clinical disability. Parkinson's disease is a multisystem disorder involving dopaminergic, noradrenergic, serotoninergic and cholinergic systems, characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms. Parkinson's disease affects several neuronal structures outside the substantia nigra, among which is the enteric nervous system. Recent reports have shown that the lesions in the enteric nervous system occur in very early stages of the disease, even before the involvement of the central nervous system. This has led to the postulation that the enteric nervous system could be critical in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, as it could represent the point of entry for a putative environmental factor to initiate the pathological process. This review covers the data related to the etiology, epidemiology, clinical expression, pathophysiology, genetic aspects, gastrointestinal motor dysfunction, visceral sensitivity, management, prevention and prognosis of neurogenic bowel

  8. Immune endocrinological evaluation in patients with severe vascular acquired brain injuries: therapeutical approaches.

    PubMed

    Amico, Angelo Paolo; Terlizzi, Annamaria; Annamaria, Terlizzi; Megna, Marisa; Marisa, Megna; Megna, Gianfranco; Gianfranco, Megna; Damiani, Sabino; Sabino, Damiani

    2013-06-01

    It is known that in severe acquired brain injuries there is process of neuroinflammation, with the activation of a local and general stress response. In our study we considered six patients with disorders of consciousness (five in vegetative state and one in minimal consciousness state) in subacute phase, which had both a clinical assessment and a functional imaging (fMRI): in all these patients we analised blood levels of osteopontin (OPN), a cytokin involved in neuroinflammation but also in neurorepair with a still discussed role. Besides we studied the lymphocyte subsets and blood levels of some hormones (ADH, ACTH, PRL, GH, TSH, fT3, fT4). We found a positive correlation between the levels of serum osteopontin (higher than normal in all subjects) and the severity of the brain injury, especially for prognosis: actually, the patient with the lowest level has emerged from minimal consciousness state, while the one with the highest level has died a few days after the evaluation. The lymphocyte subset was altered, with a general increase of CD4+/CD3+ ratio, but without a so strict correlation with clinical severity; the only hormone with a significant increase in the worse patients was prolactin. In fMRI we detected some responses to visual and acoustic stimuli also in vegetative states, which had no clinical response to this kind of stimulation but generally have had a better prognosis. So we conclude that osteopontin could be a good marker of neuroinflammation and relate to a worse prognosis of brain injuries; the lymphocyte alterations in these disorders are not clear, but we suspect an unbalance of CD4 towards Th2; PRL is the best endocrinological marker of brain injury severity; fMRI surely plays an important role in the detection of subclinical responses and in prognostic stratification, that is still to define with more studies and statistical analysis.

  9. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Sun K.; Mak, Walter; Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao; Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Do, Ly

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  10. Association between the rapid shallow breathing index and extubation success in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Helena França Correia; Almeida, Mônica Lajana Oliveira; da Silva, Mário Ferreira; Moreira, Julião Oliveira; Rocha, Mário de Seixas

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between the rapid shallow breathing index and successful extubation in patients with traumatic brain injury. Methods This study was a prospective study conducted in patients with traumatic brain injury of both genders who underwent mechanical ventilation for at least two days and who passed a spontaneous breathing trial. The minute volume and respiratory rate were measured using a ventilometer, and the data were used to calculate the rapid shallow breathing index (respiratory rate/tidal volume). The dependent variable was the extubation outcome: reintubation after up to 48 hours (extubation failure) or not (extubation success). The independent variable was the rapid shallow breathing index measured after a successful spontaneous breathing trial. Results The sample comprised 119 individuals, including 111 (93.3%) males. The average age of the sample was 35.0±12.9 years old. The average duration of mechanical ventilation was 8.1±3.6 days. A total of 104 (87.4%) participants achieved successful extubation. No association was found between the rapid shallow breathing index and extubation success. Conclusion The rapid shallow breathing index was not associated with successful extubation in patients with traumatic brain injury. PMID:24213084

  11. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Eating Disordered Patients With or Without Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Els; Dierckx, Eva; Schoevaerts, Katrien; Claes, Laurence

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) in function of eating disorder (ED) subtypes (restrictive/bulimic) and the presence/absence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Female inpatients (N = 491) completed the Young Schema Questionnaire and the Self-Injury Questionnaire. The influence of ED subtype and the presence/absence of NSSI and their interaction on the EMS were investigated by means of a MANCOVA. The results showed main effects of ED subtype and the presence of NSSI on EMS. Patients with bulimia scored significantly higher on insufficient self-control and emotional deprivation, which are more related to cluster B compared with restrictive patients, whereas restrictive patients scored significantly higher on social undesirability, failure to achieve, subjugation and unrelenting standards compared with patients with bulimia that are more related to cluster C. Patients with ED with NSSI reported significantly higher EMS levels compared with patients without NSSI, suggesting that they could be of particular interest to benefit from schema therapy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  12. [Application of magnet laser radiation to stimulate healing of perineum injuries in the maternity patients].

    PubMed

    Rzakulieva, L M; Israfilbeĭli, S G; Gasymova, G

    2006-09-01

    The study is aimed at developing the new complex effective method of treatment with an application of magnet laser radiation as a stimulating aid in healing of perineum injuries in the maternity patients. 86 maternity patients with perineotomy and/or episiotomy were studied in treatment. The injury on the perineum was conventionally treated by antiseptics in 40 maternity patients (control group); the magnet laser therapy (MLT) by means of device "MILTA" was applied to 46 maternity patients in concomitantly with the conventional methods. The therapeutic effect was based on the combined influence of the constant magnetic field and impulsive laser radiation of the red and infra-red range on the body. The patients reported less discomfort during MLT, which promotes the decrease of pain intensity and hyperaemia instantly after 2-3 procedures. We have not observed any sutures divergence in the maternity patients who received MLT, in comparison to the control group where full divergence of sutures was registered in 2.5%, and partial--in 7.5%. The proposed complex method of treatment with the application of MLT improves the process of the healing considerably, promotes the rapid disappearance of inflammatory signs and renders analgesic effect.

  13. Early Maladaptive Schemas in Eating Disordered Patients With or Without Non-Suicidal Self-Injury.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Els; Dierckx, Eva; Schoevaerts, Katrien; Claes, Laurence

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates early maladaptive schemas (EMSs) in function of eating disorder (ED) subtypes (restrictive/bulimic) and the presence/absence of non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). Female inpatients (N = 491) completed the Young Schema Questionnaire and the Self-Injury Questionnaire. The influence of ED subtype and the presence/absence of NSSI and their interaction on the EMS were investigated by means of a MANCOVA. The results showed main effects of ED subtype and the presence of NSSI on EMS. Patients with bulimia scored significantly higher on insufficient self-control and emotional deprivation, which are more related to cluster B compared with restrictive patients, whereas restrictive patients scored significantly higher on social undesirability, failure to achieve, subjugation and unrelenting standards compared with patients with bulimia that are more related to cluster C. Patients with ED with NSSI reported significantly higher EMS levels compared with patients without NSSI, suggesting that they could be of particular interest to benefit from schema therapy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. PMID:27349211

  14. The Effect of Various Types of Motorcycle Helmets on Cervical Spine Injury in Head Injury Patients: A Multicenter Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mau-Roung; Chu, Shu-Fen; Tsai, Shin-Han; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The relationship between cervical spine injury (CSI) and helmet in head injury (HI) patients following motorcycle crashes is crucial. Controversy still exists; therefore we evaluated the effect of various types of helmets on CSI in HI patients following motorcycle crashes and researched the mechanism of this effect. Patients and Methods. A total of 5225 patients of motorcycle crashes between 2000 and 2009 were extracted from the Head Injury Registry in Taiwan. These patients were divided into case and control groups according to the presence of concomitant CSI. Helmet use and types were separately compared between the two groups and the odds ratio of CSI was obtained by using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results. We observed that 173 (3.3%) of the HI patients were associated with CSI. The HI patients using a helmet (odds ratio (OR) = 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.19−0.49), full-coverage helmet (0.19, 0.10−0.36), and partial-coverage helmet (0.35, 0.21−0.56) exhibited a significantly decreased rate of CSI compared with those without a helmet. Conclusion. Wearing full-coverage and partial-coverage helmets significantly reduced the risk of CSI among HI patients following motorcycle crashes. This effect may be due to the smooth surface and hard padding materials of helmet. PMID:25705663

  15. Endophthalmitis after tooth extraction in a patient with previous perforating eye injury.

    PubMed

    Ogurel, Tevfik; Onaran, Zafer; Ogurel, Reyhan; Örnek, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this stuty is to describe a case of endophthalmitis after tooth extraction in a patient with previous perforating eye injury. 50 years old male patient attempted to our clinic with complaints of sudden severe pain, reduced vision, light sensitivity and redness in the right eye. The patient stated that severe pain in his eye began approximately 12 hours following tooth extraction. The patient's ocular examination revealed a visual acuity of hand motion in the right eye. Anterior segment examination of the right eye showed intense conjunctival hyperemia, chemosis, a fine keraticprespitat and corneal edema. Dental procedures of the patients who had recently underwent ocular surgery or trauma should be done in a more controlled manner under anti -infective therapy or should be postponed in elective procedures. PMID:26090030

  16. Acute hydrocephalus secondary to obstruction of the foramen of monro and cerebral aqueduct caused by a choroid plexus cyst in the lateral ventricle. Case report.

    PubMed

    Nahed, Brian V; Darbar, Aneela; Doiron, Robert; Saad, Ali; Robson, Caroline D; Smith, Edward R

    2007-09-01

    Choroid plexus cysts are common and typically asymptomatic abnormal folds of the epithelial lining of the choroid plexus. Rarely, these cysts may gradually enlarge and cause outflow obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid. The authors present a case of a large choroid plexus cyst causing acute hydrocephalus in a previously healthy 2-year-old boy. The patient presented with markedly declining mental status, vomiting, and bradycardia over the course of several hours. Computed tomography scans demonstrated enlarged lateral and third ventricles with sulcal effacement, but no obvious mass lesions or hemorrhage. There was no antecedent illness or trauma. A right frontal external ventricular drain was placed in the patient, resulting in decompression of only the right lateral ventricle. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated a lobulated cyst arising from the choroid plexus of the left lateral ventricle and herniating through the foramen of Monro into the third ventricle, occluding both the foramen of Monro and the cerebral aqueduct. The patient underwent an endoscopic fenestration of the cyst, and histological results confirmed that it was a choroid plexus cyst. Postoperative MR imaging showed a marked reduction in the cyst size. The cyst was no longer in the third ventricle, the foramen of Monro and the aqueduct were patent, and the ventricles were decompressed. The patient was discharged home with no deficits. To the authors' knowledge, there are no previous reports of a choroid plexus cyst causing acute hydrocephalus due to herniation into the third ventricle. This case is illustrative because it describes this entity for the first time, and more importantly highlights the need to obtain a diagnosis when a patient presents with acute hydrocephalus without a clear cause.

  17. [The efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in patients with upper limb spasticity due to traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Akulov, M A; Khat'kova, S E; Mokienko, O A; Orlova, O R; Usachev, D Yu; Zakharov, V O; Orlova, A S; Tomsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a type of muscle hyperactivity that occurs in patients after focal lesions of the Central nervous system due to various diseases: stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, neurosurgical intervention, as well as multiple sclerosis and other diseases of the Central nervous system and is the most disability manifestation of the syndrome of upper motor neuron (UMNS). Focal spasticity of the upper limb requires a complex treatment. Botulinum toxin therapy is an effective treatment for focal/multifocal spasticity in reducing muscle tone and improving function with the highest level of evidence according to the latest American and European guidelines for treatment of spasticity. There are many publications devoted to BTA use in post-stroke patients. This article provides a review of the BTA use in patients with the upper limb spasticity due to severe traumatic brain injury. Some local data on the BTA efficacy in the cohort of patients with traumatic brain injury are also presented. PMID:27635608

  18. [The efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy in patients with upper limb spasticity due to traumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Akulov, M A; Khat'kova, S E; Mokienko, O A; Orlova, O R; Usachev, D Yu; Zakharov, V O; Orlova, A S; Tomsky, A A

    2016-01-01

    Spasticity is a type of muscle hyperactivity that occurs in patients after focal lesions of the Central nervous system due to various diseases: stroke, traumatic brain injury or spinal cord injury, neurosurgical intervention, as well as multiple sclerosis and other diseases of the Central nervous system and is the most disability manifestation of the syndrome of upper motor neuron (UMNS). Focal spasticity of the upper limb requires a complex treatment. Botulinum toxin therapy is an effective treatment for focal/multifocal spasticity in reducing muscle tone and improving function with the highest level of evidence according to the latest American and European guidelines for treatment of spasticity. There are many publications devoted to BTA use in post-stroke patients. This article provides a review of the BTA use in patients with the upper limb spasticity due to severe traumatic brain injury. Some local data on the BTA efficacy in the cohort of patients with traumatic brain injury are also presented.

  19. Cognitive complaints in patients after whiplash injury: the impact of malingering

    PubMed Central

    Schmand, B; Lindeboom, J; Schagen, S; Heijt, R; Koene, T; Hamburger, H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—The validity of memory and concentration complaints that are often reported after a whiplash trauma is controversial. The prevalence of malingering or underperformance in post-whiplash patients, and its impact on their cognitive test results were studied.
METHODS—The Amsterdam short term memory (ASTM) test, a recently developed malingering test, was used as well as a series of conventional memory and concentration tests. The study sample was a highly selected group of patients, who were examined either as part of a litigation procedure (n=36) or in the normal routine of an outpatient clinic (n=72).
RESULTS—The prevalence of underperformance, as defined by a positive score on the malingering test, was 61% (95% CI: 45-77) in the context of litigation, and 29% (95% CI: 18-40) in the outpatient clinic (p=0.003). Furthermore, the scores on the memory and concentration test of malingering post-whiplash patients (n=43) and non-malingering post-whiplash patients (n=65) were compared with the scores of patients with closed head injury (n=20) and normal controls (n=46). The malingering post-whiplash patients scored as low as the patients with closed head injury on most tests.
CONCLUSIONS—The prevalence of malingering or cognitive underperformance in late post-whiplash patients is substantial, particularly in litigation contexts. It is not warranted to explain the mild cognitive disorders of whiplash patients in terms of brain damage, as some authors have done. The cognitive complaints of non-malingering post-whiplash patients are more likely a result of chronic pain, chronic fatigue, or depression.

 PMID:9527145

  20. Association between early airway damage-associated molecular patterns and subsequent bacterial infection in patients with inhalational and burn injury.

    PubMed

    Maile, Robert; Jones, Samuel; Pan, Yinghao; Zhou, Haibo; Jaspers, Ilona; Peden, David B; Cairns, Bruce A; Noah, Terry L

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial infection is a major cause of morbidity affecting outcome following burn and inhalation injury. While experimental burn and inhalation injury animal models have suggested that mediators of cell damage and inflammation increase the risk of infection, few studies have been done on humans. This is a prospective, observational study of patients admitted to the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at the University of North Carolina who were intubated and on mechanical ventilation for treatment of burn and inhalational injury. Subjects were enrolled over a 2-yr period and followed till discharge or death. Serial bronchial washings from clinically indicated bronchoscopies were collected and analyzed for markers of tissue injury and inflammation. These include damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as hyaluronic acid (HA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP-70), and high-mobility group protein B-1 (HMGB-1). The study population was comprised of 72 patients who had bacterial cultures obtained for clinical indications. Elevated HA, dsDNA, and IL-10 levels in bronchial washings obtained early (the first 72 h after injury) were significantly associated with positive bacterial respiratory cultures obtained during the first 14 days postinjury. Independent of initial inhalation injury severity and extent of surface burn, elevated levels of HA dsDNA and IL-10 in the central airways obtained early after injury are associated with subsequent positive bacterial respiratory cultures in patients intubated after acute burn/inhalation injury.

  1. Association between early airway damage-associated molecular patterns and subsequent bacterial infection in patients with inhalational and burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Samuel; Pan, Yinghao; Zhou, Haibo; Jaspers, Ilona; Peden, David B.; Cairns, Bruce A.; Noah, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infection is a major cause of morbidity affecting outcome following burn and inhalation injury. While experimental burn and inhalation injury animal models have suggested that mediators of cell damage and inflammation increase the risk of infection, few studies have been done on humans. This is a prospective, observational study of patients admitted to the North Carolina Jaycee Burn Center at the University of North Carolina who were intubated and on mechanical ventilation for treatment of burn and inhalational injury. Subjects were enrolled over a 2-yr period and followed till discharge or death. Serial bronchial washings from clinically indicated bronchoscopies were collected and analyzed for markers of tissue injury and inflammation. These include damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as hyaluronic acid (HA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), heat-shock protein 70 (HSP-70), and high-mobility group protein B-1 (HMGB-1). The study population was comprised of 72 patients who had bacterial cultures obtained for clinical indications. Elevated HA, dsDNA, and IL-10 levels in bronchial washings obtained early (the first 72 h after injury) were significantly associated with positive bacterial respiratory cultures obtained during the first 14 days postinjury. Independent of initial inhalation injury severity and extent of surface burn, elevated levels of HA dsDNA and IL-10 in the central airways obtained early after injury are associated with subsequent positive bacterial respiratory cultures in patients intubated after acute burn/inhalation injury. PMID:25770180

  2. Risk factors for poor outcomes in patients with open-globe injuries

    PubMed Central

    Page, Rita D; Gupta, Sumeet K; Jenkins, Thomas L; Karcioglu, Zeynel A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors that are predictive of poor outcomes in penetrating globe trauma. Patients and methods This retrospective case series evaluated 103 eyes that had been surgically treated for an open-globe injury from 2007 to 2010 at the eye clinic of the University of Virginia. A total of 64 eyes with complete medical records and at least 6 months of follow-up were included in the study. Four risk factors (preoperative best-corrected visual acuity [pre-op BCVA], ocular trauma score [OTS], zone of injury [ZOI], and time lapse [TL] between injury and primary repair) and three outcomes (final BCVA, monthly rate of additional surgeries [MRAS], and enucleation) were identified for analysis. Results Pre-op BCVA was positively associated with MRAS, final BCVA, and enucleation. Calculated OTS was negatively associated with the outcome variables. No association was found between TL and ZOI with the outcome variables. Further, age and predictor variable-adjusted analyses showed pre-op BCVA to be independently positively associated with MRAS (P=0.008) and with final BCVA (P<0.001), while the calculated OTS was independently negatively associated with final BCVA (P<0.001), but not uniquely associated with MRAS (P=0.530). Conclusion Pre-op BCVA and OTS are best correlated with prognosis in open-globe injuries. However, no conventional features reliably predict the outcome of traumatized eyes. PMID:27536059

  3. The Risk of Transphyseal Drilling in Skeletally Immature Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Faunø, Peter; Rømer, Lone; Nielsen, Torsten; Lind, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in skeletally immature patients can result in growth plate injury, which can cause growth disturbances. Purpose: To evaluate radiological tibial and femoral length and axis growth disturbances as well as clinical outcomes in skeletally immature ACLR patients treated with a transphyseal drilling technique. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 39 pediatric patients with ACL injury and open physes at time of surgery, as diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were treated using transphyseal ACLR using hamstring graft. Mean patient age was 11.7 years (range, 9.0-14.0 years). Patients were evaluated with full extremity radiographs measuring leg length discrepancy and malalignment, as well as clinical evaluation with KT-1000 arthrometer measurements and Tegner activity scale and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) outcomes after follow-up of 68 months (range, 29-148 months). Results: Of the 39 initial patients, 33 were evaluated both clinically and radiographically. We found a mean femoral length shortening of 3.5 mm (P = .01) on the operated leg. Eight patients (24%) had a more than 10-mm shortening of the operated leg, whereas only 1 patient (3%) had a 10-mm shortening of the nonoperated leg. In 27 of 33 patients (82%; P < .001), the anatomic femoral axes of the operated leg were found to be more than 2° of valgus compared with the nonoperated leg. The tibial anatomic axes changed into a less pronounced varus angulation (P = .02). The femoral-tibial anatomic axes were not significantly different when comparing the 2 legs. We did not find any statistical difference in growth arrest comparing patients treated surgically at the ages of 13 to 14 years to patients younger than 13 years. Tegner and KOOS scores were significantly lower among girls compared with boys. Side-to-side KT-1000 arthrometer difference improved from 5.2 mm

  4. The Risk of Transphyseal Drilling in Skeletally Immature Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    PubMed Central

    Faunø, Peter; Rømer, Lone; Nielsen, Torsten; Lind, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR) in skeletally immature patients can result in growth plate injury, which can cause growth disturbances. Purpose: To evaluate radiological tibial and femoral length and axis growth disturbances as well as clinical outcomes in skeletally immature ACLR patients treated with a transphyseal drilling technique. Study Design: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 39 pediatric patients with ACL injury and open physes at time of surgery, as diagnosed clinically and with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), were treated using transphyseal ACLR using hamstring graft. Mean patient age was 11.7 years (range, 9.0-14.0 years). Patients were evaluated with full extremity radiographs measuring leg length discrepancy and malalignment, as well as clinical evaluation with KT-1000 arthrometer measurements and Tegner activity scale and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) outcomes after follow-up of 68 months (range, 29-148 months). Results: Of the 39 initial patients, 33 were evaluated both clinically and radiographically. We found a mean femoral length shortening of 3.5 mm (P = .01) on the operated leg. Eight patients (24%) had a more than 10-mm shortening of the operated leg, whereas only 1 patient (3%) had a 10-mm shortening of the nonoperated leg. In 27 of 33 patients (82%; P < .001), the anatomic femoral axes of the operated leg were found to be more than 2° of valgus compared with the nonoperated leg. The tibial anatomic axes changed into a less pronounced varus angulation (P = .02). The femoral-tibial anatomic axes were not significantly different when comparing the 2 legs. We did not find any statistical difference in growth arrest comparing patients treated surgically at the ages of 13 to 14 years to patients younger than 13 years. Tegner and KOOS scores were significantly lower among girls compared with boys. Side-to-side KT-1000 arthrometer difference improved from 5.2 mm

  5. [Paralytic ileus after ileocystoplasty in a patient with spinal cord injury: is homeopathy helpful?].

    PubMed

    Pannek, J; Pannek-Rademacher, S; Jus, M C; Jus, M S

    2014-11-01

    A paralytic ileus is a typical complication of ileocystoplasty of the bladder. In patients with a spinal cord injury, this risk is higher due to a preexisting neurogenic bowel dysfunction. We present the case of a paraplegic man who developed a massive paralytic ileus after ileocystoplasty and surgical revision. Conventional stimulation of bowel function was unsuccessful; only by an adjunctive homeopathic treatment was normalization of bowel function achieved. Adjunctive homeopathic therapy is a promising treatment option in patients with complex bowel dysfunction after abdominal surgery who do not adequately respond to conventional treatment. PMID:25116088

  6. Lap belt complex. Recognition & assessment of seatbelt injuries in pediatric trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Jordan, B

    2001-05-01

    That seatbelts save lives is irrefutable. Every health-care professional should advocate parents use proper restraint systems for their children. Resource guides are available from local, state and national organizations regarding proper restraint usage for the pediatric population. However, children restrained with lap belts are at risk of sustaining an occult injury. You must quickly stabilize the ABCs, immobilize the spine and get the patient en route to a trauma center while you perform a solid baseline assessment. The trauma team needs information on kinetics, type of restraints used, assessment findings and treatment rendered so they can accurately assess subtle changes in the patient's condition and initiate proper treatment.

  7. Choosing a model of care for patients in alternate level care: caregiver perspectives with respect to staff injury.

    PubMed

    Ostry, Aleck S; Tomlin, Katrina M; Cvitkovich, Yuri; Ratner, Pamela A; Park, Il Hyeok; Tate, Robert B; Yassi, Annalee

    2004-03-01

    The population of alternate level care (ALC) patients utilizing acute-care hospital resources inappropriate to their needs is growing. The purpose of this study was to explore how the care of ALC patients was managed at 4 acute-care facilities in the Canadian province of British Columbia and to examine how this care impacts on outcomes of staff injury. Interviews were conducted to identify and characterize the different models of ALC. Injury outcomes for all caregivers were obtained (n = 2,854) and logistic regression conducted to compare staff injuries across ALC models. Injured workers were surveyed regarding their perceptions of injury risk and ALC. Five ALC models were identified: low-mix, high-mix, dedicated ALC units, extended care units, and geriatric assessment units. The risk for caregiver injuries was lowest on dedicated ALC units. These findings suggest that acute-care facilities faced with a growing ALC population should consider creating dedicated ALC units.

  8. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  9. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry.

    PubMed

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K; Rivers, Carly S; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S; Christie, Sean D; Fourney, Daryl R; Hurlbert, R John; Linassi, A G; Fehlings, Michael G; Dvorak, Marcel F

    2015-11-01

    In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1-T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2-L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There was a

  10. The management of trauma victims with head injury: a study by the national confidential enquiry into patient outcome and death

    PubMed Central

    Smith, NCE; Findlay, GP; Weyman, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In 2006 the National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death undertook a large prospective study of trauma care, which revealed several findings pertaining to the management of head injuries in a sample of 493 patients. Methods Case note data were collected for all trauma patients admitted to all hospitals accepting emergencies in England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Channel Islands over a three-month period. Severely injured patients with an injury severity score (ISS) of ≥16 were included in the study. The case notes for these patients were peer reviewed by a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, who rated the overall level of care the patient received. Results Of the 795 patients who met the inclusion criteria for the study, 493 were admitted with a head injury. Room for improvement in the level of care was found in a substantial number of patients (265/493). Good practice was found to be highest in high volume centres. The overall head injury management was found to be satisfactory in 84% of cases (319/381). Conclusions This study has shown that care for trauma patients with head injury is frequently rated as less than good and suggests potential long-term remedies for the problem, including a reconfiguration of trauma services and better provision of neurocritical care facilities. PMID:23484990

  11. Social cognition and its relationship to functional outcomes in patients with sustained acquired brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Ubukata, Shiho; Tanemura, Rumi; Yoshizumi, Miho; Sugihara, Genichi; Murai, Toshiya; Ueda, Keita

    2014-01-01

    Deficits in social cognition are common after traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known about how such deficits affect functional outcomes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between social cognition and functional outcomes in patients with TBI. We studied this relationship in 20 patients with TBI over the course of 1 year post-injury. Patients completed neurocognitive assessments and social cognition tasks. The social cognition tasks included an emotion-perception task and three theory of mind tasks: the Faux Pas test, Reading the Mind in the Eyes (Eyes) test, and the Moving-Shapes paradigm. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique was used to assess functional outcomes. Compared with our database of normal subjects, patients showed impairments in all social cognition tasks. Multiple regression analysis revealed that theory of mind ability as measured by the Eyes test was the best predictor of the cognitive aspects of functional outcomes. The findings of this pilot study suggest that the degree to which a patient can predict what others are thinking is an important measure that can estimate functional outcomes over 1 year following TBI. PMID:25395854

  12. Incidence of deep vein thrombosis after spinal cord injury in Korean patients at acute rehabilitation unit.

    PubMed

    Do, Jong Geol; Kim, Du Hwan; Sung, Duk Hyun

    2013-09-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and subsequent pulmonary embolism (PE) remain significant causes of morbidity, mortality in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI). Since incidence of DVT after SCI in Korean population has not been much studied, we retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 185 SCI patients admitted for acute rehabilitation unit to investigate the incidence of DVT. Color Doppler ultrasonography was performed to screen for the occurrence of DVT at the time of initial presentation to acute rehabilitation unit. Primary study outcome was the incidence of DVT. Possible risk factors for DVT including the epidemiologic characteristics, completeness of motor paralysis, cause of injury, spasticity, surgery, and active cancer were analyzed. The incidence of DVT after SCI was 27.6%. In multiple logistic regression analysis, absence of spasticity was a significant independent risk factor (P<0.05) for occurrence of DVT. Symptomatic pulmonary embolism was evident in 7 patients without an episode of sudden death. Therefore, it is concluded that the incidence of DVT after SCI in Korean patients is comparable with that in Western populations. This result suggests that pharmacologic thromboprophylaxis should be considered in Korean patients with SCI.

  13. A high-definition fiber tracking report for patients with traumatic brain injury and their doctors.

    PubMed

    Chmura, Jon; Presson, Nora; Benso, Steven; Puccio, Ava M; Fissel, Katherine; Hachey, Rebecca; Braun, Emily; Okonkwo, David O; Schneider, Walter

    2015-03-01

    We have developed a tablet-based application, the High-Definition Fiber Tracking Report App, to enable clinicians and patients in research studies to see and understand damage from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) by viewing 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional images of their brain, with a focus on white matter tracts with quantitative metrics. The goal is to visualize white matter fiber tract injury like bone fractures; that is, to make the "invisible wounds of TBI" understandable for patients. Using mobile computing technology (iPad), imaging data for individual patients can be downloaded remotely within hours of a magnetic resonance imaging brain scan. Clinicians and patients can view the data in the form of images of each tract, rotating animations of the tracts, 3-dimensional models, and graphics. A growing number of tracts can be examined for asymmetry, gaps in streamline coverage, reduced arborization (branching), streamline volume, and standard quantitative metrics (e.g., Fractional Anisotropy (FA)). Novice users can learn to effectively navigate and interact with the application (explain the figures and graphs representing normal and injured brain tracts) within 15 minutes of simple orientation with high accuracy (96%). The architecture supports extensive graphics, configurable reports, provides an easy-to-use, attractive interface with a smooth user experience, and allows for securely serving cases from a database. Patients and clinicians have described the application as providing dramatic benefits in understanding their TBI and improving their lives.

  14. [Management of patients with severe head injury in Hungary, in 2002].

    PubMed

    Csepregi, Gyula; Büki, András; Futó, Judit; Sándor, János; Göbl, Gábor; Dóczi, Tamás

    2007-04-29

    In Hungary, epidemiological and clinical data regarding brain injury were rather scarce. The Hungarian Society for Neurotrauma aimed to make a nation-wide study about the number and the mortality of patients with severe head trauma, the organization of management, the diagnostics and monitoring in use, and finally about the clinical practice of management. A national survey was carried out with questionnaires asking about data of 2001, and a prospective, three-month-long data collection based on case studies was also executed in 2002. The Hungarian National Ambulance and Emergency Service centralized information gathering on rescue, and transportation. To collect data of hospital care, a network of regional coordinators and hospital communicators was developed. The responders covered 76% of the hospital neurotrauma care in the country. The number of brain trauma patients was close to 14,000 per year: 71.3% mild, 19.4% moderate, and 9.4% severe trauma. According to prospective study the mortality of those patients who were admitted as severe head injury patients was 55% and the mortality of those who got into severe condition later was 35% during the acute care. These data showed much worse outcome than those published in Western European countries and North America. In the background the authors found communication disorder between prehospital and hospital care, extreme long time spent until the patients got to the first CT-exam and to the definitive care. The implementation of Hungarian and international head trauma guidelines did not spread widely. PMID:17452306

  15. Transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells into contusion-injured spinal cord of rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Kenji; Nakano, Norihiko; Noda, Toru; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Masayoshi; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukushima, Masanori; Ide, Chizuka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of the transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs) on locomotor improvement and tissue repair including axonal extension in spinal cord lesions was examined in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: CPECs were cultured from the choroid plexus of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats, and transplanted directly into the contusion-injured spinal cord lesions of rats of the same strain. Locomotor behaviors were evaluated based on BBB scores every week after transplantation until 4 weeks after transplantation. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed at 2 days, and every week until 5 weeks after transplantation. Results: Locomotor behaviors evaluated by the BBB score were significantly improved in cell-transplanted rats. Numerous axons grew, with occasional interactions with CPECs, through the astrocyte-devoid areas. These axons exhibited structural characteristics of peripheral nerves. GAP-43-positive axons were found at the border of the lesion 2 days after transplantation. Cavity formation was more reduced in cell-transplanted than control spinal cords. CPECs were found within the spinal cord lesion, and sometimes in association with astrocytes at the border of the lesion until 2 weeks after transplantation. Conclusion: The transplantation of CPECs enhanced locomotor improvement and tissue recovery, including axonal regeneration, in rats with SCI. PMID:26923614

  16. Features and Outcomes of 899 Patients with Drug-induced Liver Injury: The DILIN Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Chalasani, N; Bonkovsky, HL; Fontana, R; Lee, W; Stolz, A; Talwalkar, J; Reddy, KR; Watkins, PB; Navarro, V; Barnhart, H; Gu, J; Serrano, J

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims The drug-induced liver injury network (DILIN) is conducting a prospective study of patients with DILI in the United States. We present characteristics and subgroup analyses from the first 1257 patients enrolled in the study. Methods In an observational longitudinal study, we began collecting data on eligible individuals with suspected DILI in 2004, following them for 6 months or longer. Subjects were evaluated systematically for other etiologies, causes, and severity of DILI. Results Among 1257 enrolled subjects with suspected DILI, the causality was assessed in 1091 patients, and 899 were considered to have definite, highly likely, or probable DILI. Ten percent of patients died or underwent liver transplantation and 17% had chronic liver injury. In the 89 patients (10%) with pre-existing liver disease, DILI appeared to be more severe than in those without (difference not statistically significant; P=.09) and mortality was significantly higher (16% vs 5.2%; P<.001). Azithromycin was the implicated agent in a higher proportion of patients with pre-existing liver disease compared to those without liver disease (6.7% vs. 1.5%, p=0.006). Forty-one cases with latency ≤ 7 days were caused predominantly by antimicrobial agents (71%). Two most common causes for 60 DILI cases with latency >365 days were nitrofurantoin (25%) or minocycline (17%). There were no differences in outcomes of patients with short vs long latency of DILI. Compared to individuals younger than 65 y, individuals 65 y or older (n=149) were more likely to have cholestatic injury, although mortality and rate of liver transplantation did not differ. Nine patients (1%) had concomitant severe skin reactions; implicated agents were lamotrigine, azithromycin, carbamazepine, moxifloxacin, cephalexin, diclofenac, and nitrofurantoin. Four of these patients died. Conclusion Mortality from DILI is significantly higher in individuals with pre-existing liver disease or concomitant severe skin

  17. Towards personalized care for persons with spinal cord injury: a study on patients' perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Garrino, Lorenza; Curto, Natascia; Decorte, Rita; Felisi, Nadia; Matta, Ebe; Gregorino, Silvano; Actis, M. Vittoria; Marchisio, Cecilia; Carone, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Objective/background A newly designed Spinal Cord Unit (SCU) was set up at the Orthopedic Traumatology Center (OTC), Turin, Italy, in July 2007. With the relocation of the SCU came the need to reorganize and improve the delivery of its services. The study reported here is a preliminary part of a project entitled ‘Experimentation and evaluation of personalized healthcare for patients with spinal cord injury’, which is a component of an overarching program of targeted research into healthcare funded by the Piedmont Region in 2006. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of care by patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) by collecting important data in order to determine whether an integrated and personalized care pathway could be effective both in hospital and in a rehabilitation setting. Design Qualitative research study. The interview format was based on a narrative approach. Methods Qualitative in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 patients with SCI. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify categories and themes arising from the data. Results Six main categories emerged from the perspectives of patients: expectations of rehabilitation care, impact and welcome, relationship with nurses and their involvement in treatment, relationship with physical therapists and participation in rehabilitation programs, relationship with physicians and their availability and attendance, and imparting of information on injury and rehabilitation outcomes. Care was the aspect new patients admitted to the SCU found most important. When closer relationships with staff formed, the healthcare professionals became an essential support. Patients with SCI commonly stated that receiving explicit information was necessary for accepting their condition. Conclusions Analysis of the patients' perceptions revealed a wealth of details on their experience in the SCU and the need for flexible planning of care time in particular. Incorporating the patients

  18. Total knee arthroplasty in patient with paraplegia after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zietek, P; Dobiecki, K

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of paraplegic patients is more complex than in able-bodied subjects. Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects younger, active people more often than the elderly during high-energy fall or traffic accidents. In order to return to work after suffering an SCI, patients need to regain their functional independence, especially their ability to drive. The literature lacks strong evidence addressing the surgical solutions in severe knee arthrosis in paralyzed patients after SCI. We present a favourable outcome of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) of a stiff knee in extension in a man with T12 grade C paraplegia after SCI. We describe an effective rehabilitation protocol after knee arthroplasty in patient with damage to the spinal cord. Several factors should be taken into account before performing surgery: 1. ability of regaining some of spinal cord locomotor function through intensive gait rehabilitation in SCI patients, 2. presence of muscle imbalance and knee contractures combined with a risk of bone fracture resulting from intensive postoperative rehabilitation, 3. the impaired microvasculature of the skin and subcutaneous tissues and increased risk of occlusion occurrence of the capillaries and small vessels of the leg, 4. higher prevalence of secondary infections via urinary entry sites in patients after SCI, 5. patient's strong determination and willingness to undergo the arthroplasty procedure. TKA might be considered in selected paralyzed patients after SCI, especially in those with severe arthrosis as well as significant knee contractures. Our study reveals the advantage of performing TKA in improving functional state in patients with cord injury. PMID:25748667

  19. Bacterial Respiratory Tract Infections are Promoted by Systemic Hyperglycemia after Severe Burn Injury in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Finnerty, Celeste C; Cox, Robert A; Williams, Felicia N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Background Burn injuries are associated with hyperglycemia leading to increased incidence of infections with pneumonia being one of the most prominent and adverse complication. Recently, various studies in critically ill patients indicated that increased pulmonary glucose levels with airway/blood glucose threshold over 150 mg/dl lead to an overwhelming growth of bacteria in the broncho-pulmonary system, subsequently resulting in an increased risk of pulmonary infections. The aim of the present study was to determine whether a similar cutoff value exists for severely burned pediatric patients. Methods One-hundred six severely burned pediatric patients were enrolled in the study. Patients were divided in two groups: high (H) defined as daily average glucose levels >75% of LOS >150 mg/dl), and low (L) with daily average glucose levels >75% of the LOS <150 mg/dl). Incidences of pneumonia, atelectasis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) were assessed. Incidence of infections, sepsis, and respiratory parameters were recorded. Blood was analyzed for glucose and insulin levels. Statistical analysis was performed using Student’s t-test and chi-square test. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results Patient groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Pneumonia in patients on the mechanical ventilation (L: 21% H: 32%) and off mechanical ventilation (L: 5% H: 15%), as well as ARDS were significantly higher in the high group (L: 3% H: 19%), p<0.05, while atelectasis was not different. Patients in the high group required significantly longer ventilation compared to low patients (p<0.05). Furthermore, incidence of infection and sepsis were significantly higher in the high group, p<0.05. Conclusion Our results indicate that systemic glucose levels over 150 mg/dl are associated with a higher incidence of pneumonia confirming the previous studies in critically ill patients. PMID:24074819

  20. Pancreatic injury.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nasim; Vernick, Jerome J

    2009-12-01

    Injury to the pancreas, because of its retroperitoneal location, is a rare occurrence, most commonly seen with penetrating injuries (gun shot or stab wounds). Blunt trauma to the pancreas accounts for only 25% of the cases. Pancreatic injuries are associated with high morbidity and mortality due to accompanying vascular and duodenal injuries. Pancreatic injuries are not always easy to diagnose resulting in life threatening complications. Physical examination as well as serum amylase is not diagnostic following blunt trauma. Computed tomography (CT) scan can delineate the injury or transaction of the pancreas. Endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography (ERCP) is the main diagnostic modality for evaluation of the main pancreatic duct. Unrecognized ductal injury leads to pancreatic pseudocyst, fistula, abscess, and other complications. Management depends upon the severity of the pancreatic injury as well as associated injuries. Damage control surgery in hemodynamic unstable patients reduces morbidity and mortality.

  1. General intensive care for patients with traumatic brain injury: An update

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Kowalski, Stephen; Arabi, Yaseen; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a growing epidemic throughout the world and may present as major global burden in 2020. Some intensive care units throughout the world still have no access to specialized monitoring methods, equipments and other technologies related to intensive care management of these patients; therefore, this review is meant for providing generalized supportive measurement to this subgroup of patients so that evidence based management could minimize or prevent the secondary brain injury. Methods: Therefore, we have included the PubMed search for the relevant clinical trials and reviews (from 1 January 2007 to 31 March 2013), which specifically discussed about the topic. Results: General supportive measures are equally important to prevent and minimize the effects of secondary brain injury and therefore, have a substantial impact on the outcome in patients with TBI. The important considerations for general supportive intensive care unit care remain the prompt reorganization and treatment of hypoxemia, hypotension and hypercarbia. Evidences are found to be either against or weak regarding the use of routine hyperventilation therapy, tight control blood sugar regime, use of colloids and late as well as parenteral nutrition therapy in patients with severe TBI. Conclusion: There is also a need to develop some evidence based protocols for the health-care sectors, in which there is still lack of specific management related to monitoring methods, equipments and other technical resources. Optimization of physiological parameters, understanding of basic neurocritical care knowledge as well as incorporation of newer guidelines would certainly improve the outcome of the TBI patients. PMID:24843343

  2. Improved Dysphagia After Decannulation of Tracheostomy in Patients With Brain Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Jeong-Gyu; Lee, Jang-Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate improved dysphagia after the decannulation of a tracheostomy in patients with brain injuries. Methods The subjects of this study are patients with brain injuries who were admitted to the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine in Myongji Hospital and who underwent a decannulation between 2012 and 2014. A video fluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) was performed in order to investigate whether the patients' dysphagia had improved. We measured the following 5 parameters: laryngeal elevation, pharyngeal transit time, post-swallow pharyngeal remnant, upper esophageal width, and semisolid aspiration. We analyzed the patients' results from VFSS performed one month before and one month after decannulation. All VFSS images were recorded using a camcorder running at 30 frames per second. An AutoCAD 2D screen was used to measure laryngeal elevation, post-swallow pharyngeal remnant, and upper esophageal width. Results In this study, a number of dysphagia symptoms improved after decannulation. Laryngeal elevation, pharyngeal transit time, and semisolid aspiration showed no statistically significant differences (p>0.05), however after decannulation, the post-swallow pharyngeal remnant (pre 37.41%±24.80%, post 21.02%±11.75%; p<0.001) and upper esophageal width (pre 3.57±1.93 mm, post 4.53±2.05 mm; p<0.001) showed statistically significant differences. Conclusion When decannulation is performed on patients with brain injuries who do not require a ventilator and who are able to independently excrete sputum, improved esophageal dysphagia can be expected. PMID:26605176

  3. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements.

  4. Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity in pediatric traumatic brain injury: A case series of four patients.

    PubMed

    Deepika, Akhil; Mathew, Manish Joseph; Kumar, S Arun; Devi, Bhagavatula Indira; Shukla, Dhaval

    2015-12-01

    Paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity (PSH) is a condition in which there is extreme autonomic dysregulation leading to multiple episodes of sympathetic hyperactivity. Its occurrence after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in pediatric population is a neglected scenario. In our series, all pediatric patients with moderate and severe head injuries were studied and those patients who developed PSH were monitored for the PSH episodes. Four children out of 36 cases of pediatric severe traumatic brain injury developed features of PSH. Admission GCS of 3 children were 4/15 and 1 child was 6/15 and each of them had an ICU stay of more than 2 weeks and a poor DRS score at discharge. The presence of PSH is known to produce poorer outcome in terms of overall mortality, time needed for recovery, chances of developing infections, etc. which was also seen in these cases presented here. Though some studies have provided guidelines for the management of PSH like symptomatic management and use of drugs like clonidine, bromocriptine, benzodiazepines, and gabapentin, strict management guidelines are not established and exact incidence in pediatric population is not determined. PMID:26277041

  5. Clinical features and biomarkers of concussion and mild traumatic brain injury in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Matthew T; Kosofsky, Barry E

    2015-05-01

    There has been increasing awareness of the incidence and potential long-term consequences of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in children and young adults. While parents, school systems, and athletic programs are clamoring for evidence-based guidelines, the field remains primitive in understanding the factors resulting in a spectrum of individual outcomes, most of which are complete, but some of which are not. In this article, we discuss the definition, epidemiology, clinical presentation, course, and outcomes of mTBI, with a focus on the pediatric population as the context for reviewing the mechanisms and pathophysiology mediating, and biomarkers reflective of, more significant concussion-induced brain injury. Our goal is to present a general overview of the features of mTBI in the pediatric population in order to provide a conceptual model for pediatricians and pediatric subspecialists. This model emphasizes the importance of establishing actionable, noninvasive biomarkers that are reflective of brain injury and that may identify those pediatric patients who can benefit from earlier and more aggressive interventions. We will focus on the specific features of mTBI in pediatric patients; although given the relative lack of research in the pediatric population, we will also extrapolate from research on adults.

  6. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients' ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  7. Effect of Robotic-Assisted Gait Training in Patients With Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Ji Yong; Park, Han Kyul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of robotic-assisted gait training (RAGT) compared to conventional overground training. Methods Sixty patients with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) were included in a prospective, randomized clinical trial by comparing RAGT to conventional overground training. The RAGT group received RAGT three sessions per week at duration of 40 minutes with regular physiotherapy in 4 weeks. The conventional group underwent regular physiotherapy twice a day, 5 times a week. Main outcomes were lower extremity motor score of American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale (LEMS), ambulatory motor index (AMI), Spinal Cord Independence Measure III mobility section (SCIM3-M), and walking index for spinal cord injury version II (WISCI-II) scale. Results At the end of rehabilitation, both groups showed significant improvement in LEMS, AMI, SCIM3-M, and WISCI-II. Based on WISCI-II, statistically significant improvement was observed in the RAGT group. For the remaining variables, no difference was found. Conclusion RAGT combined with conventional physiotherapy could yield more improvement in ambulatory function than conventional therapy alone. RAGT should be considered as one additional tool to provide neuromuscular reeducation in patient with incomplete SCI. PMID:25566469

  8. Barriers to and facilitators of coping with spinal cord injury for Iranian patients: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Negarandeh, Reza; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore the perspectives and experiences of Iranian patients regarding barriers and facilitators to their ability to cope with spinal cord injury (SCI). A qualitative design, based on the content analysis approach, was used to collect and analyze the experiences of 18 patients with spinal cord injury in two centers in Tehran, Iran. After using purposeful sampling for selection of the participants, semi-structured interviews were held for data collection. Lack of "knowledge", "financial resources", "employment opportunities", "suitable facilities and accessibility" as well as "societal acceptance and support" emerged as barriers; and having "self-confidence", "religious beliefs", "support networks" and "positive thinking" emerged as facilitators in coping with spinal cord injury. Participants believed that with these hindering factors in place, adapting to their new condition had been difficult, therefore they can only manage to adapt partially to their situation. Additional multidisciplinary endeavors are needed to help this group cope adequately and further research is required to influence policy making and legislation processes efficiently.

  9. Assessing Incidence and Risk Factors of Cervical Spine Injury in Blunt Trauma Patients Using the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew J; Wolfe, Luke; Tinkoff, Glenn; Duane, Therese M

    2015-09-01

    Despite the potentially devastating impact of missed cervical spine injuries (CI), there continues to be a large disparity in how institutions attempt to make the diagnosis. To better streamline the approach among institutions, understanding incidence and risk factors across the country is paramount. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of CI using the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009. We performed a retrospective review of the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009 comparing patients with and without CI. We then performed subset analysis separating injury by patients with and without fracture and ligamentous injury. There were a total of 591,138 patients included with a 6.2 per cent incidence of CI. Regression found that age, Injury Severity Score, alcohol intoxication, and specific mechanisms of motor vehicle crash (MVC), motorcycle crash (MCC), fall, pedestrian stuck, and bicycle were independent risk factors for overall injury (P < 0.0001). Patients with CI had longer intensive care unit (8.5 12.5 vs 5.1 7.7) and hospital lengths of stay (days) (9.6 14.2 vs 5.3 8.1) and higher mortality (1.2 per cent vs 0.3%), compared with those without injury (P < 0.0001). There were 33,276 patient with only fractures for an incidence of 5.6 per cent and 1875 patients with ligamentous injury. Just over 6 per cent of patients suffer some form of CI after blunt trauma with the majority being fractures. Higher Injury Severity Score and MVC were consistent risk factors in both groups. This information will assist in devising an algorithm for clearance that can be used nationally allowing for more consistency among trauma providers. PMID:26350665

  10. Bomb blast injuries: an exploration of patient characteristics and outcome using Pakistan National Emergency Departments Surveillance (Pak-NEDS) data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Bomb blast injuries result in premature deaths and burdening of healthcare systems. The objective of this study was to explore the characteristics and outcome of patients presenting to the emergency departments in Pakistan with bomb blast injuries. Methods Active surveillance was conducted in seven major emergency departments of Pakistan from November 2010-March 2011. All the sites are tertiary care urban centers. All the patients who presented to the hospital's emergency department (ED) following a bomb blast injury as per self-report or the ambulance personnel were included in the study. Frequency of demographics, injury pattern, and outcomes were calculated. Results A total of 103 patients with bomb blast injuries presented to the selected emergency departments. The median age of patients was 30 years. Around three-fourth of the patients were males (n = 74, 74.7%). Most of the bomb blast patients were seen in Peshawar (n = 41, 39.8%) and Karachi city (n = 31, 30.1%) and the most common mode of arrival was non-ambulance transport (n = 71, 76.3%). Upper limb injuries (n = 12, 40%) were common in the under 18 age group and lower limb injuries (n = 31, 39.2%) in the 18 years and above group. There were a total of 8 (7.7%) deaths reported out of these 103 patients. Conclusion Bomb blast injuries in Pakistan generally affect young males. Non-ambulance transport is the most common way to access emergency departments (ED). Overall ED mortality is high and capturing data during a disaster in an emergency department is challenging. PMID:26692453

  11. Computed tomography of pressure sores, pelvic abscess, and osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injury

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Lam, S.; Sokolow, J.; Kung, J.S.

    1982-11-01

    Nine patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and large pressure ulcers and other possible complications, were evaluated by computed tomography (CT), conventional radiography, tomography, bone scanning, gallium scanning, and sonography. CT revealed the depth, extent, and relationship of the ulcer-bed to the underlying structures in all 9 patients. CT also positively identified unsuspected intra- and extra-pelvic abscess and pelvic osteomyelitis in 4 patients each. Other modalities identified only 2 of these complications. We believe CT is the modality of choice for evaluation of these complications in SCI patients, because of its superior ability in evaluation of pressure sores and detection of pathologic changes in soft tissue and bone in the pelvic region.

  12. Prediction of outcome in traumatic brain injury patients using long-term qEEG features.

    PubMed

    Mikola, Annika; Ratsep, Indrek; Sarkela, Mika; Lipping, Tarmo

    2015-08-01

    Treatment of patients suffering from severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly involves sedation and mechanical ventilation during prolonged stay in the intensive care unit. Continuous EEG is often monitored in these patients to detect epileptic seizures. It has also been suggested that EEG has prognostic value regarding the outcome of the treatment. In this study the ability of 186 qEEG features to predict the outcome of the treatment of TBI patients is assessed. The features are based on the power spectrum of the EEG. The data underlying the study contains long term (over 24 h) recordings from 20 patients treated in the postoperative intensive care unit of the North Estonian Medical Center. 12 qEEG features were found to have predictive value when evaluated by calculating the area under the receiver operating curve constructed from feature probabilities. PMID:26736563

  13. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Han, Min Soo; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions.

  14. Characterization of T2 hyperintensity lesions in patients with mild traumatic brain injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caban, Jesus J.; Green, Savannah A.; Riedy, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) is often an invisible injury that is poorly understood and its sequelae can be difficult to diagnose. Recent neuroimaging studies on patients diagnosed with mild TBI (mTBI) have demonstrated an increase in hyperintense brain lesions on T2-weighted MR images. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of the multi-modal and morphological properties of T2 hyperintensity lesions among service members diagnosed with mTBI. A total of 790 punctuate T2 hyperintensity lesions from 89 mTBI subjects were analyzed and used to characterize the lesions based on different quantitative measurements. Morphological analysis shows that on average, T2 hyperintensity lesions have volumes of 23mm3 (+/-24.75), a roundness measure of 0.83 (+/-0.08) and an elongation of 7.90 (+/-2.49). The frontal lobe lesions demonstrated significantly more elongated lesions when compared to other areas of the brain.

  15. Deviations in Monthly Staffing and Injurious Assaults Against Staff and Patients on Psychiatric Units.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S

    2016-10-01

    It is widely thought that low staffing levels are associated with higher risk of psychiatric inpatient violence. The purpose of this study was to determine whether odds of an injurious assault are higher in months in which unit staffing levels are higher or lower relative to unit average, using a design allowing each unit to serve as its own control. Using 2011-2013 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators data from 480 adult and 90 geriatric units in 361 US hospitals, monthly assault odds were modeled as functions of unit staffing. Monthly RN and non-RN staffing (hours per patient day) were categorized as very low, low, average, high, or very high, based on deviation from the unit's average staffing across study months. Endpoints were binary indicators for one or more injurious assaults against staff during the month and for one or more injurious assaults against patients during the month. Despite large sample sizes, neither RN nor non-RN staffing was a statistically significant predictor of odds of assault, nor was there a consistent trend of odds of assault being higher at below- or above-average staffing levels. There was little evidence that monthly deviation in unit staffing is associated with the odds of an injurious assault on a unit. This suggests that staffing-assault rate associations in previous studies of monthly data are largely attributable to between-unit rather than within-unit staffing differences. Hospitals may need to look beyond below- or above-average nurse staffing as a cause of assaults. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27304990

  16. Deviations in Monthly Staffing and Injurious Assaults Against Staff and Patients on Psychiatric Units.

    PubMed

    Staggs, Vincent S

    2016-10-01

    It is widely thought that low staffing levels are associated with higher risk of psychiatric inpatient violence. The purpose of this study was to determine whether odds of an injurious assault are higher in months in which unit staffing levels are higher or lower relative to unit average, using a design allowing each unit to serve as its own control. Using 2011-2013 National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators data from 480 adult and 90 geriatric units in 361 US hospitals, monthly assault odds were modeled as functions of unit staffing. Monthly RN and non-RN staffing (hours per patient day) were categorized as very low, low, average, high, or very high, based on deviation from the unit's average staffing across study months. Endpoints were binary indicators for one or more injurious assaults against staff during the month and for one or more injurious assaults against patients during the month. Despite large sample sizes, neither RN nor non-RN staffing was a statistically significant predictor of odds of assault, nor was there a consistent trend of odds of assault being higher at below- or above-average staffing levels. There was little evidence that monthly deviation in unit staffing is associated with the odds of an injurious assault on a unit. This suggests that staffing-assault rate associations in previous studies of monthly data are largely attributable to between-unit rather than within-unit staffing differences. Hospitals may need to look beyond below- or above-average nurse staffing as a cause of assaults. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Mapping Alterations to the Endogenous Elemental Distribution within the Lateral Ventricles and Choroid Plexus in Brain Disorders Using X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed

    Lins, Brittney R; Pushie, Jake M; Jones, Michael; Howard, Daryl L; Howland, John G; Hackett, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    The choroid plexus and cerebral ventricles are critical structures for the production of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and play an important role in regulating ion and metal transport in the brain, however many aspects of its roles in normal physiology and disease states, such as psychiatric illness, remain unknown. The choroid plexus is difficult to examine in vivo, and in situ ex vivo, and as such has typically been examined indirectly with radiolabeled tracers or ex vivo stains, making measurements of the endogenous K+, Cl-, and Ca+ distributions unreliable. In the present study, we directly examined the distribution of endogenous ions and biologically relevant transition metals in the choroid plexus and regions surrounding the ventricles (ventricle wall, cortex, corpus callosum, striatum) using X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI). We find that the choroid plexus was rich in Cl- and Fe while K+ levels increase further from the ventricle as Cl- levels decrease, consistent with the known role of ion transporters in the choroid plexus CSF production. A polyI:C offspring displayed enlarged ventricles, elevated Cl- surrounding the ventricles, and intraventricular calcifications. These observations fit with clinical findings in patients with schizophrenia and suggest maternal treatment with polyI:C may lead to dysfunctional ion regulation in offspring. This study demonstrates the power of XFI for examining the endogenous elemental distributions of the ventricular system in healthy brain tissue as well as disease models. PMID:27351594

  18. Mapping Alterations to the Endogenous Elemental Distribution within the Lateral Ventricles and Choroid Plexus in Brain Disorders Using X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lins, Brittney R.; Pushie, Jake M.; Jones, Michael; Howard, Daryl L.; Howland, John G.; Hackett, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The choroid plexus and cerebral ventricles are critical structures for the production of cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and play an important role in regulating ion and metal transport in the brain, however many aspects of its roles in normal physiology and disease states, such as psychiatric illness, remain unknown. The choroid plexus is difficult to examine in vivo, and in situ ex vivo, and as such has typically been examined indirectly with radiolabeled tracers or ex vivo stains, making measurements of the endogenous K+, Cl−, and Ca+ distributions unreliable. In the present study, we directly examined the distribution of endogenous ions and biologically relevant transition metals in the choroid plexus and regions surrounding the ventricles (ventricle wall, cortex, corpus callosum, striatum) using X-ray fluorescence imaging (XFI). We find that the choroid plexus was rich in Cl− and Fe while K+ levels increase further from the ventricle as Cl− levels decrease, consistent with the known role of ion transporters in the choroid plexus CSF production. A polyI:C offspring displayed enlarged ventricles, elevated Cl− surrounding the ventricles, and intraventricular calcifications. These observations fit with clinical findings in patients with schizophrenia and suggest maternal treatment with polyI:C may lead to dysfunctional ion regulation in offspring. This study demonstrates the power of XFI for examining the endogenous elemental distributions of the ventricular system in healthy brain tissue as well as disease models. PMID:27351594

  19. Identification of autoantibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein in spinal cord injury patients.

    PubMed

    Hergenroeder, Georgene W; Moore, Anthony N; Schmitt, Karl M; Redell, John B; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-20

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating injury causing significant morbidity and mortality. Experimental studies have demonstrated that SCI induced cellular damage and disruption of the blood-spinal cord barrier can initiate an autoimmune response. This response is thought to be pathogenic and contribute to poor outcome. The objective of this research was to investigate whether human SCI mounts an autoimmune response to self-antigens. Plasma samples were collected longitudinally from SCI patients (n=18) at acute (T1, <48 h) and subacute (T2, 2-4 weeks) time points to probe western blots of human brain homogenates in order to screen patients for the presence of putative autoantibodies. To identify the corresponding antigens, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, western blot and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses were performed. We found that four of 18 patients (22%) had novel immunoreactive bands ranging in size from 36 to 42 kDa present in subacute, but not in acute, plasma samples suggesting postinjury production. To identify the cross-reacting antigens, we separated brain proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and identified nine immunoreactive spots. Amino acid sequence analysis of these spots identified peptides that mapped to glial fibrillary acidic protein. Our results suggest that ∼ 22% of SCI patients generated autoantibodies to glial fibrillary acidic protein. Future studies will be required to determine whether these autoantibodies contribute to the pathogenic sequelae of SCI.

  20. Caffeine test in predicting flutamide-induced hepatic injury in patients with prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ozono, S; Yamaguchi, A; Mochizuki, H; Kawakami, T; Fujimoto, K; Otani, T; Yoshida, K; Ichinei, M; Yamashita, T; Hirao, Y

    2002-01-01

    The caffeine test measures the activity of cytochrome p450 (CYP1A2) which is a major enzyme involved in the activation of flutamide. The usefulness of this test in predicting flutamide-induced hepatic injury in patients with prostate cancer was examined. The subjects were: (1). five patients whose aspartate aminotransferase (AST) or alanine aminotransferase (ALT) level rose to 100 IU/l or higher following the start of flutamide (moderately injured group); (2). four patients whose AST and ALT levels were higher than normal but less than 100 IU/l (mildly injured group); and (3). two patients whose hepatic function remained normal (normal group). The subjects were each given canned coffee to drink. Urinary caffeine (137X), paraxanthine (17X) and 1, 7-dimethyluric acid (17U) levels were measured 4-5 h later. The metabolite ratio, (17U+17X)/137X, was calculated to serve as an indicator of CYP1A2 activity. The metabolite ratio for the moderately injured group (3.98+/-1.56) and the mildly injured group (5.55+/-1.42) were lower than that for the normal group (9.56). The results suggest that a decrease in CYP1A2 activity is involved in the onset of flutamide-induced hepatic injury, and that the caffeine test seems to provide a useful means of its prediction. PMID:12497002

  1. Imaging of Cerebral Blood Flow in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neurointensive Care

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Elham; Engquist, Henrik; Enblad, Per

    2014-01-01

    Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). A great challenge for the treatment of TBI patients in the neurointensive care unit (NICU) is to detect early signs of ischemia in order to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. Today, several imaging techniques are available to monitor cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the injured brain such as positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography, xenon computed tomography (Xenon-CT), perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and CT perfusion scan. An ideal imaging technique would enable continuous non-invasive measurement of blood flow and metabolism across the whole brain. Unfortunately, no current imaging method meets all these criteria. These techniques offer snapshots of the CBF. MRI may also provide some information about the metabolic state of the brain. PET provides images with high resolution and quantitative measurements of CBF and metabolism; however, it is a complex and costly method limited to few TBI centers. All of these methods except mobile Xenon-CT require transfer of TBI patients to the radiological department. Mobile Xenon-CT emerges as a feasible technique to monitor CBF in the NICU, with lower risk of adverse effects. Promising results have been demonstrated with Xenon-CT in predicting outcome in TBI patients. This review covers available imaging methods used to monitor CBF in patients with severe TBI. PMID:25071702

  2. Health and economic benefits of physical activity for patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Larry E; Herbert, William G

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic, life-disrupting event with an annual incidence of 17,000 cases in the US. SCI is characterized by progressive physical deconditioning due to limited mobility and lack of modalities to allow safe physical activity that may partially offset these deleterious physical changes. Approximately, 50% of patients with SCI report no leisure-time physical activity and 15% report leisure-time physical activity below the threshold where meaningful health benefits could be realized. Collectively, about 363,000 patients with SCI, or 65% of the entire spinal cord injured population in the US, engages in insufficient physical activity and represents a target population that could derive considerable health benefits from even modest physical activity levels. Currently, the annual direct costs related to SCI exceed US$45 billion in the US. Rehabilitation protocols and technologies aimed to improve functional mobility have potential to significantly reduce the risk of medical complications and cost associated with SCI. Patients who commence routine physical activity in the first post-injury year and experience typical motor function improvements would realize US$290,000 to US$435,000 in lifetime cost savings, primarily due to fewer hospitalizations and less reliance on assistive care. New assistive technologies that allow patients with SCI to safely engage in routine physical activity are desperately needed. PMID:27757043

  3. Use of Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound for Diagnosis of Brain Death in Patients with Severe Cerebral Injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuequn; Liu, Shangwei; Xun, Fangfang; Liu, Zhan; Huang, Xiuying

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the use of transcranial Doppler (TCD) for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe cerebral injury. Material/Methods This retrospective study enrolled 42 patients based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients were divided into either the brain death group or the survival group according to prognosis. Blood flow of the brain was examined by TCD and analyzed for spectrum changes. The average blood flow velocity (Vm), pulse index (PI), and diastolic blood flow in reverse (RDF) were recorded and compared. Results The data demonstrated that the average speed of bilateral middle cerebral artery blood flow in the brain death group was significantly reduced (P<0.05). However, the PI of the brain death group increased significantly. Moreover, RDF spectrum and nail-like sharp peak spectrum of the brain death group was higher than in the survival group. Conclusions Due to its simplicity, high repeatability, and specificity, TCD combined with other methods is highly valuable for diagnosis of brain death in patients with severe brain injury. PMID:27264088

  4. Affective responses after different intensities of exercise in patients with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Rzezak, Patricia; Caxa, Luciana; Santolia, Patricia; Antunes, Hanna K. M.; Suriano, Italo; Tufik, Sérgio; de Mello, Marco T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) usually have mood and anxiety symptoms secondary to their brain injury. Exercise may be a cost-effective intervention for the regulation of the affective responses of this population. However, there are no studies evaluating the effects of exercise or the optimal intensity of exercise for this clinical group. Methods: Twelve male patients with moderate or severe TBI [mean age of 31.83 and SD of 9.53] and 12 age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers [mean age of 30.58 and SD of 9.53] participated in two sessions of exercise of high and moderate-intensity. Anxiety and mood was evaluated, and subjective assessment of experience pre- and post-exercise was assessed. A mixed between and within-subjects general linear model (GLM) analysis was conducted to compare groups [TBI, control] over condition [baseline, session 1, session 2] allowing for group by condition interaction to be determined. Planned comparisons were also conducted to test study hypotheses. Results: Although no group by condition interaction was observed, planned comparisons indicated that baseline differences between patients and controls in anxiety (Cohens’ d = 1.80), tension (d = 1.31), depression (d = 1.18), anger (d = 1.08), confusion (d = 1.70), psychological distress (d = 1.28), and physical symptoms (d = 1.42) disappear after one session of exercise, independently of the intensity of exercise. Conclusion: A single-section of exercise, regardless of exercise intensity, had a positive effect on the affective responses of patients with TBI both by increasing positive valence feelings and decreasing negative ones. Exercise can be an easily accessible intervention that may alleviate depressive symptoms related to brain injury. PMID:26161074

  5. Relationship of patient characteristics and rehabilitation services to outcomes following spinal cord injury: The SCIRehab Project

    PubMed Central

    Whiteneck, Gale; Gassaway, Julie; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Heinemann, Allen W.; Kreider, Scott E. D.

    2012-01-01

    Background/objective To examine associations of patient characteristics along with treatment quantity delivered by seven clinical disciplines during inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation with outcomes at rehabilitation discharge and 1-year post-injury. Methods Six inpatient SCI rehabilitation centers enrolled 1376 patients during the 5-year SCIRehab study. Clinicians delivering standard care documented details of treatment. Outcome data were derived from SCI Model Systems Form I and II and a project-specific interview conducted at approximately 1-year post-injury. Regression modeling was used to predict outcomes; models were cross-validated by examining relative shrinkage of the original model R2 using 75% of the dataset to the R2 for the same outcome using a validation subsample. Results Patient characteristics are strong predictors of outcome; treatment duration adds slightly more predictive power. More time in physical therapy was associated positively with motor Functional Independence Measure at discharge and the 1-year anniversary, CHART Physical Independence, Social Integration, and Mobility dimensions, and smaller likelihood of rehospitalization after discharge and reporting of pressure ulcer at the interview. More time in therapeutic recreation also had multiple similar positive associations. Time spent in other disciplines had fewer and mixed relationships. Seven models validated well, two validated moderately well, and four validated poorly. Conclusion Patient characteristics explain a large proportion of variation in multiple outcomes after inpatient rehabilitation. The total amount of treatment received during rehabilitation from each of seven disciplines explains little additional variance. Reasons for this and the phenomenon that sometimes more hours of service predict poorer outcome, need additional study. Note This is the first of nine articles in the SCIRehab series. PMID:23318033

  6. Improving self-efficacy in spinal cord injury patients through "design thinking" rehabilitation workshops.

    PubMed

    Wolstenholme, Daniel; Downes, Tom; Leaver, Jackie; Partridge, Rebecca; Langley, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Advances in surgical and medical management have significantly reduced the length of time that patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have to stay in hospital, but has left patients with potentially less time to psychologically adjust. Following a pilot in 2012, this project was designed to test the effect of "design thinking" workshops on the self-efficacy of people undergoing rehabilitation following spinal injuries. Design thinking is about understanding the approaches and methods that designers use and then applying these to think creatively about problems and suggest ways to solve them. In this instance, design thinking is not about designing new products (although the approaches can be used to do this) but about developing a long term creative and explorative mind-set through skills such as lateral thinking, prototyping and verbal and visual communication. The principles of "design thinking" have underpinned design education and practice for many years, it is also recognised in business and innovation for example, but a literature review indicated that there was no evidence of it being used in rehabilitation or spinal injury settings. Twenty participants took part in the study; 13 (65%) were male and the average age was 37 years (range 16 to 72). Statistically significant improvements were seen for EQ-5D score (t = -3.13, p = 0.007) and Patient Activation Measure score (t = -3.85, p = 0.001). Other outcome measures improved but not statistically. There were no statistical effects on length of stay or readmission rates, but qualitative interviews indicated improved patient experience. PMID:27493735

  7. High resolution neurography of the lumbosacral plexus on 3T magneteic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Escobar, I; Serra, M; Barroso, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance neurography is a technique that complements clinical and electrophysiological study of the peripheral nerves and brachial and lumbosacral plexuses. Numerous focal processes (inflammatory, traumatic, primary tumors, secondary tumors) and diffuse processes (diabetic polyneuropathy, chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy due to amyloidosis or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) can involve the lumbosacral plexus. This article reviews the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus, describes the technique for neurography of the plexus at our institution, and shows the diverse diseases that affect it.

  8. Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block With or Without Dexamethasone as an Adjuvant to 0.5% Levobupivacaine: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bhupal, Jatinder Paul Singh; Kumar, Parmod; Gandhi, Gurjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Brachial plexus block is an excellent method for attaining optimal operating conditions by producing complete muscular relaxation, maintaining stable intraoperative haemodynamics and the associated sympathetic block. In addition, they provide extended postoperative analgesia with minimal side effects. Different adjuvants have been described in literature to hasten the onset and prolong the duration of block. The present study was conducted to study the effect of adding dexamethasone to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Aim To observe the effect of dexamethasone on onset and duration of anaesthesia, when used as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block. Materials and Methods A total of 60 patients in the age group of 18-65 years belonging to ASA physical status I or II were included in the study. They are randomly allocated in two groups and each group included 30 patients. In group 1, patients received 30ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine with 2ml of isotonic sodium chloride. In group 2 patients received 8mg (2ml) dexamethasone in addition to 30ml of 0.5% isobaric levobupivacaine. Results The results showed that the onset of sensory and motor block were faster in group 2(p<0.05). The duration of sensory and motor block were significantly longer in group 2 (p<0.05). VAS score at 12 hours were significantly lower in group 2 (p<0.05). None of the patients had bradycardia, hypotension or any other side effects. Conclusion Dexamethasone added to levobupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block reduces the time to onset of sensory and motor blockage and prolongs the duration of analgesia. PMID:27504384

  9. Humeral rotational osteotomy for shoulder deformity in obstetric brachial plexus palsy: which direction should I rotate?

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Amr A; Pirela-Cruz, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    Shoulder internal rotation contracture is the most common deformity affecting the shoulder in patients with Obstetric Brachial Plexus Palsy. With progression of the deformity, the glenohumeral joint starts to subluxate and then dislocates. This is accompanied with bony changes of both the humerus and the glenoid. Two opposite direction humeral osteotomies have been proposed for this condition (internal rotation osteotomy (IRO) and external rotation osteotomy (ERO)). This fact of different direction osteotomies has not adequately been explained in the literature. Most orthopedic surgeons may not be able to fully differentiate between these two osteotomies regarding the indications, outcomes and effects on the joint. This review explains these differences in details.

  10. [Clinical and toxicologic study of axillary plexus block with prilocaine or mepivacaine].

    PubMed

    Tryba, M; Kurth, H; Zenz, M

    1987-01-01

    A prospective controlled double-blind study was designed to compare the efficacy and the toxicity of mepivacaine and prilocaine for the axillary blockade of the brachial plexus. Twenty patients in each group received 40 ml of either 1.5% mepivacaine or 1.5% prilocaine. The sensory and the motor blockade achieved in both groups were comparable. The mean plasma levels attained following mepivacaine were significantly higher than those attained after prilocaine (peak-plasma level (mean +/- SD): 2.02 +/- 0.28 micrograms/ml vs 5.37 +/- 1.83 micrograms/ml). In four patients of the mepivacaine group, the plasma levels entered the toxic range. While no methemoglobinemia could be detected following mepivacaine, four of the patients receiving prilocaine developed methemoglobinemia with a maximum level of 10%. No complications due to methemoglobinemia were observed in any of the patients. Because of its significantly lower toxic potential, prilocaine seems to be the better local anaesthetic for axillary blockade of the brachial plexus.

  11. Urine Levels of Defensin α1 Reflect Kidney Injury in Leptospirosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chagan-Yasutan, Haorile; Chen, Yue; Lacuesta, Talitha Lea; Leano, Prisca Susan A.; Iwasaki, Hiroko; Hanan, Firmanto; Taurustiati, Delsi; Ohmoto, Yasukazu; Ashino, Yugo; Saitoh, Hiroki; Kiyomoto, Hideyasu; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Telan, Freda O. Elizabeth; Hattori, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease whose severe forms are often accompanied by kidney dysfunction. In the present study, urinary markers were studied for potential prediction of disease severity. Urine samples from 135 patients with or without leptospirosis at San Lazaro Hospital, the Philippines, were analyzed. Urine levels of defensin α1 (uDA1) were compared with those of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL) and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosidase (uNAG). Serum creatinine (Cr) was used as a marker of kidney injury. The levels of uDA1/Cr, uNGAL/Cr, and uNAG/Cr were positive in 46%, 90%, and 80% of leptospirosis patients, and 69%, 70%, and 70% of non-leptospirosis patients, respectively. In leptospirosis patients, the correlation of uDA1/Cr, uNGAL/Cr and uNAG/Cr levels with serum Cr were r = 0.3 (p < 0.01), r = 0.29 (p < 0.01), and r = 0.02 (p = 0.81), respectively. uDA1/Cr levels were correlated with uNGAL/Cr levels (r = 0.49, p < 0.01) and uNAG/Cr levels (r = 0.47, p < 0.0001) in leptospirosis patients. These findings suggest that uDA1, uNGAL, and uNAG were elevated in leptospirosis patients and reflected various types of kidney damage. uDA1 and uNGAL can be used to track kidney injury in leptospirosis patients because of their correlation with the serum Cr level. PMID:27689992

  12. Incidence and Risk Factors for Acute Kidney Injury Following Mannitol Infusion in Patients With Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Yi; Tang, Sung-Chun; Tsai, Li-Kai; Yeh, Shin-Joe; Shen, Li-Jiuan; Wu, Fe-Lin Lin; Jeng, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mannitol, an osmotic diuretic, is commonly used to treat patients with acute brain edema, but its use also increases the risk of developing acute kidney injury (AKI). In this study, we investigated the incidence and risk factors of mannitol-related AKI in acute stroke patients. A total of 432 patients (ischemic stroke 62.3%) >20 years of age who were admitted to the neurocritical care center in a tertiary hospital and received mannitol treatment were enrolled in this study. Clinical parameters including the scores of National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) at admission, vascular risk factors, laboratory data, and concurrent nephrotoxic medications were registered. Acute kidney injury was defined as an absolute elevation in the serum creatinine (Scr) level of ≥0.3 mg/dL from the baseline or a ≥50% increase in Scr. The incidence of mannitol-related AKI was 6.5% (95% confidence interval, 4.5%–9.3%) in acute stroke patients, 6.3% in patients with ischemic stroke, and 6.7% in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetes, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate at baseline, higher initial NIHSS score, and concurrent use of diuretics increased the risk of mannitol-related AKI. When present, the combination of these elements displayed an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.839 (95% confidence interval, 0.770–0.909). In conclusion, mannitol-related AKI is not uncommon in the treatment of acute stroke patients, especially in those with vulnerable risk factors. PMID:26632702

  13. Prevalence of Hyponatremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients With Brain Injury in Kashan Shahid-Beheshti Hospital in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Chitsazian, Zahra; Zamani, Batool; Mohagheghfar, Maryam

    2013-01-01

    Background Hyponatremia is a common disorder in patients with brain injury. It can result in acute and chronic complications providing this electrolytic disorder is not diagnosed and treated in due time. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of hyponatremia in 95 brain injury patients hospitalized in the intensive care unit (ICU) in Kashan Shahid-Veheshti hospital. Patients and Methods This trans-sectional study was conducted on brain injury patients (brain traumas, brain hemorrhage, meningitis and brain tumors) during their six-month stay in the ICU in Kashan Shahid-Beheshti hospital. Data were analyzed after excluding cases of pseudohyponatremia. Results Ninety-five patients with brain injury (69.5% male and 30.5% female ( had a mean age of 42.85 ± 22.59 years, while the hyponatremic patients had a mean age of 48.37 ± 24.03 years. Prevalence and occurrence of hyponatremia were 31.6% and 9.29 ± 6.8 days, respectively. This study revealed no meaningful differences between age, sex, underlying disease and the prevalence of hyponatremia. Conclusions Our study showed an elevated frequency of hyponatremia in patients with brain injuries in ICU which demands the effective approaches for an accurate and timely diagnosis of this electrolyte disorder. PMID:24396801

  14. Patient and Trauma Center Characteristics Associated with Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Transport for Patients with Minor Injuries in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Brian H.; Delgado, M. Kit; Staudenmayer, Kristan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Helicopter emergency medical services (EMS) transport is expensive, and previous work has shown that cost-effective use of this resource is dependent on the proportion of minor injuries flown. To understand how over-triage to helicopter EMS versus ground EMS can be reduced, it is important to understand factors associated with helicopter transport of patients with minor injuries. Objectives The aim was to characterize patient and hospital characteristics associated with helicopter transport of patients with minor injuries. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of adults ≥18 years who were transported by helicopter to Level I/II trauma centers from 2009 through 2010 as identified in the National Trauma Data Bank. Minor injuries were defined as all injuries scored at an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) < 3. Patient and hospital characteristics associated of being flown with only minor injuries were compared in an unadjusted and adjusted fashion. Hierarchical, multivariate logistic regression was used to adjust for patient demographics, mechanism of injury, presenting physiology, injury severity, urban-rural location of injury, total EMS time, hospital characteristics, and region. Results A total of 24,812 records were identified, corresponding to 76,090 helicopter transports. The proportion of helicopter transports with only minor injuries was 36% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 34% to 39%). Patient characteristics associated with being flown with minor injuries included being uninsured (odds ratio [OR] 1.36, 95% CI = 1.26 to 1.47), injury by a fall (OR 1.32, 95% CI = 1.20 to 1.45), or other penetrating trauma (OR 2.52, 95% CI = 2.12 to 3.00). Being flown with minor injuries was more likely if the patient was transported to a trauma center that also received a high proportion of patients with minor injuries by ground EMS (OR 1.89, 95% CI = 1.58 to 2.26) or a high proportion of EMS traffic by helicopter (OR 1.35, 95% CI = 1.02 to 1.78). No significant

  15. Severe traumatic brain injury: outcome in patients with diffuse axonal injury managed conservatively in Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Johor Bahru--an observational study.

    PubMed

    Liew, B S; Johari, S A; Nasser, A W; Abdullah, J

    2009-12-01

    Patients with isolated severe head injury with diffuse axonal injury and without any surgical lesion may be treated safely without cerebral resuscitation and intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring. Seventy two patients were divided into three groups of patients receiving treatment based on ICP-CPP-targeted, or conservative methods either with or without ventilation support. The characteristics of these three groups were compared based on age, gender, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), pupillary reaction to light, computerized tomography scanning according to the Marshall classification, duration of intensive care unit (ICU) stays, Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) and possible complications. There were higher risk of mortality (p < 0.001), worse GCS improvement upon discharge (p < 0.001) and longer ICU stays (p = 0.016) in ICP group compared to Intubation group. There were no significant statistical differences of GOS at 3rd and 6th months between all three groups.

  16. Chronic abdominal pain secondary to mesenteric panniculitis treated successfully with endoscopic ultrasonography-guided celiac plexus block: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Alhazzani, Waleed; Al-Shamsi, Humaid O; Greenwald, Eric; Radhi, Jasim; Tse, Frances

    2015-01-01

    Mesenteric panniculitis is a chronic illness that is characterized by fibrosing inflammation of the mesenteries that can lead to intractable abdominal pain. Pain control is a crucial component of the management plan. Most patients will improve with oral corticosteroids treatment, however, some patients will require a trial of other immunosuppressive agents, and a minority of patients will continue to have refractory disease. Endoscopic ultrasound guided celiac plexus block is used frequently to control abdominal pain in patients with pancreatic pathology. To our knowledge there are no case reports describing its use in mesenteric panniculitis patients with refractory abdominal pain. PMID:25992196

  17. Warfarin usage among elderly atrial fibrillation patients with traumatic injury, an analysis of United States Medicare fee-for-service enrollees.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinggang; Baumgarten, Mona; Smith, Gordon; Gambert, Steven; Gottlieb, Stephen; Rattinger, Gail; Albrecht, Jennifer; Langenberg, Patricia; Zuckerman, Ilene

    2015-01-01

    This study examined warfarin usage for elderly Medicare beneficiaries with atrial fibrillation (AF) who suffered traumatic brain injury (TBI), hip fracture, or torso injuries. Using the 5% Chronic Condition Data Warehouse administrative claims data, this study included fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries who had a single injury hospitalization (TBI, hip fracture, or major torso injury) between 1/1/2007 and 12/31/2009, with complete Medicare Parts A, B (no Medicare Advantage), and D coverage 6 months before injury, and who were aged 66 years or older and diagnosed with AF at least 1 year before injury. About 45% of the AF patients were using warfarin before TBI or torso injury, and 35% before hip fracture. After injury, there was a dramatic and persistent decrease in warfarin use in TBI and torso injury groups (30% for TBI and 37% for torso injury at 12 months after injury). Warfarin usage in hip fracture patients also dropped after injury but returned to pre-injury level within 4 months. TBI and torso injury lead to significant decreases in warfarin usage in elderly AF patients. Further research is needed to understand reasons for the pattern and to develop evidence-based management strategies in the post-acute setting. PMID:25098860

  18. Secondary stroke in patients with polytrauma and traumatic brain injury treated in an Intensive Care Unit, Karlovac General Hospital, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Belavić, M; Jančić, E; Mišković, P; Brozović-Krijan, A; Bakota, B; Žunić, J

    2015-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is divided into primary and secondary brain injury. Primary brain injury occurs at the time of injury and is the direct consequence of kinetic energy acting on the brain tissue. Secondary brain injury occurs several hours or days after primary brain injury and is the result of factors including shock, systemic hypotension, hypoxia, hypothermia or hyperthermia, intracranial hypertension, cerebral oedema, intracranial bleeding or inflammation. The aim of this retrospective analysis of a prospective database was to determine the prevalence of secondary stroke and stroke-related mortality, causes of secondary stroke, treatment and length of stay in the ICU and hospital. This study included patients with TBI with or without other injuries who were hospitalised in a general ICU over a five-year period. The following parameters were assessed: demographics (age, sex), scores (Glasgow Coma Score, APACHE II, SOFA), secondary stroke (prevalence, time of occurrence after primary brain injury, causes of stroke and associated mortality), length of stay in the ICU and hospital, vital parameters (state of consciousness, cardiac function, respiration, circulation, thermoregulation, diuresis) and laboratory values (leukocytes, C-reactive protein [CRP], blood glucose, blood gas analysis, urea, creatinine). Medical data were analysed for 306 patients with TBI (median age 56 years, range 18-93 years) who were treated in the general ICU. Secondary stroke occurred in 23 patients (7.5%), 10 of whom died, which gives a mortality rate of 43.4%. Three patients were excluded as the cause of the injury was missile trauma. The study data indicate that inflammation is the most important cause of secondary insults. Levels of CRP were elevated in 65% of patients with secondary brain injury; leukocytosis was present in 87% of these patients, and blood glucose was elevated in 73%. The lungs and urinary tract were the most common sites of infection. In conclusion

  19. Birth brachial plexus palsy: a race against time.

    PubMed

    Patra, Sambeet; Narayana Kurup, Jayakrishnan K; Acharya, Ashwath M; Bhat, Anil K

    2016-01-01

    A 5-year-old child presented to us with weakness of the left upper limb since birth. With the given history of obstetric trauma and limb examination, a diagnosis of birth brachial plexus palsy was made. Brachial plexus exploration along with microsurgery was performed at the same time which included extrinsic neurolysis of the roots and trunks and nerve transfer for better shoulder external rotation and elbow flexion. Both the movements were severely restricted previously due to co-contractures with the shoulder internal rotators and triceps. The problem of birth brachial plexus palsy is proving to be a global health burden both in developed countries and in developing countries such as India. The lack of awareness among the general public and primary healthcare providers and inadequate orthopaedic and neurosurgeons trained to treat the condition have worsened the prognosis. This case lays stress on the delayed complications in birth brachial palsy and its effective management. PMID:27402656

  20. The sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Sir William Turner.

    PubMed

    Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marious; Shokouhi, Ghaffar; Ghabili, Kamyar; Agutter, Paul S

    2010-08-20

    Sir William Turner (1832-1916) was Professor of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh. His classic paper of 1863 on the anastomoses between the parietal and visceral branches of the abdominal aorta, later known as the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus of Turner, has mostly been forgotten. Located in the retroperitoneum and surrounding the kidneys and other adjacent structures, this plexus is an important route of collateral circulation. In the current paper, we discuss the sub-peritoneal arterial plexus as described by Turner in 1863 and review the literature concerning its potential clinical significance in the kidney, emphasizing its probable role in the metastatic spread of various tumors of abdominal organs and in the continuing viability of the kidney after renal artery occlusion. A biographical sketch of Sir William Turner is also presented.

  1. Virtual reality pain control during physical therapy range of motion exercises for a patient with multiple blunt force trauma injuries.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Patterson, David R; Soltani, Maryam; Teeley, Aubriana; Miller, William; Sharar, Sam R

    2009-02-01

    Patients with severe blunt force trauma injuries (e.g., multiple fractures and/or internal injuries) often experience severe to excruciating pain during medical procedures. We explored the adjunctive use of immersive virtual reality (VR) to distract a patient with multiple blunt trauma injuries from his procedural pain during physical therapy. The patient was a 32-year-old male hospitalized after suffering upper and lower extremity injuries when he was hit by a semi truck as a pedestrian. While a nurse assisted the patient's passive range of motion (ROM) leg exercises over two days, the patient spent a total of 10 minutes of physical therapy with no distraction and 10 minutes in VR (within-subjects design, order randomized). Three 0 to 10 graphic-rating-scale pain scores for each of the two treatment conditions served as the primary dependent variables. The patient reported a reduction in pain when distracted with VR. "Pain unpleasantness" ratings during physical therapy dropped from "severe" (mean = 8.5) to "mild/moderate" (4.5). The patient's ROM was 1 degree less during VR on day 1, but the patient achieved 15 degrees greater ROM during VR on day 2. The present study provides preliminary evidence that immersive VR can be an effective adjunctive, nonpharmacologic pain-reduction technique for a patient with multiple blunt trauma injuries experiencing severe pain during physical therapy. The potential utility of VR analgesia for movement or exercise therapy for patients with blunt force trauma injuries should be explored in controlled studies.

  2. Clinical Management of a Patient with Chronic Recurrent Vertigo Following a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Eric G.

    2009-01-01

    Vertigo, was provoked and right torsional up-beat nystagmus was observed in a 47-year-old patient when she was placed into the right Hallpike-Dix test position using infrared goggle technology. The clinical diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), specifically right posterior canalithiasis, resulting from a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffered approximately six-months earlier. Previous medical consultations did not include vestibular system examination, and Meclizine was prescribed to suppress her chief complaint of vertigo. Ultimately, the patient was successfully managed by performing two canalith repositioning maneuvers during a single clinical session. The patient reported 100% resolution of symptoms upon reexamination the following day, and the Hallpike-Dix test was negative. Continued symptom resolution was subjectively reported 10 days postintervention via telephone consultation. This case report supports previous publications concerning the presence of BPPV following TBI and the need for inclusion of vestibular system examination during medical consultation. PMID:19826635

  3. Clinical management of a patient with chronic recurrent vertigo following a mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Eric G

    2009-01-01

    Vertigo, was provoked and right torsional up-beat nystagmus was observed in a 47-year-old patient when she was placed into the right Hallpike-Dix test position using infrared goggle technology. The clinical diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), specifically right posterior canalithiasis, resulting from a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) suffered approximately six-months earlier. Previous medical consultations did not include vestibular system examination, and Meclizine was prescribed to suppress her chief complaint of vertigo. Ultimately, the patient was successfully managed by performing two canalith repositioning maneuvers during a single clinical session. The patient reported 100% resolution of symptoms upon reexamination the following day, and the Hallpike-Dix test was negative. Continued symptom resolution was subjectively reported 10 days postintervention via telephone consultation. This case report supports previous publications concerning the presence of BPPV following TBI and the need for inclusion of vestibular system examination during medical consultation. PMID:19826635

  4. [Cerebral salt wasting syndrome in a patient with posttraumatic brain injury].

    PubMed

    Krysiak, Robert; Okopień, Bogusław

    2012-01-01

    In patients with central nervous system disease, life-threatening hyponatremia can result from either the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) or cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). Both clinical entities share many similar laboratory and clinical findings, and are characterized by low serum osmolality, inappropriately high urine osmolality, and high urine sodium levels. Despite outward similarities, the pathophysiology and treatment of these two conditions are very different. The former is treated with fluid restriction because of the increased level of free water and its dilutional effect causing hyponatremia, whereas the latter is treated with fluid and sodium resuscitation because of the increased loss of high urinary sodium. We present a 24-year-old man who developed CSWS after traumatic brain injury, showing diagnostic and treatment strategies undertaken in this patient and their impact on the course of CSWS. This case report illustrates the need for clinical awareness of CSWS in patients after head trauma.

  5. Computerized tomography of pelvic osteomyelitis in patients with spinal cord injuries

    SciTech Connect

    Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Golimbu, C.; Sokolow, J.

    1983-12-01

    Computerized tomography (CT) was performed in 19 patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) who had large pressure sores and in whom other complications were suspected. CT detected the depth, extent, and degree of undermining of the edges of the pressure sores in 19 of 27 lesions. Conventional radiography detected four cases of pelvic osteomyelitis. CT detected eight additional cases of pelvic osteomyelitis, as well as eight clinically unsuspected peripelvic and intrapelvic abscesses. Technetium-99m bone scanning was not very helpful because of localization in chronic proliferative changes of bone and widespread foci of myositis ossificans, as well as in osteomyelitis. Gallium-67 scanning detected only one of six abscesses. It was not very helpful because of confusion of abscess and osteomyelitis with intense soft tissue swelling and cellulitis, which are often associated with pressure sores in patients with chronic SCI. CT was found to be, by far, the modality of choice for detection of pelvic osteomyelitis and abscess in patients with SCI.

  6. Relationship of physical therapy inpatient rehabilitation interventions and patient characteristics to outcomes following spinal cord injury: The SCIRehab project

    PubMed Central

    Teeter, Laura; Gassaway, Julie; Taylor, Sally; LaBarbera, Jacqueline; McDowell, Shari; Backus, Deborah; Zanca, Jeanne M.; Natale, Audrey; Cabrera, Jordan; Smout, Randall J.; Kreider, Scott E. D.; Whiteneck, Gale

    2012-01-01

    Background/objective Examine associations of type and quantity of physical therapy (PT) interventions delivered during inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and patient characteristics with outcomes at the time of discharge and at 1 year post-injury. Methods Physical therapists delivering routine care documented details of PT interventions provided. Regression modeling was used to predict outcomes at discharge and 1 year post-injury for a 75% subset; models were validated with the remaining 25%. Injury subgroups also were examined: motor complete low tetraplegia, motor complete paraplegia, and American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) D motor incomplete tetra-/paraplegia. Results PT treatment variables explain more variation in three functionally homogeneous subgroups than in the total sample. Among patients with motor complete low tetraplegia, higher scores for the transfer component of the discharge motor Functional Independence Measure () are strongly associated with more time spent working on manual wheelchair skills. Being male is the most predictive variable for the motor FIM score at discharge for patients with motor complete paraplegia. Admission ASIA lower extremity motor score (LEMS) and change in LEMS were the factors most predictive for having the primary locomotion mode of “walk” or “both (walk and wheelchair)” on the discharge motor FIM for patients with AIS D injuries. Conclusion Injury classification influences type and quantity of PT interventions during inpatient SCI rehabilitation and is a strong predictor of outcomes at discharge and 1 year post-injury. The impact of PT treatment increases when patient groupings become more homogeneous and outcomes become specific to the groupings. Note This is the second of nine articles in the SCIRehab series. PMID:23318034

  7. Oral self-injuries: Clinical findings in a series of 19 patients

    PubMed Central

    Cannavale, Rosangela; Itro, Angelo; Campisi, Giuseppina; Compilato, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Self-injury (SI) is defined as a behavioral disturbance consisting of a deliberate harm to one’s own body without suicidal intent, it is not uncommon and ranges in severity from simple nail-biting to more extreme forms of self-mutilation. The head neck region may be the target of such lesions. SI is associated with several medical conditions, of which it can represent the first clinical sign. Aim of this paper is to describe a series of oral SI, giving special emphasis to the clinical findings, etiology and the management of lesions. Material and Methods: A total of 19 patients with oral SI were prospectively examined; attention was paid to the occurrence and characterization of oral lesions. The management of the lesion also varied depending on the patient medical history, on the etiology of the psychiatric behavior, and on the severity, frequency, and method of inflicting injury. Periodic examinations were performed (after two weeks, three months and six months) and registered. Results: All the patients healed gradually and healing was conditioned by the disease underlying. The treatment consisted of behavior modification in 11 cases, pharmacological treatment in 11 cases, psychotherapy in 2 cases, mouth guard in 9 cases, surgery in 2 cases, extractions in 1 case. Conclusions: Oral SI are uncommon in the clinical practice. They may be associated with a known disease or may be the consequence of this, but often they may be the first sign of a psychiatric disorder. Key words:Oral self-mutilation, self-inflicted lesions, self-injurious behavior, ulcers, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, mental retardation. PMID:25475766

  8. Intermittent Hypoxia Does not Elicit Memory Impairment in Spinal Cord Injury Patients.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Opazo, Angela; Alcayaga, Julio; Testa, Denisse; Quinteros, Ana Luisa

    2016-06-01

    There is a critical need for new therapeutic strategies to restore motor function in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCIs), without unwanted effects. Intermittent hypoxia (IH) induces plasticity in spared synaptic pathways to motor neurons below the level of injury, which can be harnessed to elicit motor recovery in incomplete SCI patients. However, there is conflicting evidence regarding the effects of IH on memory function. The aim of this study was to assess episodic verbal and visual memory function with the Complutense verbal learning test (TAVEC) and the Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (ROCF), respectively, before and after a 4-week protocol of repetitive IH combined with body weight-supported treadmill training (BWSTT) in incomplete ASIA C and D SCI subjects. Subjects received either IH (cycling 9%/21% FiO2 every 1.5 min, 15 cycles per day) or continued normoxia (Nx, 21% FiO2) combined with 45 min of BWSTT for 5 consecutive days, followed by 3 times per week IH and BWSTT for 3 additional weeks. ROCF Z scores between IH plus BWSTT and Nx plus BWSTT were not significantly different (p = .43). Compared with baseline, IH and BWSTT group showed a significantly greater (p < .05) verbal memory performance for immediate, short-term, and long-term recall; however, it was not different from Nx plus BWSTT group in all verbal memory components (p > .05). Our results suggest that a 4-week protocol of moderate IH does not elicit visual or verbal memory impairment. Thus, repetitive IH may be a safe therapeutic approach to incomplete spinal cord injury patients, without deleterious cognitive effects. PMID:27084733

  9. An assessment of etiological spectrum and injury characteristics among maxillofacial trauma patients of Government dental college and Research Institute, Bangalore

    PubMed Central

    Guruprasad, Yadavalli; Hemavathy, OR; Giraddi, Girish; Shetty, Jayaprasad N

    2014-01-01

    Background: Maxillofacial injuries pose a therapeutic challenge to trauma, maxillofacial and plastic surgeons practicing in developing countries. This was a retrospective study carried out to determine the incidence, etiology, injury characteristics of maxillofacial injuries reported at our centre. Patients and Methods: The data for this study were obtained from the medical records of 689 cases reported to our centre during the period from 2006-2009. Records of patients who were either treated in the emergency room as outpatients or the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery as inpatients were analyzed and were subjected to statistical analysis using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) for Windows version 17.0. Data was summarized in form of proportions and frequency tables for categorical variables and was subjected to Chi-Square test. Results: Out of 689 patients, 75.9% were male and 24.1% were female. 42.5% of the patients were in the age group of 21 to 30 years. Road traffic accidents accounted for the majority (74.3%) of cases of maxillofacial trauma. Mandible was seen as the most commonly fractured bone (50.3%) and 53.8% head and neck injuries were most common among the associated injuries. Conclusion: Road traffic accidents were clearly the most prevalent etiological factor for maxillofacial trauma. Measures on prevention of road traffic crashes should be strongly emphasized in order to reduce the occurrence of these injuries. PMID:24678196

  10. IL-6 induces regionally selective spinal cord injury in patients with the neuroinflammatory disorder transverse myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kaplin, Adam I.; Deshpande, Deepa M.; Scott, Erick; Krishnan, Chitra; Carmen, Jessica S.; Shats, Irina; Martinez, Tara; Drummond, Jennifer; Dike, Sonny; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Keswani, Sanjay C.; Moran, Timothy H.; Pardo, Carlos A.; Calabresi, Peter A.; Kerr, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Transverse myelitis (TM) is an immune-mediated spinal cord disorder associated with inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage. We investigated the soluble immune derangements present in TM patients and found that IL-6 levels were selectively and dramatically elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid and directly correlated with markers of tissue injury and sustained clinical disability. IL-6 was necessary and sufficient to mediate cellular injury in spinal cord organotypic tissue culture sections through activation of the JAK/STAT pathway, resulting in increased activity of iNOS and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). Rats intrathecally infused with IL-6 developed progressive weakness and spinal cord inflammation, demyelination, and axonal damage, which were blocked by PARP inhibition. Addition of IL-6 to brain organotypic cultures or into the cerebral ventricles of adult rats did not activate the JAK/STAT pathway, which is potentially due to increased expression of soluble IL-6 receptor in the brain relative to the spinal cord that may antagonize IL-6 signaling in this context. The spatially distinct responses to IL-6 may underlie regional vulnerability of different parts of the CNS to inflammatory injury. The elucidation of this pathway identifies specific therapeutic targets in the management of CNS autoimmune conditions. PMID:16184194

  11. Comparison of knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with a posterior cruciate ligament injury

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to compare knee laxity and isokinetic muscle strength in patients with an isolated posterior cruciate ligament injury. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty high school rugby players with a previous posterior cruciate ligament injury and abnormal findings higher than surgical grade I were included. Laxity with 132 N of pressure was measured using Kneelax 3 to assess the stability of the posterior cruciate ligament, and flexor and extensor torques were measured at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec to measure the isokinetic muscle strength of the knee joint. The average and standard deviation values were extracted from all data to assess the measured data. [Results] Regarding the ipsilateral and contralateral laxity, the deviation value at the peak force and maximum manual drawer was statistically significant. The peak torque and peak torque per body weight in isokinetic measurements were significantly different only for knee extensor torque at 60°/sec, 180°/sec, and 240°/sec. [Conclusion] Return to normal activities post injury is important. Thus base data gathered by comparing patients’ ipsilateral and contralateral sides will serve as essential criteria for structuring future rehabilitation programs to facilitate functional improvements. PMID:27134367

  12. Correlation between brain injury and dysphagia in adult patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Maria Cristina de Alencar; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon; Santos, Rosane Sampaio; Furkim, Ana Maria; Massi, Giselle; Pinto, Gisele Sant Ana; Lange, Marcos Christiano

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction: In the literature, the incidence of oropharyngeal dysphagia in patients with cerebrovascular accident (AVE) ranges 20–90%. Some studies correlate the location of a stroke with dysphagia, while others do not. Objective: To correlate brain injury with dysphagia in patients with stroke in relation to the type and location of stroke. Method: A prospective study conducted at the Hospital de Clinicas with 30 stroke patients: 18 women and 12 men. All patients underwent clinical evaluation and swallowing nasolaryngofibroscopy (FEES®), and were divided based on the location of the injury: cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex, subcortical areas, and type: hemorrhagic or transient ischemic. Results: Of the 30 patients, 18 had ischemic stroke, 10 had hemorrhagic stroke, and 2 had transient stroke. Regarding the location, 10 lesions were in the cerebral cortex, 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices, 3 were in the cerebral cortex and subcortical areas, and 3 were in the cerebral and cerebellar cortices and subcortical areas. Cerebral cortex and subcortical area ischemic strokes predominated in the clinical evaluation of dysphagia. In FEES®, decreased laryngeal sensitivity persisted following cerebral cortex and ischemic strokes. Waste in the pharyngeal recesses associated with epiglottic valleculae predominated in the piriform cortex in all lesion areas and in ischemic stroke. A patient with damage to the cerebral and cerebellar cortices from an ischemic stroke exhibited laryngeal penetration and tracheal aspiration of liquid and honey. Conclusion: Dysphagia was prevalent when a lesion was located in the cerebral cortex and was of the ischemic type. PMID:25991951

  13. The significance of tubular and glomerular proteinuria in critically ill patients with severe acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Christopher Thiam Seong; Tan, Han Khim; Lau, Yeow Kok

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) frequently need acute renal replacement therapy (aRRT). We evaluated an inexpensive, rapid quantitative and qualitative analysis of proteinuria on the course of AKI patients requiring aRRT in intensive care. Method: This was a prospective, observational study of critically ill patients with severe established AKI or Acute on Chronic Kidney Injury (AoCKI) requiring aRRT. Urine samples were analyzed using Sodium-Dodecyl-Sulphate-Polyacryamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Results: A total of 30 critically ill patients were studied. Those who died have higher APACHE II (29 ± 6 vs. 20 ± 5, p<0.001), multi-organ failure (0.7 ± 0.5 vs. 0.2 ± 0.4, p < 0.02) and Tubular/Glomerular ratio (114 ± 60 vs. 75± 37, p < 0.05).The renal non-recoverers have higher baseline creatinine (415 ± 328 vs. 125± 19 umol/l, p < 0.01), urinary Dipstick value (1.8±0.8 vs. 0.5±0, p <0.05) and Glomerular score (3.0 ± 1.8 vs. 0.6 ± 0.2, p < 0.02).Heavy tubular proteinuria also predicts a longer duration of interim dialysis support and mortality whereas glomerular proteinuria correlates with development of chronicity and End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Conclusions: The dominant presence of tubular proteinuria is associated with poor survival in patients who have high APACHE II score and multi-organ failure. It also correlates with a longer duration of dialysis support in survivals. Renal Non-recoverers had heavy dominant presence of glomerular proteinuria. SDS-PAGE proteinuria analysis offers a reliable and inexpensive method to prognosticate proteinuria in this group of critically ill patients. PMID:25674105

  14. [Evaluation of the adhesive characteristics of uropathogenic escherichia coli strains in patients with spinal cord injuries].

    PubMed

    Osipova, E V; Shipitsina, I V

    2014-01-01

    The adhesion characteristics of 9 clinical E.coli strains, isolated from the urine of 9 patients with spinal cord injuries in late period were evaluated. Patient age was 21 to 54 years. Neurogenic urination disordes observed in patients were the result of a spinal injury in the cervical (5 patients), thoracic (2 patients) and thoracolumbar (2 patients) spine. The duration of disease ranged from 2 to 12 years. Despite primarily a low adhesion activity of tested strains, the formation of biofilm occurs on the surfaces having both hydrophobic (polystyrene) and hydrophilic (cover glass) properties. After 24 h, according to the photometric evaluation, 7 of 9 strains had weak, 1 - medium, and 1 - high ability to form biofilms. After 48 hours, only 4 strains had low ability to form biofilms, of whom 2 had an increase ability compared to the previous period of observation. Other strains possess the medium ability to form biofilm. When quantifying the ability of bacteria to form biofilms on the surface of the cover glass, it was revealed that a large fraction of the area of the field of view was accounted for microcolonies with size 10 microm2 at 24 hours, and microcolony with size from 100 to 1000 microm2 at 48 h. There were number of significant correlations between parameters studied. After 24 h, the correlation coefficient between the optical density (OD630) and the number, OD630 and proportion of microcolonies with size 10 to 10000 microm2 varied from 0.79 to 0.9. After 48 hours, there was a direct correlation between the OD630 and the number (r = 0.73, P = 0.025), OD630 and proportion (r = 0.81, P = 0.009) of microcolonies with size 1,000 to 10,000 mkm2.

  15. Levosimendan Versus Dobutamine in Myocardial Injury Patients with Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Jian-biao; Hu, Ma-hong; Lai, Zhi-zhen; Ji, Chun-lian; Xu, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Geng; Tian, Shuyuan

    2016-01-01

    Background We aimed to investigate the effect of levosimendan on biomarkers of myocardial injury and systemic hemodynamics in patients with septic shock. Material/Methods After achieving normovolemia and a mean arterial pressure of at least 65 mmHg, 38 septic shock patients with low cardiac output (left ventricular ejective fraction), LEVF ≤45%) were randomly divided into two groups: levosimendan dobutamine. Patients in the levosimendan and dobutamine groups were maintained with intravenous infusion of levosimendan (0.2 μg/kg/minute) and dobutamine (5 μg/kg/minute) for 24 hours respectively. During treatment we monitored hemodynamics and LVEF, and measured levels of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (HFABP), troponin I (TNI), and brain natriuretic peptide(BNP). In addition, the length of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit (ICU) stay, hospital stay, and 28-day mortality were compared between the two groups. Results The levosimendan group and the dobutamine group were well matched with respect to age (years, 55.4±1 7.5 versus 50.2±13.6) and gender (males, 68.4% versus 57.9%). Levosimendan-treated patients had higher stroke volume index (SVI), cardiac index (CI), LVEF, and left ventricular stroke work index (LVSWI), and lower extravascular lung water index (EVLWI) compared to dobutamine-treated patients (p<0.05). HFABP, TNI, and BNP in the levosimendan group were less than in the dobutamine group (p<0.05). There was no difference in the mechanical ventilation time, length of stay in ICU and hospital, and 28-day mortality between the two groups. Conclusions Compared with dobutamine, levosimendan reduces biomarkers of myocardial injury and improves systemic hemodynamics in patients with septic shock. However, it does not reduce the days on mechanical ventilation, length of stay in ICU and hospital, or 28-day mortality. PMID:27138236

  16. Changes of monocyte subsets in patients with acute coronary syndrome and correlation with myocardial injury markers

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Yin, Yigang; Zhou, Ruifang; Lin, Jie; Li, Jianming; Ye, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of peripheral blood monocytes subsets in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and its clinical significance. Methods: A total of 68 ACS patients and 27 healthy subjects (HS) were enrolled. Monocyte subset analysis was performed using flow cytometry: CD14++CD16-(Mon1), CD14++CD16+ (Mon2), and CD14+CD16++ (Mon3). Results: 1. The number of Mon1 and Mon3 were significantly increased in ACS patients compared with HS (P<0.05) and Mon2 decreased in ACS patients (P<0.05). 2. The number of Mon1, Mon2, Mon3 was positively correlated with WBC count (P<0.05). The Mon2% was negatively correlated with the serum levels of LDH, CK, CK-MB (P<0.05). The number of Mon1, Mon3 was positively correlated with the serum levels of LDH, CK, CK-MB (P<0.05). Conclusion: The changes in different subsets of monocytes may be associated with pathogenesis of ACS and myocardial injury. The findings might be useful in the assessment of myocardial injury. PMID:26261625

  17. Type and occurrence of serious complications in patients after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Sivak, S; Nosal, V; Bittsansky, M; Dluha, J; Dobrota, D; Kurca, E

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains a major public health and socio-economic problem, and 70-90% of all TBIs are classified as mild. Mild TBIs and concussions are mostly considered to be non-serious conditions with symptoms subsiding within a few days or weeks. However in 10-15% of patients, the symptoms persist one year after concussion and mostly include headache, fatigue, irritability, and cognitive problems (e.g. memory, concentration). These persisting symptoms negatively influence patient daily activities as postconcussion syndrome (PCS). Second-impact syndrome (SIS) is a very rare but usually fatal condition and occurs when repeated brain injuries lead to a catastrophic diffuse brain swelling. There is no scientific evidence on the incidence and risk of SIS. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a progressive degenerative disease of the brain found in patients with a history of repetitive brain trauma. CTE presents with behavioural, cognitive, and motor symptoms. The literature to date lacks prospective epidemiological studies of the incidence of CTE. In recent medical literature, there is a description of 110 athletes with postmortem diagnosis of CTE (Tab. 1, Ref. 37). PMID:26810165

  18. Phase 1 Trial of Autologous Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kakabadze, Zurab; Mardaleishvili, Konstantine; Chutkerashvili, Gocha; Chelishvili, Irakli; Harders, Albrecht; Loladze, George; Shatirishvili, Gocha; Kipshidze, Nodar; Chakhunashvili, David; Chutkerashvili, Konstantine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. A total of 18 patients, with complete motor deficits and paraplegia caused by thoracic and lumbar spine trauma without muscle atrophy or psychiatric problems, were included into this study. Materials and Methods. The bone marrow was aspirated from the anterior iliac crest under local anesthesia and the mononuclear fraction was isolated by density gradient method. At least 750 million mononuclear-enriched cells, suspended in 2 mL of saline, were infused intrathecally. Results and Discussion. The study reports demonstrated improvement of motor and sensory functions of various degrees observed in 9 of the 18 (50%) cases after bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Measured by the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale, 7 (78%) out of the 9 patients observed an improvement by one grade, while two cases (22%) saw an improvement by two grades. However, there were no cases in which the condition was improved by three grades. Conclusions. Analysis of subsequent treatment results indicated that the transplantation of mononuclear-enriched autologous BMSCs is a feasible and safe technique. However, successful application of the BMSCs in the clinical practice is associated with the necessity of executing more detailed examinations to evaluate the effect of BMSCs on the patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:27433165

  19. Functional evaluation of arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Neto, Douglas Lobato Lopes; Muchiuti Junior, Melvis; Checchia, Sergio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective to evaluate the functional result from arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in patients with pseudoparalysis, defined as incapacity to actively raise the arm above 90°, while complete passive elevation was possible. Methods we reevaluated 38 patients with a mean follow-up of 51 months (minimum of 24). We analyzed the pseudoparalysis reversion rate and the functional result obtained. Results according to the assessment criteria of the University of California in Los Angeles (UCLA), 31 (82%) patients had good and excellent results, two (5%) had fair results and five (13%) had poor results. The mean active elevation went from 39° before the operation to 139° after the operation (p < 0.05); the mean active lateral rotation went from 30° to 48° (p < 0.05) and the mean active medial rotation went from level L3 to T12 (p < 0.05). Conclusion arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries produced good and excellent results in 82% of the cases and a statistically significant improvement of active range of motion, with reversion of the pseudoparalysis in 97.4% of the cases. It is therefore a good treatment option. PMID:26229796

  20. Scapular Muscle-Activation Ratios in Patients With Shoulder Injuries During Functional Shoulder Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, Chad R.; Bliven, Kellie C. Huxel; Valier, Alison R. Snyder

    2014-01-01

    Context: Alterations in scapular muscle activation, which are common with glenohumeral (GH) injuries, affect stability and function. Rehabilitation aims to reestablish activation between muscles for stability by progressing to whole-body movements. Objective: To determine scapular muscle-activation ratios and individual muscle activity (upper trapezius [UT], middle trapezius [MT], lower trapezius [LT], serratus anterior [SA]) differences between participants with GH injuries and healthy control participants during functional rehabilitation exercises. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-nine participants who had GH injuries (n = 20; age = 23.6 ± 3.2 years, height = 170.7 ± 11.5 cm, mass = 74.7 ± 13.1 kg) or were healthy (n = 19; age = 24.4 ± 3.3 years, height = 173.6 ± 8.6 cm, mass = 74.7 ± 14.8 kg) were tested. Intervention(s): Clinical examination confirmed each participant's classification as GH injury or healthy control. Participants performed 4 exercises (bow and arrow, external rotation with scapular squeeze, lawnmower, robbery) over 3 seconds with no load while muscle activity was recorded. Main Outcome Measure(s): We used surface electromyography to measure UT, MT, LT, and SA muscle activity. Scapular muscle-activation ratios (UT:MT, UT:LT, and UT:SA) were calculated (normalized mean electromyography of the UT divided by normalized mean electromyography of the MT, LT, and SA). Exercise × group analyses of variance with repeated measures were conducted. Results: No group differences for activation ratios or individual muscle activation amplitude were found (P > .05). Similar UT:MT and UT:LT activation ratios during bow-and-arrow and robbery exercises were seen (P > .05); both had greater activation than external-rotation-with-scapular-squeeze and lawnmower exercises (P < .05). The bow-and-arrow exercise elicited the highest activation from the UT, MT, and LT muscles; SA activation was greatest

  1. Serum levels of 12 renal function and injury markers in patients with glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Serwin, Natalia M; Wiśniewska, Magda; Jesionowska, Anna; Skwirczyńska, Edyta; Marcinowska, Zuzanna; Dołęgowska, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    INTRODUCTION    Glomerulonephritis (GN) is a complex disease that affects the function of the whole nephron. There are few data on the serum levels of the most common biomarkers of kidney function and injury in GN, or the studies provide ambiguous results. OBJECTIVES    The aim of the study was to evaluate the levels of known kidney-specific and nonspecific markers of renal function or injury in the serum of patients with diagnosed primary or secondary GN, with or without the presence of nephrotic syndrome (NS) and arterial hypertension (AH). PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 58 patients with diagnosed GN and 6 patients with congenital defects (CD) of the kidney and AH (CD+AH). The serum levels of β2-microglobulin (β2M), neutrophil‑gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), osteopontin, trefoil factor 3 (TFF-3), calbindin, glutathione-S‑transferase- π (GST-π), interleukin 18 (IL-18), kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) were measured with Kidney Toxicity Panels 1 and 2 using the Bio-Plex method. Renalase levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS    In the whole group and in the subgroups (GN, GN+AH, GN+NS, CD+AH), NGAL, KIM-1, TFF-3, IL-18, β2M, and calbindin levels correlated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). In patients with NS, this correlation for calbindin was reversed. Renalase, MCP-1, GST-π, and osteopontin levels were independent of eGFR. Increase in IL-18 levels in the group with GN was assiociated with lower odds of the kidney disease. When this group was divided according to eGFR into subgroups G1-G5, TFF-3, NGAL, and β2M levels increased with the stage of the disease. CONCLUSIONS In patients with NS, renalase and MCP-1 might regulate each other's levels. Further studies are needed to investigate associations between renalase, MCP-1, and osteopontin as factors unrelated to eGFR in GN. NS may contribute to the loss of calbindin from

  2. EVALUATION OF THE RESULTS FROM ARTHROSCOPIC REPAIR ON ROTATOR CUFF INJURIES AMONG PATIENTS UNDER 50 YEARS OF AGE

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Santos, Ruy Mesquita Maranhão; de Souza, Adriano; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the results from arthroscopic surgical treatment of rotator cuff injuries among patients under 50 years of age. Methods: Sixty-three patients with rotator cuff injuries who underwent arthroscopic surgical treatment performed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in the Fernandinho Simonsen wing of Santa Casa Medical School, São Paulo, between August 1998 and December 2007, were reassessed. The study included all patients with rotator cuff injuries who were under 50 years of age and had been followed up postoperatively for at least 24 months. Results: According to the UCLA evaluation criteria, 59 patients (92%) showed excellent and good results; five (8%) showed fair results; and none showed poor results. The postoperative evaluation showed that the mean range of motion was 145° for elevation, 47° for lateral rotation and T10 for medial rotation. Unsatisfactory results were associated with prolonged duration of the injury, with a statistically significant relationship. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff injuries in young patients produces excellent or good results for most patients. PMID:27047819

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial of Personalized Motivational Interventions in Substance Using Patients With Facial Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Vivek; Murphy, Debra A.; Zigler, Corwin; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R.; Belin, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The proximate use of illicit drugs or alcohol (substance use) is the most common precipitator of facial injuries among socioeconomically disadvantaged populations. Reducing these risky behaviors could minimize adverse health sequelae and potential reinjury. The objective of our study was to test whether a culturally competent, personalized motivational intervention incorporated into surgical care could significantly reduce existing substance use behaviors in facial injury patients. Patients and Methods Substance-using subjects (n = 218) presenting with facial injuries to a level 1 trauma center were randomly assigned to either a personalized motivational intervention (PMI) condition or a health-information (HI) control condition. After a brief assessment of the individual’s substance use severity and willingness to change these behaviors, both groups attended 2 counseling sessions with a trained interventionist. The PMI subjects (n = 118) received individualized, motivational interventions, whereas the HI subjects (n = 100) received only general health information. Both groups were reassessed at 6 and 12 months postinjury, and changes in substance-use patterns were measured to assess the effects of intervention. Results The PMI and HI groups were closely matched on their sociodemographic and substance use characteristics. Subjects in the PMI group showed statistically significant declines in drug use at both the 6- and 12-month assessments. The intervention’s effect on lowering illicit drug use was greatest at the 6-month assessment but had weakened by the 1-year follow-up. The efficacy of the PMI was moderated by an individual’s initial drug use severity; individuals with greater drug use dependency at baseline were seen to have larger intervention effects, as did individuals who were most aware of their drug problem and willing to change their substance use behaviors. Unlike illicit drug use, changes in alcohol use did not differ significantly

  4. Quality assurance for patients with head injuries admitted to a regional trauma unit.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, M L; Sharkey, P W; Andersen, J A

    1991-07-01

    The efficacy of trauma systems in reducing preventable deaths has been established but the methods of auditing care are still evolving. Various "audit filters" to identify which patients' charts should be reviewed have been proposed. An analysis of all patients admitted to the Regional Trauma Unit (RTU) over a 19-month period was conducted. Of 729 patients, 135 were identified as having suffered a traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (TICH). On review, neither delay in transfer from the emergency room to the operating room nor increasing time from the incident to the operating room correlated with increasing mortality. In contrast to delay, the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score on admission correlated well with outcome. The charts of patients with anomalous outcomes based on admission GCS score were reviewed, and two possibly preventable deaths were identified. There were 48 patients with TICH who had no operations but there were no deaths attributable to a missed operation. There were 76 patients for whom the GCS score at the referring hospital and the GCS score on admission to the RTU were available. Seven of 19 patients who worsened on transfer declined because of significant pulmonary injuries. Anomalous outcomes based on admission GCS score and declining GCS scores are recommended as quality assurance filters. PMID:2072435