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Sample records for plp gene causing

  1. Three or more copies of the proteolipid protein gene PLP1 cause severe Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Nicole I; Sistermans, Erik A; Cundall, Maria; Hobson, Grace M; Davis-Williams, Angelique P; Palmer, Rodger; Stubbs, Paula; Davies, Sally; Endziniene, Milda; Wu, Yvonne; Chong, Wui K; Malcolm, Sue; Surtees, Robert; Garbern, James Y; Woodward, Karen J

    2005-04-01

    We describe five boys from different families with an atypically severe form of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) who have three, and in one case, five copies of the proteolipid protein (PLP1) gene. This is the first report of more than two copies of PLP1 in PMD patients and clearly demonstrates that severe clinical symptoms are associated with increased PLP1 gene dosage. Previously, duplications, deletions and mutations of the PLP1 gene were reported to give rise to this X-linked disorder. Patients with PLP1 duplication are usually classified as having either classical or transitional PMD rather than the more rare severe connatal form. The clinical symptoms of the five patients in this study included lack of stable head control and severe mental retardation, with three having severe paroxysmal disorder and two dying before the first year of life. Gene dosage was determined using interphase FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) and the novel approach of multiple ligation probe amplification (MLPA). We found FISH unreliable for dosage detection above the level of a duplication and MLPA to be more accurate in determination of specific copy number. Our finding that three or more copies of the gene give rise to a more severe phenotype is in agreement with observations in transgenic mice where severity of disease increased with Plp1 gene dosage and level of overexpression. The patient with five copies of PLP1 was not more affected than those with a triplication, suggesting that there is possibly a limit to the level of severity or that other genetic factors influence the phenotype. It highlights the significance of PLP1 dosage in CNS myelinogenesis as well as the importance of accurate determination of PLP1 gene copy number in the diagnosis of PMD and carrier detection.

  2. Targeted Deletion of the Antisilencer/Enhancer (ASE) Element from Intron 1 of the Myelin Proteolipid Protein Gene (Plp1) in Mouse Reveals that the Element Is Dispensable for Plp1 Expression in Brain during Development and Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Glauber B.; Meng, Fanxue; Kockara, Neriman T.; Yang, Baoli; Wight, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Myelin proteolipid protein gene (Plp1) expression is temporally regulated in brain, which peaks during the active myelination period of CNS development. Previous studies with Plp1-lacZ transgenic mice demonstrated that (mouse) Plp1 intron 1 DNA is required for high levels of expression in oligodendrocytes. Deletion-transfection analysis revealed the intron contains a single positive regulatory element operative in the N20.1 oligodendroglial cell line, which was named ASE (antisilencer/enhancer) based on its functional properties in these cells. To investigate the role of the ASE in vivo, the element was deleted from the native gene in mouse using a Cre/lox strategy. While removal of the ASE from Plp1-lacZ constructs profoundly decreased expression in transfected oligodendroglial cell lines (N20.1 and Oli-neu), the element was dispensable to achieve normal levels of Plp1 gene expression in mouse during development (except perhaps at postnatal day 15) and throughout the remyelination period following cuprizone-induced (acute) demyelination. Thus, it is possible that the ASE is nonfunctional in vivo, or that loss of the ASE from the native gene in mouse can be compensated for by the presence of other regulatory elements within the Plp1 gene. PMID:23157328

  3. Immune responses against chimeric DNA and protein vaccines composed of plpEN-OmpH and PlpEC-OmpH from Pasteurella multocida A:3 in mice.

    PubMed

    Okay, Sezer; Ozcengiz, Erkan; Ozcengiz, Gülay

    2012-12-01

    Pasteurella multocida is a pathogenic bacterium causing many diseases that are of significant economic importance to livestock industries. Outer membrane protein H (ompH) gene and two fragments of Pasteurella lipoprotein E (plpE) gene, namely plpEN and plpEC, were cloned from P. multocida A:3. Three DNA vaccine formulations, namely pCMV-ompH, pCMV-plpEN-ompH and pCMV-plpEC-ompH and two protein-based prototype vaccines, alum adjuvanted PlpEN-OmpH and PlpEC-OmpH, were generated. Antibody levels were induced in mice vaccinated with chimeric DNA or protein vaccines. A significant (p < 0.05) increase in serum IFN-g titer was obtained by vaccination with 100 μg of pCMV-ompH, pCMV-plpEC-ompH and PlpEC-OmpH. DNA vaccines did not provide protection upon intraperitoneal challenge with 10 LD50 of live P. multocida A:3. However, 40% protection was conferred by 100 μg of PlpEC-OmpH which was not statistically significant. These results showed that plpEN-ompH and plpEC-ompH chimeric DNA vaccines and alum adjuvanted PlpEN-OmpH or PlpEC-OmpH protein vaccines were immunogenic but not protective against P. multocida A:3 in mice. Prime-boost strategies, i.e. priming with DNA vaccines and boost with protein formulations or different adjuvants can be utilized to obtain significant protection.

  4. The Effect of the Disease-Causing R266K Mutation on the Heme and PLP Environments of Human Cystathionine β-Synthase

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Aaron T.; Su, Yang; Stevens, Daniel J.; Majtan, Tomas; Kraus, Jan P.; Burstyn, Judith N.

    2012-01-01

    Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) is an essential PLP-dependent enzyme of the transsulfuration pathway that condenses serine with homocysteine to form cystathionine; intriguingly, human CBS also contains a heme b cofactor of unknown function. Herein we describe the enzymatic and spectroscopic properties of a disease-associated R266K hCBS variant, which has an altered hydrogen-bonding environment. The R266K hCBS contains a low-spin, six-coordinate Fe(III) heme bearing a His/Cys ligation motif, like that of WT hCBS; however, there is a geometric distortion that exists at the R266K heme. Using rR spectroscopy, we show that the Fe(III)-Cys(thiolate) bond is longer and weaker in R266K, as evidenced by an 8 cm−1 downshift in the ν(Fe-S) resonance. Presence of this longer and weaker Fe(III)-Cys(thiolate) is correlated with alteration of the fluorescence spectrum of the active PLP ketoenamine tautomer. Activity data demonstrate that, relative to WT, the R266K variant is more impaired in the alternative cysteine-synthesis reaction than in the canonical cystathionine-synthesis reaction. This diminished cysteine synthesis activity and a greater sensitivity to exogenous PLP correlates with the change in PLP environment. Fe-S(Cys) bond weakening causes a nearly 300-fold increase in the rate of ligand switching upon reduction of the R266K heme. Combined, these data demonstrate cross talk between the heme and PLP active sites, consistent with previous proposals, revealing that alteration of the Arg266-Cys52 interaction affects PLP-dependent activity and dramatically destabilizes the ferrous thiolate-ligated heme complex, underscoring the importance of this hydrogen-bonding residue pair. PMID:22738154

  5. Expression of a novel member of the ATP1G1/PLM/MAT8 family, phospholemman-like protein (PLP) gene, in the developmental process of mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Saito, S; Matoba, R; Kato, K; Matsubara, K

    2001-11-28

    We have identified a new member of the ATP1G1/PLM/MAT8 family, named phospholemman-like protein (PLP), from a mouse cerebellum cDNA library. The family consists of small transmembrane proteins that modulate the activities of some ion channels. The deduced amino acid sequence of PLP consists of 93 residues that contain the ATP1G1/PLM/MAT8 motif and a single transmembrane domain, and is most similar to the sequence of mouse phospholemman. In situ hybridization analysis showed that the PLP gene is highly expressed in cerebellar granule cells. PLP expression is elevated in the postnatal developing cerebellum. Thus, it may be implicated in the proliferation, differentiation, and axon elongation of granule cells as they mature and migrate to the internal granule layer.

  6. Additional Copies of the Proteolipid Protein Gene Causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease Arise by Separate Integration into the X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Hodes, M. E.; Woodward, Karen; Spinner, Nancy B.; Emanuel, Beverly S.; Enrico-Simon, Agnes; Kamholz, John; Stambolian, Dwight; Zackai, Elaine H.; Pratt, Victoria M.; Thomas, I. T.; Crandall, Kerry; Dlouhy, Stephen R.; Malcolm, Sue

    2000-01-01

    The proteolipid protein gene (PLP) is normally present at chromosome Xq22. Mutations and duplications of this gene are associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). Here we describe two new families in which males affected with PMD were found to have a copy of PLP on the short arm of the X chromosome, in addition to a normal copy on Xq22. In the first family, the extra copy was first detected by the presence of heterozygosity of the AhaII dimorphism within the PLP gene. The results of FISH analysis showed an additional copy of PLP in Xp22.1, although no chromosomal rearrangements could be detected by standard karyotype analysis. Another three affected males from the family had similar findings. In a second unrelated family with signs of PMD, cytogenetic analysis showed a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome. In the inv(X) carried by several affected family members, FISH showed PLP signals at Xp11.4 and Xq22. A third family has previously been reported, in which affected members had an extra copy of the PLP gene detected at Xq26 in a chromosome with an otherwise normal banding pattern. The identification of three separate families in which PLP is duplicated at a noncontiguous site suggests that such duplications could be a relatively common but previously undetected cause of genetic disorders. PMID:10827108

  7. Additional copies of the proteolipid protein gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease arise by separate integration into the X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Hodes, M E; Woodward, K; Spinner, N B; Emanuel, B S; Enrico-Simon, A; Kamholz, J; Stambolian, D; Zackai, E H; Pratt, V M; Thomas, I T; Crandall, K; Dlouhy, S R; Malcolm, S

    2000-07-01

    The proteolipid protein gene (PLP) is normally present at chromosome Xq22. Mutations and duplications of this gene are associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). Here we describe two new families in which males affected with PMD were found to have a copy of PLP on the short arm of the X chromosome, in addition to a normal copy on Xq22. In the first family, the extra copy was first detected by the presence of heterozygosity of the AhaII dimorphism within the PLP gene. The results of FISH analysis showed an additional copy of PLP in Xp22.1, although no chromosomal rearrangements could be detected by standard karyotype analysis. Another three affected males from the family had similar findings. In a second unrelated family with signs of PMD, cytogenetic analysis showed a pericentric inversion of the X chromosome. In the inv(X) carried by several affected family members, FISH showed PLP signals at Xp11.4 and Xq22. A third family has previously been reported, in which affected members had an extra copy of the PLP gene detected at Xq26 in a chromosome with an otherwise normal banding pattern. The identification of three separate families in which PLP is duplicated at a noncontiguous site suggests that such duplications could be a relatively common but previously undetected cause of genetic disorders.

  8. PMD patient mutations reveal a long-distance intronic interaction that regulates PLP1/DM20 alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Taube, Jennifer R.; Sperle, Karen; Banser, Linda; Seeman, Pavel; Cavan, Barbra Charina V.; Garbern, James Y.; Hobson, Grace M.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of the proteolipid protein 1 gene (PLP1) produces two forms, PLP1 and DM20, due to alternative use of 5′ splice sites with the same acceptor site in intron 3. The PLP1 form predominates in central nervous system RNA. Mutations that reduce the ratio of PLP1 to DM20, whether mutant or normal protein is formed, result in the X-linked leukodystrophy Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). We investigated the ability of sequences throughout PLP1 intron 3 to regulate alternative splicing using a splicing minigene construct transfected into the oligodendrocyte cell line, Oli-neu. Our data reveal that the alternative splice of PLP1 is regulated by a long-distance interaction between two highly conserved elements that are separated by 581 bases within the 1071-base intron 3. Further, our data suggest that a base-pairing secondary structure forms between these two elements, and we demonstrate that mutations of either element designed to destabilize the secondary structure decreased the PLP1/DM20 ratio, while swap mutations designed to restore the structure brought the PLP1/DM20 ratio to near normal levels. Sequence analysis of intron 3 in families with clinical symptoms of PMD who did not have coding-region mutations revealed mutations that segregated with disease in three families. We showed that these patient mutations, which potentially destabilize the secondary structure, also reduced the PLP1/DM20 ratio. This is the first report of patient mutations causing disease by disruption of a long-distance intronic interaction controlling alternative splicing. This finding has important implications for molecular diagnostics of PMD. PMID:24890387

  9. Reduced response of splenocytes after mitogen-stimulation in the prion protein (PrP) gene-deficient mouse: PrPLP/Doppel production and cerebral degeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Chi-Kyeong; Hirose, Yuko; Sakudo, Akikazu; Takeyama, Natsumi; Kang, Chung-Boo; Taniuchi, Yojiro; Matsumoto, Yoshitsugu; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Sakaguchi, Suehiro; Onodera, Takashi . E-mail: aonoder@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2007-06-29

    Splenocytes of wild-type (Prnp {sup +/+}) and prion protein gene-deficient (Prnp {sup -/-}) mice were treated with various activation stimuli such as T cell mitogen concanavalin A (ConA), phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) + ionomycin (Io), or B cell mitogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) expression was enhanced following ConA stimulation, but not PMA + Io or LPS in Prnp {sup +/+} splenocytes. Rikn Prnp {sup -/-} splenocytes elicited lower cell proliferations than Prnp {sup +/+} or Zrch I Prnp {sup -/-} splenocytes after LPS stimulation and showed sporadic nerve cells in the cerebral cortex and deeper structure. Around the degenerated nerve cells, mild vacuolation in the neuropil was observed. This neural alteration correlated well to the suppressed response of B cells in the spleen. The finding that discrete lesions within the central nervous systems induced marked modulation of immune function probably indicates the existence of a delicately balanced neural-endocrine network by PrP{sup C} and PrPLP/Doppel.

  10. Control of Human PLP1 Expression Through Transcriptional Regulatory Elements and Alternatively Spliced Exons in Intron 1

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Hamdan; Kockara, Neriman T.; Jolly, Lee Ann; Haun, Shirley

    2015-01-01

    *These authors contributed equally to this work.Although the myelin proteolipid protein gene (PLP1) encodes the most abundant protein in central nervous system (CNS) myelin, not much is known about the mechanisms that govern expression of the human gene (hPLP1). Much more is known about the processes that regulate Plp1 gene expression in rodents. From studies with Plp1-lacZ transgenic mice, it was determined that the first intron of mouse Plp1 (mPlp1) is required to attain high levels of expression in brain, concurrent with the active myelination period. Other studies have suggested that within mPlp1 intron 1 (>8 kb) lie several regions with enhancer-like activity. To test whether these sequences (and possibly others) in hPLP1 intron 1 are functional, deletion-transfection analysis was performed with hPLP1-lacZ constructs that contain various portions of the intron, or lack it altogether. Results presented here demonstrate the importance of hPLP1 intron 1 in achieving maximal levels of expression in the immortalized oligodendroglial cell line, Oli-neu. Deletion analysis indicates that the intron contains multiple positive regulatory elements which are active in Oli-neu cells. Some of these elements appear to be functionally conserved between human and mouse, while others are not. Furthermore, our studies demonstrate that multiple splice variants can be formed due to inclusion of extra (supplementary) exons from what is classically thought of as hPLP1 intron 1. Thus, splicing of these novel exons (which are not recognized as such in mPlp1 due to lack of conserved splice sites) must utilize factors common to both human and mouse since Oli-neu cells are of mouse origin. PMID:25694552

  11. Further genotype-phenotype correlation emerging from two families with PLP1 exon 4 skipping.

    PubMed

    Biancheri, Roberta; Grossi, Serena; Regis, Stefano; Rossi, Andrea; Corsolini, Fabio; Rossi, Daniela Paola; Cavalli, Pietro; Severino, Mariasavina; Filocamo, Mirella

    2014-03-01

    Proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene-related disorders due to mutations in the PLP1 include a wide spectrum of X-linked disorders ranging from severe connatal Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) to spastic paraplegia 2 (SPG2). Duplications, deletions or point mutations in coding and noncoding regions of the PLP1 gene may occur. We report the clinical, neuroradiologic and molecular findings in six patients from two unrelated families. The affected males showed severe mental retardation, spastic tetraparesis, inability of walking and pes cavus at onset in early infancy. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hypomyelination and brain atrophy. Nystagmus was never observed. The affected females showed adult-onset progressive spastic paraparesis leading to wheel-chair dependency and subtle white matter changes on brain MRI. Molecular studies in the two families identified two different intronic mutations, the novel c.622+2T>C and the known c.622+1G>A, leading to the skipping of PLP1-exon 4. The clinical presentation of the affected males did not consistently fit in any of the PLP1-related disorder subtypes (i.e., connatal or classic PMD, SPG2 and 'PLP1 null syndrome'), and in addition, the carrier females were symptomatic despite the severe clinical picture of their respective probands. This study provides new insight into the genotype-phenotype correlations of patients with PLP1 splice-site mutations.

  12. A novel PLP1 mutation associated with optic nerve enlargement in two siblings with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: A new MRI finding.

    PubMed

    Pavlidou, Efterpi; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Govender, Veronica; Wilson, Clare; Das, Rini; Vlachou, Victoria; Pavlou, Evangelos; Saggar, Anand; Mankad, Kshitij; Kinali, Maria

    2017-03-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is a rare, X-linked disorder characterized by hypomyelination of the Central Nervous System due to mutations in the PLP1 gene. Certain mutations of the PLP1 gene correlate with specific clinical phenotypes and neuroimaging findings. We herein report a novel mutation of the PLP1 gene in two siblings with PMD associated with a rare and protean neuroimaging finding of optic nerve enlargement. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that this novel mutation H133P of PLP1 gene is identified and clinically associated with optic nerve enlargement in PMD patients.

  13. The pepper patatin-like phospholipase CaPLP1 functions in plant cell death and defense signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Sung; Jeun, Yongchull; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2014-02-01

    Phospholipases hydrolyze phospholipids into fatty acids and other lipophilic substances. Phospholipid signaling is crucial for diverse cellular processes in plants. However, the precise role of phospholipases in plant cell death and defense signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identified a pepper (Capsicum annuum) patatin-like phospholipase (CaPLP1) gene that is transcriptionally induced in pepper leaves by avirulent Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. CaPLP1 containing an N-terminal signal peptide localized to the cytoplasm and plasma membrane, leading to the secretion into the apoplastic regions. Silencing of CaPLP1 in pepper conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection. Defense responses to Xcv, including the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), hypersensitive cell death and the expression of the salicylic acid (SA)-dependent marker gene CaPR1, were compromised in the CaPLP1-silenced pepper plants. Transient expression of CaPLP1 in pepper leaves induced the accumulation of fluorescent phenolics, expression of the defense marker genes CaPR1 and CaSAR82A, and generation of ROS, ultimately leading to the hypersensitive cell death response. Overexpression (OX) of CaPLP1 in Arabidopsis also conferred enhanced resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. CaPLP1-OX leaves showed reduced Pst growth, enhanced ROS burst and electrolyte leakage, induction of the defense response genes AtPR1, AtRbohD and AtGST, as well as constitutive activation of both the SA-dependent gene AtPR1 and the JA-dependent gene AtPDF1.2. Together, these results suggest that CaPLP1 is involved in plant defense and cell death signaling in response to microbial pathogens.

  14. PLP and GABA trigger GabR-mediated transcription regulation in Bacillus subtilis via external aldimine formation

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Rui; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Belitsky, Boris R.; ...

    2017-03-27

    Here, the Bacillus subtilis protein regulator of the gabTD operon and its own gene (GabR) is a transcriptional activator that regulates transcription of gamma-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT; GabT) upon interactions with pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) and GABA, and thereby promotes the biosynthesis of glutamate from GABA. We show here that the external aldimine formed between PLP and GABA is apparently responsible for triggering the GabR-mediated transcription activation. Details of the "active site" in the structure of the GabR effector-binding/oligomerization (Eb/O) domain suggest that binding a monocarboxylic.-amino acid such as GABA should be preferred over dicarboxylic acid ligands. A reactive GABA analog, (S)-4-amino-5-fluoropentanoicmore » acid (AFPA), was used as a molecular probe to examine the reactivity of PLP in both GabR and a homologous aspartate aminotransferase (Asp-AT) from Escherichia coli as a control. A comparison between the structures of the Eb/O-PLP-AFPA complex and Asp-AT-PLP-AFPA complex revealed that GabR is incapable of facilitating further steps of the transamination reaction after the formation of the external aldimine. Results of in vitro and in vivo assays using full-length GabR support the conclusion that AFPA is an agonistic ligand capable of triggering GabR-mediated transcription activation via formation of an external aldimine with PLP.« less

  15. A PLP-dependent polyketide chain releasing mechanism in the biosynthesis of mycotoxin fumonisins in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Ryan; Lou, Lili; Du, Liangcheng

    2009-03-11

    Fumonisins are polyketide-derived mycotoxins produced by several plant pathogenic fungi. The toxins cause several fatal diseases in domestic animals and are associated with esophageal cancer and neural tube defects in humans. Fumonisins contain a highly reduced, acyclic 18-carbon chain, which is synthesized by an iterative polyketide synthase (PKS). This PKS does not contain a thioesterase or cyclase domain that is found in other PKSs for the release of the covalently linked polyketide chain. In this study, we expressed the acyl carrier protein (ACP) of FUM1 and in vitro loaded acyl chains to the ACP from acyl-CoA using a promiscuous 4'-phosphopantetheinyl transferase. We then expressed FUM8, which is homologous to 2-oxoamine synthase genes, in yeast and showed that the enzyme is able to offload the acyl chains from ACP. Products resulted from the decarboxylative condensation between l-alanine and acyl-S-ACP were detected by GC-MS. The enzyme activity was dependent on pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP), and C18-S-ACP was the preferred substrate. The results revealed a novel polyketide chain-releasing mechanism, in which a PLP-dependent enzyme catalyzes the termination and offloading of the polyketide chain as well as the introduction of a new carbon-carbon bond and an amino group to the chain. The mechanism is fundamentally different from the thioesterase/cyclase-catalyzed polyketide chain release found in bacterial and other fungal polyketide biosyntheses.

  16. X chromosome cDNA microarray screening identifies a functional PLP2 promoter polymorphism enriched in patients with X-linked mental retardation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lilei; Jie, Chunfa; Obie, Cassandra; Abidi, Fatima; Schwartz, Charles E.; Stevenson, Roger E.; Valle, David; Wang, Tao

    2007-01-01

    X-linked Mental Retardation (XLMR) occurs in 1 in 600 males and is highly genetically heterogeneous. We used a novel human X chromosome cDNA microarray (XCA) to survey the expression profile of X-linked genes in lymphoblasts of XLMR males. Genes with altered expression verified by Northern blot and/or quantitative PCR were considered candidates. To validate this approach, we documented the expected changes of expression in samples from a patient with a known X chromosome microdeletion and from patients with multiple copies of the X chromosome. We used our XCA to survey lymphoblast RNA samples from 43 unrelated XLMR males and found 15 genes with significant (≥1.5-fold) reduction in expression in at least one proband. Of these, subsequent analysis confirmed altered expression in 12. We followed up one, PLP2, at Xp11.23, which exhibits approximately fourfold decreased expression in two patients. Sequencing analysis in both patients revealed a promoter variant, −113C>A, that alters the core-binding site of the transcription factor ELK1. We showed that PLP2-(−113C>A) is sufficient to cause reduced expression using a luciferase reporter system and is enriched in a cohort of males with probable XLMR (14 of 239, 5.85%) as compared to normal males (9 of 577, 1.56%) (χ2 = 11.07, P < 0.001). PLP2 is expressed abundantly in the pyramidal cells of hippocampus and granular cells of the cerebellum in the brain. We conclude that our XCA screening is an efficient strategy to identify genes that show significant changes in transcript abundance as candidate genes for XLMR. PMID:17416750

  17. The proteolipid protein gene and myelin disorders in man and animal models.

    PubMed

    Yool, D A; Edgar, J M; Montague, P; Malcolm, S

    2000-04-12

    The two proteins, proteolipid protein and DM20, which are encoded by alternative transcripts from the proteolipid protein ( PLP ) gene, are major components of central nervous system myelin. In man, mutations of these proteins cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), an X-linked dysmyelinating neuropathy. The mutations found are very varied, ranging from deletions, loss-of-function and missense mutations to additional copies of the gene. This same range of known genetic defects has been observed in animal models with spontaneous and engineered Plp gene mutations. The relationship between genotype and phenotype is remarkably close in the animal models and the PMD cases, making them useful models for studying the mechanisms of PLP gene-related disease. As a result, it has become clear that the PLP gene plays a wider role in neural development in addition to its function as a structural component of myelin. It has also emerged that duplications of the PLP gene are the commonest mutation in PMD. Genetic disorders arising from a dosage effect may be more common than previously recognized. The study of the PLP gene in this rare disorder is, therefore, contributing both to our understanding of neural development and maintenance and to the mechanisms of human genetic disorders.

  18. Haploid Genetic Screens Identify an Essential Role for PLP2 in the Downregulation of Novel Plasma Membrane Targets by Viral E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Timms, Richard T.; Duncan, Lidia M.; Tchasovnikarova, Iva A.; Antrobus, Robin; Smith, Duncan L.; Dougan, Gordon; Weekes, Michael P.; Lehner, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus gene products K3 and K5 are viral ubiquitin E3 ligases which downregulate MHC-I and additional cell surface immunoreceptors. To identify novel cellular genes required for K5 function we performed a forward genetic screen in near-haploid human KBM7 cells. The screen identified proteolipid protein 2 (PLP2), a MARVEL domain protein of unknown function, as essential for K5 activity. Genetic loss of PLP2 traps the viral ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it is unable to ubiquitinate and degrade its substrates. Subsequent analysis of the plasma membrane proteome of K5-expressing KBM7 cells in the presence and absence of PLP2 revealed a wide range of novel K5 targets, all of which required PLP2 for their K5-mediated downregulation. This work ascribes a critical function to PLP2 for viral ligase activity and underlines the power of non-lethal haploid genetic screens in human cells to identify the genes involved in pathogen manipulation of the host immune system. PMID:24278019

  19. Genes and mutations causing retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, SP; Sullivan, LS; Bowne, SJ

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous set of inherited retinopathies with many disease-causing genes, many known mutations, and highly varied clinical consequences. Progress in finding treatments is dependent on determining the genes and mutations causing these diseases, which includes both gene discovery and mutation screening in affected individuals and families. Despite the complexity, substantial progress has been made in finding RP genes and mutations. Depending on the type of RP, and the technology used, it is possible to detect mutations in 30–80% of cases. One of the most powerful approaches to genetic testing is high-throughput ‘deep sequencing’, that is, next-generation sequencing (NGS). NGS has identified several novel RP genes but a substantial fraction of previously unsolved cases have mutations in genes that are known causes of retinal disease but not necessarily RP. Apparent discrepancy between the molecular defect and clinical findings may warrant reevaluation of patients and families. In this review, we summarize the current approaches to gene discovery and mutation detection for RP, and indicate pitfalls and unsolved problems. Similar considerations apply to other forms of inherited retinal disease. PMID:23701314

  20. 13 CFR 120.452 - What are the requirements of PLP loan processing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the requirements of PLP loan processing? 120.452 Section 120.452 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Lenders Preferred Lenders Program (plp) § 120.452 What are the requirements of PLP loan...

  1. [The Research Advances of the Pathomechanism of Phantom Limb Pain (PLP)].

    PubMed

    Jin, Qing-Qing; Tang, Dan-Dan; Peng, Wei-Wei; Hu, Li

    2015-10-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a hallucination that the patient feels the existence off the limb after its loss and experiences somewhat pain of the missing limb. Such a pain normally appears in the distal end of the missing limb. Currently, the pathomechanism of PLP is still unclear, and the clinical research of PLP mainly relies on the subjective report of the patients and the psychophysical measurements. In this paper, we discuss extensively the pathomechanism of PLP, and summarize comprehensively the advanced methods for studying the pathomechanism of PLP. In short, the paper could deepen our understanding of the pathomechanism of PLP, and could serve as an effective instruction basis for researchers and doctors to diagnose and treat the PLP.

  2. miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes cell proliferation and invasion in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Hong; Miao, Mei-hua; Ji, Xue-qiang; Xue, Jun; Shao, Xue-jun

    2015-04-03

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in the pathogenesis of many types of cancers by negatively regulating gene expression at posttranscriptional level. However, the role of microRNAs in leukaemia, particularly T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL), has remained elusive. Here, we identified miR-664 and its predicted target gene PLP2 were differentially expressed in T-ALL using bioinformatics methods. In T-ALL cell lines, CCK-8 proliferation assay indicated that the cell proliferation was promoted by miR-664, while miR-664 inhibitor could significantly inhibited the proliferation. Moreover, migration and invasion assay showed that overexpression of miR-664 could significantly promoted the migration and invasion of T-ALL cells, whereas miR-664 inhibitor could reduce cell migration and invasion. luciferase assays confirmed that miR-664 directly bound to the 3'untranslated region of PLP2, and western blotting showed that miR-664 suppressed the expression of PLP2 at the protein levels. This study indicated that miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 and promotes proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cell lines. Thus, miR-664 may represent a potential therapeutic target for T-ALL intervention. - Highlights: • miR-664 mimics promote the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 inhibitors inhibit the proliferation and invasion of T-ALL cells. • miR-664 targets 3′ UTR of PLP2 in T-ALL cells. • miR-664 negatively regulates PLP2 in T-ALL cells.

  3. A single gene defect causing claustrophobia

    PubMed Central

    El-Kordi, A; Kästner, A; Grube, S; Klugmann, M; Begemann, M; Sperling, S; Hammerschmidt, K; Hammer, C; Stepniak, B; Patzig, J; de Monasterio-Schrader, P; Strenzke, N; Flügge, G; Werner, H B; Pawlak, R; Nave, K-A; Ehrenreich, H

    2013-01-01

    Claustrophobia, the well-known fear of being trapped in narrow/closed spaces, is often considered a conditioned response to traumatic experience. Surprisingly, we found that mutations affecting a single gene, encoding a stress-regulated neuronal protein, can cause claustrophobia. Gpm6a-deficient mice develop normally and lack obvious behavioral abnormalities. However, when mildly stressed by single-housing, these mice develop a striking claustrophobia-like phenotype, which is not inducible in wild-type controls, even by severe stress. The human GPM6A gene is located on chromosome 4q32-q34, a region linked to panic disorder. Sequence analysis of 115 claustrophobic and non-claustrophobic subjects identified nine variants in the noncoding region of the gene that are more frequent in affected individuals (P=0.028). One variant in the 3′untranslated region was linked to claustrophobia in two small pedigrees. This mutant mRNA is functional but cannot be silenced by neuronal miR124 derived itself from a stress-regulated transcript. We suggest that loosing dynamic regulation of neuronal GPM6A expression poses a genetic risk for claustrophobia. PMID:23632458

  4. A single gene defect causing claustrophobia.

    PubMed

    El-Kordi, A; Kästner, A; Grube, S; Klugmann, M; Begemann, M; Sperling, S; Hammerschmidt, K; Hammer, C; Stepniak, B; Patzig, J; de Monasterio-Schrader, P; Strenzke, N; Flügge, G; Werner, H B; Pawlak, R; Nave, K-A; Ehrenreich, H

    2013-04-30

    Claustrophobia, the well-known fear of being trapped in narrow/closed spaces, is often considered a conditioned response to traumatic experience. Surprisingly, we found that mutations affecting a single gene, encoding a stress-regulated neuronal protein, can cause claustrophobia. Gpm6a-deficient mice develop normally and lack obvious behavioral abnormalities. However, when mildly stressed by single-housing, these mice develop a striking claustrophobia-like phenotype, which is not inducible in wild-type controls, even by severe stress. The human GPM6A gene is located on chromosome 4q32-q34, a region linked to panic disorder. Sequence analysis of 115 claustrophobic and non-claustrophobic subjects identified nine variants in the noncoding region of the gene that are more frequent in affected individuals (P=0.028). One variant in the 3'untranslated region was linked to claustrophobia in two small pedigrees. This mutant mRNA is functional but cannot be silenced by neuronal miR124 derived itself from a stress-regulated transcript. We suggest that loosing dynamic regulation of neuronal GPM6A expression poses a genetic risk for claustrophobia.

  5. LKTA and PlpE small fragments fusion protein protect against Mannheimia haemolytica challenge.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Quintero-Fabián, Saray; González-Castillo, Celia; de Obeso-Fernández del Valle, Álvaro; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; de la Mora, Germán; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex is a major cause of economic losses for the cattle backgrounding and feedlot industries. Mannheimia haemolytica is considered the most important pathogen associated with this disease. Vaccines against M. haemolytica have been prepared and used for many decades, but traditional bacterins have failed to demonstrate effective protection and their use has often exacerbated disease in vaccinated animals. Thus, the BRD complex continues to exert a strong adverse effect on the health and wellbeing of stocker and feeder cattle. Therefore, generation of recombinant proteins has been helpful in formulating enhanced vaccines against M. haemolytica, which could confer better protection against BRD. In the present study, we formulated a vaccine preparation enriched with recombinant small fragments of leukotoxin A (LKTA) and outer-membrane lipoprotein (PlpE) proteins, and demonstrated its ability to generate high antibody titers in rabbits and sheep, which protected against M. haemolytica bacterial challenge in mice.

  6. 13 CFR 120.453 - Responsibilities of PLP Lenders for servicing and liquidating 7(a) loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Responsibilities of PLP Lenders for servicing and liquidating 7(a) loans. 120.453 Section 120.453 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Lenders Preferred Lenders Program (plp) § 120.453 Responsibilities...

  7. Involvement of Peripheral Nerves in the Transgenic PLP-α-Syn Model of Multiple System Atrophy: Extending the Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kuzdas-Wood, Daniela; Irschick, Regina; Theurl, Markus; Malsch, Philipp; Mair, Norbert; Mantinger, Christine; Wanschitz, Julia; Klimaschewski, Lars; Poewe, Werner; Stefanova, Nadia; Wenning, Gregor K

    2015-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with (oligodendro-)glial cytoplasmic α-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions (GCIs). Peripheral neuropathies have been reported in up to 40% of MSA patients, the cause remaining unclear. In a transgenic MSA mouse model featuring GCI-like inclusion pathology based on PLP-promoter driven overexpression of human α-syn in oligodendroglia motor and non-motor deficits are associated with MSA-like neurodegeneration. Since α-syn is also expressed in Schwann cells we aimed to investigate whether peripheral nerves are anatomically and functionally affected in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. To this end, heat/cold as well as mechanical sensitivity tests were performed. Furthermore, in vivo and ex vivo nerve conduction and the G-ratios of the sciatic nerve were analyzed, and thermosensitive ion channel mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was assessed. The presence of human α-syn in Schwann cells was associated with subtle behavioral impairments. The G-ratio of the sciatic nerve, the conduction velocity of myelinated and unmyelinated primary afferents and the expression of thermosensitive ion channels in the sensory neurons, however, were similar to wildtype mice. Our results suggest that the PNS appears to be affected by Schwann cell α-syn deposits in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. However, there was no consistent evidence for functional PNS perturbations resulting from such α-syn aggregates suggesting a more central cause of the observed behavioral abnormalities. Nonetheless, our results do not exclude a causal role of α-syn in the pathogenesis of MSA associated peripheral neuropathy.

  8. Involvement of Peripheral Nerves in the Transgenic PLP-α-Syn Model of Multiple System Atrophy: Extending the Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kuzdas-Wood, Daniela; Irschick, Regina; Theurl, Markus; Malsch, Philipp; Mair, Norbert; Mantinger, Christine; Wanschitz, Julia; Klimaschewski, Lars; Poewe, Werner; Stefanova, Nadia; Wenning, Gregor K.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a fatal, rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease with (oligodendro-)glial cytoplasmic α-synuclein (α-syn) inclusions (GCIs). Peripheral neuropathies have been reported in up to 40% of MSA patients, the cause remaining unclear. In a transgenic MSA mouse model featuring GCI-like inclusion pathology based on PLP-promoter driven overexpression of human α-syn in oligodendroglia motor and non-motor deficits are associated with MSA-like neurodegeneration. Since α-syn is also expressed in Schwann cells we aimed to investigate whether peripheral nerves are anatomically and functionally affected in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. Results To this end, heat/cold as well as mechanical sensitivity tests were performed. Furthermore, in vivo and ex vivo nerve conduction and the G-ratios of the sciatic nerve were analyzed, and thermosensitive ion channel mRNA expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was assessed. The presence of human α-syn in Schwann cells was associated with subtle behavioral impairments. The G-ratio of the sciatic nerve, the conduction velocity of myelinated and unmyelinated primary afferents and the expression of thermosensitive ion channels in the sensory neurons, however, were similar to wildtype mice. Conclusion Our results suggest that the PNS appears to be affected by Schwann cell α-syn deposits in the PLP-α-syn MSA mouse model. However, there was no consistent evidence for functional PNS perturbations resulting from such α-syn aggregates suggesting a more central cause of the observed behavioral abnormalities. Nonetheless, our results do not exclude a causal role of α-syn in the pathogenesis of MSA associated peripheral neuropathy. PMID:26496712

  9. Rogue Genes May Cause Some ALS Cases

    MedlinePlus

    ... known family history of the disease and a control group of 324 people without ALS. When researchers looked ... four times as likely as those in the control group to have rare and likely harmful gene variants -- ...

  10. Myelin-associated glycoprotein gene mutation causes Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like disorder

    PubMed Central

    Elazar, Nimrod; Lerer, Israela; Schueler-Furman, Ora; Fellig, Yakov; Glick, Benjamin; Zimmerman, Bat-El; Azulay, Haim; Dotan, Shlomo; Goldberg, Sharon; Gomori, John M.; Ponger, Penina; Newman, J. P.; Marreed, Hodaifah; Steck, Andreas J.; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Mor, Nofar; Harel, Michal; Geiger, Tamar; Eshed-Eisenbach, Yael; Peles, Elior

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease is an X-linked hypomyelinating leukodystrophy caused by mutations or rearrangements in PLP1. It presents in infancy with nystagmus, jerky head movements, hypotonia and developmental delay evolving into spastic tetraplegia with optic atrophy and variable movement disorders. A clinically similar phenotype caused by recessive mutations in GJC2 is known as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease. Both genes encode proteins associated with myelin. We describe three siblings of a consanguineous family manifesting the typical infantile-onset Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease-like phenotype slowly evolving into a form of complicated hereditary spastic paraplegia with mental retardation, dysarthria, optic atrophy and peripheral neuropathy in adulthood. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy were consistent with a demyelinating leukodystrophy. Using genetic linkage and exome sequencing, we identified a homozygous missense c.399C>G; p.S133R mutation in MAG. This gene, previously associated with hereditary spastic paraplegia, encodes myelin-associated glycoprotein, which is involved in myelin maintenance and glia-axon interaction. This mutation is predicted to destabilize the protein and affect its tertiary structure. Examination of the sural nerve biopsy sample obtained in childhood in the oldest sibling revealed complete absence of myelin-associated glycoprotein accompanied by ill-formed onion-bulb structures and a relatively thin myelin sheath of the affected axons. Immunofluorescence, cell surface labelling, biochemical analysis and mass spectrometry-based proteomics studies in a variety of cell types demonstrated a devastating effect of the mutation on post-translational processing, steady state expression and subcellular localization of myelin-associated glycoprotein. In contrast to the wild-type protein, the p.S133R mutant was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and was subjected to endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation by the

  11. MAL Is a Regulator of the Recruitment of Myelin Protein PLP to Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Bijlard, Marjolein; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Klunder, Bert; Nomden, Anita; Hoekstra, Dick; Baron, Wia

    2016-01-01

    In oligodendrocytes (OLGs), an indirect, transcytotic pathway is mediating transport of de novo synthesized PLP, a major myelin specific protein, from the apical-like plasma membrane to the specialized basolateral-like myelin membrane to prevent its premature compaction. MAL is a well-known regulator of polarized trafficking in epithelial cells, and given its presence in OLGs it was therefore of interest to investigate whether MAL played a similar role in PLP transport in OLGs, taking into account its timely expression in these cells. Our data revealed that premature expression of mCherry-MAL in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells interfered with terminal OLG differentiation, although myelin membrane formation per se was not impaired. In fact, also PLP transport to myelin membranes via the cell body plasma membrane was unaffected. However, the typical shift of PLP from TX-100-insoluble membrane domains to CHAPS-resistant, but TX-100-soluble membrane domains, seen in the absence of MAL expression, is substantially reduced upon expression of the MAL protein. Interestingly, not only in vitro, but also in developing brain a strongly diminished shift from TX-100 resistant to TX-100 soluble domains was observed. Consistently, the MAL-expression mediated annihilation of the typical membrane microdomain shift of PLP is also reflected by a loss of the characteristic surface expression profile of conformation-sensitive anti-PLP antibodies. Hence, these findings suggest that MAL is not involved in vesicular PLP trafficking to either the plasma membrane and/or the myelin membrane as such. Rather, we propose that MAL may regulate PLP’s distribution into distinct membrane microdomains that allow for lateral diffusion of PLP, directly from the plasma membrane to the myelin membrane once the myelin sheath has been assembled. PMID:27171274

  12. The proteolipid protein gene: Double, double, . . . and trouble

    SciTech Connect

    Hodes, M.E.; Dlouhy, S.R.

    1996-07-01

    That more of a good thing may be too much has been apparent at least since the discovery that Down syndrome is caused by three copies of chromosome 21 instead of the normal two. Duplications of myelin genes also lead to trouble. An extra dose of PMP22, the gene for a protein of peripheral nervous system myelin, causes Charcot-Marie Tooth type 1A disease (CMT1A). Increased dosage of the proteolipid protein gene, PLP, which encodes the chief protein of CNS myelin, can cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). The work of Inoue et al. is of particular importance because they found the duplication in four of five families with {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} PMD, whereas other changes in PLP, such as missense mutations, are found in no more than one in four or five patients with the disease. 27 refs.

  13. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to MAG mRNA profoundly alter BP and PLP mRNA expression in differentiating oligodendrocytes: a caution.

    PubMed

    Laszkiewicz, I; Wiggins, R C; Konat, G W

    1999-09-01

    The applicability of antisense technology to suppress the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in cultured oligodendrocytes was evaluated. Differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells obtained by the shake-off method were exposed to nine unmodified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) targeted to the first seven exons of MAG mRNA. After four days, steady-state levels of MAG, proteolipid protein (PLP) and basic protein (BP) mRNAs were determined by Northern blot analysis. Only ODN annealing to 599-618 nt of the MAG mRNA (the junction of exon 5 and 6) resulted in a significant, 75% decrease in the MAG mRNA level. Unexpectedly, six other anti-MAG ODNs which had no significant effect on the MAG message, greatly increased the level of BP mRNA. The highest upregulation of approximately 12 fold was observed with ODN annealing to 139-168 nt (junction of exon 3 and 4). On the other hand, the 997-1016 ODN decreased the levels of BP and PLP messages by 70-80%. The 599-618 ODN also decreased the PLP mRNA by 85%. The results demonstrate that antisense ODNs targeted to one gene may profoundly alter the expression of other genes, and hence, complicate functional analysis of the targeted protein.

  14. Two discreet subsets of CD8 T cells modulate PLP91-110 induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Mangalam, Ashutosh K.; Luckey, David; Giri, Shailendra; Smart, Michele; Pease, Larry R.; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella S.

    2013-01-01

    Previously we showed that transgenic mice expressing human HLA-DR3 gene are susceptible to PLP91-110 induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and can serve as an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). HLA-DR3 mice with EAE showed increased number of CD8 T cells indicating their important role in disease pathogenesis. The role of CD8 T cells in MS, an inflammatory demyelinating disease of CNS, has been enigmatic as it has been assigned both regulatory and pathogenic roles. Therefore, to evaluate the role of CD8 T cells, we generated CD8 deficient HLA-DR3 transgenic mice (DR3.CD8-/-). Immunization with PLP91-110 led to more severe EAE in DR3.CD8-/- mice compared to HLA-DR3 mice indicating a regulatory role for CD8 T cells. Interestingly, DR3.CD8-/- mice with EAE showed decreased CNS pathology compared to DR3 mice thus suggesting a pathogenic role for CD8 T cells. We show that these two subsets of CD8 T cells can be differentiated based on the surface expression of CD122 (IL-2 Rβ chain). CD8 T cells expressing CD122 (CD8+CD122+) play a regulatory role while CD8+CD122- T cells act as a pathogenic subset. CD122 expressing CD8 T cells are the regulatory subset of CD8 T cells and regulate the encephalitogenic CD4 T cells either through direct modulation of antigen presenting cells or through the release of immuno-regulatory cytokines such as IL-10, IFNγ and TGFβ. We also showed that adoptive transfer of CD8CD122-T cells caused increased spinal cord demyelination indicating that these are pathogenic subset of CD8 T cells. Our study suggests that CD8+ T cells play both regulatory as well as pathogenic role in disease pathogenesis of EAE. A better understanding of these subsets could aid in designing novel therapy for MS patients. PMID:22459490

  15. Two discreet subsets of CD8 T cells modulate PLP(91-110) induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in HLA-DR3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Luckey, David; Giri, Shailendra; Smart, Michele; Pease, Larry R; Rodriguez, Moses; David, Chella S

    2012-06-01

    Previously we showed that transgenic mice expressing human HLA-DR3 gene are susceptible to PLP(91-110) induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and can serve as an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS). HLA-DR3 mice with EAE showed increased number of CD8 T cells indicating their important role in disease pathogenesis. The role of CD8 T cells in MS, an inflammatory demyelinating disease of CNS, has been enigmatic as it has been assigned both regulatory and pathogenic roles. Therefore, to evaluate the role of CD8 T cells, we generated CD8 deficient HLA-DR3 transgenic mice (DR3.CD8(-/-)). Immunization with PLP(91-110) led to more severe EAE in DR3.CD8(-/-) mice compared to HLA-DR3 mice indicating a regulatory role for CD8 T cells. Interestingly, DR3.CD8(-/-) mice with EAE showed decreased CNS pathology compared to DR3 mice thus suggesting a pathogenic role for CD8 T cells. We show that these two subsets of CD8 T cells can be differentiated based on the surface expression of CD122 (IL-2 Rβ chain). CD8 T cells expressing CD122 (CD8+CD122+) play a regulatory role while CD8+CD122- T cells act as a pathogenic subset. CD122 expressing CD8 T cells are the regulatory subset of CD8 T cells and regulate the encephalitogenic CD4 T cells through direct modulation of antigen presenting cells and/or through the release of immunoregulatory cytokines such as IL-10, IFNγ and TGFβ. We also showed that adoptive transfer of CD8CD122- T cells caused increased spinal cord demyelination indicating that these are pathogenic subset of CD8 T cells. Our study suggests that CD8+ T cells play both regulatory as well as pathogenic role in disease pathogenesis of EAE. A better understanding of these subsets could aid in designing novel therapy for MS patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The number of cells expressing the myelin-supporting oligodendrocyte marker PLP-exon 3b remains unchanged in Wallerian degeneration.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Blakemore, W F

    2004-08-01

    Following spinal cord trauma there is controversy as to whether myelin-supporting oligodendrocytes at a distance from areas of spinal cord damage undergo apoptosis. To examine the response of oligodendrocytes to axon degeneration, we counted the number of oligodendrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors in the dorsal funiculi during the course of Wallerian degeneration. Axons were disrupted at T13 and the number of labelled cells in the dorsal funiculi counted at T12, 4 days and 2, 4, and 8 weeks after injury using riboprobes to exon-3b of the PLP gene whose expression is considered to restricted to myelin-supporting oligodendrocytes, PDGFRalpha which is regarded as a marker of oligodendrocyte precursors, and MOG a marker previously used to identify myelin-supporting oligodendrocytes. We found that the number of PLP-exon-3b labelled cells remained constant during the course of Wallerian degeneration while the number of cells labelled with the riboprobes to PDGFRalpha and MOG increased. Significantly the number of MOG-positive cells was increased at times when the number of PDGFRalpha labelled cells was highest. The number of PDGFRalpha labelled cells decreased with time while the number PLP-exon-3b labelled cells remained constant. It is therefore possible that the apoptotic oligodendrocytes identified in previous studies could represent degenerating oligodendrocyte precursors or their progeny rather than degenerating myelin-supporting oligodendrocytes.

  17. Comparative wavelet, PLP, and LPC speech recognition techniques on the Hindi speech digits database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, A. N.; Shrotriya, M. C.; Sharan, S. N.

    2010-02-01

    In view of the growing use of automatic speech recognition in the modern society, we study various alternative representations of the speech signal that have the potential to contribute to the improvement of the recognition performance. In this paper wavelet based features using different wavelets are used for Hindi digits recognition. The recognition performance of these features has been compared with Linear Prediction Coefficients (LPC) and Perceptual Linear Prediction (PLP) features. All features have been tested using Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based classifier for speaker independent Hindi digits recognition. The recognition performance of PLP features is11.3% better than LPC features. The recognition performance with db10 features has shown a further improvement of 12.55% over PLP features. The recognition performance with db10 is best among all wavelet based features.

  18. Cilia gene mutations cause atrioventricular septal defects by multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Steimle, Jeffrey D.; Huang, Wenhui; Felker, Lindsay; Kamp, Anna; Kweon, Junghun; Peterson, Michael; Reeves, Roger H.; Maslen, Cheryl L.; Gruber, Peter J.; Yang, Xinan H.; Shendure, Jay; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2016-01-01

    Atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are a common severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD). In this study we identified deleterious non-synonymous mutations in two cilia genes, Dnah11 and Mks1, in independent N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mouse mutant lines with heritable recessive AVSDs by whole-exome sequencing. Cilia are required for left/right body axis determination and second heart field (SHF) Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, and we find that cilia mutations affect these requirements differentially. Dnah11avc4 did not disrupt SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs only concurrently with heterotaxy, a left/right axis abnormality. In contrast, Mks1avc6 disrupted SHF Hh signaling and caused AVSDs without heterotaxy. We performed unbiased whole-genome SHF transcriptional profiling and found that cilia motility genes were not expressed in the SHF whereas cilia structural and signaling genes were highly expressed. SHF cilia gene expression predicted the phenotypic concordance between AVSDs and heterotaxy in mice and humans with cilia gene mutations. A two-step model of cilia action accurately predicted the AVSD/heterotaxyu phenotypic expression pattern caused by cilia gene mutations. We speculate that cilia gene mutations contribute to both syndromic and non-syndromic AVSDs in humans and provide a model that predicts the phenotypic consequences of specific cilia gene mutations. PMID:27340223

  19. The Major Myelin-Resident Protein PLP Is Transported to Myelin Membranes via a Transcytotic Mechanism: Involvement of Sulfatide

    PubMed Central

    Ozgen, Hande; Klunder, Bert; de Jonge, Jenny C.; Nomden, Anita; Plat, Annechien; Trifilieff, Elisabeth; de Vries, Hans; Hoekstra, Dick

    2014-01-01

    Myelin membranes are sheet-like extensions of oligodendrocytes that can be considered membrane domains distinct from the cell's plasma membrane. Consistent with the polarized nature of oligodendrocytes, we demonstrate that transcytotic transport of the major myelin-resident protein proteolipid protein (PLP) is a key element in the mechanism of myelin assembly. Upon biosynthesis, PLP traffics to myelin membranes via syntaxin 3-mediated docking at the apical-surface-like cell body plasma membrane, which is followed by subsequent internalization and transport to the basolateral-surface-like myelin sheet. Pulse-chase experiments, in conjunction with surface biotinylation and organelle fractionation, reveal that following biosynthesis, PLP is transported to the cell body surface in Triton X-100 (TX-100)-resistant microdomains. At the plasma membrane, PLP transiently resides within these microdomains and its lateral dissipation is followed by segregation into 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS)-resistant domains, internalization, and subsequent transport toward the myelin membrane. Sulfatide triggers PLP's reallocation from TX-100- into CHAPS-resistant membrane domains, while inhibition of sulfatide biosynthesis inhibits transcytotic PLP transport. Taking these findings together, we propose a model in which PLP transport to the myelin membrane proceeds via a transcytotic mechanism mediated by sulfatide and characterized by a conformational alteration and dynamic, i.e., transient, partitioning of PLP into distinct membrane microdomains involved in biosynthetic and transcytotic transport. PMID:25368380

  20. Experimental Study for Structural Behaviour of Precast Lightweight Panel (PLP) Under Flexural Load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, W. I.; Mohamad, N.; Tay, Y. L.; Rahim, N. H. A.; Jhatial, A. A.; Samad, A. A. A.; Abdullah, R.

    2017-06-01

    Precast lightweight concrete slab is first fabricated in workshop or industrial before construction and then transported to site and installed by skilled labour. It can reduce construction time by minimizing user delay and time for cast-in-situ to increase workability and efficiency. is environmental friendly and helps in resource reduction. Although the foamed concrete has low compressive strength compared to normal weight concrete but it has excellent thermal insulation and sound absorption. It is environmental friendly and helps in resource reduction. To determine the material properties of foamed concrete, nine cubes and six cylindrical specimens were fabricated and the results were recorded. In this study, structural behaviour of precast lightweight panel (PLP) with dry density of 1800 kg/m3 was tested under flexural load. The results were recorded and analysed in terms of ultimate load, crack pattern, load-deflection profiles and strain distribution. Linear Voltage Displacement Transducers (LVDT) and strain gauges were used to determine the deflection and strain distribution of PLP. The theoretical and experimental ultimate load of PLP was analysed and recorded to be 70 and 62 kN respectively, having a difference of 12.9%. Based on the results, it can be observed that PLP can resist the adequate loading. Thus, it can be used in precast industry for construction purposes.

  1. Runaway telomere elongation caused by telomerase RNA gene mutations.

    PubMed

    McEachern, M J; Blackburn, E H

    1995-08-03

    The ribonucleoprotein enzyme telomerase adds telomeric DNA onto chromosome ends and is normally regulated so that telomeric DNA lengths are kept within defined bounds. In the telomerase RNA gene from the yeast Kluyveromyces lactis, specific mutations that alter telomeric DNA sequences result in telomeres elongating to up to 100 times their normal length and impair cell growth. Some mutations cause immediate elongation whereas others behave like genetic time bombs, causing elongation only after a latent period of hundreds of generations.

  2. LADD syndrome with glaucoma is caused by a novel gene

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Allie; Avdic, Armin; Roos, Ben R.; DeLuca, Adam; Miller, Kathy; Schnieders, Michael J.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Alward, Wallace L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital (LADD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder displaying variable expression of multiple congenital anomalies including hypoplasia or aplasia of the lacrimal and salivary systems causing abnormal tearing and dry mouth. Mutations in the FGF10, FGFR2, and FGFR3 genes were found to cause some cases of LADD syndrome in prior genetic studies. The goal of this study is to identify the genetic basis of a case of LADD syndrome with glaucoma and thin central corneal thickness (CCT). Methods Whole exome sequencing was performed, and previously described disease-causing genes (FGF10, FGFR2, and FGFR3) were first evaluated for mutations. Fifty-eight additional prioritized candidate genes were identified by searching gene annotations for features of LADD syndrome. The potential pathogenicity of the identified mutations was assessed by determining their frequency in large public exome databases; through sequence analysis using the Blosum62 matrix, PolyPhen2, and SIFT algorithms; and through homology analyses. A structural analysis of the effects of the top candidate mutation in tumor protein 63 (TP63) was also conducted by superimposing the mutation over the solved crystal structure. Results No mutations were detected in FGF10, FGFR2, or FGFR3. The LADD syndrome patient’s exome data was searched for mutations in the 58 candidate genes and only one mutation was detected, an Arg343Trp mutation in the tumor protein 63 (TP63) gene. This TP63 mutation is absent from the gnomAD sequence database. Analysis of the Arg343Trp mutation with Blosum62, PolyPhen2, and SIFT all suggest it is pathogenic. This arginine residue is highly conserved in orthologous genes. Finally, crystal structure analysis showed that the Arg343Trp mutation causes a significant alteration in the structure of TP63’s DNA binding domain. Conclusions We report a patient with no mutations in known LADD syndrome genes (FGF10, FGFR2, and FGFR3). Our analysis provides strong

  3. Crystal structures capture three states in the catalytic cycle of a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) synthase.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L

    2015-02-27

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate.

  4. Gene expression variability in clonal populations: Causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Roberfroid, Stefanie; Vanderleyden, Jos; Steenackers, Hans

    2016-11-01

    During the last decade it has been shown that among cell variation in gene expression plays an important role within clonal populations. Here, we provide an overview of the different mechanisms contributing to gene expression variability in clonal populations. These are ranging from inherent variations in the biochemical process of gene expression itself, such as intrinsic noise, extrinsic noise and bistability to individual responses to variations in the local micro-environment, a phenomenon called phenotypic plasticity. Also genotypic variations caused by clonal evolution and phase variation can contribute to gene expression variability. Consequently, gene expression studies need to take these fluctuations in expression into account. However, frequently used techniques for expression quantification, such as microarrays, RNA sequencing, quantitative PCR and gene reporter fusions classically determine the population average of gene expression. Here, we discuss how these techniques can be adapted towards single cell analysis by integration with single cell isolation, RNA amplification and microscopy. Alternatively more qualitative selection-based techniques, such as mutant screenings, in vivo expression technology (IVET) and recombination-based IVET (RIVET) can be applied for detection of genes expressed only within a subpopulation. Finally, differential fluorescence induction (DFI), a protocol specially designed for single cell expression is discussed.

  5. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    PubMed

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutations in the pericentrin (PCNT) gene cause primordial dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Anita; Thiel, Christian T; Schindler, Detlev; Wick, Ursula; Crow, Yanick J; Ekici, Arif B; van Essen, Anthonie J; Goecke, Timm O; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H; Zweier, Christiane; Brunner, Han G; Becker, Kristin; Curry, Cynthia J; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dörfler, Arnd; Kinning, Esther; Megarbane, André; Meinecke, Peter; Semple, Robert K; Spranger, Stephanie; Toutain, Annick; Trembath, Richard C; Voss, Egbert; Wilson, Louise; Hennekam, Raoul; de Zegher, Francis; Dörr, Helmuth-Günther; Reis, André

    2008-02-08

    Fundamental processes influencing human growth can be revealed by studying extreme short stature. Using genetic linkage analysis, we find that biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the centrosomal pericentrin (PCNT) gene on chromosome 21q22.3 cause microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) in 25 patients. Adults with this rare inherited condition have an average height of 100 centimeters and a brain size comparable to that of a 3-month-old baby, but are of near-normal intelligence. Absence of PCNT results in disorganized mitotic spindles and missegregation of chromosomes. Mutations in related genes are known to cause primary microcephaly (MCPH1, CDK5RAP2, ASPM, and CENPJ).

  7. Mutations in the deubiquitinase gene USP8 cause Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Reincke, Martin; Sbiera, Silviu; Hayakawa, Akira; Theodoropoulou, Marily; Osswald, Andrea; Beuschlein, Felix; Meitinger, Thomas; Mizuno-Yamasaki, Emi; Kawaguchi, Kohei; Saeki, Yasushi; Tanaka, Keiji; Wieland, Thomas; Graf, Elisabeth; Saeger, Wolfgang; Ronchi, Cristina L; Allolio, Bruno; Buchfelder, Michael; Strom, Tim M; Fassnacht, Martin; Komada, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Cushing's disease is caused by corticotroph adenomas of the pituitary. To explore the molecular mechanisms of endocrine autonomy in these tumors, we performed exome sequencing of 10 corticotroph adenomas. We found somatic mutations in the USP8 deubiquitinase gene in 4 of 10 adenomas. The mutations clustered in the 14-3-3 protein binding motif and enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and catalytic activity of USP8. Cleavage of USP8 led to increased deubiqutination of the EGF receptor, impairing its downregulation and sustaining EGF signaling. USP8 mutants enhanced promoter activity of the gene encoding proopiomelanocortin. In summary, our data show that dominant mutations in USP8 cause Cushing's disease via activation of EGF receptor signaling.

  8. Parkin gene causing benign autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Nisipeanu, P; Inzelberg, R; Abo Mouch, S; Carasso, R L; Blumen, S C; Zhang, J; Matsumine, H; Hattori, N; Mizuno, Y

    2001-06-12

    Autosomal recessive juvenile parkinsonism (AR-JP) is an early-onset parkinsonism caused by exonic deletions or point mutations in the parkingene. The relationship between the type of the genetic defect and the clinical presentation, the response to therapy, and the evolution have not been yet determined. The authors describe a single-basepair deletion at nucleotide 202 in exon 2 of the parkin gene in a kindred with a benign clinical course.

  9. Functional evolution of PLP-dependent enzymes based on active-site structural similarities.

    PubMed

    Catazaro, Jonathan; Caprez, Adam; Guru, Ashu; Swanson, David; Powers, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Families of distantly related proteins typically have very low sequence identity, which hinders evolutionary analysis and functional annotation. Slowly evolving features of proteins, such as an active site, are therefore valuable for annotating putative and distantly related proteins. To date, a complete evolutionary analysis of the functional relationship of an entire enzyme family based on active-site structural similarities has not yet been undertaken. Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes are primordial enzymes that diversified in the last universal ancestor. Using the comparison of protein active site structures (CPASS) software and database, we show that the active site structures of PLP-dependent enzymes can be used to infer evolutionary relationships based on functional similarity. The enzymes successfully clustered together based on substrate specificity, function, and three-dimensional-fold. This study demonstrates the value of using active site structures for functional evolutionary analysis and the effectiveness of CPASS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) deficiency might contribute to the onset of type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rubí, B

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of type I diabetes is rising worldwide, particularly in young children. Type I diabetes is considered a multifactorial disease with genetic predisposition and environmental factors participating. Currently, despite years of research, there is no consensus regarding the factors that initiate the autoimmune response. Type I diabetes is preceded by autoimmunity to islet antigens, among them the protein glutamic acid decarboxylase, GAD-65. Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) is formed from vitamin B6 by the action of pyridoxal kinase. Interaction of GAD65 with PLP is necessary for GAD65-mediated synthesis of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). PLP is also a required cofactor for dopamine synthesis by L-aromatic decarboxylase (L-AADC). Both GAD65 and L-AADC are expressed in pancreatic islets. Here it is proposed that lack of the vitamin B6 derivative pyridoxal 5'-phosphate might contribute to the appearance of pancreatic islet autoimmunity and type I diabetes onset. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genes and Mutations Causing Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Daiger, Stephen P.; Bowne, Sara J.; Sullivan, Lori S.

    2015-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) has a prevalence of approximately one in 4000; 25%–30% of these cases are autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Like other forms of inherited retinal disease, adRP is exceptionally heterogeneous. Mutations in more than 25 genes are known to cause adRP, more than 1000 mutations have been reported in these genes, clinical findings are highly variable, and there is considerable overlap with other types of inherited disease. Currently, it is possible to detect disease-causing mutations in 50%–75% of adRP families in select populations. Genetic diagnosis of adRP has advantages over other forms of RP because segregation of disease in families is a useful tool for identifying and confirming potentially pathogenic variants, but there are disadvantages too. In addition to identifying the cause of disease in the remaining 25% of adRP families, a central challenge is reconciling clinical diagnosis, family history, and molecular findings in patients and families. PMID:25304133

  12. A novel mutation of the fibrillin gene causing Ectopia lentis

    SciTech Connect

    Loennqvist, L.; Kainulainen, K.; Puhakka, L.; Peltonen, L. ); Child, A. ); Peltonen, L. )

    1994-02-01

    Ectopia lentis (EL), a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder, has been genetically linked to the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) in earlier studies. Here, the authors report the first EL mutation in the FBN1 gene confirming that EL is caused by mutations of this gene. So far, several mutations in the FBN1 gene have been reported in patients with Marfan syndrome (MFS). EL and MFS are clinically related but distinct conditions with typical manifestations in the ocular and skeletal systems, the fundamental difference between them being the absence of cardiovascular involvement in EL. They report a point mutation, cosegregating with the disease in the described family, that displays EL over four generations. The mutation changes a conserved glutamic acid residue in an EGF-like motif, which is the major structural component of the fibrillin and is repeated throughout the polypeptide. In vitro mutagenetic studies have demonstrated the necessity of an analogous glutamic acid residue for calcium binding in an EGF-like repeat of human factor IX. This provides a possible explanation for the role of this mutation in the disease pathogenesis. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. De novo mutation in the NOTCH3 gene causing CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Dragan; Grozdanović, Danijela; Petrović, Sladjana; Benedeto-Stojanov, Daniela; Stefanović, Ivan; Stojanović, Nebojša; Ilić, Dušica N

    2014-02-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is one of the most common hereditary forms of stroke, and migraine with aura, mood disorders and dementia. CADASIL is caused by mutations of the NOTCH3 gene. This mutation is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. Most individuals with CADASIL have a parent with the disorder. In extremely rare cases, CADASIL may occur due to a spontaneous genetic mutation that occurs for unknown reasons (de novo mutation). We report a new case of patient with de novo mutation of the NOTCH3 gene and a condition strongly suggestive of CADASIL (migraine, stroke, and white matter abnormalities), except that this patient did not have any first-degree relatives with similar symptoms.

  14. Treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP) based on augmented reality and gaming controlled by myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study of a chronic PLP patient

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max; Sander, Nichlas; Kristoffersen, Morten B.; Håkansson, Bo; Brånemark, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    A variety of treatments have been historically used to alleviate phantom limb pain (PLP) with varying efficacy. Recently, virtual reality (VR) has been employed as a more sophisticated mirror therapy. Despite the advantages of VR over a conventional mirror, this approach has retained the use of the contralateral limb and is therefore restricted to unilateral amputees. Moreover, this strategy disregards the actual effort made by the patient to produce phantom motions. In this work, we investigate a treatment in which the virtual limb responds directly to myoelectric activity at the stump, while the illusion of a restored limb is enhanced through augmented reality (AR). Further, phantom motions are facilitated and encouraged through gaming. The proposed set of technologies was administered to a chronic PLP patient who has shown resistance to a variety of treatments (including mirror therapy) for 48 years. Individual and simultaneous phantom movements were predicted using myoelectric pattern recognition and were then used as input for VR and AR environments, as well as for a racing game. The sustained level of pain reported by the patient was gradually reduced to complete pain-free periods. The phantom posture initially reported as a strongly closed fist was gradually relaxed, interestingly resembling the neutral posture displayed by the virtual limb. The patient acquired the ability to freely move his phantom limb, and a telescopic effect was observed where the position of the phantom hand was restored to the anatomically correct distance. More importantly, the effect of the interventions was positively and noticeably perceived by the patient and his relatives. Despite the limitation of a single case study, the successful results of the proposed system in a patient for whom other medical and non-medical treatments have been ineffective justifies and motivates further investigation in a wider study. PMID:24616655

  15. Treatment of phantom limb pain (PLP) based on augmented reality and gaming controlled by myoelectric pattern recognition: a case study of a chronic PLP patient.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Catalan, Max; Sander, Nichlas; Kristoffersen, Morten B; Håkansson, Bo; Brånemark, Rickard

    2014-01-01

    A variety of treatments have been historically used to alleviate phantom limb pain (PLP) with varying efficacy. Recently, virtual reality (VR) has been employed as a more sophisticated mirror therapy. Despite the advantages of VR over a conventional mirror, this approach has retained the use of the contralateral limb and is therefore restricted to unilateral amputees. Moreover, this strategy disregards the actual effort made by the patient to produce phantom motions. In this work, we investigate a treatment in which the virtual limb responds directly to myoelectric activity at the stump, while the illusion of a restored limb is enhanced through augmented reality (AR). Further, phantom motions are facilitated and encouraged through gaming. The proposed set of technologies was administered to a chronic PLP patient who has shown resistance to a variety of treatments (including mirror therapy) for 48 years. Individual and simultaneous phantom movements were predicted using myoelectric pattern recognition and were then used as input for VR and AR environments, as well as for a racing game. The sustained level of pain reported by the patient was gradually reduced to complete pain-free periods. The phantom posture initially reported as a strongly closed fist was gradually relaxed, interestingly resembling the neutral posture displayed by the virtual limb. The patient acquired the ability to freely move his phantom limb, and a telescopic effect was observed where the position of the phantom hand was restored to the anatomically correct distance. More importantly, the effect of the interventions was positively and noticeably perceived by the patient and his relatives. Despite the limitation of a single case study, the successful results of the proposed system in a patient for whom other medical and non-medical treatments have been ineffective justifies and motivates further investigation in a wider study.

  16. Mutations in BTD gene causing biotinidase deficiency: a regional report.

    PubMed

    Kasapkara, Çiğdem Seher; Akar, Melek; Özbek, Mehmet Nuri; Tüzün, Heybet; Aldudak, Bedri; Baran, Rıza Taner; Tanyalçın, Tijen

    2015-03-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inborn error of biotin metabolism. Children with biotinidase deficiency cannot cleave biocytin and, therefore, cannot recycle biotin. Untreated individuals become secondarily biotin deficient, which in turn results in decreased activities of the biotin-dependent carboxylases and the subsequent accumulation of toxic metabolites causing clinical symptoms. Biotinidase deficiency is characterized by neurological, cutaneous manifestations and metabolic abnormalities. The worldwide incidence of profound biotinidase deficiency has been estimated at 1:112,271. The human biotinidase gene is located on chromosome 3p25 and consists of four exons with a total length of 1629 base pairs. To date, more than 100 mutations in the biotinidase gene known to cause biotinidase deficiency have been reported. The vast majority of mutations are homozygous or compound heterozygous. Finding known mutations can be correlated with the biochemical enzymatic results. This report summarizes the demographic features of patients identified as biotinidase deficient from August of 2012 through August of 2013 and mutation analysis results for 20 cases in the southeast region of Turkey.

  17. Proteolipoprotein gene analysis in 82 patients with sporadic Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: duplications, the major cause of the disease, originate more frequently in male germ cells, but point mutations do not. The Clinical European Network on Brain Dysmyelinating Disease.

    PubMed

    Mimault, C; Giraud, G; Courtois, V; Cailloux, F; Boire, J Y; Dastugue, B; Boespflug-Tanguy, O

    1999-08-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease (PMD) is an X-linked developmental defect of myelination affecting the central nervous system and segregating with the proteolipoprotein (PLP) locus. Investigating 82 strictly selected sporadic cases of PMD, we found PLP mutations in 77%; complete PLP-gene duplications were the most frequent abnormality (62%), whereas point mutations in coding or splice-site regions of the gene were involved less frequently (38%). We analyzed the maternal status of 56 cases to determine the origin of both types of PLP mutation, since this is relevant to genetic counseling. In the 22 point mutations, 68% of mothers were heterozygous for the mutation, a value identical to the two-thirds of carrier mothers that would be expected if there were an equal mutation rate in male and female germ cells. In sharp contrast, among the 34 duplicated cases, 91% of mothers were carriers, a value significantly (chi2=9. 20, P<.01) in favor of a male bias, with an estimation of the male/female mutation frequency (k) of 9.3. Moreover, we observed the occurrence of de novo mutations between parental and grandparental generations in 17 three-generation families, which allowed a direct estimation of the k value (k=11). Again, a significant male mutation imbalance was observed only for the duplications. The mechanism responsible for this strong male bias in the duplications may involve an unequal sister chromatid exchange, since two deletion events, responsible for mild clinical manifestations, have been reported in PLP-related diseases.

  18. Proteolipoprotein gene analysis in 82 patients with sporadic Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: duplications, the major cause of the disease, originate more frequently in male germ cells, but point mutations do not. The Clinical European Network on Brain Dysmyelinating Disease.

    PubMed Central

    Mimault, C; Giraud, G; Courtois, V; Cailloux, F; Boire, J Y; Dastugue, B; Boespflug-Tanguy, O

    1999-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease (PMD) is an X-linked developmental defect of myelination affecting the central nervous system and segregating with the proteolipoprotein (PLP) locus. Investigating 82 strictly selected sporadic cases of PMD, we found PLP mutations in 77%; complete PLP-gene duplications were the most frequent abnormality (62%), whereas point mutations in coding or splice-site regions of the gene were involved less frequently (38%). We analyzed the maternal status of 56 cases to determine the origin of both types of PLP mutation, since this is relevant to genetic counseling. In the 22 point mutations, 68% of mothers were heterozygous for the mutation, a value identical to the two-thirds of carrier mothers that would be expected if there were an equal mutation rate in male and female germ cells. In sharp contrast, among the 34 duplicated cases, 91% of mothers were carriers, a value significantly (chi2=9. 20, P<.01) in favor of a male bias, with an estimation of the male/female mutation frequency (k) of 9.3. Moreover, we observed the occurrence of de novo mutations between parental and grandparental generations in 17 three-generation families, which allowed a direct estimation of the k value (k=11). Again, a significant male mutation imbalance was observed only for the duplications. The mechanism responsible for this strong male bias in the duplications may involve an unequal sister chromatid exchange, since two deletion events, responsible for mild clinical manifestations, have been reported in PLP-related diseases. PMID:10417279

  19. Bioinformatic analysis of a PLP-dependent enzyme superfamily suitable for biocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Steffen-Munsberg, Fabian; Vickers, Clare; Kohls, Hannes; Land, Henrik; Mallin, Hendrik; Nobili, Alberto; Skalden, Lilly; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Berglund, Per; Höhne, Matthias; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2015-01-01

    In this review we analyse structure/sequence-function relationships for the superfamily of PLP-dependent enzymes with special emphasis on class III transaminases. Amine transaminases are highly important for applications in biocatalysis in the synthesis of chiral amines. In addition, other enzyme activities such as racemases or decarboxylases are also discussed. The substrate scope and the ability to accept chemically different types of substrates are shown to be reflected in conserved patterns of amino acids around the active site. These findings are condensed in a sequence-function matrix, which facilitates annotation and identification of biocatalytically relevant enzymes and protein engineering thereof.

  20. Identification of disease-causing genes using microarray data mining and Gene Ontology.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Azadeh; Saraee, Mohammad H; Salehi, Mansoor

    2011-01-26

    One of the best and most accurate methods for identifying disease-causing genes is monitoring gene expression values in different samples using microarray technology. One of the shortcomings of microarray data is that they provide a small quantity of samples with respect to the number of genes. This problem reduces the classification accuracy of the methods, so gene selection is essential to improve the predictive accuracy and to identify potential marker genes for a disease. Among numerous existing methods for gene selection, support vector machine-based recursive feature elimination (SVMRFE) has become one of the leading methods, but its performance can be reduced because of the small sample size, noisy data and the fact that the method does not remove redundant genes. We propose a novel framework for gene selection which uses the advantageous features of conventional methods and addresses their weaknesses. In fact, we have combined the Fisher method and SVMRFE to utilize the advantages of a filtering method as well as an embedded method. Furthermore, we have added a redundancy reduction stage to address the weakness of the Fisher method and SVMRFE. In addition to gene expression values, the proposed method uses Gene Ontology which is a reliable source of information on genes. The use of Gene Ontology can compensate, in part, for the limitations of microarrays, such as having a small number of samples and erroneous measurement results. The proposed method has been applied to colon, Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) and prostate cancer datasets. The empirical results show that our method has improved classification performance in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the study of the molecular function of selected genes strengthened the hypothesis that these genes are involved in the process of cancer growth. The proposed method addresses the weakness of conventional methods by adding a redundancy reduction stage and utilizing Gene

  1. Identification of disease-causing genes using microarray data mining and Gene Ontology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the best and most accurate methods for identifying disease-causing genes is monitoring gene expression values in different samples using microarray technology. One of the shortcomings of microarray data is that they provide a small quantity of samples with respect to the number of genes. This problem reduces the classification accuracy of the methods, so gene selection is essential to improve the predictive accuracy and to identify potential marker genes for a disease. Among numerous existing methods for gene selection, support vector machine-based recursive feature elimination (SVMRFE) has become one of the leading methods, but its performance can be reduced because of the small sample size, noisy data and the fact that the method does not remove redundant genes. Methods We propose a novel framework for gene selection which uses the advantageous features of conventional methods and addresses their weaknesses. In fact, we have combined the Fisher method and SVMRFE to utilize the advantages of a filtering method as well as an embedded method. Furthermore, we have added a redundancy reduction stage to address the weakness of the Fisher method and SVMRFE. In addition to gene expression values, the proposed method uses Gene Ontology which is a reliable source of information on genes. The use of Gene Ontology can compensate, in part, for the limitations of microarrays, such as having a small number of samples and erroneous measurement results. Results The proposed method has been applied to colon, Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) and prostate cancer datasets. The empirical results show that our method has improved classification performance in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the study of the molecular function of selected genes strengthened the hypothesis that these genes are involved in the process of cancer growth. Conclusions The proposed method addresses the weakness of conventional methods by adding a redundancy

  2. Gene Transposition Causing Natural Variation for Growth in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Vlad, Daniela; Rappaport, Fabrice; Simon, Matthieu; Loudet, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in biology is to identify molecular polymorphisms responsible for variation in complex traits of evolutionary and agricultural interest. Using the advantages of Arabidopsis thaliana as a model species, we sought to identify new genes and genetic mechanisms underlying natural variation for shoot growth using quantitative genetic strategies. More quantitative trait loci (QTL) still need be resolved to draw a general picture as to how and where in the pathways adaptation is shaping natural variation and the type of molecular variation involved. Phenotypic variation for shoot growth in the Bur-0 × Col-0 recombinant inbred line set was decomposed into several QTLs. Nearly-isogenic lines generated from the residual heterozygosity segregating among lines revealed an even more complex picture, with major variation controlled by opposite linked loci and masked by the segregation bias due to the defective phenotype of SG3 (Shoot Growth-3), as well as epistasis with SG3i (SG3-interactor). Using principally a fine-mapping strategy, we have identified the underlying gene causing phenotypic variation at SG3: At4g30720 codes for a new chloroplast-located protein essential to ensure a correct electron flow through the photosynthetic chain and, hence, photosynthesis efficiency and normal growth. The SG3/SG3i interaction is the result of a structural polymorphism originating from the duplication of the gene followed by divergent paralogue's loss between parental accessions. Species-wide, our results illustrate the very dynamic rate of duplication/transposition, even over short periods of time, resulting in several divergent—but still functional—combinations of alleles fixed in different backgrounds. In predominantly selfing species like Arabidopsis, this variation remains hidden in wild populations but is potentially revealed when divergent individuals outcross. This work highlights the need for improved tools and algorithms to resolve structural variation

  3. Novel mutation in VCP gene causes atypical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Paloma; Cirulli, Elizabeth T.; Drory, Vivian E.; Dabby, Ron; Nisipeanu, Puiu; Carasso, Ralph L.; Sadeh, Menachem; Fox, Andrew; Festoff, Barry W.; Sapp, Peter C.; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Goldstein, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify the genetic variant that causes autosomal dominantly inherited motor neuron disease in a 4-generation Israeli-Arab family using genetic linkage and whole exome sequencing. Methods: Genetic linkage analysis was performed in this family using Illumina single nucleotide polymorphism chips. Whole exome sequencing was then undertaken on DNA samples from 2 affected family members using an Illumina 2000 HiSeq platform in pursuit of potentially pathogenic genetic variants that comigrate with the disease in this pedigree. Variants meeting these criteria were then screened in all affected individuals. Results: A novel mutation (p.R191G) in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene was identified in the index family. Direct sequencing of the VCP gene in a panel of DNA from 274 unrelated individuals with familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS) revealed 5 additional mutations. Among them, 2 were previously identified in pedigrees with a constellation of inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD) and in FALS, and 2 other mutations (p.R159C and p.R155C) in IBMPFD alone. We did not detect VCP gene mutations in DNA from 178 cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Conclusions: We report a novel VCP mutation identified in an amyotrophic lateral sclerosis family (p.R191G) with atypical clinical features. In our experience, VCP mutations arise in approximately 1.5% of FALS cases. Our study supports the view that motor neuron disease is part of the clinical spectrum of VCP-associated disease. PMID:23152587

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa patatin-like protein PlpD is the archetype of a novel Type V secretion system.

    PubMed

    Salacha, Richard; Kovacić, Filip; Brochier-Armanet, Céline; Wilhelm, Susanne; Tommassen, Jan; Filloux, Alain; Voulhoux, Romé; Bleves, Sophie

    2010-06-01

    We discovered a novel secreted protein by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, PlpD, as a member of the bacterial lipolytic enzyme family of patatin-like proteins (PLPs). PlpD is synthesized as a single molecule consisting of a secreted domain fused to a transporter domain. The N-terminus of PlpD includes a classical signal peptide followed by the four PLP conserved blocks that account for its lipase activity. The C-terminus consists of a POTRA (polypeptide transport-associated) motif preceding a putative 16-stranded beta-barrel similar to those of TpsB transporters of Type Vb secretion system. We showed that the C-terminus remains inserted into the outer membrane while the patatin moiety is secreted. The association between a TpsB component and a passenger protein is a unique hybrid organization that we propose to classify as Type Vd. More than 200 PlpD orthologues exist among pathogenic and environmental bacteria, which suggests that bacteria secrete numerous PLPs using this newly defined mechanism.

  5. Impaired PLP-dependent metabolism in brain samples from Huntington disease patients and transgenic R6/1 mice.

    PubMed

    Sorolla, M Alba; Rodríguez-Colman, María José; Vall-Llaura, Núria; Vived, Celia; Fernández-Nogales, Marta; Lucas, José J; Ferrer, Isidre; Cabiscol, Elisa

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress has been described as important to Huntington disease (HD) progression. In a previous HD study, we identified several carbonylated proteins, including pyridoxal kinase and antiquitin, both of which are involved in the metabolism of pyridoxal 5´-phosphate (PLP), the active form of vitamin B6. In the present study, pyridoxal kinase levels were quantified and showed to be decreased both in HD patients and a R6/1 mouse model, compared to control samples. A metabolomic analysis was used to analyze metabolites in brain samples of HD patients and R6/1 mice, compared to control samples using mass spectrometry. This technique allowed detection of increased concentrations of pyridoxal, the substrate of pyridoxal kinase. In addition, PLP, the product of the reaction, was decreased in striatum from R6/1 mice. Furthermore, glutamate and cystathionine, both substrates of PLP-dependent enzymes were increased in HD. This reinforces the hypothesis that PLP synthesis is impaired, and could explain some alterations observed in the disease. Together, these results identify PLP as a potential therapeutic agent.

  6. Interphase centrosome organization by the PLP-Cnn scaffold is required for centrosome function

    PubMed Central

    Lerit, Dorothy A.; Jordan, Holly A.; Poulton, John S.; Fagerstrom, Carey J.; Galletta, Brian J.; Peifer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Pericentriolar material (PCM) mediates the microtubule (MT) nucleation and anchoring activity of centrosomes. A scaffold organized by Centrosomin (Cnn) serves to ensure proper PCM architecture and functional changes in centrosome activity with each cell cycle. Here, we investigate the mechanisms that spatially restrict and temporally coordinate centrosome scaffold formation. Focusing on the mitotic-to-interphase transition in Drosophila melanogaster embryos, we show that the elaboration of the interphase Cnn scaffold defines a major structural rearrangement of the centrosome. We identify an unprecedented role for Pericentrin-like protein (PLP), which localizes to the tips of extended Cnn flares, to maintain robust interphase centrosome activity and promote the formation of interphase MT asters required for normal nuclear spacing, centrosome segregation, and compartmentalization of the syncytial embryo. Our data reveal that Cnn and PLP directly interact at two defined sites to coordinate the cell cycle–dependent rearrangement and scaffolding activity of the centrosome to permit normal centrosome organization, cell division, and embryonic viability. PMID:26150390

  7. Complex Genomic Rearrangements at the PLP1 Locus Include Triplication and Quadruplication

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Christine R.; Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Banser, Linda; Gambin, Tomasz; Stubbolo, Danielle; Yuan, Bo; Sperle, Karen; McCahan, Suzanne M.; Henneke, Marco; Seeman, Pavel; Hobson, Grace M.; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Inverted repeats (IRs) can facilitate structural variation as crucibles of genomic rearrangement. Complex duplication—inverted triplication—duplication (DUP-TRP/INV-DUP) rearrangements that contain breakpoint junctions within IRs have been recently associated with both MECP2 duplication syndrome (MIM#300260) and Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD, MIM#312080). We investigated 17 unrelated PMD subjects with copy number gains at the PLP1 locus including triplication and quadruplication of specific genomic intervals—16/17 were found to have a DUP-TRP/INV-DUP rearrangement product. An IR distal to PLP1 facilitates DUP-TRP/INV-DUP formation as well as an inversion structural variation found frequently amongst normal individuals. We show that a homology—or homeology—driven replicative mechanism of DNA repair can apparently mediate template switches within stretches of microhomology. Moreover, we provide evidence that quadruplication and potentially higher order amplification of a genomic interval can occur in a manner consistent with rolling circle amplification as predicted by the microhomology-mediated break induced replication (MMBIR) model. PMID:25749076

  8. Recombination and Gene Flux Caused by Gene Conversion and Crossing over in Inversion Heterokaryotypes

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, A.; Betran, E.; Barbadilla, A.; Ruiz, A.

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of the effects of inversions on recombination and gene flux between arrangements caused by gene conversion and crossing over was carried out. Two different mathematical models of recombination were used: the Poisson model (without interference) and the Counting model (with interference). The main results are as follows. (1) Recombination and gene flux are highly site-dependent both inside and outside the inverted regions. (2) Crossing over overwhelms gene conversion as a cause of gene flux in large inversions, while conversion becomes relatively significant in short inversions and in regions around the breakpoints. (3) Under the Counting model the recombination rate between two markers depends strongly on the position of the markers along the inverted segment. Two equally spaced markers in the central part of the inverted segment have less recombination than if they are in a more extreme position. (4) Inversions affect recombination rates in the uninverted regions of the chromosome. Recombination increases in the distal segment and decreases in the proximal segment. These results provide an explanation for a number of observations reported in the literature. Because inversions are ubiquitous in the evolutionary history of many Drosophila species, the effects of inversions on recombination are expected to influence DNA variation patterns. PMID:9178017

  9. Disease-causing mutations in genes of the complement system.

    PubMed

    Degn, Søren E; Jensenius, Jens C; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-06-10

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of "conventional" complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles.

  10. Disease-Causing Mutations in Genes of the Complement System

    PubMed Central

    Degn, Søren E.; Jensenius, Jens C.; Thiel, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed profound developmental consequences of mutations in genes encoding proteins of the lectin pathway of complement activation, a central component of the innate immune system. Apart from impairment of immunity against microorganisms, it is known that hereditary deficiencies of this system predispose one to autoimmune conditions. Polymorphisms in complement genes are linked to, for example, atypical hemolytic uremia and age-dependent macular degeneration. The complement system comprises three convergent pathways of activation: the classical, the alternative, and the lectin pathway. The recently discovered lectin pathway is less studied, but polymorphisms in the plasma pattern-recognition molecule mannan-binding lectin (MBL) are known to impact its level, and polymorphisms in the MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) result in defects of complement activation. Recent studies have described roles outside complement and immunity of another MBL-associated serine protease, MASP-3, in the etiology of 3MC syndrome, an autosomal-recessive disorder involving a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism. Syndrome-causing mutations were identified in MASP1, encoding MASP-3 and two additional proteins, MASP-1 and MAp44. Furthermore, an association was discovered between 3MC syndrome and mutations in COLEC11, encoding CL-K1, another molecule of the lectin pathway. The findings were confirmed in zebrafish, indicating that MASP-3 and CL-K1 underlie an evolutionarily conserved pathway of embryonic development. Along with the discovery of a role of C1q in pruning synapses in mice, these recent advances point toward a broader role of complement in development. Here, we compare the functional immunologic consequences of “conventional” complement deficiencies with these newly described developmental roles. PMID:21664996

  11. Rice pollen hybrid incompatibility caused by reciprocal gene loss of duplicated genes.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Yoko; Harushima, Yoshiaki; Kurata, Nori

    2010-11-23

    Genetic incompatibility is a barrier contributing to species isolation and is caused by genetic interactions. We made a whole genome survey of two-way interacting loci acting within the gametophyte or zygote using independence tests of marker segregations in an F(2) population from an intersubspecific cross between O. sativa subspecies indica and japonica. We detected only one reproducible interaction, and identified paralogous hybrid incompatibility genes, DOPPELGANGER1 (DPL1) and DOPPELGANGER2 (DPL2), by positional cloning. Independent disruptions of DPL1 and DPL2 occurred in indica and japonica, respectively. DPLs encode highly conserved, plant-specific small proteins (∼10 kDa) and are highly expressed in mature anther. Pollen carrying two defective DPL alleles became nonfunctional and did not germinate, suggesting an essential role for DPLs in pollen germination. Although rice has many duplicated genes resulting from ancient whole genome duplication, the origin of this gene duplication was in recent small-scale gene duplication, occurring after Oryza-Brachypodium differentiation. Comparative analyses suggested the geographic and phylogenetic distribution of these two defective alleles, showing that loss-of-function mutations of DPL1 genes emerged multiple times in indica and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, and that the DPL2 gene defect is specific to japonica cultivars.

  12. Scientists Spot Gene for Rare Disorder Causing Deafness, Blindness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Hearing Disorders and Deafness Vision Impairment and Blindness About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to ...

  13. GJB2 gene mutations causing familial hereditary deafness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bayazit, Yildirim A; Cable, Benjamin B; Cataloluk, Osman; Kara, Cengiz; Chamberlin, Parker; Smith, Richard J H; Kanlikama, Muzaffer; Ozer, Enver; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Mumbuc, Semih; Arslan, Ahmet

    2003-12-01

    Mutations in Connexin 26 (Cx26) play an important role in autosomal non-syndromic hereditary hearing loss. In this study, our objective was to find out the significance of Cx26 mutations in Turkish families who had hereditary deafness. Fourteen families who had at least two prelingually deaf children per family were included in the study. One affected child from each of the 14 families was selected for single-stranded conformational polymorphism SSCP analysis. Three PCR reactions were used for each subject to amplify the entire Cx26 coding region with overlap. PCR products were sequenced on an Applied Biosystems (ABI) model 3700 automated sequencer. Six of the 14 representative family members (42.9%) demonstrated shifts on SSCP and were subsequently sequenced for Exons 1 and 2 of GJB2 and were tested for the 432 kb upstream deletion. No mutations were found in Exon 1 and no 432 kb deletions were noted. Three different GJB2 mutations were found in Exon 2 of the probands, which were 35delG, 299-300delAT, and 487G > A (M163V). GJB2 mutations were detected in 21.4% of the families. Two patients were homozygous for 35delG and 299-300delAT mutations, and were given a diagnosis of DFNB1 deafness (14.3%). Two different polymorphisms, 457G > A (V153I) and 380G > AG (R127H) were also found. In conclusion, although GJB2 mutations were detected in 21.4% of the families tested, only 14.3% of subject representatives were homozygous and therefore deafness caused by Cx26 mutation segregated with DFNB1. Thus, contribution of GJB2 mutations appears less significant in familial deafness. This necessitates further assessment for the other known gene regions as well as a search for new genetic factors in familial type of genetic deafness.

  14. PTRH2 gene mutation causes progressive congenital skeletal muscle pathology.

    PubMed

    Doe, Jinger; Kaindl, Angela M; Jijiwa, Mayumi; de la Vega, Michelle; Hu, Hao; Griffiths, Genevieve S; Fontelonga, Tatiana M; Barraza, Pamela; Cruz, Vivian; Van Ry, Pam; Ramos, Joe W; Burkin, Dean J; Matter, Michelle L

    2017-04-15

    Peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase 2 (PTRH2) regulates integrin-mediated pro-survival and apoptotic signaling. PTRH2 is critical in muscle development and regulates myogenic differentiation. In humans a biallelic mutation in the PTRH2 gene causes infantile-onset multisystem disease with progressive muscle weakness. We report here that the Ptrh2 knockout mouse model recapitulates the progressive congenital muscle pathology observed in patients. Ptrh2 null mice demonstrate multiple degenerating and regenerating muscle fibers, increased central nuclei, elevated creatine kinase activity and endomysial fibrosis. This progressive muscle pathology resembles the muscular dystrophy phenotype in humans and mice lacking the α7 integrin. We demonstrate that in normal muscle Ptrh2 associates in a complex with the α7β1 integrin at the sarcolemma and Ptrh2 expression is decreased in α7 integrin null muscle. Furthermore, Ptrh2 expression is altered in skeletal muscle of classical congenital muscular dystrophy mouse models. Ptrh2 levels were up-regulated in dystrophin deficient mdx muscle, which correlates with the elevated levels of the α7β1 integrin observed in mdx muscle and Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. Similar to the α7 integrin, Ptrh2 expression was decreased in laminin-α2 dyW null gastrocnemius muscle. Our data establishes a PTRH2 mutation as a novel driver of congenital muscle degeneration and identifies a potential novel target to treat muscle myopathies. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Enhanced method of magnetic powder alignment for production of PLP Nd-Fe-B magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. G.; Golovnia, O. A.; Protasov, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    It is demonstrated how the high degree of powder alignment in PLP magnets can be achieved by loading the powder into a container placed in a magnetic field of moderate strength. The strip-cast alloy with a composition of 30.00 Nd, 1.95 Dy, 66.42 Fe, 0.99 B, 0.54 Co, 0.1 Ga (wt%) was subjected to hydrogen decrepitation and then milled in a vibratory mill in toluene to an average particle size of 2.9 μm determined by the FSSS method. The powder was compacted in the magnetic field of 0.2 - 1.2 T to the filling density 2.6 - 3.2×103 kg/m3. It is shown that loading the powder into a container placed in a magnetic field enhances the degree of powder alignment in sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets produced from non-pressed powder. At the filling density less than 3.2×103 kg/m3, the density of magnets is high but insufficient, because of the formation of magnetostatic chains of particles, which impedes the powder compaction. The simulation by the discrete-element method qualitatively proves that the magnetostatic interaction of the chains of particles that are formed in the course of loading in the magnetic field stimulates a decrease in the density of the sintered magnets and its non-uniform distribution over the sample. As a result of the optimization of the parameters of the alignment and compaction of the powder loaded in a magnetic field, PLP magnets with Br ≥1.34 T, Нc ≥950 kA/m, (BH)max ≥340 kJ/m3, and the degree of alignment exceeding 96% were produced.

  16. Bioinformatic analysis of fold-type III PLP-dependent enzymes discovers multimeric racemases.

    PubMed

    Knight, Anders M; Nobili, Alberto; van den Bergh, Tom; Genz, Maika; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Albrecht, Dirk; Riedel, Katharina; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2017-02-01

    Pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzymes are ubiquitous in nature and catalyze a variety of important metabolic reactions. The fold-type III PLP-dependent enzyme family is primarily comprised of decarboxylases and alanine racemases. In the development of a multiple structural alignment database (3DM) for the enzyme family, a large subset of 5666 uncharacterized proteins with high structural, but low sequence similarity to alanine racemase and decarboxylases was found. Compared to these two classes of enzymes, the protein sequences being the object of this study completely lack the C-terminal domain, which has been reported important for the formation of the dimer interface in other fold-type III enzymes. The 5666 sequences cluster around four protein templates, which also share little sequence identity to each other. In this work, these four template proteins were solubly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and their substrate profiles were evaluated by HPLC analysis for racemase activity using a broader range of amino acids. They were found active only against alanine or serine, where they exhibited Michaelis constants within the range of typical bacterial alanine racemases, but with significantly lower turnover numbers. As the already described racemases were proposed to be active and appeared to be monomers as judged from their crystal structures, we also investigated this aspect for the four new enzymes. Here, size exclusion chromatography indicated the presence of oligomeric states of the enzymes and a native-PAGE in-gel assay showed that the racemase activity was present only in an oligomeric state but not as monomer. This suggests the likelihood of a different behavior of these enzymes in solution compared to the one observed in crystalline form.

  17. Myelin-reactive antibodies mediate the pathology of MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4-induced EAE.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Pauly, Robert; Rottlaender, Andrea; Rodi, Michael; Gruppe, Traugott L; Addicks, Klaus; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V

    2011-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is frequently used for studies of multiple sclerosis (MS). Because in most EAE models T cells mediate the pathology in the absence of B cells/autoantibodies, the notion has evolved that also MS may be a primarily T cell-mediated disease. We have previously introduced MBP-PLP fusion protein (MP4)-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice. Here we show that the disease in this model is antibody-dependent. Immunization of B cell-deficient mice did not induce EAE. When such B cell-deficient mice were, however, injected with MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in addition to the immunization with MP4, they developed disease of a severity and course that was similar to the wild-type mice. The deposition of antibodies in demyelinated lesions provided further evidence for the contribution of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies to CNS lesion formation. Based upon these data we suggest a two-stage model for the involvement of MBP/PLP-specific antibodies in autoimmune CNS pathology.

  18. Mechanism of Substrate Recognition And PLP-Induced Conformational Changes in II-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase From Arabidopsis Thaliana

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, N.; Clay, M.D.; Belkum, M.J.van; Cherney, M.M.; Vederas, J.C.; James, M.N.G.

    2009-05-26

    LL-Diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT), a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathways of plants and Chlamydia, is a potential target for the development of herbicides or antibiotics. This homodimeric enzyme converts L-tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (THDP) directly to LL-DAP using L-glutamate as the source of the amino group. Earlier, we described the 3D structures of native and malate-bound LL-DAP-AT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDAP-AT). Seven additional crystal structures of AtDAP-AT and its variants are reported here as part of an investigation into the mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis. Two structures are of AtDAP-AT with reduced external aldimine analogues: N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-glutamate (PLP-Glu) and N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)- LL-Diaminopimelate (PLP-DAP) bound in the active site. Surprisingly, they reveal that both L-glutamate and LL-DAP are recognized in a very similar fashion by the same sets of amino acid residues; both molecules adopt twisted V-shaped conformations. With both substrates, the {alpha}-carboxylates are bound in a salt bridge with Arg404, whereas the distal carboxylates are recognized via hydrogen bonds to the well-conserved side chains of Tyr37, Tyr125 and Lys129. The distal C{sup {var_epsilon}} amino group of LL-DAP is specifically recognized by several non-covalent interactions with residues from the other subunit (Asn309*, Tyr94*, Gly95*, and Glu97* (Amino acid designators followed by an asterisk (*) indicate that the residues originate in the other subunit of the dimer)) and by three bound water molecules. Two catalytically inactive variants of AtDAP-AT were created via site-directed mutagenesis of the active site lysine (K270N and K270Q). The structures of these variants permitted the observation of the unreduced external aldimines of PLP with L-glutamate and with LL-DAP in the active site, and revealed differences in the torsion angle about the PLP-substrate bond. Lastly, an apo

  19. Mechanism of substrate recognition and PLP-induced conformational changes in LL-diaminopimelate aminotransferase from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuhiko; Clay, Matthew D; van Belkum, Marco J; Cherney, Maia M; Vederas, John C; James, Michael N G

    2008-12-31

    LL-Diaminopimelate aminotransferase (LL-DAP-AT), a pyridoxal phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme in the lysine biosynthetic pathways of plants and Chlamydia, is a potential target for the development of herbicides or antibiotics. This homodimeric enzyme converts L-tetrahydrodipicolinic acid (THDP) directly to LL-DAP using L-glutamate as the source of the amino group. Earlier, we described the 3D structures of native and malate-bound LL-DAP-AT from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtDAP-AT). Seven additional crystal structures of AtDAP-AT and its variants are reported here as part of an investigation into the mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis. Two structures are of AtDAP-AT with reduced external aldimine analogues: N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)-L-glutamate (PLP-Glu) and N-(5'-phosphopyridoxyl)- LL-Diaminopimelate (PLP-DAP) bound in the active site. Surprisingly, they reveal that both L-glutamate and LL-DAP are recognized in a very similar fashion by the same sets of amino acid residues; both molecules adopt twisted V-shaped conformations. With both substrates, the alpha-carboxylates are bound in a salt bridge with Arg404, whereas the distal carboxylates are recognized via hydrogen bonds to the well-conserved side chains of Tyr37, Tyr125 and Lys129. The distal C(epsilon) amino group of LL-DAP is specifically recognized by several non-covalent interactions with residues from the other subunit (Asn309*, Tyr94*, Gly95*, and Glu97* (Amino acid designators followed by an asterisk (*) indicate that the residues originate in the other subunit of the dimer)) and by three bound water molecules. Two catalytically inactive variants of AtDAP-AT were created via site-directed mutagenesis of the active site lysine (K270N and K270Q). The structures of these variants permitted the observation of the unreduced external aldimines of PLP with L-glutamate and with LL-DAP in the active site, and revealed differences in the torsion angle about the PLP-substrate bond. Lastly, an apo

  20. Single-gene causes of congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) in humans.

    PubMed

    Vivante, Asaf; Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-04-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) cover a wide range of structural malformations that result from defects in the morphogenesis of the kidney and/or urinary tract. These anomalies account for about 40-50 % of children with chronic kidney disease worldwide. Knowledge from genetically modified mouse models suggests that single gene mutations in renal developmental genes may lead to CAKUT in humans. However, until recently, only a handful of CAKUT-causing genes were reported, most of them in familial syndromic cases. Recent findings suggest that CAKUT may arise from mutations in a multitude of different single gene causes. We focus here on single-gene causes of CAKUT and their developmental origin. Currently, more than 20 monogenic CAKUT-causing genes have been identified. High-throughput sequencing techniques make it likely that additional CAKUT-causing genes will be identified in the near future.

  1. Crystal Structures Capture Three States in the Catalytic Cycle of a Pyridoxal Phosphate (PLP) Synthase*♦

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amber Marie; Brown, William Clay; Harms, Etti; Smith, Janet L.

    2015-01-01

    PLP synthase (PLPS) is a remarkable single-enzyme biosynthetic pathway that produces pyridoxal 5′-phosphate (PLP) from glutamine, ribose 5-phosphate, and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The intact enzyme includes 12 synthase and 12 glutaminase subunits. PLP synthesis occurs in the synthase active site by a complicated mechanism involving at least two covalent intermediates at a catalytic lysine. The first intermediate forms with ribose 5-phosphate. The glutaminase subunit is a glutamine amidotransferase that hydrolyzes glutamine and channels ammonia to the synthase active site. Ammonia attack on the first covalent intermediate forms the second intermediate. Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate reacts with the second intermediate to form PLP. To investigate the mechanism of the synthase subunit, crystal structures were obtained for three intermediate states of the Geobacillus stearothermophilus intact PLPS or its synthase subunit. The structures capture the synthase active site at three distinct steps in its complicated catalytic cycle, provide insights into the elusive mechanism, and illustrate the coordinated motions within the synthase subunit that separate the catalytic states. In the intact PLPS with a Michaelis-like intermediate in the glutaminase active site, the first covalent intermediate of the synthase is fully sequestered within the enzyme by the ordering of a generally disordered 20-residue C-terminal tail. Following addition of ammonia, the synthase active site opens and admits the Lys-149 side chain, which participates in formation of the second intermediate and PLP. Roles are identified for conserved Asp-24 in the formation of the first intermediate and for conserved Arg-147 in the conversion of the first to the second intermediate. PMID:25568319

  2. Discovering causes and cures for cancer from gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Weeraratna, Ashani T

    2005-11-01

    Tumorigenesis is governed by a series of complex genetic and epigenetic changes. Both mechanisms can result in either the silencing or aberrant expression of messages in a cell. Gene expression profiling techniques such as the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) or microarray analysis can provide global overviews of these changes, as well identify key genes and pathways involved in this process. This review outlines the current roles of these techniques in cancer research, and how they may contribute to finding not only mechanisms of this disease, but potential targets for therapy.

  3. Aucsia gene silencing causes parthenocarpic fruit development in tomato.

    PubMed

    Molesini, Barbara; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo; Dani, Valeria; Spena, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    In angiosperms, auxin phytohormones play a crucial regulatory role in fruit initiation. The expression of auxin biosynthesis genes in ovules and placenta results in uncoupling of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit development from fertilization with production of parthenocarpic fruits. We have identified two newly described genes, named Aucsia genes, which are differentially expressed in auxin-synthesis (DefH9-iaaM) parthenocarpic tomato flower buds. The two tomato Aucsia genes encode 53-amino-acid-long peptides. We show, by RNA interference-mediated gene suppression, that Aucsia genes are involved in both reproductive and vegetative plant development. Aucsia-silenced tomato plants exhibited auxin-related phenotypes such as parthenocarpic fruit development, leaf fusions, and reflexed leaves. Auxin-induced rhizogenesis in cotyledon explants and polar auxin transport in roots were reduced in Aucsia-silenced plants compared with wild-type plants. In addition, Aucsia-silenced plants showed an increased sensitivity to 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. We further prove that total indole-3-acetic acid content was increased in preanthesis Aucsia-silenced flower buds. Thus, the data presented demonstrate that Aucsia genes encode a novel family of plant peptides that control fruit initiation and affect other auxin-related biological processes in tomato. Aucsia homologous genes are present in both chlorophytes and streptophytes, and the encoded peptides are distinguished by a 16-amino-acid-long (PYSGXSTLALVARXSA) AUCSIA motif, a lysine-rich carboxyl-terminal region, and a conserved tyrosine-based endocytic sorting motif.

  4. SINE retrotransposons cause epigenetic reprogramming of adjacent gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Estécio, Marcos R H; Gallegos, Juan; Dekmezian, Mhair; Lu, Yue; Liang, Shoudan; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2012-10-01

    Almost half of the human genome and as much as 40% of the mouse genome is composed of repetitive DNA sequences. The majority of these repeats are retrotransposons of the SINE and LINE families, and such repeats are generally repressed by epigenetic mechanisms. It has been proposed that these elements can act as methylation centers from which DNA methylation spreads into gene promoters in cancer. Contradictory to a methylation center function, we have found that retrotransposons are enriched near promoter CpG islands that stay methylation-free in cancer. Clearly, it is important to determine which influence, if any, these repetitive elements have on nearby gene promoters. Using an in vitro system, we confirm here that SINE B1 elements can influence the activity of downstream gene promoters, with acquisition of DNA methylation and loss of activating histone marks, thus resulting in a repressed state. SINE sequences themselves did not immediately acquire DNA methylation but were marked by H3K9me2 and H3K27me3. Moreover, our bisulfite sequencing data did not support that gain of DNA methylation in gene promoters occurred by methylation spreading from SINE B1 repeats. Genome-wide analysis of SINE repeats distribution showed that their enrichment is directly correlated with the presence of USF1, USF2, and CTCF binding, proteins with insulator function. In summary, our work supports the concept that SINE repeats interfere negatively with gene expression and that their presence near gene promoters is counter-selected, except when the promoter is protected by an insulator element.

  5. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: Detection of mutations Thr[sup 181][yields]Pro and Leu[sup 223][yields]Pro in the proteolipid protein gene, and prenatal diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Strautnieks, S.; Rutland, P.; Malcolm, S.; Baraitser, M. ); Winter, R.M. )

    1992-10-01

    A family with an apparent history of X-linked Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease presented for genetic counseling, requesting carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis. RFLP analysis using the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene probe was uninformative in this family. A prenatal diagnosis on a chorionic villus sample (CVS) was carried out using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSC) analysis of a variant in exon 4 of the PLP gene. The fetus was predicted to be unaffected. Sequencing of the exon from the CVS, the predicted-carrier mother, and the obligate-carrier grandmother revealed an A-to-C change at nucleotide 541 in the two women but not in the fetus. As this change results in a Thr-to-Pro change at amino acid 181 in a region of the gene predicted to be part of a transmembrane segment, it was concluded that this was the mutation causing the disease in this family. In addition, in a second family, an exon 5 variant band pattern on SSCP analysis was shown by sequencing to be due to a T-to-C change at nucleotide 668. This results in a Leu-to-Pro change in a carrier mother and in her two affected sons. These results provide further examples of mutations in PLP that cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease and illustrate the value of SSCP in genetic analysis. 17 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. NDRC: A Disease-Causing Genes Prioritized Method Based on Network Diffusion and Rank Concordance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Minghong; Hu, Xiaohua; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; He, Tingting

    2015-07-01

    Disease-causing genes prioritization is very important to understand disease mechanisms and biomedical applications, such as design of drugs. Previous studies have shown that promising candidate genes are mostly ranked according to their relatedness to known disease genes or closely related disease genes. Therefore, a dangling gene (isolated gene) with no edges in the network can not be effectively prioritized. These approaches tend to prioritize those genes that are highly connected in the PPI network while perform poorly when they are applied to loosely connected disease genes. To address these problems, we propose a new disease-causing genes prioritization method that based on network diffusion and rank concordance (NDRC). The method is evaluated by leave-one-out cross validation on 1931 diseases in which at least one gene is known to be involved, and it is able to rank the true causal gene first in 849 of all 2542 cases. The experimental results suggest that NDRC significantly outperforms other existing methods such as RWR, VAVIEN, DADA and PRINCE on identifying loosely connected disease genes and successfully put dangling genes as potential candidate disease genes. Furthermore, we apply NDRC method to study three representative diseases, Meckel syndrome 1, Protein C deficiency and Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1A (Zellweger). Our study has also found that certain complex disease-causing genes can be divided into several modules that are closely associated with different disease phenotype.

  7. Angiogenic gene therapy does not cause retinal pathology.

    PubMed

    Prokosch, Verena; Stupp, Tobias; Spaniol, Kristina; Pham, Emmanuel; Nikol, Sigrid

    2014-01-01

    The potential negative influence of angiogenic gene therapy on the development or progression of retinal pathologies such as diabetic retinopathy (DR) or age-related macular degeneration (AMD) has led to the systematic exclusion of affected patients from trials. We investigated the role of nonviral fibroblast factor 1 (NV1FGF) in two phase II, multinational, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, gene therapy trials (TALISMAN 201 and 211). One hundred and fifty-two subjects with critical limb ischemia or claudication were randomized to receive eight intramuscular injections of 2.5 ml of NV1FGF at 0.2 mg/ml or 0.4 mg/dl or placebo. One hundred and fifty-two patients received a plasmid dose of NV1FGF of up to 32 mg or placebo. All patients underwent a systematic ophthalmologic examination at baseline and at 3, 6 or 12 months following gene therapy. Twenty-six of these patients (Münster subgroup) received a retinal fluorescence angiography at baseline and at final examination. Among those 26 patients, four of nine patients with diabetes suffered from nonproliferative DR. Three patients showed non-exsudative AMD. No change of retinal morphology or function was observed in Münster subgroup of both TALISMAN trials independent of the intramuscular NV1FGF dosage applied. Angiogenic gene therapy using NV1FGF is safe even in diabetics. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Solvent effects on acrylate kp in organic media?-A systematic PLP-SEC study.

    PubMed

    Haehnel, Alexander P; Wenn, Benjamin; Kockler, Katrin; Bantle, Tobias; Misske, Andrea M; Fleischhaker, Friederike; Junkers, Thomas; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    The Arrhenius parameters of the propagation rate coefficient, kp , are determined employing high-frequency pulsed laser polymerization-size exclusion chromatography (PLP-SEC) for the homologous series of five linear alkyl acrylates (i.e., methyl acrylate (MA), butyl acrylate (BA), dodecyl acrylate (DA), stearyl acrylate (SA), and behenyl acrylate (BeA)) in 1 m solution in butyl acetate (BuAc) as well as in toluene. The comparison of the obtained kp values with the literature known values for bulk demonstrates that no significant solvent influence neither in BuAc nor in toluene on the propagation reaction compared to bulk is detectable. Concomitantly, the kp values in toluene and in BuAc solution display a similar increase with increasing number of C-atoms in the ester side chain as was previously reported for the bulk systems. These findings are in clear contrast to earlier studies, which report a decrease of kp with increasing ester side chain length in toluene. The additional investigation of the longest and shortest ester side chain acrylate (i.e., BeA and MA) over the entire experimentally available concentration range at one temperature (i.e., 50 °C) does not reveal any general concentration dependence and all observed differences in the kp are within the experimental error. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. PLP-dependent enzymes as entry and exit gates of sphingolipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Bourquin, Florence; Capitani, Guido; Grütter, Markus Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Sphingolipids are membrane constituents as well as signaling molecules involved in many essential cellular processes. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) and sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SPL), both PLP (pyridoxal 5′-phosphate)-dependent enzymes, function as entry and exit gates of the sphingolipid metabolism. SPT catalyzes the condensation of serine and a fatty acid into 3-keto-dihydrosphingosine, whereas SPL degrades sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) into phosphoethanolamine and a long-chain aldehyde. The recently solved X-ray structures of prokaryotic homologs of SPT and SPL combined with functional studies provide insight into the structure–function relationship of the two enzymes. Despite carrying out different reactions, the two enzymes reveal striking similarities in the overall fold, topology, and residues crucial for activity. Unlike their eukaryotic counterparts, bacterial SPT and SPL lack a transmembrane helix, making them targets of choice for biochemical characterization because the use of detergents can be avoided. Both human enzymes are linked to severe diseases or disorders and might therefore serve as targets for the development of therapeutics aiming at the modulation of their activity. This review gives an overview of the sphingolipid metabolism and of the available biochemical studies of prokaryotic SPT and SPL, and discusses the major similarities and differences to the corresponding eukaryotic enzymes. PMID:21710479

  10. Resolution of gene regulatory conflicts caused by combinations of antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Bollenbach, Tobias; Kishony, Roy

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Regulatory conflicts occur when two signals which individually trigger opposite cellular responses are present simultaneously. Here, we investigate regulatory conflicts in the bacterial response to antibiotic combinations. We use an Escherichia coli promoter-GFP library to study the transcriptional response of many promoters to either additive or antagonistic drug pairs at fine two-dimensional resolution of drug concentration. Surprisingly, we find that this dataset can be characterized as a linear sum of only two principal components. Component one, accounting for over 70% of the response, represents the response to growth inhibition by the drugs. Component two describes how regulatory conflicts are resolved. For the additive drug pair, conflicts are resolved by linearly interpolating the single drug responses, while for the antagonistic drug pair, the growth-limiting drug dominates the response. Importantly, for a given drug pair, the same conflict resolution strategy applies to almost all genes. These results provide a recipe for predicting gene expression responses to antibiotic combinations. PMID:21596308

  11. Familial dysautonomia is caused by mutations of the IKAP gene.

    PubMed

    Anderson, S L; Coli, R; Daly, I W; Kichula, E A; Rork, M J; Volpi, S A; Ekstein, J; Rubin, B Y

    2001-03-01

    The defective gene DYS, which is responsible for familial dysautonomia (FD) and has been mapped to a 0.5-cM region on chromosome 9q31, has eluded identification. We identified and characterized the RNAs encoded by this region of chromosome 9 in cell lines derived from individuals homozygous for the major FD haplotype, and we observed that the RNA encoding the IkappaB kinase complex-associated protein (IKAP) lacks exon 20 and, as a result of a frameshift, encodes a truncated protein. Sequence analysis reveals a T-->C transition in the donor splice site of intron 20. In individuals bearing a minor FD haplotype, a missense mutation in exon 19 disrupts a consensus serine/threonine kinase phosphorylation site. This mutation results in defective phosphorylation of IKAP. These mutations were observed to be present in a random sample of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals, at approximately the predicted carrier frequency of FD. These findings demonstrate that mutations in the gene encoding IKAP are responsible for FD.

  12. Familial Dysautonomia Is Caused by Mutations of the IKAP Gene

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sylvia L.; Coli, Rocco; Daly, Ira W.; Kichula, Elizabeth A.; Rork, Matthew J.; Volpi, Sabrina A.; Ekstein, Josef; Rubin, Berish Y.

    2001-01-01

    The defective gene DYS, which is responsible for familial dysautonomia (FD) and has been mapped to a 0.5-cM region on chromosome 9q31, has eluded identification. We identified and characterized the RNAs encoded by this region of chromosome 9 in cell lines derived from individuals homozygous for the major FD haplotype, and we observed that the RNA encoding the IκB kinase complex–associated protein (IKAP) lacks exon 20 and, as a result of a frameshift, encodes a truncated protein. Sequence analysis reveals a T→C transition in the donor splice site of intron 20. In individuals bearing a minor FD haplotype, a missense mutation in exon 19 disrupts a consensus serine/threonine kinase phosphorylation site. This mutation results in defective phosphorylation of IKAP. These mutations were observed to be present in a random sample of Ashkenazi Jewish individuals, at approximately the predicted carrier frequency of FD. These findings demonstrate that mutations in the gene encoding IKAP are responsible for FD. PMID:11179021

  13. Integrative proteomics, genomics, and translational immunology approaches reveal mutated forms of Proteolipid Protein 1 (PLP1) and mutant-specific immune response in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Qendro, Veneta; Bugos, Grace A; Lundgren, Debbie H; Glynn, John; Han, May H; Han, David K

    2017-03-01

    In order to gain mechanistic insights into multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis, we utilized a multi-dimensional approach to test the hypothesis that mutations in myelin proteins lead to immune activation and central nervous system autoimmunity in MS. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of human MS brain lesions revealed seven unique mutations of PLP1; a key myelin protein that is known to be destroyed in MS. Surprisingly, in-depth genomic analysis of two MS patients at the genomic DNA and mRNA confirmed mutated PLP1 in RNA, but not in the genomic DNA. Quantification of wild type and mutant PLP RNA levels by qPCR further validated the presence of mutant PLP RNA in the MS patients. To seek evidence linking mutations in abundant myelin proteins and immune-mediated destruction of myelin, specific immune response against mutant PLP1 in MS patients was examined. Thus, we have designed paired, wild type and mutant peptide microarrays, and examined antibody response to multiple mutated PLP1 in sera from MS patients. Consistent with the idea of different patients exhibiting unique mutation profiles, we found that 13 out of 20 MS patients showed antibody responses against specific but not against all the mutant-PLP1 peptides. Interestingly, we found mutant PLP-directed antibody response against specific mutant peptides in the sera of pre-MS controls. The results from integrative proteomic, genomic, and immune analyses reveal a possible mechanism of mutation-driven pathogenesis in human MS. The study also highlights the need for integrative genomic and proteomic analyses for uncovering pathogenic mechanisms of human diseases.

  14. Role of the pyridine nitrogen in pyridoxal 5'-phosphate catalysis: activity of three classes of PLP enzymes reconstituted with deazapyridoxal 5'-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Griswold, Wait R; Toney, Michael D

    2011-09-21

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP; vitamin B(6))-catalyzed reactions have been well studied, both on enzymes and in solution, due to the variety of important reactions this cofactor catalyzes in nitrogen metabolism. Three functional groups are central to PLP catalysis: the C4' aldehyde, the O3' phenol, and the N1 pyridine nitrogen. In the literature, the pyridine nitrogen has traditionally been assumed to be protonated in enzyme active sites, with the protonated pyridine ring providing resonance stabilization of carbanionic intermediates. This assumption is certainly correct for some PLP enzymes, but the structures of other active sites are incompatible with protonation of N1, and, consequently, these enzymes are expected to use PLP in the N1-unprotonated form. For example, aspartate aminotransferase protonates the pyridine nitrogen for catalysis of transamination, while both alanine racemase and O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase are expected to maintain N1 in the unprotonated, formally neutral state for catalysis of racemization and β-elimination. Herein, kinetic results for these three enzymes reconstituted with 1-deazapyridoxal 5'-phosphate, an isosteric analogue of PLP lacking the pyridine nitrogen, are compared to those for the PLP enzyme forms. They demonstrate that the pyridine nitrogen is vital to the 1,3-prototropic shift central to transamination, but not to reactions catalyzed by alanine racemase or O-acetylserine sulfhydrylase. Not all PLP enzymes require the electrophilicity of a protonated pyridine ring to enable formation of carbanionic intermediates. It is proposed that modulation of cofactor electrophilicity plays a central role in controlling reaction specificity in PLP enzymes.

  15. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  16. Unusual presentation of pelizaeus-merzbacher disease: female patient with deletion of the proteolipid protein 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Brender, Teva; Wallerstein, Donna; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is neurodegenerative leukodystrophy caused by dysfunction of the proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene on Xq22, which codes for an essential myelin protein. As an X-linked condition, PMD primarily affects males; however there have been a small number of affected females reported in the medical literature with a variety of different mutations in this gene. No affected females to date have a deletion like our patient. In addition to this, our patient has skewed X chromosome inactivation which adds to her presentation as her unaffected mother also carries the mutation.

  17. Unusual Presentation of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease: Female Patient with Deletion of the Proteolipid Protein 1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Brender, Teva; Wallerstein, Donna; Sum, John; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is neurodegenerative leukodystrophy caused by dysfunction of the proteolipid protein 1 (PLP1) gene on Xq22, which codes for an essential myelin protein. As an X-linked condition, PMD primarily affects males; however there have been a small number of affected females reported in the medical literature with a variety of different mutations in this gene. No affected females to date have a deletion like our patient. In addition to this, our patient has skewed X chromosome inactivation which adds to her presentation as her unaffected mother also carries the mutation. PMID:25789183

  18. Biologically relevant conformational features of linear and cyclic proteolipid protein (PLP) peptide analogues obtained by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kordopati, Golfo G; Tzoupis, Haralambos; Troganis, Anastassios N; Tsivgoulis, Gerasimos M; Golic Grdadolnik, Simona; Simal, Carmen; Tselios, Theodore V

    2017-07-29

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) is one of the main proteins of myelin sheath that are destroyed during the progress of multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunodominant PLP139-151 epitope is known to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, animal model of MS), wherein residues 144 and 147 are recognized by T cell receptor (TCR) during the formation of trimolecular complex with peptide-antigen and major histocompability complex. The conformational behavior of linear and cyclic peptide analogues of PLP, namely PLP139-151 and cyclic (139-151) (L(144), R(147)) PLP139-151, have been studied in solution by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods in combination with unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that the side chains of mutated amino acids in the cyclic analogue have different spatial orientation compared with the corresponding side chains of the linear analogue, which can lead to reduced affinity to TCR. NMR experiments combined with theoretical calculations pave the way for the design and synthesis of potent restricted peptides of immunodominant PLP139-151 epitope as well as non peptide mimetics that rises as an ultimate goal.

  19. Biologically relevant conformational features of linear and cyclic proteolipid protein (PLP) peptide analogues obtained by high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordopati, Golfo G.; Tzoupis, Haralambos; Troganis, Anastassios N.; Tsivgoulis, Gerasimos M.; Golic Grdadolnik, Simona; Simal, Carmen; Tselios, Theodore V.

    2017-07-01

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) is one of the main proteins of myelin sheath that are destroyed during the progress of multiple sclerosis (MS). The immunodominant PLP139-151 epitope is known to induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, animal model of MS), wherein residues 144 and 147 are recognized by T cell receptor (TCR) during the formation of trimolecular complex with peptide-antigen and major histocompability complex. The conformational behavior of linear and cyclic peptide analogues of PLP, namely PLP139-151 and cyclic (139-151) (L144, R147) PLP139-151, have been studied in solution by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods in combination with unrestrained molecular dynamics simulations. The results indicate that the side chains of mutated amino acids in the cyclic analogue have different spatial orientation compared with the corresponding side chains of the linear analogue, which can lead to reduced affinity to TCR. NMR experiments combined with theoretical calculations pave the way for the design and synthesis of potent restricted peptides of immunodominant PLP139-151 epitope as well as non peptide mimetics that rises as an ultimate goal.

  20. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease in a family of Portuguese origin caused by a point mutation in exon 5 of the proteolipid protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, V.M.; Boyadjiev, S.; Dlouhy, S.R.

    1995-02-13

    Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of an affected male with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) showed a slight change in mobility of amplified exon 5 of the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene. The exon was sequenced and a G{r_arrow}A transition at codon 216 was found. This mutation eliminates a BstNI restriction site and creates a MaeI restriction site. In 1989, Gencic et al. reported a mutation that destroyed the same BstNI site, but resulted in a substitution at codon 15. The mutation we report here is also present in the patient`s mother and her male fetus as determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis of amniocytes. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Mutations in Ehrlichia chaffeensis Causing Polar Effects in Gene Expression and Differential Host Specificities.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chuanmin; Nair, Arathy D S; Jaworski, Deborah C; Ganta, Roman R

    2015-01-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis, a tick-borne rickettsial, is responsible for human monocytic ehrlichiosis. In this study, we assessed E. chaffeensis insertion mutations impacting the transcription of genes near the insertion sites. We presented evidence that the mutations within the E. chaffeensis genome at four genomic locations cause polar effects in altering gene expressions. We also reported mutations causing attenuated growth in deer (the pathogen's reservoir host) and in dog (an incidental host), but not in its tick vector, Amblyomma americanum. This is the first study documenting insertion mutations in E. chaffeensis that cause polar effects in altering gene expression from the genes located upstream and downstream to insertion sites and the differential requirements of functionally active genes of the pathogen for its persistence in vertebrate and tick hosts. This study is important in furthering our knowledge on E. chaffeensis pathogenesis.

  2. Differential gene expression patterns between smokers and non-smokers: cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Vink, Jacqueline M; Jansen, Rick; Brooks, Andy; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Grootheest, Gerard; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Jan H; Penninx, Brenda W; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2017-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms causing smoking-induced health decline are largely unknown. To elucidate the molecular pathways involved in cause and consequences of smoking behavior, we conducted a genome-wide gene expression study in peripheral blood samples targeting 18 238 genes. Data of 743 smokers, 1686 never smokers and 890 ex-smokers were available from two population-based cohorts from the Netherlands. In addition, data of 56 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for ever smoking were used. One hundred thirty-two genes were differentially expressed between current smokers and never smokers (P < 1.2 × 10(-6) , Bonferroni correction). The most significant genes were G protein-coupled receptor 15 (P < 1 × 10(-150) ) and leucine-rich repeat neuronal 3 (P < 1 × 10(-44) ). The smoking-related genes were enriched for immune system, blood coagulation, natural killer cell and cancer pathways. By taking the data of ex-smokers into account, expression of these 132 genes was classified into reversible (94 genes), slowly reversible (31 genes), irreversible (6 genes) or inconclusive (1 gene). Expression of 6 of the 132 genes (three reversible and three slowly reversible) was confirmed to be reactive to smoking as they were differentially expressed in monozygotic pairs discordant for smoking. Cis-expression quantitative trait loci for GPR56 and RARRES3 (downregulated in smokers) were associated with increased number of cigarettes smoked per day in a large genome-wide association meta-analysis, suggesting a causative effect of GPR56 and RARRES3 expression on smoking behavior. In conclusion, differential gene expression patterns in smokers are extensive and cluster in several underlying disease pathways. Gene expression differences seem mainly direct consequences of smoking, and largely reversible after smoking cessation. However, we also identified DNA variants that may influence smoking behavior via the mediating gene expression.

  3. Differential gene expression patterns between smokers and non‐smokers: cause or consequence?

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Rick; Brooks, Andy; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Grootheest, Gerard; de Geus, Eco; Smit, Jan H.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The molecular mechanisms causing smoking‐induced health decline are largely unknown. To elucidate the molecular pathways involved in cause and consequences of smoking behavior, we conducted a genome‐wide gene expression study in peripheral blood samples targeting 18 238 genes. Data of 743 smokers, 1686 never smokers and 890 ex‐smokers were available from two population‐based cohorts from the Netherlands. In addition, data of 56 monozygotic twin pairs discordant for ever smoking were used. One hundred thirty‐two genes were differentially expressed between current smokers and never smokers (P < 1.2 × 10−6, Bonferroni correction). The most significant genes were G protein‐coupled receptor 15 (P < 1 × 10−150) and leucine‐rich repeat neuronal 3 (P < 1 × 10−44). The smoking‐related genes were enriched for immune system, blood coagulation, natural killer cell and cancer pathways. By taking the data of ex‐smokers into account, expression of these 132 genes was classified into reversible (94 genes), slowly reversible (31 genes), irreversible (6 genes) or inconclusive (1 gene). Expression of 6 of the 132 genes (three reversible and three slowly reversible) was confirmed to be reactive to smoking as they were differentially expressed in monozygotic pairs discordant for smoking. Cis‐expression quantitative trait loci for GPR56 and RARRES3 (downregulated in smokers) were associated with increased number of cigarettes smoked per day in a large genome‐wide association meta‐analysis, suggesting a causative effect of GPR56 and RARRES3 expression on smoking behavior. In conclusion, differential gene expression patterns in smokers are extensive and cluster in several underlying disease pathways. Gene expression differences seem mainly direct consequences of smoking, and largely reversible after smoking cessation. However, we also identified DNA variants that may influence smoking behavior via the mediating gene

  4. Homology-based molecular modelling of PLP-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Mmorganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Tahanejad, F S; Naderi-Manesh, H; Habibinejad, B; Mahmoudian, M

    2000-06-01

    The 3-D structural information is a prerequisite for a rational ligand design. In the absence of experimental data, model building on the basis of a known 3-D structure of a homologous protein is at present the only reliable method to obtain structural information. A homology model building study of the pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent histidine decarboxylase from Morganella morganii (HDC-MM) has been carried out based on the crystal structure of the aspartate aminotransferase from Escherichia coli (AAT-EC). The primary sequences of AAT-EC and HDC-MM were aligned by automated alignment procedure. A 3-D model of HDC-MM was constructed by copying the coordinates of the residues from the crystal structure of AAT-EC into the corresponding residues in HDC-MM. After energy-minimization of the resulting 3-D model of HDC-MM, possible active site residues were identified by fitting the substrate (l-histidine) into the proposed active-site. In our model, several residues, which have an important role in the AAT-EC active-site, are located in positions spatially identical to those in AAT-EC structure. The back-bone of the modelled active site pocket is constructed by residues; Gly-92, Gly-93, Thr-93, Ser-115, Asp-200, Ala-202, Ser-229 and Lys-232 together with residues Asn-8, His-119, Thr-171, His-198, Leu-203, His-231, Ser-236 and Ile-238. In the ligand binding site, it appears that the HDC-MM model will position l-histidine (substrate) in the area consisting of the residues; Glu-29, Ser-30, Leu-38, His-231 and Lys-232. The nitrogen atom of the imidazole ring (N2) of the substrate is predicted to interact with the carboxylate group of Ser-30. The alpha-carboxylate of histidine points toward the Lys-232 to have electrostatic interaction with its side chain nitrogen atom (N(Z)). In conclusion, this combination of sequence and 3-D structural homology between AAT-EC and HDC-MM model could provide insight in assigning the probable active site residues.

  5. Identification of candidate cancer-causing genes in mouse brain tumors by retroviral tagging

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Fredrik K.; Brodd, Josefin; Eklöf, Charlotta; Ferletta, Maria; Hesselager, Göran; Tiger, Carl-Fredrik; Uhrbom, Lene; Westermark, Bengt

    2004-01-01

    Murine retroviruses may cause malignant tumors in mice by insertional mutagenesis of host genes. The use of retroviral tagging as a means of identifying cancer-causing genes has, however, almost entirely been restricted to hematopoietic tumors. The aim of this study was to develop a system allowing for the retroviral tagging of candidate genes in malignant brain tumors. Mouse gliomas were induced by a recombinant Moloney murine leukemia virus encoding platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) B-chain. The underlying idea was that tumors evolve through a combination of PDGF-mediated autocrine growth stimulation and insertional mutagenesis of genes that cooperate with PDGF in gliomagenesis. Common insertion sites (loci that were tagged in more than one tumor) were identified by cloning and sequencing retroviral flanking segments, followed by blast searches of mouse genome databases. A number of candidate brain tumor loci (Btls) were identified. Several of these Btls correspond to known tumor-causing genes; these findings strongly support the underlying idea of our experimental approach. Other Btls harbor genes with a hitherto unproven role in transformation or oncogenesis. Our findings indicate that retroviral tagging with a growth factor-encoding virus may be a powerful means of identifying candidate tumor-causing genes in nonhematopoietic tumors. PMID:15273287

  6. A single gene causes both male sterility and segregation distortion in Drosophila hybrids*

    PubMed Central

    Phadnis, Nitin; Orr, H. Allen

    2008-01-01

    A central goal of evolutionary biology is to identify the genes and evolutionary forces that cause speciation, the emergence of reproductive isolation between populations. Despite the identification of several genes that cause hybrid sterility or inviability— many of which have evolved rapidly under positive Darwinian selection— little is known about the ecological or genomic forces that drive the evolution of postzygotic isolation. Here we show that the same gene, Overdrive, causes both male sterility and segregation distortion in F1 hybrids between the Bogota and USA subspecies of Drosophila pseudoobscura. This segregation distorter gene is essential for hybrid sterility, a strong reproductive barrier between these young taxa. Our results suggest that genetic conflict may be an important evolutionary force in speciation. PMID:19074311

  7. Human Genetic Disorders Caused by Mutations in Genes Encoding Biosynthetic Enzymes for Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans*

    PubMed Central

    Mizumoto, Shuji; Ikegawa, Shiro; Sugahara, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    A number of genetic disorders are caused by mutations in the genes encoding glycosyltransferases and sulfotransferases, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) side chains of proteoglycans, including chondroitin sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and heparan sulfate. The phenotypes of these genetic disorders reflect disturbances in crucial biological functions of GAGs in human. Recent studies have revealed that mutations in genes encoding chondroitin sulfate and dermatan sulfate biosynthetic enzymes cause various disorders of connective tissues. This minireview focuses on growing glycobiological studies of recently described genetic diseases caused by disturbances in biosynthetic enzymes for sulfated GAGs. PMID:23457301

  8. VIP Gene Deletion in Mice Causes Cardiomyopathy Associated with Upregulation of Heart Failure Genes

    SciTech Connect

    Szema, Anthony M.; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Smith, S. David; Benveniste, Helene; Katare, Rajesh Gopalrao

    2013-05-20

    Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP), a pulmonary vasodilator and inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle proliferation, is absent in pulmonary arteries of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We previously determined that targeted deletion of the VIP gene in mice leads to PAH with pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular (RV) dilatation. Whether the left ventricle is also affected by VIP gene deletion is unknown. In the current study, we examined if VIP knockout mice (VIP-/-) develop both right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) cardiomyopathy, manifested by LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction, as well as overexpression of genes conducive to heart failure.

  9. VIP Gene Deletion in Mice Causes Cardiomyopathy Associated with Upregulation of Heart Failure Genes

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M.; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Smith, S. David; Benveniste, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP), a pulmonary vasodilator and inhibitor of vascular smooth muscle proliferation, is absent in pulmonary arteries of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We previously determined that targeted deletion of the VIP gene in mice leads to PAH with pulmonary vascular remodeling and right ventricular (RV) dilatation. Whether the left ventricle is also affected by VIP gene deletion is unknown. In the current study, we examined if VIP knockout mice (VIP−/−) develop both right (RV) and left ventricular (LV) cardiomyopathy, manifested by LV dilatation and systolic dysfunction, as well as overexpression of genes conducive to heart failure. Methods We examined VIP−/−and wild type (WT) mice using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for evidence of cardiomyopathy associated with biventricular dilation and wall thickness changes. Lung tissue from VIP−/− and WT mice was subjected to whole-genome gene microarray analysis. Results Lungs from VIP−/− mice showed overexpression of cardiomyopathy genes: Myh1 was upregulated 224 times over WT, and Mylpf was increased 72 fold. Tnnt3 was increased 105 times and tnnc2 181 fold. Hearts were dilated in VIP−/− mice, with thinning of LV wall and increase in RV and LV chamber size, though RV enlargement varied. Weights of VIP−/− mice were consistently lower. Conclusions Critically-important heart failure-related genes are upregulated in VIP−/− mice associated with the spontaneous cardiomyopathy phenotype, involving both left and right ventricles, suggesting that loss of the VIP gene orchestrates a panoply of pathogenic genes which are detrimental to both left and right cardiac homeostasis. PMID:23700405

  10. GeneCOST: a novel scoring-based prioritization framework for identifying disease causing genes.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Bugra; Sağıroğlu, Mahmut; Demirci, Hüseyin

    2015-11-15

    Due to the big data produced by next-generation sequencing studies, there is an evident need for methods to extract the valuable information gathered from these experiments. In this work, we propose GeneCOST, a novel scoring-based method to evaluate every gene for their disease association. Without any prior filtering and any prior knowledge, we assign a disease likelihood score to each gene in correspondence with their variations. Then, we rank all genes based on frequency, conservation, pedigree and detailed variation information to find out the causative reason of the disease state. We demonstrate the usage of GeneCOST with public and real life Mendelian disease cases including recessive, dominant, compound heterozygous and sporadic models. As a result, we were able to identify causative reason behind the disease state in top rankings of our list, proving that this novel prioritization framework provides a powerful environment for the analysis in genetic disease studies alternative to filtering-based approaches. GeneCOST software is freely available at www.igbam.bilgem.tubitak.gov.tr/en/softwares/genecost-en/index.html. buozer@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of apo, holo, and inactivator bound GABA-at reveal the role of active site residues in PLP dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gökcan, Hatice; Monard, Gerald; Sungur Konuklar, F Aylin

    2016-07-01

    The pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) cofactor is a significant organic molecule in medicinal chemistry. It is often found covalently bound to lysine residues in proteins to form PLP dependent enzymes. An example of this family of PLP dependent enzymes is γ-aminobutyric acid aminotransferase (GABA-AT) which is responsible for the degradation of the neurotransmitter GABA. Its inhibition or inactivation can be used to prevent the reduction of GABA concentration in brain which is the source of several neurological disorders. As a test case for PLP dependent enzymes, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of GABA-AT to reveal the roles of the protein residues and its cofactor. Three different states have been considered: the apoenzyme, the holoenzyme, and the inactive state obtained after the suicide inhibition by vigabatrin. Different protonation states have also been considered for PLP and two key active site residues: Asp298 and His190. Together, 24 independent molecular dynamics trajectories have been simulated for a cumulative total of 2.88 µs. Our results indicate that, unlike in aqueous solution, the PLP pyridine moiety is protonated in GABA-AT. This is a consequence of a pKa shift triggered by a strong charge-charge interaction with an ionic "diad" formed by Asp298 and His190 that would help the activation of the first half-reaction of the catalytic mechanism in GABA-AT: the conversion of PLP to free pyridoxamine phosphate (PMP). In addition, our MD simulations exhibit additional strong hydrogen bond networks between the protein and PLP: the phosphate group is held in place by the donation of at least three hydrogen bonds while the carbonyl oxygen of the pyridine ring interacts with Gln301; Phe181 forms a π-π stacking interaction with the pyridine ring and works as a gate keeper with the assistance of Val300. All these interactions are hypothesized to help maintain free PMP in place inside the protein active site to facilitate the second half

  12. Mutation in TNXB gene causes moderate to severe Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Carolyn S; Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    We report a 28-year-old female who presented with severe joint pain, chronic muscle weakness, Raynaud’s phenomenon, and hypermobility. She was found to have a 6074A > T nucleotide transition in the TNXB gene causing an amino acid protein change at Asp2025Val classified as likely pathogenic. We add this clinical report to the literature and classical human disease gene catalogs to identify this specific mutation as disease-causing. This gene variant was reported previously in a different 36-year-old patient who shared our patient’s symptoms of joint hypermobility, skeletal and joint pain, skin elasticity and musculoskeletal problems, thereby causing a more severe presentation than seen in the hypermobility type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). At the time of writing, a few mutations in the TNXB gene have been recognized as pathogenic causing EDS due to tenascin-X deficiency, but the variant identified in our patient has not been recognized as pathogenic in online genetic databases. Our case study in combination with peer-reviewed literature suggests that the 6074A > T nucleotide transition in the TNXB gene may be classified as disease-causing for EDS due to tenascin-X deficiency.

  13. Relative paucity of genes causing inviability in hybrids between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans.

    PubMed Central

    Coyne, J A; Simeonidis, S; Rooney, P

    1998-01-01

    Using deficiencies from Drosophila melanogaster, we looked for genomic regions in the sister species D. simulans that could cause lethality when hemizygous on a hybrid genetic background. Such genotypes allow hemizygous genes from one species to interact with heterozygous genes from other species and may correspond to the kinds of genotypes causing Haldane's rule, the observation that if only one gender is sterile or inviable in species hybrids, it is nearly always the heterogametic sex. A survey of roughly 50% of the D. simulans genome (114 chromosome regions) revealed only four regions causing hybrid lethality and five causing severe reductions in hybrid viability. However, the viability of all of these genotypes was at least partially restored by rearing hybrids at lower temperature or using different genetic backgrounds from D. simulans. We therefore detected no D. simulans chromosome regions causing unconditional hybrid lethality, although several regions were shown to be deleterious under most tested temperatures and genetic backgrounds. The relative paucity of "inviability genes" supports the idea, suggested by work on other species, that hybrid inviability between closely related species might be caused by interactions among relatively few genes, while hybrid sterility may involve many more loci. PMID:9799261

  14. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-05-31

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies.

  15. Identification of Genetic Causes of Inherited Peripheral Neuropathies by Targeted Gene Panel Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soo Hyun; Hong, Young Bin; Hyun, Young Se; Nam, Da Eun; Kwak, Geon; Hwang, Sun Hee; Choi, Byung-Ok; Chung, Ki Wha

    2016-01-01

    Inherited peripheral neuropathies (IPN), which are a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous peripheral nerve disorders including Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), exhibit progressive degeneration of muscles in the extremities and loss of sensory function. Over 70 genes have been reported as genetic causatives and the number is still growing. We prepared a targeted gene panel for IPN diagnosis based on next generation sequencing (NGS). The gene panel was designed to detect mutations in 73 genes reported to be genetic causes of IPN or related peripheral neuropathies, and to detect duplication of the chromosome 17p12 region, the major genetic cause of CMT1A. We applied the gene panel to 115 samples from 63 non-CMT1A families, and isolated 15 pathogenic or likely-pathogenic mutations in eight genes from 25 patients (17 families). Of them, eight mutations were unreported variants. Of particular interest, this study revealed several very rare mutations in the SPTLC2, DCTN1, and MARS genes. In addition, the effectiveness of the detection of CMT1A was confirmed by comparing five 17p12-nonduplicated controls and 15 CMT1A cases. In conclusion, we developed a gene panel for one step genetic diagnosis of IPN. It seems that its time- and cost-effectiveness are superior to previous tiered-genetic diagnosis algorithms, and it could be applied as a genetic diagnostic system for inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:27025386

  16. An essential cell cycle regulation gene causes hybrid inviability in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Phadnis, Nitin; Baker, EmilyClare P; Cooper, Jacob C; Frizzell, Kimberly A; Hsieh, Emily; de la Cruz, Aida Flor A; Shendure, Jay; Kitzman, Jacob O; Malik, Harmit S

    2015-12-18

    Speciation, the process by which new biological species arise, involves the evolution of reproductive barriers, such as hybrid sterility or inviability between populations. However, identifying hybrid incompatibility genes remains a key obstacle in understanding the molecular basis of reproductive isolation. We devised a genomic screen, which identified a cell cycle-regulation gene as the cause of male inviability in hybrids resulting from a cross between Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Ablation of the D. simulans allele of this gene is sufficient to rescue the adult viability of hybrid males. This dominantly acting cell cycle regulator causes mitotic arrest and, thereby, inviability of male hybrid larvae. Our genomic method provides a facile means to accelerate the identification of hybrid incompatibility genes in other model and nonmodel systems.

  17. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G.; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G.; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene. PMID:12651888

  18. Human and mouse TPIT gene mutations cause early onset pituitary ACTH deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Couture, Catherine; Gauthier, Yves; Brue, Thierry; David, Michel; Malpuech, Georges; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; Drouin, Jacques

    2003-03-15

    Tpit is a highly cell-restricted transcription factor that is required for expression of the pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) gene and for terminal differentiation of the pituitary corticotroph lineage. Its exclusive expression in pituitary POMC-expressing cells has suggested that its mutation may cause isolated deficiency of pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). We now show that Tpit-deficient mice constitute a model of isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) that is very similar to human IAD patients carrying TPIT gene mutations. Through genetic analysis of a panel of IAD patients, we show that TPIT gene mutations are associated at high frequency with early onset IAD, but not with juvenile forms of this deficiency. We identified seven different TPIT mutations, including nonsense, missense, point deletion, and a genomic deletion. This work defines congenital early onset IAD as a relatively homogeneous clinical entity caused by recessive transmission of loss-of-function mutations in the TPIT gene.

  19. Exome sequencing reveals cubilin mutation as a single-gene cause of proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H; Yilmaz, Engin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-10-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B(12) deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B(12)-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy.

  20. Exome Sequencing Reveals Cubilin Mutation as a Single-Gene Cause of Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M.; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H.; Yilmaz, Engin

    2011-01-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy. PMID:21903995

  1. Distinct Parameters in the EEG of the PLP α-SYN Mouse Model for Multiple System Atrophy Reinforce Face Validity

    PubMed Central

    Härtner, Lorenz; Keil, Tobias W. M.; Kreuzer, Matthias; Fritz, Eva Maria; Wenning, Gregor K.; Stefanova, Nadia; Fenzl, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by parkinsonian symptoms and cerebellar symptoms. Sleep disturbances also play a crucial role in MSA. One of the most convincing animal models in MSA research is the PLP α-SYN model, but to date no studies on sleep disturbances in this mouse model, frequently found in MSA patients are available. We identified spectral shifts within the EEG of the model, strikingly resembling results of clinical studies. We also characterized muscle activity during REM sleep, which is one of the key symptoms in REM sleep behavioral disorder. Spectral shifts and REM sleep-linked muscle activity were age dependent, supporting Face Validity of the PLP α-SYN model. We also strongly suggest our findings to be critically evaluated for Predictive Validity in future studies. Currently, research on MSA lacks potential compounds attenuating or curing MSA. Future drugs must prove its potential in animal models, for this our study provides potential biomarkers. PMID:28119583

  2. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles.

    PubMed

    Boone, Philip M; Campbell, Ian M; Baggett, Brett C; Soens, Zachry T; Rao, Mitchell M; Hixson, Patricia M; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R; Beaudet, Arthur L; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A; Lupski, James R

    2013-09-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles.

  3. Defective erythropoiesis caused by mutations of the thyroid hormone receptor α gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Sunmi; Han, Cho Rong; Park, Jeong Won; Zhao, Li; Zhu, Xuguang; Willingham, Mark; Bodine, David M; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2017-09-01

    Patients with mutations of the THRA gene exhibit classical features of hypothyroidism, including erythroid disorders. We previously created a mutant mouse expressing a mutated TRα1 (denoted as PV; Thra1PV/+ mouse) that faithfully reproduces the classical hypothyroidism seen in patients. Using Thra1PV/+ mice, we explored how the TRα1PV mutant acted to cause abnormalities in erythropoiesis. Thra1PV/+ mice exhibited abnormal red blood cell indices similarly as reported for patients. The total bone marrow cells and erythrocytic progenitors were markedly reduced in the bone marrow of Thra1PV/+ mice. In vitro terminal differentiation assays showed a significant reduction of mature erythrocytes in Thra1PV/+ mice. In wild-type mice, the clonogenic potential of progenitors in the erythrocytic lineage was stimulated by thyroid hormone (T3), suggesting that T3 could directly accelerate the differentiation of progenitors to mature erythrocytes. Analysis of gene expression profiles showed that the key regulator of erythropoiesis, the Gata-1 gene, and its regulated genes, such as the Klf1, β-globin, dematin genes, CAII, band3 and eALAS genes, involved in the maturation of erythrocytes, was decreased in the bone marrow cells of Thra1PV/+ mice. We further elucidated that the Gata-1 gene was a T3-directly regulated gene and that TRα1PV could impair erythropoiesis via repression of the Gata-1 gene and its regulated genes. These results provide new insights into how TRα1 mutants acted to cause erythroid abnormalities in patients with mutations of the THRA gene. Importantly, the Thra1PV/+ mouse could serve as a preclinical mouse model to identify novel molecular targets for treatment of erythroid disorders.

  4. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  5. Gene Therapy for the Retinal Degeneration of Usher Syndrome Caused by Mutations in MYO7A.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Vanda S; Williams, David S

    2015-01-20

    Usher syndrome is a deaf-blindness disorder. One of the subtypes, Usher 1B, is caused by loss of function of the gene encoding the unconventional myosin, MYO7A. A variety of different viral-based delivery approaches have been tested for retinal gene therapy to prevent the blindness of Usher 1B, and a clinical trial based on one of these approaches has begun. This review evaluates the different approaches.

  6. Gene expression caused by alkylating agents and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fram, R J; Crockett, J; Volkert, M R

    1988-09-01

    Previous work has demonstrated heterogeneous effects of methylating agents on induction of DNA damage inducible genes in Escherichia coli. These studies employed E. coli mutants that have fusions of the lac operon to genes induced by treatment with sublethal levels of alkylating agents. These mutants were selected from random insertions of the Mu-dl (Apr lac) phage by screening for induction of beta-galactosidase activity in the presence of methylmethanesulfonate or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The current report extends these findings by analyzing gene expression caused by mechlorethamine, chloroethylnitrosoureas and cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). The results demonstrate heterogeneous effects by these agents on gene expression. While 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea induces alkA, other nitrosoureas, mechlorethamine, and cis-DDP do not cause expression of this gene. Further, while all nitrosoureas caused expression of aidC, mechlorethamine and cis-DDP did not. Lastly, cis-DDP caused marked expression of a sulA fusion mutant while not inducing any of the other E. coli fusion mutants.

  7. Comprehensive detection of genes causing a phenotype using phenotype sequencing and pathway analysis.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marc; Gronenberg, Luisa; Liao, James; Lee, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Discovering all the genetic causes of a phenotype is an important goal in functional genomics. We combine an experimental design for detecting independent genetic causes of a phenotype with a high-throughput sequencing analysis that maximizes sensitivity for comprehensively identifying them. Testing this approach on a set of 24 mutant strains generated for a metabolic phenotype with many known genetic causes, we show that this pathway-based phenotype sequencing analysis greatly improves sensitivity of detection compared with previous methods, and reveals a wide range of pathways that can cause this phenotype. We demonstrate our approach on a metabolic re-engineering phenotype, the PEP/OAA metabolic node in E. coli, which is crucial to a substantial number of metabolic pathways and under renewed interest for biofuel research. Out of 2157 mutations in these strains, pathway-phenoseq discriminated just five gene groups (12 genes) as statistically significant causes of the phenotype. Experimentally, these five gene groups, and the next two high-scoring pathway-phenoseq groups, either have a clear connection to the PEP metabolite level or offer an alternative path of producing oxaloacetate (OAA), and thus clearly explain the phenotype. These high-scoring gene groups also show strong evidence of positive selection pressure, compared with strictly neutral selection in the rest of the genome.

  8. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. ); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. ); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  9. Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphatase gene that cause glycogen storage disease Type 1a

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, K.J.; Shelly, L.L.; Pan, C.J.; Sidbury, J.B.; Chou, J.Y. )

    1993-10-22

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type 1a is caused by the deficiency of d-glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), the key enzyme in glucose homeostasis. Despite both a high incidence and morbidity, the molecular mechanisms underlying this deficiency have eluded characterization. In the present study, the molecular and biochemical characterization of the human G6Pase complementary DNA, its gene, and the expressed protein, which is indistinguishable from human microsomal G6Pase are reported. Several mutations in the G6Pase gene of affected individuals that completely inactivate the enzyme have been identified. These results establish the molecular basis of this disease and open the way for future gene therapy.

  10. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Moyer, J H; Lee-Tischler, M J; Kwon, H Y; Schrick, J J; Avner, E D; Sweeney, W E; Godfrey, V L; Cacheiro, N L; Wilkinson, J E; Woychik, R P

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  11. Novel mutations of NFIX gene causing Marshall-Smith syndrome or Sotos-like syndrome: one gene, two phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Francisco; Marín-Reina, Purificación; Sanchis-Calvo, Amparo; Perez-Aytés, Antonio; Oltra, Silvestre; Roselló, Mónica; Mayo, Sonia; Monfort, Sandra; Pantoja, Jorge; Orellana, Carmen

    2015-11-01

    Only 15 point mutations in NFIX gene have been reported so far, nine of them cause the Marshall-Smith syndrome (MSS) and the remaining mutations lead to an overgrowth disorder with a less severe phenotype, defined as Sotos-like. The clinical findings in three patients with MSS and two patients with a Sotos-like phenotype are presented. Analysis of the NFIX gene was performed both by conventional or next-generation sequencing. Five de novo mutations in NFIX gene were identified, four of them not previously reported. Two frameshift mutations and a donor-splice one caused MSS, while two missense mutations in the DNA binding/dimerisation domain entailed an overgrowth syndrome with some clinical features resembling Sotos syndrome, accompanied by a marfanoid habitus, very low BMI, long narrow face, or arachnodactyly. Marshall-Smith mutations are scattered through exons 6-10 of NFIX gene, while most point mutations causing an overgrowth syndrome are clustered in exon 2. Clinical features of this overgrowth syndrome may well be considered an intermediate phenotype between Sotos and Marfan syndromes.

  12. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-01-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  13. New mutation in periaxin gene causing Charcot Marie Tooth disease in a Puerto Rican young male.

    PubMed

    Noriega, Elizabeth; Ramos, Edwardo

    2013-12-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease is an inherited peripheral neuropathy caused by mutations in more than 30 different genes. One of the genes encodes for periaxin (PRX) protein, which is required for the maintenance of peripheral nerve myelin. Individuals with PRX gene mutations have been described to present early-onset, autosomal recessive, demyelinating CMT disease or CMT4F subtype. Only 23 mutations involving the PRX gene have been reported in patients throughout the world. We describe a case of a Puerto Rican adolescent with history, neurologic examination, electromyographic data, and laboratory tests consistent with CMT4F. Genetic analysis of this individual showed a heterozygous transversion resulting in amino acid change from arginine to glycine in the PRX gene, suggesting CMT4F. We report this novel PRX mutation to expand the clinical spectrum of CMT disease.

  14. Gene amplification as a cause of inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess in two Japanese families

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yuichi; Miura, Yoshitaka; Saito, Hidehiko

    1995-12-01

    T{sub 4}-binding globulin (TBG) is the major thyroid hormone transport protein in man. Inherited abnormalities in the level of serum TBG have been classified as partial deficiency, complete deficiency, and excess. Sequencing analysis of the TBG gene, located on Xq21-22, has uncovered the molecular defects causing partial and complete deficiency. However, the mechanism leading to inherited TBG excess remains unknown. In this study, two Japanese families, F-A and F-T, with inherited TBG excess were analyzed. Serum TBG levels in hemizygous males were 58 and 44 {mu}g/mL, 3- and 2-fold the normal value, respectively. The molecule had normal properties in terms of heat stability and isoelectric focussing pattern. The sequence of the coding region and the promoter activity of the TBG gene were also indistinguishable between hemizygotes and normal subjects. The gene dosage of TBG relative to that of {beta}-globin, which is located on chromosome 11, and Duchenne muscular dystropy, which is located on Xp, was evaluated by coamplification of these target genes using polymerase chain reaction and subsequent quantitation by HPLC. The TBG/{beta}-globin ratios of the affected male and female of F-A were 3.13 and 4.13 times, respectively, that in the normal males. The TBG/Duchenne muscular dystrophy ratios were 2.92 and 2.09 times the normal value, respectively. These results are compatible with three copies of TBG gene on the affected X-chromosome. Similarly, a 2-fold increase in gene dosage was demonstrated in the affected hemizygote of F-T. A 3-fold tandem amplification of the TBG gene was shown by in situ hybridization of prometaphase and interphase chromosomes from the affected male with a biotinylated genomic TBG probe, confirming the gene dosage results. Gene amplification of TBG is the cause of inherited TBG excess in these two families. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Chromosomal Duplication Involving the Forkhead Transcription Factor Gene FOXC1 Causes Iris Hypoplasia and Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Ordan J.; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Jordan, Tim; Fox, Margaret; Ocaka, Louise; Payne, Annette; Leroy, Bart P.; Clark, Brian J.; Hitchings, Roger A.; Povey, Sue; Khaw, Peng T.; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2000-01-01

    The forkhead transcription factor gene FOXC1 (formerly FKHL7) is responsible for a number of glaucoma phenotypes in families in which the disease maps to 6p25, although mutations have not been found in all families in which the disease maps to this region. In a large pedigree with iris hypoplasia and glaucoma mapping to 6p25 (peak LOD score 6.20 [recombination fraction 0] at D6S967), no FOXC1 mutations were detected by direct sequencing. However, genotyping with microsatellite repeat markers suggested the presence of a chromosomal duplication that segregated with the disease phenotype. The duplication was confirmed in affected individuals by FISH with markers encompassing FOXC1. These results provide evidence of gene duplication causing developmental disease in humans, with increased gene dosage of either FOXC1 or other, as yet unknown genes within the duplicated segment being the probable mechanism responsible for the phenotype. PMID:11007653

  16. Horizontally acquired AT-rich genes in Escherichia coli cause toxicity by sequestering RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Lamberte, Lisa E; Baniulyte, Gabriele; Singh, Shivani S; Stringer, Anne M; Bonocora, Richard P; Stracy, Mathew; Kapanidis, Achillefs N; Wade, Joseph T; Grainger, David C

    2017-01-09

    Horizontal gene transfer permits rapid dissemination of genetic elements between individuals in bacterial populations. Transmitted DNA sequences may encode favourable traits. However, if the acquired DNA has an atypical base composition, it can reduce host fitness. Consequently, bacteria have evolved strategies to minimize the harmful effects of foreign genes. Most notably, xenogeneic silencing proteins bind incoming DNA that has a higher AT content than the host genome. An enduring question has been why such sequences are deleterious. Here, we showed that the toxicity of AT-rich DNA in Escherichia coli frequently results from constitutive transcription initiation within the coding regions of genes. Left unchecked, this causes titration of RNA polymerase and a global downshift in host gene expression. Accordingly, a mutation in RNA polymerase that diminished the impact of AT-rich DNA on host fitness reduced transcription from constitutive, but not activator-dependent, promoters.

  17. Myotonia caused by mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene CLCN1.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Michael

    2002-04-01

    Pure non-syndromic, non-dystrophic myotonia in humans is caused by mutations in the genes coding for the skeletal muscle sodium channel (SCN5A) or the skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLCN1) with similar phenotypes. Chloride-channel myotonia can be dominant (Thomsen-type myotonia) or recessive (Becker-type myotonia). More than 60 myotonia-causing mutations in the CLCN1 gene have been identified, with only a few of them being dominant. A common phenotype of dominant mutations is a dominant negative effect of mutant subunits in mutant-WT heterodimers, causing a large shift of the steady-state open probability voltage-dependence towards more positive, unphysiological voltages. The study of the properties of disease causing mutations has helped in understanding the functional properties of the CLC-1 channel that is part of a nine-member gene family of chloride channels. The large body of knowledge obtained for CLC-1 may also help to better understand the other CLC channels, three of which are also involved in genetic diseases.

  18. Gene Augmentation for X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by Mutations in RPGR

    PubMed Central

    Beltran, William A.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Lewin, Alfred S.; Hauswirth, William W.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2015-01-01

    X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP) caused by mutations in the RPGR gene is a severe and early onset form of retinal degeneration, and no treatment is currently available. Recent evidence in two clinically relevant canine models shows that adeno-associated viral (AAV)-mediated RPGR gene transfer to rods and cones can prevent disease onset and rescue photoreceptors at early- and mid-stages of degeneration. There is thus a strong incentive for conducting long-term, preclinical efficacy and safety studies, while concomitantly pursuing the detailed phenotypic characterization of XLRP disease in patients that may benefit from such corrective therapy. PMID:25301933

  19. A mutation in arylsulfatase B gene causes mucopolysuccharidosis VI in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kunieda, T.; Ikadai, H.; Desnick, R.J.

    1994-09-01

    Mucopolysuccharidosis (MPS) type VI comprises a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by the deficiency of arylsulfatase B (ARSB) and subsequent lysosomal storage of glucosaminoglycans. We have identified a mutant rat strain that has remarkable similarites to human MPS VI. Recently, we have localized the autosomal recessive gene for the mutant phenotype on rat chromosome 2 by linkage analysis. The rat chromosome 2 is syntenic with the human and mouse chromosomes on which ARSB genes were assigned. Thus the mutant rats were expected to have a mutation in the ARSB gene. A normal rat liver cDNA library was screened using the cat ARSB cDNA as a probe, and clones which cover almost all of the complete ARSB open reading frame were isolated. The nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence of the rat ARSB sequence showed 80% and 85% similarities with the human ARSB gene, respectively. The ARSB gene was assigned to rat chromosome 2 by using a rat-mouse hybrid cell panel, confirming the linkage analysis. Based on the nucleotide sequence of the normal rat ARSB gene, RT-PCR using liver RNA of the mutant rat was carried out to isolate the cDNA of the mutant rat ARSB gene. By sequencing several independent clones, the cDNA of the mutant rat was found to have a one base insertion at nucleotide 507, resulting in a frameshift mutation in the coding region of the rat ARSB gene, which introduces a stop codon in position 258 of the putative ARSB polypeptide. All affected MPS VI rats were homozygous for the mutant allele, while all phenotypically normal rats were heterozygous or homozygous for the wild type allele, indicating a perfect correspondence between the MPS VI phenotype and the genotype of the mutation. We conclude that the mutation in the ARSB gene is responsible for MPS VI in the rat, and that the mutant rat is an excellent model for study of human MPS VI pathogenesis and treatment.

  20. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes FMRI gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Zonana, J.; Gunter, K.; Peterson, K.L.; Magenis, R.E., Popovich, B.W.

    1995-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common form of inherited mental retardation and results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR1 gene. In the vast majority of cases, this is caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. We describe here a phenotypically atypical case of fragile X syndrome, caused by a deletion that includes the entire FMR1 gene and {ge}9.0 Mb of flanking DNA. The proband, RK, was a 6-year-old mentally retarded male with obesity and anal atresia. A diagnosis of fragile X syndrome was established by the failure of RK`s DNA to hybridize to a 558-bp PstI-XhoI fragment (pfxa3) specific for the 5{prime}-end of the FMR1 gene. The analysis of flanking markers in the interval from Xq26.3-q28 indicated a deletion extending from between 160-500 kb distal and 9.0 Mb proximal to the FMR1 gene. High-resolution chromosome banding confirmed a deletion with breakpoints in Xq26.3 and Xq27.3. This deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X chromosome. The maternal transmission of the deletion was confirmed by FISH using a 34-kb cosmid (c31.4) containing most of the FMR1 gene. These results indicated that RK carried a deletion of the FMR1 region with the most proximal breakpoint described to date. This patient`s unusual clinical presentation may indicate the presence of genes located in the deleted interval proximal to the FMR1 locus that are able to modify the fragile X syndrome phenotype. 36 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Host-induced gene silencing inhibits the biotrophic pathogen causing downy mildew of lettuce.

    PubMed

    Govindarajulu, Manjula; Epstein, Lynn; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) is an RNA interference-based approach in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are produced in the host plant and subsequently move into the pathogen to silence pathogen genes. As a proof-of-concept, we generated stable transgenic lettuce plants expressing siRNAs targeting potentially vital genes of Bremia lactucae, a biotrophic oomycete that causes downy mildew, the most important disease of lettuce worldwide. Transgenic plants, expressing inverted repeats of fragments of either the Highly Abundant Message #34 (HAM34) or Cellulose Synthase (CES1) genes of B. lactucae, specifically suppressed expression of these genes, resulting in greatly reduced growth and inhibition of sporulation of B. lactucae. This demonstrates that HIGS can provide effective control of B. lactucae in lettuce; such control does not rely on ephemeral resistance conferred by major resistance genes and therefore offers new opportunities for durable control of diverse diseases in numerous crops. © 2014 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Identifying photoreceptors in blind eyes caused by RPE65 mutations: Prerequisite for human gene therapy success.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Samuel G; Aleman, Tomas S; Cideciyan, Artur V; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B; Windsor, Elizabeth A M; Traboulsi, Elias I; Heon, Elise; Pittler, Steven J; Milam, Ann H; Maguire, Albert M; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M; Bennett, Jean

    2005-04-26

    Mutations in RPE65, a gene essential to normal operation of the visual (retinoid) cycle, cause the childhood blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Retinal gene therapy restores vision to blind canine and murine models of LCA. Gene therapy in blind humans with LCA from RPE65 mutations may also have potential for success but only if the retinal photoreceptor layer is intact, as in the early-disease stage-treated animals. Here, we use high-resolution in vivo microscopy to quantify photoreceptor layer thickness in the human disease to define the relationship of retinal structure to vision and determine the potential for gene therapy success. The normally cone photoreceptor-rich central retina and rod-rich regions were studied. Despite severely reduced cone vision, many RPE65-mutant retinas had near-normal central microstructure. Absent rod vision was associated with a detectable but thinned photoreceptor layer. We asked whether abnormally thinned RPE65-mutant retina with photoreceptor loss would respond to treatment. Gene therapy in Rpe65(-/-) mice at advanced-disease stages, a more faithful mimic of the humans we studied, showed success but only in animals with better-preserved photoreceptor structure. The results indicate that identifying and then targeting retinal locations with retained photoreceptors will be a prerequisite for successful gene therapy in humans with RPE65 mutations and in other retinal degenerative disorders now moving from proof-of-concept studies toward clinical trials.

  3. Altering presenilin gene activity in zebrafish embryos causes changes in expression of genes with potential involvement in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Newman, Morgan; Tucker, Ben; Nornes, Svanhild; Ward, Alister; Lardelli, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Aberrant splicing and point mutations in the human presenilin genes, PSEN1 and PSEN2, have been linked to familial forms of Alzheimer's disease. We have previously described that low-level aberrant splicing of exon 8 in zebrafish psen1 transcripts in zebrafish embryos produces potent dominant negative effects that increase psen1 transcription, cause a dramatic hydrocephalus phenotype, decreased pigmentation and other developmental defects. Similar effects are also observed after low-level interference with splicing of exon 8 of psen2. To determine the molecular etiology of these effects, we performed microarray analyses of global gene expression changes. Of the 100 genes that showed greatest dysregulation after either psen1 or psen2 manipulation, 12 genes were common to both treatments. Five of these have known function and showed increased expression: cyclin G1 (ccng1), prosaposin (psap), cathepsin Lb (ctslb), heat shock protein 70kDa (hsp70) and hatching enzyme 1 (he1). We used phylogenetic and conserved synteny analysis to confirm the orthology of zebrafish ccng1 with human CCNG1. We analyzed the expression of zebrafish ccng1 in developing embryos to 24 hours post fertilization (hpf). Decreased ccng1 expression does not rescue the hydrocephalus or pigmentation phenotypes of embryos with aberrant splicing of psen1 exon 8.

  4. Alu-mediated large deletion of the CDSN gene as a cause of peeling skin disease.

    PubMed

    Wada, T; Matsuda, Y; Muraoka, M; Toma, T; Takehara, K; Fujimoto, M; Yachie, A

    2014-10-01

    Peeling skin disease (PSD) is an autosomal recessive skin disorder caused by mutations in CDSN and is characterized by superficial peeling of the upper epidermis. Corneodesmosin (CDSN) is a major component of corneodesmosomes that plays an important role in maintaining epidermis integrity. Herein, we report a patient with PSD caused by a novel homozygous large deletion in the 6p21.3 region encompassing the CDSN gene, which abrogates CDSN expression. Several genes including C6orf15, PSORS1C1, PSORS1C2, CCHCR1, and TCF19 were also deleted, however, the patient showed only clinical features typical of PSD. The deletion size was 59.1 kb. Analysis of the sequence surrounding the breakpoint showed that both telomeric and centromeric breakpoints existed within Alu-S sequences that were oriented in opposite directions. These results suggest an Alu-mediated recombination event as the mechanism underlying the deletion in our patient.

  5. The lateral membrane organization and dynamics of myelin proteins PLP and MBP are dictated by distinct galactolipids and the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Hande; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Hendrix, Jelle; de Jonge, Jenny C; Lamb, Don C; Hoekstra, Dick; Kahya, Nicoletta; Baron, Wia

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, lipid-protein interactions are pivotal for myelin maintenance, as these interactions regulate protein transport to the myelin membrane as well as the molecular organization within the sheath. To improve our understanding of the fundamental properties of myelin, we focused here on the lateral membrane organization and dynamics of peripheral membrane protein 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) and transmembrane protein proteolipid protein (PLP) as a function of the typical myelin lipids galactosylceramide (GalC), and sulfatide, and exogenous factors such as the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-2 and fibronectin, employing an oligodendrocyte cell line, selectively expressing the desired galactolipids. The dynamics of MBP were monitored by z-scan point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), while PLP dynamics in living cells were investigated by circular scanning FCS. The data revealed that on an inert substrate the diffusion rate of 18.5-kDa MBP increased in GalC-expressing cells, while the diffusion coefficient of PLP was decreased in sulfatide-containing cells. Similarly, when cells were grown on myelination-promoting laminin-2, the lateral diffusion coefficient of PLP was decreased in sulfatide-containing cells. In contrast, PLP's diffusion rate increased substantially when these cells were grown on myelination-inhibiting fibronectin. Additional biochemical analyses revealed that the observed differences in lateral diffusion coefficients of both proteins can be explained by differences in their biophysical, i.e., galactolipid environment, specifically with regard to their association with lipid rafts. Given the persistence of pathological fibronectin aggregates in multiple sclerosis lesions, this fundamental insight into the nature and dynamics of lipid-protein interactions will be instrumental in developing myelin regenerative strategies.

  6. ISPD gene mutations are a common cause of congenital and limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Cirak, Sebahattin; Foley, Aileen Reghan; Herrmann, Ralf; Willer, Tobias; Yau, Shu; Stevens, Elizabeth; Torelli, Silvia; Brodd, Lina; Kamynina, Alisa; Vondracek, Petr; Roper, Helen; Longman, Cheryl; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Marrosu, Gianni; Nürnberg, Peter; Michele, Daniel E; Plagnol, Vincent; Hurles, Matt; Moore, Steven A; Sewry, Caroline A; Campbell, Kevin P; Voit, Thomas; Muntoni, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Dystroglycanopathies are a clinically and genetically diverse group of recessively inherited conditions ranging from the most severe of the congenital muscular dystrophies, Walker-Warburg syndrome, to mild forms of adult-onset limb-girdle muscular dystrophy. Their hallmark is a reduction in the functional glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, which can be detected in muscle biopsies. An important part of this glycosylation is a unique O-mannosylation, essential for the interaction of α-dystroglycan with extracellular matrix proteins such as laminin-α2. Mutations in eight genes coding for proteins in the glycosylation pathway are responsible for ∼50% of dystroglycanopathy cases. Despite multiple efforts using traditional positional cloning, the causative genes for unsolved dystroglycanopathy cases have escaped discovery for several years. In a recent collaborative study, we discovered that loss-of-function recessive mutations in a novel gene, called isoprenoid synthase domain containing (ISPD), are a relatively common cause of Walker-Warburg syndrome. In this article, we report the involvement of the ISPD gene in milder dystroglycanopathy phenotypes ranging from congenital muscular dystrophy to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy and identified allelic ISPD variants in nine cases belonging to seven families. In two ambulant cases, there was evidence of structural brain involvement, whereas in seven, the clinical manifestation was restricted to a dystrophic skeletal muscle phenotype. Although the function of ISPD in mammals is not yet known, mutations in this gene clearly lead to a reduction in the functional glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, which not only causes the severe Walker-Warburg syndrome but is also a common cause of the milder forms of dystroglycanopathy.

  7. Intragenomic heterogeneity of 16S rRNA genes causes overestimation of prokaryotic diversity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dong-Lei; Jiang, Xuan; Wu, Qinglong L; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2013-10-01

    Ever since Carl Woese introduced the use of 16S rRNA genes for determining the phylogenetic relationships of prokaryotes, this method has been regarded as the "gold standard" in both microbial phylogeny and ecology studies. However, intragenomic heterogeneity within 16S rRNA genes has been reported in many investigations and is believed to bias the estimation of prokaryotic diversity. In the current study, 2,013 completely sequenced genomes of bacteria and archaea were analyzed and intragenomic heterogeneity was found in 952 genomes (585 species), with 87.5% of the divergence detected being below the 1% level. In particular, some extremophiles (thermophiles and halophiles) were found to harbor highly divergent 16S rRNA genes. Overestimation caused by 16S rRNA gene intragenomic heterogeneity was evaluated at different levels using the full-length and partial 16S rRNA genes usually chosen as targets for pyrosequencing. The result indicates that, at the unique level, full-length 16S rRNA genes can produce an overestimation of as much as 123.7%, while at the 3% level, an overestimation of 12.9% for the V6 region may be introduced. Further analysis showed that intragenomic heterogeneity tends to concentrate in specific positions, with the V1 and V6 regions suffering the most intragenomic heterogeneity and the V4 and V5 regions suffering the least intragenomic heterogeneity in bacteria. This is the most up-to-date overview of the diversity of 16S rRNA genes within prokaryotic genomes. It not only provides general guidance on how much overestimation can be introduced when applying 16S rRNA gene-based methods, due to its intragenomic heterogeneity, but also recommends that, for bacteria, this overestimation be minimized using primers targeting the V4 and V5 regions.

  8. Alpharetroviral Vectors: From a Cancer-Causing Agent to a Useful Tool for Human Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suerth, Julia D.; Labenski, Verena; Schambach, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Gene therapy using integrating retroviral vectors has proven its effectiveness in several clinical trials for the treatment of inherited diseases and cancer. However, vector-mediated adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis were also observed, emphasizing the need for safer therapeutic vectors. Paradoxically, alpharetroviruses, originally discovered as cancer-causing agents, have a more random and potentially safer integration pattern compared to gammaretro- and lentiviruses. In this review, we provide a short overview of the history of alpharetroviruses and explain how they can be converted into state-of-the-art gene delivery tools with improved safety features. We discuss development of alpharetroviral vectors in compliance with regulatory requirements for clinical translation, and provide an outlook on possible future gene therapy applications. Taken together, this review is a broad overview of alpharetroviral vectors spanning the bridge from their parental virus discovery to their potential applicability in clinical settings. PMID:25490763

  9. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robert E; Lettice, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities.

  10. A deleterious mutation in the LOXHD1 gene causes autosomal recessive hearing loss in Ashkenazi Jews.

    PubMed

    Edvardson, S; Jalas, C; Shaag, A; Zenvirt, S; Landau, C; Lerer, I; Elpeleg, O

    2011-05-01

    Autosomal recessive nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (ARNSHL) in Ashkenazi Jews, is mainly caused by mutations in the GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Here we describe a novel homozygous mutation of the LOXHD1 gene resulting in a premature stop codon (R1572X) in nine patients of Ashkenazi Jewish origin who had severe-profound congenital non-progressive ARNSHL and benefited from cochlear implants. Upon screening for the mutation among 719 anonymous Ashkenazi-Jews we detected four carriers, indicating a carrier rate of 1:180 Ashkenazi Jews. This is the second reported mutation in the LOXHD1 gene, and its homozygous presence in two of 39 Ashkenazi Jewish families with congenital ARNSHL suggest that it could account for some 5% of the familial cases in this community. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. First contiguous gene deletion causing biotinidase deficiency: The enzyme deficiency in three Sri Lankan children.

    PubMed

    Senanayake, Danika Nadeen; Jasinge, Eresha A; Pindolia, Kirit; Wanigasinghe, Jithangi; Monaghan, Kristin; Suchy, Sharon F; Wei, Sainan; Jaysena, Subashini; Wolf, Barry

    2015-03-01

    We report three symptomatic children with profound biotinidase deficiency from Sri Lanka. All three children presented with typical clinical features of the disorder. The first is homozygous for a missense mutation in the BTD gene (c.98_104 del7insTCC; p.Cys33PhefsX36) that is commonly seen in the western countries, the second is homozygous for a novel missense mutation (p.Ala439Asp), and the third is the first reported instance of a contiguous gene deletion causing the enzyme deficiency. In addition, this latter finding exemplifies the importance of considering a deletion within the BTD gene for reconciling enzymatic activity with genotype, which can occur in asymptomatic children who are identified by newborn screening.

  12. Alterations to the remote control of Shh gene expression cause congenital abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robert E.; Lettice, Laura A.

    2013-01-01

    Multi-species conserved non-coding elements occur in the vertebrate genome and are clustered in the vicinity of developmentally regulated genes. Many are known to act as cis-regulators of transcription and may reside at long distances from the genes they regulate. However, the relationship of conserved sequence to encoded regulatory information and indeed, the mechanism by which these contribute to long-range transcriptional regulation is not well understood. The ZRS, a highly conserved cis-regulator, is a paradigm for such long-range gene regulation. The ZRS acts over approximately 1 Mb to control spatio-temporal expression of Shh in the limb bud and mutations within it result in a number of limb abnormalities, including polydactyly, tibial hypoplasia and syndactyly. We describe the activity of this developmental regulator and discuss a number of mechanisms by which regulatory mutations in this enhancer function to cause congenital abnormalities. PMID:23650631

  13. Hereditary juvenile cobalamin deficiency caused by mutations in the intrinsic factor gene.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Stephan M; Li, Zhongyuan; Perko, James D; Oner, Cihan; Cetin, Mualla; Altay, Cigdem; Yurtsever, Zekiye; David, Karen L; Faivre, Laurence; Ismail, Essam A; Gräsbeck, Ralph; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2005-03-15

    Hereditary juvenile megaloblastic anemia due to vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency is caused by intestinal malabsorption of cobalamin. In Imerslund-Grasbeck syndrome (IGS), cobalamin absorption is completely abolished and not corrected by the administration of intrinsic factor (IF); if untreated, the disease is fatal. Biallelic mutations either in the cubilin (CUBN) or amnionless (AMN) gene cause IGS. In a series of families clinically diagnosed with likely IGS, at least six displayed no evidence of mutations in CUBN or AMN. A genome-wide search for linkage followed by mutational analysis of candidate genes was performed in five of these families. A region in chromosome 11 showed evidence of linkage in four families. The gastric IF (GIF) gene located in this region harbored homozygous nonsense and missense mutations in these four families and in three additional families. The disease in these cases therefore should be classified as hereditary IF deficiency. Clinically, these patients resembled those with typical IGS; radiocobalamin absorption tests had been inconclusive regarding the nature of the defect. In the diagnosis of juvenile cobalamin deficiency, mutational analysis of the CUBN, AMN, and GIF genes provides a molecular characterization of the underlying defect and may be the diagnostic method of choice.

  14. Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome: A premature aging disease caused by LMNA gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray; Askjaer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Products of the LMNA gene, primarily lamin A and C, are key components of the nuclear lamina, a proteinaceous meshwork that underlies the inner nuclear membrane and is essential for proper nuclear architecture. Alterations in lamin A and C that disrupt the integrity of the nuclear lamina affect a whole repertoire of nuclear functions, causing cellular decline. In humans, hundreds of mutations in the LMNA gene have been identified and correlated with over a dozen degenerative disorders, referred to as laminopathies. These diseases include neuropathies, muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies, and premature aging diseases. This review focuses on one of the most severe laminopathies, Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which is caused by aberrant splicing of the LMNA gene and expression of a mutant product called progerin. Here, we discuss current views about the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the pathophysiology of this devastating disease, as well as the strategies being tested in vitro and in vivo to counteract progerin toxicity. In particular, progerin accumulation elicits nuclear morphological abnormalities, misregulated gene expression, defects in DNA repair, telomere shortening, and genomic instability, all of which limit cellular proliferative capacity. In patients harboring this mutation, a severe premature aging disease develops during childhood. Interestingly, progerin is also produced in senescent cells and cells from old individuals, suggesting that progerin accumulation might be a factor in physiological aging. Deciphering the molecular mechanisms whereby progerin expression leads to HGPS is an emergent area of research, which could bring us closer to understanding the pathology of aging.

  15. Absence of functional TolC protein causes increased stress response gene expression in Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The TolC protein from Sinorhizobium meliloti has previously been demonstrated to be required for establishing successful biological nitrogen fixation symbiosis with Medicago sativa. It is also needed in protein and exopolysaccharide secretion and for protection against osmotic and oxidative stresses. Here, the transcriptional profile of free-living S. meliloti 1021 tolC mutant is described as a step toward understanding its role in the physiology of the cell. Results Comparison of tolC mutant and wild-type strains transcriptomes showed 1177 genes with significantly increased expression while 325 had significantly decreased expression levels. The genes with an increased expression suggest the activation of a cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic stress responses possibly mediated by the sigma factor RpoH1 and protein homologues of the CpxRA two-component regulatory system of Enterobacteria, respectively. Stress conditions are probably caused by perturbation of the cell envelope. Consistent with gene expression data, biochemical analysis indicates that the tolC mutant suffers from oxidative stress. This is illustrated by the elevated enzyme activity levels detected for catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase. The observed increase in the expression of genes encoding products involved in central metabolism and transporters for nutrient uptake suggests a higher metabolic rate of the tolC mutant. We also demonstrated increased swarming motility in the tolC mutant strain. Absence of functional TolC caused decreased expression mainly of genes encoding products involved in nitrogen metabolism and transport. Conclusion This work shows how a mutation in the outer membrane protein TolC, common to many bacterial transport systems, affects expression of a large number of genes that act in concert to restore cell homeostasis. This finding further underlines the fundamental role of this protein in Sinorhizobium meliloti biology. PMID:20573193

  16. Sudden infant death syndrome caused by cardiac arrhythmias: only a matter of genes encoding ion channels?

    PubMed

    Sarquella-Brugada, Georgia; Campuzano, Oscar; Cesar, Sergi; Iglesias, Anna; Fernandez, Anna; Brugada, Josep; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-03-01

    Sudden infant death syndrome is the unexpected demise of a child younger than 1 year of age which remains unexplained after a complete autopsy investigation. Usually, it occurs during sleep, in males, and during the first 12 weeks of life. The pathophysiological mechanism underlying the death is unknown, and the lethal episode is considered multifactorial. However, in cases without a conclusive post-mortem diagnosis, suspicious of cardiac arrhythmias may also be considered as a cause of death, especially in families suffering from any cardiac disease associated with sudden cardiac death. Here, we review current understanding of sudden infant death, focusing on genetic causes leading to lethal cardiac arrhythmias, considering both genes encoding ion channels as well as structural proteins due to recent association of channelopathies and desmosomal genes. We support a comprehensive analysis of all genes associated with sudden cardiac death in families suffering of infant death. It allows the identification of the most plausible cause of death but also of family members at risk, providing cardiologists with essential data to adopt therapeutic preventive measures in families affected with this lethal entity.

  17. Mutations in olfactory signal transduction genes are not a major cause of human congenital general anosmia.

    PubMed

    Feldmesser, Ester; Bercovich, Dani; Avidan, Nili; Halbertal, Shmuel; Haim, Liora; Gross-Isseroff, Ruth; Goshen, Sivan; Lancet, Doron

    2007-01-01

    Anosmia affects the western world population, mostly the elderly, reaching to 5% in subjects over the age of 45 years and strongly lowering their quality of life. A smaller minority (about 0.01%) is born without a sense of smell, afflicted with congenital general anosmia (CGA). No causative genes for human CGA have been identified yet, except for some syndromic cases such as Kallman syndrome. In mice, however, deletion of any of the 3 main olfactory transduction components (guanidine triphosphate binding protein, adenylyl cyclase, and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-gated channel) causes profound reduction of physiological responses to odorants. In an attempt to identify human CGA-related mutations, we performed whole-genome linkage analysis in affected families, but no significant linkage signals were observed, probably due to the small size of families analyzed. We further carried out direct mutation screening in the 3 main olfactory transduction genes in 64 unrelated anosmic individuals. No potentially causative mutations were identified, indicating that transduction gene variations underlie human CGA rarely and that mutations in other genes have to be identified. The screened genes were found to be under purifying selection, suggesting that they play a crucial functional role not only in olfaction but also potentially in additional pathways.

  18. Autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataracts caused by a CRYAA gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Li, Fei-Feng; Yang, Min; Ma, Xu; Zhang, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Shu-Zhen; Zhu, Si-Quan

    2010-06-01

    We sought to identify the genetic defect in a four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataracts, examine the clinical features in detail and demonstrate the functional analysis of a candidate gene in the family. Family history data were recorded. Clinical and ophthalmological examinations were performed on affected and unaffected family members. All the members were genotyped with microsatellite markers at loci considered to be associated with cataracts. Two-point LOD scores were calculated using the LINKAGE program package after genotyping. A mutation was detected by dilff521229rect sequencing and verified by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Wild-type and mutant proteins were analyzed with online softwares. All affected members of this family had nuclear cataracts. Genetic analysis revealed a heterozygous previously described Arg116Cys mutation in the CRYAA gene in all of the affected members of the family but not in unaffected or 100 normal, unrelated individuals. Data generated with online software revealed that the different amino acid side chain, impact the aa116 interaction with other amino acids, thereby affecting the proteins secondary structure. This study identified a mutation in the CRYAA gene causing autosomal dominant nuclear cataracts and some patients show nystagmus or small blepharophimosis clinical features. These results provide evidence that CRYAA is a pathogenic gene for congenital cataracts, congenital cataracts are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous lens condition; at the same time, demonstrates a possible mechanism of action for the mutant gene.

  19. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Daisuke; Abe, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Takahide; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus canis (Sc) is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm(A), erm(B), or mef(A), macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  20. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; ...

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events inmore » NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.« less

  1. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O.; Ory, Daniel S.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-02-18

    Here, predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. Methods: We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism s fitness. As a result, removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. In conclusion, the results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.

  2. Establishing the precise evolutionary history of a gene improves prediction of disease-causing missense mutations.

    PubMed

    Adebali, Ogun; Reznik, Alexander O; Ory, Daniel S; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-10-01

    Predicting the phenotypic effects of mutations has become an important application in clinical genetic diagnostics. Computational tools evaluate the behavior of the variant over evolutionary time and assume that variations seen during the course of evolution are probably benign in humans. However, current tools do not take into account orthologous/paralogous relationships. Paralogs have dramatically different roles in Mendelian diseases. For example, whereas inactivating mutations in the NPC1 gene cause the neurodegenerative disorder Niemann-Pick C, inactivating mutations in its paralog NPC1L1 are not disease-causing and, moreover, are implicated in protection from coronary heart disease. We identified major events in NPC1 evolution and revealed and compared orthologs and paralogs of the human NPC1 gene through phylogenetic and protein sequence analyses. We predicted whether an amino acid substitution affects protein function by reducing the organism's fitness. Removing the paralogs and distant homologs improved the overall performance of categorizing disease-causing and benign amino acid substitutions. The results show that a thorough evolutionary analysis followed by identification of orthologs improves the accuracy in predicting disease-causing missense mutations. We anticipate that this approach will be used as a reference in the interpretation of variants in other genetic diseases as well.Genet Med 18 10, 1029-1036.

  3. Novel mutations in the CLN6 gene causing a variant late infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Carla A; Espinola, Janice; Huo, Liang; Kohlschütter, Johannes; Persaud Sawin, Dixie-Ann; Minassian, Berge; Bessa, Carlos J P; Guimarães, A; Stephan, Dietrich A; Sá Miranda, Maria Clara; MacDonald, Marcy E; Ribeiro, Maria Gil; Boustany, Rose-Mary N

    2003-05-01

    The neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCLs) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive neurodegenerative diseases comprising Batten and other related diseases plus numerous variants. They are characterized by progressive neuronal cell death. The CLN6 gene was recently identified, mutations in which cause one of the variant late infantile forms of NCL (vLINCL). We describe four novel mutations in the CLN6 gene. This brings the total number of CLN6 mutations known to 11 in 38 families. This suggests that the CLN6 gene may be highly mutable. An American patient of Irish/French/Native American origin was heterozygous for a 4-bp insertion (c.267_268insAACG) in exon 3. The other allele had a point mutation (c.898T>C) in exon 7 resulting in a W300R amino acid change. Two Trinidadian siblings of Indian origin were homozygous for a mutation at the 5' donor splice site of exon 4 (IVS4+1G>T), affecting the first base of the invariant GT at the beginning of intron 4. The fourth novel mutation, a double deletion of 4 bp and 1 bp in exon 7 (c.829_832delGTCG;c.837delG), was identified in a Portuguese patient heterozygous for the I154del Portuguese CLN6 mutation. Four of the 11 mutations identified are in exon 4. Three Portuguese patients with clinical profiles similar to CLN6 patients without defects in CLN6 or other known NCL genes are described. We conclude the following: 1) the CLN6 gene may be a highly mutable gene; 2) exon 4 must code for a segment of the protein crucial for function; 3) vLINCL disease in Portugal is genetically heterogeneous; 4) the I154del accounts for 81.25% of affected CLN6 Portuguese alleles; and 5) three vLINCL Portuguese patients may have defects in a new NCL gene.

  4. A single gene causes an interspecific difference in pigmentation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ahmed-Braimah, Yasir H; Sweigart, Andrea L

    2015-05-01

    The genetic basis of species differences remains understudied. Studies in insects have contributed significantly to our understanding of morphological evolution. Pigmentation traits in particular have received a great deal of attention and several genes in the insect pigmentation pathway have been implicated in inter- and intraspecific differences. Nonetheless, much remains unknown about many of the genes in this pathway and their potential role in understudied taxa. Here we genetically analyze the puparium color difference between members of the virilis group of Drosophila. The puparium of Drosophila virilis is black, while those of D. americana, D. novamexicana, and D. lummei are brown. We used a series of backcross hybrid populations between D. americana and D. virilis to map the genomic interval responsible for the difference between this species pair. First, we show that the pupal case color difference is caused by a single Mendelizing factor, which we ultimately map to an ∼11-kb region on chromosome 5. The mapped interval includes only the first exon and regulatory region(s) of the dopamine N-acetyltransferase gene (Dat). This gene encodes an enzyme that is known to play a part in the insect pigmentation pathway. Second, we show that this gene is highly expressed at the onset of pupation in light brown taxa (D. americana and D. novamexicana) relative to D. virilis, but not in the dark brown D. lummei. Finally, we examine the role of Dat in adult pigmentation between D. americana (heavily melanized) and D. novamexicana (lightly melanized) and find no discernible effect of this gene in adults. Our results demonstrate that a single gene is entirely or almost entirely responsible for a morphological difference between species.

  5. Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy caused by a mutation in the GATOR1 complex gene NPRL3.

    PubMed

    Korenke, Georg-Christoph; Eggert, Marlene; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Sander, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in NPRL3, one of three genes that encode proteins of the mTORC1-regulating GATOR1 complex, have recently been reported to cause cortical dysplasia with focal epilepsy. We have now analyzed a multiplex epilepsy family by whole exome sequencing and identified a frameshift mutation (NM_001077350.2; c.1522delG; p.E508Rfs*46) within exon 13 of NPRL3. This truncating mutation causes an epilepsy phenotype characterized by early childhood onset of mainly nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The penetrance in our family was low (three affected out of six mutation carriers), compared to families with either ion channel- or DEPDC5-associated familial nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. The absence of apparent structural brain abnormalities suggests that mutations in NPRL3 are not necessarily associated with focal cortical dysplasia but might be able to cause epilepsy by different, yet unknown pathomechanisms. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 International League Against Epilepsy.

  6. Molecular analysis of the genes causing recessive demyelinating Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Makiko; Abe, Akiko; Murakami, Tatsufumi; Yamao, Satoshi; Arai, Hidee; Hattori, Hideji; Iai, Mizue; Watanabe, Kyoko; Oka, Nobuyuki; Chida, Keiji; Kishikawa, Yumiko; Hayasaka, Kiyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), the most common hereditary neuropathy, has been classified into two types, demyelinating and axonal types. We previously analyzed the genes causing dominant demyelinating CMT in 227 Japanese patients to identify the genetic background, but could not find any mutations in 110 patients. To investigate the frequency of patients with autosomal recessive demyelinating CMT (CMT4) mutations, we analyzed the coding sequence of known causative genes of CMT4 in 103 demyelinating CMT patients, excluding seven patients owing to lack of specimens. We found one patient with a GDAP1 mutation, one patient with an MTMR2 mutation, two patients with SH3TC2/KIAA1985 mutations and three patients with FGD4 mutations. Twelve patients, including five previously detected patients with PRX mutations, were diagnosed as CMT4, accounting for 5.5% of demyelinating CMT. In the patient with GDAP1 mutation, only one mutation inherited from his mother was detected by genomic sequencing. Analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using messenger RNA (mRNA) from the patient's leukocytes revealed the absence of transcription from the allele inherited from his father, suggesting the existence of one more mutation leading to a lack or destabilization of mRNA. Most patients carrying CMT4 gene mutations present with early-onset and slowly progressive symptoms, which may be associated with the function of mutants. We could not identify the disease-causing gene in 96 patients (about 45%). Further studies including studies with next-generation sequencers will be required to identify the causative gene in Japanese CMT.

  7. Application of Bayesian networks for inferring cause-effect relations from gene expression profiles of cancer versus normal cells.

    PubMed

    Polanski, Andrzej; Polanska, Joanna; Jarzab, Michal; Wiench, Malgorzata; Jarzab, Barbara

    2007-10-01

    The paper is devoted to two questions: whether distinction of causes versus effects of neoplasia leaves a signature in the cancer versus normal gene expression profiles and whether roles of genes, "causes" or "effects", can be inferred from repeated measurements of gene expressions. We model joint probability distributions of logarithms of gene expressions with the use of Bayesian networks (BN). Fitting our models to real data confirms that our BN models have the ability to explain some aspects of observational evidence from DNA microarray experiments. Effects of neoplastic transformation are well seen among genes with the highest power to differentiate between normal and cancer cells. Likelihoods of BNs depend on the biological role of selected genes, defined by Gene Ontology. Also predictions of our BN models are coherent with the set of putative causes and effects constructed based on our data set of papillary thyroid cancer.

  8. Aneuploidy Causes Tissue-Specific Qualitative Changes in Global Gene Expression Patterns in Maize1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Makarevitch, Irina; Harris, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Segmental aneuploidy refers to the relative excess or deficiency of specific chromosome regions. This condition results in gene dosage imbalance and often causes severe phenotypic alterations in plants and animals. The mechanisms by which gene dosage imbalance affects gene expression and phenotype are not completely clear. The effects of aneuploidy on the transcriptome may depend on the types of cells analyzed and on the developmental stage. We performed global gene expression profiling to determine the effects of segmental aneuploidy on gene expression levels in two different maize (Zea mays) tissues and a detailed analysis of expression of 30 genes affected by aneuploidy in multiple maize tissues. Different maize tissues varied in the frequency at which genes located outside of the aneuploid regions are positively or negatively regulated as well as in the degree of gene dosage compensation. Multiple genes demonstrated qualitative changes in gene expression due to aneuploidy, when the gene became ectopically expressed or completely silenced in aneuploids relative to wild-type plants. Our data strongly suggested that quantitative changes in gene expression at developmental transition points caused by variation in gene copy number progressed through tissue development and resulted in stable qualitative changes in gene expression patterns. Thus, aneuploidy in maize results in alterations of gene expression patterns that differ between tissues and developmental stages of maize seedlings. PMID:20018594

  9. Hepatoerythropoietic Porphyria Caused by a Novel Homoallelic Mutation in Uroporphyrinogen Decarboxylase Gene in Egyptian Patients.

    PubMed

    Farrag, M S; Mikula, I; Richard, E; Saudek, V; De Verneuil, H; Martásek, P

    2015-01-01

    Porphyrias are metabolic disorders resulting from mutations in haem biosynthetic pathway genes. Hepatoerythropoietic porphyria (HEP) is a rare type of porphyria caused by the deficiency of the fifth enzyme (uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, UROD) in this pathway. The defect in the enzymatic activity is due to biallelic mutations in the UROD gene. Currently, 109 UROD mutations are known. The human disease has an early onset, manifesting in infancy or early childhood with red urine, skin photosensitivity in sun-exposed areas, and hypertrichosis. Similar defects and links to photosensitivity and hepatopathy exist in several animal models, including zebrafish and mice. In the present study, we report a new mutation in the UROD gene in Egyptian patients with HEP. We show that the homozygous c.T163A missense mutation leads to a substitution of a conserved phenylalanine (amino acid 55) for isoleucine in the enzyme active site, causing a dramatic decrease in the enzyme activity (19 % of activity of wild-type enzyme). Inspection of the UROD crystal structure shows that Phe-55 contacts the substrate and is located in the loop that connects helices 2 and 3. Phe-55 is strictly conserved in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic UROD. The F55I substitution likely interferes with the enzyme-substrate interaction.

  10. Novel mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein gene causing abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Ishibashi, S; Osuga, J; Tozawa, R; Harada, K; Yahagi, N; Shionoiri, F; Iizuka, Y; Tamura, Y; Nagai, R; Illingworth, D R; Gotoda, T; Yamada, N

    2000-08-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an inherited disease characterized by the virtual absence of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins from plasma. Only limited numbers of families have been screened for mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene. To clarify the genetic basis of clinical diversity of ABL, mutations of the MTP gene have been screened in 4 unrelated patients with ABL. Three novel mutations have been identified: a frameshift mutation caused by a single adenine deletion at position 1389 of the cDNA, and a missense mutation, Asn780Tyr, each in homozygous forms; and a splice site mutation, 2218-2A-->G, in a compound heterozygous form. The frameshift and splice site mutations are predicted to encode truncated forms of MTP. When transiently expressed in Cos-1 cells, the Asn780Tyr mutant MTP bound protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) but displayed negligible MTP activity. It is of interest that the patient having the Asn780Tyr mutation, a 27-year-old male, has none of the manifestations characteristic of classic ABL even though his plasma apoB and vitamin E were virtually undetectable. These results indicated that defects of the MTP gene are the proximal cause of ABL.

  11. Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy Caused by a Novel Frameshift in the BAG3 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Moncayo-Arlandi, Javier; Allegue, Catarina; Iglesias, Anna; Mangas, Alipio; Brugada, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Background Dilated cardiomyopathy, a major cause of chronic heart failure and cardiac transplantation, is characterized by left ventricular or biventricular heart dilatation. In nearly 50% of cases the pathology is inherited, and more than 60 genes have been reported as disease-causing. However, in 30% of familial cases the mutation remains unidentified even after comprehensive genetic analysis. This study clinically and genetically assessed a large Spanish family affected by dilated cardiomyopathy to search for novel variations. Methods and Results Our study included a total of 100 family members. Clinical assessment was performed in alive, and genetic analysis was also performed in alive and 1 deceased relative. Genetic screening included resequencing of 55 genes associated with sudden cardiac death, and Sanger sequencing of main disease-associated genes. Genetic analysis identified a frame-shift variation in BAG3 (p.H243Tfr*64) in 32 patients. Genotype-phenotype correlation identified substantial heterogeneity in disease expression. Of 32 genetic carriers (one deceased), 21 relatives were clinically affected, and 10 were asymptomatic. Seventeen of the symptomatic genetic carriers exhibited proto-diastolic septal knock by echocardiographic assessment. Conclusions We report p.H243Tfr*64_BAG3 as a novel pathogenic variation responsible for familial dilated cardiomyopathy. This variation correlates with a more severe phenotype of the disease, mainly in younger individuals. Genetic analysis in families, even asymptomatic individuals, enables early identification of individuals at risk and allows implementation of preventive measures. PMID:27391596

  12. A new mutation site in the AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wufei; Hu, Zhen; Liao, Xiangyu; Chen, Xing; Huang, Wenrong; Zhong, Yu; Zeng, Zhaoyang

    2017-05-24

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1, OMIM 2403000) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that is caused by autoimmune regulator (AIRE). The main symptoms of APS-1 are chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, autoimmune adrenocortical insufficiency (Addison's disease) and hypoparathyroidism. We collected APS-1 cases and analysed them. The AIRE genes of the patient and his family members were sequenced to identify whether the APS-1 patient had an AIRE mutation. We discovered a mutation site (c.206A>C) that had never before been reported in the AIRE gene located in exon 2 of the AIRE gene. This homogyzous mutation caused a substitution of the 69th amino acid of the AIRE protein from glutamine to proline (p.Q69P). A yeast two-hybrid assay, which was used to analyse the homodimerization properties of the mutant AIRE protein, showed that the mutant AIRE protein could not interact with the normal AIRE protein. Flow cytometry and RT-qPCR analyses indicated that the new mutation site could decrease the expression levels of the AIRE, glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH1) proteins to affect central immune tolerance. In conclusion, our research has shown that the new mutation site (c.206A>C) may influence the homodimerization and expression levels and other aspects of the AIRE protein. It may also impact the expression levels of tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs), leading to a series of autoimmune diseases.

  13. Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is caused by somatic mutations in the PIG-A gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bessler, M; Mason, P J; Hillmen, P; Miyata, T; Yamada, N; Takeda, J; Luzzatto, L; Kinoshita, T

    1994-01-01

    Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH), an acquired clonal blood disorder, is caused by the absence of glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored surface proteins due to a defect in a specific step of GPI-anchor synthesis. The cDNA of the X-linked gene, PIG-A, which encodes a protein required for this step has recently been isolated. We have carried out a molecular and functional analysis of the PIG-A gene in four cell lines deficient in GPI-linked proteins, obtained by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformation of affected B-lymphocytes from PNH patients. In all four cell lines transfection with PIG-A cDNA restored normal expression of GPI-linked proteins. In three of the four cell lines the primary lesion is a frameshift mutation. In two of these there is a reduction in the amount of full-length mRNA. The fourth cell line contains a missense mutation in PIG-A. In each case the mutation was present in the affected granulocytes from peripheral blood of the patients, but not in normal sister cell lines from the same patient. These data prove that PNH is caused in most patients by a single mutation in the PIG-A gene. The nature of the mutation can vary and most likely occurs on the active X-chromosome in an early haematopoietic stem cell. Images PMID:8306954

  14. Mutational hotspot in the human biotinidase gene causes profound biotinidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pomponio, R J; Reynolds, T R; Cole, H; Buck, G A; Wolf, B

    1995-09-01

    Biotinidase deficiency is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder that is characterized by neurological and cutaneous symptoms. Biotinidase-deficient children cannot recycle endogenous biotin, an essential water-soluble B vitamin. Biotin is covalently attached to epsilon-amino groups of lysyl residues of four carboxylases. These carboxylases are subsequently degraded to biocytin (biotin-epsilon-lysine). Biotinidase cleaves biocytin to biotin and lysine, thereby completing the biotin cycle. The symptoms of biotinidase deficiency can be resolved or prevented by treatment with biotin. Therefore, it is important that biotinidase deficiency is diagnosed early so that permanent neurological damage can be prevented. Many states and countries currently perform newborn screening for biotinidase deficiency. We have recently isolated and characterized the cDNA for normal human biotinidase and localized the gene to chromosome 3p25 (ref. 9). We have now identified the first mutation that causes profound biotinidase deficiency. It occurs in a distinct region of the gene that encodes the putative signal peptide. Fifty percent of symptomatic children studied have a 7-bp deletion coupled with a 3-bp insertion in at least one of their alleles of the biotinidase gene. This mutation appears to be a common cause of biotinidase deficiency in symptomatic children.

  15. Mutations in the NEB gene cause fetal akinesia/arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Feingold-Zadok, Michal; Chitayat, David; Chong, Karen; Injeyan, Marie; Shannon, Patrick; Chapmann, Daphne; Maymon, Ron; Pillar, Nir; Reish, Orit

    2017-02-01

    We studied a series of patients with fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS)/arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), with nemaline bodies on muscle specimens, which revealed mutations in the NEB gene. We pathologically assessed seven cases from three families, who presented with AMC/FADS. Targeted genetic analysis for Ashkenazi Jewish mutation (in relevant patients) was followed by next-generation sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. All cases were detected on prenatal ultrasound. Characteristic nemaline bodies on muscle specimens were demonstrated in at least one case in each of the nuclear families. In the Ashkenazi Jewish family, the known founder mutation was compounded by one recurrent novel splice site. The other two families were of Chinese and Korean origins, and only one pathogenic heterozygous mutation was detected in each. Nemaline myopathy due to NEB mutation(s) leads to FADS/AMC. Currently, mutated NEB is under-recognized as a cause for AMC/FADS. Our study attempts to raise recognition of this gene as a cause, suggesting the NEB gene should be included in genetic panels used for FADS/AMC cases and be fully covered when EXOME sequencing is utilized. A heterozygous mutation may suggest either compounding undetected one or digenic interaction that requires further genetic analyses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Diabetes causes multiple genetic alterations and downregulates expression of DNA repair genes in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yuying; Cai, Mengyin; Zhu, Baoyi; Mu, Panwei; Xia, Xuan; Zhao, Yi; Weng, Jianping; Gao, Xin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2011-09-01

    The molecular impact of diabetes mellitus on prostate gland has not been elucidated. In this study, we performed a whole-genome cDNA microarray analysis using a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model to identify the effects of diabetes on the gene expression profiles in prostate. Our study shows that diabetes causes changes in the expression of multiple genes, particularly those related to cell proliferation and differentiation, oxidative stress, DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoints, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These findings were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining using rat and human prostate tissue. We also used a cell culture model (human normal prostatic RWPE-1 cell line) to study the direct effect of high glucose. We found that high glucose caused increased intracellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as downregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and DNA damage repair genes MRE11 and XRCC3. Our findings provide important insights into understanding the pathogenesis of the diabetes-induced changes in prostate as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets for future studies.

  17. Mutation G61C in the CRYGD gene causing autosomal dominant congenital coralliform cataracts.

    PubMed

    Li, Feifeng; Wang, Shuzhen; Gao, Chang; Liu, Shiguo; Zhao, Baojian; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Shangzhi; Zhu, Siquan; Ma, Xu

    2008-03-04

    We sought to identify the genetic defect in a four-generation Chinese family with autosomal dominant congenital coralliform cataracts and demonstrate the functional analysis of a candidate gene in the family. Family history data were recorded. Clinical and ophthalmologic examinations were performed on affected and unaffected family members. All the members were genotyped with microsatellite markers at loci considered to be associated with cataracts. Two-point LOD scores were calculated using the Linkage software after genotyping. A mutation was detected by direct sequencing, using gene-specific primers. Wild-type and mutant proteins were analyzed with online software. Affected members of this family had coralliform cataracts. Linkage analysis was obtained at markers, D2S72 (LOD score [Z]=3.31, recombination fraction [theta]=0.0) and D2S1782 (Z=3.01, theta=0.0). Haplotype analysis indicated that the cataract gene was closely linked to these two markers. Sequencing the gammaD-crystallin gene (CRYGD) revealed a G>T transversion in exon 2, which caused a conservative substitution of Gly to Cys at codon 61 (P.G61C). This mutation co-segregated with the disease phenotype in all affected individuals and was not observed in any of the unaffected or 100 normal, unrelated individuals. Bioinformatic analyses showed that a highly conserved region was located around Gly61. Data generated with online software revealed that the mutation altered the protein's stability, solvent-accessibility, and interactions with other proteins. This is the first reported case of a congenital coralliform cataract phenotype associated with the mutation of Gly61Cys (P.G61C) in the CRYGD gene; it demonstrates a possible mechanism of action for the mutant gene.

  18. Mutations in a P-Type ATPase Gene Cause Axonal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Wilhelmine N.; Smith, Richard S.; Wright, Dana L.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Seburn, Kevin L.; John, Simon W. M.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal loss and axonal degeneration are important pathological features of many neurodegenerative diseases. The molecular mechanisms underlying the majority of axonal degeneration conditions remain unknown. To better understand axonal degeneration, we studied a mouse mutant wabbler-lethal (wl). Wabbler-lethal (wl) mutant mice develop progressive ataxia with pronounced neurodegeneration in the central and peripheral nervous system. Previous studies have led to a debate as to whether myelinopathy or axonopathy is the primary cause of neurodegeneration observed in wl mice. Here we provide clear evidence that wabbler-lethal mutants develop an axonopathy, and that this axonopathy is modulated by Wlds and Bax mutations. In addition, we have identified the gene harboring the disease-causing mutations as Atp8a2. We studied three wl alleles and found that all result from mutations in the Atp8a2 gene. Our analysis shows that ATP8A2 possesses phosphatidylserine translocase activity and is involved in localization of phosphatidylserine to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Atp8a2 is widely expressed in the brain, spinal cord, and retina. We assessed two of the mutant alleles of Atp8a2 and found they are both nonfunctional for the phosphatidylserine translocase activity. Thus, our data demonstrate for the first time that mutation of a mammalian phosphatidylserine translocase causes axon degeneration and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:22912588

  19. A recurrent synonymous mutation in the human androgen receptor gene causing complete androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Batista, Rafael Loch; Rodrigues, Andresa di Santi; Nishi, Mirian Yumie; Gomes, Nathalia Lisboa; Faria, José Antonio Diniz; Moraes, Daniela Rodrigues de; Carvalho, Luciani Renata; Costa, Elaine Maria Frade; Domenice, Sorahia; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho

    2017-07-22

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is the most common cause of 46,XY disorders of sex development (46,XY DSD). This syndrome is an X-linked inheritance disease and it is caused by mutations in the human androgen receptor (AR) gene. Non-synonymous point AR mutations are frequently described in this disease, including in the complete phenotype. We present a novel synonymous mutation in the human AR gene (c.1530C > T) in four 46,XY patients from two unrelated families associated with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS). The analysis of mRNA from testis showed that synonymous AR mutation changed the natural exon 1 donor splice site, with deletion of the last 92 nucleotides of the AR exon 1 leading to a premature stop codon 12 positions ahead resulting in a truncate AR protein. Linkage analyses suggested a probable founder effect for this mutation. In conclusion, we described the first synonymous AR mutation associated with CAIS phenotype, reinforcing the disease-causing role of synonymous mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Congenital isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency: an underestimated cause of neonatal death, explained by TPIT gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Vallette-Kasic, Sophie; Brue, Thierry; Pulichino, Anne-Marie; Gueydan, Magali; Barlier, Anne; David, Michel; Nicolino, Marc; Malpuech, Georges; Déchelotte, Pierre; Deal, Cheri; Van Vliet, Guy; De Vroede, Monique; Riepe, Felix G; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G; Berberoglu, Merih; Atasay, Begüm; de Zegher, Francis; Beckers, Dominique; Kyllo, Jennifer; Donohoue, Patricia; Fassnacht, Martin; Hahner, Stefanie; Allolio, Bruno; Noordam, C; Dunkel, Leo; Hero, Matti; Pigeon, B; Weill, Jacques; Yigit, Sevket; Brauner, Raja; Heinrich, Juan Jorge; Cummings, Elizabeth; Riddell, Christie; Enjalbert, Alain; Drouin, Jacques

    2005-03-01

    Tpit is a T box transcription factor important for terminal differentiation of pituitary proopiomelanocortin-expressing cells. We demonstrated that human and mouse mutations of the TPIT gene cause a neonatal-onset form of congenital isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD). In the absence of glucocorticoid replacement, IAD can lead to neonatal death by acute adrenal insufficiency. This clinical entity was not previously well characterized because of the small number of published cases. Since identification of the first TPIT mutations, we have enlarged our series of neonatal IAD patients to 27 patients from 21 unrelated families. We found TPIT mutations in 17 of 27 patients. We identified 10 different TPIT mutations, with one mutation found in five unrelated families. All patients appeared to be homozygous or compound heterozygous for TPIT mutations, and their unaffected parents are heterozygous carriers, confirming a recessive mode of transmission. We compared the clinical and biological phenotype of the 17 IAD patients carrying a TPIT mutation with the 10 IAD patients with normal TPIT-coding sequences. This series of neonatal IAD patients revealed a highly homogeneous clinical presentation, suggesting that this disease may be an underestimated cause of neonatal death. Identification of TPIT gene mutations as the principal molecular cause of neonatal IAD permits prenatal diagnosis for families at risk for the purpose of early glucocorticoid replacement therapy.

  1. Overexpression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene 1 causes primary defects in myogenic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xynos, Alexandros; Neguembor, Maria Victoria; Caccia, Roberta; Licastro, Danilo; Nonis, Alessandro; Di Serio, Clelia; Stupka, Elia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-05-15

    Overexpression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1) in mice, frogs and worms leads to muscular and vascular abnormalities. Nevertheless, the mechanism that follows FRG1 overexpression and finally leads to muscular defects is currently unknown. Here, we show that the earliest phenotype displayed by mice overexpressing FRG1 is a postnatal muscle-growth defect. Long before the development of muscular dystrophy, FRG1 mice also exhibit a muscle regeneration impairment. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments revealed that FRG1 overexpression causes myogenic stem cell activation and proliferative, clonogenic and differentiation defects. A comparative gene expression profiling of muscles from young pre-dystrophic wild-type and FRG1 mice identified differentially expressed genes in several gene categories and networks that could explain the emerging tissue and myogenic stem cell defects. Overall, our study provides new insights into the pathways regulated by FRG1 and suggests that muscle stem cell defects could contribute to the pathology of FRG1 mice.

  2. Deleterious Mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene Cause Brittle Cornea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Almogit; Frydman, Moshe; Marek, Dina; Pras, Eran; Nir, Uri; Reznik-Wolf, Haike; Pras, Elon

    2008-01-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a thin cornea that tends to perforate, causing progressive visual loss and blindness. Additional systemic symptoms such as joint hypermotility, hyperlaxity of the skin, and kyphoscoliosis place BCS among the connective-tissue disorders. Previously, we assigned the disease gene to a 4.7 Mb interval on chromosome 16q24. In order to clone the BCS gene, we first narrowed the disease locus to a 2.8 Mb interval and systematically sequenced genes expressed in connective tissue in this chromosomal segment. We have identified two frameshift mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 gene (ZNF469). In five unrelated patients of Tunisian Jewish ancestry, we found a 1 bp deletion at position 5943 (5943 delA), and in an inbred Palestinian family we detected a single-nucleotide deletion at position 9527 (9527 delG). The function of ZNF469 is unknown. However, a 30% homology to a number of collagens suggests that it could act as a transcription factor involved in the synthesis and/or organization of collagen fibers. PMID:18452888

  3. Multiple organ gigantism caused by mutation in VmPPD gene in blackgram (Vigna mungo).

    PubMed

    Naito, Ken; Takahashi, Yu; Chaitieng, Bubpa; Hirano, Kumi; Kaga, Akito; Takagi, Kyoko; Ogiso-Tanaka, Eri; Thavarasook, Charaspon; Ishimoto, Masao; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2017-03-01

    Seed size is one of the most important traits in leguminous crops. We obtained a recessive mutant of blackgram that had greatly enlarged leaves, stems and seeds. The mutant produced 100% bigger leaves, 50% more biomass and 70% larger seeds though it produced 40% less number of seeds. We designated the mutant as multiple-organ-gigantism (mog) and found the mog phenotype was due to increase in cell numbers but not in cell size. We also found the mog mutant showed a rippled leaf (rl) phenotype, which was probably caused by a pleiotropic effect of the mutation. We performed a map-based cloning and successfully identified an 8 bp deletion in the coding sequence of VmPPD gene, an orthologue of Arabidopsis PEAPOD (PPD) that regulates arrest of cell divisions in meristematic cells. We found no other mutations in the neighboring genes between the mutant and the wild type. We also knocked down GmPPD genes and reproduced both the mog and rl phenotypes in soybean. Controlling PPD genes to produce the mog phenotype is highly valuable for breeding since larger seed size could directly increase the commercial values of grain legumes.

  4. Motility defects in Campylobacter jejuni defined gene deletion mutants caused by second-site mutations

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Stefan P. W.; Gupta, Srishti; Baig, Abiyad; L'Heureux, Joanna; Pont, Elsa; Wolanska, Dominika P.; Maskell, Duncan J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation due to mutation and phase variation has a considerable impact on the commensal and pathogenic behaviours of Campylobacter jejuni. In this study, we provide an example of how second-site mutations can interfere with gene function analysis in C. jejuni. Deletion of the flagellin B gene (flaB) in C. jejuni M1 resulted in mutant clones with inconsistent motility phenotypes. From the flaB mutant clones picked for further analysis, two were motile, one showed intermediate motility and two displayed severely attenuated motility. To determine the molecular basis of this differential motility, a genome resequencing approach was used. Second-site mutations were identified in the severely attenuated and intermediate motility flaB mutant clones: a TA-dinucleotide deletion in fliW and an A deletion in flgD, respectively. Restoration of WT fliW, using a newly developed genetic complementation system, confirmed that the second-site fliW mutation caused the motility defect as opposed to the primary deletion of flaB. This study highlights the importance of (i) screening multiple defined gene deletion mutant clones, (ii) genetic complementation of the gene deletion and ideally (iii) screening for second-site mutations that might interfere with the pathways/mechanisms under study. PMID:26385289

  5. Mutations in the proenteropeptidase gene are the molecular cause of congenital enteropeptidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Andreas; Maier, Esther M; Bück, Cornelius; Mayerhofer, Peter U; Kappler, Matthias; Haworth, James C; Moroz, Stanley P; Hadorn, Hans-Beat; Sadler, J Evan; Roscher, Adelbert A

    2002-01-01

    Enteropeptidase (enterokinase [E.C.3.4.21.9]) is a serine protease of the intestinal brush border in the proximal small intestine. It activates the pancreatic proenzyme trypsinogen, which, in turn, releases active digestive enzymes from their inactive pancreatic precursors. Congenital enteropeptidase deficiency is a rare recessively inherited disorder leading, in affected infants, to severe failure to thrive. The genomic structure of the proenteropeptidase gene (25 exons, total gene size 88 kb) was characterized in order to perform DNA sequencing in three clinically and biochemically proved patients with congenital enteropeptidase deficiency who were from two families. We found compound heterozygosity for nonsense mutations (S712X/R857X) in two affected siblings and found compound heterozygosity for a nonsense mutation (Q261X) and a frameshift mutation (FsQ902) in the third patient. In accordance with the biochemical findings, all four defective alleles identified are predicted null alleles leading to a gene product not containing the active site of the enzyme. These data provide first evidence that proenteropeptidase-gene mutations are the primary cause of congenital enteropeptidase deficiency.

  6. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  7. Mutations in the lipase-H gene causing autosomal recessive hypotrichosis and woolly hair.

    PubMed

    Mehmood, Sabba; Jan, Abid; Muhammad, Dost; Ahmad, Farooq; Mir, Hina; Younus, Muhammad; Ali, Ghazanfar; Ayub, Muhammad; Ansar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    Hypotrichosis is characterised by sparse scalp hair, sparse to absent eyebrows and eyelashes, or absence of hair from other parts of the body. In few cases, the condition is associated with tightly curled woolly scalp hair. The present study searched for disease-causing sequence variants in the genes in four Pakistani lineal consanguineous families exhibiting features of hypotrichosis or woolly hair. A haplotype analysis established links in all four families to the LIPH gene located on chromosome 3q27.2. Subsequently, sequencing LIPH identified a novel non-sense mutation (c.328C>T; p.Arg110*) in one and a previously reported 2-bp deletion mutation (c.659_660delTA, p.Ile220ArgfsX29) in three other families.

  8. Rhizomelic Chondrodysplasia Punctata Type 1 Caused by a Novel Mutation in the PEX7 Gene.

    PubMed

    Çim, Abdullah; Coşkun, Salih; Görükmez, Orhan; Yüksel, Hatice; Uluca, Ünal; Pietro, Erminia Di; Plourde, François; Braverman, Nancy Elise

    2015-03-01

    Peroxisomes are involved in various metabolic reactions. Rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (RCDP) type 1 is one of the peroxisomal biogenesis disorders caused by mutations in the PEX7 gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. We present a nine-year-old boy with skeletal abnormalities and dysmorphic facial appearance. The patient was born to parents who were first cousins. Very-long-chain fatty acids and pristanic acid levels were in the normal range, but an elevated phytanic acid level was detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The PEX7 gene was sequenced in the patient and his parents. A novel homozygous mutation, c.192delT (p.F64Lfs*10), was identified in the patient and was present in heterozygosity in both parents. In conclusion, the clinical presentation and peroxisome profile of the patient suggest that this novel mutation leads to RCDP type 1.

  9. Glutathione Causes a Massive and Selective Induction of Plant Defense Genes 1

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, Vincent P. M.; Lawton, Michael A.; Lamb, Christopher J.

    1988-01-01

    The reduced form of glutathione (GSH), when supplied to suspension cultured cells of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) at concentrations in the range 0.01 to 1.0 millimolar, stimulates transcription of defense genes including those that encode cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins and the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic enzymes phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) and chalcone synthase (CHS) involved in lignin (PAL) and phytoalexin (PAL, CHS) production. Transcriptional activation of these genes leads to marked accumulation of the corresponding transcripts, contributing to a massive change in the overall pattern of protein synthesis which closely resembles that previously observed in response to fungal elicitor. GSH causes a marked increase in extractable PAL activity, whereas the oxidized form of glutathione, constituent amino acids, or other reducing agents are inactive. Possible roles of GSH in signaling biological stress are discussed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:16666104

  10. A cancer-causing gene is positively correlated with male aggression in Xiphophorus cortezi

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, André A.

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of seemingly maladaptive genes in organisms challenges evolutionary biological thought. In Xiphophorus fishes, certain melanin patterns form malignant melanomas due to a cancer-causing gene (Xiphophorus melanoma receptor kinase; Xmrk), which arose several millions years ago from unequal meiotic recombination. Xiphophorus melanomas are male biased and induced by androgens however male behavior and Xmrk genotype has not been investigated. This study found that male X. cortezi with the spotted caudal (Sc) pattern, from which melanomas originate, displayed increased aggression in mirror image trials. Furthermore, Xmrk males (regardless of Sc phenotype) bit and performed more agonistic displays than Xmrk deficient males. Male aggressive response decreased when males viewed their Sc image as compared to their non-Sc image. Collectively, these results indicate that Xmrk males experience a competitive advantage over wild-type males and that intrasexual selection could be an important component in the evolutionary maintenance of this oncogene within Xiphophorus. PMID:20021547

  11. A glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression system can cause growth defects in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Amirsadeghi, Sasan; McDonald, Allison E; Vanlerberghe, Greg C

    2007-07-01

    We find that an expression system widely used to chemically induce transgenes of interest in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Petit Havana SR1) can cause severe growth defects in this species. This gene expression system has been shown to cause non-specific effects (including growth retardation) in other plant species, but has until now been largely accepted to be a relatively problem-free system for use in tobacco. The expression system is based on the ability of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) to activate a non-plant chimeric transcription factor (GVG), which then activates expression of a transgene of interest. The aberrant growth phenotype only manifests itself after DEX application and only occurs in plants in which the constitutive levels of GVG expression are higher than average. We found that approximately 30% of all transgenic plants produced showed some level of growth retardation under our standard growth conditions. However, by modulating irradiance levels following DEX application, we also showed that the manifestation and severity of the aberrant phenotype is highly dependent upon growth conditions, highlighting that such conditions are a critical parameter to consider during all stages of using this gene expression system. We also identified an increase in ACC oxidase gene expression as an early, sensitive and robust molecular marker for the aberrant phenotype. This molecular marker should be valuable to investigators wishing to readily identify transgenic plants in which GVG expression levels are beyond a threshold that begins to produce non-specific effects of the gene expression system under a defined set of growth conditions.

  12. DUX4, a Candidate Gene for Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy, Causes p53-Dependent Myopathy In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Lindsay M.; Garwick, Sara E.; Mei, Wenyan; Belayew, Alexandra; Coppee, Frederique; Ladner, Katherine J.; Guttridge, Denis; Yang, Jing; Harper, Scott Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is associated with D4Z4 repeat contraction on human chromosome 4q35. This genetic lesion does not result in complete loss or mutation of any gene. Consequently, the pathogenic mechanisms underlying FSHD have been difficult to discern. In leading FSHD pathogenesis models, D4Z4 contractions are proposed to cause epigenetic changes, which ultimately increase expression of genes with myopathic potential. Although no gene has been conclusively linked to FSHD development, recent evidence supports a role for the D4Z4-encoded DUX4 gene in FSHD. In this study, our objective was to test the in vivo myopathic potential of DUX4. Methods We delivered DUX4 to zebrafish and mouse muscle by transposon-mediated transgenesis and adeno-associated viral vectors, respectively. Results Overexpression of DUX4, which encodes a transcription factor, caused abnormalities associated with muscular dystrophy in zebrafish and mice. This toxicity required DNA binding, because a DUX4 DNA binding domain mutant produced no abnormalities. Importantly, we found the myopathic effects of DUX4 were p53 dependent, as p53 inhibition mitigated DUX4 toxicity in vitro, and muscles from p53 null mice were resistant to DUX4-induced damage. Interpretation Our work demonstrates the myopathic potential of DUX4 in animal muscle. Considering previous studies showed DUX4 was elevated in FSHD patient muscles, our data support the hypothesis that DUX4 overexpression contributes to FSHD development. Moreover, we provide a p53-dependent mechanism for DUX4 toxicity that is consistent with previous studies showing p53 pathway activation in FSHD muscles. Our work justifies further investigation of DUX4 and the p53 pathway in FSHD pathogenesis. PMID:21446026

  13. Deletion of the meq gene significantly decreases immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic marek's disease virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Marek's disease virus (MDV) causes an acute lymphoproliferative disease in chickens, resulting in immunosuppression, which is considered to be an integral aspect of the pathogenesis of Marek's disease (MD). A recent study showed that deletion of the Meq gene resulted in loss of transformation of T-cells in chickens and a Meq-null virus, rMd5ΔMeq, could provide protection superior to CVI988/Rispens. Results In the present study, to investigate whether the Meq-null virus could be a safe vaccine candidate, we constructed a Meq deletion strain, GX0101ΔMeq, by deleting both copies of the Meq gene from a pathogenic MDV, GX0101 strain, which was isolated in China. Pathogenesis experiments showed that the GX0101ΔMeq virus was fully attenuated in specific pathogen-free chickens because none of the infected chickens developed Marek's disease-associated lymphomas. The study also evaluated the effects of GX0101ΔMeq on the immune system in chickens after infection with GX0101ΔMeq virus. Immune system variables, including relative lymphoid organ weight, blood lymphocytes and antibody production following vaccination against AIV and NDV were used to assess the immune status of chickens. Experimental infection with GX0101ΔMeq showed that deletion of the Meq gene significantly decreased immunosuppression in chickens caused by pathogenic MDV. Conclusion These findings suggested that the Meq gene played an important role not only in tumor formation but also in inducing immunosuppressive effects in MDV-infected chickens. PMID:21205328

  14. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  15. Phenotype sequencing: identifying the genes that cause a phenotype directly from pooled sequencing of independent mutants.

    PubMed

    Harper, Marc A; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M P; Nelson, Stanley F; Liao, James C; Lee, Christopher J

    2011-02-18

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50-100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a "Phenotype Sequencing" approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110-$340.

  16. Rufous oculocutaneous albinism in southern African Blacks is caused by mutations in the TYRP1 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Manga, P; Kromberg, J G; Box, N F; Sturm, R A; Jenkins, T; Ramsay, M

    1997-01-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is the most common autosomal recessive disorder among southern African Blacks. There are three forms that account for almost all OCA types in this region. Tyrosinase-positive OCA (OCA2), which is the most common, affects approximately 1/3,900 newborns and has a carrier frequency of approximately 1/33. It is caused by mutations in the P gene on chromosome 15. Brown OCA (BOCA) and rufous OCA (ROCA) account for the majority of the remaining phenotypes. The prevalence of BOCA is unknown, but for ROCA it is approximately 1/8,500. Linkage analysis performed on nine ROCA families showed that ROCA was linked to an intragenic marker at the TYRP1 locus (maximum LOD score = 3.80 at straight theta=.00). Mutation analysis of 19 unrelated ROCA individuals revealed a nonsense mutation at codon 166 (S166X) in 17 (45%) of 38 ROCA chromosomes, and a second mutation (368delA) was found in an additional 19 (50%) of 38 chromosomes; mutations were not identified in the remaining 2 ROCA chromosomes. In one family, two siblings with a phenotypically unclassified form of albinism were found to be compound heterozygotes for mutations (S166X/368delA) at the TYRP1 locus and were heterozygous for a common 2.7-kb deletion in the P gene. These findings have highlighted the influence of genetic background on phenotype, in which the genotype at one locus can be influenced by the genotype at a second locus, leading to a modified phenotype. ROCA, which in southern African Blacks is caused by mutations in the TYRP1 gene, therefore should be referred to as "OCA3," since this is the third locus that has been shown to cause an OCA phenotype in humans. Images Figure 1 PMID:9345097

  17. X-linked paroxysmal dyskinesia and severe global retardation caused by defective MCT8 gene.

    PubMed

    Brockmann, Knut; Dumitrescu, Alexandra M; Best, Thomas T; Hanefeld, Folker; Refetoff, Samuel

    2005-06-01

    We previously reported two unrelated boys aged 3 and 8 years with mutations in the thyroid hormone transporter gene MCT8 resulting in severe global retardation and an uncommon pattern of thyroid hormone abnormalities. We now further describe an unusual neurological phenotype associated with these mutations, namely paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesias (PKD), provoked by certain stimuli including changing of their clothes or diapers. It is not clear how the MCT8 defect causes PKDs. PKDs have been previously noted in patients with thyroid abnormalities. This novel X-linked condition widens the spectrum of secondary PKDs.

  18. Mutations in the Drosophila gene encoding ribosomal protein S6 cause tissue overgrowth.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, M J; Denell, R

    1993-01-01

    We have characterized two P-element-induced, lethal mutations in Drosophila melanogaster which affect the larval hemocytes, mediators of the insect immune response. Each mutant displays larval melanotic tumors characteristic of mutations affecting the insect cellular immune system, and the moribund animals develop grossly hypertrophied hematopoietic organs because of increased cell proliferation and extra rounds of endoreduplication in some hematopoietic cells. Surprisingly, these mutations are due to P element insertions in the 5' regulatory region of the Drosophila gene encoding ribosomal protein S6 and cause a reduction of S6 transcript abundance in mutant larvae. Images PMID:8384310

  19. [Juvenile haemochromatosis caused by a homozygous Gly320Val mutation in the haemojuvelin gene].

    PubMed

    Berg, Line Brunemark; Milman, Nils Thorm; Friis-Hansen, Lennart; Jensen, Peter-Diedrich Mathias; Fründ, Torben

    2013-04-15

    Juvenile haemochromatosis caused by a homozygous Gly320Val mutation in the haemojuvelin (HJV) gene was diagnosed in a 12-year-old Danish girl and her 10-year-old sister. Both appeared healthy without clinical or biochemical signs of organ damage. They had iron overload (plasma transferrin saturation 81 and 80%, plasma ferritin 3,671 and 1,356 microgram/l, liver iron content of 375 and 361 micromol/g dry weight, normal myocardial iron content. Their parents were both HJV heterozygous with normal iron status. The girls began phlebotomy treatment with favourable effect.

  20. Large exonic deletions in POLR3B gene cause POLR3-related leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Mariana; Thiffault, Isabelle; Guerrero, Kether; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Tran, Luan T; Benko, William; van der Knaap, Marjo S; van Spaendonk, Rosalina M L; Wolf, Nicole I; Bernard, Geneviève

    2015-06-05

    POLR3-related (or 4H) leukodystrophy is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in POLR3A or POLR3B and is characterized by neurological and non-neurological features. In a small proportion of patients, no mutation in either gene or only one mutation is found. Analysis of the POLR3B cDNA revealed a large deletion of exons 21-22 in one case and of exons 26-27 in another case. These are the first reports of long deletions causing POLR3-related leukodystrophy, suggesting that deletions and duplications in POLR3A or POLR3B should be investigated in patients with a compatible phenotype, especially if one pathogenic variant has been identified.

  1. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Danielle C; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Innes, A Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E; Lemire, Edmond G; Chodirker, Bernard N; Taylor, Juliet P; Zackai, Elaine H; McLeod, D Ross; Kirk, Edwin P; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Bernier, Francois P

    2014-07-22

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development.

  2. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Danielle C.; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Innes, A. Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E.; Lemire, Edmond G.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Taylor, Juliet P.; Zackai, Elaine H.; McLeod, D. Ross; Kirk, Edwin P.; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Boycott, Kym; MacKenzie, Alex; Brudno, Michael; Bulman, Dennis; Dyment, David; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Bernier, Francois P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development. PMID:25047197

  3. ATAD3 gene cluster deletions cause cerebellar dysfunction associated with altered mitochondrial DNA and cholesterol metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Radha; Frazier, Ann E.; Durigon, Romina; Patel, Harshil; Jones, Aleck W.; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Lake, Nicole J.; Compton, Alison G.; Mountford, Hayley S.; Tucker, Elena J.; Mitchell, Alice L. R.; Jackson, Deborah; Sesay, Abdul; Di Re, Miriam; van den Heuvel, Lambert P.; Burke, Derek; Lunke, Sebastian; McGillivray, George; Mandelstam, Simone; Mochel, Fanny; Keren, Boris; Jardel, Claude; Turner, Anne M.; Ian Andrews, P.; Smeitink, Jan; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Heales, Simon J.; Kohda, Masakazu; Ohtake, Akira; Murayama, Kei; Okazaki, Yasushi; Lombès, Anne; Holt, Ian J.; Thorburn, David R.; Spinazzola, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Although mitochondrial disorders are clinically heterogeneous, they frequently involve the central nervous system and are among the most common neurogenetic disorders. Identifying the causal genes has benefited enormously from advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies; however, once the defect is known, researchers face the challenge of deciphering the underlying disease mechanism. Here we characterize large biallelic deletions in the region encoding the ATAD3C, ATAD3B and ATAD3A genes. Although high homology complicates genomic analysis of the ATAD3 defects, they can be identified by targeted analysis of standard single nucleotide polymorphism array and whole exome sequencing data. We report deletions that generate chimeric ATAD3B/ATAD3A fusion genes in individuals from four unrelated families with fatal congenital pontocerebellar hypoplasia, whereas a case with genomic rearrangements affecting the ATAD3C/ATAD3B genes on one allele and ATAD3B/ATAD3A genes on the other displays later-onset encephalopathy with cerebellar atrophy, ataxia and dystonia. Fibroblasts from affected individuals display mitochondrial DNA abnormalities, associated with multiple indicators of altered cholesterol metabolism. Moreover, drug-induced perturbations of cholesterol homeostasis cause mitochondrial DNA disorganization in control cells, while mitochondrial DNA aggregation in the genetic cholesterol trafficking disorder Niemann-Pick type C disease further corroborates the interdependence of mitochondrial DNA organization and cholesterol. These data demonstrate the integration of mitochondria in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, in which ATAD3 plays a critical role. The dual problem of perturbed cholesterol metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction could be widespread in neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28549128

  4. The Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox gene ATHB12 is involved in symptom development caused by geminivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungan; Lee, Hyun-Ju; Cheon, Choong-Ill; Kim, Sung-Han; Hur, Yoon-Sun; Auh, Chung-Kyun; Im, Kyung-Hwan; Yun, Dae-Jin; Lee, Sukchan; Davis, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    Geminiviruses are single-stranded DNA viruses that infect a number of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous plants. Arabidopsis is susceptible to infection with the Curtovirus, Beet severe curly top virus (BSCTV). Infection of Arabidopsis with BSCTV causes severe symptoms characterized by stunting, leaf curling, and the development of abnormal inflorescence and root structures. BSCTV-induced symptom development requires the virus-encoded C4 protein which is thought to interact with specific plant-host proteins and disrupt signaling pathways important for controlling cell division and development. Very little is known about the specific plant regulatory factors that participate in BSCTV-induced symptom development. This study was conducted to identify specific transcription factors that are induced by BSCTV infection. Arabidopsis plants were inoculated with BSCTV and the induction of specific transcription factors was monitored using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays. We found that the ATHB12 and ATHB7 genes, members of the homeodomain-leucine zipper family of transcription factors previously shown to be induced by abscisic acid and water stress, are induced in symptomatic tissues of Arabidopsis inoculated with BSCTV. ATHB12 expression is correlated with an array of morphological abnormalities including leaf curling, stunting, and callus-like structures in infected Arabidopsis. Inoculation of plants with a BSCTV mutant with a defective c4 gene failed to induce ATHB12. Transgenic plants expressing the BSCTV C4 gene exhibited increased ATHB12 expression whereas BSCTV-infected ATHB12 knock-down plants developed milder symptoms and had lower ATHB12 expression compared to the wild-type plants. Reporter gene studies demonstrated that the ATHB12 promoter was responsive to BSCTV infection and the highest expression levels were observed in symptomatic tissues where cell cycle genes also were induced. These results suggest that ATHB7 and ATHB12 may play an

  5. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (Maroteaux-Lamy Syndrome): Six unique arylsulfatase B gene alleles causing variable disease phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Isbrandt, D.; Arlt, G.; Figura, K. von; Peters, C.; Brooks, D.A.; Hopwood, J.J.

    1994-03-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type VI, or Maroteaux-Lamy syndrome, is a lysosomal storage disorder caused by a deficiency of the enzyme arylsulfatase B (ASB), also known as N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase. Multiple clinical phenotypes of this autosomal recessively inherited disease have been described. Recent isolation and characterization of the human ASB gene facilitated the analysis of molecular defects underlying the different phenotypes. Conditions for PCR amplification of the entire open reading frame from genomic DNA and for subsequent direct automated DNA sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments were established. Besides two polymorphisms described elsewhere that cause methionine-for-valine substitutions in the arylsulfatase B gene, six new mutations in six patients were detected: four point mutations resulting in amino acid substitutions, a 1-bp deletion, and a 1-bp insertion. The point mutations were two G-to-A and two T-to-C transitions. The G-to-A transitions cause an arginine-for-glycine substitution at residue 144 in a homoallelic patient with a severe disease phenotype and a tyrosine-for-cysteine substitution at residue 521 in a potentially heteroallelic patient with the severe form of the disease. The T-to-C transitions cause an arginine-for-cysteine substitution at amino acid residue 192 in a homoallelic patient with mild symptoms and a proline-for-leucine substitution at amino acid 321 in a homoallelic patient with the intermediate form. The insertion between nucleotides T1284 and G1285 resulted in a loss of the 100 C-terminal amino acids of the wild-type protein and in the deletion of nucleotide C1577 in a 39-amino-acid C-terminal extension of the ASB polypeptide. Both mutations were detected in homoallelic patients with the severe form of the disease. Expression of mutant cDNAs encoding the four amino acid substitutions and the deletion resulted in reduction of both ASB protein levels and arylsulfatase enzyme activity. 25 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Generic HPLC platform for automated enzyme reaction monitoring: Advancing the assay toolbox for transaminases and other PLP-dependent enzymes.

    PubMed

    Börner, Tim; Grey, Carl; Adlercreutz, Patrick

    2016-08-01

    Methods for rapid and direct quantification of enzyme kinetics independent of the substrate stand in high demand for both fundamental research and bioprocess development. This study addresses the need for a generic method by developing an automated, standardizable HPLC platform monitoring reaction progress in near real-time. The method was applied to amine transaminase (ATA) catalyzed reactions intensifying process development for chiral amine synthesis. Autosampler-assisted pipetting facilitates integrated mixing and sampling under controlled temperature. Crude enzyme formulations in high and low substrate concentrations can be employed. Sequential, small (1 µL) sample injections and immediate detection after separation permits fast reaction monitoring with excellent sensitivity, accuracy and reproducibility. Due to its modular design, different chromatographic techniques, e.g. reverse phase and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) can be employed. A novel assay for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent enzymes is presented using SEC for direct monitoring of enzyme-bound and free reaction intermediates. Time-resolved changes of the different cofactor states, e.g. pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate and the internal aldimine were traced in both half reactions. The combination of the automated HPLC platform with SEC offers a method for substrate-independent screening, which renders a missing piece in the assay and screening toolbox for ATAs and other PLP-dependent enzymes.

  7. PLP-dependent enzymes as potential drug targets for protozoan diseases.

    PubMed

    Kappes, Barbara; Tews, Ivo; Binter, Alexandra; Macheroux, Peter

    2011-11-01

    The chemical properties of the B(6) vitamers are uniquely suited for wide use as cofactors in essential reactions, such as decarboxylations and transaminations. This review addresses current efforts to explore vitamin B(6) dependent enzymatic reactions as drug targets. Several current targets are described that are found amongst these enzymes. The focus is set on diseases caused by protozoan parasites. Comparison across a range of these organisms allows insight into the distribution of potential targets, many of which may be of interest in the development of broad range anti-protozoan drugs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Pyridoxal Phosphate Enzymology.

  8. The crystal structure of D-threonine aldolase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans provides insight into a metal ion assisted PLP-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uhl, Michael K; Oberdorfer, Gustav; Steinkellner, Georg; Riegler-Berket, Lina; Mink, Daniel; van Assema, Friso; Schürmann, Martin; Gruber, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Threonine aldolases catalyze the pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) dependent cleavage of threonine into glycine and acetaldehyde and play a major role in the degradation of this amino acid. In nature, L- as well as D-specific enzymes have been identified, but the exact physiological function of D-threonine aldolases (DTAs) is still largely unknown. Both types of enantio-complementary enzymes have a considerable potential in biocatalysis for the stereospecific synthesis of various β-hydroxy amino acids, which are valuable building blocks for the production of pharmaceuticals. While several structures of L-threonine aldolases (LTAs) have already been determined, no structure of a DTA is available to date. Here, we report on the determination of the crystal structure of the DTA from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans (AxDTA) at 1.5 Å resolution. Our results underline the close relationship of DTAs and alanine racemases and allow the identification of a metal binding site close to the PLP-cofactor in the active site of the enzyme which is consistent with the previous observation that divalent cations are essential for DTA activity. Modeling of AxDTA substrate complexes provides a rationale for this metal dependence and indicates that binding of the β-hydroxy group of the substrate to the metal ion very likely activates this group and facilitates its deprotonation by His193. An equivalent involvement of a metal ion has been implicated in the mechanism of a serine dehydratase, which harbors a metal ion binding site in the vicinity of the PLP cofactor at the same position as in DTA. The structure of AxDTA is completely different to available structures of LTAs. The enantio-complementarity of DTAs and LTAs can be explained by an approximate mirror symmetry of crucial active site residues relative to the PLP-cofactor.

  9. Novel mutations in the human sucrase-isomaltase gene (SI) that cause congenital carbohydrate malabsorption.

    PubMed

    Sander, Petra; Alfalah, Marwan; Keiser, Markus; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma; Kovács, Judit B; Leeb, Tosso; Naim, Hassan Y

    2006-01-01

    Disaccharide intolerance I or congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency (CSID) is a disorder leading to maldigestion of disaccharides, which is autosomal recessively inherited. Here we analyzed the sucrase-isomaltase (SI) gene from 11 patients of Hungarian origin with congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency. Variants in the SI gene had previously been described in CSID patients, which cause amino acid exchanges that affect the transport, the processing, or the function of the SI protein. None of our patients had known mutations for CSID. Our analyses revealed 43 SI variants in total, 15 within exons and one at a splice site. Eight of the exonic mutations lead to amino acid exchanges, causing hypomorph or null alleles. One new variation affects a splice site, which is also predicted to result in a null allele. All potential pathological alterations were present on one allele only. In six out of the 11 patients the phenotype of CSID could be explained by compound heterozygosity. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Hypomorphic mutation in mouse Nppc gene causes retarded bone growth due to impaired endochondral ossification

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuji, Takehito Kondo, Eri; Yasoda, Akihiro; Inamoto, Masataka; Kiyosu, Chiyo; Nakao, Kazuwa; Kunieda, Tetsuo

    2008-11-07

    Long bone abnormality (lbab/lbab) is a spontaneous mutant mouse characterized by dwarfism with shorter long bones. A missense mutation was reported in the Nppc gene, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but it has not been confirmed whether this mutation is responsible for the dwarf phenotype. To verify that the mutation causes the dwarfism of lbab/lbab mice, we first investigated the effect of CNP in lbab/lbab mice. By transgenic rescue with chondrocyte-specific expression of CNP, the dwarf phenotype in lbab/lbab mice was completely compensated. Next, we revealed that CNP derived from the lbab allele retained only slight activity to induce cGMP production through its receptor. Histological analysis showed that both proliferative and hypertrophic zones of chondrocytes in the growth plate of lbab/lbab mice were markedly reduced. Our results demonstrate that lbab/lbab mice have a hypomorphic mutation in the Nppc gene that is responsible for dwarfism caused by impaired endochondral ossification.

  11. Disruptions of Topological Chromatin Domains Cause Pathogenic Rewiring of Gene-Enhancer Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Lupiáñez, Darío G.; Kraft, Katerina; Heinrich, Verena; Krawitz, Peter; Brancati, Francesco; Klopocki, Eva; Horn, Denise; Kayserili, Hülya; Opitz, John M.; Laxova, Renata; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Wittler, Lars; Borschiwer, Marina; Haas, Stefan A.; Osterwalder, Marco; Franke, Martin; Timmermann, Bernd; Hecht, Jochen; Spielmann, Malte; Visel, Axel; Mundlos, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Mammalian genomes are organized into megabase-scale topologically associated domains (TADs). We demonstrate that disruption of TADs can rewire long-range regulatory architecture and result in pathogenic phenotypes. We show that distinct human limb malformations are caused by deletions, inversions, or duplications altering the structure of the TAD-spanning WNT6/IHH/EPHA4/PAX3 locus. Using CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we generated mice with corresponding rearrangements. Both in mouse limb tissue and patient-derived fibroblasts, disease-relevant structural changes cause ectopic interactions between promoters and non-coding DNA, and a cluster of limb enhancers normally associated with Epha4 is misplaced relative to TAD boundaries and drives ectopic limb expression of another gene in the locus. This rewiring occurred only if the variant disrupted a CTCF-associated boundary domain. Our results demonstrate the functional importance of TADs for orchestrating gene expression via genome architecture and indicate criteria for predicting the pathogenicity of human structural variants, particularly in non-coding regions of the human genome. PMID:25959774

  12. A Novel Virulence Gene in Klebsiella pneumoniae Strains Causing Primary Liver Abscess and Septic Metastatic Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Chi-Tai; Chuang, Yi-Ping; Shun, Chia-Tung; Chang, Shan-Chwen; Wang, Jin-Town

    2004-01-01

    Primary Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess complicated with metastatic meningitis or endophthalmitis is a globally emerging infectious disease. Its pathogenic mechanism remains unclear. The bacterial virulence factors were explored by comparing clinical isolates. Differences in mucoviscosity were observed between strains that caused primary liver abscess (invasive) and those that did not (noninvasive). Hypermucoviscosity correlated with a high serum resistance and was more prevalent in invasive strains (52/53 vs. 9/52; P < 0.0001). Transposon mutagenesis identified candidate virulence genes. A novel 1.2-kb locus, magA, which encoded a 43-kD outer membrane protein, was significantly more prevalent in invasive strains (52/53 vs. 14/52; P < 0.0001). The wild-type strain produced a mucoviscous exopolysaccharide web, actively proliferated in nonimmune human serum, resisted phagocytosis, and caused liver microabscess and meningitis in mice. However, magA− mutants lost the exopolysaccharide web and became extremely serum sensitive, phagocytosis susceptible, and avirulent to mice. Virulence was restored by complementation using a magA-containing plasmid. We conclude that magA fits molecular Koch's postulates as a virulence gene. Thus, this locus can be used as a marker for the rapid diagnosis and for tracing the source of this emerging infectious disease. PMID:14993253

  13. Mutations in LOXHD1 gene cause various types and severities of hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kentaro; Moteki, Hideaki; Kobayashi, Yumiko; Azaiez, Hela; Booth, Kevin T; Nishio, Shin-ya; Sato, Hiroaki; Smith, Richard J H; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Objective We present two families that were identified with novel mutations in LOXHD1, as a cause of non-progressive hearing loss. Methods One thousand three hundred fourteen (1,314) Japanese subjects with sensorineural hearing loss from unrelated families were enrolled in the study. Targeted genomic enrichment and massively parallel sequencing of all known non-syndromic hearing loss genes were performed to identify the genetic cause of hearing loss. Results Two patients in one family affected with homozygous mutation; c.879+1G>A in LOXHD1, showed profound congenital hearing loss, whereas two patients in the other family with compound heterozygous mutations; c.5869G>T (p.E1957X) and c.4480C>T (p.R1494X) showed moderate to severe hearing loss. Conclusion Mutations in LOXHD1 are extremely rare, and these cases are the first identified in a Japanese population. The genotype-phenotype correlation in LOXHD1 is still unclear. The differences of phenotypes in each patient might be the result of the nature of the mutations, or the location at the gene, or be influenced by genetic modifier. PMID:25792669

  14. Mutations in KEOPS-complex genes cause nephrotic syndrome with primary microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Braun, Daniela A; Rao, Jia; Mollet, Geraldine; Schapiro, David; Daugeron, Marie-Claire; Tan, Weizhen; Gribouval, Olivier; Boyer, Olivia; Revy, Patrick; Jobst-Schwan, Tilman; Schmidt, Johanna Magdalena; Lawson, Jennifer A; Schanze, Denny; Ashraf, Shazia; Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Hoogstraten, Charlotte A; Boddaert, Nathalie; Collinet, Bruno; Martin, Gaëlle; Liger, Dominique; Lovric, Svjetlana; Furlano, Monica; Guerrera, I Chiara; Sanchez-Ferras, Oraly; Hu, Jennifer F; Boschat, Anne-Claire; Sanquer, Sylvia; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah; De Rocker, Nina; Airik, Merlin; Hermle, Tobias; Shril, Shirlee; Widmeier, Eugen; Gee, Heon Yung; Choi, Won-Il; Sadowski, Carolin E; Pabst, Werner L; Warejko, Jillian K; Daga, Ankana; Basta, Tamara; Matejas, Verena; Scharmann, Karin; Kienast, Sandra D; Behnam, Babak; Beeson, Brendan; Begtrup, Amber; Bruce, Malcolm; Ch'ng, Gaik-Siew; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Chang, Jui-Hsing; Chen, Chao-Huei; Cho, Megan T; Gaffney, Patrick M; Gipson, Patrick E; Hsu, Chyong-Hsin; Kari, Jameela A; Ke, Yu-Yuan; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Lai, Wai-Ming; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Masri, Amira; Moghtaderi, Mastaneh; Nakamura, Kazuyuki; Ozaltin, Fatih; Praet, Marleen; Prasad, Chitra; Prytula, Agnieszka; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Rump, Patrick; Schnur, Rhonda E; Shiihara, Takashi; Sinha, Manish D; Soliman, Neveen A; Soulami, Kenza; Sweetser, David A; Tsai, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Jeng-Daw; Topaloglu, Rezan; Vester, Udo; Viskochil, David H; Vatanavicharn, Nithiwat; Waxler, Jessica L; Wierenga, Klaas J; Wolf, Matthias T F; Wong, Sik-Nin; Leidel, Sebastian A; Truglio, Gessica; Dedon, Peter C; Poduri, Annapurna; Mane, Shrikant; Lifton, Richard P; Bouchard, Maxime; Kannu, Peter; Chitayat, David; Magen, Daniella; Callewaert, Bert; van Tilbeurgh, Herman; Zenker, Martin; Antignac, Corinne; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2017-10-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GAMOS) is an autosomal-recessive disease characterized by the combination of early-onset nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and microcephaly with brain anomalies. Here we identified recessive mutations in OSGEP, TP53RK, TPRKB, and LAGE3, genes encoding the four subunits of the KEOPS complex, in 37 individuals from 32 families with GAMOS. CRISPR-Cas9 knockout in zebrafish and mice recapitulated the human phenotype of primary microcephaly and resulted in early lethality. Knockdown of OSGEP, TP53RK, or TPRKB inhibited cell proliferation, which human mutations did not rescue. Furthermore, knockdown of these genes impaired protein translation, caused endoplasmic reticulum stress, activated DNA-damage-response signaling, and ultimately induced apoptosis. Knockdown of OSGEP or TP53RK induced defects in the actin cytoskeleton and decreased the migration rate of human podocytes, an established intermediate phenotype of SRNS. We thus identified four new monogenic causes of GAMOS, describe a link between KEOPS function and human disease, and delineate potential pathogenic mechanisms.

  15. Riboflavin-responsive lipid-storage myopathy caused by ETFDH gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bing; Dai, Tingjun; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yuying; Liu, Shuping; Zhang, Chunhua; Li, Honghao; Wu, Jinling; Li, Danian; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2010-02-01

    Lipid-storage myopathy (LSM), defined by triglyceride accumulation in muscle fibres, is a heterogeneous group of lipid metabolic disorders predominantly affecting skeletal muscle. In the past 15 years, more than 200 cases of LSM have been reported in the Chinese literature, but the accurate pathogenic mechanisms are still unknown. In order to gain more insight into the metabolic and genetic dysfunctions of LSM, the authors described a group of Chinese patients with LSM who were very responsive to isolated riboflavin treatment (riboflavin responsive LSM, RR-LSM). Nineteen consecutive LSM patients collected during 1995-2007 in our Neuromuscular Laboratory who were dramatically responsive to riboflavin and presented with proximal muscle weakness, exercise intolerance and elevated serum CK but without episodic encephalopathy were subjected to pathological, biochemical and molecular analysis. On the basis of muscle pathology, all 19 patients were diagnosed as LSM. Seventeen patients were suspected of having multiple acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase deficiency (MADD) according to blood acylcarnitine profiles and urine organic acid analysis. Genetic analysis identified 19 novel mutations in ETFDH gene in 18 patients, among which one was homozygote, 16 were compound heterozygotes, and one was a single heterozygote. No pathogenic mutation was detected in ETFA or ETFB genes. Western blot analysis showed there was no significant decrease in ETF:QO expression except for one patient. The research findings suggest that the majority of Chinese patients with RR-LSM are caused by a mild type of MADD with unique myopathy which is due to ETFDH gene mutation.

  16. Cutaneous Venous Malformations in Familial Cerebral Cavernomatosis Caused by KRIT1 Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Agustí; Parera, Elisabet; Giménez-Arnau, Ana M.; Pou, Alejandro; Lloreta, Josep; Limaye, Nisha; Vikkula, Miikka; Pujol, Ramon M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular lesions characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities without intervening brain parenchyma. Although often asymptomatic, seizures, cerebral haemorrhages and focal neurological deficits are well-documented complications. Mutations in the CCM1 (7q21–22), CCM2 (7p13–15) and CCM3 (3q25.2–27) genes have been identified in familial CCM. In rare instances, the association of congenital hyperkeratotic cutaneous capillary-venous malformations (HCCVMs) with CCM1 has been reported. Observations: We studied 6 members of a family with CCMs. Four members of the family developed late-onset multiple, tiny, bluish, soft, cutaneous papules, mainly located on the face, arm and abdominal area, corresponding histologically to venous malformations. A splice donor site mutation in intron 4 (c. 1146 + 1 G→A) in the CCM1 gene was identified. Conclusions Our findings suggest that mutations in the KRIT1 gene may cause phenotypically heterogeneous cutaneous vascular lesions other than those previously described as HCCVMs. PMID:19182478

  17. [Genes in the cAMP pathway causing skeletal dysplasia with or without hormonal resistance].

    PubMed

    Silve, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Acrodysostosis refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsa, as observed in PHP1a. Defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR-Gsa-cAMP-PKA signaling, were recently identified in patients affected with acrodysostosis. This has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: acrodysostosis type 1 due to PRKAR1A defects, and acrodysostosis type 2, due to PDE4D defects. The existence of hormone resistance is typical of the acrodysostosis type 1 syndrome. We discuss here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, in particular in regard to phenotypically related diseases caused by Gsa gene defects in the same signaling pathway. © Société de Biologie, 2016.

  18. Two novel mutations in the PPIB gene cause a rare pedigree of osteogenesis imperfecta type IX.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Pan, Jingxin; Guo, Dongwei; Zhang, Wei; Xie, Jie; Fang, Zishui; Guo, Chunmiao; Fang, Qun; Jiang, Weiying; Guo, Yibin

    2017-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare genetic skeletal disorder characterized by increased bone fragility and vulnerability to fractures. PPIB is identified as a candidate gene for OI-IX, here we detect two pathogenic mutations in PPIB and analyze the genotype-phenotype correlation in a Chinese family with OI. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to screen the whole exome of the parents of proband. Screening of variation frequency, evolutionary conservation comparisons, pathogenicity evaluation, and protein structure prediction were conducted to assess the pathogenicity of the novel mutations. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the candidate variants. RTQ-PCR was used to analyze the PPIB gene expression. All mutant genes screened out by NGS were excluded except PPIB. Two novel heterozygous PPIB mutations (father, c.25A>G; mother, c.509G>A) were identified in relation to osteogenesis imperfecta type IX. Both mutations were predicted to be pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis and RTQ-PCR analysis revealed downregulated PPIB expression in the two carriers. We report a rare pedigree with an autosomal recessive osteogenesis imperfecta type IX (OI-IX) caused by two novel PPIB mutations identified for the first time in China. The current study expands our knowledge of PPIB mutations and their associated phenotypes, and provides new information on the genetic defects associated with this disease for clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A Partial Gene Deletion of SLC45A2 Causes Oculocutaneous Albinism in Doberman Pinscher Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Paige A.; Gornik, Kara R.; Ramsey, David T.; Dubielzig, Richard R.; Venta, Patrick J.; Petersen-Jones, Simon M.; Bartoe, Joshua T.

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968–77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model. PMID:24647637

  20. A partial gene deletion of SLC45A2 causes oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinscher dogs.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Paige A; Gornik, Kara R; Ramsey, David T; Dubielzig, Richard R; Venta, Patrick J; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Bartoe, Joshua T

    2014-01-01

    The first white Doberman pinscher (WDP) dog was registered by the American Kennel Club in 1976. The novelty of the white coat color resulted in extensive line breeding of this dog and her offspring. The WDP phenotype closely resembles human oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and clinicians noticed a seemingly high prevalence of pigmented masses on these dogs. This study had three specific aims: (1) produce a detailed description of the ocular phenotype of WDPs, (2) objectively determine if an increased prevalence of ocular and cutaneous melanocytic tumors was present in WDPs, and (3) determine if a genetic mutation in any of the genes known to cause human OCA is causal for the WDP phenotype. WDPs have a consistent ocular phenotype of photophobia, hypopigmented adnexal structures, blue irides with a tan periphery and hypopigmented retinal pigment epithelium and choroid. WDPs have a higher prevalence of cutaneous melanocytic neoplasms compared with control standard color Doberman pinschers (SDPs); cutaneous tumors were noted in 12/20 WDP (<5 years of age: 4/12; >5 years of age: 8/8) and 1/20 SDPs (p<0.00001). Using exclusion analysis, four OCA causative genes were investigated for their association with WDP phenotype; TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2. SLC45A2 was found to be linked to the phenotype and gene sequencing revealed a 4,081 base pair deletion resulting in loss of the terminus of exon seven of SLC45A2 (chr4∶77,062,968-77,067,051). This mutation is highly likely to be the cause of the WDP phenotype and is supported by a lack of detectable SLC45A2 transcript levels by reverse transcriptase PCR. The WDP provides a valuable model for studying OCA4 visual disturbances and melanocytic neoplasms in a large animal model.

  1. Twenty novel mutations in the alpha-galactosidase A gene causing Fabry disease.

    PubMed Central

    Topaloglu, A. K.; Ashley, G. A.; Tong, B.; Shabbeer, J.; Astrin, K. H.; Eng, C. M.; Desnick, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fabry disease, an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, results from the deficient activity of the lysosomal exoglycohydrolase alpha-galactosidase A (EC 3.2.1.22; alpha-Gal A). The nature of the molecular lesions in the alpha-Gal A gene in 30 unrelated families was determined to provide precise heterozygote detection, prenatal diagnosis, and define genotype-phenotype correlations. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from affected males and/or carrier females from 30 unrelated families with Fabry disease. The entire alpha-Gal A coding region and flanking intronic sequences were analyzed by PCR amplification and automated sequencing. RESULTS: Twenty new mutations were identified, each in a single family: C142R, G183D, S235C, W236L, D244H, P259L, M267I, I289F, Q321E, C378Y, C52X, W277X, IVS4(+4), IVS6(+2), IVS6(-1), 35del13, 256del1, 892ins1, 1176del4, and 1188del1. In the remaining 10 unrelated Fabry families, 9 previously reported mutations were detected: M42V, R112C, S148R, D165V, N215S (in 2 families), Q99X, C142X, R227X, and 1072del3. Haplotype analysis using markers closely flanking the alpha-Gal A gene indicated that the two patients with the N215S lesion were unrelated. The IVS4(+4) mutation was a rare intronic splice site mutation that causes Fabry disease. CONCLUSIONS: These studies further define the heterogeneity of mutations in the alpha-Gal A gene causing Fabry disease, permit precise heterozygote detection and prenatal diagnosis, and help delineate phenotype-genotype correlations in this disease.

  2. Conditional ablation of the choroideremia gene causes age-related changes in mouse retinal pigment epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wavre-Shapton, Silène T; Tolmachova, Tanya; Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; da Silva, Mafalda Lopes; Futter, Clare E; Seabra, Miguel C

    2013-01-01

    The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a pigmented monolayer of cells lying between the photoreceptors and a layer of fenestrated capillaries, the choriocapillaris. Choroideremia (CHM) is an X-linked progressive degeneration of these three layers caused by the loss of function of Rab Escort protein-1 (REP1). REP1 is involved in the prenylation of Rab proteins, key regulators of membrane trafficking. To study the pathological consequences of chronic disruption of membrane traffic in the RPE we used a cell type-specific knock-out mouse model of the disease, where the Chm/Rep1 gene is deleted only in pigmented cells (Chm(Flox), Tyr-Cre+). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to quantitate the melanosome distribution in the RPE and immunofluorescent staining of rhodopsin was used to quantitate phagocytosed rod outer segments in retinal sections. The ultrastructure of the RPE and Bruch's membrane at different ages was characterised by TEM to analyse age-related changes occurring as a result of defects in membrane traffic pathways. Chm/Rep1 gene knockout in RPE cells resulted in reduced numbers of melanosomes in the apical processes and delayed phagosome degradation. In addition, the RPE accumulated pathological changes at 5-6 months of age similar to those observed in 2-year old controls. These included the intracellular accumulation of lipofuscin-containing deposits, disorganised basal infoldings and the extracellular accumulation of basal laminar and basal linear deposits. The phenotype of the Chm(Flox), Tyr-Cre+ mice suggests that loss of the Chm/Rep1 gene causes premature accumulation of features of aging in the RPE. Furthermore, the striking similarities between the present observations and some of the phenotypes reported in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) suggest that membrane traffic defects may contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD.

  3. Differential patterns of spinal cord pathology induced by MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, and PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Kuerten, Stefanie; Gruppe, Traugott L; Laurentius, Laura-Maria; Kirch, Christiane; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lehmann, Paul V; Addicks, Klaus

    2011-06-01

    In this study we demonstrate that experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by the MBP-PLP fusion protein MP4, MOG peptide 35-55, or PLP peptide 178-191 in C57BL/6 mice, respectively, displays distinct features of CNS pathology. Major differences between the three models resided in (i) the region-/tract-specificity and disseminated nature of spinal cord degeneration, (ii) the extent and kinetics of demyelination, and (iii) the involvement of motoneurons in the disease. In contrast, axonal damage was present in all models and to a similar extent, proposing this feature as a possible morphological correlate for the comparable chronic clinical course of the disease induced by the three antigens. The data suggest that the antigen targeted in autoimmune encephalomyelitis is crucial to the induction of differential histopathological disease manifestations. The use of MP4-, MOG:35-55-, and PLP:178-191-induced EAE on the C57BL/6 background can be a valuable tool when it comes to reproducing and studying the structural-morphological diversity of multiple sclerosis.

  4. Is There Convincing Evidence that Intermediate Repeats in the HTT Gene Cause Huntington's Disease?

    PubMed

    Oosterloo, Mayke; Van Belzen, Martine J; Bijlsma, Emilia K; Roos, Raymund A C

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease associated with a CAG repeat expansion in the Huntingtin (HTT) gene. A trinucleotide size between 27 and 35 is considered 'intermediate' and not to cause symptoms and signs of HD. There are articles claiming otherwise, however publishing only the cases that have a HD phenotype introduces a significant publication bias. Our objective is to determine if there is convincing evidence that intermediate repeats (IA) cause HD. Previously published case reports on HTT intermediate repeat sizes and all cases from the Netherlands with an IA were reviewed for clinical symptoms and signs. Four patients had a clinical presentation of Huntington's disease and an IA out of ten reported cases in literature. Between 2001 and 2012, 1,690 patients were tested for HD in the Netherlands. One case out of 60 with an IA had a phenotype resembling HD, but had already been published in a case report. Given the high background frequency of intermediate alleles in several populations, the possibility of developing HD would have huge implications for 1-7% of the normal population. It is possible that IAs present as an endophenotype with the potential of subsequent clinical manifestations. However, given the scarcity of convincing cases, the lack of convincing biological evidence for pathogenicity of intermediate alleles, and many genes still to be discovered for HD mimics, we find that it is premature to claim that IAs can cause HD. We recommend systematic follow up of this group of individuals and if possible brain pathology for confirmation or exclusion of HD.

  5. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan; Ferguson, David J P; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Wehner, Maria; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Swan, Daniel; Houniet, Darren; Büchner, Aline; Weibel, Lisa; Wagner, Nicola; Grimalt, Ramon; Bygum, Anette; Serre, Guy; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Sprecher, Eli; Schoch, Susanne; Oji, Vinzenz; Hamm, Henning; Farrant, Paul; Simon, Michel; Betz, Regina C

    2016-12-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic causes of UHS and shed light on its pathophysiology and hair physiology in general. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification and expression of mutations in the hydroxymethylbilane synthase gene causing acute intermittent porphyria (AIP).

    PubMed Central

    Solis, C.; Lopez-Echaniz, I.; Sefarty-Graneda, D.; Astrin, K. H.; Desnick, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal dominant inborn error, results from the half-normal activity of the heme biosynthetic enzyme hydroxymethylbilane synthase (EC 4.3.1.8; HMB-synthase). This disease is characterized by acute, life-threatening neurologic attacks that are precipitated by various drugs, hormones, and other factors. The enzymatic and/or biochemical diagnosis of AIP heterozygotes is problematic; therefore, efforts have focused on the identification of HMB-synthase mutations so that heterozygotes can be identified and educated to avoid the precipitating factors. In Spain, the occurrence of AIP has been reported, but the nature of the HMB-synthase mutations causing AIP in Spanish families has not been investigated. Molecular analysis was therefore undertaken in nine unrelated Spanish AIP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from affected probands and family members of nine unrelated Spanish families with AIP. The HMB-synthase gene was amplified by long-range PCR and the nucleotide sequence of each exon was determined by cycle sequencing. RESULTS: Three new mutations, a missense, M212V; a single base insertion, g4715insT; and a deletion/insertion, g7902ACT-->G, as well as five previously reported mutations (G111R, R116W, R149X R167W, and R173W) were detected in the Spanish probands. Expression of the novel missense mutation M212V in E. coli revealed that the mutation was causative, having <2% residual activity. CONCLUSIONS: These studies identified the first mutations in the HMB-synthase gene causing AIP in Spanish patients. Three of the mutations were novel, while five previously reported lesions were found in six Spanish families. These findings enable accurate identification and counseling of presymptomatic carriers in these nine unrelated Spanish AIP families and further demonstrate the genetic heterogeneity of mutations causing AIP. Images Fig. 1 PMID:10602775

  7. Bestrophin Gene Mutations Cause Canine Multifocal Retinopathy: A Novel Animal Model for Best Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guziewicz, Karina E.; Zangerl, Barbara; Lindauer, Sarah J.; Mullins, Robert F.; Sandmeyer, Lynne S.; Grahn, Bruce H.; Stone, Edwin M.; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Canine multifocal retinopathy (cmr) is an autosomal recessive disorder of multiple dog breeds. The disease shares a number of clinical and pathologic similarities with Best macular dystrophy (BMD), and cmr is proposed as a new large animal model for Best disease. Methods cmr was characterized by ophthalmoscopy and histopathology and compared with BMD-affected patients. BEST1 (alias VMD2), the bestrophin gene causally associated with BMD, was evaluated in the dog. Canine ortholog cDNA sequence was cloned and verified using RPE/choroid 5′- and 3′-RACE. Expression of the canine gene transcripts and protein was analyzed by Northern and Western blotting and immunocytochemistry. All exons and the flanking splice junctions were screened by direct sequencing. Results The clinical phenotype and pathology of cmr closely resemble lesions of BMD. Canine VMD2 spans 13.7 kb of genomic DNA on CFA18 and shows a high level of conservation among eukaryotes. The transcript is predominantly expressed in RPE/choroid and encodes bestrophin, a 580-amino acid protein of 66 kDa. Immunocytochemistry of normal canine retina demonstrated specific localization of protein to the RPE basolateral plasma membranes. Two disease-specific sequence alterations were identified in the canine VMD2 gene: a C73 T stop mutation in cmr1 and a G482A missense mutation in cmr2. Conclusions The authors propose these two spontaneous mutations in the canine VMD2 gene, which cause cmr, as the first naturally occurring animal model of BMD. Further development of the cmr models will permit elucidation of the complex molecular mechanism of these retinopathies and the development of potential therapies. PMID:17460247

  8. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Murdoch, Jennifer N.; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D. E.; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2Lp, ScribCrc and Celsr1Crsh mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1Crsh;Vangl2Lp;ScribCrc triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas ScribCrc is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1Crsh and Vangl2Lp homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic interactions are

  9. Genetic interactions between planar cell polarity genes cause diverse neural tube defects in mice.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Jennifer N; Damrau, Christine; Paudyal, Anju; Bogani, Debora; Wells, Sara; Greene, Nicholas D E; Stanier, Philip; Copp, Andrew J

    2014-10-01

    Neural tube defects (NTDs) are among the commonest and most severe forms of developmental defect, characterized by disruption of the early embryonic events of central nervous system formation. NTDs have long been known to exhibit a strong genetic dependence, yet the identity of the genetic determinants remains largely undiscovered. Initiation of neural tube closure is disrupted in mice homozygous for mutations in planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway genes, providing a strong link between NTDs and PCP signaling. Recently, missense gene variants have been identified in PCP genes in humans with NTDs, although the range of phenotypes is greater than in the mouse mutants. In addition, the sequence variants detected in affected humans are heterozygous, and can often be detected in unaffected individuals. It has been suggested that interactions between multiple heterozygous gene mutations cause the NTDs in humans. To determine the phenotypes produced in double heterozygotes, we bred mice with all three pairwise combinations of Vangl2(Lp), Scrib(Crc) and Celsr1(Crsh) mutations, the most intensively studied PCP mutants. The majority of double-mutant embryos had open NTDs, with the range of phenotypes including anencephaly and spina bifida, therefore reflecting the defects observed in humans. Strikingly, even on a uniform genetic background, variability in the penetrance and severity of the mutant phenotypes was observed between the different double-heterozygote combinations. Phenotypically, Celsr1(Crsh);Vangl2(Lp);Scrib(Crc) triply heterozygous mutants were no more severe than doubly heterozygous or singly homozygous mutants. We propose that some of the variation between double-mutant phenotypes could be attributed to the nature of the protein disruption in each allele: whereas Scrib(Crc) is a null mutant and produces no Scrib protein, Celsr1(Crsh) and Vangl2(Lp) homozygotes both express mutant proteins, consistent with dominant effects. The variable outcomes of these genetic

  10. In utero gene therapy rescues microcephaly caused by Pqbp1-hypofunction in neural stem progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, H; Shiwaku, H; Yoshida, C; Homma, H; Luo, H; Chen, X; Fujita, K; Musante, L; Fischer, U; Frints, S G M; Romano, C; Ikeuchi, Y; Shimamura, T; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Muramatsu, S-i; Kawauchi, T; Hoshino, M; Sudol, M; Arumughan, A; Wanker, E E; Rich, T; Schwartz, C; Matsuzaki, F; Bonni, A; Kalscheuer, V M; Okazawa, H

    2015-01-01

    Human mutations in PQBP1, a molecule involved in transcription and splicing, result in a reduced but architecturally normal brain. Examination of a conditional Pqbp1-knockout (cKO) mouse with microcephaly failed to reveal either abnormal centrosomes or mitotic spindles, increased neurogenesis from the neural stem progenitor cell (NSPC) pool or increased cell death in vivo. Instead, we observed an increase in the length of the cell cycle, particularly for the M phase in NSPCs. Corresponding to the developmental expression of Pqbp1, the stem cell pool in vivo was decreased at E10 and remained at a low level during neurogenesis (E15) in Pqbp1-cKO mice. The expression profiles of NSPCs derived from the cKO mouse revealed significant changes in gene groups that control the M phase, including anaphase-promoting complex genes, via aberrant transcription and RNA splicing. Exogenous Apc4, a hub protein in the network of affected genes, recovered the cell cycle, proliferation, and cell phenotypes of NSPCs caused by Pqbp1-cKO. These data reveal a mechanism of brain size control based on the simple reduction of the NSPC pool by cell cycle time elongation. Finally, we demonstrated that in utero gene therapy for Pqbp1-cKO mice by intraperitoneal injection of the PQBP1-AAV vector at E10 successfully rescued microcephaly with preserved cortical structures and improved behavioral abnormalities in Pqbp1-cKO mice, opening a new strategy for treating this intractable developmental disorder. PMID:25070536

  11. Somatic USP8 Gene Mutations Are a Common Cause of Pediatric Cushing Disease.

    PubMed

    Faucz, Fabio R; Tirosh, Amit; Tatsi, Christina; Berthon, Annabel; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Settas, Nikolaos; Angelousi, Anna; Correa, Ricardo; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Chittiboina, Prashant; Quezado, Martha; Pankratz, Nathan; Lane, John; Dimopoulos, Aggeliki; Mills, James L; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-01

    Somatic mutations in the ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) gene have been recently identified as the most common genetic alteration in patients with Cushing disease (CD). However, the frequency of these mutations in the pediatric population has not been extensively assessed. We investigated the status of the USP8 gene at the somatic level in a cohort of pediatric patients with corticotroph adenomas. The USP8 gene was fully sequenced in both germline and tumor DNA samples from 42 pediatric patients with CD. Clinical, biochemical, and imaging data were compared between patients with and without somatic USP8 mutations. Five different USP8 mutations (three missense, one frameshift, and one in-frame deletion) were identified in 13 patients (31%), all of them located in exon 14 at the previously described mutational hotspot, affecting the 14-3-3 binding motif of the protein. Patients with somatic mutations were older at disease presentation [mean 5.1 ± 2.1 standard deviation (SD) vs 13.1 ± 3.6 years, P = 0.03]. Levels of urinary free cortisol, midnight serum cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone, as well as tumor size and frequency of invasion of the cavernous sinus, were not significantly different between the two groups. However, patients harboring somatic USP8 mutations had a higher likelihood of recurrence compared with patients without mutations (46.2% vs 10.3%, P = 0.009). Somatic USP8 gene mutations are a common cause of pediatric CD. Patients harboring a somatic mutation had a higher likelihood of tumor recurrence, highlighting the potential importance of this molecular defect for the disease prognosis and the development of targeted therapeutic options.

  12. Mutation of CERKL, a Novel Human Ceramide Kinase Gene, Causes Autosomal Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP26)

    PubMed Central

    Tuson, Miquel; Marfany, Gemma; Gonzàlez-Duarte, Roser

    2004-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP), the main cause of adult blindness, is a genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by progressive loss of photoreceptors through apoptosis. Up to now, 39 genes and loci have been implicated in nonsyndromic RP, yet the genetic bases of >50% of the cases, particularly of the recessive forms, remain unknown. Previous linkage analysis in a Spanish consanguineous family allowed us to define a novel autosomal recessive RP (arRP) locus, RP26, within an 11-cM interval (17.4 Mb) on 2q31.2-q32.3. In the present study, we further refine the RP26 locus down to 2.5 Mb, by microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) homozygosity mapping. After unsuccessful mutational analysis of the nine genes initially reported in this region, a detailed gene search based on expressed-sequence-tag data was undertaken. We finally identified a novel gene encoding a ceramide kinase (CERKL), which encompassed 13 exons. All of the patients from the RP26 family bear a homozygous mutation in exon 5, which generates a premature termination codon. The same mutation was also characterized in another, unrelated, Spanish pedigree with arRP. Human CERKL is expressed in the retina, among other adult and fetal tissues. A more detailed analysis by in situ hybridization on adult murine retina sections shows expression of Cerkl in the ganglion cell layer. Ceramide kinases convert the sphingolipid metabolite ceramide into ceramide-1-phosphate, both key mediators of cellular apoptosis and survival. Ceramide metabolism plays an essential role in the viability of neuronal cells, the membranes of which are particularly rich in sphingolipids. Therefore, CERKL deficiency could shift the relative levels of the signaling sphingolipid metabolites and increase sensitivity of photoreceptor and other retinal cells to apoptotic stimuli. This is the first genetic report suggesting a direct link between retinal neurodegeneration in RP and sphingolipid-mediated apoptosis. PMID

  13. 3′ deletions cause aniridia by preventing PAX6 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Lauderdale, James D.; Wilensky, Jonathan S.; Oliver, Edward R.; Walton, David S.; Glaser, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Aniridia is a panocular human eye malformation caused by heterozygous null mutations within PAX6, a paired-box transcription factor, or cytogenetic deletions of chromosome 11p13 that encompass PAX6. Chromosomal rearrangements also have been described that disrupt 11p13 but spare the PAX6 transcription unit in two families with aniridia. These presumably cause a loss of gene expression, by removing positive cis regulatory elements or juxtaposing negative DNA sequences. We report two submicroscopic de novo deletions of 11p13 that cause aniridia but are located >11 kb from the 3′ end of PAX6. The clinical manifestations are indistinguishable from cases with chain-terminating mutations in the coding region. Using human × mouse retinoblastoma somatic cell hybrids, we show that PAX6 is transcribed only from the normal allele but not from the deleted chromosome 11 homolog. Our findings suggest that remote 3′ regulatory elements are required for initiation of PAX6 expression. PMID:11087823

  14. SVA retrotransposition in exon 6 of the coagulation factor IX gene causing severe hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Murata, Moe; Takagi, Yuki; Kozuka, Toshihiro; Nakata, Yukiko; Hasebe, Ryo; Takagi, Akira; Kitazawa, Jun-ichi; Shima, Midori; Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2015-07-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessive bleeding disorder caused by abnormalities of the coagulation factor IX gene (F9). Insertion mutations in F9 ranging from a few to more than 100 base pairs account for only a few percent of all hemophilia B cases. We investigated F9 to elucidate genetic abnormalities causing severe hemophilia B in a Japanese subject. We performed PCR-mediated analysis of F9 and identified a large insertion in exon 6. Next, we carried out direct sequencing of a PCR clone of the whole insert using nested deletion by exonuclease III and S1 nuclease. We identified an approximately 2.5-kb SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA)-F element flanked by 15-bp duplications in the antisense orientation in exon 6. Additionally, we carried out exontrap analysis to assess the effect of this retrotransposition on mRNA splicing. We observed that regular splicing at exons 5 and 6 of F9 was disturbed by the SVA retrotransposition, suggesting that abnormal FIX mRNA may be reduced by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. In conclusion, this is the first report of SVA retrotransposition causing severe hemophilia B; only five cases of LINE-1 or Alu retrotranspositions in F9 have been reported previously.

  15. Targeting Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling in Mouse Models of Cardiomyopathy Caused by Lamin A/C Gene Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Muchir, Antoine; Worman, Howard J.

    2016-01-01

    The most frequently occurring mutations in the gene encoding nuclear lamin A and nuclear lamin C cause striated muscle diseases virtually always involving the heart. In this review, we describe the approaches and methods used to discover that cardiomyopathy-causing lamin A/C gene mutations increase MAP kinase signaling in the heart and that this plays a role in disease pathogenesis. We review different mouse models of cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations and how transcriptomic analysis of one model identified increased cardiac activity of the ERK1/2, JNK, and p38α MAP kinases. We describe methods used to measure the activity of these MAP kinases in mouse hearts and then discuss preclinical treatment protocols using pharmacological inhibitors to demonstrate their role in pathogenesis. Several of these kinase inhibitors are in clinical development and could potentially be used to treat human subjects with cardiomyopathy caused by lamin A/C gene mutations. PMID:26795484

  16. Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4F disease caused by S399fsx410 mutation in the PRX gene.

    PubMed

    Kabzinska, D; Drac, H; Sherman, D L; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Brophy, P J; Kochanski, A; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I

    2006-03-14

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4F disease (CMT4F) is an autosomal recessive neuropathy caused by mutations in the PRX gene. To date, only seven mutations have been identified in the PRX gene. In this study, the authors report a novel S399fsX410 mutation in the PRX gene and its effects at the protein level, which was identified in an 8-year-old patient with early-onset CMT disease.

  17. Time Delayed Causal Gene Regulatory Network Inference with Hidden Common Causes

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Leung-Yau; Wong, Man-Leung; Lee, Kin-Hong; Leung, Kwong-Sak

    2015-01-01

    Inferring the gene regulatory network (GRN) is crucial to understanding the working of the cell. Many computational methods attempt to infer the GRN from time series expression data, instead of through expensive and time-consuming experiments. However, existing methods make the convenient but unrealistic assumption of causal sufficiency, i.e. all the relevant factors in the causal network have been observed and there are no unobserved common cause. In principle, in the real world, it is impossible to be certain that all relevant factors or common causes have been observed, because some factors may not have been conceived of, and therefore are impossible to measure. In view of this, we have developed a novel algorithm named HCC-CLINDE to infer an GRN from time series data allowing the presence of hidden common cause(s). We assume there is a sparse causal graph (possibly with cycles) of interest, where the variables are continuous and each causal link has a delay (possibly more than one time step). A small but unknown number of variables are not observed. Each unobserved variable has only observed variables as children and parents, with at least two children, and the children are not linked to each other. Since it is difficult to obtain very long time series, our algorithm is also capable of utilizing multiple short time series, which is more realistic. To our knowledge, our algorithm is far less restrictive than previous works. We have performed extensive experiments using synthetic data on GRNs of size up to 100, with up to 10 hidden nodes. The results show that our algorithm can adequately recover the true causal GRN and is robust to slight deviation from Gaussian distribution in the error terms. We have also demonstrated the potential of our algorithm on small YEASTRACT subnetworks using limited real data. PMID:26394325

  18. Time Delayed Causal Gene Regulatory Network Inference with Hidden Common Causes.

    PubMed

    Lo, Leung-Yau; Wong, Man-Leung; Lee, Kin-Hong; Leung, Kwong-Sak

    2015-01-01

    Inferring the gene regulatory network (GRN) is crucial to understanding the working of the cell. Many computational methods attempt to infer the GRN from time series expression data, instead of through expensive and time-consuming experiments. However, existing methods make the convenient but unrealistic assumption of causal sufficiency, i.e. all the relevant factors in the causal network have been observed and there are no unobserved common cause. In principle, in the real world, it is impossible to be certain that all relevant factors or common causes have been observed, because some factors may not have been conceived of, and therefore are impossible to measure. In view of this, we have developed a novel algorithm named HCC-CLINDE to infer an GRN from time series data allowing the presence of hidden common cause(s). We assume there is a sparse causal graph (possibly with cycles) of interest, where the variables are continuous and each causal link has a delay (possibly more than one time step). A small but unknown number of variables are not observed. Each unobserved variable has only observed variables as children and parents, with at least two children, and the children are not linked to each other. Since it is difficult to obtain very long time series, our algorithm is also capable of utilizing multiple short time series, which is more realistic. To our knowledge, our algorithm is far less restrictive than previous works. We have performed extensive experiments using synthetic data on GRNs of size up to 100, with up to 10 hidden nodes. The results show that our algorithm can adequately recover the true causal GRN and is robust to slight deviation from Gaussian distribution in the error terms. We have also demonstrated the potential of our algorithm on small YEASTRACT subnetworks using limited real data.

  19. Mutations within the programmed cell death 10 gene cause cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Bergametti, F; Denier, C; Labauge, P; Arnoult, M; Boetto, S; Clanet, M; Coubes, P; Echenne, B; Ibrahim, R; Irthum, B; Jacquet, G; Lonjon, M; Moreau, J J; Neau, J P; Parker, F; Tremoulet, M; Tournier-Lasserve, E

    2005-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are hamartomatous vascular malformations characterized by abnormally enlarged capillary cavities without intervening brain parenchyma. They cause seizures and cerebral hemorrhages, which can result in focal neurological deficits. Three CCM loci have been mapped, and loss-of-function mutations were identified in the KRIT1 (CCM1) and MGC4607 (CCM2) genes. We report herein the identification of PDCD10 (programmed cell death 10) as the CCM3 gene. The CCM3 locus has been previously mapped to 3q26-27 within a 22-cM interval that is bracketed by D3S1763 and D3S1262. We hypothesized that genomic deletions might occur at the CCM3 locus, as reported previously to occur at the CCM2 locus. Through high-density microsatellite genotyping of 20 families, we identified, in one family, null alleles that resulted from a deletion within a 4-Mb interval flanked by markers D3S3668 and D3S1614. This de novo deletion encompassed D3S1763, which strongly suggests that the CCM3 gene lies within a 970-kb region bracketed by D3S1763 and D3S1614. Six additional distinct deleterious mutations within PDCD10, one of the five known genes mapped within this interval, were identified in seven families. Three of these mutations were nonsense mutations, and two led to an aberrant splicing of exon 9, with a frameshift and a longer open reading frame within exon 10. The last of the six mutations led to an aberrant splicing of exon 5, without frameshift. Three of these mutations occurred de novo. All of them cosegregated with the disease in the families and were not observed in 200 control chromosomes. PDCD10, also called "TFAR15," had been initially identified through a screening for genes differentially expressed during the induction of apoptosis in the TF-1 premyeloid cell line. It is highly conserved in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Its implication in cerebral cavernous malformations strongly suggests that it is a new player in vascular morphogenesis and

  20. Transgenic Rat Model of Neurodegeneration Caused by Mutation in the TDP Gene

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Han; Wang, Dian; Landel, Carlisle P.; Xia, Pedro Yuxing; Bowser, Robert; Liu, Yong-Jian; Xia, Xu Gang

    2010-01-01

    TDP-43 proteinopathies have been observed in a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. Mutations in the gene encoding TDP-43 (i.e., TDP) have been identified in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and in frontotemporal lobe degeneration associated with motor neuron disease. To study the consequences of TDP mutation in an intact system, we created transgenic rats expressing normal human TDP or a mutant form of human TDP with a M337V substitution. Overexpression of mutant, but not normal, TDP caused widespread neurodegeneration that predominantly affected the motor system. TDP mutation reproduced ALS phenotypes in transgenic rats, as seen by progressive degeneration of motor neurons and denervation atrophy of skeletal muscles. This robust rat model also recapitulated features of TDP-43 proteinopathies including the formation of TDP-43 inclusions, cytoplasmic localization of phosphorylated TDP-43, and fragmentation of TDP-43 protein. TDP transgenic rats will be useful for deciphering the mechanisms underlying TDP-43–related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:20361056

  1. Mutations in the lectin complement pathway genes COLEC11 and MASP1 cause 3MC syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rooryck, Caroline; Diaz-Font, Anna; Osborn, Daniel P.S.; Chabchoub, Elyes; Hernandez-Hernandez, Victor; Shamseldin, Hanan; Kenny, Joanna; Waters, Aoife; Jenkins, Dagan; Kaissi, Ali Al; Leal, Gabriela F.; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Carnevale, Franco; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Lees, Melissa; Hennekam, Raoul; Stanier, Philip; Burns, Alan J.; Peeters, Hilde; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Beales, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    3MC syndrome has been proposed as a unifying term to integrate the overlapping Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech and Michels syndromes. These rare autosomal recessive disorders of unknown cause comprise a spectrum of developmental features including characteristic facial dysmorphism, cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis, learning disability, and genital, limb and vesicorenal anomalies. In a cohort of eleven 3MC families, we identified two mutated genes COLEC11 and MASP1 both of which encode proteins within the lectin complement pathway (CL-K1 and MASP-1 & −3 respectively). CL-K1 is highly expressed in embryonic murine craniofacial cartilage, heart, bronchi, kidney, and vertebral bodies. Zebrafish morphants develop pigment defects and severe craniofacial abnormalities. Here, we show that CL-K1 serves as a key guidance cue for neural crest cell migration thus demonstrating for the first time, a role for complement pathway factors in fundamental developmental processes and the origin of 3MC syndrome. PMID:21258343

  2. Conformational transition of DNA by dinuclear Pt(II) complexes causes cooperative inhibition of gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Yuta; Yoshikawa, Yuko; Kenmotsu, Takahiro; Komeda, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2017-06-01

    Recently, it was reported that a cationic tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear Pt(II) complex, 5-H-Y, is a promising anticancer drug candidate. Here, we investigated the effects of a series of tetrazolato-bridged dinuclear Pt(II) complexes on the higher-order structure of DNA by using fluorescence and atomic force microscopies. The results showed that these dinuclear Pt(II) complexes cause marked shrinkage on the conformation of genomic DNA. We also found highly cooperative inhibitory effects of these drugs on in vitro gene expression. The unique mechanism of action of these dinuclear Pt(II) complexes is discussed in terms of their bridging effect on DNA segments.

  3. A deletion in the bovine FANCI gene compromises fertility by causing fetal death and brachyspina.

    PubMed

    Charlier, Carole; Agerholm, Jorgen Steen; Coppieters, Wouter; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Li, Wanbo; de Jong, Gerben; Fasquelle, Corinne; Karim, Latifa; Cirera, Susanna; Cambisano, Nadine; Ahariz, Naima; Mullaart, Erik; Georges, Michel; Fredholm, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Fertility is one of the most important traits in dairy cattle, and has been steadily declining over the last decades. We herein use state-of-the-art genomic tools, including high-throughput SNP genotyping and next-generation sequencing, to identify a 3.3 Kb deletion in the FANCI gene causing the brachyspina syndrome (BS), a rare recessive genetic defect in Holstein dairy cattle. We determine that despite the very low incidence of BS (<1/100,000), carrier frequency is as high as 7.4% in the Holstein breed. We demonstrate that this apparent discrepancy is likely due to the fact that a large proportion of homozygous mutant calves die during pregnancy. We postulate that several other embryonic lethals may segregate in livestock and significantly compromise fertility, and propose a genotype-driven screening strategy to detect the corresponding deleterious mutations.

  4. Improving palm oil quality through identification and mapping of the lipase gene causing oil deterioration.

    PubMed

    Morcillo, F; Cros, D; Billotte, N; Ngando-Ebongue, G-F; Domonhédo, H; Pizot, M; Cuéllar, T; Espéout, S; Dhouib, R; Bourgis, F; Claverol, S; Tranbarger, T J; Nouy, B; Arondel, V

    2013-01-01

    The oil palm fruit mesocarp contains high lipase activity that increases free fatty acids and necessitates post-harvest inactivation by heat treatment of fruit bunches. Even before heat treatment the mesocarp lipase activity causes consequential oil losses and requires costly measures to limit free fatty acids quantities. Here we demonstrate that elite low-lipase lines yield oil with substantially less free fatty acids than standard genotypes, allowing more flexibility for post-harvest fruit processing and extended ripening for increased yields. We identify the lipase and its gene cosegregates with the low-/high-lipase trait, providing breeders a marker to rapidly identify potent elite genitors and introgress the trait into major cultivars. Overall, economic gains brought by wide adoption of this material could represent up to one billion dollars per year. Expected benefits concern all planters but are likely to be highest for African smallholders who would be more able to produce oil that meets international quality standards.

  5. Cloning of the gene containing mutations that cause PARK8-linked Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Paisán-Ruíz, Coro; Jain, Shushant; Evans, E Whitney; Gilks, William P; Simón, Javier; van der Brug, Marcel; López de Munain, Adolfo; Aparicio, Silvia; Gil, Angel Martínez; Khan, Naheed; Johnson, Janel; Martinez, Javier Ruiz; Nicholl, David; Carrera, Itxaso Marti; Pena, Amets Saénz; de Silva, Rohan; Lees, Andrew; Martí-Massó, José Félix; Pérez-Tur, Jordi; Wood, Nick W; Singleton, Andrew B

    2004-11-18

    Parkinson's disease (PD; OMIM #168600) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder in the Western world and presents as a progressive movement disorder. The hallmark pathological features of PD are loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra and neuronal intracellular Lewy body inclusions. Parkinsonism is typically sporadic in nature; however, several rare familial forms are linked to genetic loci, and the identification of causal mutations has provided insight into the disease process. PARK8, identified in 2002 by Funayama and colleagues, appears to be a common cause of familial PD. We describe here the cloning of a novel gene that contains missense mutations segregating with PARK8-linked PD in five families from England and Spain. Because of the tremor observed in PD and because a number of the families are of Basque descent, we have named this protein dardarin, derived from the Basque word dardara, meaning tremor.

  6. Improving palm oil quality through identification and mapping of the lipase gene causing oil deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Morcillo, F.; Cros, D.; Billotte, N.; Ngando-Ebongue, G.-F.; Domonhédo, H.; Pizot, M.; Cuéllar, T.; Espéout, S.; Dhouib, R.; Bourgis, F.; Claverol, S.; Tranbarger, T. J.; Nouy, B.; Arondel, V.

    2013-01-01

    The oil palm fruit mesocarp contains high lipase activity that increases free fatty acids and necessitates post-harvest inactivation by heat treatment of fruit bunches. Even before heat treatment the mesocarp lipase activity causes consequential oil losses and requires costly measures to limit free fatty acids quantities. Here we demonstrate that elite low-lipase lines yield oil with substantially less free fatty acids than standard genotypes, allowing more flexibility for post-harvest fruit processing and extended ripening for increased yields. We identify the lipase and its gene cosegregates with the low-/high-lipase trait, providing breeders a marker to rapidly identify potent elite genitors and introgress the trait into major cultivars. Overall, economic gains brought by wide adoption of this material could represent up to one billion dollars per year. Expected benefits concern all planters but are likely to be highest for African smallholders who would be more able to produce oil that meets international quality standards. PMID:23857501

  7. Diazoxide-responsive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia caused by HNF4A gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan, S E; Kapoor, R R; Mali, G; Cody, D; Murphy, N; Schwahn, B; Siahanidou, T; Banerjee, I; Akcay, T; Rubio-Cabezas, O; Shield, J P H; Hussain, K; Ellard, S

    2010-01-01

    Objective The phenotype associated with heterozygous HNF4A gene mutations has recently been extended to include diazoxide responsive neonatal hypoglycemia in addition to maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). To date, mutation screening has been limited to patients with a family history consistent with MODY. In this study, we investigated the prevalence of HNF4A mutations in a large cohort of patients with diazoxide responsive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (HH). Subjects and methods We sequenced the ABCC8, KCNJ11, GCK, GLUD1, and/or HNF4A genes in 220 patients with HH responsive to diazoxide. The order of genetic testing was dependent upon the clinical phenotype. Results A genetic diagnosis was possible for 59/220 (27%) patients. KATP channel mutations were most common (15%) followed by GLUD1 mutations causing hyperinsulinism with hyperammonemia (5.9%), and HNF4A mutations (5%). Seven of the 11 probands with a heterozygous HNF4A mutation did not have a parent affected with diabetes, and four de novo mutations were confirmed. These patients were diagnosed with HI within the first week of life (median age 1 day), and they had increased birth weight (median +2.4 SDS). The duration of diazoxide treatment ranged from 3 months to ongoing at 8 years. Conclusions In this large series, HNF4A mutations are the third most common cause of diazoxide responsive HH. We recommend that HNF4A sequencing is considered in all patients with diazoxide responsive HH diagnosed in the first week of life irrespective of a family history of diabetes, once KATP channel mutations have been excluded. PMID:20164212

  8. Germline heterozygous variants in genes associated with familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis as a cause of increased bleeding.

    PubMed

    Fager Ferrari, Marcus; Leinoe, Eva; Rossing, Maria; Norström, Eva; Strandberg, Karin; Steen Sejersen, Tobias; Qvortrup, Klaus; Zetterberg, Eva

    2017-04-11

    Familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) is caused by biallelic variants in genes regulating granule secretion in cytotoxic lymphocytes. In FHL3-5, the affected genes UNC13D, STX11 and STXBP2 have further been shown to regulate the secretion of platelet granules, giving rise to compromised platelet function. Therefore, we aimed to investigate platelet degranulation in patients heterozygous for variants in UNC13D, STX11 and STXBP2. During the work-up of patients referred to the Coagulation Unit, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden and the Department of Hematology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark due to bleeding tendencies, 12 patients harboring heterozygous variants in UNC13D, STX11 or STXBP2 were identified using targeted whole exome sequencing. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to assess the secretion of platelet dense granules following thrombin stimulation. Platelet degranulation, activation and aggregation were further assessed by flow cytometry (FC) and light transmission aggregometry (LTA) with lumi-aggregometry. In total, eight out of twelve (67%) patients showed impaired degranulation by at least one of the assays (TEM, FC and LTA). In the 12 patients, eight different heterozygous variants were identified. One variant was strongly associated with impaired degranulation, while four of the variants were associated with impaired granule secretion to a slightly lesser extent. One additional variant was found in six out of the twelve patients, and was associated with varying degrees of degranulation impairment. Accordingly, six out of the eight (75%) identified variants were associated with impaired platelet degranulation. Our results suggest that heterozygous variants in UNC13D, STX11 and STXBP2 are sufficient to cause platelet secretion defects resulting in increased bleeding.

  9. De Novo Mutations in Synaptic Transmission Genes Including DNM1 Cause Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Appenzeller, Silke; Balling, Rudi; Barisic, Nina; Baulac, Stéphanie; Caglayan, Hande; Craiu, Dana; De Jonghe, Peter; Depienne, Christel; Dimova, Petia; Djémié, Tania; Gormley, Padhraig; Guerrini, Renzo; Helbig, Ingo; Hjalgrim, Helle; Hoffman-Zacharska, Dorota; Jähn, Johanna; Klein, Karl Martin; Koeleman, Bobby; Komarek, Vladimir; Krause, Roland; Kuhlenbäumer, Gregor; Leguern, Eric; Lehesjoki, Anna-Elina; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lerche, Holger; Linnankivi, Tarja; Marini, Carla; May, Patrick; Møller, Rikke S.; Muhle, Hiltrud; Pal, Deb; Palotie, Aarno; Pendziwiat, Manuela; Robbiano, Angela; Roelens, Filip; Rosenow, Felix; Selmer, Kaja; Serratosa, Jose M.; Sisodiya, Sanjay; Stephani, Ulrich; Sterbova, Katalin; Striano, Pasquale; Suls, Arvid; Talvik, Tiina; von Spiczak, Sarah; Weber, Yvonne; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Zara, Federico; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Alldredge, Brian K.; Andermann, Eva; Andermann, Frederick; Amron, Dina; Bautista, Jocelyn F.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Bluvstein, Judith; Boro, Alex; Cascino, Gregory; Consalvo, Damian; Crumrine, Patricia; Devinsky, Orrin; Dlugos, Dennis; Epstein, Michael P.; Fiol, Miguel; Fountain, Nathan B.; French, Jacqueline; Friedman, Daniel; Geller, Eric B.; Glauser, Tracy; Glynn, Simon; Haas, Kevin; Haut, Sheryl R.; Hayward, Jean; Helmers, Sandra L.; Joshi, Sucheta; Kanner, Andres; Kirsch, Heidi E.; Knowlton, Robert C.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Kuperman, Rachel; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; McGuire, Shannon M.; Motika, Paul V.; Novotny, Edward J.; Ottman, Ruth; Paolicchi, Juliann M.; Parent, Jack; Park, Kristen; Poduri, Annapurna; Sadleir, Lynette; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Shellhaas, Renée A.; Sherr, Elliott; Shih, Jerry J.; Singh, Rani; Sirven, Joseph; Smith, Michael C.; Sullivan, Joe; Thio, Liu Lin; Venkat, Anu; Vining, Eileen P.G.; Von Allmen, Gretchen K.; Weisenberg, Judith L.; Widdess-Walsh, Peter; Winawer, Melodie R.; Allen, Andrew S.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Cossette, Patrick; Delanty, Norman; Dlugos, Dennis; Eichler, Evan E.; Epstein, Michael P.; Glauser, Tracy; Goldstein, David B.; Han, Yujun; Heinzen, Erin L.; Johnson, Michael R.; Kuzniecky, Ruben; Lowenstein, Daniel H.; Marson, Anthony G.; Mefford, Heather C.; Nieh, Sahar Esmaeeli; O’Brien, Terence J.; Ottman, Ruth; Petrou, Stephen; Petrovski, Slavé; Poduri, Annapurna; Ruzzo, Elizabeth K.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Sherr, Elliott

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that epileptic encephalopathies are genetically highly heterogeneous, underscoring the need for large cohorts of well-characterized individuals to further define the genetic landscape. Through a collaboration between two consortia (EuroEPINOMICS and Epi4K/EPGP), we analyzed exome-sequencing data of 356 trios with the “classical” epileptic encephalopathies, infantile spasms and Lennox Gastaut syndrome, including 264 trios previously analyzed by the Epi4K/EPGP consortium. In this expanded cohort, we find 429 de novo mutations, including de novo mutations in DNM1 in five individuals and de novo mutations in GABBR2, FASN, and RYR3 in two individuals each. Unlike previous studies, this cohort is sufficiently large to show a significant excess of de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathy probands compared to the general population using a likelihood analysis (p = 8.2 × 10−4), supporting a prominent role for de novo mutations in epileptic encephalopathies. We bring statistical evidence that mutations in DNM1 cause epileptic encephalopathy, find suggestive evidence for a role of three additional genes, and show that at least 12% of analyzed individuals have an identifiable causal de novo mutation. Strikingly, 75% of mutations in these probands are predicted to disrupt a protein involved in regulating synaptic transmission, and there is a significant enrichment of de novo mutations in genes in this pathway in the entire cohort as well. These findings emphasize an important role for synaptic dysregulation in epileptic encephalopathies, above and beyond that caused by ion channel dysfunction. PMID:25262651

  10. Congenital myopathy caused by a novel missense mutation in the CFL2 gene

    PubMed Central

    Ockeloen, C.W.; Gilhuis, H.J.; Pfundt, R.; Kamsteeg, E.J.; Agrawal, P.B.; Beggs, A.H.; Hama-Amin, A. Dara; Diekstra, A.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Lammens, M.; van Alfen, N.

    2012-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy and myofibrillar myopathy are heterogeneous myopathies that both comprise early-onset forms. We present two sisters from a consanguineous Iraqi Kurdish family with predominant axial and limb girdle weakness. Muscle biopsies showed features of both nemaline myopathy and myofibrillar myopathy. We performed homozygosity mapping in both siblings using an Affymetrix 250K Nspl SNP array. One of the overlapping homozygous regions harbored the gene CFL2. Because a mutation in CFL2 was identified in a family with nemaline myopathy, we performed sequence analysis of the gene and a novel homozygous missense mutation in exon 2 (c.19G>A, p.Val7Met) of CFL2 was identified in both siblings. CFL2 encodes the protein cofilin-2, which plays an important role in regulation of sarcomeric actin filaments. To our knowledge, this is the second family in which a mutation in CFL2 causes an autosomal recessive form of congenital myopathy with features of both nemaline and myofibrillar myopathy. Given the clinical variability and the multitude of histological features of congenital myopathies, CFL2 sequence analysis should be considered in patients presenting with an autosomal recessive form of congenital myopathy. PMID:22560515

  11. Reversal of gene dysregulation in cultured cytotrophoblasts reveals possible causes of preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan; Gormley, Matthew J.; Hunkapiller, Nathan M.; Kapidzic, Mirhan; Stolyarov, Yana; Feng, Victoria; Nishida, Masakazu; Drake, Penelope M.; Bianco, Katherine; Wang, Fei; McMaster, Michael T.; Fisher, Susan J.

    2013-01-01

    During human pregnancy, a subset of placental cytotrophoblasts (CTBs) differentiates into cells that aggressively invade the uterus and its vasculature, anchoring the progeny and rerouting maternal blood to the placenta. In preeclampsia (PE), CTB invasion is limited, reducing placental perfusion and/or creating intermittent flow. This syndrome, affecting 4%–8% of pregnancies, entails maternal vascular alterations (e.g., high blood pressure, proteinuria, and edema) and, in some patients, fetal growth restriction. The only cure is removal of the faulty placenta, i.e., delivery. Previously, we showed that defective CTB differentiation contributes to the placental component of PE, but the causes were unknown. Here, we cultured CTBs isolated from PE and control placentas for 48 hours, enabling differentiation and invasion. In various severe forms of PE, transcriptomics revealed common aberrations in CTB gene expression immediately after isolation, including upregulation of SEMA3B, which resolved in culture. The addition of SEMA3B to normal CTBs inhibited invasion and recreated aspects of the PE phenotype. Additionally, SEMA3B downregulated VEGF signaling through the PI3K/AKT and GSK3 pathways, effects that were observed in PE CTBs. We propose that, in severe PE, the in vivo environment dysregulates CTB gene expression; the autocrine actions of the upregulated molecules (including SEMA3B) impair CTB differentiation, invasion and signaling; and patient-specific factors determine the signs. PMID:23934129

  12. A Novel Nonsense Mutation of POU4F3 Gene Causes Autosomal Dominant Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chi; Wang, Mingming; Zhang, Fengguo; Zhou, Yicui; Li, Jianfeng; Zheng, Qingyin; Bai, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    POU4F3 gene encodes a transcription factor which plays an essential role in the maturation and maintenance of hair cells in cochlea and vestibular system. Several mutations of POU4F3 have been reported to cause autosomal dominant nonsyndromic hearing loss in recent years. In this study, we describe a pathogenic nonsense mutation located in POU4F3 in a four-generation Chinese family. Target region capture sequencing was performed to search for the candidate mutations from 81 genes related to nonsyndromic hearing loss in this family. A novel nonsense mutation of POU4F3, c.337C>T (p. Gln113⁎), was identified in a Chinese family characterized by late-onset progressive nonsyndromic hearing loss. The novel mutation cosegregated with hearing loss in this family and was absent in 200 ethnicity-matched controls. The mutation led to a stop codon and thus a truncated protein with no functional domains remained. Transient transfection and immunofluorescence assay revealed that the subcellular localization of the truncated protein differed markedly from normal protein, which could be the underlying reason for complete loss of its normal function. Here, we report the first nonsense mutation of POU4F3 associated with progressive hearing loss and explored the possible underlying mechanism. Routine examination of POU4F3 is necessary for the genetic diagnosis of hereditary hearing loss in the future. PMID:27999687

  13. A novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 gene causes Weyers acrofacial dysostosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiaoqian; Song, Guangtai; Fan, Mingwen; Shi, Lisong; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Huang, Shangzhi; Guo, Ruiqiang; Bian, Zhuan

    2006-03-01

    Weyers acrofacial dysostosis (MIM 193530) is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by mild short stature, postaxial polydactyly, nail dystrophy and dysplastic teeth. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive disorder with a similar, but more severe phenotype. Mutations in the EVC have been identified in both syndromes. However, the EVC mutations only occur in a small proportion of EvC patients. Recently, mutations in a new gene, EVC2, were found to be associated with other EvC cases. The EVC and EVC2 are located close to each other in a head-to-head configuration and may be functionally related. In this study, we report identification of a novel heterozygous deletion in the EVC2 that is responsible for autosomal dominant Weyers acrofacial dysostosis in a large Chinese family. This constitutes the first report of Weyers acrofacial dysostosis caused by this gene. Hence, the spectrum of malformation syndromes due to EVC2 mutations is further extended. Our data provides conclusive evidence that Weyers acrofacial dysostosis and EvC syndrome are allelic and genetically heterogeneous conditions.

  14. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-Ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-06-08

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3-/-) mice. Most Slc52a3-/- mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3-/- mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3-/- fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency.

  15. Disruption of Slc52a3 gene causes neonatal lethality with riboflavin deficiency in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimatsu, Hiroki; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Yamanishi, Kaori; Yao, Yoshiaki; Sugano, Kumiko; Nakagawa, Shunsaku; Imai, Satoshi; Omura, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Yano, Ikuko; Masuda, Satohiro; Inui, Ken-ichi; Matsubara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of riboflavin should be maintained by transporters. Previous in vitro studies have elucidated basic information about riboflavin transporter RFVT3 encoded by SLC52A3 gene. However, the contribution of RFVT3 to the maintenance of riboflavin homeostasis and the significance in vivo remain unclear. Here, we investigated the physiological role of RFVT3 using Slc52a3 knockout (Slc52a3−/−) mice. Most Slc52a3−/− mice died with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia within 48 hr after birth. The plasma and tissue riboflavin concentrations in Slc52a3−/− mice at postnatal day 0 were dramatically lower than those in wild-type (WT) littermates. Slc52a3−/− fetuses showed a lower capacity of placental riboflavin transport compared with WT fetuses. Riboflavin supplement during pregnancy and after birth reduced neonatal death and metabolic disorders. To our knowledge, this is the first report to indicate that Rfvt3 contributes to placental riboflavin transport, and that disruption of Slc52a3 gene caused neonatal mortality with hyperlipidemia and hypoglycemia owing to riboflavin deficiency. PMID:27272163

  16. Transient high glucose causes persistent epigenetic changes and altered gene expression during subsequent normoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    El-Osta, Assam; Brasacchio, Daniella; Yao, Dachun; Pocai, Alessandro; Jones, Peter L.; Roeder, Robert G.; Cooper, Mark E.; Brownlee, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The current goal of diabetes therapy is to reduce time-averaged mean levels of glycemia, measured as HbA1c, to prevent diabetic complications. However, HbA1c only explains <25% of the variation in risk of developing complications. Because HbA1c does not correlate with glycemic variability when adjusted for mean blood glucose, we hypothesized that transient spikes of hyperglycemia may be an HbA1c–independent risk factor for diabetic complications. We show that transient hyperglycemia induces long-lasting activating epigenetic changes in the promoter of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) subunit p65 in aortic endothelial cells both in vitro and in nondiabetic mice, which cause increased p65 gene expression. Both the epigenetic changes and the gene expression changes persist for at least 6 d of subsequent normal glycemia, as do NF-κB–induced increases in monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression. Hyperglycemia-induced epigenetic changes and increased p65 expression are prevented by reducing mitochondrial superoxide production or superoxide-induced α-oxoaldehydes. These results highlight the dramatic and long-lasting effects that short-term hyperglycemic spikes can have on vascular cells and suggest that transient spikes of hyperglycemia may be an HbA1c–independent risk factor for diabetic complications. PMID:18809715

  17. Disruption of the Pelota Gene Causes Early Embryonic Lethality and Defects in Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Adham, Ibrahim M.; Sallam, Mahmoud A.; Steding, Gerd; Korabiowska, Monika; Brinck, Ulrich; Hoyer-Fender, Sigrid; Oh, Changkyu; Engel, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Mutations in either the Drosophila melanogaster pelota or pelo gene or the Saccharomyces cerevisiae homologous gene, DOM34, cause defects of spermatogenesis and oogenesis in Drosophila, and delay of growth and failure of sporulation in yeast. These phenotypes suggest that pelota is required for normal progression of the mitotic and meiotic cell cycle. To determine the role of the pelota in mouse development and progression of cell cycle, we have established a targeted disruption of the mouse Pelo. Heterozygous animals are variable and fertile. Genotyping of the progeny of heterozygous intercrosses shows the absence of Pelo−/− pups and suggests an embryo-lethal phenotype. Histological analyses reveal that the homozygous Pelo deficient embryos fail to develop past day 7.5 of embryogenesis (E7.5). The failure of mitotic active inner cell mass of the Pelo−/− blastocysts to expand in growth after 4 days in culture and the survival of mitotic inactive trophoplast indicate that the lethality of Pelo-null embryos is due to defects in cell proliferation. Analysis of the cellular DNA content reveals the significant increase of aneuploid cells in Pelo−/− embryos at E7.5. Therefore, the percent increase of aneuploid cells at E7.5 may be directly responsible for the arrested development and suggests that Pelo is required for the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:12556505

  18. De Novo Truncating FUS Gene Mutation as a Cause of Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Kocerha, Jannet; Finch, NiCole; Crook, Richard; Baker, Matt; Desaro, Pamela; Johnston, Amelia; Rutherford, Nicola; Wojtas, Aleksandra; Kennelly, Kathleen; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill; Boylan, Kevin; Rademakers, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding fused in sarcoma (FUS) were recently identified as a novel cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), emphasizing the genetic heterogeneity of ALS. We sequenced the genes encoding superoxide dismutase (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP) and FUS in 99 sporadic and 17 familial ALS patients ascertained at Mayo Clinic. We identified two novel mutations in FUS in two out of 99 (2.0%) sporadic ALS patients and established the de novo occurrence of one FUS mutation. In familial patients, we identified three (17.6%) SOD1 mutations, while FUS and TARDBP mutations were excluded. The de novo FUS mutation (g.10747A>G; IVS13-2A>G) affects the splice-acceptor site of FUS intron 13 and was shown to induce skipping of FUS exon 14 leading to the C-terminal truncation of FUS (p.G466VfsX14). Subcellular localization studies showed a dramatic increase in the cytoplasmic localization of FUS and a reduction of normal nuclear expression in cells transfected with truncated compared to wild-type FUS. We further identified a novel in-frame insertion/deletion mutation in FUS exon 12 (p.S402 P411delinsGGGG) which is predicted to expand a conserved poly-glycine motif. Our findings extend the mutation spectrum in FUS leading to ALS and describe the first de novo mutation in FUS. PMID:20232451

  19. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junyu; Liu, Hongbin; Liu, Zhiyuan; Liao, Yong; Guo, Luo; Wang, Honglian; He, Lin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Xing, Qinghe

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1) is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser) in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203) containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  20. A Gene-Specific Method for Predicting Hemophilia-Causing Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hamasaki-Katagiri, Nobuko; Salari, Raheleh; Wu, Andrew; Qi, Yini; Schiller, Tal; Filiberto, Amanda C.; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Komar, Anton A.; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental goal of medical genetics is the accurate prediction of genotype–phenotype correlations. As an approach to develop more accurate in silico tools for prediction of disease-causing mutations of structural proteins, we present a gene- and disease-specific prediction tool based on a large systematic analysis of missense mutations from hemophilia A (HA) patients. Our HA-specific prediction tool, HApredictor, showed disease prediction accuracy comparable to other publicly available prediction software. In contrast to those methods, its performance is not limited to non-synonymous mutations. Given the role of synonymous mutations in disease and drug codon optimization, we propose that utilizing a gene- and disease-specific method can be highly useful to make functional predictions possible even for synonymous mutations. Incorporating computational metrics at both nucleotide and amino acid levels along with multiple protein sequence/structure alignment significantly improved the predictive performance of our tool. HApredictor is freely available for download at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/CBBresearch/Przytycka/HA_Predict/index.htm. PMID:23920358

  1. Multiple Genes Cause Postmating Prezygotic Reproductive Isolation in the Drosophila virilis Group

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of speciation is a central problem in evolutionary biology. Studies of reproductive isolation have provided several insights into the genetic causes of speciation, especially in taxa that lend themselves to detailed genetic scrutiny. Reproductive barriers have usually been divided into those that occur before zygote formation (prezygotic) and after (postzygotic), with the latter receiving a great deal of attention over several decades. Reproductive barriers that occur after mating but before zygote formation [postmating prezygotic (PMPZ)] are especially understudied at the genetic level. Here, I present a phenotypic and genetic analysis of a PMPZ reproductive barrier between two species of the Drosophila virilis group: D. americana and D. virilis. This species pair shows strong PMPZ isolation, especially when D. americana males mate with D. virilis females: ∼99% of eggs laid after these heterospecific copulations are not fertilized. Previous work has shown that the paternal loci contributing to this incompatibility reside on two chromosomes, one of which (chromosome 5) likely carries multiple factors. The other (chromosome 2) is fixed for a paracentric inversion that encompasses nearly half the chromosome. Here, I present two results. First, I show that PMPZ in this species cross is largely due to defective sperm storage in heterospecific copulations. Second, using advanced intercross and backcross mapping approaches, I identify genomic regions that carry genes capable of rescuing heterospecific fertilization. I conclude that paternal incompatibility between D. americana males and D. virilis females is underlain by four or more genes on chromosomes 2 and 5. PMID:27729433

  2. Linkage disequilibrium mapping places the gene causing familial Mediterranean fever close to D16S246

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, E. N.; Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.

    1996-03-01

    This report presents refined genetic mapping data for the gene causing familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), a recessively inherited disorder of inflammation. We sampled 65 Jewish, Armenian, and Arab families and typed them for eight markers from chromosome 16p. Using a new algorithm that permits multipoint calculations for a dense map of markers in consanguineous families, we obtained a maximal LOD score of 49.2 at a location 1.6 cM centromeric to D16S246. A specific haplotype at D16S283-D16S94-D16S246 was found in 76% of Moroccan and 32% of non-Moroccan Jewish carrier chromosomes, but this haplotype was not overrepresented in Armenian or Arab FMF carriers. Moreover, the 2.5-kb allele at D16S246 was significantly associated with FMF in Moroccan and non-Moroccan Jews but not in Armenians or Arabs. Since the Moroccan Jewish community represents a relatively recently established and genetically isolated founder population, we analyzed the Moroccan linkage-disequilibrium data by using Luria-Delbruck formulas and simulations based on a Poisson branching process. These methods place the FMF susceptibility gene within 0.305 cM of D16S246 (2-LOD-unit range 0.02-0.64 cM). 41 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. An inactivating mutation in the SOD 1 gene causes familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pramatarova, A.; Rouleau, G.A.; Goto, J.

    1994-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by highly selective death of large motor neurons in the cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The familial form of ALS (FALS) accounts for approximately 10% of the cases and is transmitted in an autosomal dominant manner. Recently the defective gene causing chromosome 21-linked FALS was shown to be the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD 1). However, the precise mechanism of neurotoxicity seen in FALS with SOD 1 mutations is still unknown. Until now all SOD 1 mutations reported were single base pair substitutions (missense). We have identified a nonsense mutation in exon 5 of the SOD 1 gene in a FALS kindred. This two base pair deletion provokes a frameshift and a predicted premature truncation of the protein. The region affected has a very important structural and functional role: it contains part of the active loop and is involved in dimer contact. We would predict that the loss of these structures would impair the functioning of the enzyme.

  4. A NOVEL MUTATION IN THE HCN4 GENE CAUSES SYMPTOMATIC SINUS BRADYCARDIA IN MOROCCAN JEWS

    PubMed Central

    Laish-Farkash, Avishag; Brass, Dovrat; Marek-Yagel, Dina; Pras, Elon; Dascal, Nathan; Antzelevitch, Charles; Nof, Eyal; Reznik, Haya; Eldar, Michael; Glikson, Michael; Luria, David

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To conduct a clinical, genetic and functional analysis of three unrelated families with familial sinus bradycardia (FSB). Background Mutations in the hyperpolarization-activated nucleotide-gated channel (HCN4) are known to be associated with FSB. Methods and Results Three males of Moroccan Jewish descent were hospitalized: one survived an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and 2 presented with weakness and presyncopal events. All 3 had significant sinus bradycardia, also found in other first-degree relatives, with a segregation suggesting autosomal-dominant inheritance. All had normal response to exercise and normal heart structure. Sequencing of the HCN4 gene in all patients revealed a C to T transition at nucleotide position 1454, which resulted in an alanine to valine change (A485V) in the ion channel pore found in most of their bradycardiac relatives, but not in 150 controls. Functional expression of the mutated ion channel in Xenopus oocytes and in human embryonic kidney 293 cells revealed profoundly reduced function and synthesis of the mutant channel compared to wild-type. Conclusions We describe a new mutation in the HCN4 gene causing symptomatic FSB in 3 unrelated individuals of similar ethnic background that may indicate unexplained FSB in this ethnic group. This profound functional defect is consistent with the symptomatic phenotype. PMID:20662977

  5. A case of familial paraganglioma syndrome type 4 caused by a mutation in the SDHB gene.

    PubMed

    Drucker, Aaron M; Houlden, Robyn L

    2006-12-01

    A 40-year-old man was referred to our clinic with recurrent paragangliomas. He had undergone resection of a paraganglioma superior to the right adrenal gland at 19 years of age, resection of two para-aortic paragangliomas at 39 years of age, and resection of a paraganglioma in the interatrial septum at 40 years. The patient's mother had died at age 39 years of metastases from a carotid body tumor. MRI and CT scanning, 131I-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine scanning, and genetic testing for a mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit B gene. Familial paraganglioma syndrome type 4 caused by a mutation in the succinate dehydrogenase complex, subunit B gene. The patient underwent two surgical procedures in our clinic. The first was to remove two para-aortic paragangliomas, and the second to remove a paraganglioma that involved both atria. The patient is at high risk for malignant disease and should undergo an annual monitoring program that consists of physical examination and measurement of his blood pressure and levels of urinary catecholamines and metanephrines. If these procedures suggest a recurrence of paraganglioma, 123I-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine scanning should be performed. As he might develop nonfunctional tumors, however, he should also undergo CT scanning, MRI scanning, or both, of the neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis every 6-12 months. Genetic testing has been offered to family members.

  6. Mutations of the CEP290 gene encoding a centrosomal protein cause Meckel-Gruber syndrome.

    PubMed

    Frank, Valeska; den Hollander, Anneke I; Brüchle, Nadina Ortiz; Zonneveld, Marijke N; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Becker, Christian; Du Bois, Gabriele; Kendziorra, Heide; Roosing, Susanne; Senderek, Jan; Nürnberg, Peter; Cremers, Frans P M; Zerres, Klaus; Bergmann, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS) is an autosomal recessive, lethal multisystemic disorder characterized by meningooccipital encephalocele, cystic kidney dysplasia, hepatobiliary ductal plate malformation, and postaxial polydactyly. Recently, genes for MKS1 and MKS3 were identified, putting MKS on the list of ciliary disorders (ciliopathies). By positional cloning in a distantly related multiplex family, we mapped a novel locus for MKS to a 3-Mb interval on 12q21. Sequencing of the CEP290 gene located in the minimal critical region showed a homozygous 1-bp deletion supposed to lead to loss of function of the encoded centrosomal protein CEP290/nephrocystin-6. CEP290 is thought to be involved in chromosome segregation and localizes to cilia, centrosomes, and the nucleus. Subsequent analysis of another consanguineous multiplex family revealed homozygous haplotypes and the same frameshift mutation. Our findings add to the increasing body of evidence that ciliopathies can cause a broad spectrum of disease phenotypes, and pleiotropic effects of CEP290 mutations range from single organ involvement with isolated Leber congenital amaurosis to Joubert syndrome and lethal early embryonic multisystemic malformations in Meckel-Gruber syndrome. We compiled clinical and genetic data of all patients with CEP290 mutations described so far. No clear-cut genotype-phenotype correlations were apparent as almost all mutations are nonsense, frameshift, or splice-site changes and scattered throughout the gene irrespective of the patients' phenotypes. Conclusively, other factors than the type and location of CEP290 mutations may underlie phenotypic variability. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Central Precocious Puberty Caused by Mutations in the Imprinted Gene MKRN3

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Dauber, Andrew; Macedo, Delanie B.; Noel, Sekoni D.; Brito, Vinicius N.; Gill, John C.; Cukier, Priscilla; Thompson, Iain R.; Navarro, Victor M.; Gagliardi, Priscila C.; Rodrigues, Tânia; Kochi, Cristiane; Longui, Carlos Alberto; Beckers, Dominique; de Zegher, Francis; Montenegro, Luciana R.; Mendonca, Berenice B.; Carroll, Rona S.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Latronico, Ana Claudia; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND The onset of puberty is first detected as an increase in pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Early activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis results in central precocious puberty. The timing of pubertal development is driven in part by genetic factors, but only a few, rare molecular defects associated with central precocious puberty have been identified. METHODS We performed whole-exome sequencing in 40 members of 15 families with central precocious puberty. Candidate variants were confirmed with Sanger sequencing. We also performed quantitative real-time polymerase-chain-reaction assays to determine levels of messenger RNA (mRNA) in the hypothalami of mice at different ages. RESULTS We identified four novel heterozygous mutations in MKRN3, the gene encoding makorin RING-finger protein 3, in 5 of the 15 families; both sexes were affected. The mutations included three frameshift mutations, predicted to encode truncated proteins, and one missense mutation, predicted to disrupt protein function. MKRN3 is a paternally expressed, imprinted gene located in the Prader–Willi syndrome critical region (chromosome 15q11–q13). All affected persons inherited the mutations from their fathers, a finding that indicates perfect segregation with the mode of inheritance expected for an imprinted gene. Levels of Mkrn3 mRNA were high in the arcuate nucleus of prepubertal mice, decreased immediately before puberty, and remained low after puberty. CONCLUSIONS Deficiency of MKRN3 causes central precocious puberty in humans. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.) PMID:23738509

  8. [Phenotype predictions of the pathogenic nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in deafness-causing gene COCH].

    PubMed

    Xuli, Qian; Xin, Cao

    2015-07-01

    The COCH (Coagulation factor C homology) gene, located in human chromosome 14q12-q13, is the first gene identified to cause vestibular dysfunction. COCH encodes cochlin, which contains an N-terminal LCCL (Limulus factor C, cochlin, and late gestation lung protein Lgl1) domain and a C-temimal vWFA (Von Willebrand factor type A) domain. Recently, functional research of COCH mutations and cochlin have come under the spotlight in the field of hereditary deafness. Approximately 16 mutations in COCH have been confirmed to date, among which 13 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) are the most common form of genetic variations. Nonetheless, there is poor knowledge on the relationship between the genotype and the phenotype of the other nsSNPs in COCH. Here we analyzed deleterious nsSNPs from all SNPs in the COCH gene in the vWFA domain based on different computational methods and identified eight potential pathogenic nsSNPs (I176T, R180Q, G265E, V269L, I368N, I372T, R416C and Y424D) after combining literatures with 3D structures. Meanwhile, the protein structures of six reported pathogenic nsSNPs (P51S, G87W, I109N, I109T, W117R and F121S) in the LCCL domain have been constructed, and we identified aberrant structural changes in loops and chains. The prediction of pathogenic mutations for COCH nsSNPs will provide a blueprint for screening pathogenic mutations, and it will be beneficial to the functional research of COCH and cochlin in this field.

  9. Mutations in c10orf11, a melanocyte-differentiation gene, cause autosomal-recessive albinism.

    PubMed

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-03-07

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2-q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11 in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal-recessive albinism in humans. Copyright © 2013 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Familial glucocorticoid resistance caused by a splice site deletion in the human glucocorticoid receptor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, M.; Lamberts, S.W.J.; Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Encio, I.J.; Stratakis, C.A.; Hurley, D.M.; Accili, D.; Chrousos, G.P. Erasmus Univ. of Rotterdam )

    1993-03-01

    The clinical syndrome of generalized, compensated glucocorticoid resistance is characterized by increased cortisol secretion without clinical evidence of hyper- or hypocortisolism, and manifestations of androgen and/or mineralocorticoid excess. This condition results from partial failure of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to modulate transcription of its target genes. The authors studied the molecular mechanisms of this syndrome in a Dutch kindred, whose affected members had hypercortisolism and approximately half of normal GRs, and whose proband was a young woman with manifestations of hyperandrogenism. Using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify and sequence each of the nine exons of the GR gene [alpha], along with their 5[prime]- and 3[prime]-flanking regions, the authors identified a 4-base deletion at the 3[prime]-boundary of exon 6 in one GR allele ([Delta][sub 4]), which removed a donor splice site in all three affected members studied. In contrast, the sequence of exon 6 in the two unaffected siblings was normal. A single nucleotide substitution causing an amino acid substitution in the amino terminal domain of the GR (asparagine to serine, codon 363) was also discovered in exon 2 of the other allele (G[sub 1220]) in the proband, in one of her affected brothers and in her unaffected sister. This deletion in the glucocorticoid receptor gene was associated with the expression of only one allele and a decrease of GR protein by 50% in affected members of this glucocorticoid resistant family. The mutation identified in exon 2 did not segregate with the disease and appears to be of no functional significance. The presence of the null allele was apparently compensated for by increased cortisol production at the expense of concurrent hyperandrogenism. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Knockdown of Zebrafish Lumican Gene (zlum) Causes Scleral Thinning and Increased Size of Scleral Coats*

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Lung-Kun; Liu, Chia-Yang; Kao, Winston W.-Y.; Huang, Chang-Jen; Hu, Fung-Rong; Chien, Chung-Liang; Wang, I-Jong

    2010-01-01

    The lumican gene (lum), which encodes one of the major keratan sulfate proteoglycans (KSPGs) in the vertebrate cornea and sclera, has been linked to axial myopia in humans. In this study, we chose zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an animal model to elucidate the role of lumican in the development of axial myopia. The zebrafish lumican gene (zlum) spans ∼4.6 kb of the zebrafish genome. Like human (hLUM) and mouse (mlum), zlum consists of three exons, two introns, and a TATA box-less promoter at the 5′-flanking region of the transcription initiation site. Sequence analysis of the cDNA predicts that zLum encodes 344 amino acids. zLum shares 51% amino acid sequence identity with human lumican. Similar to hLUM and mlum, zlum mRNA is expressed in the eye and many other tissues, such as brain, muscle, and liver as well. Transgenic zebrafish harboring an enhanced GFP reporter gene construct downstream of a 1.7-kb zlum 5′-flanking region displayed enhanced GFP expression in the cornea and sclera, as well as throughout the body. Down-regulation of zlum expression by antisense zlum morpholinos manifested ocular enlargement resembling axial myopia due to disruption of the collagen fibril arrangement in the sclera and resulted in scleral thinning. Administration of muscarinic receptor antagonists, e.g. atropine and pirenzepine, effectively subdued the ocular enlargement caused by morpholinos in in vivo zebrafish larvae assays. The observation suggests that zebrafish can be used as an in vivo model for screening compounds in treating myopia. PMID:20551313

  12. Mutations in C10orf11, a Melanocyte-Differentiation Gene, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Albinism

    PubMed Central

    Grønskov, Karen; Dooley, Christopher M.; Østergaard, Elsebet; Kelsh, Robert N.; Hansen, Lars; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Vilhelmsen, Kaj; Møllgård, Kjeld; Stemple, Derek L.; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal-recessive albinism is a hypopigmentation disorder with a broad phenotypic range. A substantial fraction of individuals with albinism remain genetically unresolved, and it has been hypothesized that more genes are to be identified. By using homozygosity mapping of an inbred Faroese family, we identified a 3.5 Mb homozygous region (10q22.2–q22.3) on chromosome 10. The region contains five protein-coding genes, and sequencing of one of these, C10orf11, revealed a nonsense mutation that segregated with the disease and showed a recessive inheritance pattern. Investigation of additional albinism-affected individuals from the Faroe Islands revealed that five out of eight unrelated affected persons had the nonsense mutation in C10orf11. Screening of a cohort of autosomal-recessive-albinism-affected individuals residing in Denmark showed a homozygous 1 bp duplication in C10orf11 in an individual originating from Lithuania. Immunohistochemistry showed localization of C10orf11 in melanoblasts and melanocytes in human fetal tissue, but no localization was seen in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Knockdown of the zebrafish (Danio rerio) homolog with the use of morpholinos resulted in substantially decreased pigmentation and a reduction of the apparent number of pigmented melanocytes. The morphant phenotype was rescued by wild-type C10orf11, but not by mutant C10orf11. In conclusion, we have identified a melanocyte-differentiation gene, C10orf11, which when mutated causes autosomal-recessive albinism in humans. PMID:23395477

  13. Computational identification and structural analysis of deleterious functional SNPs in MLL gene causing acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    George Priya Doss, C; Rajasekaran, R; Sethumadhavan, Rao

    2010-09-01

    A promising application of the huge amounts of data from the Human Genome Project currently available offers new opportunities for identifying the genetic predisposition and developing a better understanding of complex diseases such as cancers. The main focus of cancer genetics is the study of mutations that are causally implicated in tumorigenesis. The identification of such causal mutations does not only provide insight into cancer biology but also presents anticancer therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers. In this study, we evaluated the Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) that can alter the expression and the function in MLL gene through computational methods. We applied an evolutionary perspective to screen the SNPs using a sequence homologybased SIFT tool, suggested that 10 non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) (50%) were found to be deleterious. Structure based approach PolyPhen server suggested that 5 nsSNPS (25%) may disrupt protein function and structure. PupaSuite tool predicted the phenotypic effect of SNPs on the structure and function of the affected protein. Structure analysis was carried out with the major mutations that occurred in the native protein coded by MLL gene is at amino acid positions Q1198P and K1203Q. The solvent accessibility results showed that 7 residues changed from exposed state in the native type protein to buried state in Q1198P mutant protein and remained unchanged in the case of K1203Q. From the overall results obtained, nsSNP with id (rs1784246) at the amino acid position Q1198P could be considered as deleterious mutation in the acute leukemia caused by MLL gene.

  14. A founder mutation in the CLCNKB gene causes Bartter syndrome type III in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Soriano, Juan; Vallo, Alfredo; Pérez de Nanclares, Gustavo; Bilbao, José Ramón; Castaño, Luis

    2005-07-01

    The term "Bartter syndrome" encompasses a group of closely related inherited tubulopathies characterized by markedly reduced NaCl transport by the distal nephron. At present, five different genetic variants have been demonstrated. The majority of patients with so-called classic Bartter syndrome carry inactivating mutations of the CLCNKB gene encoding the basolateral ClC-Kb chloride channel (Bartter syndrome type III). The purpose of this study was to investigate the underlying mutation in cases of classic Bartter syndrome followed at our center. Ten patients, including two sisters, with clinical and biochemical features of classic Bartter syndrome were included in the mutational analysis. They originated from different regions of Spain with either Basque or Spanish ancestry. There was no history of consanguineous marriage in any of the kindreds. The parents and siblings of each patient, as well as a population of 300 healthy control adult subjects, were also analyzed. All ten patients were found to be homozygous for an identical missense mutation in the CLCNKB gene, substituting a threonine for an alanine at codon 204 (A204T) in the putative fifth transmembrane domain of the protein. None of the 300 control subjects were homozygous for the A204T allele. Overall, the A204T mutation was detected on 2/600 control chromosomes. Despite sharing a common mutation, the clinical manifestations of the syndrome in the patients varied from lack of symptoms to severe growth retardation. Demonstration of a point mutation within the CLCNKB gene as the apparently unique cause of Bartter syndrome type III in Spain is highly suggestive of a founder effect. Our results also support the lack of correlation between genotype and phenotype in this disease.

  15. Congenital thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura caused by new compound heterozygous mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene.

    PubMed

    Rank, Cecilie Utke; Kremer Hovinga, Johanna; Taleghani, Magnus Mansouri; Lämmle, Bernhard; Gøtze, Jens Peter; Nielsen, Ove Juul

    2014-02-01

    Upshaw-Schulman syndrome (USS) is due to severe congenital deficiency of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin and metalloprotease with thrombospondin type 1 domains, nr 13) activity resulting in the presence of unusually large forms of VWF in the circulation, causing intravascular platelet clumping and thrombotic microangiopathy. Our patient, a 26-year-old man, had attacks of thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) with thrombocytopenia and a urine dipstick positive for hemoglobin (4+), often as the only sign of hemolytic activity. He had ADAMTS13 activity of <1% of normal plasma without the presence of inhibitors of ADAMTS13. ADAMTS13 deficiency was caused by two new mutations of the ADAMTS13 gene: a deletion of a single nucleotide in exon17 (c. 2042 delA) leading to a frameshift (K681C fs X16), and a missense mutation in exon 25 (c.3368G>A) leading to p.R1123H. This case report confirms the importance of the analysis of the ADAMTS13 activity and its inhibitor in patients who have episodes of TTP, with a very low platelet count and sometimes without the classic biochemical signs of hemolysis.

  16. Mild recessive mutations in six Fraser syndrome-related genes cause isolated congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Stefan; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Dworschak, Gabriel C; Hilger, Alina C; Saisawat, Pawaree; Vivante, Asaf; Stajic, Natasa; Bogdanovic, Radovan; Reutter, Heiko M; Kehinde, Elijah O; Tasic, Velibor; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) account for approximately 40% of children with ESRD in the United States. Hitherto, mutations in 23 genes have been described as causing autosomal dominant isolated CAKUT in humans. However, >90% of cases of isolated CAKUT still remain without a molecular diagnosis. Here, we hypothesized that genes mutated in recessive mouse models with the specific CAKUT phenotype of unilateral renal agenesis may also be mutated in humans with isolated CAKUT. We applied next-generation sequencing technology for targeted exon sequencing of 12 recessive murine candidate genes in 574 individuals with isolated CAKUT from 590 families. In 15 of 590 families, we identified recessive mutations in the genes FRAS1, FREM2, GRIP1, FREM1, ITGA8, and GREM1, all of which function in the interaction of the ureteric bud and the metanephric mesenchyme. We show that isolated CAKUT may be caused partially by mutations in recessive genes. Our results also indicate that biallelic missense mutations in the Fraser/MOTA/BNAR spectrum genes cause isolated CAKUT, whereas truncating mutations are found in the multiorgan form of Fraser syndrome. The newly identified recessive biallelic mutations in these six genes represent the molecular cause of isolated CAKUT in 2.5% of the 590 affected families in this study. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Ablation of XP-V gene causes adipose tissue senescence and metabolic abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yih-Wen; Harris, Robert A.; Hatahet, Zafer; Chou, Kai-ming

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome have evolved to be major health issues throughout the world. Whether loss of genome integrity contributes to this epidemic is an open question. DNA polymerase η (pol η), encoded by the xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V) gene, plays an essential role in preventing cutaneous cancer caused by UV radiation-induced DNA damage. Herein, we demonstrate that pol η deficiency in mice (pol η−/−) causes obesity with visceral fat accumulation, hepatic steatosis, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose intolerance. In comparison to WT mice, adipose tissue from pol η−/− mice exhibits increased DNA damage and a greater DNA damage response, indicated by up-regulation and/or phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), and poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Concomitantly, increased cellular senescence in the adipose tissue from pol η−/− mice was observed and measured by up-regulation of senescence markers, including p53, p16Ink4a, p21, senescence-associated (SA) β-gal activity, and SA secretion of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) as early as 4 wk of age. Treatment of pol η−/− mice with a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, reduced adipocyte senescence and attenuated the metabolic abnormalities. Furthermore, elevation of adipocyte DNA damage with a high-fat diet or sodium arsenite exacerbated adipocyte senescence and metabolic abnormalities in pol η−/− mice. In contrast, reduction of adipose DNA damage with N-acetylcysteine or metformin ameliorated cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities. These studies indicate that elevated DNA damage is a root cause of adipocyte senescence, which plays a determining role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26240351

  18. Novel variants in PAX6 gene caused congenital aniridia in two Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Zhang, R; Linpeng, S; Wei, X; Li, H; Huang, Y; Guo, J; Wu, Q; Liang, D; Wu, L

    2017-06-01

    PurposeTo reveal the underlying genetic defect in two four-generation Chinese families with aniridia and explore the pathologic mechanism.MethodsFull ophthalmic examinations were performed in two families with aniridia. The PAX6 gene was directly sequenced in patients of two families, and the detected variants were screened in unaffected family members and two hundred unrelated healthy controls. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to explore pathologic mechanisms of the two variants.ResultsAniridia, cataract, and oscillatory nystagmus were observed in patients of the two families. In addition, we observed corneal opacity and microphthalmus in family 1, and strabismus, left ectopia lentis, microphthalmus, and microcornea in family 2. Sanger sequencing detected a novel 1-bp duplication (c.50dupA) in family 1 and a novel 2-bp splice site deletion (c.765+1_765+2delGT) in family 2. Sequencing of cDNA indicated skipping of exon 9 caused by the splice site deletion, being predicted to cause a premature stop codon, as well as the duplication. The PAX6 mRNA significantly lower in patients with aniridia than in unaffected family members in both families, suggesting that the duplication and splice site deletion caused nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.ConclusionsOur study identified two novel PAX6 variants in two families with aniridia and revealed the pathogenicity of the variants; this would expand the variant spectrum of PAX6 and help us better understand the molecular basis of aniridia, thus facilitating genetic counseling.

  19. A recurrent germline mutation in the PIGA gene causes Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2.

    PubMed

    Fauth, Christine; Steindl, Katharina; Toutain, Annick; Farrell, Sandra; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Karall, Daniela; Joset, Pascal; Böhm, Sebastian; Baumer, Alessandra; Maier, Oliver; Zschocke, Johannes; Weksberg, Rosanna; Marshall, Christian R; Rauch, Anita

    2016-02-01

    Hypomorphic germline mutations in the PIGA (phosphatidylinositol glycan class A) gene recently were recognized as the cause of a clinically heterogeneous spectrum of X-linked disorders including (i) early onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe muscular hypotonia, dysmorphism, multiple congenital anomalies, and early death ("MCAHS2"), (ii) neurodegenerative encephalopathy with systemic iron overload (ferro-cerebro-cutaneous syndrome, "FCCS"), and (iii) intellectual disability and seizures without dysmorphism. Previous studies showed that the recurrent PIGA germline mutation c.1234C>T (p.Arg412*) leads to a clinical phenotype at the most severe end of the spectrum associated with early infantile lethality. We identified three additional individuals from two unrelated families with the same PIGA mutation. Major clinical findings include early onset intractable epileptic encephalopathy with a burst-suppression pattern on EEG, generalized muscular hypotonia, structural brain abnormalities, macrocephaly and increased birth weight, joint contractures, coarse facial features, widely spaced eyes, a short nose with anteverted nares, gingival overgrowth, a wide mouth, short limbs with short distal phalanges, and a small penis. Based on the phenotypic overlap with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome type 2 (SGBS2), we hypothesized that both disorders might have the same underlying cause. We were able to confirm the same c.1234C>T (p.Arg412*) mutation in the DNA sample from an affected fetus of the original family affected with SGBS2. We conclude that the recurrent PIGA germline mutation c.1234C>T leads to a recognizable clinical phenotype with a poor prognosis and is the cause of SGBS2.

  20. Permanent neonatal diabetes caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation in the glucokinase gene.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Cabezas, O; Díaz González, F; Aragonés, A; Argente, J; Campos-Barros, A

    2008-06-01

    Glucokinase deficiency is an unfrequent cause of permanent neonatal diabetes (PND), as only seven patients have been reported, either homozygous for a missense or frameshift mutation or compound heterozygous for both of them. We report here the first known case caused by a homozygous nonsense mutation (Y61X) in the glucokinase gene (GCK) that introduces a premature stop codon, generating a truncated protein that is predicted to be completely inactive as it lacks both the glucose- and the adenosine triphosphate-binding sites. The proband, born to consanguineous parents, was a full-term, intra-uterine growth-retarded male newborn who presented with a glycaemia of 129 mg/dL (7.16 mmol/L) on his second day of life, increasing thereafter up to 288 mg/dL (15.98 mmol/L) and 530 mg/dL (29.41 mmol/L) over the next 24 h, in the face of low serum insulin (<3 muIU/mL; <20.83 pmol/L). He was put on insulin on the third day of life. Insulin has never been discontinued since then. The patient was tested negative for anti-insulin and islet cell antibodies at age 5 months. His father had non-progressive, impaired fasting glucose for several years. The mother was found to be mildly hyperglycaemic only when her glucose was checked after the child was diagnosed. In conclusion, biallelic GCK loss should be considered as a potential cause of PND in children born to consanguineous parents, even if they are not known to be diabetic at the time of PND presentation.

  1. Ablation of XP-V gene causes adipose tissue senescence and metabolic abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yih-Wen; Harris, Robert A; Hatahet, Zafer; Chou, Kai-ming

    2015-08-18

    Obesity and the metabolic syndrome have evolved to be major health issues throughout the world. Whether loss of genome integrity contributes to this epidemic is an open question. DNA polymerase η (pol η), encoded by the xeroderma pigmentosum (XP-V) gene, plays an essential role in preventing cutaneous cancer caused by UV radiation-induced DNA damage. Herein, we demonstrate that pol η deficiency in mice (pol η(-/-)) causes obesity with visceral fat accumulation, hepatic steatosis, hyperleptinemia, hyperinsulinemia, and glucose intolerance. In comparison to WT mice, adipose tissue from pol η(-/-) mice exhibits increased DNA damage and a greater DNA damage response, indicated by up-regulation and/or phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX), and poly[ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Concomitantly, increased cellular senescence in the adipose tissue from pol η(-/-) mice was observed and measured by up-regulation of senescence markers, including p53, p16(Ink4a), p21, senescence-associated (SA) β-gal activity, and SA secretion of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) as early as 4 wk of age. Treatment of pol η(-/-) mice with a p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, reduced adipocyte senescence and attenuated the metabolic abnormalities. Furthermore, elevation of adipocyte DNA damage with a high-fat diet or sodium arsenite exacerbated adipocyte senescence and metabolic abnormalities in pol η(-/-) mice. In contrast, reduction of adipose DNA damage with N-acetylcysteine or metformin ameliorated cellular senescence and metabolic abnormalities. These studies indicate that elevated DNA damage is a root cause of adipocyte senescence, which plays a determining role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance.

  2. Recurring dominant-negative mutations in the AVP-NPII gene cause neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Repaske, D.R.; Phillips, J.A.; Krishnamani, M.R.S.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (ADNDI) is a familial form of arginine vasopressin (or antidiuretic hormone) deficiency that is usually manifest in early childhood with polyuria, polydipsia and an antidiuretic response to exogenous vasopressin or its analogs. The phenotype is postulated to arise from gliosis and depletion of the magnocellular neurons that produce vasopressin in the supraoptic and paraventricular nuclei of the hypothalamus. ADNDI is caused by heterozygosity for a variety of mutations in the AVP-NPII gene which encodes vasopressin, its carrier protein (NPII) and a glycoprotein (copeptin) of unknown function. These mutations include: (1) Ala 19{r_arrow}Thr (G279A) in AVP`s signal peptide, (2) Gly 17{r_arrow}Val (G1740T), (3) Pro 24{r_arrow}Leu (C1761T), (4) Gly 57{r_arrow}Ser (G1859A) and (5) del Glu 47({delta}AGG 1824-26), all of which occur in NPII. In characterizing the AVP-NPII mutations in five non-related ADNDI kindreds, we have detected two kindreds having mutation 1 (G279A), two having mutation 3 (C1761T) and one having mutation 4 (G1859A) without any other allelic changes being detected. Two of these recurring mutations (G279A and G1859A) are transitions that occur at CpG dinucleotides while the third (C1761T) does not. Interestingly, families with the same mutations differed in their ethnicity or in their affected AVP-NPII allele`s associated haplotype of closely linked DNA polymorphisms. Our data indicated that at least three of five known AVP-NPII mutations causing ADNDI tend to recur but the mechanisms by which these dominant-negative mutations cause variable or progressive expression of the ADNDI phenotype remain unclear.

  3. One novel Dravet syndrome causing mutation and one recurrent MAE causing mutation in SCN1A gene.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Iglika; Todorov, Tihomir; Dimova, Petia; Hristova, Dimitrina; Tincheva, Radka; Litvinenko, Ivan; Yotovska, Olga; Kremensky, Ivo; Todorova, Albena

    2011-04-25

    Mutations in SCN1A gene, encoding the voltage-gated sodium channel α1-subunit, are found to be associated with severe myoclonic epilepsy in infancy or Dravet syndrome (DS), but only rarely with the myoclonic astatic epilepsy (MAE, or Doose syndrome). We report on two patients with SCN1A mutations and severe epilepsy within the spectrum of generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus syndrome (GEFS+), the phenotypes being consistent with DS and MAE, respectively. Analysis of SCN1A revealed a heterozygous de novo frameshift mutation (c.4205_4208delGAAA) in the patient with DS, and a recurrent missense mutation (c.3521C>G) in that suffering from MAE. The missense mutation has been reported in patients with neurological diseases of various manifestations, which suggests that this variability is likely to result from the modifying effects of other genetic or environmental factors. DS phenotype has been mainly found associated with truncation mutations, while predominantly missense mutations and very few prematurely terminating substitutions have been reported in GEFS+ patients.

  4. Identification and Characterization of 15 Novel GALC Gene Mutations Causing Krabbe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tappino, Barbara; Biancheri, Roberta; Mort, Matthew; Regis, Stefano; Corsolini, Fabio; Rossi, Andrea; Stroppiano, Marina; Lualdi, Susanna; Fiumara, Agata; Bembi, Bruno; Di Rocco, Maja; Cooper, David N; Filocamo, Mirella

    2010-01-01

    The characterization of the underlying GALC gene lesions was performed in 30 unrelated patients affected by Krabbe disease, an autosomal recessive leukodystrophy caused by the deficiency of lysosomal enzyme galactocerebrosidase. The GALC mutational spectrum comprised 33 distinct mutant (including 15 previously unreported) alleles. With the exception of 4 novel missense mutations that replaced evolutionarily highly conserved residues (p.P318R, p.G323R, p.I384T, p.Y490N), most of the newly described lesions altered mRNA processing. These included 7 frameshift mutations (c.61delG, c.408delA, c.521delA, c.1171_1175delCATTCinsA, c.1405_1407delCTCinsT, c.302_308dupAAATAGG, c.1819_1826dupGTTACAGG), 3 nonsense mutations (p.R69X, p.K88X, p.R127X) one of which (p.K88X) mediated the skipping of exon 2, and a splicing mutation (c.1489+1G>A) which induced the partial skipping of exon 13. In addition, 6 previously unreported GALC polymorphisms were identified. The functional significance of the novel GALC missense mutations and polymorphisms was investigated using the MutPred analysis tool. This study, reporting one of the largest genotype-phenotype analyses of the GALC gene so far performed in a European Krabbe disease cohort, revealed that the Italian GALC mutational profile differs significantly from other populations of European origin. This is due in part to a GALC missense substitution (p.G553R) that occurs at high frequency on a common founder haplotype background in patients originating from the Naples region. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20886637

  5. A nonsense mutation in the COL7A1 gene causes epidermolysis bullosa in Vorderwald cattle.

    PubMed

    Pausch, Hubert; Ammermüller, Simon; Wurmser, Christine; Hamann, Henning; Tetens, Jens; Drögemüller, Cord; Fries, Ruedi

    2016-12-01

    The widespread use of individual sires for artificial insemination promotes the propagation of recessive conditions. Inadvertent matings between unnoticed carriers of deleterious alleles may result in the manifestation of fatal phenotypes in their progeny. Breeding consultants and farmers reported on Vorderwald calves with a congenital skin disease. The clinical findings in affected calves were compatible with epidermolysis bullosa. Pedigree analysis indicated autosomal recessive inheritance of epidermolysis bullosa in Vorderwald cattle. We genotyped two diseased and 41 healthy animals at 41,436 single nucleotide polymorphisms and performed whole-genome haplotype-based association testing, which allowed us to map the locus responsible for the skin disease to the distal end of bovine chromosome 22 (P = 8.0 × 10(-14)). The analysis of whole-genome re-sequencing data of one diseased calf, three obligate mutation carriers and 1682 healthy animals from various bovine breeds revealed a nonsense mutation (rs876174537, p.Arg1588X) in the COL7A1 gene that segregates with the disease. The same mutation was previously detected in three calves with dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa from the Rotes Höhenvieh cattle breed. We show that diseased animals from Vorderwald and Rotes Höhenvieh cattle are identical by descent for an 8.72 Mb haplotype encompassing rs876174537 indicating they inherited the deleterious allele from a recent common ancestor. Autosomal recessive epidermolysis bullosa in Vorderwald and Rotes Höhenvieh cattle is caused by a nonsense mutation in the COL7A1 gene. Our findings demonstrate that deleterious alleles may segregate across cattle populations without apparent admixture. The identification of the causal mutation now enables the reliable detection of carrier animals. Genome-based mating strategies can avoid inadvertent matings of carrier animals thereby preventing the birth of homozygous calves that suffer from a painful skin disease.

  6. CRISPR Knockout of the HuR Gene Causes a Xenograft Lethal Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lal, Shruti; Cheung, Edwin C; Zarei, Mahsa; Preet, Ranjan; Chand, Saswati N; Mambelli-Lisboa, Nicole C; Romeo, Carmella; Stout, Matthew C; Londin, Eric; Goetz, Austin; Lowder, Cinthya Y; Nevler, Avinoam; Yeo, Charles J; Campbell, Paul M; Winter, Jordan M; Dixon, Dan A; Brody, Jonathan R

    2017-02-27

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the U.S., while colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer. The RNA binding protein HuR (ELAVL1), supports a pro-oncogenic network in gastrointestinal (GI) cancer cells through enhanced HuR expression. Using a publically available database, HuR expression levels were determined to be increased in primary PDA and CRC tumor cohorts as compared to normal pancreas and colon tissues, respectively. CRISPR/Cas9 technology was successfully used to delete the HuR gene in both PDA (MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T) and CRC (HCT116) cell lines. HuR deficiency has a mild phenotype, in vitro, as HuR-deficient MIA PaCa-2 (MIA.HuR-KO(-/-)) cells had increased apoptosis when compared to isogenic wild-type (MIA.HuR-WT(+/+)) cells. Using this isogenic system, mRNAs were identified that specifically bound to HuR and were required for transforming a 2D culture into 3D (i.e., organoids). Importantly, HuR-deficient MIA PaCa-2 and Hs 766T cells were unable to engraft tumors in vivo compared to control HuR-proficient cells, demonstrating a unique xenograft lethal phenotype. While not as a dramatic phenotype, CRISPR knockout HuR HCT116 colon cancer cells (HCT.HuR-KO(-/-)) showed significantly reduced in vivo tumor growth compared to controls (HCT.HuR-WT(+/+)). Finally, HuR deletion affects KRAS activity and controls a subset of pro-oncogenic genes.

  7. Mutations in the MORC2 gene cause axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

    PubMed

    Sevilla, Teresa; Lupo, Vincenzo; Martínez-Rubio, Dolores; Sancho, Paula; Sivera, Rafael; Chumillas, María J; García-Romero, Mar; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel I; Muelas, Nuria; Dopazo, Joaquín; Vílchez, Juan J; Palau, Francesc; Espinós, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is a complex disorder with wide genetic heterogeneity. Here we present a new axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease form, associated with the gene microrchidia family CW-type zinc finger 2 (MORC2). Whole-exome sequencing in a family with autosomal dominant segregation identified the novel MORC2 p.R190W change in four patients. Further mutational screening in our axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease clinical series detected two additional sporadic cases, one patient who also carried the same MORC2 p.R190W mutation and another patient that harboured a MORC2 p.S25L mutation. Genetic and in silico studies strongly supported the pathogenicity of these sequence variants. The phenotype was variable and included patients with congenital or infantile onset, as well as others whose symptoms started in the second decade. The patients with early onset developed a spinal muscular atrophy-like picture, whereas in the later onset cases, the initial symptoms were cramps, distal weakness and sensory impairment. Weakness and atrophy progressed in a random and asymmetric fashion and involved limb girdle muscles, leading to a severe incapacity in adulthood. Sensory loss was always prominent and proportional to disease severity. Electrophysiological studies were consistent with an asymmetric axonal motor and sensory neuropathy, while fasciculations and myokymia were recorded rather frequently by needle electromyography. Sural nerve biopsy revealed pronounced multifocal depletion of myelinated fibres with some regenerative clusters and occasional small onion bulbs. Morc2 is expressed in both axons and Schwann cells of mouse peripheral nerve. Different roles in biological processes have been described for MORC2. As the silencing of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease genes have been associated with DNA damage response, it is tempting to speculate that a deregulation of this pathway may be linked to the axonal degeneration observed in MORC2 neuropathy, thus adding a

  8. Mutation of the iron-sulfur cluster assembly gene IBA57 causes fatal infantile leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Debray, François-Guillaume; Stümpfig, Claudia; Vanlander, Arnaud V; Dideberg, Vinciane; Josse, Claire; Caberg, Jean-Hubert; Boemer, François; Bours, Vincent; Stevens, René; Seneca, Sara; Smet, Joél; Lill, Roland; van Coster, Rudy

    2015-11-01

    Leukodystrophies are a heterogeneous group of severe genetic neurodegenerative disorders. A multiple mitochondrial dysfunctions syndrome was found in an infant presenting with a progressive leukoencephalopathy. Homozygosity mapping, whole exome sequencing, and functional studies were used to define the underlying molecular defect. Respiratory chain studies in skeletal muscle isolated from the proband revealed a combined deficiency of complexes I and II. In addition, western blotting indicated lack of protein lipoylation. The combination of these findings was suggestive for a defect in the iron-sulfur (Fe/S) protein assembly pathway. SNP array identified loss of heterozygosity in large chromosomal regions, covering the NFU1 and BOLA3, and the IBA57 and ABCB10 candidate genes, in 2p15-p11.2 and 1q31.1-q42.13, respectively. A homozygous c.436C > T (p.Arg146Trp) variant was detected in IBA57 using whole exome sequencing. Complementation studies in a HeLa cell line depleted for IBA57 showed that the mutant protein with the semi-conservative amino acid exchange was unable to restore the biochemical phenotype indicating a loss-of-function mutation of IBA57. In conclusion, defects in the Fe/S protein assembly gene IBA57 can cause autosomal recessive neurodegeneration associated with progressive leukodystrophy and fatal outcome at young age. In the affected patient, the biochemical phenotype was characterized by a defect in the respiratory chain complexes I and II and a decrease in mitochondrial protein lipoylation, both resulting from impaired assembly of Fe/S clusters.

  9. A Single-Gene Cause in 29.5% of Cases of Steroid-Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Carolin E.; Lovric, Svjetlana; Ashraf, Shazia; Pabst, Werner L.; Gee, Heon Yung; Kohl, Stefan; Engelmann, Susanne; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Fang, Humphrey; Halbritter, Jan; Somers, Michael J.; Tan, Weizhen; Shril, Shirlee; Fessi, Inès; Lifton, Richard P.; Bockenhauer, Detlef; El-Desoky, Sherif; Kari, Jameela A.; Zenker, Martin; Kemper, Markus J.; Mueller, Dominik; Fathy, Hanan M.; Soliman, Neveen A.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) is the second most frequent cause of ESRD in the first two decades of life. Effective treatment is lacking. First insights into disease mechanisms came from identification of single-gene causes of SRNS. However, the frequency of single-gene causation and its age distribution in large cohorts are unknown. We performed exon sequencing of NPHS2 and WT1 for 1783 unrelated, international families with SRNS. We then examined all patients by microfluidic multiplex PCR and next-generation sequencing for all 27 genes known to cause SRNS if mutated. We detected a single-gene cause in 29.5% (526 of 1783) of families with SRNS that manifested before 25 years of age. The fraction of families in whom a single-gene cause was identified inversely correlated with age of onset. Within clinically relevant age groups, the fraction of families with detection of the single-gene cause was as follows: onset in the first 3 months of life (69.4%), between 4 and 12 months old (49.7%), between 1 and 6 years old (25.3%), between 7 and 12 years old (17.8%), and between 13 and 18 years old (10.8%). For PLCE1, specific mutations correlated with age of onset. Notably, 1% of individuals carried mutations in genes that function within the coenzyme Q10 biosynthesis pathway, suggesting that SRNS may be treatable in these individuals. Our study results should facilitate molecular genetic diagnostics of SRNS, etiologic classification for therapeutic studies, generation of genotype-phenotype correlations, and the identification of individuals in whom a targeted treatment for SRNS may be available. PMID:25349199

  10. [Congenital afibrinogenemia caused by a novel insertion mutation in the FGB gene].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Zhao, Xiao-juan; Wang, Zhao-yue; Yu, Zi-qiang; Cao, Li-Juan; Ma, Zhen-ni; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Xia; Ruan, Chang-geng

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the genetic defect and its mechanism in a patient with congenital afibrinogenemia. The plasma fibrinogen activity and antigen of the patient was determined using the Clauss method and immuno-nephelometric assay, respectively. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood of the proband and his related family members. All exons and exon-intron boundaries of the three fibrinogen genes (FGA, FGB, FGG) were amplified by PCR followed by direct sequencing. Thrombin fibrin aggregation curve were detected in the plasma of the patient. Wild-type and mutation type fibrinogen vectors were constructed, and then transfected into COS-7 cells. The wild-type and mutant proteins from the culture media and cell lysates were tested by Western blot and ELISA. APTT, PT, TT were significantly longer in the proband. Plasma fibrinogen activity and antigen of the patient could not be detected using the Clauss method and immuno-nephelometry, respectively. Gene analysis revealed that a novel homozygous GTTT insertion between nucleotides 2833 and 2834 in FGB exon 2 in the proband. The proband's father, mother, brother and son were heterozygous. The polymerization curves of the patient did not show a lag phase or final turbidity, compared with the normal controls. Western blot analysis showed the lack of complete half-molecules of the fibrinogen molecule and fibrinogen in patient's plasma under non-reducing conditions. It also could not detect the truncated Bβ chain under reducing conditions. Abnormal fibrinogen molecule (molecule weight>340 000) were found in transfected COS-7 cells by Western blot, which indicated that the mutation caused the abnormal intracellular fibrinogen molecule assembly. The fibrinogen band was absent in culture media transfected by the mutation. Fibrinogen levels of mutant fibrinogen were no significant different from those of wild-type fibrinogen in cell lysates by ELISA analysis [(2.47 ± 0.30) μg/ml vs (2.65±0.60) μg/ml, P=0.0889]; However, the

  11. Transient protein-protein interactions perturb E. coli metabolome and cause gene dosage toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Bershtein, Shimon; Yan, Jin; Argun, Tijda; Gilson, Amy I; Trauger, Sunia A; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2016-01-01

    Gene dosage toxicity (GDT) is an important factor that determines optimal levels of protein abundances, yet its molecular underpinnings remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of DHFR in E. coli causes a toxic metabolic imbalance triggered by interactions with several functionally related enzymes. Though deleterious in the overexpression regime, surprisingly, these interactions are beneficial at physiological concentrations, implying their functional significance in vivo. Moreover, we found that overexpression of orthologous DHFR proteins had minimal effect on all levels of cellular organization – molecular, systems, and phenotypic, in sharp contrast to E. coli DHFR. Dramatic difference of GDT between ‘E. coli’s self’ and ‘foreign’ proteins suggests the crucial role of evolutionary selection in shaping protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks at the whole proteome level. This study shows how protein overexpression perturbs a dynamic metabolon of weak yet potentially functional PPI, with consequences for the metabolic state of cells and their fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20309.001 PMID:27938662

  12. Progressive cerebellar, auditory, and esophageal dysfunction caused by targeted disruption of the frizzled-4 gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Huso, D; Cahill, H; Ryugo, D; Nathans, J

    2001-07-01

    Wnt signaling has been implicated in the control of cell proliferation and in synapse formation during neural development, and these actions are presumed to be mediated by frizzled receptors. In this paper we report the phenotype of mice carrying a targeted deletion of the frizzled-4 (fz4) gene. fz4(-/-) mice exhibit three distinct defects: (1) progressive cerebellar degeneration associated with severe ataxia, (2) absence of a skeletal muscle sheath around the lower esophagus associated with progressive esophageal distension and dysfunction, and (3) progressive deafness caused by a defect in the peripheral auditory system unaccompanied by loss of hair cells or other auditory neurons. As assayed using a lacZ knock-in reporter, fz4 is widely expressed within the CNS. In particular, fz4 is expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells, esophageal skeletal muscle, and cochlear inner hair cells, and the absence of Fz4 in these cells is presumed to account for the fz4(-/-) phenotype. In contrast to the early cell proliferation and patterning effects classically ascribed to Wnts, the auditory and cerebellar phenotypes of fz4(-/-) mice implicate Frizzled signaling in maintaining the viability and integrity of the nervous system in later life.

  13. A Novel Splice-Site Mutation in the GJB2 Gene Causing Mild Postlingual Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Gandía, Marta; del Castillo, Francisco J.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, Francisco J.; Garrido, Gema; Villamar, Manuela; Calderón, Manuela; Moreno-Pelayo, Miguel A.; Moreno, Felipe; del Castillo, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    The DFNB1 subtype of autosomal recessive, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, caused by mutations affecting the GJB2 (connection-26) gene, is highly prevalent in most populations worldwide. DFNB1 hearing impairment is mostly severe or profound and usually appears before the acquisition of speech (prelingual onset), though a small number of hypomorphic missense mutations result in mild or moderate deafness of postlingual onset. We identified a novel GJB2 splice-site mutation, c. -22-2A>C, in three siblings with mild postlingual hearing impairment that were compound heterozygous for c. -22-2A>C and c.35delG. Reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments performed on total RNA extracted from saliva samples from one of these siblings confirmed that c. -22-2A>C abolished the acceptor splice site of the single GJB2 intron, resulting in the absence of normally processed transcripts from this allele. However, we did isolate transcripts from the c. -22-2A>C allele that keep an intact GJB2 coding region and that were generated by use of an alternative acceptor splice site previously unknown. The residual expression of wild-type connection-26 encoded by these transcripts probably underlies the mild severity and late onset of the hearing impairment of these subjects. PMID:24039984

  14. Disruption of Th2a and Th2b genes causes defects in spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Toshie; Huynh, Linh My; Takagi, Tsuyoshi; Tsukamoto, Daisuke; Tomaru, Chinatsu; Kwak, Ho-Geun; Dohmae, Naoshi; Noguchi, Junko; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2015-04-01

    The variant histones TH2A and TH2B are abundant in the testis, but their roles in spermatogenesis remain elusive. Here, we show that male mutant mice lacking both Th2a and Th2b genes were sterile, with few sperm in the epididymis. In the mutant testis, the lack of TH2B was compensated for by overexpression of H2B, whereas overexpression of H2A was not observed, indicating a decrease in the total histone level. Mutant mice exhibited two defects: incomplete release of cohesin at interkinesis after meiosis I and histone replacement during spermiogenesis. In the mutant testis, secondary spermatocytes at interkinesis accumulated and cohesin was not released normally, suggesting that the retained cohesion of sister chromatids delayed the subsequent entry into meiosis II. In addition, impaired chromatin incorporation of TNP2 and degenerated spermatids were observed in the mutant testis. These results suggest that a loss of TH2A and TH2B function in chromatin dynamics or a decrease in the total histone levels causes defects in both cohesin release and histone replacement during spermatogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Refined mapping of the gene causing Familial Mediterranean fever, by linkage and homozygosity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aksentijevich, I.; Pras, E.; Gruberg, L.; Helling, S.; Prosen, L.; Pras, M.; Kastner, D.L. ); Shen, Y.; Holman, K.; Sutherland, G.R.; Richards, R.I. ); Ramsburg, M.; Dean, M. ); Amos, C.I. )

    1993-08-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by attacks of fever and serosal inflammation; the biochemical basis is unknown. The authors recently reported linkage of the gene causing FMF (designated [open quotes]MEF[close quotes]) to two markers on chromosome 16p. To map MEF more precisely, they have now tested nine 16p markers. Two-point and multipoint linkage analysis, as well as a study of recombinant haplotypes, placed MEF between D16S94 and D16S80, a genetic interval of about 9 cM. They also examined rates of homozygosity for markers in this region, among offspring of consanguineous marriages. For eight of nine markers, the rate of homozygosity among 26 affected inbred individuals was higher than that among their 20 unaffected sibs. Localizing MEF more precisely on the basis of homozygosity rates alone would be difficult, for two reasons: First, the FMF carrier frequency increases the chance that inbred offspring could have the disease without being homozygous by descent at MEF. Second, several of the markers in this region are relatively nonpolymorphic, with a high rate of homozygosity, regardless of their chromosomal location. 30 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Taurine depletion caused by knocking out the taurine transporter gene leads to cardiomyopathy with cardiac atrophy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Kimura, Yasushi; Uozumi, Yoriko; Takai, Mika; Muraoka, Satoko; Matsuda, Takahisa; Ueki, Kei; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Schaffer, Stephen W; Fujio, Yasushi; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-01

    The sulfur-containing beta-amino acid, taurine, is the most abundant free amino acid in cardiac and skeletal muscle. Although its physiological function has not been established, it is thought to play an important role in ion movement, calcium handling, osmoregulation and cytoprotection. To begin examining the physiological function of taurine, we generated taurine transporter- (TauT-) knockout mice (TauTKO), which exhibited a deficiency in myocardial and skeletal muscle taurine content compared with their wild-type littermates. The TauTKO heart underwent ventricular remodeling, characterized by reductions in ventricular wall thickness and cardiac atrophy accompanied with the smaller cardiomyocytes. Associated with the structural changes in the heart was a reduction in cardiac output and increased expression of heart cardiac failure (fetal) marker genes, such as ANP, BNP and beta-MHC. Moreover, ultrastructural damage to the myofilaments and mitochondria was observed. Further, the skeletal muscle of the TauTKO mice also exhibited decreased cell volume, structural defects and a reduction of exercise endurance capacity. Importantly, the expression of Hsp70, ATA2 and S100A4, which are upregulated by osmotic stress, was elevated in both heart and skeletal muscle of the TauTKO mice. Taurine depletion causes cardiomyocyte atrophy, mitochondrial and myofiber damage and cardiac dysfunction, effects likely related to the actions of taurine. Our data suggest that multiple actions of taurine, including osmoregulation, regulation of mitochondrial protein expression and inhibition of apoptosis, collectively ensure proper maintenance of cardiac and skeletal muscular structure and function.

  17. Parietal lobe deficits in frontotemporal lobar degeneration caused by a mutation in the progranulin gene.

    PubMed

    Rohrer, Jonathan D; Warren, Jason D; Omar, Rohani; Mead, Simon; Beck, Jonathan; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice; Stevens, John M; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M; Hardy, John; Fox, Nick C; Collinge, John; Warrington, Elizabeth K; Rossor, Martin N

    2008-04-01

    To describe the clinical, neuropsychologic, and radiologic features of a family with a C31LfsX35 mutation in the progranulin gene CCDS11483.1). Case series. A large British kindred (DRC255) with a PGRN mutation was assessed. Affected individuals presented with a mean age of 57.8 years (range, 54-67 years) and a mean disease duration of 6.1 years (range, 2-11 years). All patients exhibited a clinical and radiologic phenotype compatible with frontotemporal lobar degeneration based on current consensus criteria. However, unlike sporadic frontotemporal lobar degeneration, parietal deficits, consisting of dyscalculia, visuoperceptual /visuospatial dysfunction, and/or limb apraxia, were a common feature, and brain imaging showed posterior extension of frontotemporal atrophy to involve the parietal lobes. Other common clinical features included language output impairment with either dynamic aphasia or nonfluent aphasia and a behavioral syndrome dominated by apathy. We suggest that parietal deficits may be a prominent feature of PGRN mutations and that these deficits may be caused by disruption of frontoparietal functional pathways.

  18. The Drosophila melanogaster hybrid male rescue gene causes inviability in male and female species hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Barbash, D A; Roote, J; Ashburner, M

    2000-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster mutation Hmr rescues inviable hybrid sons from the cross of D. melanogaster females to males of its sibling species D. mauritiana, D. simulans, and D. sechellia. We have extended previous observations that hybrid daughters from this cross are poorly viable at high temperatures and have shown that this female lethality is suppressed by Hmr and the rescue mutations In(1)AB and D. simulans Lhr. Deficiencies defined here as Hmr(-) also suppressed lethality, demonstrating that reducing Hmr(+) activity can rescue otherwise inviable hybrids. An Hmr(+) duplication had the opposite effect of reducing the viability of female and sibling X-male hybrid progeny. Similar dose-dependent viability effects of Hmr were observed in the reciprocal cross of D. simulans females to D. melanogaster males. Finally, Lhr and Hmr(+) were shown to have mutually antagonistic effects on hybrid viability. These data suggest a model where the interaction of sibling species Lhr(+) and D. melanogaster Hmr(+) causes lethality in both sexes of species hybrids and in both directions of crossing. Our results further suggest that a twofold difference in Hmr(+) dosage accounts in part for the differential viability of male and female hybrid progeny, but also that additional, unidentified genes must be invoked to account for the invariant lethality of hybrid sons of D. melanogaster mothers. Implications of our findings for understanding Haldane's rule-the observation that hybrid breakdown is often specific to the heterogametic sex-are also discussed. PMID:10747067

  19. Genetic recombination as a major cause of mutagenesis in the human globin gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Borg, Joseph; Georgitsi, Marianthi; Aleporou-Marinou, Vassiliki; Kollia, Panagoula; Patrinos, George P

    2009-12-01

    Homologous recombination is a frequent phenomenon in multigene families and as such it occurs several times in both the alpha- and beta-like globin gene families. In numerous occasions, genetic recombination has been previously implicated as a major mechanism that drives mutagenesis in the human globin gene clusters, either in the form of unequal crossover or gene conversion. Unequal crossover results in the increase or decrease of the human globin gene copies, accompanied in the majority of cases with minor phenotypic consequences, while gene conversion contributes either to maintaining sequence homogeneity or generating sequence diversity. The role of genetic recombination, particularly gene conversion in the evolution of the human globin gene families has been discussed elsewhere. Here, we summarize our current knowledge and review existing experimental evidence outlining the role of genetic recombination in the mutagenic process in the human globin gene families.

  20. Evaluating dosage compensation as a cause of duplicate gene retention in Paramecium tetraurelia

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Timothy; Ekman, Diana; Ardawatia, Himanshu; Elofsson, Arne; Liberles, David A

    2007-01-01

    The high retention of duplicate genes in the genome of Paramecium tetraurelia has led to the hypothesis that most of the retained genes have persisted because of constraints due to gene dosage. This and other possible mechanisms are discussed in the light of expectations from population genetics and systems biology. PMID:17521457

  1. Application of biclustering of gene expression data and gene set enrichment analysis methods to identify potentially disease causing nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    The presence of diverse types of nanomaterials (NMs) in commerce is growing at an exponential pace. As a result, human exposure to these materials in the environment is inevitable, necessitating the need for rapid and reliable toxicity testing methods to accurately assess the potential hazards associated with NMs. In this study, we applied biclustering and gene set enrichment analysis methods to derive essential features of altered lung transcriptome following exposure to NMs that are associated with lung-specific diseases. Several datasets from public microarray repositories describing pulmonary diseases in mouse models following exposure to a variety of substances were examined and functionally related biclusters of genes showing similar expression profiles were identified. The identified biclusters were then used to conduct a gene set enrichment analysis on pulmonary gene expression profiles derived from mice exposed to nano-titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2), carbon black (CB) or carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to determine the disease significance of these data-driven gene sets. Biclusters representing inflammation (chemokine activity), DNA binding, cell cycle, apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and fibrosis processes were identified. All of the NM studies were significant with respect to the bicluster related to chemokine activity (DAVID; FDR p-value = 0.032). The bicluster related to pulmonary fibrosis was enriched in studies where toxicity induced by CNT and CB studies was investigated, suggesting the potential for these materials to induce lung fibrosis. The pro-fibrogenic potential of CNTs is well established. Although CB has not been shown to induce fibrosis, it induces stronger inflammatory, oxidative stress and DNA damage responses than nano-TiO2 particles. The results of the analysis correctly identified all NMs to be inflammogenic and only CB and CNTs as potentially fibrogenic. In addition to identifying several previously defined, functionally relevant gene

  2. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Tiffany S.; Richardson, Jason R.; Cooper, Keith R.; White, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25–0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3–72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. PMID:25912032

  3. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kung, Tiffany S; Richardson, Jason R; Cooper, Keith R; White, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25-0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3-72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Risk conferred by tagged SNPs of AGT gene in causing susceptibility to essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Padma, G; Swapna, N; Mamata, M; Charita, Bh; Padma, T

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: AGT gene harbors several variants of which 21 are found to be in high linkage disequilibrium as per Hapmap database. Studies delineating the importance of these tagged SNPs are very limited and lacking from Indian population. In the present study, we evaluated the contribution of four tagged SNPs namely, g.6635G > A, g.6506G > A, g.12840G > A, and g.13828T > C at AGT locus along with the analyses of haplotype and epistatic interactions in causing susceptibility to essential hypertension (EHT). About 215 hypertensives and 230 normotensives were genotyped for selected tagged SNPs using PCR-RFLP method. Significant association was obtained for g.6635G > A and g.6506G > A polymorphisms wherein GG homozygotes for both the markers were at risk for developing the condition. g.13828T > C polymorphism specially, female heterozygotes (TC) were found to be at increased risk for EHT. Haplotype GGGC was found to have a significant protective effect (p = 0.0059). Markers g.6506G > A and g.12840G > A resulted in the creation of new enhancer sites thereby affecting splicing process. The present report is the first one in the literature showing general- and gender-specific association of g.6506G > A and g.13828T > C polymorphisms, respectively, with EHT. However, further studies for replication of present observations are warranted from other populations and other parts of India.

  5. Genetic and physical localization of the gene causing familial Mediterranean fever

    SciTech Connect

    Aksentijevich, I.; Chen, X.; Levy, E.

    1994-09-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is a recessively inherited disease characterized by acute attacks of fever and serositis. The gene causing FMF, designated MEF, is located on chromosome 16p13. We have genotyped a panel of 65 families (non-Ashkenazi Jewish, Armenian, and Arab) for 15 polymorphic markers from distal chromosome 16p. FMF families from all three populations show linkage to chromosome 16. Analysis of recombinants, as well as multipoint linkage data, place MEF in the interval between D16S246 (p218EP6) and D16S138 (N2), a genetic distance of 1-2 cM. We observed a total of 3 recombinants at the telomeric flanking marker D16S246, and 5 at the centromeric flanking marker D16S138. We have previously shown that a haplotype extending from D16S291 to D16S94 on the telomeric side of MEF is strongly associated with FMF among the Moroccan Jewish population, probably representing a founder effect. Here we report that the 2.5 kb allele of the closest telomeric flanking marker D16S246 (p218EP6) was associated with FMF in both Moroccan and non-Moroccan Jews, although not in Armenians and Arabs. Allelic associations for the centromeric flanking markers were much weaker in the Jewish population, suggesting that MEF may be closer to the telomeric end of the D16S246-D16S318 interval. Physical mapping indicates that this interval covers less than 1 Mb of genomic DNA. We will present data on a YAC contig covering this region.

  6. Disruption of the mouse Jhy gene causes abnormal ciliary microtubule patterning and juvenile hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Appelbe, Oliver K.; Bollman, Bryan; Attarwala, Ali; Triebes, Lindy A.; Muniz-Talavera, Hilmarie; Curry, Daniel J.; Schmidt, Jennifer V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Congenital hydrocephalus, the accumulation of excess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the ventricles of the brain, affects one of every 1,000 children born today, making it one of the most common human developmental disorders. Genetic causes of hydrocephalus are poorly understood in humans, but animal models suggest a broad genetic program underlying the regulation of CSF balance. In this study, the random integration of a transgene into the mouse genome led to the development of an early onset and rapidly progressive hydrocephalus. Juvenile hydrocephalus transgenic mice (JhylacZ) inherit communicating hydrocephalus in an autosomal recessive fashion with dilation of the lateral ventricles observed as early as postnatal day 1.5. Ventricular dilation increases in severity over time, becoming fatal at 4-8 weeks of age. The ependymal cilia lining the lateral ventricles are morphologically abnormal and reduced in number in JhylacZ/lacZ brains, and ultrastructural analysis revealed disorganization of the expected 9+2 microtubule pattern. Rather, the majority of JhylacZ/lacZ cilia develop axonemes with 9+0 or 8+2 microtubule structures. Disruption of an unstudied gene, 4931429I11Rik (now named Jhy) appears to underlie the hydrocephalus of JhylacZ/lacZ mice, and the Jhy transcript and protein are decreased in JhylacZ/lacZ mice. Partial phenotypic rescue was achieved in JhylacZ/lacZ mice by the introduction of a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) carrying 60-70% of the JHY protein coding sequence. Jhy is evolutionarily conserved from humans to basal vertebrates, but the predicted JHY protein lacks identifiable functional domains. Ongoing studies are directed at uncovering the physiological function of JHY and its role in CSF homeostasis. PMID:23906841

  7. Molecular diagnosis of pituitary adenoma predisposition caused by aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Raitila, Anniina; Karhu, Auli; Tuppurainen, Karoliina; Mäkinen, Markus J.; Vierimaa, Outi; Paschke, Ralf; Saeger, Wolfgang; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Sane, Timo; Robledo, Mercedes; De Menis, Ernesto; Weil, Robert J.; Wasik, Anna; Zielinski, Grzegorz; Lucewicz, Olga; Lubinski, Jan; Launonen, Virpi; Vahteristo, Pia; Aaltonen, Lauri A.

    2007-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas are common neoplasms of the anterior pituitary gland. Germ-line mutations in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein (AIP) gene cause pituitary adenoma predisposition (PAP), a recent discovery based on genetic studies in Northern Finland. In this population, a founder mutation explained a significant proportion of all acromegaly cases. Typically, PAP patients were of a young age at diagnosis but did not display a strong family history of pituitary adenomas. To evaluate the role of AIP in pituitary adenoma susceptibility in other populations and to gain insight into patient selection for molecular screening of the condition, we investigated the possible contribution of AIP mutations in pituitary tumorigenesis in patients from Europe and the United States. A total of 460 patients were investigated by AIP sequencing: young acromegaly patients, unselected acromegaly patients, unselected pituitary adenoma patients, and endocrine neoplasia-predisposition patients who were negative for MEN1 mutations. Nine AIP mutations were identified. Because many of the patients displayed no family history of pituitary adenomas, detection of the condition appears challenging. Feasibility of AIP immunohistochemistry (IHC) as a prescreening tool was tested in 50 adenomas: 12 AIP mutation-positive versus 38 mutation-negative pituitary tumors. AIP IHC staining levels proved to be a useful predictor of AIP status, with 75% sensitivity and 95% specificity for germ-line mutations. AIP contributes to PAP in all studied populations. AIP IHC, followed by genetic counseling and possible AIP mutation analysis in IHC-negative cases, a procedure similar to the diagnostics of the Lynch syndrome, appears feasible in identification of PAP. PMID:17360484

  8. Substituent Effects on the Thermodynamic Stability of Imines Formed from Glycine and Aromatic Aldehydes: Implications for the Catalytic Activity of Pyridoxal-5'-Phosphate (PLP)

    PubMed Central

    Crugeiras, Juan; Rios, Ana; Riveiros, Enrique; Richard, John P.

    2009-01-01

    Equilibrium constants for addition of glycine to substituted benzaldehydes to form the corresponding imines and pKas for ionization of the iminium ions were determined by 1H NMR analysis in D2O. The introduction of a phenoxide anion substituent into the aromatic ring of benzaldehyde leads to a substantial increase in the pKa of the iminium ion from 6.3 to 10.2 for p-hydroxybenzaldehyde and to 12.1 for salicyaldehyde. An analysis of the differential effect of ortho- versus para-substitution shows that the iminium ion to salicylaldehyde is stabilized by an intramolecular hydrogen bond in aqueous solution, with an estimated energy ca. 3 kcal/mol larger than can be accounted for by a simple electrostatic interaction. A comparison of the o-O− substituent effect on the acidity of the iminium ions of glycine to benzaldehyde and 4-pyridine-carboxaldehyde provides evidence for the existence of an internal hydrogen bond of similar strength in pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) iminium ions in water. The effects of other ring substituents on the stability of PLP iminium ions are discussed. PMID:19807092

  9. Effect of addition of esters of fatty acids on the microstructure and properties of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets produced by PLP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, A. G.; Gaviko, V. S.; Shchegoleva, N. N.; Golovnia, O. A.; Gorbunova, T. I.; Hadjipanayis, G. C.

    2015-07-01

    High filling density of powders for production of sintered Nd-Fe-B magnets by the pressless process (PLP) impedes magnetic alignment. The latter can be enhanced by reduction of friction forces between powder particles. Thus, increase in the remanence and maximum energy product of the magnets by lubrication of powder particles is studied. Esters of fatty acids have been added in toluene or acetone in the course of grinding of Nd-Fe-B alloy in a vibratory mill. Coated by a thin layer of a lubricant powders have been aligned in pulsed magnetic field. It is shown that the remanence of sintered magnets has been increased by 5-7%. Lubricant concentration should not exceed critical values, which for the lubricants used varied between 2.0 wt% (ethyl butyrate) and 0.3 wt% (ethyl laurate). Otherwise, the complicated removal of lubricant residue leads to reaction of the latter with Nd-rich grain-boundary phase in the course of sintering and results in a sharp decrease in magnetic hysteresis properties. Addition of lubricating additives allows one to produce PLP-magnets with density exceeding 7.5 g/cm3, Br≥14 kG, Hc≥9 kOe and (BH)max≥45 MG Oe.

  10. Penicillin-Binding Protein 5 Sequence Alteration and Levels of plp5 mRNA Expression in Clinical Isolates of Enterococcus faecium with Different Levels of Ampicillin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Belhaj, Mondher; Boutiba-Ben Boubaker, Ilhem; Slim, Amin

    2016-04-01

    Eighty-two nonduplicated ampicillin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (AREF) isolates from clinical infections at the Charles Nicolle Hospital of Tunisia were investigated. They were collected from January 2001 to December 2009. Genetic relationship between them was studied using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The amino acid sequence difference variations of the C-terminal part of penicillin-binding protein 5 (PBP5) versus levels of expressed mRNA were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), sequencing, and real-time PCR quantification of (PBP5), respectively. No β-lactamase activity was detected and none of our strains showed resistance to glycopeptides, which retain their therapeutic efficiency against enterococcal infections in our hospital. Pattern analysis of the strains revealed six main clones disseminating in different wards. Sequence data revealed the existence of 19 different plp5 alleles with a difference in 16 amino acid positions spanning from residue 414 to 632. Each allele presented at least five amino acid substitutions (His-470→Gln, Asn-496→Lys, Ala-499→Thr, Glu-525→Asp, and Glu-629→Val). No correlation between amino acid sequence polymorphism of PBP5 and levels of ampicillin resistance was detected. The levels of plp5 mRNA expression varied between strains and did not always correlate with levels of ampicillin resistance in clinical AREF.

  11. A novel gene amplification causes upregulation of the PatAB ABC transporter and fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Baylay, Alison J; Ivens, Alasdair; Piddock, Laura J V

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the ABC transporter genes patA and patB confers efflux-mediated fluoroquinolone resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae and is also linked to pneumococcal stress responses. Although upregulation of patAB has been observed in many laboratory mutants and clinical isolates, the regulatory mechanisms controlling expression of these genes are unknown. In this study, we aimed to identify the cause of high-level constitutive overexpression of patAB in M184, a multidrug-resistant mutant of S. pneumoniae R6. Using a whole-genome transformation and sequencing approach, we identified a novel duplication of a 9.2-kb region of the M184 genome which included the patAB genes. This duplication did not affect growth and was semistable with a low segregation rate. The expression levels of patAB in M184 were much higher than those that could be fully explained by doubling of the gene dosage alone, and inactivation of the first copy of patA had no effect on multidrug resistance. Using a green fluorescent protein reporter system, increased patAB expression was ascribed to transcriptional read-through from a tRNA gene upstream of the second copy of patAB. This is the first report of a large genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance in S. pneumoniae and also of a genomic duplication causing antibiotic resistance by a promoter switching mechanism.

  12. Gene expression patterns in transgenic mouse models of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by mutations in myosin regulatory light chain☆

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenrui; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Zhou, Zhiqun; Aguiar-Pulido, Vanessa; Narasimhan, Giri; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2017-01-01

    Using microarray and bioinformatics, we examined the gene expression profiles in transgenic mouse hearts expressing mutations in the myosin regulatory light chain shown to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). We focused on two malignant RLC-mutations, Arginine 58→Glutamine (R58Q) and Aspartic Acid 166 → Valine (D166V), and one benign, Lysine 104 → Glutamic Acid (K104E)-mutation. Datasets of differentially expressed genes for each of three mutants were compared to those observed in wild-type (WT) hearts. The changes in the mutant vs. WT samples were shown as fold-change (FC), with stringency FC ≥ 2. Based on the gene profiles, we have identified the major signaling pathways that underlie the R58Q-, D166V- and K104E-HCM phenotypes. The correlations between different genotypes were also studied using network-based algorithms. Genes with strong correlations were clustered into one group and the central gene networks were identified for each HCM mutant. The overall gene expression patterns in all mutants were distinct from the WT profiles. Both malignant mutations shared certain classes of genes that were up or downregulated, but most similarities were noted between D166V and K104E mice, with R58Q hearts showing a distinct gene expression pattern. Our data suggest that all three HCM mice lead to cardiomyopathy in a mutation-specific manner and thus develop HCM through diverse mechanisms. PMID:26906074

  13. Ogura-CMS in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) causes delayed expression of many nuclear genes.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangshu; Kim, Wan Kyu; Lim, Yong-Pyo; Kim, Yeon-Ki; Hur, Yoonkang

    2013-02-01

    We investigated the mechanism regulating cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis using floral bud transcriptome analyses of Ogura-CMS Chinese cabbage and its maintainer line in B. rapa 300-K oligomeric probe (Br300K) microarrays. Ogura-CMS Chinese cabbage produced few and infertile pollen grains on indehiscent anthers. Compared to the maintainer line, CMS plants had shorter filaments and plant growth, and delayed flowering and pollen development. In microarray analysis, 4646 genes showed different expression, depending on floral bud size, between Ogura-CMS and its maintainer line. We found 108 and 62 genes specifically expressed in Ogura-CMS and its maintainer line, respectively. Ogura-CMS line-specific genes included stress-related, redox-related, and B. rapa novel genes. In the maintainer line, genes related to pollen coat and germination were specifically expressed in floral buds longer than 3mm, suggesting insufficient expression of these genes in Ogura-CMS is directly related to dysfunctional pollen. In addition, many nuclear genes associated with auxin response, ATP synthesis, pollen development and stress response had delayed expression in Ogura-CMS plants compared to the maintainer line, which is consistent with the delay in growth and development of Ogura-CMS plants. Delayed expression may reduce pollen grain production and/or cause sterility, implying that mitochondrial, retrograde signaling delays nuclear gene expression.

  14. An atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, F.; Johnson, D.B.; Anoe, K.S.

    1994-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome results from the transcriptional inactivation of the FMR-1 gene. This is commonly caused by the expansion of an unstable CGG trinucleotide repeat in the first exon of the FMR-1 gene. We describe here an atypical case of fragile X syndrome caused by a deletion that includes the FMR-1 gene. RK is a 6-year-old hyperactive, mentally retarded male. Southern analysis of PstI digested genomic DNA was performed using a 558 bp XhoI-PstI fragment specific for the 5`-end of the FMR-1 gene. This analysis revealed the absence of the normal 1.0 kb PstI fragment, indicating the deletion of at least a portion of the FMR-1 gene. PCR analysis using Xq27.3 microsatellite and STS markers confirmed the presence of a deletion of at least 600 kb encompassing the FMR-1 gene. Southern blot and PCR analysis demonstrated that this deletion was maternally transmitted and arose as a new mutation on the grandpaternal X-chromosome. High resolution chromosome banding revealed an extremely small deletion of a portion of band Xq27 which was confirmed by fluorescent in situ hybridrization (FISH) analysis using a 34 kb cosmid containing the FMR-1 gene. As expected, RK manifests physical features typical of fragile X syndrome, including a high arched palate, prognathism, and large ears. Interestingly, RK also presents with anal atresia, obesity and short stature, features not part of fragile X syndrome. In addition, RK has normal sized testicles and does not exhibit the characteristic gaze avoidance, hand-flapping, and crowd anxiety behaviors. These atypical features may result from the deletion of additional genes in the vicinity of the FMR-1 gene. Further work is underway to determine more precisely the extent of the deletion in RK`s DNA.

  15. NK cells are intrinsically functional in pigs with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by spontaneous mutations in the Artemis gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have identified Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) in a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University. These SCID pigs lack B-cells and T-cells, but possess Natural Killer (NK) cells. This SCID phenotype is caused by recessive mutations in the Artemis gene. Interestingly, two human tumor c...

  16. Campylobacter jejuni, an uncommon cause of splenic abscess diagnosed by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

    PubMed

    Seng, Piseth; Quenard, Fanny; Menard, Amélie; Heyries, Laurent; Stein, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare disease that primarily occurs in patients with splenic trauma, endocarditis, sickle cell anemia, or other diseases that compromise the immune system. This report describes a culture-negative splenic abscess in an immunocompetent patient caused by Campylobacter jejuni, as determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  17. Not All SCID Pigs Are Created Equally: Two Independent Mutations in the Artemis Gene Cause SCID in Pigs.

    PubMed

    Waide, Emily H; Dekkers, Jack C M; Ross, Jason W; Rowland, Raymond R R; Wyatt, Carol R; Ewen, Catherine L; Evans, Alyssa B; Thekkoot, Dinesh M; Boddicker, Nicholas J; Serão, Nick V L; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Tuggle, Christopher K

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in >30 genes are known to result in impairment of the adaptive immune system, causing a group of disorders collectively known as SCID. SCID disorders are split into groups based on their presence and/or functionality of B, T, and NK cells. Piglets from a line of Yorkshire pigs at Iowa State University were shown to be affected by T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID, representing, to our knowledge, the first example of naturally occurring SCID in pigs. In this study, we present evidence for two spontaneous mutations as the molecular basis for this SCID phenotype. Flow cytometry analysis of thymocytes showed an increased frequency of immature T cells in SCID pigs. Fibroblasts from these pigs were more sensitive to ionizing radiation than non-SCID piglets, eliminating the RAG1 and RAG2 genes. Genetic and molecular analyses showed that two mutations were present in the Artemis gene, which in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state cause the immunodeficient phenotype. Rescue of SCID fibroblast radiosensitivity by human Artemis protein demonstrated that the identified Artemis mutations are the direct cause of this cellular phenotype. The work presented in the present study reveals two mutations in the Artemis gene that cause T(-)B(-)NK(+) SCID in pigs. The SCID pig can be an important biomedical model, but these mutations would be undesirable in commercial pig populations. The identified mutations and associated genetic tests can be used to address both of these issues. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. A novel splicing mutation in COL1A1 gene caused type I osteogenesis imperfecta in a Chinese family.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Zhang, Yuhui; Long, Zhigao; Zhao, Ding; Guo, Zhenxin; Xue, Jinjie; Xie, Zhiguo; Xiong, Zhimin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Su, Wei; Wang, Bing; Xia, Kun; Hu, Zhengmao

    2012-07-10

    Osteogenesis imperfect (OI) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with bone fragility as a cardinal manifestation, accompanied by short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hyperlaxity of ligaments and skin, blue sclerae and hearing loss. Dominant form of OI is caused by mutations in the type I procollagen genes, COL1A1/A2. Here we identified a novel splicing mutation c.3207+1G>A (GenBank ID: JQ236861) in the COL1A1 gene that caused type I OI in a Chinese family. RNA splicing analysis proved that this mutation created a new splicing site at c.3200, and then led to frameshift. This result further enriched the mutation spectrum of type I procollagen genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of a novel splice-site mutation in the Lebercilin (LCA5) gene causing Leber congenital amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Soumittra, Nagasamy; Nancarrow, Derek; Sen, Parveen; McKibbin, Martin; Williams, Grange A; Arokiasamy, Tharigopala; Lakshmipathy, Praveena; Inglehearn, Chris F

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is one of the most common causes of hereditary blindness in infants. To date, mutations in 13 known genes and at two other loci have been implicated in LCA causation. An examination of the known genes highlights several processes which, when defective, cause LCA, including photoreceptor development and maintenance, phototransduction, vitamin A metabolism, and protein trafficking. In addition, it has been known for some time that defects in sensory cilia can cause syndromes involving hereditary blindness. More recently evidence has come to light that non-syndromic LCA can also be a “ciliopathy.” Methods Here we present a homozygosity mapping analysis in a consanguineous sibship that led to the identification of a mutation in the recently discovered LCA5 gene. Homozygosity mapping was done using Affymetrix 10K Xba I Gene Chip and a 24.5cM region on chromosome 6 (6q12- q16.3) was identified to be significantly homozygous. The LCA5 gene on this region was sequenced and cDNA sequencing also done to characterize the mutation. Results A c.955G>A missense mutation in the last base of exon 6 causing disruption of the splice donor site was identified in both the affected sibs. Since there is a second consensus splice donor sequence 5 bp into the adjacent intron, this mutation results in a transcript with a 5 bp insertion of intronic sequence, leading to a frameshift and premature truncation. Conclusions We report a missense mutation functionally altering the splice donor site and leading to a truncated protein. This is the second report of LCA5 mutations causing LCA. It may also be significant that one affected child died at eleven months of age due to asphyxia during sleep. To date the only phenotype unambiguously associated with mutations in this gene is LCA. However the LCA5 gene is known to be expressed in nasopharynx, trachea and lungs and was originally identified in the proteome of bronchial epithelium ciliary axonemes. The

  20. Gene expression profiling of the rewarding effect caused by methamphetamine in the mesolimbic dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Moon Hee; Jung, Min-Suk; Lee, Min Joo; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Yook, Yeon Joo; Park, Eun Young; Choi, Seo Hee; Suh, Young Ju; Kim, Kee-Won; Park, Jong Hoon

    2008-08-31

    Methamphetamine, a commonly used addictive drug, is a powerful addictive stimulant that dramatically affects the CNS. Repeated METH administration leads to a rewarding effect in a state of addiction that includes sensitization, dependence, and other phenomena. It is well known that susceptibility to the development of addiction is influenced by sources of reinforcement, variable neuroadaptive mechanisms, and neurochemical changes that together lead to altered homeostasis of the brain reward system. These behavioral abnormalities reflect neuroadaptive changes in signal transduction function and cellular gene expression produced by repeated drug exposure. To provide a better understanding of addiction and the mechanism of the rewarding effect, it is important to identify related genes. In the present study, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray analysis in a reward effect animal model. We also investigated gene expression in four important regions of the brain, the nucleus accumbens, striatum, hippocampus, and cingulated cortex, and analyzed the data by two clustering methods. Genes related to signaling pathways including G-protein-coupled receptor-related pathways predominated among the identified genes. The genes identified in our study may contribute to the development of a gene modeling network for methamphetamine addiction.

  1. [The MDR3 gene mutation: a rare cause of progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PFIC)].

    PubMed

    Maisonnette, F; Abita, T; Barriere, E; Pichon, N; Vincensini, J F; Descottes, B

    2005-10-01

    A 47-year old man complained about persistant pain and cholestasis 12-years after a cholescystectomy. In his family, all his brothers and sisters had cholecystectomy. Genetic explorations revealed a MDR3 gene mutation. All symptoms disappeared with a treatment by ursodesoxycholic acid. MDR3 gene mutation is to be researched in all cases of familial cholestasis.

  2. Contrasting invertebrate immune defense behaviors caused by a single gene, the Caenorhabditis elegans neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Snoek, L Basten; Yang, Wentao; Ellendt, Sunna; Schneider, Franziska; Mohr, Timm G; Rösingh, Lone; Masche, Anna C; Rosenstiel, Philip C; Dierking, Katja; Kammenga, Jan E; Schulenburg, Hinrich

    2016-04-11

    The invertebrate immune system comprises physiological mechanisms, physical barriers and also behavioral responses. It is generally related to the vertebrate innate immune system and widely believed to provide nonspecific defense against pathogens, whereby the response to different pathogen types is usually mediated by distinct signalling cascades. Recent work suggests that invertebrate immune defense can be more specific at least at the phenotypic level. The underlying genetic mechanisms are as yet poorly understood. We demonstrate in the model invertebrate Caenorhabditis elegans that a single gene, a homolog of the mammalian neuropeptide Y receptor gene, npr-1, mediates contrasting defense phenotypes towards two distinct pathogens, the Gram-positive Bacillus thuringiensis and the Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Our findings are based on combining quantitative trait loci (QTLs) analysis with functional genetic analysis and RNAseq-based transcriptomics. The QTL analysis focused on behavioral immune defense against B. thuringiensis, using recombinant inbred lines (RILs) and introgression lines (ILs). It revealed several defense QTLs, including one on chromosome X comprising the npr-1 gene. The wildtype N2 allele for the latter QTL was associated with reduced defense against B. thuringiensis and thus produced an opposite phenotype to that previously reported for the N2 npr-1 allele against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of npr-1 mutants confirmed these contrasting immune phenotypes for both avoidance behavior and nematode survival. Subsequent transcriptional profiling of C. elegans wildtype and npr-1 mutant suggested that npr-1 mediates defense against both pathogens through p38 MAPK signaling, insulin-like signaling, and C-type lectins. Importantly, increased defense towards P. aeruginosa seems to be additionally influenced through the induction of oxidative stress genes and activation of GATA transcription factors, while the repression of oxidative stress genes

  3. Immunoglobulin V gene replacement is caused by the intramolecular DNA deletion mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Usuda, S; Takemori, T; Matsuoka, M; Shirasawa, T; Yoshida, K; Mori, A; Ishizaka, K; Sakano, H

    1992-01-01

    Circular DNA resulting from V gene replacement was studied with an A-MuLV transformed cell line containing ablts. This cell line undergoes V gene replacement at elevated temperatures in the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (H) gene. Examination of circular DNA revealed that a heptamer-related sequence (TACTGTG) within the coding region of VDJ was joined to the recombination signal sequence (RSS) of a germline VH segment. This provides direct evidence for a intramolecular DNA deletion mechanism for V gene replacement. In the pre-B cell line as well as in in vivo lymphocytes, unusual circular DNAs were found which were structurally similar to the V gene replacement circles. They represented excision products of the deletion type recombination between one complete RSS and a heptamer-like sequence in the Ig H region. PMID:1311252

  4. Accelerated alcoholic fermentation caused by defective gene expression related to glucose derepression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Naoya; Mizuno, Megumi; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    Sake yeast strains maintain high fermentation rates, even after the stationary growth phase begins. To determine the molecular mechanisms underlying this advantageous brewing property, we compared the gene expression profiles of sake and laboratory yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during the stationary growth phase. DNA microarray analysis revealed that the sake yeast strain examined had defects in expression of the genes related to glucose derepression mediated by transcription factors Adr1p and Cat8p. Furthermore, deletion of the ADR1 and CAT8 genes slightly but statistically significantly improved the fermentation rate of a laboratory yeast strain. We also identified two loss-of-function mutations in the ADR1 gene of existing sake yeast strains. Taken together, these results indicate that the gene expression program associated with glucose derepression for yeast acts as an impediment to effective alcoholic fermentation under glucose-rich fermentative conditions.

  5. Phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency caused by a single base substitution in an exon of the human phenylalanine hydroxylase gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lichter-Konecki, U.; Konecki, D.S.; DiLella, A.G.; Brayton, K.; Marvit, J.; Hahn, T.M.; Trefz, E.K.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-04-19

    A novel restriction fragment length polymorphism in the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) locus generated by the restriction endonuclease MspI was observed in a German phenylketonuria (PKU) patient. Molecular cloning and DNA sequence analyses revealed that the MspI polymorphism was created by a T to C transition in exon 9 of the human PAH gene, which also resulted in the conversion of a leucine codon to proline codon. The effect of the amino acid substitution was investigated by creating a corresponding mutation in a full-length human PAD cDNA by site-directed mutagenesis followed by expression analysis in cultured mammalian cells. Results demonstrate that the mutation in the gene causes the synthesis of an unstable protein in the cell corresponding to a CRM/sup -/ phenotype. Together with the other mutations recently reported in the PAH gene,the data support previous biochemical and clinical observations that PKU is a heterogeneous disorder at the gene level.

  6. [Current Status of Genetic Diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease: Variety of the Disease-causing Genes].

    PubMed

    Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Higuchi, Yujiro; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    At least 40 genes have been associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) and the related inherited neuropathies. Genetic studies have revealed the following factors as causes of inherited neuropathies: myelin components, transcription factors for myelination, myelin maintenance systems, differentiation factors of the peripheral nerve, neurofilaments, protein transfer systems, mitochondrial proteins, DNA repair, RNA/protein synthesis, ion channels, and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. Since 2007, we have tried to screen for mutations in CMT patients using microarrays or next generation sequencers. As a result, the detection rate of gene mutations has improved to about 25%. In this study, we applied target resequencing to 72 genes. From the negative examples, we identified the cases based on clinical course, family history, and electrophysiological findings, and then performed exome analysis. We then tried to identify novel causative genes by analyzing the enormous data obtained from our exome analysis.

  7. [A novel homozygous mutation in PLA2G6 gene causes infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy in a case].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinling; Wu, Wei; Chen, Xuefeng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Xiumin; Dong, Guanping

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the clinical symptoms and potential mutations in the PLA2G6 gene for a child with infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy. Clinical data of the patient was collected. The coding regions of PLA2G6 gene was subjected to Sanger sequencing using blood DNA from the patient and her parents. The patient has presented with psychomotor regression and hypotonia, followed by development of tetraparesis. A novel homozygous mutation G68A in the PLA2G6 gene was found by DNA sequencing, while her parents were both heterozygous carriers. The psychomotor regression and tetraparesis of the patient was caused by infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy due to a novel homozygous mutation in the PLA2G6 gene, which was inherited from her parents.

  8. DNA-intercalators Causing Rapid Re-expression of Methylated and Silenced Genes in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Healey, Megan A.; Lee, Calvin; Poh, Weijie; Yerram, Sashidhar R.; Patel, Kalpesh; Azad, Nilofer S.; Herman, James G.; Kern, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic inactivation of tumor-suppressor and other regulatory genes plays a critical role in carcinogenesis. Transcriptional silencing is often maintained by DNA methyl transferase (DNMT)-mediated hypermethylation of CpG islands in promoter DNA. Nucleoside analogs including azacytidine and decitabine have been used to inhibit DNMT and re-activate genes, and are clinically used. Their shortcomings include a short half-life and a slow onset of action due to required nucleotide incorporation during DNA replication, which may limit clinical utility. It might be useful to begin to identify lead compounds having novel properties, specifically distinct and fast-acting gene desilencing. We previously identified chemicals augmenting gene expression in multiple reporter systems. We now report that a subset of these compounds that includes quinacrine re-expresses epigenetically silenced genes implicated in carcinogenesis. p16, TFPI2, the cadherins E-cadherin and CDH13, and the secreted frizzle-related proteins (SFRPs) SFRP1 and SFRP5 were desilenced in cancer cell lines. These lead compounds were fast-acting: re-expression occurred by 12-24 hours. Reactivation of silenced genes was accompanied by depletion of DNMT1 at the promoters of activated genes and demethylation of DNA. A model compound, 5175328, induced changes more rapidly than decitabine. These gene desilencing agents belonged to a class of acridine compounds, intercalated into DNA, and inhibited DNMT1 activity in vitro. Although to define the mechanism would be outside the scope of this initial report, this class may re-activate silenced genes in part by intercalating into DNA and subsequently inhibiting full DNMT1 activity. Rapid mechanisms for chemical desilencing of methylated genes therefore exist. PMID:23593653

  9. Digital gene expression analysis of corky split vein caused by boron deficiency in 'Newhall' Navel Orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) for selecting differentially expressed genes related to vascular hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Quan; Liu, Yong-Zhong; An, Ji-Cui; Li, Shuang; Jin, Long-Fei; Zhou, Gao-Feng; Wei, Qing-Jiang; Yan, Hui-Qing; Wang, Nan-Nan; Fu, Li-Na; Liu, Xiao; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Yan, Ting-Shuai; Peng, Shu-Ang

    2013-01-01

    Corky split vein caused by boron (B) deficiency in 'Newhall' Navel Orange was studied in the present research. The boron-deficient citrus exhibited a symptom of corky split vein in mature leaves. Morphologic and anatomical surveys at four representative phases of corky split veins showed that the symptom was the result of vascular hypertrophy. Digital gene expression (DGE) analysis was performed based on the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform, which was applied to analyze the gene expression profilings of corky split veins at four morphologic phases. Over 5.3 million clean reads per library were successfully mapped to the reference database and more than 22897 mapped genes per library were simultaneously obtained. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed that the expressions of genes associated with cytokinin signal transduction, cell division, vascular development, lignin biosynthesis and photosynthesis in corky split veins were all affected. The expressions of WOL and ARR12 involved in the cytokinin signal transduction pathway were up-regulated at 1(st) phase of corky split vein development. Furthermore, the expressions of some cell cycle genes, CYCs and CDKB, and vascular development genes, WOX4 and VND7, were up-regulated at the following 2(nd) and 3(rd) phases. These findings indicated that the cytokinin signal transduction pathway may play a role in initiating symptom observed in our study.

  10. [Advances in molecular mechanisms of bacterial resistance caused by stress-induced transfer of resistance genes--a review].

    PubMed

    Sun, Dongchang; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Lihong

    2013-07-04

    The transfer of resistance gene is one of the most important causes of bacterial resistance. Recent studies reveal that stresses induce the transfer of antibiotic resistance gene through multiple mechanisms. DNA damage stresses trigger bacterial SOS response and induce the transfer of resistance gene mediated by conjugative DNA. Antibiotic stresses induce natural bacterial competence for transformation in some bacteria which lack the SOS system. In addition, our latest studies show that the general stress response regulator RpoS regulates a novel type of resistance gene transfer which is mediated by double-stranded plasmid DNA and occurs exclusively on the solid surface. In this review, we summarized recent advances in SOS dependent and independent stress-induced DNA transfer which is mediated by conjugation and transformation respectively, and the transfer of double-stranded plasmid DNA on the solid surface which is regulated by RpoS. We propose that future work should address how stresses activate the key regulators and how these regulators control the expression of gene transfer related genes. Answers to the above questions would pave the way for searching for candidate targets for controlling bacterial resistance resulted from the transfer of antibiotic genes.

  11. Two novel compound heterozygous families with a trimutation in the GJB2 gene causing sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Saucedo, Mirna; Mirna, Martínez-Saucedo; Rivera-Vega, María del Refugio; María Del Refugio, Rivera-Vega; Gonzalez--Huerta Luz, María; María, Gonzalez-Huerta Luz; Urueta-Cuellar, Héctor; Héctor, Urueta-Cuellar; Toral-López, Jaime; Jaime, Toral-López; Berruecos-Villalobos, Pedro; Pedro, Berruecos-Villalobos; Cuevas-Covarrubias, Sergio; Sergio, Cuevas-Covarrubias

    2015-12-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) is a genetically heterogeneous disease. GJB2 gene mutations seem to be the most frequent cause of hereditary hearing impairment in several populations. There is variability in the mutations in the GJB2 gene worldwide; this remarks the influence of ethnic background in SNHL. To describe the presence of two trimutations in the GJB2 gene in two Mexican families with hereditary SNHL. Two unrelated Mexican families with prelingual SNHL were included in the study. Analysis of the GJB2 gene through PCR and DNA direct sequencing analysis was performed in all members of the families and in 100 normal controls. Affected member of the family 1 showed the trimutation p.S19R/p.R32S/p.E47*, whereas affected members of the family 2 showed the trimutation p.F31I/p.W44*/p.V84M. Parents of both families were heterozygous with normal audition. We found a novel mutation in the GJB2 gene and two trimutations with SNHL not previously reported. This remarks the complexity in the pattern of mutations in the GJB2 gene in SNHL and enriches the spectrum of the type of molecular defects in the GJB2 gene. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel lamin A/C gene mutation causing spinal muscular atrophy phenotype with cardiac involvement: report of one case.

    PubMed

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Kawamata, Jun; Shimohama, Shun

    2015-02-20

    Mutations of the lamin A/C gene have been associated with several diseases such as Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, dilated cardiomyopathy and Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, referred to as laminopathies. Only one report of spinal muscular atrophy and cardiomyopathy phenotype with lamin A/C gene mutations has been published. The concept that lamin A/C gene mutations cause spinal muscular atrophy has not been established. We report a man aged 65 years who presented with amyotrophy of lower limbs, arrhythmia and cardiac hypofunction. He showed gait disturbance since childhood, and his family showed similar symptoms. Neurological and electrophysiological findings suggested spinal muscular atrophy type 3. Gene analysis of lamin A/C gene showed a novel nonsense mutation p.Q353X (c.1057C > T). Further investigations revealed that he and his family members had cardiac diseases including atrioventricular block. We report the first Japanese case of spinal muscular atrophy phenotype associated with lamin A/C mutation. When a patient presents a spinal muscular atrophy phenotype and unexplained cardiac disease, especially when the family history is positive, gene analysis of lamin A/C gene should be considered.

  13. Retinal Diseases Caused by Mutations in Genes Not Specifically Associated with the Clinical Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xia; Feng, Yanming; Li, Jianli; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Lewis, Richard A; Wong, Lee-Jun

    2016-01-01

    When seeking a confirmed molecular diagnosis in the research setting, patients with one descriptive diagnosis of retinal disease could carry pathogenic variants in genes not specifically associated with that description. However, this event has not been evaluated systematically in clinical diagnostic laboratories that validate fully all target genes to minimize false negatives/positives. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing analysis on 207 ocular disease-related genes for 42 patients whose DNA had been tested negative for disease-specific panels of genes known to be associated with retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, or exudative vitreoretinopathy. Pathogenic variants, including single nucleotide variations and copy number variations, were identified in 9 patients, including 6 with variants in syndromic retinal disease genes and 3 whose molecular diagnosis could not be distinguished easily from their submitted clinical diagnosis, accounting for 21% (9/42) of the unsolved cases. Our study underscores the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of retinal disorders and provides valuable reference to estimate the fraction of clinical samples whose retinal disorders could be explained by genes not specifically associated with the corresponding clinical diagnosis. Our data suggest that sequencing a larger set of retinal disorder related genes can increase the molecular diagnostic yield, especially for clinically hard-to-distinguish cases.

  14. Retinal Diseases Caused by Mutations in Genes Not Specifically Associated with the Clinical Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yanming; Li, Jianli; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jing; Lewis, Richard A.; Wong, Lee-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose When seeking a confirmed molecular diagnosis in the research setting, patients with one descriptive diagnosis of retinal disease could carry pathogenic variants in genes not specifically associated with that description. However, this event has not been evaluated systematically in clinical diagnostic laboratories that validate fully all target genes to minimize false negatives/positives. Methods We performed targeted next-generation sequencing analysis on 207 ocular disease-related genes for 42 patients whose DNA had been tested negative for disease-specific panels of genes known to be associated with retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, or exudative vitreoretinopathy. Results Pathogenic variants, including single nucleotide variations and copy number variations, were identified in 9 patients, including 6 with variants in syndromic retinal disease genes and 3 whose molecular diagnosis could not be distinguished easily from their submitted clinical diagnosis, accounting for 21% (9/42) of the unsolved cases. Conclusion Our study underscores the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of retinal disorders and provides valuable reference to estimate the fraction of clinical samples whose retinal disorders could be explained by genes not specifically associated with the corresponding clinical diagnosis. Our data suggest that sequencing a larger set of retinal disorder related genes can increase the molecular diagnostic yield, especially for clinically hard-to-distinguish cases. PMID:27788217

  15. Permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus caused by a novel mutation in the KCNJ11 gene.

    PubMed

    Doneray, Hakan; Houghton, Jayne; Tekgunduz, Kadir Serafettin; Balkir, Ferat; Caner, Ibrahim

    2014-03-01

    Mutations in the KCNJ11 gene are responsible for the majority of permanent neonatal diabetes mellitus (PNDM) cases. Some mutations in this gene, including p.Q52R, are associated with the developmental delay, epilepsy, neonatal diabetes (DEND) syndrome. We describe a patient with PNDM who had no neurological finding although she was determined to have a novel mutation (p.Q52L) in the same residue of the KCNJ11 as in the previously reported cases with DEND syndrome. This case suggests that not all Q52 mutations in the KCNJ11 gene are necessarily related to DEND syndrome.

  16. Biased Gene Conversion in Rhizobium etli Is Caused by Preferential Double-Strand Breaks on One of the Recombining Homologs

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Cuna, Fares Osam; Castellanos, Mildred

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gene conversion, the nonreciprocal transfer of information during homologous recombination, is the main process that maintains identity between members of multigene families. Gene conversion in the nitrogenase (nifH) multigene family of Rhizobium etli was analyzed by using a two-plasmid system, where each plasmid carried a copy of nifH. One of the nifH copies was modified, creating restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) spaced along the gene. Once the modified plasmid was introduced into R. etli, selection was done for cointegration with a resident plasmid lacking the RFLPs. Most of the cointegrate molecules harbor gene conversion events, biased toward a gain of RFLPs. This bias may be explained under the double-strand break repair model by proposing that the nifH gene lacking the RFLPs suffers a DNA double-strand break, so the incoming plasmid functions as a template for repairing the homolog on the resident plasmid. To support this proposal, we cloned an SceI site into the nifH homolog that had the RFLPs used for scoring gene conversion. In vivo expression of the meganuclease I-SceI allowed the generation of a double-strand break on this homolog. Upon introduction of this modified plasmid into an R. etli strain lacking I-SceI, biased gene conversion still favored the retention of markers on the incoming plasmid. In contrast, when the recipient strain ectopically expressed I-SceI, a dramatic reversal in gene conversion bias was seen, favoring the preservation of resident sequences. These results show that biased gene conversion is caused by preferential double-strand breaks on one of the recombining homologs. IMPORTANCE In this work, we analyzed gene conversion by using a system that entails horizontal gene transfer followed by homologous recombination in the recipient cell. Most gene conversion events are biased toward the acquisition of the incoming sequences, ranging in size from 120 bp to 800 bp. This bias is due to preferential cutting of

  17. Mutations in the genes for thyroglobulin and thyroid peroxidase cause thyroid dyshormonogenesis and autosomal-recessive intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Kirti; Rafiq, Muhammad A; Rafiullah, Rafiullah; Harripaul, Ricardo; Ali, Hazrat; Ayaz, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Naeem, Farooq; Amin-Ud-Din, Muhammad; Waqas, Ahmed; So, Joyce; Rappold, Gudrun A; Vincent, John B; Ayub, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    We have used single-nucleotide polymorphism microarray genotyping and homozygosity-by-descent (HBD) mapping followed by Sanger sequencing or whole-exome sequencing (WES) to identify causative mutations in three consanguineous families with intellectual disability (ID) related to thyroid dyshormonogenesis (TDH). One family was found to have a shared HBD region of 12.1 Mb on 8q24.21-q24.23 containing 36 coding genes, including the thyroglobulin gene, TG. Sanger sequencing of TG identified a homozygous nonsense mutation Arg2336*, which segregated with the phenotype in the family. A second family showed several HBD regions, including 6.0 Mb on 2p25.3-p25.2. WES identified a homozygous nonsense mutation, Glu596*, in the thyroid peroxidase gene, TPO. WES of a mother/father/proband trio from a third family revealed a homozygous missense mutation, Arg412His, in TPO. Mutations in TG and TPO are very rarely associated with ID, mainly because TDH is generally detectable and treatable. However, in populations where resources for screening and detection are limited, and especially where consanguineous marriages are common, mutations in genes involved in thyroid function may also be causes of ID, and as TPO and TG mutations are the most common genetic causes of TDH, these are also likely to be relatively common causes of ID.

  18. Norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in rodent hearts by activating Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fuxia; Xiao, Daliao; Zhang, Lubo

    2012-07-01

    Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Recent studies demonstrate that fetal programming of PKCε gene repression results in ischemia-sensitive phenotype in the heart. The present study tests the hypothesis that increased norepinephrine causes epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart via Nox1-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Prolonged norepinephrine treatment increased ROS production in fetal rat hearts and embryonic ventricular myocyte H9c2 cells via a selective increase in Nox1 expression. Norepinephrine-induced ROS resulted in an increase in PKCε promoter methylation at Egr-1 and Sp-1 binding sites, leading to PKCε gene repression. N-acetylcysteine, diphenyleneiodonium, and apocynin blocked norepinephrine-induced ROS production and the promoter methylation, and also restored PKCε mRNA and protein to control levels in vivo in fetal hearts and in vitro in embryonic myocyte cells. Accordingly, norepinephrine-induced ROS production, promoter methylation, and PKCε gene repression were completely abrogated by knockdown of Nox1 in cardiomyocytes. These findings provide evidence of a novel interaction between elevated norepinephrine and epigenetic repression of PKCε gene in the heart mediated by Nox1-dependent oxidative stress and suggest new insights of molecular mechanisms linking the heightened sympathetic activity to aberrant cardioprotection and increased ischemic vulnerability in the heart.

  19. Inherited somatic mosaicism caused by an intracisternal A particle insertion in the mouse tyrosinase gene.

    PubMed

    Wu, M; Rinchik, E M; Wilkinson, E; Johnson, D K

    1997-02-04

    A recessive, fully penetrant mutation (c(m1OR)) at the mouse albino locus that results in coat-color mottling has been characterized at the molecular level. Restriction mapping and DNA sequencing analyses provide evidence that mutants carry a 5.4-kb intracisternal A particle (IAP) element insertion upstream of the tyrosinase (Tyr) promoter. Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription-PCR results show that the tyrosinase gene is expressed at much lower levels in mutant than in wild-type mice. The mutant Tyr gene still retains the tissue-specific expression pattern, and the Tyr transcript is not initiated from the IAP long terminal repeat promoter. We propose that the IAP insertion isolates the promoter of the tyrosinase gene from upstream cis-acting regulatory elements, leading to a substantially decreased level of Tyr gene expression in mutants.

  20. Establishing a major cause of discrepancy in the calibration of Affymetrix GeneChips

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Andrew P; Johnston, Caroline E; Orengo, Christine A

    2007-01-01

    Background Affymetrix GeneChips are a popular platform for performing whole-genome experiments on the transcriptome. There are a range of different calibration steps, and users are presented with choices of different background subtractions, normalisations and expression measures. We wished to establish which of the calibration steps resulted in the biggest uncertainty in the sets of genes reported to be differentially expressed. Results Our results indicate that the sets of genes identified as being most significantly differentially expressed, as estimated by the z-score of fold change, is relatively insensitive to the choice of background subtraction and normalisation. However, the contents of the gene list are most sensitive to the choice of expression measure. This is irrespective of whether the experiment uses a rat, mouse or human chip and whether the chip definition is made using probe mappings from Unigene, RefSeq, Entrez Gene or the original Affymetrix definitions. It is also irrespective of whether both Present and Absent, or just Present, Calls from the MAS5 algorithm are used to filter genelists, and this conclusion holds for genes of differing intensities. We also reach the same conclusion after assigning genes to be differentially expressed using t-statistics, although this approach results in a large amount of false positives in the sets of genes identified due to the small numbers of replicates typically used in microarray experiments. Conclusion The major calibration uncertainty that biologists need to consider when analysing Affymetrix data is how their multiple probe values are condensed into one expression measure. PMID:17562008

  1. Aucsia Gene Silencing Causes Parthenocarpic Fruit Development in Tomato[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Molesini, Barbara; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Rotino, Giuseppe Leonardo; Dani, Valeria; Spena, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    In angiosperms, auxin phytohormones play a crucial regulatory role in fruit initiation. The expression of auxin biosynthesis genes in ovules and placenta results in uncoupling of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit development from fertilization with production of parthenocarpic fruits. We have identified two newly described genes, named Aucsia genes, which are differentially expressed in auxin-synthesis (DefH9-iaaM) parthenocarpic tomato flower buds. The two tomato Aucsia genes encode 53-amino-acid-long peptides. We show, by RNA interference-mediated gene suppression, that Aucsia genes are involved in both reproductive and vegetative plant development. Aucsia-silenced tomato plants exhibited auxin-related phenotypes such as parthenocarpic fruit development, leaf fusions, and reflexed leaves. Auxin-induced rhizogenesis in cotyledon explants and polar auxin transport in roots were reduced in Aucsia-silenced plants compared with wild-type plants. In addition, Aucsia-silenced plants showed an increased sensitivity to 1-naphthylphthalamic acid, an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. We further prove that total indole-3-acetic acid content was increased in preanthesis Aucsia-silenced flower buds. Thus, the data presented demonstrate that Aucsia genes encode a novel family of plant peptides that control fruit initiation and affect other auxin-related biological processes in tomato. Aucsia homologous genes are present in both chlorophytes and streptophytes, and the encoded peptides are distinguished by a 16-amino-acid-long (PYSGXSTLALVARXSA) AUCSIA motif, a lysine-rich carboxyl-terminal region, and a conserved tyrosine-based endocytic sorting motif. PMID:18987210

  2. Deletion of the Aconitase Gene in Corynebacterium glutamicum Causes Strong Selection Pressure for Secondary Mutations Inactivating Citrate Synthase▿†

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, Meike; Mustafi, Nurije; Krug, Andreas; Bott, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The aconitase gene acn of Corynebacterium glutamicum is regulated by four transcriptional regulators, indicating that the synthesis of this enzyme is carefully controlled. To understand the causes for this elaborate regulation, the properties of the Δacn-1 deletion mutant were analyzed in detail. The mutant was glutamate auxotrophic in glucose minimal medium, showed a strong growth defect, and secreted large amounts of acetate. None of these phenotypes could be complemented by plasmid-encoded aconitase, suggesting the presence of a secondary mutation. In fact, a point mutation within the gltA gene encoding citrate synthase was identified that caused the instability of the protein and an almost complete lack of its enzymatic activity. Subsequently, 27 further, independent Δacn clones were isolated, and 15 of them were found to contain distinct mutations in gltA, causing the loss of citrate synthase activity. A similar result was observed for mutants lacking the isocitrate dehydrogenase gene icd. In this case, 8 of 24 Δicd clones contained additional mutations in gltA. Indirect evidence was obtained that elevated intracellular citrate concentrations could be the cause of this selection pressure. Accordingly, the careful control of aconitase synthesis might have evolved due to the necessity to avoid inhibitory cytoplasmic citrate levels on the one hand and to prevent the excessive synthesis of an oxygen-sensitive protein requiring both iron and sulfur on the other hand. PMID:21984793

  3. Gene Therapy for Retinitis Pigmentosa Caused by MFRP Mutations: Human Phenotype and Preliminary Proof of Concept

    PubMed Central

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A.; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L.; Cideciyan, Artur V.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy. PMID:22142163

  4. Natural diversity in flowering responses of Arabidopsis thaliana caused by variation in a tandem gene array.

    PubMed

    Rosloski, Sarah Marie; Jali, Sathya Sheela; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Weigel, Detlef; Grbic, Vojislava

    2010-09-01

    Tandemly arrayed genes that belong to gene families characterize genomes of many organisms. Gene duplication and subsequent relaxation of selection can lead to the establishment of paralogous cluster members that may evolve along different trajectories. Here, we report on the structural variation in MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING 2 (MAF2) gene, one member of the tandemly duplicated cluster of MADS-box-containing transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana. The altered gene structure at the MAF2 locus is present as a moderate-frequency polymorphism in Arabidopsis and leads to the extensive diversity in transcript patterns due to alternative splicing. Rearrangements at the MAF2 locus are associated with an early flowering phenotype in BC(5) lines. The lack of suppression of flowering time in a MAF2-insertion line expressing the MAF2-specific artificial miRNA suggests that these MAF2 variants are behaving as loss-of-function alleles. The variation in gene architecture is also associated with segregation distortion, which may have facilitated the spread and the establishment of the corresponding alleles throughout the Eurasian range of the A. thaliana population.

  5. The Differences Between Cis- and Trans-Gene Inactivation Caused by Heterochromatin in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Abramov, Yuriy A; Shatskikh, Aleksei S; Maksimenko, Oksana G; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Gvozdev, Vladimir A; Lavrov, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) is the epigenetic disruption of gene expression near the de novo-formed euchromatin-heterochromatin border. Heterochromatic cis-inactivation may be accompanied by the trans-inactivation of genes on a normal homologous chromosome in trans-heterozygous combination with a PEV-inducing rearrangement. We characterize a new genetic system, inversion In(2)A4, demonstrating cis-acting PEV as well as trans-inactivation of the reporter transgenes on the homologous nonrearranged chromosome. The cis-effect of heterochromatin in the inversion results not only in repression but also in activation of genes, and it varies at different developmental stages. While cis-actions affect only a few juxtaposed genes, trans-inactivation is observed in a 500-kb region and demonstrates а nonuniform pattern of repression with intermingled regions where no transgene repression occurs. There is no repression around the histone gene cluster and in some other euchromatic sites. trans-Inactivation is accompanied by dragging of euchromatic regions into the heterochromatic compartment, but the histone gene cluster, located in the middle of the trans-inactivated region, was shown to be evicted from the heterochromatin. We demonstrate that trans-inactivation is followed by de novo HP1a accumulation in the affected transgene; trans-inactivation is specifically favored by the chromatin remodeler SAYP and prevented by Argonaute AGO2.

  6. The Differences Between Cis- and Trans-Gene Inactivation Caused by Heterochromatin in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Abramov, Yuriy A.; Shatskikh, Aleksei S.; Maksimenko, Oksana G.; Bonaccorsi, Silvia; Gvozdev, Vladimir A.; Lavrov, Sergey A.

    2016-01-01

    Position-effect variegation (PEV) is the epigenetic disruption of gene expression near the de novo–formed euchromatin-heterochromatin border. Heterochromatic cis-inactivation may be accompanied by the trans-inactivation of genes on a normal homologous chromosome in trans-heterozygous combination with a PEV-inducing rearrangement. We characterize a new genetic system, inversion In(2)A4, demonstrating cis-acting PEV as well as trans-inactivation of the reporter transgenes on the homologous nonrearranged chromosome. The cis-effect of heterochromatin in the inversion results not only in repression but also in activation of genes, and it varies at different developmental stages. While cis-actions affect only a few juxtaposed genes, trans-inactivation is observed in a 500-kb region and demonstrates а nonuniform pattern of repression with intermingled regions where no transgene repression occurs. There is no repression around the histone gene cluster and in some other euchromatic sites. trans-Inactivation is accompanied by dragging of euchromatic regions into the heterochromatic compartment, but the histone gene cluster, located in the middle of the trans-inactivated region, was shown to be evicted from the heterochromatin. We demonstrate that trans-inactivation is followed by de novo HP1a accumulation in the affected transgene; trans-inactivation is specifically favored by the chromatin remodeler SAYP and prevented by Argonaute AGO2. PMID:26500261

  7. Taproot promoters cause tissue specific gene expression within the storage root of sugar beet.

    PubMed

    Oltmanns, Heiko; Kloos, Dorothee U; Briess, Waltraud; Pflugmacher, Maike; Stahl, Dietmar J; Hehl, Reinhard

    2006-08-01

    The storage root (taproot) of sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) originates from hypocotyl and primary root and contains many different tissues such as central xylem, primary and secondary cambium, secondary xylem and phloem, and parenchyma. It was the aim of this work to characterize the promoters of three taproot-expressed genes with respect to their tissue specificity. To investigate this, promoters for the genes Tlp, His1-r, and Mll were cloned from sugar beet, linked to reporter genes and transformed into sugar beet and tobacco. Reporter gene expression analysis in transgenic sugar beet plants revealed that all three promoters are active in the storage root. Expression in storage root tissues is either restricted to the vascular zone (Tlp, His1-r) or is observed in the whole organ (Mll). The Mll gene is highly organ specific throughout different developmental stages of the sugar beet. In tobacco, the Tlp and Mll promoters drive reporter gene expression preferentially in hypocotyl and roots. The properties of the Mll promoter may be advantageous for the modification of sucrose metabolism in storage roots.

  8. Gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa caused by MFRP mutations: human phenotype and preliminary proof of concept.

    PubMed

    Dinculescu, Astra; Estreicher, Jackie; Zenteno, Juan C; Aleman, Tomas S; Schwartz, Sharon B; Huang, Wei Chieh; Roman, Alejandro J; Sumaroka, Alexander; Li, Qiuhong; Deng, Wen-Tao; Min, Seok-Hong; Chiodo, Vince A; Neeley, Andy; Liu, Xuan; Shu, Xinhua; Matias-Florentino, Margarita; Buentello-Volante, Beatriz; Boye, Sanford L; Cideciyan, Artur V; Hauswirth, William W; Jacobson, Samuel G

    2012-04-01

    Autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), a heterogeneous group of degenerations of the retina, can be due to mutations in the MFRP (membrane-type frizzled-related protein) gene. A patient with RP with MFRP mutations, one of which is novel and the first splice site mutation reported, was characterized by noninvasive retinal and visual studies. The phenotype, albeit complex, suggested that this retinal degeneration may be a candidate for gene-based therapy. Proof-of-concept studies were performed in the rd6 Mfrp mutant mouse model. The fast-acting tyrosine-capsid mutant AAV8 (Y733F) vector containing the small chicken β-actin promoter driving the wild-type mouse Mfrp gene was used. Subretinal vector delivery on postnatal day 14 prevented retinal degeneration. Treatment rescued rod and cone photoreceptors, as assessed by electroretinography and retinal histology at 2 months of age. This AAV-mediated gene delivery also resulted in robust MFRP expression predominantly in its normal location within the retinal pigment epithelium apical membrane and its microvilli. The clinical features of MFRP-RP and our preliminary data indicating a response to gene therapy in the rd6 mouse suggest that this form of RP is a potential target for gene-based therapy.

  9. det1, cop1, and cop9 mutations cause inappropriate expression of several gene sets.

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, R; Raventos, D; Chua, N H

    1996-01-01

    Genetic studies using Arabidopsis offer a promising approach to investigate the mechanisms of light signal transduction during seedling development. Several mutants, called det/cop, have been isolated based on their deetiolated/constitutive photomorphogenic phenotypes in the dark. This study examines the specificity of the det/cop mutations with respect to their effects on genes regulated by other signal transduction pathways. Steady state mRNA levels of a number of differently regulated gene sets were compared between mutants and the wild type. We found that det2, cop2, cop3, and cop4 mutants displayed a gene expression pattern similar to that of the wild type. By contrast, det1, cop1, and cop9 mutations exhibited pleiotropic effects. In addition to light-responsive genes, genes normally inducible by plant pathogens, hypoxia, and developmental programs were inappropriately expressed in these mutants. Our data provide evidence that DET1, COP1, and COP9 most likely act as negative regulators of several sets of genes, not just those involved in light-regulated seedling development. PMID:8953766

  10. det1, cop1, and cop9 mutations cause inappropriate expression of several gene sets.

    PubMed

    Mayer, R; Raventos, D; Chua, N H

    1996-11-01

    Genetic studies using Arabidopsis offer a promising approach to investigate the mechanisms of light signal transduction during seedling development. Several mutants, called det/cop, have been isolated based on their deetiolated/constitutive photomorphogenic phenotypes in the dark. This study examines the specificity of the det/cop mutations with respect to their effects on genes regulated by other signal transduction pathways. Steady state mRNA levels of a number of differently regulated gene sets were compared between mutants and the wild type. We found that det2, cop2, cop3, and cop4 mutants displayed a gene expression pattern similar to that of the wild type. By contrast, det1, cop1, and cop9 mutations exhibited pleiotropic effects. In addition to light-responsive genes, genes normally inducible by plant pathogens, hypoxia, and developmental programs were inappropriately expressed in these mutants. Our data provide evidence that DET1, COP1, and COP9 most likely act as negative regulators of several sets of genes, not just those involved in light-regulated seedling development.

  11. Methamphetamine Causes Differential Alterations in Gene Expression and Patterns of Histone Acetylation/Hypoacetylation in the Rat Nucleus Accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Tracey A.; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; McCoy, Michael T.; Brannock, Christie; Ladenheim, Bruce; Garrett, Tiffany; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G.; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) addiction is associated with several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Little is known about the effects of METH on gene expression and epigenetic modifications in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAC). Our study investigated the effects of a non-toxic METH injection (20 mg/kg) on gene expression, histone acetylation, and the expression of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT), ATF2, and of the histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDAC1 and HDAC2, in that structure. Microarray analyses done at 1, 8, 16 and 24 hrs after the METH injection identified METH-induced changes in the expression of genes previously implicated in the acute and longterm effects of psychostimulants, including immediate early genes and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf). In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent decreases in the expression of other genes including Npas4 and cholecystokinin (Cck). Pathway analyses showed that genes with altered expression participated in behavioral performance, cell-to-cell signaling, and regulation of gene expression. PCR analyses confirmed the changes in the expression of c-fos, fosB, Crf, Cck, and Npas4 transcripts. To determine if the METH injection caused post-translational changes in histone markers, we used western blot analyses and identified METH-mediated decreases in histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) and lysine 18 (H3K18ac) in nuclear sub-fractions. In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent increases in acetylated H4K5 and H4K8. The changes in histone acetylation were accompanied by decreased expression of HDAC1 but increased expression of HDAC2 protein levels. The histone acetyltransferase, ATF2, showed significant METH-induced increased in protein expression. These results suggest that METH-induced alterations in global gene expression seen in rat NAC might be related, in part, to METH-induced changes in histone acetylation secondary to changes in HAT and HDAC expression. The causal role that HATs and HDACs might

  12. Methamphetamine causes differential alterations in gene expression and patterns of histone acetylation/hypoacetylation in the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tracey A; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; McCoy, Michael T; Brannock, Christie; Ladenheim, Bruce; Garrett, Tiffany; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) addiction is associated with several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Little is known about the effects of METH on gene expression and epigenetic modifications in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAC). Our study investigated the effects of a non-toxic METH injection (20 mg/kg) on gene expression, histone acetylation, and the expression of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT), ATF2, and of the histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDAC1 and HDAC2, in that structure. Microarray analyses done at 1, 8, 16 and 24 hrs after the METH injection identified METH-induced changes in the expression of genes previously implicated in the acute and longterm effects of psychostimulants, including immediate early genes and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf). In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent decreases in the expression of other genes including Npas4 and cholecystokinin (Cck). Pathway analyses showed that genes with altered expression participated in behavioral performance, cell-to-cell signaling, and regulation of gene expression. PCR analyses confirmed the changes in the expression of c-fos, fosB, Crf, Cck, and Npas4 transcripts. To determine if the METH injection caused post-translational changes in histone markers, we used western blot analyses and identified METH-mediated decreases in histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) and lysine 18 (H3K18ac) in nuclear sub-fractions. In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent increases in acetylated H4K5 and H4K8. The changes in histone acetylation were accompanied by decreased expression of HDAC1 but increased expression of HDAC2 protein levels. The histone acetyltransferase, ATF2, showed significant METH-induced increased in protein expression. These results suggest that METH-induced alterations in global gene expression seen in rat NAC might be related, in part, to METH-induced changes in histone acetylation secondary to changes in HAT and HDAC expression. The causal role that HATs and HDACs might

  13. Changes in gravitational force cause changes in gene expression in the lens of developing zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Naoko; Moorman, Stephen J

    2006-10-01

    Gravity has been a constant physical factor during the evolution and development of life on Earth. We have been studying effects of simulated microgravity on gene expression in transgenic zebrafish embryos expressing gfp under the influence of gene-specific promoters. In this study, we assessed the effect of microgravity on the expression of the heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene in lens during development using transgenic zebrafish embryos expressing gfp under the control of hsp70 promoter/enhancer. Hsp70:gfp expression was up-regulated (45%) compared with controls during the developmental period that included the lens differentiation stage. This increase was lens specific, because the entire embryo showed only a 4% increase in gfp expression. Northern blot and in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the hsp70:gfp expression recapitulated endogenous hsp70 mRNA expression. Hypergravity exposure also increased hsp70 expression during the same period. In situ hybridization analysis for two lens-specific crystallin genes revealed that neither micro- nor hypergravity affected the expression level of betaB1-crystallin, a non-hsp gene used as a marker for lens differentiation. However, hypergravity changed the expression level of alphaA-crystallin, a member of the small hsp gene family. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridinetriphosphate nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay analysis showed that altered-gravity (Deltag) decreased apoptosis in lens during the same period and the decrease correlated with the up-regulation of hsp70 expression, suggesting that elimination of nuclei from differentiating lens fiber cells was suppressed probably through hsp70 up-regulation. These results support the idea that Deltag influences hsp70 expression and differentiation in lens-specific and developmental period specific manners and that hsp family genes play a specific role in the response to Deltag.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of PRPF31 gene expression by MSR1 repeat elements causes incomplete penetrance in retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Anna M.; Shah, Amna Z.; Venturini, Giulia; Krishna, Abhay; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Rivolta, Carlo; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

    2016-01-01

    PRPF31-associated retinitis pigmentosa presents a fascinating enigma: some mutation carriers are blind, while others are asymptomatic. We identify the major molecular cause of this incomplete penetrance through three cardinal features: (1) there is population variation in the number (3 or 4) of a minisatellite repeat element (MSR1) adjacent to the PRPF31 core promoter; (2) in vitro, 3-copies of the MSR1 element can repress gene transcription by 50 to 115-fold; (3) the higher-expressing 4-copy allele is not observed among symptomatic PRPF31 mutation carriers and correlates with the rate of asymptomatic carriers in different populations. Thus, a linked transcriptional modifier decreases PRPF31 gene expression that leads to haploinsufficiency. This result, taken with other identified risk alleles, allows precise genetic counseling for the first time. We also demonstrate that across the human genome, the presence of MSR1 repeats in the promoters or first introns of genes is associated with greater population variability in gene expression indicating that copy number variation of MSR1s is a generic controller of gene expression and promises to provide new insights into our understanding of gene expression regulation. PMID:26781568

  15. Identification of two rare and novel large deletions in ITGB4 gene causing epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia.

    PubMed

    Mencía, Ángeles; García, Marta; García, Eva; Llames, Sara; Charlesworth, Alexandra; de Lucas, Raúl; Vicente, Asunción; Trujillo-Tiebas, María José; Coto, Pablo; Costa, Marta; Vera, Ángel; López-Pestaña, Arantxa; Murillas, Rodolfo; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Jorcano, José Luis; Conti, Claudio J; Escámez Toledano, María José; del Río Nechaevsky, Marcela

    2016-04-01

    Epidermolysis bullosa with pyloric atresia (EB-PA) is a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disease with a variable prognosis from lethal to very mild. EB-PA is classified into Simplex form (EBS-PA: OMIM #612138) and Junctional form (JEB-PA: OMIM #226730), and it is caused by mutations in ITGA6, ITGB4 and PLEC genes. We report the analysis of six patients with EB-PA, including two dizygotic twins. Skin immunofluorescence epitope mapping was performed followed by PCR and direct sequencing of the ITGB4 gene. Two of the patients presented with non-lethal EB-PA associated with missense ITGB4 gene mutations. For the other four, early postnatal demise was associated with complete lack of β4 integrin due to a variety of ITGB4 novel mutations (2 large deletions, 1 splice-site mutation and 3 missense mutations). One of the deletions spanned 278 bp, being one of the largest reported to date for this gene. Remarkably, we also found for the first time a founder effect for one novel mutation in the ITGB4 gene. We have identified 6 novel mutations in the ITGB4 gene to be added to the mutation database. Our results reveal genotype-phenotype correlations that contribute to the molecular understanding of this heterogeneous disease, a pivotal issue for prognosis and for the development of novel evidence-based therapeutic options for EB management.

  16. Mitochondrial DNA double-strand breaks in oligodendrocytes cause demyelination, axonal injury and CNS inflammation.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Pernille M; Pinto, Milena; Patel, Shreyans; McCarthy, Stephanie; Gao, Han; Taherian, Mehran; Karmally, Shaffiat; Pereira, Claudia V; Dvoriantchikova, Galina; Ivanov, Dmitry; Tanaka, Kenji F; Moraes, Carlos T; Brambilla, Roberta

    2017-09-20

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders, including multiple sclerosis (MS). To date, the investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction in MS has focused exclusively on neurons, with no studies exploring whether dysregulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics and/or genetics in oligodendrocytes might be associated with the etiopathogenesis of MS and other demyelinating syndromes. To address this question, we established a mouse model where mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) double-strand breaks (DSB) were specifically induced in myelinating oligodendrocytes (PLP:mtPstI mice) by expressing a mitochondrial-targeted endonuclease, mtPstI, starting at 3 weeks of age. In both female and male mice, DSB of oligodendroglial mtDNA caused impairment of locomotor function, chronic demyelination, glial activation and axonal degeneration, which became more severe with time of induction. In addition, after short transient induction of mtDNA DSB, PLP:mtPstI mice showed an exacerbated response to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Together, our data demonstrate that mtDNA damage can cause primary oligodendropathy which in turn triggers demyelination, proving PLP:mtPstI mice to be a useful tool to study the pathological consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction in oligodendrocytes. In addition, the demyelination and axonal loss displayed by PLP:mtPstI mice recapitulate some of the key features of chronic demyelinating syndromes, including progressive MS forms, which are not accurately reproduced in the models currently available. For this reason the PLP:mtPstI mouse represents a unique and much needed platform for testing remyelinating therapies.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENTMadsen et al. show that oligodendrocyte-specific mtDNA double strand breaks in PLP:mtPstI mice cause oligodendrocyte death and demyelination associated with axonal damage and glial activation. Hence, PLP:mtPstI mice represent a unique tool to study the pathological

  17. Targeted 46-gene and clinical exome sequencing for mutations causing cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Waldmüller, Stephan; Schroeder, Christopher; Sturm, Marc; Scheffold, Thomas; Imbrich, Kerstin; Junker, Sandra; Frische, Christian; Hofbeck, Michael; Bauer, Peter; Bonin, Michael; Gawaz, Meinrad; Gramlich, Michael

    2015-10-01

    With the implementation of high-throughput sequencing protocols, the exhaustive scanning of known and candidate disease genes has become a feasible approach to genetic testing of patients with cardiomyopathy. A primary objective of the present study was to assess the performance characteristics of a 46-gene next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay that targets well-established cardiomyopathy genes. A total of 25 samples were analyzed. Twelve of those had previously been sequenced using resequencing arrays and served as reference samples for the assessment of the assay's performance characteristics. The remaining 13 samples were derived from consecutive patients. Both the analytical sensitivity and the specificity of the assay were 100% and the percentage of low-coverage bases was 0.4%, at an average read depth of 210×. In order to assess the diagnostic yield of the test, 13 consecutive samples representing cases of Dilated (n = 7), Hypertrophic (n = 4) and Left Ventricular Non-Compaction Cardiomyopathy (n = 2), were subjected to the 46-gene NGS assay. Including predicted pathogenic variants in the gene TTN, a total of 22 variants (11 novel) were detected in 10 patients, with a clear preponderance of variants of unknown pathogenicity (class 3 variants, 21/22, 95%). Of the seven DCM cases, two were digenic, involving variants in the genes MYH7 and RBM20 in one case and in DSP and TTN in the other case. Three other patients carried single TTN variants predicted to be pathogenic. Of the four HCM patients, one was trigenic (LAMA4, PKP2 and TTN) and three were digenic (DSP and TTN, MYH7 and NEXN, NEXN and TTN, respectively). As to LVNC, one of the two patients had one variant in the gene ABCC9 and two predicted pathogenic variants in the gene TTN. Strikingly, out of the thirteen investigated cases, only a single case exhibited a likely pathogenic or pathogenic variant justifying a positive test report. The percentage of inconclusive cases thus amounted to 69%. Three cases

  18. An efficient method to isolate yeast genes causing overexpression-mediated growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Espinet, C; de la Torre, M A; Aldea, M; Herrero, E

    1995-01-01

    In order to characterize new yeast genes regulating cell proliferation, a number of overexpression-sensitive clones have been isolated from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cDNA library in a multicopy vector under the control of the GAL1 promoter, on the basis of growth arrest phenotype under galactose-induction conditions. Thirteen of the independent clones isolated in this way correspond to previously known genes (predominantly coding for morphogenesis-related proteins or for multifunctional transcriptional factors), while the remaining 11 independent clones represent new genes with unknown functions. The more stringent conditions employed in this screening compared with previous ones that also employed a dominant genetics approach to isolate overexpression-sensitive genes has allowed us to extend the number of yeast genes that exhibit this phenotype. The effect of overexpression of MCM1 (whose product participates in the regulation of a number of apparently unrelated cellular functions) has been studied in more detail. Galactose-induced overexpression of MCM1 leads to rapid growth arrest at the G1 or S cell cycle stages, with many morphologically-abnormal cells. Several of the other clones also exhibit a G1 arrest terminal phenotype when overexpressed.

  19. A gain-of-function mutation in the GRIK2 gene causes neurodevelopmental deficits

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Yomayra F.; Ramsey, Keri; Stolz, Jacob R.; Craig, David W.; Huentelman, Mathew J.; Narayanan, Vinodh

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To identify inherited or de novo mutations associated with a suite of neurodevelopmental abnormalities in a 10-year-old patient displaying ataxia, motor and speech delay, and intellectual disability. Methods: We performed whole-exome sequencing of the proband and her parents. A pathogenic gene variant was identified as damaging based on sequence conservation, gene function, and association with disorders having similar phenotypic profiles. Functional characterization of the mutated protein was performed in vitro using a heterologous expression system. Results: A single de novo point mutation in the GRIK2 gene was identified as causative for the neurologic symptoms of the proband. The mutation is predicted to change a codon for alanine to that of a threonine at position 657 (A657T) in the GluK2 kainate receptor (KAR) subunit, a member of the ionotropic glutamate receptor gene family. Whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings revealed that KARs incorporating the GluK2(A657T) subunits show profoundly altered channel gating and are constitutively active in nominally glutamate-free extracellular media. Conclusions: In this study, we associate a de novo gain-of-function mutation in the GRIK2 gene with deficits in motor and higher order cognitive function. These results suggest that disruption of physiologic KAR function precludes appropriate development of the nervous system. PMID:28180184

  20. New intronic splicing mutation in the LMNA gene causing progressive cardiac conduction defects and variable myopathy.

    PubMed

    Rogozhina, Y; Mironovich, S; Shestak, A; Adyan, T; Polyakov, A; Podolyak, D; Bakulina, A; Dzemeshkevich, S; Zaklyazminskaya, E

    2016-12-31

    Most of mutations in the LMNA gene are unique and have been found in only a few unrelated families. The clinical interpretation of new genetic variants, especially beyond the coding area and canonical splice sites, is proving to be difficult and requires advanced investigation. This study included patients with progressive cardiac conduction defects with neuromuscular involvement. The clinical evaluation included medical history and 24-h Holter monitoring. The genetic evaluation included mutation screening in the LMNA gene by the Sanger sequence. Sanger sequencing was followed by RT-PCR of the target fragment of cDNA. In silico modeling was performed with CCBulder and Modeller software. The diagnosis of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) was established. The new intronic variant c.513+45T>G was found in the LMNA gene in the proband and affected daughter. The insertion of 45bp was confirmed in the proband's cDNA. The structural and possible functional effects of the aberrant protein were predicted. Variant c.513+45T>G in the LMNA gene likely translates into the longer lamin A/C proteins with additional 15 amino acids. This variant is thought to be pathogenic. Intronic variants in the LMNA gene located beside canonic splice sites may be responsible for some genotype-negative cases with clinical phenotype of laminopathies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical and Genomic Analysis of Liver Abscess-Causing Klebsiella pneumoniae Identifies New Liver Abscess-Associated Virulence Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Meiping; Tu, Jianfei; Jiang, Jianping; Bi, Yingmin; You, Weibo; Zhang, Yanliang; Ren, Jianmin; Zhu, Taohui; Cao, Zhuo; Yu, Zuochun; Shao, Chuxiao; Shen, Zhen; Ding, Baixing; Yuan, Jinyi; Zhao, Xu; Guo, Qinglan; Xu, Xiaogang; Huang, Jinwei; Wang, Minggui

    2016-01-01

    Hypervirulent variants of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKp) that cause invasive community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) have emerged globally. Little is known about the virulence determinants associated with hvKp, except for the virulence genes rmpA/A2 and siderophores (iroBCD/iucABCD) carried by the pK2044-like large virulence plasmid. Here, we collected most recent clinical isolates of hvKp from PLA samples in China, and performed clinical, molecular, and genomic sequencing analyses. We found that 90.9% (40/44) of the pathogens causing PLA were K. pneumoniae. Among the 40 LA-Kp, K1 (62.5%), and K2 (17.5%) were the dominant serotypes, and ST23 (47.5%) was the major sequence type. S1-PFGE analyses demonstrated that although 77.5% (31/40) of the LA-Kp isolates harbored a single large virulence plasmid varied in size, 5 (12.5%) isolates had no plasmid and 4 (10%) had two or three plasmids. Whole genome sequencing and comparative analysis of 3 LA-Kp and 3 non-LA-Kp identified 133 genes present only in LA-Kp. Further, large scale screening of the 133 genes in 45 LA-Kp and 103 non-LA-Kp genome sequences from public databases identified 30 genes that were highly associated with LA-Kp, including iroBCD, iucABCD and rmpA/A2 and 21 new genes. Then, these 21 new genes were analyzed in 40 LA-Kp and 86 non-LA-Kp clinical isolates collected in this study by PCR, showing that new genes were present 80–100% among LA-Kp isolates while 2–11% in K. pneumoniae isolates from sputum and urine. Several of the 21 genes have been proposed as virulence factors in other bacteria, such as the gene encoding SAM-dependent methyltransferase and pagO which protects bacteria from phagocytosis. Taken together, these genes are likely new virulence factors contributing to the hypervirulence phenotype of hvKp, and may deepen our understanding of virulence mechanism of hvKp. PMID:27965935

  2. Clinical and Genomic Analysis of Liver Abscess-Causing Klebsiella pneumoniae Identifies New Liver Abscess-Associated Virulence Genes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Meiping; Tu, Jianfei; Jiang, Jianping; Bi, Yingmin; You, Weibo; Zhang, Yanliang; Ren, Jianmin; Zhu, Taohui; Cao, Zhuo; Yu, Zuochun; Shao, Chuxiao; Shen, Zhen; Ding, Baixing; Yuan, Jinyi; Zhao, Xu; Guo, Qinglan; Xu, Xiaogang; Huang, Jinwei; Wang, Minggui

    2016-01-01

    Hypervirulent variants of Klebsiella pneumoniae (hvKp) that cause invasive community-acquired pyogenic liver abscess (PLA) have emerged globally. Little is known about the virulence determinants associated with hvKp, except for the virulence genes rmpA/A2 and siderophores (iroBCD/iucABCD) carried by the pK2044-like large virulence plasmid. Here, we collected most recent clinical isolates of hvKp from PLA samples in China, and performed clinical, molecular, and genomic sequencing analyses. We found that 90.9% (40/44) of the pathogens causing PLA were K. pneumoniae. Among the 40 LA-Kp, K1 (62.5%), and K2 (17.5%) were the dominant serotypes, and ST23 (47.5%) was the major sequence type. S1-PFGE analyses demonstrated that although 77.5% (31/40) of the LA-Kp isolates harbored a single large virulence plasmid varied in size, 5 (12.5%) isolates had no plasmid and 4 (10%) had two or three plasmids. Whole genome sequencing and comparative analysis of 3 LA-Kp and 3 non-LA-Kp identified 133 genes present only in LA-Kp. Further, large scale screening of the 133 genes in 45 LA-Kp and 103 non-LA-Kp genome sequences from public databases identified 30 genes that were highly associated with LA-Kp, including iroBCD, iucABCD and rmpA/A2 and 21 new genes. Then, these 21 new genes were analyzed in 40 LA-Kp and 86 non-LA-Kp clinical isolates collected in this study by PCR, showing that new genes were present 80-100% among LA-Kp isolates while 2-11% in K. pneumoniae isolates from sputum and urine. Several of the 21 genes have been proposed as virulence factors in other bacteria, such as the gene encoding SAM-dependent methyltransferase and pagO which protects bacteria from phagocytosis. Taken together, these genes are likely new virulence factors contributing to the hypervirulence phenotype of hvKp, and may deepen our understanding of virulence mechanism of hvKp.

  3. Environmental and chemotherapeutic agents induce breakage at genes involved in leukemia-causing gene rearrangements in human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Thys, Ryan G.; Lehman, Christine E.; Pierce, Levi C.T.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) give rise to all of the cells that make up the hematopoietic system in the human body, making their stability and resilience especially important. Damage to these cells can severely impact cell development and has the potential to cause diseases, such as leukemia. Leukemia-causing chromosomal rearrangements have largely been studied in the context of radiation exposure and are formed by a multi-step process, including an initial DNA breakage and fusion of the free DNA ends. However, the mechanism for DNA breakage in patients without previous radiation exposure is unclear. Here, we investigate the role of non-cytotoxic levels of environmental factors, benzene, and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), and chemotherapeutic agents, etoposide, and doxorubicin, in generating DNA breakage at the patient breakpoint hotspots of the MLL and CBFB genes in human HSPCs. These conditions represent exposure to chemicals encountered daily or residual doses from chemotherapeutic drugs. Exposure of HSPCs to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals or chemotherapeutic agents causes DNA breakage at preferential sites in the human genome, including the leukemia-related genes MLL and CBFB. Though benzene, etoposide, and doxorubicin have previously been linked to leukemia formation, this is the first study to demonstrate a role for DEN in the generation of DNA breakage at leukemia-specific sites. These chemical-induced DNA breakpoints coincide with sites of predicted topoisomerase II cleavage. The distribution of breakpoints by exposure to non-cytotoxic levels of chemicals showed a similar pattern to fusion breakpoints in leukemia patients. Our findings demonstrate that HSPCs exposed to non-cytotoxic levels of environmental chemicals and chemotherapeutic agents are prone to topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage at the leukemia-associated genes MLL and CBFB. These data suggest a role for long-term environmental chemical or residual

  4. [From gene to disease; mutations in the WFS1-gene as the cause of juvenile type I diabetes mellitus with optic atrophy (Wolfram syndrome)].

    PubMed

    Pennings, R J E; Dikkeschei, L D; Cremers, C W R J; van den Ouweland, J M W

    2002-05-25

    Wolfram syndrome patients are mainly characterised by juvenile onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. A synonym is the acronym DIDMOAD: diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness. Diabetes insipidus and sensorineural high-frequency hearing impairment are important additional features. This rare autosomal recessively inherited neurodegenerative syndrome is caused by mainly inactivating mutations in the WFS1 gene. It is located at chromosome 4p16 and encodes wolframin, a transmembrane protein. No function has yet been ascribed to this protein.

  5. A folate receptor-targeted lipoplex delivering interleukin-15 gene for colon cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao; Luo, Min; Wei, Xia-Wei; Ma, Cui-Cui; Yang, Yu-Han; Shao, Bin; Liu, Yan-Tong; Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Liu, Li; He, Zhi-Yao; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-08-09

    Interleukin-15 has been implicated as a promising cytokine for cancer immunotherapy, while folate receptor α (FRα) has been shown to be a potentially useful target for colon cancer therapy. Herein, we developed F-PLP/pIL15, a FRα-targeted lipoplex loading recombinant interleukin-15 plasmid (pIL15) and studied its antitumor effects in vivo using a CT26 colon cancer mouse model. Compared with control (normal saline) treatment, F-PLP/pIL15 significantly suppressed tumor growth in regard to tumor weight (P < 0.001) and reduced tumor nodule formation (P < 0.001). Moreover, when compared to other lipoplex-treated mice, F-PLP/pIL15-treated mice showed higher levels of IL15 secreted in the serum (P < 0.001) and ascites (P < 0.01). These results suggested that the targeted delivery of IL15 gene might be associated with its in vivo antitumor effects, which include inducing tumor cell apoptosis, inhibiting tumor proliferation and promoting the activation of immune cells such as T cells and natural killer cells. Furthermore, hematoxylin and eosin staining of vital organs following F-PLP/pIL15 treatment showed no detectable toxicity, thus indicating that intraperitoneal administration may be a viable route of delivery. Overall, these results suggest that F-PLP/pIL15 may serve as a potential targeting preparation for colon cancer therapy.

  6. A folate receptor-targeted lipoplex delivering interleukin-15 gene for colon cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Luo, Min; Wei, Xia-Wei; Ma, Cui-Cui; Yang, Yu-Han; Shao, Bin; Liu, Yan-Tong; Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Liu, Li; He, Zhi-Yao; Wei, Yu-Quan

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-15 has been implicated as a promising cytokine for cancer immunotherapy, while folate receptor α (FRα) has been shown to be a potentially useful target for colon cancer therapy. Herein, we developed F-PLP/pIL15, a FRα-targeted lipoplex loading recombinant interleukin-15 plasmid (pIL15) and studied its antitumor effects in vivo using a CT26 colon cancer mouse model. Compared with control (normal saline) treatment, F-PLP/pIL15 significantly suppressed tumor growth in regard to tumor weight (P < 0.001) and reduced tumor nodule formation (P < 0.001). Moreover, when compared to other lipoplex-treated mice, F-PLP/pIL15-treated mice showed higher levels of IL15 secreted in the serum (P < 0.001) and ascites (P < 0.01). These results suggested that the targeted delivery of IL15 gene might be associated with its in vivo antitumor effects, which include inducing tumor cell apoptosis, inhibiting tumor proliferation and promoting the activation of immune cells such as T cells and natural killer cells. Furthermore, hematoxylin and eosin staining of vital organs following F-PLP/pIL15 treatment showed no detectable toxicity, thus indicating that intraperitoneal administration may be a viable route of delivery. Overall, these results suggest that F-PLP/pIL15 may serve as a potential targeting preparation for colon cancer therapy. PMID:27438147

  7. Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia in a Japanese Man Caused by a Point Albumin Gene Mutation (R218P)

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Katsumi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) is a familial autosomal dominant disease caused by mutation in the albumin gene that produces a condition of euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia. In patients with FDH, serum-free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations as measured by several commercial methods are often falsely increased with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Therefore, several diagnostic steps are needed to differentiate TSH-secreting tumor or generalized resistance to thyroid hormone from FDH. We herein report a case of a Japanese man born in Aomori prefecture, with FDH caused by a mutant albumin gene (R218P). We found that a large number of FDH patients reported in Japan to date might have been born in Aomori prefecture and have shown the R218P mutation. In conclusion, FDH needs to be considered among the differential diagnoses in Japanese patients born in Aomori prefecture and showing normal TSH levels and elevated FT4 levels. PMID:27081329

  8. X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2) caused by single gene mosaicism in a male.

    PubMed

    Aughton, David J; Kelley, Richard I; Metzenberg, Aida; Pureza, Vincent; Pauli, Richard M

    2003-01-30

    X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata (CDPX2; Happle syndrome) is recognized almost exclusively in females, who display mosaic and asymmetric features, presumed to arise secondary to random X-inactivation. CDPX2 results from mutation of an X-linked gene coding for sterol-delta(8)-delta(7) isomerase (emopamil binding protein). We describe a boy with clinical features of CDPX2 (including those presumed to arise usually secondary to functional mosaicism in females). Biochemical and molecular studies demonstrate that he is mosaic for a sterol-delta(8)-delta(7) isomerase gene mutation. He is the first reported example of single gene mosaicism giving rise to CDPX2 in a male. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. A Mutation in the SOS1 Gene Causes Hereditary Gingival Fibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Thomas C.; Zhang, Yingze; Gorry, Michael C.; Hart, P. Suzanne; Cooper, Margaret; Marazita, Mary L.; Marks, Jared M.; Cortelli, Jose R.; Pallos, Debora

    2002-01-01

    Hereditary gingival fibromatosis (HGF) is a rare, autosomal dominant form of gingival overgrowth. Affected individuals have a benign, slowly progressive, nonhemorrhagic, fibrous enlargement of the oral masticatory mucosa. Genetic loci for autosomal dominant forms of HGF have been localized to chromosome 2p21-p22 (HGF1) and chromosome 5q13-q22 (HGF2). To identify the gene responsible for HGF1, we extended genetic linkage studies to refine the chromosome 2p21-p22 candidate interval to ∼2.3 Mb. Development of an integrated physical and genetic map of the interval identified 16 genes. Sequencing of these genes, in affected and unaffected HGF1 family members, identified a mutation in the Son of sevenless–1 (SOS1) gene in affected individuals. In this report, we describe the genomic structure of the SOS1 gene and present evidence that insertion of a cytosine between nucleotides 126,142 and 126,143 in codon 1083 of the SOS1 gene is responsible for HGF1. This insertion mutation, which segregates in a dominant manner over four generations, introduces a frameshift and creates a premature stop codon, abolishing four functionally important proline-rich SH3 binding domains normally present in the carboxyl-terminal region of the SOS1 protein. The resultant protein chimera contains the wild-type SOS1 protein for the N-terminal amino acids 1–1083 fused to a novel 22–amino acid carboxyl terminus. Similar SOS1 deletion constructs are functional in animal models, and a transgenic mouse construct with a comparable SOS1 chimera produces a phenotype with skin hypertrophy. Clarification of the functional role of this SOS1 mutant has implications for understanding other forms of gingival fibromatosis and corrective gingival-tissue management. PMID:11868160

  10. Evaluation of genes encoding for the transient outward current (Ito) identifies the KCND2 gene as a cause of J-wave syndrome associated with sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Mark J; Adler, Arnon; Green, Sharon; Al-Zoughool, Foad; Doroshenko, Petro; Orr, Nathan; Uppal, Shaheen; Healey, Jeff S; Birnie, David; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Gardner, Martin; Champagne, Jean; Simpson, Chris; Ahmad, Kamran; van den Berg, Maarten P; Chauhan, Vijay; Backx, Peter H; van Tintelen, J Peter; Krahn, Andrew D; Gollob, Michael H

    2014-12-01

    J-wave ECG patterns are associated with an increased risk of sudden arrhythmic death, and experimental evidence supports a transient outward current (I(to))-mediated mechanism of J-wave formation. This study aimed to determine the frequency of genetic mutations in genes encoding the I(to) in patients with J waves on ECG. Comprehensive mutational analysis was performed on I(to)-encoding KCNA4, KCND2, and KCND3 genes, as well as the previously described J-wave-associated KCNJ8 gene, in 51 unrelated patients with ECG evidence defining a J-wave syndrome. Only patients with a resuscitated cardiac arrest or type 1 Brugada ECG pattern were included for analysis. A rare genetic mutation of the KCND2 gene, p.D612N, was identified in a single patient. Co-expression of mutant and wild-type KCND2 with KChIP2 in HEK293 cells demonstrated a gain-of-function phenotype, including an increase in peak I(to) density of 48% (P<0.05) in the heterozygous state. Using computer modeling, this increase in Ito resulted in loss of the epicardial action potential dome, predicting an increased ventricular transmural Ito gradient. The previously described KCNJ8-S422L mutation was not identified in this cohort of patients with ECG evidence of J-wave syndrome. These findings are the first to implicate the KCND2 gene as a novel cause of J-wave syndrome associated with sudden cardiac arrest. However, genetic defects in I(to)-encoding genes seem to be an uncommon cause of sudden cardiac arrest in patients with apparent J-wave syndromes. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. A novel mutation in ornithine transcarbamylase gene causing mild intermittent hyperammonemia.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Sarar; Hamad, Muddathir H; Kondkar, Altaf A; Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2015-10-01

    We report a 3-year-old Saudi boy with recurrent episodes of vomiting, poor feeding, and altered mental status accompanied by an intermittent mild hyperammonemia, and a large elevation of urinary orotic acid. Sanger sequencing of the ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) gene revealed a novel hemizygous deletion at the fourth nucleotide of intron 4 (c.386+4delT) in the proband and his asymptomatic mother. This novel mutation in the OTC gene is responsible for the late-onset phenotype of OTC deficiency.

  12. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused by homozygous genomic deletion in the PSORS1 region encompassing the CDSN gene.

    PubMed

    Ishida-Yamamoto, Akemi; Furio, Laetitia; Igawa, Satomi; Honma, Masaru; Tron, Elodie; Malan, Valerie; Murakami, Masamoto; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Peeling skin syndrome (PSS) type B is a rare recessive genodermatosis characterized by lifelong widespread, reddish peeling of the skin with pruritus. The disease is caused by small-scale mutations in the Corneodesmosin gene (CDSN) leading to premature termination codons. We report for the first time a Japanese case resulting from complete deletion of CDSN. Corneodesmosin was undetectable in the epidermis, and CDSN was unamplifiable by PCR. QMPSF analysis demonstrated deletion of CDSN exons inherited from each parent. Deletion mapping using microsatellite haplotyping, CGH array and PCR analysis established that the genomic deletion spanned 49-72 kb between HCG22 and TCF19, removing CDSN as well as five other genes within the psoriasis susceptibility region 1 (PSORS1) on 6p21.33. This observation widens the spectrum of molecular defects underlying PSS type B and shows that loss of these five genes from the PSORS1 region does not result in an additional cutaneous phenotype.

  13. Hereditary spastic paraplegia caused by compound heterozygous mutations outside the motor domain of the KIF1A gene.

    PubMed

    Krenn, M; Zulehner, G; Hotzy, C; Rath, J; Stogmann, E; Wagner, M; Haack, T B; Strom, T M; Zimprich, A; Zimprich, F

    2017-05-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of rare, inherited disorders causing an upper motor neuron syndrome with (complex) or without (pure) additional neurological symptoms. Mutations in the KIF1A gene have already been associated with recessive and dominant forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG30) in a few cases. All family members included in the study were examined neurologically. Whole-exome sequencing was used in affected individuals to identify the responsible candidate gene. Conventional Sanger sequencing was conducted to validate familial segregation. A family of Macedonian origin with two affected siblings, one with slowly progressive and the other one with a more complex and rapidly progressing hereditary spastic paraplegia is reported. In both affected individuals, two novel pathogenic mutations outside the motor domain of the KIF1A gene were found (NM_001244008.1:c.2909G>A, p.Arg970His and c.1214dup, p.Asn405Lysfs*40) that segregate with the disease within the family establishing the diagnosis of autosomal recessive SPG30. This report provides the first evidence that mutations outside the motor domain of the gene can cause (recessive) SPG30 and extends the genotype-phenotype association for KIF1A-related diseases. © 2017 EAN.

  14. IL1RAPL1 gene deletion as a cause of X-linked intellectual disability and dysmorphic features.

    PubMed

    Youngs, Erin L; Henkhaus, Rebecca; Hellings, Jessica A; Butler, Merlin G

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability affects approximately 2% of the population with males outnumbering females due to involvement of over 300 genes on the X chromosome. The most common form of X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is fragile X syndrome. We report a family with an apparent XLID pattern with the proband, his mother and maternal half brother having an Xp21.3 deletion detected with chromosomal microarray analysis involving the interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene. IL1RAPL1 is highly expressed in the postnatal brain, specifically hippocampus suggesting a specialized role in memory and learning abilities. The proband presented with intellectual disability, a broad face, prominent and wide nasal root, ptosis, a wide philtrum and a small mouth. XLID due to involvement of the IL1RAPL1 gene has been reported to cause nonsyndromic XLID. We report a new family with XLID due to partial deletion of IL1RAPL1, summarize reported literature and describe similar phenotypic similarities among the affected individuals in this family and those reported in the literature proposing that deletion of IL1RAPL1 may cause syndromic XLID. Additional reports are needed to further characterize whether syndromic features are related to disturbances of this gene.

  15. Exclusion of the APC gene as the cause of a variant form of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)

    PubMed Central

    Stella, A; Resta, N; Gentile, M; Susca, F; Mareni, C; Montera, M P; Guanti, G

    1993-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is a premalignant disease inherited as an autosomal dominant trait, characterized by hundreds to thousands of polyps in the colorectal tract. Recently, the syndrome has been shown to be caused by mutations in the APC (adenomatous polyposis coli) gene located on chromosome 5q21. We studied two families that both presented a phenotype different than that of the classical form of FAP. The most important findings observed in these two kindreds are (a) low and variable number of colonic polyps (from 5 to 100) and (b) a slower evolution of the disease, with colon cancer occurring at a more advanced age than in FAP in spite of the early onset of intestinal manifestations. To determine whether mutations of the APC gene are also responsible for this variant syndrome, linkage studies were performed by using a series of markers both intragenic and tightly linked to the APC gene. The results provide evidence for exclusion of the APC gene as the cause of the variant form of polyposis present in the two families described. PMID:8213830

  16. Comparative Profile of Heme Acquisition Genes in Disease-Causing and Colonizing Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus

    PubMed Central

    Hariadi, Nurul I.; Zhang, Lixin; Patel, Mayuri; Sandstedt, Sara A.; Davis, Gregg S.; Marrs, Carl F.

    2015-01-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are Gram-negative bacteria that colonize the human pharynx and can cause respiratory tract infections, such as acute otitis media (AOM). Since NTHI require iron from their hosts for aerobic growth, the heme acquisition genes may play a significant role in avoiding host nutritional immunity and determining virulence. Therefore, we employed a hybridization-based technique to compare the prevalence of five heme acquisition genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, hemR, and hup) between 514 middle ear strains from children with AOM and 235 throat strains from healthy children. We also investigated their prevalences in 148 Haemophilus haemolyticus strains, a closely related species that colonizes the human pharynx and is considered to be nonpathogenic. Four out of five genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, and hemR) were significantly more prevalent in the middle ear strains (96%, 100%, 100%, and 97%, respectively) than in throat strains (80%, 92%, 93%, and 85%, respectively) of NTHI, suggesting that strains possessing these genes have a virulence advantage over those lacking them. All five genes were dramatically more prevalent in NTHI strains than in H. haemolyticus, with 91% versus 9% hxuA, 98% versus 11% hxuB, 98% versus 11% hxuC, 93% versus 20% hemR, and 97% versus 34% hup, supporting their potential role in virulence and highlighting their possibility to serve as biomarkers to distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus. In summary, this study demonstrates that heme acquisition genes are more prevalent in disease-causing NTHI strains isolated from the middle ear than in colonizing NTHI strains and H. haemolyticus isolated from the pharynx. PMID:25903577

  17. Comparative Profile of Heme Acquisition Genes in Disease-Causing and Colonizing Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae and Haemophilus haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Hariadi, Nurul I; Zhang, Lixin; Patel, Mayuri; Sandstedt, Sara A; Davis, Gregg S; Marrs, Carl F; Gilsdorf, Janet R

    2015-07-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI) are Gram-negative bacteria that colonize the human pharynx and can cause respiratory tract infections, such as acute otitis media (AOM). Since NTHI require iron from their hosts for aerobic growth, the heme acquisition genes may play a significant role in avoiding host nutritional immunity and determining virulence. Therefore, we employed a hybridization-based technique to compare the prevalence of five heme acquisition genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, hemR, and hup) between 514 middle ear strains from children with AOM and 235 throat strains from healthy children. We also investigated their prevalences in 148 Haemophilus haemolyticus strains, a closely related species that colonizes the human pharynx and is considered to be nonpathogenic. Four out of five genes (hxuA, hxuB, hxuC, and hemR) were significantly more prevalent in the middle ear strains (96%, 100%, 100%, and 97%, respectively) than in throat strains (80%, 92%, 93%, and 85%, respectively) of NTHI, suggesting that strains possessing these genes have a virulence advantage over those lacking them. All five genes were dramatically more prevalent in NTHI strains than in H. haemolyticus, with 91% versus 9% hxuA, 98% versus 11% hxuB, 98% versus 11% hxuC, 93% versus 20% hemR, and 97% versus 34% hup, supporting their potential role in virulence and highlighting their possibility to serve as biomarkers to distinguish H. influenzae from H. haemolyticus. In summary, this study demonstrates that heme acquisition genes are more prevalent in disease-causing NTHI strains isolated from the middle ear than in colonizing NTHI strains and H. haemolyticus isolated from the pharynx.

  18. Mutations in the VNTR of the carboxyl-ester lipase gene (CEL) are a rare cause of monogenic diabetes.

    PubMed

    Torsvik, Janniche; Johansson, Stefan; Johansen, Anders; Ek, Jakob; Minton, Jayne; Raeder, Helge; Ellard, Sian; Hattersley, Andrew; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Molven, Anders; Njølstad, Pål R

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that heterozygous single-base deletions in the carboxyl-ester lipase (CEL) gene cause exocrine and endocrine pancreatic dysfunction in two multigenerational families. These deletions were found in the first and fourth repeats of a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR), which has proven challenging to sequence due to high GC-content and considerable length variation. We have therefore developed a screening method consisting of a multiplex PCR followed by fragment analysis. The method detected putative disease-causing insertions and deletions in the proximal repeats of the VNTR, and determined the VNTR-length of each allele. When blindly testing 56 members of the two families with known single-base deletions in the CEL VNTR, the method correctly assessed the mutation carriers. Screening of 241 probands from suspected maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) families negative for mutations in known MODY genes (95 individuals from Denmark and 146 individuals from UK) revealed no deletions in the proximal repeats of the CEL VNTR. However, we found one Danish patient with a short, novel CEL allele containing only three VNTR repeats (normal range 7-23 in healthy controls). This allele co-segregated with diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance in the patient's family as six of seven mutation carriers were affected. We also identified individuals who had three copies of a complete CEL VNTR. In conclusion, the CEL gene is highly polymorphic, but mutations in CEL are likely to be a rare cause of monogenic diabetes.

  19. High Frequency of Pulmonary Hypertension-Causing Gene Mutation in Chinese Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Qunying; Liu, Zhihong; Zhao, Zhihui; Luo, Qin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is unknown. Histopathologic studies revealed that pulmonary vasculature lesions similar to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) existed in CTEPH patients as well. It’s well-known that genetic predisposition plays an important role in the mechanism of PAH. So we hypothesized that PAH-causing gene mutation might exist in some CTEPH patients and act as a background to facilitate the development of CTEPH. In this study, we analyzed 7 PAH-causing genes including BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, KCNK3, and CBLN2 in 49 CTEPH patients and 17 patients recovered from pulmonary embolism (PE) but without pulmonary hypertension(PH). The results showed that the nonsynonymous mutation rate in CTEPH patients is significantly higher than that in PE without PH patients (25 out of 49 (51%) CTEPH patients vs. 3 out of 17 PE without PH patients (18%); p = 0.022). Four CTEPH patients had the same point mutation in ACVRL1 exon 10 (c.1450C>G), a mutation approved to be associated with PH in a previous study. In addition, we identified two CTEPH associated SNPs (rs3739817 and rs55805125). Our results suggest that PAH-causing gene mutation might play an important role in the development of CTEPH. PMID:26820968

  20. Multiple evolutionary origins of the fungus causing Panama disease of banana: Concordant evidence from nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Kerry; Kistler, H. Corby; Cigelnik, Elizabeth; Ploetz, Randy C.

    1998-01-01

    Panama disease of banana, caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, is a serious constraint both to the commercial production of banana and cultivation for subsistence agriculture. Previous work has indicated that F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense consists of several clonal lineages that may be genetically distant. In this study we tested whether lineages of the Panama disease pathogen have a monophyletic origin by comparing DNA sequences of nuclear and mitochondrial genes. DNA sequences were obtained for translation elongation factor 1α and the mitochondrial small subunit ribosomal RNA genes for F. oxysporum strains from banana, pathogenic strains from other hosts and putatively nonpathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum. Cladograms for the two genes were highly concordant and a partition-homogeneity test indicated the two datasets could be combined. The tree inferred from the combined dataset resolved five lineages corresponding to “F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense” with a large dichotomy between two taxa represented by strains most commonly isolated from bananas with Panama disease. The results also demonstrate that the latter two taxa have significantly different chromosome numbers. F. oxysporum isolates collected as nonpathogenic or pathogenic to other hosts that have very similar or identical elongation factor 1α and mitochondrial small subunit genotypes as banana pathogens were shown to cause little or no disease on banana. Taken together, these results indicate Panama disease of banana is caused by fungi with independent evolutionary origins. PMID:9482835

  1. Molecular architecture of DesV from Streptomyces venezuelae: a PLP-dependent transaminase involved in the biosynthesis of the unusual sugar desosamine.

    PubMed

    Burgie, E Sethe; Thoden, James B; Holden, Hazel M

    2007-05-01

    Desosamine is a 3-(dimethylamino)-3,4,6-trideoxyhexose found in certain macrolide antibiotics such as the commonly prescribed erythromycin. Six enzymes are required for its biosynthesis in Streptomyces venezuelae. The focus of this article is DesV, which catalyzes the PLP-dependent replacement of a 3-keto group with an amino functionality in the fifth step of the pathway. For this study the three-dimensional structures of both the internal aldimine and the ketimine intermediate with glutamate were determined to 2.05 A resolution. DesV is a homodimer with each subunit containing 12 alpha-helical regions and 12 beta-strands that together form three layers of sheet. The structure of the internal aldimine demonstrates that the PLP-cofactor is held in place by residues contributed from both subunits (Asp 164 and Gln 167 from Subunit I and Tyr 221 and Asn 235 from Subunit II). When the ketimine intermediate is present in the active site, the loop defined by Gln 225 to Ser 228 from Subunit II closes down upon the active site. The structure of DesV is similar to another sugar-modifying enzyme referred to as PseC. This enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of pseudaminic acid, which is a sialic acid-like nonulosonate found in the flagellin of Helicobacter pylori. In the case of PseC, however, the amino group is transferred to the C-4 rather than the C-3 position. Details concerning the structural analysis of DesV and a comparison of its molecular architecture to that of PseC are presented.

  2. Childhood trauma as a cause of psychosis: linking genes, psychology, and biology.

    PubMed

    van Winkel, Ruud; van Nierop, Martine; Myin-Germeys, Inez; van Os, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have provided robust evidence for an association between childhood trauma (CT) and psychosis. Meta-analyses have quantified the association, pointing to odds ratios in the order of around 3, and prospective studies have shown that reverse causation is unlikely to explain the association. However, more work is needed to address the possibility of a gene-environment correlation, that is, whether genetic risk for psychosis predicts exposure to CT. Nevertheless, multiple studies have convincingly shown that the association between CT and psychosis remains strong and significant when controlling for genetic risk, in agreement with a possible causal association. In addition, several studies have shown plausible psychological and neurobiological mechanisms linking adverse experiences to psychosis, including induction of social defeat and reduced self-value, sensitization of the mesolimbic dopamine system, changes in the stress and immune system, and concomitant changes in stress-related brain structures, such as the hippocampus and the amygdala, findings that should be integrated, however, in more complex models of vulnerability. It is currently unclear whether genetic vulnerability plays a role in conferring the mental consequences of adversity, and which genes are likely to be involved. The current, limited evidence points to genes that are not specifically involved in psychosis but more generally in regulating mood (serotonin transporter gene), neuroplasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor), and the stress-response system (FKBP5), in line with a general effect of CT on a range of mental disorders, rather than suggesting specificity for psychosis.

  3. Gene amplification as a cause for inherited thyroxine-binding globulin excess?

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, J.

    1995-12-01

    This editorial reviews the past research regarding thyroxine-binding globulins (TBGs) and their role in hereditary diseases involving plasma concentrations of protein bound iodine. The genetic basis for TBG excess revolves around the expression and mutations of the gene for TBG. 23 refs.

  4. A mutation in the rice chalcone isomerase gene causes the golden hull and internode 1 phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lilan; Qian, Qian; Tang, Ding; Wang, Kejian; Li, Ming; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2012-07-01

    The biosynthesis of flavonoids, important secondary plant metabolites, has been investigated extensively, but few mutants of genes in this pathway have been identified in rice (Oryza sativa). The rice gold hull and internode (gh) mutants exhibit a reddish-brown pigmentation in the hull and internode and their phenotype has long been used as a morphological marker trait for breeding and genetic study. Here, we characterized that the gh1 mutant was a mutant of the rice chalcone isomerase gene (OsCHI). The result showed that gh1 had a Dasheng retrotransposon inserted in the 5′ UTR of the OsCHI gene, which resulted in the complete loss of OsCHI expression. gh1 exhibited golden pigmentation in hulls and internodes once the panicles were exposed to light. The total flavonoid content in gh1 hulls was increased threefold compared to wild type. Consistent with the gh1 phenotype, OsCHI transcripts were expressed in most tissues of rice and most abundantly in internodes. It was also expressed at high levels in panicles before heading, distributed mainly in lemmas and paleae, but its expression decreased substantially after the panicles emerged from the sheath. OsCHI encodes a protein functionally and structurally conserved to chalcone isomerases in other species. Our findings demonstrated that the OsCHI gene was indispensable for flux of the flavonoid pathway in rice.

  5. Partial Deletion of the Bovine ED1 Gene Causes Anhidrotic Ectodermal Dysplasia in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Drögemüller, Cord; Distl, Ottmar; Leeb, Tosso

    2001-01-01

    Anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (ED1) is characterized by hypotrichosis, reduced number of sweat glands, and incisior anodontia in human, mouse, and cattle. In affected humans and mice, mutations in the ED1 gene coding for ectodysplasin 1 are found. Ectodysplasin 1 is a novel trimeric transmembrane protein with an extracellular TNF-like signaling domain that is believed to be involved in the formation of hair follicles and tooth buds during fetal development. We report the construction of a 480-kb BAC contig harboring the complete bovine ED1 gene on BTA Xq22–Xq24. Physical mapping and sequence analysis of the coding parts of the ED1 gene revealed that a large genomic region including exon 3 of the ED1 gene is deleted in cattle with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia in a family of German Holstein cattle with three affected maternal half sibs. [The sequence data described in this paper have been submitted to the EMBL nucleotide database under accession nos. AJ300468, AJ300469, and AJ278907.] PMID:11591646

  6. Juvenile-onset spinal muscular atrophy caused by compound heterozygosity for mutations in the HEXA gene.

    PubMed

    Navon, R; Khosravi, R; Melki, J; Drucker, L; Fontaine, B; Turpin, J C; N'Guyen, B; Fardeau, M; Rondot, P; Baumann, N

    1997-05-01

    Progressive proximal muscle weakness is present both in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type III (Kugelberg-Welander disease) and in GM2 gangliosidosis, diseases that segregate in an autosomal recessive fashion. The SMN gene for SMA and the HEXA gene for GM2 gangliosidosis were investigated in a woman with progressive proximal muscle weakness, long believed to be SMA type III (Kugelberg-Welander type). She and her family underwent biochemical studies for GM2 gangliosidosis. Analysis of SMN excluded SMA. Biochemical studies on GM2 gangliosidosis showed deficiency in hexosaminidase A activity and increased GM2 ganglioside accumulation in the patient's fibroblasts. The HEXA gene was first analyzed for the Gly269-->Ser mutation characteristic for adult GM2 gangliosidosis. Since the patient was carrying the adult mutation heterozygously, all 14 exons and adjacent intron sequences were analyzed. A novel mutation in exon 1 resulting in an A-to-T change in the initiation codon (ATG to TTG) was identified. The adult patient is a compound heterozygote, with each allele containing a different mutation. Although mRNA was transcribed from the novel mutant allele, expression experiments showed no enzyme activity, suggesting that neither the TTG nor an alternative codon serve as an initiation codon in the HEXA gene.

  7. [Formation of para-Bombay phenotype caused by homozygous or heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zheng, Yan; Sun, Dong-Ni

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms for para-Bombay phenotype formation. The H antigen of these individuals were identified by serological techniques. The full coding region of alpha (1, 2) fucosyltransferase (FUT1) gene of these individuals was amplified by high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR product was identified by TOPO cloning sequencing. Analysis and comparison were used to explore the mechanisms of para-bombay phenotype formation in individuals. The results indicated that the full coding region of FUT1 DNA was successfully amplified by PCR and gel electrophoresis. DNA sequencing and analysis found that h1 (547-552delAG) existed in one chromosome and h4 (35C > T) existed in the other chromosome of NO.1 individual. Meantime, h1 (547-552delAG) was found in two chromosomes of NO.2 and NO.3 individual. It also means that FUT1 gene of NO.1 individual was h1h4 heterozygote, FUT1 gene of NO.2 and NO.3 individuals were h1h1 homozygote. It is concluded that homozygous and heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene can lead to the formation of para-Bombay phenotype.

  8. A congenital mutation of the novel gene LRRC8 causes agammaglobulinemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Akihisa; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Kim, Ji Yoo; Matsuda-Hashii, Yoshiko; Tokimasa, Sadao; Fujisaki, Hiroyuki; Kubota, Keiko; Endo, Hiroko; Onodera, Takashi; Ohta, Hideaki; Ozono, Keiichi; Hara, Junichi

    2003-01-01

    A girl with congenital agammaglobulinemia and minor facial anomalies lacked B cells in peripheral blood: karyotypic analysis of white blood cells showed balanced translocation, t(9;20)(q33.2;q12). In the current study, we isolated a novel gene, leucine-rich repeat–containing 8 (LRRC8), at the translocation site on chromosome 9. It has four transmembrane helixes with one isolated and eight sequentially located leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and constitutes a new protein family. It is expressed on T cells as well as on B-lineage cells. Translocation truncates the LRRC8 gene, resulting in deletion of the eighth, ninth, and half of the seventh LRR domains located close to the C-terminal. The truncated form of the LRRC8 gene is transcribed with sequences from the noncoding region adjacent to the truncated seventh LRR. Protein products derived from the truncated gene are coexpressed on white blood cells with the intact LRRC8 protein from the untranslocated allele. Transplantation experiments with murine bone marrow cells that were forced to express the truncated LRRC8 show that expression of the truncated protein inhibited B cell development. These results indicate that LRRC8 is responsible for the B cell deficiency in this patient and is required for B cell development. PMID:14660746

  9. Mutations in the LMNA gene do not cause axonal CMT in Czech patients.

    PubMed

    Lassuthová, Petra; Baránková, Lucia; Haberlová, Jana; Mazanec, Radim; Wallace, Andrew; Huehne, Kathrin; Rautenstrauss, Bernd; Seeman, Pavel

    2009-06-01

    The LMNA gene was sequenced in 98 Czech patients from 94 unrelated families with early-onset axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease consistent with both autosomal recessive inheritance and sporadic cases. Biallelic pathogenic mutations were not found in any patient in this group. One patient carried the c.1870C>T mutation that is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution, p. Arg624Cys, on one allele, but the second causative mutation was not detected. LMNA mutation is not likely to be associated with the disease in this family. To exclude larger deletions/duplications in the LMNA gene not detectable by sequencing, 48 patients from this group were also analyzed with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. No rearrangements in the LMNA gene were detected. We conclude that mutations in the LMNA gene are absent from a large group of Czech patients with axonal autosomal recessive CMT disease. Consequently, LMNA mutation screening does not seem to be relevant for axonal CMT DNA diagnostics. A similar situation may apply to other European populations.

  10. Two types of albino mutants in desert and migratory locusts are caused by gene defects in the same signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sugahara, Ryohei; Tanaka, Seiji; Jouraku, Akiya; Shiotsuki, Takahiro

    2017-04-15

    Albinism is caused by mutations in the genes involved in melanin production. Albino nymphs of Locusta migratoria and Schistocerca gregaria reared under crowded conditions are uniformly creamy-white in color. However, nothing is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in locusts. The albino strain of L. migratoria is known to lack the dark-color-inducing neuropeptide corazonin (Crz). In this study, we report that this albino strain has a 10-base-pair deletion in the gene LmCRZ, which encodes Crz. This mutation was found to cause a frame-shift, resulting in a null mutation in Crz. On the other hand, the albino strain of S. gregaria is known to have an intact Crz. This strain was found to possess a single-nucleotide substitution in the middle of the Crz receptor-encoding gene, SgCRZR, which caused a nonsense mutation, resulting in a truncated receptor. Silencing of SgCRZR in wild-type S. gregaria nymphs greatly reduced the area and intensity of their black patterning, suggesting that the functional defect of SgCRZR likely causes the albinism. The expression level of SgCRZR in the albino S. gregaria was comparable to that in the wild type. Unlike the wild type, the albino strain of this locust did not show a phase-dependent shift in a morphometric trait controlled by Crz. From these results, we conclude that the mutations in LmCRZ and SgCRZR are responsible for the albinism in L. migratoria and S. gregaria, respectively, indicating that the two types of albinism are caused by different genetic defects in the same Crz signaling pathway.

  11. Clinical and Prognostic Profiles of Cardiomyopathies Caused by Mutations in the Troponin T Gene.

    PubMed

    Ripoll-Vera, Tomás; Gámez, José María; Govea, Nancy; Gómez, Yolanda; Núñez, Juana; Socías, Lorenzo; Escandell, Ángela; Rosell, Jorge

    2016-02-01

    Mutations in the troponin T gene (TTNT2) have been associated in small studies with the development of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy characterized by a high risk of sudden death and mild hypertrophy. We describe the clinical course of patients carrying mutations in this gene. We analyzed the clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with mutations in the TNNT2 gene who were seen in an inherited cardiac disease unit. Of 180 families with genetically studied cardiomyopathies, 21 families (11.7%) were identified as having mutations in TNNT2: 10 families had Arg92Gln, 5 had Arg286His, 3 had Arg278Cys, 1 had Arg92Trp, 1 had Arg94His, and 1 had Ile221Thr. Thirty-three additional genetic carriers were identified through family assessment. The study included 54 genetic carriers: 56% were male, and the mean average age was 41 ± 17 years. There were 33 cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, 9 of dilated cardiomyopathy, and 1 of noncompaction cardiomyopathy, and maximal myocardial thickness was 18.5 ± 6mm. Ventricular dysfunction was present in 30% of individuals and a history of sudden death in 62%. During follow-up, 4 patients died and 14 (33%) received a defibrillator (8 probands, 6 relatives). Mean survival was 54 years. Carriers of Arg92Gln had early disease development, high penetrance, a high risk of sudden death, a high rate of defibrillator implantation, and a high frequency of mixed phenotype. Mutations in the TNNT2 gene were more common in this series than in previous studies. The clinical and prognostic profiles depended on the mutation present. Carriers of the Arg92Gln mutation developed hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy and had a significantly worse prognosis than those with other mutations in TNNT2 or other sarcomeric genes. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Two different forms of lethal chondrodysplasias caused by COL2A1 gene mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Winterpacht, A.; Hilbert, K.; Schwarze, U.

    1994-09-01

    Two bone dysplasia families seem to be due to mutations in the type II procollagen gene (COL2A1): the so-called spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) group with achondrogenesis II, hypochondrogenesis, SEDC, osteoarthrosis and the Stickler-Kniest pattern that include different forms of Kniest and Stickler dysplasia. Both groups comprise a clinical spectrum ranging from lethal to mild. COL2A1-mutations have been identified in lethal forms of the SEDC family but not in lethal forms of the Stickler/Kniest group. We now report a COL2A-1 mutation in an additional case of hypochondrogenesis (patient S) and in a lethal case of Kniest dysplasia (patient B). We amplified all 54 exons of the COL2A1 gene in both patients and screened the PCR products for mutations by SSCP analysis and sequencing. In patient B, we identified an 18 bp deletion in exon 34 which removes 6 amino acids from the mature protein. In patient S, we were able to identify a two base pair exchange (GG to AT) in exon 31, which leads to the very unusual conversion of Gly to Ile. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Gly to Ile conversion in the COL2A1 gene, and the first report of a COL2A1 gene mutation in a lethal form of Kniest dysplasia. On the basis of the known COL2A1 gene mutations and the genotype-phenotype correlations established so far, we provide molecular data (an in frame deletion in patient B and a Gly conversion in patient S) that support their clinical classification as Kniest dysplasia and hypochondrogenesis, respectively.

  13. A newly described mutation of the CLCN7 gene causes neuropathic autosomal recessive osteopetrosis in an Arab family.

    PubMed

    Al-Aama, Jumana Y; Dabbagh, Amal A; Edrees, Alaa Y

    2012-01-01

    Neurologic manifestations in osteopetrosis are usually secondary to sclerosis of the skull bones. However, a rare neuropathic subtype of osteopetrosis exists that resembles neurodegenerative storage disorders. Unlike other forms of osteopetrosis, this latter form does not respond to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Preliminary studies suggest that this neuropathic form is more likely to be caused by mutations in the CLCN7 gene in an autosomal recessive manner. This study provides further evidence for this phenotype-genotype correlation by presenting a previously unreported mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a Yemeni family with the neuropathic form. This is also the first study of any mutation in patients with osteopetrosis of Arabic ethnicity. As literature review suggests that this type may be more common in Arabs, cascade genetic screening of early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis in patients of Arabic ancestry may preferably start with the CLCN7 gene rather than the TCIRG gene as is routinely done in clinical laboratories. Identifying a mutation in the CLCN7 gene in a patient with early onset of autosomal recessive-osteopetrosis may also guide therapeutic decisions including the option of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

  14. A stop-gain in the laminin, alpha 3 gene causes recessive junctional epidermolysis bullosa in Belgian Blue cattle.

    PubMed

    Sartelet, Arnaud; Harland, Chad; Tamma, Nico; Karim, Latifa; Bayrou, Calixte; Li, Wanbo; Ahariz, Naima; Coppieters, Wouter; Georges, Michel; Charlier, Carole

    2015-10-01

    Four newborn purebred Belgian Blue calves presenting a severe form of epidermolysis bullosa were recently referred to our heredo-surveillance platform. SNP array genotyping followed by autozygosity mapping located the causative gene in a 8.3-Mb interval on bovine chromosome 24. Combining information from (i) whole-genome sequencing of an affected calf, (ii) transcriptomic data from a panel of tissues and (iii) a list of functionally ranked positional candidates pinpointed a private G to A nucleotide substitution in the LAMA3 gene that creates a premature stop codon (p.Arg2609*) in exon 60, truncating 22% of the corresponding protein. The LAMA3 gene encodes the alpha 3 subunit of the heterotrimeric laminin-332, a key constituent of the lamina lucida that is part of the skin basement membrane connecting epidermis and dermis layers. Homozygous loss-of-function mutations in this gene are known to cause severe junctional epidermolysis bullosa in human, mice, horse, sheep and dog. Overall, our data strongly support the causality of the identified gene and mutation. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  15. A novel mutation in PGAP2 gene causes developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly in consanguineous Saudi family.

    PubMed

    Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Rasool, Mahmood; Jan, Mohammed M; Chaudhary, Adeel G; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Abuzenadah, Adel M; Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H

    2016-12-15

    PGAP2 (Post-GPI Attachment to Proteins 2) gene is involved in lipid remodeling steps of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor maturation. At the surface of the cell this gene is required for proper expression of GPI-anchored proteins. Hyperphosphatasia with mental retardation syndrome-3 is an autosomal recessive disorder usually characterized by severe mental retardation. Mutations in the PGAP2 gene cause hyperphosphatasia mental retardation syndrome-3. We have identified a large consanguineous family from Saudi origin segregating developmental delay, intellectual disability, epilepsy and microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing with 100× coverage was performed on two affected siblings of the family. Data analysis in the patient revealed a novel missense mutation c.191C>T in PGAP2 gene resulting in Alanine to Valine substitution (Ala64Val). The mutation was reconfirmed and validated by subsequent Sanger sequencing method. The mutation was ruled out in 100 unrelated healthy controls. We suggest that this pathogenic mutation disrupts the proper function of the gene proteins resulting in the disease state.

  16. Insufficiency of copper ion homeostasis causes freeze-thaw injury of yeast cells as revealed by indirect gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Shunsuke; Ando, Akira; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2009-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to freeze-thaw stress in commercial processes, including frozen dough baking. Cell viability and fermentation activity after a freeze-thaw cycle were dramatically decreased due to freeze-thaw injury. Because this type of injury involves complex phenomena, the injury mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined freeze-thaw injury by indirect gene expression analysis during postthaw incubation after freeze-thaw treatment using DNA microarray profiling. The results showed that genes involved in the homeostasis of metal ions were frequently contained in genes that were upregulated, depending on the freezing period. We assessed the phenotype of deletion mutants of the metal ion homeostasis genes that exhibited freezing period-dependent upregulation and found that the strains with deletion of the MAC1 and CTR1 genes involved in copper ion homeostasis exhibited freeze-thaw sensitivity, suggesting that copper ion homeostasis is required for freeze-thaw tolerance. We found that supplementation with copper ions during postthaw incubation increased intracellular superoxide dismutase activity and intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were decreased. Moreover, cell viability was increased by supplementation with copper ions. These results suggest that insufficiency of copper ion homeostasis may be one of the causes of freeze-thaw injury.

  17. A Missense Mutation in the Mouse Col2a1 Gene Causes Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita, Hearing Loss, and Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    DONAHUE, LEAH RAE; CHANG, BO; MOHAN, SUBBURAMAN; MIYAKOSHI, NAO; WERGEDAL, JON E; BAYLINK, DAVID J; HAWES, NORMAN L; ROSEN, CLIFFORD J; WARD-BAILEY, PATRICIA; ZHENG, QING Y; BRONSON, RODERICK T; JOHNSON, KENNETH R; DAVISSON, MURIEL T

    2010-01-01

    A missense mutation in the mouse Col2a1 gene has been discovered, resulting in a mouse phenotype with similarities to human spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita. In addition, SED patients have been identified with a similar molecular mutation in human COL2A1. This mouse model offers a useful tool for molecular and biological studies of bone development and pathology. Introduction A new mouse autosomal recessive mutation has been discovered and named spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (gene symbol sedc). Materials and Methods Homozygous sedc mice can be identified at birth by their small size and shortened trunk. Adults have shortened noses, dysplastic vertebrae, femora, and tibias, plus retinoschisis and hearing loss. The mutation was mapped to Chr15, and Col2a1 was identified as a candidate gene. Results Sequence analyses revealed that the affected gene is Col2a1, which has a missense mutation at exon 48 causing an amino acid change of arginine to cysteine at position 1417. Two human patients with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita have been reported with the same amino acid substitution at position 789 in the human COL2A1 gene. Conclusions Thus, sedc/sedc mice provide a valuable model of human SED congenita with molecular and phenotypic homology. Further biochemical analyses, molecular modeling, and cell culture studies using sedc/sedc mice could provide insight into mechanisms of skeletal development dependent on Col2a1 and its role in fibril formation and cartilage template organization. PMID:12968670

  18. Silencing of the ACC synthase gene ACACS2 causes delayed flowering in pineapple [Ananas comosus (L.) Merr.].

    PubMed

    Trusov, Yuri; Botella, José Ramón

    2006-01-01

    Flowering is a crucial developmental stage in the plant life cycle. A number of different factors, from environmental to chemical, can trigger flowering. In pineapple, and other bromeliads, it has been proposed that flowering is triggered by a small burst of ethylene production in the meristem in response to environmental cues. A 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACC synthase) gene has been cloned from pineapple (ACACS2), which is induced in the meristem under the same environmental conditions that induce flowering. Two transgenic pineapple lines have been produced containing co-suppression constructs designed to down-regulate the expression of the ACACS2 gene. Northern analysis revealed that the ACACS2 gene was silenced in a number of transgenic plants in both lines. Southern hybridization revealed clear differences in the methylation status of silenced versus non-silenced plants by the inability of a methylation-sensitive enzyme to digest within the ACACS2 DNA extracted from silenced plants, indicating that methylation is the cause of the observed co-suppression of the ACACS2 gene. Flowering characteristics of the transgenic plants were studied under field conditions in South East Queensland, Australia. Flowering dynamics studies revealed significant differences in flowering behaviour, with transgenic plants exhibiting silencing showing a marked delay in flowering when compared with non-silenced transgenic plants and control non-transformed plants. It is argued that the ACACS2 gene is one of the key contributors towards triggering 'natural flowering' in mature pineapples under commercial field conditions.

  19. Familial isolated pituitary adenoma caused by a Aip gene mutation not described before in a family context.

    PubMed

    García-Arnés, J A; González-Molero, I; Oriola, J; Mazuecos, N; Luque, R; Castaño, J; Arraez, M A

    2013-12-01

    The cause of familial isolated pituitary adenomas (FIPA) remains unknown in a high percentage of cases, but the AIP gene plays an important role in the etiology. The aim of the study is to describe a family with FIPA syndrome and the results of genomic studies. A 16-year-old man had a giant prolactinoma resistant tomedical treatment with delayed growth and pubertal development. His mother had been previously diagnosed with a nonfunctioning pituitary macroadenoma. Transsphenoidal endoscopic resection was performed and a genetic study revealed a heterozygous mutation in exon 6: 974G>A (p.Arg325Gln). Because the AIP gene is a tumor suppressor gene, we searched for loss of heterozygosity within the AIP gene by amplifying exon 6 from tumor tissue of the patient. In the electropherogram, only the A allele was amplified (hemizygous state), indicating loss of the normal allele. We report a Spanish family with FIPA in whom a mutation in the AIP gene previously unreported in a familiar context was identified.

  20. A compound heterozygous mutation in the FMO3 gene: the first pediatric case causes fish odor syndrome in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Min; Chae, Jong-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Trimethylaminuria (TMAuria), known as “fish odor syndrome,” is a congenital metabolic disorder characterized by an odor resembling that of rotting fish. This odor is caused by the secretion of trimethylamine (TMA) in the breath, sweat, and body secretions and the excretion of TMA along with urine. TMAuria is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3). Most TMAuria cases are caused by missense mutations, but nonsense mutations have also been reported in these cases. Here, we describe the identification of a novel FMO3 gene mutation in a patient with TMAuria and her family. A 3-year-old girl presented with a strong corporal odor after ingesting fish. Genomic DNA sequence analysis revealed that she had compound heterozygous FMO3 mutations; One mutation was the missense mutation p.Val158Ile in exon 3, and the other was a novel nonsense mutation, p.Ser364X, in exon 7 of the FMO3 gene. Familial genetic analyses showed that the p.Val158Ile mutation was derived from the same allele in the father, and the p.Ser364X mutation was derived from the mother. This is the first description of the p.Ser364X mutation, and the first report of a Korean patient with TMAuria caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations. PMID:28392825

  1. Mutations of the gene encoding otogelin are a cause of autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic moderate hearing impairment.

    PubMed

    Schraders, Margit; Ruiz-Palmero, Laura; Kalay, Ersan; Oostrik, Jaap; del Castillo, Francisco J; Sezgin, Orhan; Beynon, Andy J; Strom, Tim M; Pennings, Ronald J E; Zazo Seco, Celia; Oonk, Anne M M; Kunst, Henricus P M; Domínguez-Ruiz, María; García-Arumi, Ana M; del Campo, Miguel; Villamar, Manuela; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Moreno, Felipe; Admiraal, Ronald J C; del Castillo, Ignacio; Kremer, Hannie

    2012-11-02

    Already 40 genes have been identified for autosomal-recessive nonsyndromic hearing impairment (arNSHI); however, many more genes are still to be identified. In a Dutch family segregating arNSHI, homozygosity mapping revealed a 2.4 Mb homozygous region on chromosome 11 in p15.1-15.2, which partially overlapped with the previously described DFNB18 locus. However, no putative pathogenic variants were found in USH1C, the gene mutated in DFNB18 hearing impairment. The homozygous region contained 12 additional annotated genes including OTOG, the gene encoding otogelin, a component of the tectorial membrane. It is thought that otogelin contributes to the stability and strength of this membrane through interaction or stabilization of its constituent fibers. The murine orthologous gene was already known to cause hearing loss when defective. Analysis of OTOG in the Dutch family revealed a homozygous 1 bp deletion, c.5508delC, which leads to a shift in the reading frame and a premature stop codon, p.Ala1838ProfsX31. Further screening of 60 unrelated probands from Spanish arNSHI families detected compound heterozygous OTOG mutations in one family, c.6347C>T (p.Pro2116Leu) and c. 6559C>T (p.Arg2187X). The missense mutation p.Pro2116Leu affects a highly conserved residue in the fourth von Willebrand factor type D domain of otogelin. The subjects with OTOG mutations have a moderate hearing impairment, which can be associated with vestibular dysfunction. The flat to shallow "U" or slightly downsloping shaped audiograms closely resembled audiograms of individuals with recessive mutations in the gene encoding α-tectorin, another component of the tectorial membrane. This distinctive phenotype may represent a clue to orientate the molecular diagnosis.

  2. A frameshift mutation in the melanophilin gene causes the dilute coat colour in rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) breeds.

    PubMed

    Fontanesi, L; Scotti, E; Allain, D; Dall'olio, S

    2014-04-01

    In rabbit, the dilute locus is determined by a recessive mutated allele (d) that causes the dilution of both eumelanic and pheomelanic pigmentations. In mice, similar phenotypes are determined by mutations in the myosin VA, Rab27a and melanophilin (MLPH) genes. In this study, we investigated the rabbit MLPH gene and showed that a mutation in this gene appears responsible for the dilute coat colour in this species. Checkered Giant F1 families segregating for black and grey (diluted or blue) coat colour were first genotyped for a complex indel in intron 1 of the MLPH gene that was completely associated with the coat colour phenotype (θ = 0.00; LOD = 4.82). Then, we sequenced 6357 bp of the MLPH gene in 18 rabbits of different coat colours, including blue animals. A total of 165 polymorphisms were identified: 137 were in non-coding regions and 28 were in coding exons. One of them was a frameshift deletion in exon 5. Genotyping the half-sib families confirmed the complete cosegregation of this mutation with the blue coat colour. The mutation was analysed in 198 rabbits of 23 breeds. All Blue Vienna and all other blue/grey/ash rabbits in other breeds (Californian, Castor Rex, Checkered Giant, English Spot, Fairy Marburg and Fairy Pearly) were homozygous for this deletion. The identification of MLPH as the responsible gene for the dilute locus in rabbit provides a natural animal model for human Griscelli syndrome type 3 and a new mutant to study the role of this gene on pigmentation. © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  3. Mutations in lectin complement pathway genes COLEC11 and MASP1 cause 3MC syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rooryck, Caroline; Diaz-Font, Anna; Osborn, Daniel P S; Chabchoub, Elyes; Hernandez-Hernandez, Victor; Shamseldin, Hanan; Kenny, Joanna; Waters, Aoife; Jenkins, Dagan; Kaissi, Ali Al; Leal, Gabriela F; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Carnevale, Franco; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Lees, Melissa; Hennekam, Raoul; Stanier, Philip; Burns, Alan J; Peeters, Hilde; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Beales, Philip L

    2011-03-01

    3MC syndrome has been proposed as a unifying term encompassing the overlapping Carnevale, Mingarelli, Malpuech and Michels syndromes. These rare autosomal recessive disorders exhibit a spectrum of developmental features, including characteristic facial dysmorphism, cleft lip and/or palate, craniosynostosis, learning disability and genital, limb and vesicorenal anomalies. Here we studied 11 families with 3MC syndrome and identified two mutated genes, COLEC11 and MASP1, both of which encode proteins in the lectin complement pathway (collectin kidney 1 (CL-K1) and MASP-1 and MASP-3, respectively). CL-K1 is highly expressed in embryonic murine craniofacial cartilage, heart, bronchi, kidney and vertebral bodies. Zebrafish morphants for either gene develop pigmentary defects and severe craniofacial abnormalities. Finally, we show that CL-K1 serves as a guidance cue for neural crest cell migration. Together, these findings demonstrate a role for complement pathway factors in fundamental developmental processes and in the etiology of 3MC syndrome.

  4. Mutations in the histone methyltransferase gene KMT2B cause complex early-onset dystonia.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Esther; Carss, Keren J; Rankin, Julia; Nichols, John M E; Grozeva, Detelina; Joseph, Agnel P; Mencacci, Niccolo E; Papandreou, Apostolos; Ng, Joanne; Barral, Serena; Ngoh, Adeline; Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Willemsen, Michel A; Arkadir, David; Barnicoat, Angela; Bergman, Hagai; Bhate, Sanjay; Boys, Amber; Darin, Niklas; Foulds, Nicola; Gutowski, Nicholas; Hills, Alison; Houlden, Henry; Hurst, Jane A; Israel, Zvi; Kaminska, Margaret; Limousin, Patricia; Lumsden, Daniel; McKee, Shane; Misra, Shibalik; Mohammed, Shekeeb S; Nakou, Vasiliki; Nicolai, Joost; Nilsson, Magnus; Pall, Hardev; Peall, Kathryn J; Peters, Gregory B; Prabhakar, Prab; Reuter, Miriam S; Rump, Patrick; Segel, Reeval; Sinnema, Margje; Smith, Martin; Turnpenny, Peter; White, Susan M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wiethoff, Sarah; Wilson, Brian T; Winter, Gidon; Wragg, Christopher; Pope, Simon; Heales, Simon J H; Morrogh, Deborah; Pittman, Alan; Carr, Lucinda J; Perez-Dueñas, Belen; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Reis, Andre; Gahl, William A; Toro, Camilo; Bhatia, Kailash P; Wood, Nicholas W; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan; Chong, Wui K; Gissen, Paul; Topf, Maya; Dale, Russell C; Chubb, Jonathan R; Raymond, F Lucy; Kurian, Manju A

    2017-02-01

    Histone lysine methylation, mediated by mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) proteins, is now known to be critical in the regulation of gene expression, genomic stability, cell cycle and nuclear architecture. Despite MLL proteins being postulated as essential for normal development, little is known about the specific functions of the different MLL lysine methyltransferases. Here we report heterozygous variants in the gene KMT2B (also known as MLL4) in 27 unrelated individuals with a complex progressive childhood-onset dystonia, often associated with a typical facial appearance and characteristic brain magnetic resonance imaging findings. Over time, the majority of affected individuals developed prominent cervical, cranial and laryngeal dystonia. Marked clinical benefit, including the restoration of independent ambulation in some cases, was observed following deep brain stimulation (DBS). These findings highlight a clinically recognizable and potentially treatable form of genetic dystonia, demonstrating the crucial role of KMT2B in the physiological control of voluntary movement.

  5. Hereditary spastic paraplegia with recessive trait caused by mutation in KLC4 gene.

    PubMed

    Bayrakli, Fatih; Poyrazoglu, Hatice Gamze; Yuksel, Sirin; Yakicier, Cengiz; Erguner, Bekir; Sagiroglu, Mahmut Samil; Yuceturk, Betul; Ozer, Bugra; Doganay, Selim; Tanrikulu, Bahattin; Seker, Askin; Akbulut, Fatih; Ozen, Ali; Per, Huseyin; Kumandas, Sefer; Altuner Torun, Yasemin; Bayri, Yasar; Sakar, Mustafa; Dagcinar, Adnan; Ziyal, Ibrahim

    2015-12-01

    We report an association between a new causative gene and spastic paraplegia, which is a genetically heterogeneous disorder. Clinical phenotyping of one consanguineous family followed by combined homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing analysis. Three patients from the same family shared common features of progressive complicated spastic paraplegia. They shared a single homozygous stretch area on chromosome 6. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous mutation (c.853_871del19) in the gene coding the kinesin light chain 4 protein (KLC4). Meanwhile, the unaffected parents and two siblings were heterozygous and one sibling was homozygous wild type. The 19 bp deletion in exon 6 generates a stop codon and thus a truncated messenger RNA and protein. The association of a KLC4 mutation with spastic paraplegia identifies a new locus for the disease.

  6. An unusual cause of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis: prothrombin G20210A gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Porres-Aguilar, Mateo; Square, Jaime H; Storey, Raul; Rodriguez-Dunn, Simon; Mohamed-Aly, Mohamed S

    2007-09-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis represents less than 1% of all strokes, being an uncommon entity with a wide spectrum of clinical scenarios. We present a 45-year-old Hispanic female with a history of long-term oral contraceptive use who was diagnosed with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis due to a heterozygous carrier mutation in the prothrombin G20210A gene. The patient was successfully managed with intravenous heparin with favorable clinical results without adverse effects. The prevalence of inherited primary thrombophilia increases with additional risk factors such as the use of oral contraceptives that can trigger or prothrombotic events in any vascular bed. An increased prevalence in the prothrombin G20210 gene mutation has been demonstrated in the Mexican-Mestizo population. Controversy exists regarding therapy of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis; according to experts, heparin remains the cornerstone of therapy with acceptable outcomes. More clinical trials are required to evaluate long-term outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  7. Permanent Neonatal Diabetes Caused by Creation of an Ectopic Splice Site within the INS Gene

    PubMed Central

    Gastaldo, Elena; Harries, Lorna W.; Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Castaño, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic etiology in a patient who presented with permanent neonatal diabetes at 2 months of age. Methodology/Principal Findings Regulatory elements and coding exons 2 and 3 of the INS gene were amplified and sequenced from genomic and complementary DNA samples. A novel heterozygous INS mutation within the terminal intron of the gene was identified in the proband and her affected father. This mutation introduces an ectopic splice site leading to the insertion of 29 nucleotides from the intronic sequence into the mature mRNA, which results in a longer and abnormal transcript. Conclusions/Significance This study highlights the importance of routinely sequencing the exon-intron boundaries and the need to carry out additional studies to confirm the pathogenicity of any identified intronic genetic variants. PMID:22235272

  8. Haploinsufficiency of BMP4 gene may be the underlying cause of Frías syndrome.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Fernández, María Luisa; Bermejo-Sánchez, Eva; Fernández, Belén; MacDonald, Alexandra; Fernández-Toral, Joaquín; Martínez-Frías, María Luisa

    2014-02-01

    In 2005, we reported on a family as having Frías syndrome (OMIM: 609640), with four affected members displaying a pattern of congenital defects nearly identical to those observed in a mother and son described by Frias [Frías et al. (1975). Birth Defects Orig Artic Ser 11:30-33]. These defects included growth deficiency, facial anomalies, and hand and foot alterations. We had the opportunity to study this family again due to the birth of another affected girl, who presented with similar facial characteristics to those of her elder half-sister and the rest of affected relatives, which consisted of mild exophthalmia, bilateral palpebral ptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures, and hypertelorism. We performed array-CGH, which identified an identical interstitial deletion of chromosome 14q22.1-q22.3 in the mother and two daughters. The deletion is 4.06 Mb in length and includes the BMP4 gene, a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family of secreted proteins. A review of the literature showed that deletions or mutations of this gene underlie congenital defects affecting brain, eye, teeth, and digit development. Although the clinical manifestations of the current family correlate with the defects observed in patients having either 14q22-q23 deletions or mutations of BMP4, they show a milder phenotype. In order to understand the clinical variability, we evaluated the already known functional characteristics of the BMP gene members. This gene family plays an important role during early embryogenesis, and the complex synergistic functions and redundancies of the BMPs led us to conclude that haploinsufficiency of BMP4 is likely to be responsible for the clinical expression of Frías syndrome. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Knockout of Lysosomal Enzyme-Targeting Gene Causes Abnormalities in Mouse Pup Isolation Calls

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Terra D.; Holy, Timothy E.

    2017-01-01

    Humans lacking a working copy of the GNPTAB gene suffer from the metabolic disease Mucolipidosis type II (MLII). MLII symptoms include mental retardation, skeletal deformities and cartilage defects as well as a speech delay with most subjects unable to utter single words (Otomo et al., 2009; Cathey et al., 2010; Leroy et al., 2012). Here we asked whether mice lacking a copy of Gnptab gene exhibited vocal abnormities. We recorded ultrasonic vocalizations from 5 to 8 day old mice separated from their mother and littermates. Although Gnptab−/− pups emitted a similar number of calls, several features of the calls were different from their wild type littermates. Gnptab−/− mice showed a decrease in the length of calls, an increase in the intra-bout pause duration, significantly fewer pitch jumps with smaller mean size, and an increase in the number of isolated calls. In addition, Gnptab−/− mice vocalizations had less power, particularly in the higher frequencies. Gnptab+/− mouse vocalizations did not appear to be affected. We then attempted to classify these recordings using these features to determine the genotype of the animal. We were able to correctly identify 87% of the recordings as either Gnptab−/− or Gnptab+/+ pup, significantly better than chance, demonstrating that genotype is a strong predictor of vocalization phenotype. These data show that deletion of genes in the lysosomal enzyme targeting pathway affect mouse pup isolation calls. PMID:28101008

  10. A case report: Autosomal recessive microcephaly caused by a novel mutation in MCPH1 gene.

    PubMed

    Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh; Fardaei, Majid; Gholami, Milad; Miryounesi, Mohammad

    2015-10-15

    Autosomal Recessive Primary Microcephaly (MCPH-MIM 251200) is distinguished by congenital decrease in occipito-frontal head circumference (OFC) of at least 2 standard deviations (SD) below population average in addition to non-progressive mental retardation, without any prominent neurological disorder. Mutations in MCPH1, which encodes the protein microcephalin have been detected in this disorder. Here we report a consanguineous Iranian family with 2 children affected with microcephaly. Despite the severe mental retardation observed in the male patient, the female patient had normal intelligent with no delay in motor milestones or speech. A novel splice-acceptor site homozygous mutation has been detected in intron 4 of MCPH1 gene (c.322-2A>T) which results in an RNA processing defect with a 15-nucleotide deletion in exon 5 of the mRNA transcript (r.322_336del15, p.R108_Q112del5). This novel mutation has resulted in different phenotypes in affected male and female patients of this family. The sex-specific variations in gene regulation during brain development may partially explain such difference in phenotypes probably in addition to other mechanisms such as modifier genes.

  11. Dissecting cause and effect in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders: genes, environment and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Gray, Laura; Hannan, Anthiny J

    2007-08-01

    It has long been established that the development of psychiatric illness results from a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. Postmortem and genetic linkage studies have identified a number of promising candidate genes which have been reinforced by replication and functional studies. However, the fact that concordance rates for monozygotic twins rarely approach 100% highlights the involvement of environmental factors. Whilst epidemiological studies of psychiatric cohorts have demonstrated potential risk factors, such studies are clearly limited and in many cases the potential mechanism linking a given risk factor with pathogenesis remains unclear. A very powerful method of elucidating the mechanisms underlying gene-environment interactions is the use of appropriate animal models of psychiatric pathology. Whilst animals cannot be used to map the entire complexity of diseases such as schizophrenia, dissecting the symptom profile into more simply encapsulated traits or endophenotypes has proved to be a successful approach. Such endophenotypes provide a measurable link between aetiological factors and phenotypic outcome. Given the potential for the careful control and modification of an experimental animal's environment, the combination of studies of candidate genes with investigations of environmental factors is an effective heuristic tool, allowing examination of behavioural endophenotypes in conjunction with cellular and molecular outcomes. This review will consider the extant genetic, molecular, pharmacological and lesion-based models of psychiatric disorders, and the relevant methods of environmental manipulation appearing in the literature. We will discuss studies where such models have been combined, and the potential for future experimentation in this area.

  12. Deletion of Indian hedgehog gene causes dominant semi-lethal Creeper trait in chicken

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sihua; Zhu, Feng; Wang, Yanyun; Yi, Guoqiang; Li, Junying; Lian, Ling; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Jiao, Rengang; Gong, Yu; Hou, Zhuocheng; Yang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    The Creeper trait, a classical monogenic phenotype of chicken, is controlled by a dominant semi-lethal gene. This trait has been widely cited in the genetics and molecular biology textbooks for illustrating autosomal dominant semi-lethal inheritance over decades. However, the genetic basis of the Creeper trait remains unknown. Here we have utilized ultra-deep sequencing and extensive analysis for targeting causative mutation controlling the Creeper trait. Our results indicated that the deletion of Indian hedgehog (IHH) gene was only found in the whole-genome sequencing data of lethal embryos and Creeper chickens. Large scale segregation analysis demonstrated that the deletion of IHH was fully linked with early embryonic death and the Creeper trait. Expression analysis showed a much lower expression of IHH in Creeper than wild-type chickens. We therefore suggest the deletion of IHH to be the causative mutation for the Creeper trait in chicken. Our findings unravel the genetic basis of the longstanding Creeper phenotype mystery in chicken as the same gene also underlies bone dysplasia in human and mouse, and thus highlight the significance of IHH in animal development and human haploinsufficiency disorders. PMID:27439785

  13. Novel G6B gene variant causes familial autosomal recessive thrombocytopenia and anemia.

    PubMed

    Melhem, Motasem; Abu-Farha, Mohamed; Antony, Dinu; Madhoun, Ashraf Al; Bacchelli, Chiara; Alkayal, Fadi; AlKhairi, Irina; John, Sumi; Alomari, Mohamad; Beales, Phillip L; Alsmadi, Osama

    2017-03-01

    To characterize the underlying genetic and molecular defects in a consanguineous family with lifelong blood disorder manifested with thrombocytopenia (low platelets count) and anemia. Genetic linkage analysis, exome sequencing, and functional genomics were carried out to identify and characterize the defective gene. We identified a novel truncation mutation (p.C108*) in chromosome 6 open reading frame 25 (C6orf25) gene in this family. We also showed the p.C108* mutation was responsible for destabilizing the encoded truncated G6B protein. Unlike the truncated form, wild-type G6B expression resulted in enhanced K562 differentiation into megakaryocytes and erythrocytes. C6orf25, also known as G6B, is an effector protein for the key hematopoiesis regulators, Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2. G6B seems to act through an autosomal recessive mode of disease transmission in this family and regarded as the gene responsible for the observed hematological disorder. This inference is well supported further by in vivo evidence where similar outcomes were reported from G6b(-/-) and SHP1/2 DKO mouse models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Alkaline fermentation of waste sludge causes a significant reduction of antibiotic resistance genes in anaerobic reactors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haining; Zheng, Xiong; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Hui; Wan, Rui; Su, Yinglong

    2017-02-15

    Alkaline fermentation has been reported to be an effective method to recover valuable products from waste sludge. However, to date, the potential effect of alkaline pH on the fate of antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) during anaerobic fermentation of sludge has never been documented. In this study, the target ARGs in sludge was observed to be removed effectively and stably when sludge was anaerobically fermented at pH10. Compared with the control (without pH adjustment), the abundances of target ARGs at pH10 were reduced by 0.87 (sulI), 1.36 (sulII), 0.42 (tet(O)), 1.11 (tet(Q)), 0.79 (tet(C)) and 1.04 (tet(X)) log units. Further investigations revealed that alkaline fermentation shifted the community structures of potential ARGs hosts. Moreover, alkaline fermentation remarkably decreased the quantities and the ARGs-possessing ability of genetic vectors (plasmid DNA, extracellular DNA and phage DNA), which might limit the transfer of ARGs via conjugation, transformation and transduction. These results suggest that the shifted compositions of gene hosts and restricted gene transfer potential might be the critical reasons for the attenuation of ARGs at pH10.

  15. Mutations in DDR2 gene cause SMED with short limbs and abnormal calcifications.

    PubMed

    Bargal, Ruth; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Le Merrer, Martine; Sosna, Jacob; Melki, Judith; Zangen, David H; Smithson, Sarah F; Borochowitz, Zvi; Belostotsky, Ruth; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2009-01-01

    The spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia [SMED] short limb-hand type [SMED-SL] is a rare autosomal-recessive disease, first reported by Borochowitz et al. in 1993.(1) Since then, 14 affected patients have been reported.(2-5) We diagnosed 6 patients from 5 different consanguineous Arab Muslim families from the Jerusalem area with SMED-SL. Additionally, we studied two patients from Algerian and Pakistani ancestry and the parents of the first Jewish patients reported.(1) Using a homozygosity mapping strategy, we located a candidate region on chromosome 1q23 spanning 2.4 Mb. The position of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene within the candidate region and the similarity of the ddr2 knockout mouse to the SMED patients' phenotype prompted us to study this gene(6). We identified three missense mutations c.2254 C > T [R752C], c. 2177 T > G [I726R], c.2138C > T [T713I] and one splice site mutation [IVS17+1g > a] in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene. The results of this study will permit an accurate early prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for families at risk.

  16. Mutations in the gene encoding epsilon-sarcoglycan cause myoclonus-dystonia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zimprich, A; Grabowski, M; Asmus, F; Naumann, M; Berg, D; Bertram, M; Scheidtmann, K; Kern, P; Winkelmann, J; Müller-Myhsok, B; Riedel, L; Bauer, M; Müller, T; Castro, M; Meitinger, T; Strom, T M; Gasser, T

    2001-09-01

    The dystonias are a common clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of movement disorders. More than ten loci for inherited forms of dystonia have been mapped, but only three mutated genes have been identified so far. These are DYT1, encoding torsin A and mutant in the early-onset generalized form, GCH1 (formerly known as DYT5), encoding GTP-cyclohydrolase I and mutant in dominant dopa-responsive dystonia, and TH, encoding tyrosine hydroxylase and mutant in the recessive form of the disease. Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (MDS; DYT11) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bilateral, alcohol-sensitive myoclonic jerks involving mainly the arms and axial muscles. Dystonia, usually torticollis and/or writer's cramp, occurs in most but not all affected patients and may occasionally be the only symptom of the disease. In addition, patients often show prominent psychiatric abnormalities, including panic attacks and obsessive-compulsive behavior. In most MDS families, the disease is linked to a locus on chromosome 7q21 (refs. 11-13). Using a positional cloning approach, we have identified five different heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene for epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE), which we mapped to a refined critical region of about 3.2 Mb. SGCE is expressed in all brain regions examined. Pedigree analysis shows a marked difference in penetrance depending on the parental origin of the disease allele. This is indicative of a maternal imprinting mechanism, which has been demonstrated in the mouse epsilon-sarcoglycan gene.

  17. A splicing mutation in the gene encoding phytoene synthase causes orange coloration in Habanero pepper fruits.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ok Rye; Cho, Myeong-Cheoul; Kim, Byung-Dong; Huh, Jin Hoe

    2010-12-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) display a variety of fruit colors that are reflected by the composition and amount of diverse carotenoid pigments accumulated in the pericarp. Three independent loci, c1, c2, and y, are known to determine the mature color of pepper fruits by their allelic combinations. We examined the inheritance of fruit color in recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from an interspecific cross between C. annuum cv. TF68 (red) and C. chinense cv. Habanero (orange). The c2 gene encodes phytoene synthase (PSY), a rate-limiting enzyme in the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway. TF68 has a dominant c2+ allele whereas Habanero is homozygous for the recessive c2 allele, which determined RIL fruit color. Here we report that the recessive c2 allele has a point mutation in the PSY gene that occurs at a splice acceptor site of the fifth intron leading to both a frame shift and premature translational termination, suggesting that impaired activity of PSY is responsible for orange fruit color. During ripening, PSY is expressed at a significantly high level in orange colored fruits compared to red ones. Interestingly, the PSY gene of red Habanero has a conserved splice acceptor dinucleotide AG. Further analysis suggests that red Habanero is a wild type revertant of the PSY mutant orange Habanero.

  18. Mutations in DDR2 Gene Cause SMED with Short Limbs and Abnormal Calcifications

    PubMed Central

    Bargal, Ruth; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Ben-Neriah, Ziva; Le Merrer, Martine; Sosna, Jacob; Melki, Judith; Zangen, David H.; Smithson, Sarah F.; Borochowitz, Zvi; Belostotsky, Ruth; Raas-Rothschild, Annick

    2009-01-01

    Summary The spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia [SMED] short limb-hand type [SMED-SL] is a rare autosomal-recessive disease, first reported by Borochowitz et al. in 1993.1 Since then, 14 affected patients have been reported.2–5 We diagnosed 6 patients from 5 different consanguineous Arab Muslim families from the Jerusalem area with SMED-SL. Additionally, we studied two patients from Algerian and Pakistani ancestry and the parents of the first Jewish patients reported.1 Using a homozygosity mapping strategy, we located a candidate region on chromosome 1q23 spanning 2.4 Mb. The position of the Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 (DDR2) gene within the candidate region and the similarity of the ddr2 knockout mouse to the SMED patients' phenotype prompted us to study this gene6. We identified three missense mutations c.2254 C > T [R752C], c. 2177 T > G [I726R], c.2138C > T [T713I] and one splice site mutation [IVS17+1g > a] in the conserved sequence encoding the tyrosine kinase domain of the DDR2 gene. The results of this study will permit an accurate early prenatal diagnosis and carrier screening for families at risk. PMID:19110212

  19. A novel mutation in the PEX12 gene causing a peroxisomal biogenesis disorder.

    PubMed

    Konkoľová, Jana; Petrovič, Robert; Chandoga, Ján; Halasová, Edita; Jungová, Petra; Böhmer, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The peroxisomal biogenesis disorders are autosomal recessive diseases morphologically characterised by lacking peroxisomes, biochemically by generalised deficiency of peroxisomal constituent and clinically manifested by serious health problems. Genes involved in the peroxisomal biogenesis are defined as the PEX genes encoding proteins called the peroxins. These peroxins are required for function in assembly of the peroxisomal membrane or in import of the enzymes into the peroxisomes. In this study we present a full overview of the clinical presentation, biochemical and molecular data of patient with Zellweger syndrome from Slovakia. We investigated biochemical metabolites using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The presence of causal ins/del mutations we identified by a Sanger sequencing and RFLP. We reported that the patient was a compound heterozygote for mutations in the gene PEX12: a 2-bp insertion (c.767_768dupAT) and a 2-bp deletion (c.887_888delTC). The first one mentioned is a novel mutation, which has not been reported before. Both mutations create a frameshift of the open reading frame which result a premature STOP codon and generate a complete loss of the C-terminal RING finger domain that is crucial for the correct import of proteins into peroxisomes. We found causal mutations responsible for a severe phenotype, and moreover we noted a novel mutation c.767_768dupAT that has not been reported before. The presence of mutations was studied in all family members, and the resulting data were successfully utilized for prenatal diagnosis.

  20. Impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in HBB gene causing haemoglobinopathies: in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    George Priya Doss, C; Rao, Sethumadhavan

    2009-04-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are being intensively studied to understand the biological basis of complex traits and diseases. Deleterious mutations of the human beta-globin gene (HBB) are responsible for beta-thalassaemia and other haemoglobinopathies, which are the most common genetic diseases of blood. Single amino acid substitutions in the globin chain are the commonest forms of haemoglobinopathy. Although many haemoglobinopathies present similar structural abnormal points, their functions sometimes are different. Here, using computational methods, we analysed the genetic variations that can alter the expression and function of the HBB gene. We applied an evolutionary perspective to screen the SNPs using a sequence homology-based SIFT tool, which suggested that 210 (90%) non-synonymous (ns)SNPs were found to be deleterious. The structure-based approach PolyPhen server suggested that 134 (57%) nsSNPS may disrupt protein function and structure. The PupaSuite tool predicted the phenotypic effect of SNPs on the structure and function of the affected protein. Structure analysis was carried out with the major mutation that occurred in the native protein coded by the HBB gene in HbC, HbD, HbE and HbS. The amino acid residues in the native and mutant modelled protein were further analysed for solvent accessibility, and secondary structure to check the stability of the proteins. The functional analysis presented here may be a good model for further research.

  1. Integrative subcellular proteomic analysis allows accurate prediction of human disease-causing genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Chen, Yiyun; Bajaj, Amol Onkar; Eblimit, Aiden; Xu, Mingchu; Soens, Zachry T.; Wang, Feng; Ge, Zhongqi; Jung, Sung Yun; He, Feng; Li, Yumei; Wensel, Theodore G.; Qin, Jun; Chen, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic profiling on subcellular fractions provides invaluable information regarding both protein abundance and subcellular localization. When integrated with other data sets, it can greatly enhance our ability to predict gene function genome-wide. In this study, we performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis on the light-sensing compartment of photoreceptors called the outer segment (OS). By comparing with the protein profile obtained from the retina tissue depleted of OS, an enrichment score for each protein is calculated to quantify protein subcellular localization, and 84% accuracy is achieved compared with experimental data. By integrating the protein OS enrichment score, the protein abundance, and the retina transcriptome, the probability of a gene playing an essential function in photoreceptor cells is derived with high specificity and sensitivity. As a result, a list of genes that will likely result in human retinal disease when mutated was identified and validated by previous literature and/or animal model studies. Therefore, this new methodology demonstrates the synergy of combining subcellular fractionation proteomics with other omics data sets and is generally applicable to other tissues and diseases. PMID:26912414

  2. Epidermolysis bullosa in Danish Hereford calves is caused by a deletion in LAMC2 gene.

    PubMed

    Murgiano, Leonardo; Wiedemar, Natalie; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Isling, Louise K; Drögemüller, Cord; Agerholm, Jørgen S

    2015-02-07

    Heritable forms of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) constitute a heterogeneous group of skin disorders of genetic aetiology that are characterised by skin and mucous membrane blistering and ulceration in response to even minor trauma. Here we report the occurrence of EB in three Danish Hereford cattle from one herd. Two of the animals were necropsied and showed oral mucosal blistering, skin ulcerations and partly loss of horn on the claws. Lesions were histologically characterized by subepidermal blisters and ulcers. Analysis of the family tree indicated that inbreeding and the transmission of a single recessive mutation from a common ancestor could be causative. We performed whole genome sequencing of one affected calf and searched all coding DNA variants. Thereby, we detected a homozygous 2.4 kb deletion encompassing the first exon of the LAMC2 gene, encoding for laminin gamma 2 protein. This loss of function mutation completely removes the start codon of this gene and is therefore predicted to be completely disruptive. The deletion co-segregates with the EB phenotype in the family and absent in normal cattle of various breeds. Verifying the homozygous private variants present in candidate genes allowed us to quickly identify the causative mutation and contribute to the final diagnosis of junctional EB in Hereford cattle. Our investigation confirms the known role of laminin gamma 2 in EB aetiology and shows the importance of whole genome sequencing in the analysis of rare diseases in livestock.

  3. Alzheimer's disease: a pathogenetic autoimmune disorder caused by herpes simplex in a gene-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Carter, C J

    2010-12-29

    Herpes simplex is implicated in Alzheimer's disease and viral infection produces Alzheimer's disease like pathology in mice. The virus expresses proteins containing short contiguous amino acid stretches (5-9aa "vatches" = viralmatches) homologous to APOE4, clusterin, PICALM, and complement receptor 1, and to over 100 other gene products relevant to Alzheimer's disease, which are also homologous to proteins expressed by other pathogens implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Such homology, reiterated at the DNA level, suggests that gene association studies have been tracking infection, as well as identifying key genes, demonstrating a role for pathogens as causative agents. Vatches may interfere with the function of their human counterparts, acting as dummy ligands, decoy receptors, or via interactome interference. They are often immunogenic, and antibodies generated in response to infection may target their human counterparts, producing protein knockdown, or generating autoimmune responses that may kill the neurones in which the human homologue resides, a scenario supported by immune activation in Alzheimer's disease. These data may classify Alzheimer's disease as an autoimmune disorder created by pathogen mimicry of key Alzheimer's disease-related proteins. It may well be prevented by vaccination and regular pathogen detection and elimination, and perhaps stemmed by immunosuppression or antibody adsorption-related therapies.

  4. Epilepsy-causing sequence variations in SIK1 disrupt synaptic activity response gene expression and affect neuronal morphology.

    PubMed

    Pröschel, Christoph; Hansen, Jeanne N; Ali, Adil; Tuttle, Emily; Lacagnina, Michelle; Buscaglia, Georgia; Halterman, Marc W; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2017-02-01

    SIK1 syndrome is a newly described developmental epilepsy disorder caused by heterozygous mutations in the salt-inducible kinase SIK1. To better understand the pathophysiology of SIK1 syndrome, we studied the effects of SIK1 pathogenic sequence variations in human neurons. Primary human fetal cortical neurons were transfected with a lentiviral vector to overexpress wild-type and mutant SIK1 protein. We evaluated the transcriptional activity of known downstream gene targets in neurons expressing mutant SIK1 compared with wild type. We then assayed neuronal morphology by measuring neurite length, number and branching. Truncating SIK1 sequence variations were associated with abnormal MEF2C transcriptional activity and decreased MEF2C protein levels. Epilepsy-causing SIK1 sequence variations were associated with significantly decreased expression of ARC (activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated) and other synaptic activity response element genes. Assay of mRNA levels for other MEF2C target genes NR4A1 (Nur77) and NRG1, found significantly, decreased the expression of these genes as well. The missense p.(Pro287Thr) SIK1 sequence variation was associated with abnormal neuronal morphology, with significant decreases in mean neurite length, mean number of neurites and a significant increase in proximal branches compared with wild type. Epilepsy-causing SIK1 sequence variations resulted in abnormalities in the MEF2C-ARC pathway of neuronal development and synapse activity response. This work provides the first insights into the mechanisms of pathogenesis in SIK1 syndrome, and extends the ARX-MEF2C pathway in the pathogenesis of developmental epilepsy.

  5. Mutation of the Erwinia amylovora argD gene causes arginine auxotrophy, nonpathogenicity in apples, and reduced virulence in pears.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Laura S; Lehman, Brian L; Peter, Kari A; McNellis, Timothy W

    2014-11-01

    Fire blight is caused by Erwinia amylovora and is the most destructive bacterial disease of apples and pears worldwide. In this study, we found that E. amylovora argD(1000)::Tn5, an argD Tn5 transposon mutant that has the Tn5 transposon inserted after nucleotide 999 in the argD gene-coding region, was an arginine auxotroph that did not cause fire blight in apple and had reduced virulence in immature pear fruits. The E. amylovora argD gene encodes a predicted N-acetylornithine aminotransferase enzyme, which is involved in the production of the amino acid arginine. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type argD gene complemented both the nonpathogenic and the arginine auxotrophic phenotypes of the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant. However, even when mixed with virulent E. amylovora cells and inoculated onto immature apple fruit, the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant still failed to grow, while the virulent strain grew and caused disease. Furthermore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid was stably maintained in the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant growing in host tissues without any antibiotic selection. Therefore, the pCR2.1-argD complementation plasmid could be useful for the expression of genes, markers, and reporters in E. amylovora growing in planta, without concern about losing the plasmid over time. The ArgD protein cannot be considered an E. amylovora virulence factor because the argD(1000)::Tn5 mutant was auxotrophic and had a primary metabolism defect. Nevertheless, these results are informative about the parasitic nature of the fire blight disease interaction, since they indicate that E. amylovora cannot obtain sufficient arginine from apple and pear fruit tissues or from apple vegetative tissues, either at the beginning of the infection process or after the infection has progressed to an advanced state.

  6. The Maize Low-Phytic Acid Mutant lpa2 Is Caused by Mutation in an Inositol Phosphate Kinase Gene

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jinrui; Wang, Hongyu; Wu, Yunsheng; Hazebroek, Jan; Meeley, Robert B.; Ertl, David S.

    2003-01-01

    Reduced phytic acid content in seeds is a desired goal for genetic improvement in several crops. Low-phytic acid mutants have been used in genetic breeding, but it is not known what genes are responsible for the low-phytic acid phenotype. Using a reverse genetics approach, we found that the maize (Zea mays) low-phytic acid lpa2 mutant is caused by mutation in an inositol phosphate kinase gene. The maize inositol phosphate kinase (ZmIpk) gene was identified through sequence comparison with human and Arabidopsis Ins(1,3,4)P3 5/6-kinase genes. The purified recombinant ZmIpk protein has kinase activity on several inositol polyphosphates, including Ins(1,3,4)P3, Ins(3,5,6)P3, Ins(3,4,5,6)P4, and Ins(1,2,5,6)P4. The ZmIpk mRNA is expressed in the embryo, the organ where phytic acid accumulates in maize seeds. The ZmIpk Mutator insertion mutants were identified from a Mutator F2 family. In the ZmIpk Mu insertion mutants, seed phytic acid content is reduced approximately 30%, and inorganic phosphate is increased about 3-fold. The mutants also accumulate myo-inositol and inositol phosphates as in the lpa2 mutant. Allelic tests showed that the ZmIpk Mu insertion mutants are allelic to the lpa2. Southern-blot analysis, cloning, and sequencing of the ZmIpk gene from lpa2 revealed that the lpa2-1 allele is caused by the genomic sequence rearrangement in the ZmIpk locus and the lpa2-2 allele has a nucleotide mutation that generated a stop codon in the N-terminal region of the ZmIpk open reading frame. These results provide evidence that ZmIpk is one of the kinases responsible for phytic acid biosynthesis in developing maize seeds. PMID:12586875

  7. Grey, a novel mutation in the murine Lyst gene, causes the beige phenotype by skipping of exon 25.

    PubMed

    Runkel, Fabian; Büssow, Heinrich; Seburn, Kevin L; Cox, Gregory A; Ward, Diane McVey; Kaplan, Jerry; Franz, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    The murine beige mutant phenotype and the human Chediak-Higashi syndrome are caused by mutations in the murine Lyst (lysosomal trafficking regulator) gene and the human CHS gene, respectively. In this report we have analyzed a novel murine mutant Lyst allele, called Lyst(bg-grey), that had been found in an ENU mutation screen and named grey because of the grey coat color of affected mice. The phenotype caused by the Lyst(bg-grey) mutation was inherited in a recessive fashion. Melanosomes of melanocytes associated with hair follicles and the choroid layer of the eye, as well as melanosomes in the neural tube-derived pigment epithelium of the retina, were larger and irregularly shaped in homozygous mutants compared with those of wild-type controls. Secretory vesicles in dermal mast cells of the mutant skin were enlarged as well. Test crosses with beige homozygous mutant mice (Lyst(bg)) showed that double heterozygotes (Lyst(bg)/Lyst(bg-grey)) were phenotypically indistinguishable from either homozygous parent, demonstrating that the ENU mutation was an allele of the murine Lyst gene. RT-PCR analyses revealed the skipping of exon 25 in Lyst(bg-grey) mutants, which is predicted to cause a missense D2399E mutation and the loss of the following 77 amino acids encoded by exon 25 but leave the C-terminal end of the protein intact. Analysis of the genomic Lyst locus around exon 25 showed that the splice donor at the end of exon 25 showed a T-to-C transition point mutation. Western blot analysis suggests that the Lyst(bg-grey) mutation causes instability of the LYST protein. Because the phenotype of Lyst(bg) and Lyst(bg-grey) mutants is indistinguishable, at least with respect to melanosomes and secretory granules in mast cells, the Lyst(bg-grey) mutation defines a critical region for the stability of the murine LYST protein.

  8. Mutation of a U2 snRNA gene causes global disruption of alternative splicing and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yichang; Mu, John C; Ackerman, Susan L

    2012-01-20

    Although uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs) are essential for pre-mRNA splicing, little is known regarding their function in the regulation of alternative splicing or of the biological consequences of their dysfunction in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that mutation of Rnu2-8, one of the mouse multicopy U2 snRNA genes, causes ataxia and neurodegeneration. Coincident with the observed pathology, the level of mutant U2 RNAs was highest in the cerebellum and increased after granule neuron maturation. Furthermore, neuron loss was strongly dependent on the dosage of mutant and wild-type snRNA genes. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a group of alternative splicing events, including the splicing of small introns, which were disrupted in the mutant cerebellum. Our results suggest that the expression of mammalian U2 snRNA genes, previously presumed to be ubiquitous, is spatially and temporally regulated, and dysfunction of a single U2 snRNA causes neuron degeneration through distortion of pre-mRNA splicing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Global Disruption of Alternative Splicing and Neurodegeneration Is Caused by Mutation of a U2 snRNA Gene

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yichang; Mu, John C.; Ackerman, Susan L.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Although uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (U-snRNAs) are essential for pre-mRNA splicing, little is known regarding their function in the regulation of alternative splicing or of the biological consequences of their dysfunction in mammals. Here, we demonstrate that mutation of Rnu2–8, one of the mouse multicopy U2 snRNA genes, causes ataxia and neurodegeneration. Coincident with the observed pathology, the level of mutant U2 RNAs was highest in the cerebellum and increased after granule neuron maturation. Furthermore, neuron loss was strongly dependent on the dosage of mutant and wild type snRNA genes. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a group of alternative splicing events, including the splicing of small introns, which were disrupted in the mutant cerebellum. Our results suggest that the expression of mammalian U2 snRNA genes, previously presumed to be ubiquitious, is spatially and temporally regulated, and dysfunction of a single U2 snRNA causes neuron degeneration through distortion of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:22265417

  10. Becker Muscular Dystrophy (BMD) caused by duplication of exons 3-6 of the dystrophin gene presenting as dilated cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, A.C.; Allingham-Hawkins, D.J.; Becker, L.

    1994-09-01

    X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy (XLCM) is a progressive myocardial disease presenting with congestive heart failure in teenage males without clinical signs of skeletal myopathy. Tight linkage of XLCM to the DMD locus has been demonstrated; it has been suggested that, at least in some families, XLCM is a {open_quotes}dystrophinopathy.{close_quotes} We report a 14-year-old boy who presented with acute heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. He had no history of muscle weakness, but physical examination revealed pseudohypertrophy of the calf muscles. He subsequently received a heart transplantation. Family history was negative. Serum CK level at the time of diagnosis was 10,416. Myocardial biopsy showed no evidence of carditis. Dystrophin staining of cardiac and skeletal muscle with anti-sera to COOH and NH{sub 2}termini showed a patchy distribution of positivity suggestive of Becker muscular dystrophy. Analysis of 18 of the 79 dystrophin exons detected a duplication that included exons 3-6. The proband`s mother has an elevated serum CK and was confirmed to be a carrier of the same duplication. A mutation in the muscle promotor region of the dystrophin gene has been implicated in the etiology of SLCM. However, Towbin et al. (1991) argued that other 5{prime} mutations in the dystrophin gene could cause selective cardiomyopathy. The findings in our patient support the latter hypothesis. This suggests that there are multiple regions in the dystrophin gene which, when disrupted, can cause isolated dilated cardiomyopathy.

  11. Hartnup disorder is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the neutral amino acid transporter SLC6A19.

    PubMed

    Seow, Heng F; Bröer, Stefan; Bröer, Angelika; Bailey, Charles G; Potter, Simon J; Cavanaugh, Juleen A; Rasko, John E J

    2004-09-01

    Hartnup disorder (OMIM 234500) is an autosomal recessive abnormality of renal and gastrointestinal neutral amino acid transport noted for its clinical variability. We localized a gene causing Hartnup disorder to chromosome 5p15.33 and cloned a new gene, SLC6A19, in this region. SLC6A19 is a sodium-dependent and chloride-independent neutral amino acid transporter, expressed predominately in kidney and intestine, with properties of system B(0). We identified six mutations in SLC6A19 that cosegregated with disease in the predicted recessive manner, with most affected individuals being compound heterozygotes. The disease-causing mutations that we tested reduced neutral amino acid transport function in vitro. Population frequencies for the most common mutated SLC6A19 alleles are 0.007 for 517G --> A and 0.001 for 718C --> T. Our findings indicate that SLC6A19 is the long-sought gene that is mutated in Hartnup disorder; its identification provides the opportunity to examine the inconsistent multisystemic features of this disorder.

  12. Inactivation of the UGPase1 gene causes genic male sterility and endosperm chalkiness in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Woo, Mi-Ok; Ham, Tae-Ho; Ji, Hyeon-So; Choi, Min-Seon; Jiang, Wenzhu; Chu, Sang-Ho; Piao, Rihua; Chin, Joong-Hyoun; Kim, Jung-A; Park, Bong Soo; Seo, Hak Soo; Jwa, Nam-Soo; McCouch, Susan; Koh, Hee-Jong

    2008-04-01

    A rice genic male-sterility gene ms-h is recessive and has a pleiotropic effect on the chalky endosperm. After fine mapping, nucleotide sequencing analysis of the ms-h gene revealed a single nucleotide substitution at the 3'-splice junction of the 14th intron of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 1 (UGPase1; EC2.7.7.9) gene, which causes the expression of two mature transcripts with abnormal sizes caused by the aberrant splicing. An in vitro functional assay showed that both proteins encoded by the two abnormal transcripts have no UGPase activity. The suppression of UGPase by the introduction of a UGPase1-RNAi construct in wild-type plants nearly eliminated seed set because of the male defect, with developmental retardation similar to the ms-h mutant phenotype, whereas overexpression of UGPase1 in ms-h mutant plants restored male fertility and the transformants produced T(1) seeds that segregated into normal and chalky endosperms. In addition, both phenotypes were co-segregated with the UGPase1 transgene in segregating T(1) plants, which demonstrates that UGPase1 has functional roles in both male sterility and the development of a chalky endosperm. Our results suggest that UGPase1 plays a key role in pollen development as well as seed carbohydrate metabolism.

  13. Maternal uniparental isodisomy and heterodisomy on chromosome 6 encompassing a CUL7 gene mutation causing 3M syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Okamoto, N; Kosaki, K; Yorifuji, T; Shimokawa, O; Mishima, H; Yoshiura, K-i; Harada, N

    2011-11-01

    We report a case of segmental uniparental maternal hetero- and isodisomy involving the whole of chromosome 6 (mat-hUPD6 and mat-iUPD6) and a cullin 7 (CUL7) gene mutation in a Japanese patient with 3M syndrome. 3M syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation that was recently reported to involve mutations in the CUL7 or obscurin-like 1 (OBSL1) genes. We encountered a patient with severe growth retardation, an inverted triangular gloomy face, an inverted triangle-shaped head, slender long bones, inguinal hernia, hydrocele testis, mild ventricular enlargement, and mild mental retardation. Sequence analysis of the CUL7 gene of the patient revealed a homozygous missense mutation, c.2975G>C. Genotype analysis using a single nucleotide polymorphism array revealed two mat-hUPD and two mat-iUPD regions involving the whole of chromosome 6 and encompassing CUL7. 3M syndrome caused by complete paternal iUPD of chromosome 6 involving a CUL7 mutation has been reported, but there have been no reports describing 3M syndrome with maternal UPD of chromosome 6. Our results represent a combination of iUPDs and hUPDs from maternal chromosome 6 involving a CUL7 mutation causing 3M syndrome.

  14. Mutations in the HSP27 (HSPB1) gene cause dominant, recessive, and sporadic distal HMN/CMT type 2.

    PubMed

    Houlden, H; Laura, M; Wavrant-De Vrièze, F; Blake, J; Wood, N; Reilly, M M

    2008-11-18

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is the most common inherited neuromuscular disorder and is characterized by significant clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Recently, mutations in both the small heat shock protein 27 (HSP27 or HSPB1) and 22 (HSP22 or HSPB8) genes have been reported to cause autosomal dominant CMT with minimal sensory involvement (CMT 2F/CMT2L) and autosomal dominant distal hereditary motor neuropathy type II (dHMN II). We analyzed the HSPB1 and HSPB8 genes in a large clinically well-characterized series of dHMN and CMT type 2 (CMT2) cases and families using linkage analysis and direct sequencing of these genes. We identified a novel homozygous mutation in the alpha-crystallin domain of HSPB1 segregating in an autosomal recessive fashion in a family with distal HMN/CMT2. A further four heterozygous HSPB1 mutations were identified in four autosomal dominant families dHMN/CMT2, and two sporadic cases were identified with probable de novo mutations. In the autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive families, there were no clinical sensory findings, but reduced sural nerve action potential amplitudes were found in some affected individuals, indicating that long sensory axons are mildly affected in this predominantly motor disorder. This extends the clinical and electrophysiologic spectrum of HSPB1 mutations and identifies four unreported dominant HSPB1 mutations and the first family where the HSPB1 mutation acts in a recessive way to cause distal HMN.

  15. Double-stranded RNA made in C. elegans neurons can enter the germline and cause transgenerational gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Devanapally, Sindhuja; Ravikumar, Snusha; Jose, Antony M.

    2015-01-01

    An animal that can transfer gene-regulatory information from somatic cells to germ cells may be able to communicate changes in the soma from one generation to the next. In the worm Caenorhabditis elegans, expression of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in neurons can result in the export of dsRNA-derived mobile RNAs to other distant cells. Here, we show that neuronal mobile RNAs can cause transgenerational silencing of a gene of matching sequence in germ cells. Consistent with neuronal mobile RNAs being forms of dsRNA, silencing of target genes that are expressed either in somatic cells or in the germline requires the dsRNA-selective importer SID-1. In contrast to silencing in somatic cells, which requires dsRNA expression in each generation, silencing in the germline is heritable after a single generation of exposure to neuronal mobile RNAs. Although initiation of inherited silencing within the germline requires SID-1, a primary Argonaute RDE-1, a secondary Argonaute HRDE-1, and an RNase D homolog MUT-7, maintenance of inherited silencing is independent of SID-1 and RDE-1, but requires HRDE-1 and MUT-7. Inherited silencing can persist for >25 generations in the absence of the ancestral source of neuronal dsRNA. Therefore, our results suggest that sequence-specific regulatory information in the form of dsRNA can be transferred from neurons to the germline to cause transgenerational silencing. PMID:25646479

  16. Hypotrichosis and juvenile macular dystrophy caused by CDH3 mutation: A candidate disease for retinal gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mandeep S.; Broadgate, Suzanne; Mathur, Ranjana; Holt, Richard; Halford, Stephanie; MacLaren, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes childhood visual impairment. HJMD is caused by mutations in CDH3 which encodes cadherin-3, a protein expressed in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells that may have a key role in intercellular adhesion. We present a case of HJMD and analyse its phenotypic and molecular characteristics to assess the potential for retinal gene therapy as a means of preventing severe visual loss in this condition. Longitudinal in vivo imaging of the retina showed the relative anatomical preservation of the macula, which suggested the presence of a therapeutic window for gene augmentation therapy to preserve visual acuity. The coding sequence of CDH3 fits within the packaging limit of recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors that have been shown to be safe in clinical trials and can efficiently target RPE cells. This report expands the number of reported cases of HJMD and highlights the phenotypic characteristics to consider when selecting candidates for retinal gene therapy. PMID:27157923

  17. In Silico Analysis of SNPs in PARK2 and PINK1 Genes That Potentially Cause Autosomal Recessive Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Osama Mirghani; Mirghani, Yousra Abdelazim; Hassan, Mohamed Ahmed Salih

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder. Mutations in PINK1 are the second most common agents causing autosomal recessive, early onset PD. We aimed to identify the pathogenic SNPs in PARK2 and PINK1 using in silico prediction software and their effect on the structure, function, and regulation of the proteins. Materials and Methods. We carried out in silico prediction of structural effect of each SNP using different bioinformatics tools to predict substitution influence on protein structure and function. Result. Twenty-one SNPs in PARK2 gene were found to affect transcription factor binding activity. 185 SNPs were found to affect splicing. Ten SNPs were found to affect the miRNA binding site. Two SNPs rs55961220 and rs56092260 affected the structure, function, and stability of Parkin protein. In PINK1 gene only one SNP (rs7349186) was found to affect the structure, function, and stability of the PINK1 protein. Ten SNPs were found to affect the microRNA binding site. Conclusion. Better understanding of Parkinson's disease caused by mutations in PARK2 and PINK1 genes was achieved using in silico prediction. Further studies should be conducted with a special consideration of the ethnic diversity of the different populations. PMID:28127307

  18. Role of tagged SNPs of the AGT gene in causing susceptibility to essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gunda, Padma; Nagalingam, Swapna; Tirunilai, Padma

    Angiotensinogen (AGT) is one of the candidate genes that has been extensively investigated for association of its variants with essential hypertension. Studies focusing on the contribution of tagged single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the AGT gene are limited and lacking from Indian population. Hence, the present study was carried out to examine the role of five tagged SNPs viz., g.6147G>A (rs7539020), g.5978A>G (rs2493134); g.6241T>C (rs1078499), g.7781G>T (rs11122577), and g.5855G>A (rs3789678) in the development of hypertension. 202 hypertensives and 222 normotensives were screened for five tagged SNPs using the method of polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). The present study revealed significant association of g.5855G>A polymorphism with essential hypertension in different logistic regression models wherein protection was conferred by g.5855G>A against developing the condition. The polymorphism led to the creation of new exonic splicing enhancer and destruction of exonic splicing silencer site thereby enhancing the process of mRNA splicing. The haplotypes AGTG and GACG were found to have a significant protective effect. Other polymorphisms did not show any significant association with hypertension. The present study is the first one to report the protective role of g.5855G>A polymorphism in the development of essential hypertension. The results reflect possibility of ethnic variation in the contribution of g.5855G>A polymorphism of the AGT gene to essential hypertension.

  19. Homozygous mutation in SAMHD1 gene causes cerebral vasculopathy and early onset stroke.

    PubMed

    Xin, Baozhong; Jones, Stephen; Puffenberger, Erik G; Hinze, Claas; Bright, Alicia; Tan, Haiyan; Zhou, Aimin; Wu, Guiyun; Vargus-Adams, Jilda; Agamanolis, Dimitris; Wang, Heng

    2011-03-29

    We describe an autosomal recessive condition characterized with cerebral vasculopathy and early onset of stroke in 14 individuals in Old Order Amish. The phenotype of the condition was highly heterogeneous, ranging from severe developmental disability to normal schooling. Cerebral vasculopathy was a major hallmark of the condition with a common theme of multifocal stenoses and aneurysms in large arteries, accompanied by chronic ischemic changes, moyamoya morphology, and evidence of prior acute infarction and hemorrhage. Early signs of the disease included mild intrauterine growth restriction, infantile hypotonia, and irritability, followed by failure to thrive and short stature. Acrocyanosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, chilblain lesions, low-pitch hoarse voice, glaucoma, migraine headache, and arthritis were frequently observed. The early onset or recurrence of strokes secondary to cerebral vasculopathy seems to always be associated with poor outcomes. The elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), IgG, neopterin, and TNF-α found in these patients suggested an immune disorder. Through genomewide homozygosity mapping, we localized the disease gene to chromosome (Chr) 20q11.22-q12. Candidate gene sequencing identified a homozygous mutation, c.1411-2A > G, in the SAMHD1 gene, being associated with this condition. The mutation appeared at the splice-acceptor site of intron 12, resulted in the skipping of exon 13, and gave rise to an aberrant protein with in-frame deletion of 31 amino acids. Immunoblotting analysis showed lack of mutant SAMHD1 protein expression in affected cell lines. The function of SAMHD1 remains unclear, but the inflammatory vasculopathies of the brain found in the patients with SAMHD1 mutation indicate its important roles in immunoregulation and cerebral vascular hemeostasis.

  20. Herpesvirus saimiri Tip gene causes T-cell lymphomas in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wehner, L E; Schröder, N; Kamino, K; Friedrich, U; Biesinger, B; Rüther, U

    2001-02-01

    New World primates develop T-cell lymphomas on infection with Herpesvirus saimiri. To investigate the oncogenic potential of the Tip gene of Herpesvirus saimiri strain C488, we tried to establish transgenic mice that should express Tip under control of a constitutive promoter. Although transgene-positive embryos were found, lines could not be established. However, using a system in which the transgene has to be activated by a Cre recombinase-mediated deletion, we were able to obtain several Tip transgenic lines. At high expression levels, the mice developed T-cell lymphomas. Thus, Tip can induce lymphomas and is therefore very likely responsible for the oncogenicity of Herpesvirus saimiri.