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Sample records for plunging liquid jet

  1. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  2. Numerical Investigation of Vertical Plunging Jet Using a Hybrid Multifluid–VOF Multiphase CFD Solver

    DOE PAGES

    Shonibare, Olabanji Y.; Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid multiphase flow solver has been used to conduct simulations of a vertical plunging liquid jet. This solver combines a multifluid methodology with selective interface sharpening to enable simulation of both the initial jet impingement and the long-time entrained bubble plume phenomena. Models are implemented for variable bubble size capturing and dynamic switching of interface sharpened regions to capture transitions between the initially fully segregated flow types into the dispersed bubbly flow regime. It was found that the solver was able to capture the salient features of the flow phenomena under study and areas for quantitative improvement havemore » been explored and identified. In particular, a population balance approach is employed and detailed calibration of the underlying models with experimental data is required to enable quantitative prediction of bubble size and distribution to capture the transition between segregated and dispersed flow types with greater fidelity.« less

  3. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  4. Dynamics of a cylinder plunging into liquid: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang

    2012-11-01

    The impact of a cylinder on a liquid surface and subsequent events are investigated numerically. The flows are resolved by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the Cahn-Hilliard equation. Moving contact lines are modeled by a diffuse interface model (Seppecher 1996; Jaqcmin 2000), and contact-angle hysteresis is included (Ding&Spelt 2008). The method is validated by comparison to the experiments by Aristoff and Bush (2009). Our studies focus on the dynamics of the waves induced by the impact and the cavity collapse behind the cylinder. A variety of parameters affect the flow behaviors such as wettability, impact speed, viscosity etc. Their effects on the transition of the flow phenomena are investigated through parametric simulations over relevant ranges of Weber and Reynolds numbers and contact angles. This work is supposed by the 100 Talents Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11172294).

  5. Determination of heat transfer coefficients in plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Santos, M Victoria; Sansinena, M; Chirife, J; Zaritzky, N

    2014-12-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamic process during the cooling of reproductive biological systems is important to assess and optimize the cryopreservation procedures. The time-temperature curve of a sample immersed in liquid nitrogen enables the calculation of cooling rates and helps to determine whether it is vitrified or undergoes phase change transition. When dealing with cryogenic liquids, the temperature difference between the solid and the sample is high enough to cause boiling of the liquid, and the sample can undergo different regimes such as film and/or nucleate pool boiling. In the present work, the surface heat transfer coefficients (h) for plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen were determined using the measurement of time-temperature curves. When straws filled with ice were used the cooling curve showed an abrupt slope change which was attributed to the transition of film into nucleate pool boiling regime. The h value that fitted each stage of the cooling process was calculated using a numerical finite element program that solves the heat transfer partial differential equation under transient conditions. In the cooling process corresponding to film boiling regime, the h that best fitted experimental results was h=148.12±5.4 W/m(2) K and for nucleate-boiling h=1355±51 W/m(2) K. These values were further validated by predicting the time-temperature curve for French straws filled with a biological fluid system (bovine semen-extender) which undergoes freezing. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental and predicted temperature profiles, further confirming the accuracy of the h values previously determined for the ice-filled straw. These coefficients were corroborated using literature correlations. The determination of the boiling regimes that govern the cooling process when plunging straws in liquid nitrogen constitutes an important issue when trying to optimize cryopreservation procedures. Furthermore, this information can lead to

  6. Determination of heat transfer coefficients in plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Santos, M Victoria; Sansinena, M; Chirife, J; Zaritzky, N

    2014-12-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamic process during the cooling of reproductive biological systems is important to assess and optimize the cryopreservation procedures. The time-temperature curve of a sample immersed in liquid nitrogen enables the calculation of cooling rates and helps to determine whether it is vitrified or undergoes phase change transition. When dealing with cryogenic liquids, the temperature difference between the solid and the sample is high enough to cause boiling of the liquid, and the sample can undergo different regimes such as film and/or nucleate pool boiling. In the present work, the surface heat transfer coefficients (h) for plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen were determined using the measurement of time-temperature curves. When straws filled with ice were used the cooling curve showed an abrupt slope change which was attributed to the transition of film into nucleate pool boiling regime. The h value that fitted each stage of the cooling process was calculated using a numerical finite element program that solves the heat transfer partial differential equation under transient conditions. In the cooling process corresponding to film boiling regime, the h that best fitted experimental results was h=148.12±5.4 W/m(2) K and for nucleate-boiling h=1355±51 W/m(2) K. These values were further validated by predicting the time-temperature curve for French straws filled with a biological fluid system (bovine semen-extender) which undergoes freezing. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental and predicted temperature profiles, further confirming the accuracy of the h values previously determined for the ice-filled straw. These coefficients were corroborated using literature correlations. The determination of the boiling regimes that govern the cooling process when plunging straws in liquid nitrogen constitutes an important issue when trying to optimize cryopreservation procedures. Furthermore, this information can lead to

  7. Whipping of electrified liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-09-23

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally. PMID:25201984

  8. Whipping of electrified liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R.; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally. PMID:25201984

  9. Whipping of electrified liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-09-23

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally.

  10. Cooling rate and ice-crystal measurement in biological specimens plunged into liquid ethane, propane, and Freon 22.

    PubMed

    Ryan, K P; Bald, W B; Neumann, K; Simonsberger, P; Purse, D H; Nicholson, D N

    1990-06-01

    Specimens sandwiched between copper planchettes were plunged up to a depth of 430 mm into coolants used for cryofixation. Hydrated gelatin containing a miniature thermocouple was used to mimic the behaviour of tissue during freezing. Gelatin and red blood cells were used for ice-crystal analysis. Ethane produced the fastest cooling rates and the smallest ice-crystal profiles, and Freon 22 produced the slowest cooling rates and the largest crystal profiles. Smaller crystal profiles were often seen in the centre of the specimens than in subsurface zones. The results show that ethane, rather than propane, should be used for freezing metal-sandwiched freeze-fracture specimens by the plunging method, and probably also in the jet-cooling method. They further suggest that good cryofixation could occur at the centre of thin specimens rather than only at their surfaces. Comparison between theoretical and experimental ice-crystal sizes was satisfactory, indicating that where the experimental parameters can be defined then realistic predictions can be made regarding cryofixation results.

  11. Transient gas jets into liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jane Ming-Chin

    An experimental investigation of the development of high velocity, impulsively initiated gas jets into liquid was conducted in an effort to understand some of the physical processes that occur for a jet of very light fluid into a dense ambient atmosphere. Four gases, refrigerants 12 and 22, nitrogen, and helium were injected into water at nozzle exit Mach numbers from 1.0 to 2.2.The study showed that a gas jet into water develops in at least three stages: startup, transition, and global steady state. The startup is characterized by bubble growth; the growth rate is well predicted by classical bubble-growth theory. Jet transition is marked by axially directed flow, which penetrates through the startup bubble and which forms a cylindrical protrusion along the axis of symmetry. A combination of strong recirculating flow and liquid entrainment causes the startup bubble to deflate and to lift off and move downstream. In the steady state, instantaneous photographs show small-scale fluctuations of the jet boundary, but time-averaged photographs show the expected conical spreading of the steady jet; the measured spreading angles range from 18-25 degrees.However, the most significant finding of this study is that under some conditions, the gas jet into liquid never reaches the global steady state. Instead, the jet boundary exhibits chugging: large nonlinear oscillations which lead to irregular collapses of the gas column followed by explosive outward bursts of gas. The unsteadiness observed is much more violent than the familiar fluctuations typical of constant-density jets. The length scale of the motion is generally on the order of several jet diameters; the time scale is on the order of the period for bubble collapse.It was found that the amplitude and frequency of chugging are strongly dependent on the ratio of the liquid density to the gas density, the jet Mach number, and the operating pressure ratio. The conditions under which unsteadiness occurs were determined

  12. Disintegration of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haenlein, A

    1932-01-01

    This report presents an experimental determination of the process of disintegration and atomization in its simplest form, and the influence of the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized on the disintegration of the jet. Particular attention was paid to the investigation of the process of atomization.

  13. Cavitation bubble behavior inside a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Etienne; Lettry, Jacques; Farhat, Mohamed; Monkewitz, Peter A.; Avellan, François

    2007-06-01

    The growth and collapse of laser-induced vapor cavities inside axisymmetric free-falling liquid water jets have been studied. Bubbles of different size are generated at various distances from the jet axis and the effects on the jet interface are recorded by means of ultrafast cinematography. The configuration is characterized by two dimensionless parameters: the bubble to jet diameter ratio δ and the eccentricity coefficient ɛ defined as the radius of bubble generation divided by the jet radius. For high δ and ɛ, microjets and droplets are ejected from the liquid jet at speeds exceeding 100m/s. The observed jet fragmentation shows similarities with experiments conducted on a liquid mercury jet hit by a pulsed proton beam, a candidate configuration for future accelerator based facilities.

  14. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  15. Dynamics of liquid films and thin jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of liquid films and thin jets as one- and two-dimensional continuums is examined. The equations of motion have led to solutions for the characteristic speeds of wave propagation for the parameters characterizing the shape. The formal analogy with a compressible fluid indicates the possibility of shock wave generation in films and jets and the formal analogy to the theory of threads and membranes leads to the discovery of some new dynamic effects. The theory is illustrated by examples.

  16. Flapping instability of a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matas, Jean-Philippe; Cartellier, Alain

    2013-01-01

    We study the flapping instability observed when a liquid jet is incompletely atomized by a fast parallel gas stream: the remaining liquid jet is destabilized over a scale large compared with its radius, and breaks into liquid fragments. We characterize the symmetry of this instability and its frequency. The intact liquid length is measured as a function of gas and liquid velocity, and turns out to be longer than the one predicted by Raynal (1997) for a planar mixing layer. The frequency of the instability is measured with a spectral method, and is in agreement with the frequency observed for the planar shear instability, though slightly smaller. The planar, and not helical, symmetry of the instability makes it akin to a flapping instability, observed when a planar liquid sheet is atomized by two planar gas streams. We next measure drop sizes when the flapping instability is present, with a method based on image processing. Measured size distributions are in agreement with distributions observed in a mixing layer geometry for low gas velocities (long tail distribution). The mean drop diameter depends weakly on liquid velocity, and decreases as d10˜Ug0.9. On the contrary, Sauter diameter depends strongly on liquid velocity.

  17. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  18. Liquid jet pumps for two-phase flows

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, R.G.

    1995-06-01

    Isothermal compression of a bubbly secondary fluid in a mixing-throat and diffuser is described by a one-dimensional flow model of a liquid-jet pump. Friction-loss coefficients used in the four equations may be determined experimentally, or taken from the literature. The model reduces to the liquid-jet gas compressor case if the secondary liquid is zero. Conversely, a zero secondary-gas flow reduces the liquid-jet gas and liquid (LJGL) model to that of the familiar liquid-jet liquid pump. A ``jet loss`` occurs in liquid-jet pumps if the nozzle tip is withdrawn from the entrance plane of the throat, and jet loss is included in the efficiency equations. Comparisons are made with published test data for liquid-jet liquid pumps and for liquid-jet gas compressors. The LJGL model is used to explore jet pump responses to two-phase secondary flows, nozzle-to-throat area ratio, and primary-jet velocity. The results are shown in terms of performance curves versus flow ratios. Predicted peak efficiencies are approximately 50 percent. Under sever operating conditions, LJGL pump performance curves exhibit maximum-flow ratios or cut-offs. Cut-offs occurs when two-phase secondary-flow steams attain sonic values at the entry of the mixing throat. A dimensionless number correlates flow-ratio cut-offs with pump geometry and operating conditions. Throat-entry choking of the secondary flow can be predicted, hence avoided, in designing jet pumps to hand two-phase fluids.

  19. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials [preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S-W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  20. Jet interaction in liquid-liquid coaxial injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Sivakumar, D.; Raghunandan, B.N.

    1996-06-01

    Interaction between two conical sheets of liquid formed by a coaxial swirl injector has been studied using water in the annular orifice and potassium permanganate solution in the inner orifice. Experiments using photographic techniques have been conducted to study the influence of the inner jet on outer conical sheet spray characteristics such as spray cone angle and break-up length. The core spray has a strong influence on the outer sheet when the pressure drop in the latter is low. This is attributed to the pressure variations caused by ejector effects. This paper also discusses the merging and separation behavior of the liquid sheets which exhibits hysteresis effect while injector pressure drop is varied.

  1. Multiphase flow of miscible liquids: jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Travis W.; Logia, Alison N.; Fuller, Gerald G.

    2015-05-01

    Drops and jets of liquids that are miscible with the surrounding bulk liquid are present in many processes from cleaning surfaces with the aid of liquid soaps to the creation of biocompatible implants for drug delivery. Although the interactions of immiscible drops and jets show similarities to miscible systems, the small, transient interfacial tension associated with miscible systems create distinct outcomes such as intricate droplet shapes and breakup resistant jets. Experiments have been conducted to understand several basic multiphase flow problems involving miscible liquids. Using high-speed imaging of the morphological evolution of the flows, we have been able to show that these processes are controlled by interfacial tensions. Further multiphase flows include investigating miscible jets, which allow the creation of fibers from inelastic materials that are otherwise difficult to process due to capillary breakup. This work shows that stabilization from the diminishing interfacial tensions of the miscible jets allows various elongated morphologies to be formed.

  2. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-02-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to gain an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in material removal by fluidjet machining processes. Experiments were performed to determine conditions under which the liquid jet impacting a solid material will cause material removal and also to delineate possible physical mechanisms of mass removal at optimum jet-cutting conditions. We have also carried out numerical simulations of jet-induced surface pressure rises and of the material deformation and spallation behavior due to multiple droplet impacts. Results obtained from the experiments and theoretical calculations and their physical implications are also discussed.

  3. Size limits the formation of liquid jets during bubble bursting

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji San; Weon, Byung Mook; Park, Su Ji; Je, Jung Ho; Fezzaa, Kamel; Lee, Wah-Keat

    2011-01-01

    A bubble reaching an air–liquid interface usually bursts and forms a liquid jet. Jetting is relevant to climate and health as it is a source of aerosol droplets from breaking waves. Jetting has been observed for large bubbles with radii of R≫100 μm. However, few studies have been devoted to small bubbles (R<100 μm) despite the entrainment of a large number of such bubbles in sea water. Here we show that jet formation is inhibited by bubble size; a jet is not formed during bursting for bubbles smaller than a critical size. Using ultrafast X-ray and optical imaging methods, we build a phase diagram for jetting and the absence of jetting. Our results demonstrate that jetting in bubble bursting is analogous to pinching-off in liquid coalescence. The coalescence mechanism for bubble bursting may be useful in preventing jet formation in industry and improving climate models concerning aerosol production. PMID:21694715

  4. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet for liquid spray treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitić, S.; Philipps, J.; Hofmann, D.

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets have been intensively studied in recent years due to growing interest in their use for biomedical applications and surface treatments. Either surfaces can be treated by a plasma jet afterglow for cleaning or activation or a material can be deposited by a reactive gas component activated by plasma. Effects of plasma on liquid have been reported several times where the electron spin trapping method was used for radical detection. Here we propose another method of liquid treatment using the atmospheric pressure plasma jet. In the device presented here, liquid was sprayed in droplets from an inner electrode directly into a plasma jet where it was treated and sprayed out by gas flow. Optical end electrical measurements were done for diagnostics of the plasma while electron paramagnetic resonance measurements were used for detection of radicals (\\text{OH},\\text{OOH},\\text{CH} ) produced by plasma treatment of liquids.

  5. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelqvist, E. Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-07

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  6. Splattering during turbulent liquid jet impingement on solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, S.K.; Lienhard, J.H. V . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    In turbulent liquid jet impingement, a spray of droplets often breaks off of the liquid layer formed on the target. This splattering of liquid alters the efficiencies of jet impingement heat transfer processes and chemical containment safety devices, and leads to problems of aerosol formation in jet impingement cleaning processes. In this paper, the authors present a more complete study of splattering and improved correlations that extend and supersede the previous reports on this topic. The authors report experimental results on the amount of splattering for jets of water, isopropanol-water solutions, and soap-water mixtures. Jets were produced by straight tube nozzles of diameter 0.8--5.8 mm, with fully developed turbulent pipe-flow upstream of the nozzle exist. These experiments cover Weber numbers between 130--31,000, Reynolds numbers between 2,700--98,000, and nozzle-to-target separations of 0.2 [<=]l/d[<=]125. Splattering of up to 75 percent of the incoming jet liquid is observed. The results show that only the Weber number and l/d affect the fraction of jet liquid splattered. The presence of surfactants does not alter the splattering. A new correlation for the onset condition for splattering is given. In addition, the authors establish the range of applicability of the model of Lienhard et al. and the authors provide a more accurate set of coefficients for their correlation.

  7. Breakup of a liquid jet in supersonic crossflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.-S.; Karagozian, A. R.

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical study of the breakup of a circular liquid jet injected transversely into a supersonic air stream is conducted. Two different criteria for breakup are explored in the context of a previously developed model for the behavior of liquid jets in compressible crossflow (Heister et al., 1989). The local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980) is explored, in addition to an auxiliary criterion put forth by Clark (1964) based on surface-tension stability. It is found that the local sonic point appears to provide a more reasonable approximation to the actual location of jet breakup, based on comparisons with limited experimental data.

  8. Cavitating Jet Method and System for Oxygenation of Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    Reclamation and re-use of water is critical for space-based life support systems. A number of functions must be performed by any such system including removal of various contaminants and oxygenation. For long-duration space missions, this must be done with a compact, reliable system that requires little or no use of expendables and minimal power. DynaJets cavitating jets can oxidize selected organic compounds with much greater energy efficiency than ultrasonic devices typically used in sonochemistry. The focus of this work was to develop cavitating jets to simultaneously accomplish the functions of oxygenation and removal of contaminants of importance to space-structured water reclamation systems. The innovation is a method to increase the concentration of dissolved oxygen or other gasses in a liquid. It utilizes a particular form of novel cavitating jet operating at low to moderate pressures to achieve a high-efficiency means of transporting and mixing the gas into the liquid. When such a jet is utilized to simultaneously oxygenate the liquid and to oxidize organic compounds within the liquid, such as those in waste water, the rates of contaminant removal are increased. The invention is directed toward an increase in the dissolved gas content of a liquid, in general, and the dissolved oxygen content of a liquid in particular.

  9. Contraction of an inviscid swirling liquid jet: Comparison with results for a rotating granular jet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.

    2007-11-01

    In honor of the tercentenary of Leonhard Euler, we report a new solution of the Euler equations for the shape of an inviscid rotating liquid jet emanating from a tube of inner radius R0 aligned with gravity. Jet contraction is dependent on the exit swirl parameter χ0 = R0 φ0/U0 where φ0 and U0 are the uniform rotation rate and axial velocity of the liquid at the exit. The results reveal that rotation reduces the rate of jet contraction. In the limit χ0-> 0 one recovers the contraction profile for a non-rotating jet and the limit χ0->∞ gives a jet of constant radius. In contrast, experiments and a kinematic model for a rotating non-cohesive granular jet show that it expands rather than contracts when a certain small angular velocity is exceeded. The blossoming profiles are parabolic in nature. The model predicts a jet of uniform radius for χ0-> 0 and a jet with an initially horizontal trajectory in the limit χ0->∞.

  10. Time-resolved proper orthogonal decomposition of liquid jet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2009-11-01

    New insight into the mechanism of liquid jet in crossflow atomization is provided by an analysis technique based on proper orthogonal decomposition and spectral analysis. Data are provided in the form of high-speed videos of the jet near field from experiments over a broad range of injection conditions. For each condition, proper orthogonal modes (POMs) are generated and ordered by intensity variation relative to the time average. The feasibility of jet dynamics reduction by truncation of the POM series to the first few modes is then examined as a function of crossflow velocity for laminar and turbulent liquid injection. At conditions where the jet breaks up into large chunks of liquid, the superposition of specific orthogonal modes is observed to track long waves traveling along the liquid column. The temporal coefficients of these modes can be described as a bandpass spectrum that shifts toward higher frequencies as the crossflow velocity is increased. The dynamic correlation of these modes is quantified by their cross-power spectrum density. Based on the frequency and wavelength extracted from the videos, the observed traveling waves are linked to the linearly fastest growing wave of Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The gas boundary layer thickness at the gas-liquid shear layer emerges at the end of this study as the dominant length scale of jet dynamics at moderate Weber numbers.

  11. Controls on Filling and Evacuation of Sediment in Waterfall Plunge Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Many waterfalls are characterized by the presence of deep plunge pools that experience periods of sediment fill and evacuation. These cycles of sediment fill are a first order control on the relative magnitude of lateral versus vertical erosion at the base of waterfalls, as vertical incision requires cover-free plunge pools to expose the bedrock floor, while lateral erosion can occur when pools are partially filled and plunge-pool walls are exposed. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model describing sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools, limiting our ability to predict waterfall retreat. To address this knowledge gap, we performed detailed laboratory experiments measuring plunge-pool sediment transport capacity (Qsc_pool) under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. Our experimental plunge-pool sediment transport capacity measurements match well with a mechanistic model we developed which combines existing waterfall jet theory with a modified Rouse profile to predict sediment transport capacity as a function of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration at the plunge-pool lip. Comparing the transport capacity of plunge pools to lower gradient portions of rivers (Qsc_river) shows that, for transport limited conditions, plunge pools fill with sediment under modest water discharges when Qsc_river > Qsc_pool, and empty to bedrock under high discharges when Qsc_pool > Qsc_river. These results are consistent with field observations of sand-filled plunge pools with downstream boulder rims, implying filling and excavation of plunge pools over single-storm timescales. Thus, partial filling of waterfall plunge pools may provide a mechanism to promote lateral undercutting and retreat of waterfalls in homogeneous rock in which plunge-pool vertical incision occurs during brief large floods that expose bedrock, whereas lateral erosion may prevail during smaller events.

  12. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  13. Experimental investigation of charged liquid jet efflux from a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakin, A. I.; Belov, P. A.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    The shapes and electrical characteristics of charged liquid (water, ethanol, glycerol, castor oil) jets emitted from a metal capillary have been experimentally studied depending on the applied high voltage. A map of efflux regimes in the flow velocity-applied voltage coordinates is constructed for water. The effects of medium viscosity, surface tension, and charge relaxation time on the laws of jet efflux are analyzed.

  14. The breakup of a liquid jet at microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Sung P.; Honohan, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    The parameter ranges in which a viscous liquid jet emanating into a viscous gas will breakup in three different modes are calculated. The three modes of jet breakup are: Rayleigh mode of capillary pinching, Taylor mode of atomization, and the absolute instability mode. The apparatus designed for elucidating these three different modes of instability is described. Some preliminary results of the ongoing ground based experiments will be reported.

  15. Modeling of Turbulence Effect on Liquid Jet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, H. P.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effect on the atomization process. Such turbulent flow phenomena are encountered in most practical applications of common liquid spray devices. This research aims to model the effects of turbulence occurring inside a cylindrical liquid jet to its atomization process. The two widely used atomization models Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz and the Taylor analogy breakup (TAB) of O'Rourke and Amsden portraying primary liquid jet disintegration and secondary droplet breakup, respectively, are examined. Additional terms are formulated and appropriately implemented into these two models to account for the turbulence effect. Results for the flow conditions examined in this study indicate that the turbulence terms are significant in comparison with other terms in the models. In the primary breakup regime, the turbulent liquid jet tends to break up into large drops while its intact core is slightly shorter than those without turbulence. In contrast, the secondary droplet breakup with the inside liquid turbulence consideration produces smaller drops. Computational results indicate that the proposed models provide predictions that agree reasonably well with available measured data.

  16. Sediment transport through self-adjusting, bedrock-walled waterfall plunge pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-05-01

    Many waterfalls have deep plunge pools that are often partially or fully filled with sediment. Sediment fill may control plunge-pool bedrock erosion rates, partially determine habitat availability for aquatic organisms, and affect sediment routing and debris flow initiation. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model to describe sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools. Here we develop an analytical model to predict steady-state plunge-pool depth and sediment-transport capacity by combining existing jet theory with sediment transport mechanics. Our model predicts plunge-pool sediment-transport capacity increases with increasing river discharge, flow velocity, and waterfall drop height and decreases with increasing plunge-pool depth, radius, and grain size. We tested the model using flume experiments under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. The model and experiments show that through morphodynamic feedbacks, plunge pools aggrade to reach shallower equilibrium pool depths in response to increases in imposed sediment supply. Our theory for steady-state pool depth matches the experiments with an R2 value of 0.8, with discrepancies likely due to model simplifications of the hydraulics and sediment transport. Analysis of 75 waterfalls suggests that the water depths in natural plunge pools are strongly influenced by upstream sediment supply, and our model provides a mass-conserving framework to predict sediment and water storage in waterfall plunge pools for sediment routing, habitat assessment, and bedrock erosion modeling.

  17. Combined aerodynamic and electrostatic atomization of dielectric liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourmatzis, Agissilaos; Ergene, Egemen L.; Shrimpton, John S.; Kyritsis, Dimitrios C.; Mashayek, Farzad; Huo, Ming

    2012-07-01

    The electrical and atomization performance of a plane-plane charge injection atomizer using a dielectric liquid, and operating at pump pressures ranging from 15 to 35 bar corresponding to injection velocities of up to 50 m/s, is explored via low current electrical measurements, spray imaging and phase Doppler anemometry. The work is aimed at understanding the contribution of electrostatic charging relevant to typical higher pressure fuel injection systems such as those employed in the aeronautical, automotive and marine sectors. Results show that mean-specific charge increases with injection velocity significantly. The effect of electrostatic charge is advantageous at the 15-35 bar range, and an arithmetic mean diameter D 10 as low as 0.2 d is achievable in the spray core and lower still in the periphery where d is the orifice diameter. Using the data available from this higher pressure system and from previous high Reynolds number systems (Shrimpton and Yule Exp Fluids 26:460-469, 1999), the promotion of primary atomization has been analysed by examining the effect that charge has on liquid jet surface and liquid jet bulk instability. The results suggest that for the low charge density Q v ~ 2 C/m3 cases under consideration here, a significant increase in primary atomization is observed due to a combination of electrical and aerodynamic forces acting on the jet surface, attributed to the significantly higher jet Weber number ( We j) when compared to low injection pressure cases. Analysis of Sauter mean diameter results shows that for jets with elevated specific charge density of the order Q v ~ 6 C/m3, the jet creates droplets that a conventional turbulent jet would, but with a significantly lower power requirement. This suggests that `turbulent' primary atomization, the turbulence being induced by electrical forces, may be achieved under injection pressures that would produce laminar jets.

  18. On transit time instability in liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabitz, G.; Meier, G.

    1982-01-01

    A basic transit time instability in flows with disturbances of speed is found. It was shown that the mass distribution is established by and large by the described transit time effects. These transit time effects may also be involved for gas jets.

  19. Inkjet printing - the physics of manipulating liquid jets and drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, G. D.; Hoath, S. D.; Hutchings, I. M.

    2008-03-01

    Over the last 30 years inkjet printing technology has been developed for many applications including: product date codes, mailing shots, desktop printing, large-area graphics and, most recently, the direct writing of materials to form electronic, biological, polymeric and metallic devices. The new non-graphical applications require higher print rates, better resolution and higher reliability while printing more complex, non-Newtonian and heavily solids-loaded liquids. This makes the understanding of the physics involved in the precise manipulation of liquid jets and drops ever more important. The proper understanding and control of jet formation and subsequent motion of the jetted materials requires physical studies into material properties at very high shear rates, acoustic modes in print heads, instabilities of jets, drop formation, drop motion, stretching of fluid ligaments, the role of polymers in jet break up, electrical charging of drops and the aerodynamic and electrostatic interaction of jets and drops in flight. Techniques for observation, measurement and analysis are evolving to assist these studies. This paper presents some examples of the application of physics to understanding and implementing inkjet printing, including recent work at the Cambridge Inkjet Research Centre.

  20. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Chen, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. For certain flow regimes, it has been observed that the liquid jet surface is highly turbulent. This turbulence characteristic plays a key role on the breakup of the liquid jet near to the injector exit. Other experiments also showed that the breakup length of the liquid core is sharply shortened as the liquid jet is changed from the laminar to the turbulent flow conditions. In the numerical and physical modeling arena, most of commonly used atomization models do not include the turbulence effect. Limited attempts have been made in modeling the turbulence phenomena on the liquid jet disintegration. The subject correlation and models treat the turbulence either as an only source or a primary driver in the breakup process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. In the course of this study, two widely used models, Reitz's primary atomization (blob) and Taylor-Analogy-Break (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al. are examined. Additional terms are derived and implemented appropriately into these two models to account for the turbulence effect on the atomization process. Since this enhancement effort is based on a framework of the two existing atomization models, it is appropriate to denote the two present models as T-blob and T-TAB for the primary and secondary atomization predictions, respectively. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic time scales and the initial flow conditions. This treatment offers a balance of contributions of individual physical phenomena on the liquid breakup process. For the secondary breakup, an addition turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size

  1. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  2. Converging swirling liquid jets from pressure swirl atomizers: Effect of inner air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, D.; Raghunandan, B. N.

    2002-12-01

    Converging swirling liquid jets from pressure swirl atomizers injected into atmospheric air are studied experimentally using still and cine photographic techniques in the context of liquid-liquid coaxial swirl atomizers used in liquid rocket engines. The jet exhibits several interesting flow features in contrast to the nonswirling liquid jets (annular liquid jets) studied in the literature. The swirl motion creates multiple converging sections in the jet, which gradually collapse one after the other due to the liquid sheet breakup with increasing Weber number (We). This is clearly related to the air inside the converging jet which exhibits a peculiar variation of the pressure difference across the liquid sheet, ΔP, with We. The variation shows a decreasing trend of ΔP with We in an overall sense, but exhibits local maxima and minima at specific flow conditions. The number of maxima or minima observed in the curve depends on the number of converging sections seen in the jet at the lowest We. An interesting feature of this variation is that it delineates the regions of prominent jet flow features like the oscillating jet region, nonoscillating jet region, number of converging sections, and so on. Numerical predictions of the jet characteristics are obtained by modifying an existing nonswirling liquid jet model by including the swirling motion. The comparison between the experimental and numerical measurements shows that the pressure difference across the liquid sheet is important for the jet behavior and cannot be neglected in any theoretical analysis.

  3. Study of liquid jet instability by confocal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lisong; Adamson, Leanne J.; Bain, Colin D.

    2012-07-01

    The instability of a liquid microjet was used to measure the dynamic surface tension of liquids at the surface ages of ≤1 ms using confocal microscopy. The reflected light from a laser beam at normal incidence to the jet surface is linear in the displacement of the surface near the confocal position, leading to a radial resolution of 4 nm and a dynamic range of 4 μm in the surface position, thus permitting the measurement of amplitude of oscillation at the very early stage of jet instability. For larger oscillations outside the linear region of the confocal response, the swell and neck position of the jet can be located separately and the amplitude of oscillation determined with an accuracy of 0.2 μm. The growth rate of periodically perturbed water and ethanol/water mixture jets with a 100-μm diameter nozzle and mean velocity of 5.7 m s-1 has been measured. The dynamic surface tension was determined from the growth rate of the instability with a linear, axisymmetric, constant property model. Synchronisation of the confocal imaging system with the perturbation applied to the jet permitted a detailed study of the temporal evolution of the neck into a ligament and eventually into a satellite drop.

  4. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  5. Two-phase liquid-liquid flows generated by impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaoulidis, Dimitrios; Li, Qi; Angeli, Panagiota

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flows in intensified small-scale systems find increasing applications in (bio)chemical analysis and synthesis, fuel cells, polymerisation, and separation processes (solvent extraction). Current nuclear spent fuel reprocessing separation technologies have been developed many decades ago and have not taken account recent advances on process intensification which can drive down plant size and economics. In this work, intensified impinging jets will be developed to create dispersions by bringing the two liquid phases into contact through opposing small channels. A systematic set of experiments has been undertaken, to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics, to develop predictive models, and enable comparisons with other contactors. Drop size distribution and mixing intensity will be investigated for liquid-liquid mixtures as a function of various parameters using high speed imaging and conductivity probes.

  6. The pressure relaxation of liquid jets after isochoric heating

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    During isochoric heating by fast neutron irradiation, a high pressure is almost instantaneously built up inside the falling liquid jets in a HYLIFE (ICF) reactor. It has been suggested that the jets will breakup as a consequence of negative pressure occurring during the relaxation. This is important to both the subsequent condensation process and the chamber wall design. In this paper the mechanism of the relaxation of liquid jets after isochoric heating has been studied with both incompressible and compressible models. The transient pressure field predicted is qualitatively similar for both models and reveals a strongly peaked tension in the wake of a rarefaction wave. The pressure then rises monotonically in radius to zero pressure on the boundary. The incompressible approximation greatly over predicts the peak tension, which increases with time as the rarefaction wave moves toward the center of the jet. Since the tension distribution is as a narrow spike rather than uniform, a cylindrical fracture is the most likely mode of failure. The paper also discusses the available methods for estimating liquid tensile strength.

  7. Multiple Pulses from Plasma Jets onto Liquid Covered Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth; Tian, Wei; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets are being studied in the treatment of biological surfaces that are often covered by a thin layer of liquid. The plume of the plasma jet contains neutral radicals and charged species that solvate into the liquid and eventually form terminal species that reach the tissue below. The contribution of neutral and charged species to reactivity in the liquid is sensitive to whether the active plasma plume touches the liquid. In this paper, we discuss results from modeling the production of the aqueous species formed from the interaction of the plume of plasma jets over multiple pulses with the water layer, and the fluences of the species to the underlying tissue. The model used in this study, nonPDPSIM, solves transport equations for charged and neutral species and electron energy, Poisson's equation for the electric potential, and Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. Radiation transport includes photoionization of O2 and H2O in the gas and liquid phases and photodissocation of H2Oaq in the liquid. Multiple pulses when the plasma plume touches and does not touch the liquid will be examined. Two regimes of hydrodynamics will be discussed - low repetition rates where the neutral radicals are blown away before the next discharge pulse, and high repetition rate when the plasma plume interacts with neutral radicals from previous pulses. The density of aqueous ions produced in the liquid layer is strongly dependent on whether the plasma effluent touches or does not touch the water surface. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and NSF.

  8. METHOD OF LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION OF BLOOD SURROGATES FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO JET FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A baseline method of liquid?liquid extraction for assessing human exposure to JP-8 jet fuel was established by extracting several representative compounds ranging from very volatile to semi-volatile organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, nonane, decane, undecane, tridec...

  9. Liquid engine jet atomization Workshop report

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, K.W.

    1987-01-01

    The workshop was oriented to disclose information and unsettled problems in understanding the fundamental physical mechanism of the droplet formation process. Based on presentation and discussion of results, recommendations were made which should lead to associated future activities. To accomplish this task, existing observations and experiments, contributing to the basic knowledge, providing data for analytical concept verification, and forming a basis for empirical correlations were solicited. Advanced analytical modeling methods or results from specific studies were requested as well as the experience and advice from injector designers. All effort is directed to advance current analytical techniques, simulating the flow behavior downstream of the injection elements in a liquid rocket combustion chamber. Such a tool can be used to optimize injector designs with respect to short length weight savings, wall material protection, or large heat energy transport to a regenerative cooling fluid, while simultaneously achieving the maximum specific impulse in performance. The liquid atomization process also forms a sound basis for combustion instability analysis.

  10. Parametric Investigation of Liquid Jets in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2005-01-01

    An axisymmetric phase field model is developed and used to model surface tension forces on liquid jets in microgravity. The previous work in this area is reviewed and a baseline drop tower experiment selected for model comparison. This paper uses the model to parametrically investigate the influence of key parameters on the geysers formed by jets in microgravity. Investigation of the contact angle showed the expected trend of increasing contact angle increasing geyser height. Investigation of the tank radius showed some interesting effects and demonstrated the zone of free surface deformation is quite large. Variation of the surface tension with a laminar jet showed clearly the evolution of free surface shape with Weber number. It predicted a breakthrough Weber number of 1.

  11. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  12. Laser-induced jet formation in liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, Frederik; Arnold, Craig

    2014-11-01

    The absorption of a focused laser pulse in a liquid film generates a cavitation bubble on which a narrow jet can form. This is the basis of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a versatile printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. We study the influence of the fluid properties and laser pulse energy on jet formation using numerical simulations and time-resolved imaging. At low energies, surface tension causes the jet to retract without transferring a drop, and at high energies, the bubble breaks up into a splashing spray. We explore the parameter space of Weber number, Ohnesorge number, and ratio of film thickness to maximum bubble radius, revealing regions where uniform drops are transferred.

  13. Global frequency response analysis of gravitationally stretched liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli-Lizzi, Paula; Coenen, Wilfried; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    The convective capillary break-up of freely falling axisymmetric jets of Newtonian liquid is theoretically studied with a one-dimensional description of the mass and momentum conservation equations. Instead of using the classical quasi-parallel assumption in the stability analysis, here we compute the global linear response of the flow to harmonic inputs at the exit of the jet, allowing us to predict its break-up length in cases where the base flow is not slender. Our theory compares favourably with recent experiments by Javadi et al. (PRL 110, 144501, 2013), who measured the break-up length of unforced liquid jets of several viscosities. From the physical point of view, our main finding is that the meniscus region near the injector outlet, where the jet experiences the strongest axial stretching, delays the growth of capillary disturbances due to a spatial counterpart of the kinematic stabilizing mechanism firstly described by Tomotika (Proc. Roy. Soc. 153, 1936) in a temporal setting. Supported by Spanish MINECO under project DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  14. Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Tension in Microgravity Modeled Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, jets must be contained by surface tension forces. Recent NASA experiments in microgravity (Tank Pressure Control Experiment, TPCE, and Vented Tank Pressure Experiment, VTRE) resulted in a wealth of data about jet behavior in microgravity. VTRE was surprising in that, although it contained a complex geometry of baffles and vanes, the limit on liquid inflow was the emergence of a liquid jet from the top of the vane structure. Clearly understanding the restraint of liquid jets by surface tension is key to managing fluids in low gravity. To model this phenomenon, we need a numerical method that can track the fluid motion and the surface tension forces. The fluid motion is modeled with the Navier-Stokes equation formulated for low-speed incompressible flows. The quantities of velocity and pressure are placed on a staggered grid, with velocity being tracked at cell faces and pressure at cell centers. The free surface is tracked via the introduction of a color function that tracks liquid as 1/2 and gas as -1/2. A phase model developed by Jacqmin is used. This model converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly. Previous attempts at this formulation have been criticized for smearing the interface. However, by sharpening the phase

  15. Liquid jets injected into non-uniform crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tambe, Samir

    An experimental study has been conducted with liquid jets injected transversely into a crossflow to study the effect of non-uniformities in the crossflow velocity distribution to the jet behavior. Two different non-uniform crossflows were created during this work, a shear-laden crossflow and a swirling crossflow. The shear-laden crossflow was generated by merging two independent, co-directional, parallel airstreams creating a shear mixing layer at the interface between them. The crossflow exhibited a quasi-linear velocity gradient across the height of the test chamber. By varying the velocities of the two airstreams, the sense and the slope of the crossflow velocity gradient could be changed. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) studies were conducted to characterize the crossflow. The parameter, UR, is defined as the ratio of the velocities of the two streams and governs the velocity gradient. A positive velocity gradient was observed for UR > 1 and a negative velocity gradient for UR < 1. PIV and Phase Doppler Particle Anemometry (PDPA) studies were conducted to study the penetration and atomization of 0.5 mm diameter water jets injected into this crossflow. The crossflow velocity gradient was observed to have a significant effect on jet penetration as well as the post breakup spray. For high UR (> 1), jet penetration increased and the Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) distribution became more uniform. For low UR (< 1), low penetration, higher droplet velocities and better atomization were observed. The second crossflow tested was a swirling flow generated using in-house designed axial swirlers. Three swirlers were used, with vane exit angles of 30°, 45° and 60°. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was used to study the crossflow velocities. The axial (Ux) and the tangential (Utheta) components of the crossflow velocity were observed to decrease with increasing radial distance away from the centerbody. The flow angle of the crossflow was smaller than the vane exit angle

  16. Penetration of Liquid Jets into a High-velocity Air Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chelko, Louis J

    1950-01-01

    Data are presented showing the penetration characteristics of liquid jets directed approximately perpendicular to a high-velocity air stream for jet-nozzle-throat diameters from 0.0135 to 0.0625 inch, air stream densities from 0.0805 to 0.1365 pound per cubic foot, liquid jet velocities from 168.1 to 229.0 feet per second and a liquid jet density of approximately 62 pounds per cubic foot. The data were analyzed and a correlation was developed that permitted the determination of the penetration length of the liquid jet for any operation condition within the range of variables investigated.

  17. Breakup characteristics of a liquid jet in subsonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopala, Yogish

    This thesis describes an experimental investigation of the breakup processes involved in the formation of a spray created by a liquid jet injected into a gaseous crossflow. This work is motivated by the utilization of this method to inject fuel in combustors and afterburners of airplane engines. This study aims to develop a better understanding of the spray breakup processes and to provide better experimental inputs to improve the fidelity of numerical models. A review of the literature in this field identified the fundamental physical processes involved in the breakup of the spray and the dependence of spray properties on operating conditions. The time taken for the liquid column to break up into ligaments and droplets, the primary breakup time and the effect of injector geometry on the spray formation processes and spray properties as the key research areas in which research done so far has been inadequate. Determination of the location where the liquid column broke up was made difficult by the presence of a large number of droplets surrounding it. This study utilizes the liquid jet light guiding technique that enables accurate measurements of this location for a wide range of operating conditions. Prior to this study, the primary breakup time was thought to be a function the density ratio of the liquid and the gas, the diameter of the orifice and the air velocity. This study found that the time to breakup of the liquid column depends on the Reynolds number of the liquid jet. This suggests that the breakup of a turbulent liquid jet is influenced by both the aerodynamic breakup processes and the turbulent breakup processes. Observations of the phenomenon of the liquid jet splitting up into two or more jets were made at some operating conditions with the aid of the new visualization technique. Finally, this thesis investigates the effect of injector geometry on spray characteristics. One injector was a round edged orifice with a length to diameter ratio of 1 and a

  18. Liquid jet breakup regimes at supercritical pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-07-23

    Previously, a theory has been presented that explains how discrete vapor–liquid interfaces become diminished at certain high-pressure conditions in a manner that leads to well known qualitative trends observed from imaging in a variety of experiments. Rather than surface tension forces, transport processes can dominate over relevant ranges of conditions. In this paper, this framework is now generalized to treat a wide range of fuel-oxidizer combinations in a manner consistent with theories of capillary flows and extended corresponding states theory. Different flow conditions and species-specific molecular properties are shown to produce distinct variations of interfacial structures and local free molecularmore » paths. These variations are shown to occur over the operating ranges in a variety of propulsion and power systems. Despite these variations, the generalized analysis reveals that the envelope of flow conditions at which the transition from classical sprays to diffusion-dominated mixing occurs exhibits a characteristic shape for all liquid–gas combinations. As a result, for alkane-oxidizer mixtures, it explains that these conditions shift to higher pressure flow conditions with increasing carbon number and demonstrates that, instead of widely assumed classical spray atomization, diffusion-dominated mixing may occur under relevant high-pressure conditions in many modern devices.« less

  19. Liquid jet breakup regimes at supercritical pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-07-23

    Previously, a theory has been presented that explains how discrete vapor–liquid interfaces become diminished at certain high-pressure conditions in a manner that leads to well known qualitative trends observed from imaging in a variety of experiments. Rather than surface tension forces, transport processes can dominate over relevant ranges of conditions. In this paper, this framework is now generalized to treat a wide range of fuel-oxidizer combinations in a manner consistent with theories of capillary flows and extended corresponding states theory. Different flow conditions and species-specific molecular properties are shown to produce distinct variations of interfacial structures and local free molecular paths. These variations are shown to occur over the operating ranges in a variety of propulsion and power systems. Despite these variations, the generalized analysis reveals that the envelope of flow conditions at which the transition from classical sprays to diffusion-dominated mixing occurs exhibits a characteristic shape for all liquid–gas combinations. As a result, for alkane-oxidizer mixtures, it explains that these conditions shift to higher pressure flow conditions with increasing carbon number and demonstrates that, instead of widely assumed classical spray atomization, diffusion-dominated mixing may occur under relevant high-pressure conditions in many modern devices.

  20. Jet impingement and primary atomization of non-Newtonian liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallory, Jennifer A.

    The effect of liquid rheology on the flowfield resulting from non-Newtonian impinging jets was investigated experimentally and analytically. Experimental data were acquired using a unique experimental apparatus developed to examine the jet impingement of non-Newtonian liquids. The analytical modeling was aimed at determining which physical mechanisms transform non-Newtonian impinging jets into a sheet with waves on its surface, how those waves influence sheet fragmentation and subsequent ligament formation, and how those ligaments break up to form drops (primary atomization). Prior to impinging jet measurements, the rheological properties of 0.5 wt.-% CMC-7HF, 1.4 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.8 wt.-% CMC-7MF, 0.06 wt.-% CMC-7MF 75 wt.-% glycerin, 1 wt.-% Kappa carrageenan, and 1 wt.-% Agar were determined through the use of rotational and capillary rheometers. Two approaches were used to experimentally measure solid-like gel propellant simulant static surface tension. All liquids exhibited pseudoplastic rheological behavior. At various atomizer geometric and flow parameters sheet instability wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop sizes were measured from high-speed video images. Results showed that viscosity dependence on shear rate is not the sole factor that determines atomization likelihood. Instead, a key role is played by the interaction of the gelling agent with the solvent at the molecular level. For instance, despite high jet exit velocities and varying atomizer geometric parameters HPC gel propellant simulants did not atomize. The molecular nature of HPC results in physical entanglement of polymer chains when gelled, which resists liquid breakup and subsequent spray formation. However, atomization was achieved with Agar, which absorbs the water and forms a network around it rather than bonding to it. The measured liquid sheet instability wavelength, sheet breakup length, ligament diameter, and drop sizes were compared to predictions from a

  1. Characteristics of liquid jet atomization across a high-speed airstream. III - Breakup process of liquid jet and internal structure of spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Tetsuya; Hiroyasu, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keiya

    1993-04-01

    To elucidate deformation and breakup processes of a liquid jet across an airstream, tomograms of the liquid jet were taken by means of the laser light sheet method. In this method, fluorescent dye, Eosine-Y, was contained in the injected water, and the liquid jet was illuminated by the Nd:YAG laser light sheet. There are two types of atomization mechanisms. In the first mechanism, a horizontal section of the liquid column is distorted into a bow shape, and there exists a cavity without drops behind the liquid column. Small drops are produced at both tips of the bow. The continuous length and the width of the liquid column were measured from the tomograms. In the second mechanism, in which velocities of both the airstream and the injecting liquid are low, the liquid column is distorted in a snakelike shape and drops are produced near the tip of the liquid column.

  2. Effect of gas mass flux on cryogenic liquid jet breakup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    A scattered-light scanning instrument developed at NASA Lewis Research Center was used to measure the characteristic drop size of clouds of liquid nitrogen droplets. The instrument was calibrated with suspensions of monosized polystyrene spheres. In this investigation of the mechanism of liquid nitrogen jet disintegration in a high-velocity gas flow, the Sauter mean diameter, D32, was found to vary inversely with the nitrogen gas mass flux raised to the power 1.33. Values of D32 varied from 5 to 25 microns and the mass flux exponent of 1.33 agrees well with theory for liquid jet breakup in high-velocity gas flows. The loss of very small droplets due to the high vaporization rate of liquid nitrogen was avoided by sampling the spray very close to the atomizer, i.e., 1.3 cm downstream of the nozzle orifice. The presence of high velocity and thermal gradients in the gas phase also made sampling of the particles difficult. As a result, it was necessary to correct the measurements for background noise produced by both highly turbulent gas flows and thermally induced density gradients in the gas phase.

  3. Effect of gas mass flux on cryogenic liquid jet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    A scattered-light scanning instrument developed at NASA Lewis Research Center was used to measure the characteristic drop size of clouds of liquid nitrogen droplets. The instrument was calibrated with suspensions of monosized polystyrene spheres. In this investigation of the mechanism of liquid nitrogen jet disintegration in a high-velocity gas flow, the Sauter mean diameter, D32, was found to vary inversely with the nitrogen gas mass flux raised to the power 1.33. Values of D32 varied from 5 to 25 microns and the mass flux exponent of 1.33 agrees well with theory for liquid jet breakup in high-velocity gas flows. The loss of very small droplets due to the high vaporization rate of liquid nitrogen was avoided by sampling the spray very close to the atomizer, i.e., 1.3 cm downstream of the nozzle orifice. The presence of high velocity and thermal gradients in the gas phase also made sampling of the particles difficult. As a result, it was necessary to correct the measurements for background noise produced by both highly turbulent gas flows and thermally induced density gradients in the gas phase.

  4. An Experimental Study of Droplets Produced by Plunging Breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Dai, D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    The production of droplets by breaking water waves greatly affects the heat, mass and momentum transfer between the atmosphere and the sea surface. In this study, the production of droplets by mechanically generated breaking water waves was explored in a wave tank. The breakers were generated from dispersively focused wave packets (average frequency 1.15 Hz) using a programmable wave maker. Two overall wave maker amplitudes were used to create a strong spilling and a strong plunging breaker. The profile histories of the breaking wave crests along the center plane of the tank were measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique, while the droplet diameter distributions and motions were measured at different locations along a horizontal line, which is 1 cm above the maximum height of the wave crest, using a double-pulsed cinematic shadowgraph technique. It is found that droplets are primarily generated when the plunging jet of the wave generates strong turbulence during impact with the wave's front face and when large air bubbles, entrapped during the plunging process, rise to the free surface and pop. The differences between the generation mechanisms in spilling and plunging breakers is highlighted. This work is supported by the Ocean Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation.

  5. Spray measurements of aerothermodynamic effect on disintegrating liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation was made to determine the effect of atomizing gas mass flux and temperature on liquid jet breakup in sonic velocity gas flow. Characteristic drop size data were obtained by using the following atomizing gases: nitrogen, argon, and helium to breakup water jets in high velocity gas flow. A scattered light scanning instrument developed at Lewis Research Center was used to measure Sauter mean diameter (SMD). The three gases gave a molecular weight range of 4 to 40 and atomizing gas mass flux and temperature were varied from 6 to 50 g/sq cm and 275-400 K, respectively. The ratio of liquid jet diameter to SMD, D(sub 0)/D(sub 32), was correlated with aerodynamic and liquid-surface force ratios, i.e., the product of the Weber and Reynolds number, We Re, the gas to liquid density ratio, rho(sub g)/rho(sub 1) g and also the molecular scale dimensionless group, rho(sub 1)(Vm exp 3)/ mu(sub 1) g, to give the following expression: D(sub 0)/D(sub 32) = 0.90 x 10(exp -8) x (We Re rho sub g/rho sub 1)exp 0.44 x (rho sub 1 Vm exp 3/mu sub 1 g)exp 0.67 where We Re = ((rho sub g)exp 2(D sub 0)exp 2(V sub C)exp3))/ mu sub 1 sigma, mu sub 1 is liquid viscosity, sigma is surface tension, V sub C is the acoustic gas velocity, V sub m is the RMS velocity of gas molecules, and g is the acceleration of gas molecules due to gravity. Good agreement was obtained with atomization theory for liquid-jet breakup in the regime of aerodynamic stripping. Also, due to its low molecular weight and high acoustic velocity, helium was considerably more effective than nitrogen or argon in producing small-droplet sprays with values of D(sub 32) on the order of 5 microns.

  6. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2011-11-01

    In the recent years, development of alternative jet fuels is gaining importance owing to the demand for cleaner combustion. In addition to having energy density that matches those of conventional fuels, alternate jet fuels need to possess vital qualities such as rapid atomization and vaporization, quick re-ignition at high altitude, less emission, and poses ease of handling. The fuel preparatory steps (atomization and vaporization) and mixing in a combustion chamber play a crucial role on the subsequent combustion and emission characteristics. Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) synthetic jet fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics as a result of the absence of aromatics and sulphur. As a part of an on-going joint effort between Texas A&M at Qatar (TAMUQ), Rolls-Royce (UK), and German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR), a spray characterization experimental facility is set up at TAMUQ to study the spray characteristics of GTL fuel and highlights the influence of change in fuel composition on the spray characteristics. In this work, spray characteristics such as droplet size, velocity, and distribution of different GTL fuel blends is investigated and compared with the spray characteristics of conventional JetA1 fuel. Supported by Qatar Science and Technology Park, QSTP.

  7. Initial instability of round liquid jet at subcritical and supercritical environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2016-07-01

    In the present experimental work, the behavior of laminar liquid jet in its own vapor as well as supercritical fluid environment is conducted. Also the study of liquid jet injection into nitrogen (N2) environment is carried out at supercritical conditions. It is expected that the injected liquid jet would undergo thermodynamic transition to the chamber condition and this would alter the behavior of the injected jet. Moreover at such conditions there is a strong dependence between thermodynamic and fluid dynamic processes. Thus the thermodynamic transition has its effect on the initial instability as well as the breakup nature of the injected liquid jet. In the present study, the interfacial disturbance wavelength, breakup characteristics, and mixing behavior are analysed for the fluoroketone liquid jet that is injected into N2 environment as well as into its own vapor at subcritical to supercritical conditions. It is observed that at subcritical chamber conditions, the injected liquid jet exhibits classical liquid jet characteristics with Rayleigh breakup at lower Weber number and Taylor breakup at higher Weber number for both N2 and its own environment. At supercritical chamber conditions with its own environment, the injected liquid jet undergoes sudden thermodynamic transition to chamber conditions and single phase mixing characteristics is observed. However, the supercritical chamber conditions with N2 as ambient fluid does not have significant effect on the thermodynamic transition of the injected liquid jet.

  8. Nanoscale Liquid Jets Shape New Line of Business

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Just as a pistol shrimp stuns its prey by quickly closing its oversized claw to shoot out a shock-inducing, high-velocity jet of water, NanoMatrix, Inc., is sending shockwaves throughout the nanotechnology world with a revolutionary, small-scale fabrication process that uses powerful liquid jets to cut and shape objects. Emanuel Barros, a former project engineer at NASA s Ames Research Center, set out to form the Santa Cruz, California-based NanoMatrix firm and materialize the micro/nano cutting process partially inspired by the water-spewing crustacean. Early on in his 6-year NASA career, Barros led the development of re-flown flight hardware for an award-winning Spacelab project called NeuroLab. This project, the sixteenth and final Spacelab mission, focused on a series of experiments to determine the effects of microgravity on the development of the mammalian nervous system.

  9. Disintegration of a Round Liquid Jet due to Impact on a Superhydrophobic Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalaal, Maziyar; Stoeber, Boris

    2013-11-01

    Liquid jet breakup has several applications such as Inkjet printers, diesel fuel injectors, and paint sprays. Very recently liquid jets have been shown to be useful for small volume transportation (Clestini et al. Soft Matter, 2010), where a micro-scale liquid jet on superhydrophobic surface was investigated. Although the instability of the liquid jet for some circumstances was shown, the disintegration of the liquid jet was not discussed. In the present study, we aim to analyze the breakup of a micro liquid jet due to inclined impact to a superhydrophobic surface. A range of Weber and Reynolds numbers have been explored experimentally. Water-glycerin solution as the working fluid. Generally, it is shown that the liquid jet forms a disc-like film over the surface and further rebounds (``bouncing jet''). A simple energy balance method is provided to estimate the diameter of the disc-like film. It is shown, for the case of low viscosity (large Re), this parameter is logarithmically proportional to the normal Weber number. Additionally, linear stability analysis for viscous jets provides a good estimate of droplet size. From an application point of view, using superhydrophobic surfaces 1) enables rebound of the liquid jet 2) advances the breakup point (shorten the breakup length).

  10. Numerical simulation of evaporating liquid jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soteriou, Marios; Li, Xiaoyi

    2014-11-01

    Atomization of liquid fuel jets by cross-flowing air is critical to combustor performance. Ability to experimentally probe the fundamentals of this multiscale two phase flows has been hampered by limitations in experimental techniques and the challenges posed by operating conditions. Direct numerical simulation has recently emerged as a promising alternative due to advances in computer hardware and numerical methods. Using this approach, we recently demonstrated the ability to reproduce the physics of atomization of a liquid jet in cross-flow (LJIC) under ambient conditions. In this work we consider this flow in a high temperature environment. The inclusion of evaporation is the major new element. The numerical approach employs the CLSVOF method to capture the liquid-gas interface. Interface evaporation is solved directly with proper treatment of interface conditions and reproduces the relevant species/temperature fields there. A Lagrangian droplet tracking approach is used for the small droplets which are transferred from the Eulerian phase and evaporate using a traditional d2 law model. Other key algorithms of the massively parallelized solver include a ghost fluid method, a multi-grid preconditioned conjugate gradient approach and an adaptive mesh refinement technique. The overall method is verified using canonical problems. Simulations of evaporating LJIC point to the significant effect that evaporation has on the evolution of this flow and elucidate the downstream fuel species patterns.

  11. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. Two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al, are further extended to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size formed from this breakup regime is estimated based on the energy balance before and after the breakup occurrence. This paper describes theoretical development of the current models, called "T-blob" and "T-TAB", for primary and secondary breakup respectivety. Several assessment studies are also presented in this paper.

  12. Acoustic excitation of liquid fuel droplets and coaxial jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan Ignacio

    This experimental study focuses on two important problems relevant to acoustic coupling with condensed phase transport processes, with special relevance to liquid rocket engine and airbreathing engine combustion instabilities. The first part of this dissertation describes droplet combustion characteristics of various fuels during exposure to external acoustical perturbations. Methanol, ethanol, a liquid synthetic fuel derived from coal gasification via the Fischer-Tropsch process, and a blend of aviation fuel and the synthetic fuel are used. During acoustic excitation, the droplet is situated at or near a pressure node condition, where the droplet experiences the largest velocity perturbations, and at or near a pressure antinode condition, where the droplet is exposed to minimal velocity fluctuations. For unforced conditions, the values of the droplet burning rate constant K of the different fuels are consistent with data in the literature. The location of the droplet with respect to a pressure node or antinode also has a measurable effect on droplet burning rates, which are different for different fuels and in some cases are as high as 28% above the unforced burning rate value. Estimates of flame extinction due to acoustic forcing for different fuels are also obtained. The second part of this work consists of an experimental study on coaxial jet behavior under non-reactive, cryogenic conditions, with direct applications to flow mixing and unstable behavior characterization in liquid rocket engines. These experiments, conducted with nitrogen, span a range of outer to inner jet momentum flux ratios from 0.013 to 23, and explore subcritical, nearcritical and supercritical pressure conditions, with and without acoustic excitation, for two injector geometries. Acoustic forcing at 3 kHz is utilized to maximize the pressure fluctuations within the chamber acting on the jet, reaching maximum values of 4% of the mean chamber pressure. The effect of the magnitude and phase

  13. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza; GTL jet fuel Consortium Team

    2012-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics. GTL fuels are expected to meet the vital qualities such as atomization, combustion and emission characteristics of conventional jet fuels. It is imperative to understand fuel atomization in order to gain insights on the combustion and emission aspects of an alternative fuel. In this work spray characteristics of GTL-SPK, which could be used as a drop-in fuel in aircraft gas turbine engines, is studied. This work outlines the spray experimental facility, the methodology used and the results obtained using two SPK's with different chemical compositions. The spray characteristics, such as droplet size and distribution, are presented at three differential pressures across a simplex nozzle and compared with that of the conventional Jet A-1 fuel. Experimental results clearly show that although the chemical composition is significantly different between SPK's, the spray characteristics are not very different. This could be attributed to the minimal difference in fluid properties between the SPK's. Also, the spray characteristics of SPK's show close resemblance to the spray characteristics of Jet A-1 fuel.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet Atomization Including Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.; Balasubramanyam, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes numerical implementation of a newly developed hybrid model, T-blob/T-TAB, into an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program for primary and secondary breakup simulation of liquid jet atomization. This model extend two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O'Rourke and Amsden to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. Several assessment studies are presented and the results indicate that the existing KH and TAB models tend to under-predict the product drop size and spray angle, while the current model provides superior results when compared with the measured data.

  15. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur; McClure, John; Avila, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding were measured for a 0.5 inch diameter pin entering a 2219 aluminum alloy plate. Weld structures were preserved for metallographic observation by making emergency stops at various plunge depths. The plunging pin tool is seen to be surrounded by a very fine grained layer of recrystallized metal extending substantially below the bottom of the pin, implying a shear interface in the metal below and not at the tool-metal interface. Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding are calculated from a straight forward model based on a concept to plastic flow in the vicinity of the plunging tool compatible with structural observations. The concept: a disk of weld metal seized to and rotating with the bottom of the pin is squeezed out laterally by the plunge force and extruded upwards in a hollow cylinder around the tool. As the shear surface separating rotating disk from stationary weld metal engulfs fresh metal, the fresh metal is subjected to severe shear deformation, which results in its recrystallization. Encouraging agreement between computations and measured torque and plunge force is obtained.

  16. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.W.; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-04-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to understand the physics of material removal by jet-machining processes. Experiments were performed to delineate conditions under which liquid jet impacts will cause mass removal, and to determine optimum jet-cutting conditions. Theoretical analyses have also been carried out to study the effects of multiple jet-droplet impacts on a target surface as a material deformation mechanism. The calculated target response and spallation behavior following droplet impacts and their physical implications are also discussed.

  17. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    Steinke, I; Walther, M; Lehmkühler, F; Wochner, P; Valerio, J; Mager, R; Schroer, M A; Lee, S; Roseker, W; Jain, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Hartmann, R; Huth, M; Strüder, L; Sprung, M; Robert, A; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Grübel, G

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser. PMID:27370468

  18. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, I.; Walther, M.; Lehmkühler, F.; Wochner, P.; Valerio, J.; Mager, R.; Schroer, M. A.; Lee, S.; Roseker, W.; Jain, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Hartmann, R.; Huth, M.; Strüder, L.; Sprung, M.; Robert, A.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Grübel, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser.

  19. Photoionization of Sodium Salt Solutions in a Liquid Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Grieves, G. A.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Herring-Captain, J.; Olanrewaju, B.; Aleksandrov, A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2008-06-05

    A liquid microjet was employed to examine the gas/liquid interface of aqueous sodium halide (Na+X-, X=Cl, Br, I) salt solutions. Laser excitation at 193 nm produced and removed cations of the form H+(H2O)n and Na+(H2O)m from liquid jet surfaces containing either NaCl, NaBr or NaI. The protonated water cluster yield varied inversely with increasing salt concentration, while the solvated sodium ion cluster yield varied by anion type. The distribution of H+(H2O)n at low salt concentration is identical to that observed from low-energy electron irradiated amorphous ice and the production of these clusters can be accounted for using a localized ionization/Coulomb expulsion model. Production of Na+(H2O)m is not accounted for by this model but requires ionization of solvation shell waters and a contact ion/Coulomb expulsion mechanism. The reduced yields of Na+(H2O)m from high concentration (10-2 and 10-1 M) NaBr and NaI solutions indicate a propensity for Br- and I- at the solution surfaces and interfaces. This is supported by the observation of multiphoton induced production and desorption of Br+ and I+ from the 10-2 and 10-1 M solution surfaces.

  20. Effect of gravity on capillary instability of liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Amini, Ghobad; Ihme, Matthias; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gravity on the onset and growth rate of capillary instabilities in viscous liquid jets is studied. To this end, a spatial linear stability analysis of Cosserat's equations is performed using a multiscale expansion technique. A dispersion relation and expressions for the perturbation amplitude are derived to evaluate the growth rate of the most unstable axisymmetric disturbance mode. Modeling results are compared with classical results in the limit of zero Bond number, confirming the validity of this approach. Expressions for the critical Weber number, demarcating the transition between convective and absolute instability are derived as functions of capillary and Bond numbers. Parametric investigations for a range of relevant operating conditions (characterized by capillary, Weber, and Bond numbers) are performed to examine the jet breakup and the perturbation growth rate. In addition to the physical insight that is obtained from this investigation, the results that are presented in this work could also be of relevance as test cases for the algorithmic development and the verification of high-fidelity multiphase simulation codes.

  1. Analysis of impingement heat transfer for two parallel liquid-metal slot jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1974-01-01

    An analytical method is developed for determining heat transfer by impinging liquid-metal slot jets. The method involves mapping the jet flow region, which is bounded by free streamlines, into a potential plane where it becomes a uniform flow in a channel of constant width. The energy equation is transformed into potential plane coordinates and is solved in the channel flow region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution back into the physical plane and obtain the desired heat-transfer characteristics. The analysis given here determines the heat-transfer characteristics for two parallel liquid-metal slot jets impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jets are inviscid and that molecular conduction is dominating heat diffusion. Wall temperature distributions along the heated plate are obtained as a function of spacing between the jets and the jet Peclet number.

  2. Detailed Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet In Crossflow Atomization with High Density Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Sina

    The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross-flowing gas has many applications such as gas turbines and augmentors. The mechanisms by which the liquid jet initially breaks up, however, are not well understood. Experimental studies suggest the dependence of spray properties on operating conditions and nozzle geom- etry. Detailed numerical simulations can offer better understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms that lead to the breakup of the injected liquid jet. In this work, detailed numerical simulation results of turbulent liquid jets injected into turbulent gaseous cross flows for different density ratios is presented. A finite volume, balanced force fractional step flow solver to solve the Navier-Stokes equations is employed and coupled to a Refined Level Set Grid method to follow the phase interface. To enable the simulation of atomization of high density ratio fluids, we ensure discrete consistency between the solution of the conservative momentum equation and the level set based continuity equation by employing the Consistent Rescaled Momentum Transport (CRMT) method. The impact of different inflow jet boundary conditions on different jet properties including jet penetration is analyzed and results are compared to those obtained experimentally by Brown & McDonell(2006). In addition, instability analysis is performed to find the most dominant insta- bility mechanism that causes the liquid jet to breakup. Linear instability analysis is achieved using linear theories for Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities and non-linear analysis is performed using our flow solver with different inflow jet boundary conditions.

  3. Atomization of liquids in a Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber. Part I. Jet dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J A S; Costa, M A M; Henrique, P R; Coury, J R

    2003-02-28

    Jet dynamics, in particular jet penetration, is an important design parameter affecting the collection efficiency of Venturi scrubbers. A mathematical description of the trajectory, break-up and penetration of liquid jets initially transversal to a subsonic gas stream is presented. Experimental data obtained from a laboratory scale Venturi scrubber, operated with liquid injected into the throat through a single orifice, jet velocities between 6.07 and 15.9 m/s, and throat gas velocities between 58.3 and 74.9 m/s, is presented and used to validate the model. PMID:12573843

  4. Acceleration wave breakup of liquid jets with airstreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristic mean drop diameters were determined for downstream and upstream injection into nonswirling and swirling airflows. The effects of the aerodynamic and liquid surface forces on the mean drop size were obtained with a scanning radiometer. Water jet breakup was studied primarily in the acceleration wave regime with values of WeRe 10 to the 6th power and the following empirical expression was obtained: D(o)/D(m) =C (WeRe) to the 0.4, power where D(o) and D(m) are the orifice and mean drop diameters, respectively. We and Re are the Weber and Reynolds numbers defined as repectively, We = rho(a)D(o)V(r)/sigma and Re = D(o)V(r)/nu, where V(r) and rho(a) are airstream relative velocity and density, respectively, and sigma and nu are surface tension and kinematic viscosity of the liquid, respectively. The proportionally constant C was evaluated as follows: for downstream injection, C = 0.023 with nonswirling airflow, and C = 0.027 with swirling airflow. For upstream injection, the empirical expression D(o)/D(m) = 0.0045 (WeRe) to the 0.5 power was obtained with nonswirling airflow. Experimental conditions included a water flow rate of 68 liter per hour and an airflow rate per unit area range of 4.6 to 25.2 gm/sq cm sec at 293 K and atmospheric pressure.

  5. Measurement of intact-core length of atomizing liquid jets by image deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Roger; Burch, Robert; Kuo, Kenneth; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their high liquid load fractions and hence their optical opacity. Focus was on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact-liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial-type rocket engine injectors in which liquid oxygen is injected through the center post while high velocity gaseous hydrogen is injected through a concentric annulus, providing a shear force to the liquid jet surface. Real-time x ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, is used to make the measurements. The intact-liquid-core length data were obtained and interpreted using two conceptually different methods to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure, gas-to-liquid momentum ratio, and cavitation.

  6. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  7. Preliminary Investigation of Performance and Starting Characteristics of Liquid Fluorine : Liquid Oxygen Mixtures with Jet Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothenberg, Edward A; Ordin, Paul M

    1954-01-01

    The performance of jet fuel with an oxidant mixture containing 70 percent liquid fluorine and 30 percent liquid oxygen by weight was investigated in a 500-pound-thrust engine operating at a chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute. A one-oxidant-on-one-fuel skewed-hole impinging-jet injector was evaluated in a chamber of characteristic length equal to 50 inches. A maximum experimental specific impulse of 268 pound-seconds per pound was obtained at 25 percent fuel, which corresponds to 96 percent of the maximum theoretical specific impulse based on frozen composition expansion. The maximum characteristic velocity obtained was 6050 feet per second at 23 percent fuel, or 94 percent of the theoretical maximum. The average thrust coefficient was 1.38 for the 500-pound thrust combustion-chamber nozzle used, which was 99 percent of the theoretical (frozen) maximum. Mixtures of fluorine and oxygen were found to be self-igniting with jet fuel with fluorine concentrations as low as 4 percent, when low starting propellant flow rated were used.

  8. Microfluidic liquid jet system with compatibility for atmospheric and high-vacuum conditions.

    PubMed

    Trebbin, Martin; Krüger, Kilian; DePonte, Daniel; Roth, Stephan V; Chapman, Henry N; Förster, Stephan

    2014-05-21

    We present microfluidic chip based devices that produce liquid jets with micrometer diameters while operating at very low flow rates. The chip production is based on established soft-lithographical techniques employing a three-layer design protocol. This allows the exact, controlled and reproducible design of critical parts such as nozzles and the production of nozzle arrays. The microfluidic chips reproducibly generate liquid jets exiting at perfect right angles with diameters between 20 μm and 2 μm, and under special circumstances, even down to 0.9 μm. Jet diameter, jet length, and the domain of the jetting/dripping instability can be predicted and controlled based on the theory for liquid jets in the plate-orifice configuration described by Gañán-Calvo et al. Additionally, conditions under which the device produces highly reproducible monodisperse droplets at exact and predictable rates can be achieved. The devices operate under atmospheric and under vacuum conditions making them highly relevant for a wide range of applications, for example, for free-electron lasers. Further, the straightforward integration of additional features such as a jet-in-jet is demonstrated. This device design has the potential to integrate more features based on established microfluidic components and may become a standard device for small liquid jet production.

  9. A new device for generating thin jets of highly-viscous liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuki, Hajime; Oi, Yuto; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Thin liquid jets are applied to various devices, such as ink-jet printers. However, it is challenging to generate liquid jets of highly-viscous liquids (~ 1,000 cSt) using existing methods. To overcome this challenge, we invent a highly-viscous liquid-jet generator. This device has simple structure as follows: a wettable-thin tube is inserted into a liquid filled container. We keep the liquid level inside a thin tube deeper than that outside of the tube. When an impulsive force acts on the bottom of the container, a thin jet is generated. The jet is up to 20 times faster than the initial velocity given by the impulsive force. We successfully generate jets with a wide range of viscosity (1-1,000 cSt). We also propose the physical model based on pressure-impulse approach to rationalize its mechanism. Inside the thin tube, a gradient of pressure impulse is much larger than that outside of the tube. We verify the performance of our device experimentally. We find that the proposed model can describe all experimental results in this research. JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26709007.

  10. Liquid jet target x-ray tube with field emission cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heid, Oliver; Polikhov, Stepan; Karpinskiy, Gennadiy; Geisler, Andreas; Bondarenko, Taras; Botyachkova, Alexandra; Frolov, Sergey; Ivanov, Vladislav

    2015-08-01

    We introduce first results of our research in a promising approach for micro focal x-ray generation. The approach combines the use of liquid metal jet target as anode and carbon based nanostructures as field emission cathode. Results of metal jet break-up CFD simulation and cold cathode performance tests are described. The planned experimental program is discussed herein as well.

  11. Cryogenic liquid-jet breakup in two-fluid atomizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1991-01-01

    A two-fluid atomizer was used to study the breakup of liquid-nitrogen jets in nitrogen, argon, and helium atomizing gas flows. A scattered-light scanner particle sizing instrument previously developed at NASA Lewis Research Center was further developed and used to determine characteristic drop diameters for the cryogenic sprays. In the breakup regime of aerodynamic-stripping, i.e., sonic-velocity conditions, the following correlation of the reciprocal Sauter mean diameter, D(sub 32)exp -1, with the atomizing-gas flowrate, W(g), was obtained: D(sub 32)exp -1 = k(sub c)(W(g)exp 1.33), where k(sub c) is a proportionality constant evaluated for each atomizing gas. Values of k(sub c) = 120, 220, and 1100 were obtained for argon, nitrogen, and helium gasflows, respectively. The reciprocal Sauter mean diameter and gas flowrate have the units of 1/cm and g/sec, respectively. In the regime of capillary-wave breakup, or subsonic conditions, it was found that D(sub 32)exp -1 = k(g)(W(g)exp 0.75), where k = 270, 390, and 880 for argon, nitrogen, and helium gasflows, respectively.

  12. Analysis of liquid-metal-jet impingement cooling in a corner region and for a row of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A conformal mapping method was used to analyze liquid-metal-jet impingement heat transfer. The jet flow region and energy equation are transformed to correspond to uniform flow in a parallel plate channel with nonuniform heat addition along a portion of one wall. The exact solution for the wall-temperature distribution was obtained in the transformed channel, and the results are mapped back into the physical plane. Two geometries are analyzed. One is for a single slot jet directed either into an interior corner formed by two flat plates, or over the external sides of the corner; the flat plates are uniformly heated, and the corner can have various included angles. The heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation point at the apex of the plates is obtained as a function of the corner angle, and temperature distributions are calculated along the heated walls. The second geometry is an infinite row of uniformly spaced parallel slot jets impinging normally against a uniformly heated plate. The heat-transfer behavior is obtained as a function of the spacing between the jets. Results are given for several jet Peclet numbers from 5 to 50.

  13. Analysis of heat transfer for a normally impinging liquid-metal slot jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1973-01-01

    A two-dimensional liquid-metal slot jet that is impinging normally against a uniformly heated flat plate is analyzed. The distributions of wall temperature and heat-transfer coefficient are obtained as functions of position along the plate. The liquid-metal assumptions are made that the jet is inviscid and that molecular condition is dominating heat diffusion. The solution is obtained by mapping the jet flow region into a potential plane where it occupies a strip of uniform width. The energy equation is transformed into potential coordinates, and an exact solution obtained in the strip region. Conformal mapping is then used to transform the solution into the physical plane.

  14. On the spatial stability of a liquid jet in the presence of vapor cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Ming; Ning, Zhi Lu, Mei; Yan, Kai; Fu, Juan; Sun, Chunhua

    2013-11-15

    A dispersion equation describing the effect of temperature differences on the stability of three-dimensional cylindrical liquid jets in the presence of vapor cavities is presented by the use of linear stability analysis. The mathematical model and its solving method are verified by comparing them with the data in the literature, and then the effect of temperature differences between jet and surrounding gas on the spatial stability of liquid jet is investigated. Some conclusions can be drawn from the results of this investigation: (1) the temperature difference destabilizes the liquid jet when the jet liquid is cooler than the surrounding gas, (2) the smallest atomized droplet without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is significantly larger than that when the effect of temperature differences is taken into account, (3) the effect of temperature differences on the stability of liquid jet has little relationship with azimuthal wave modes, (4) cavitation destabilizes the liquid jet when the value of the bubble volume fraction is not greater than 0.1 (0 ≤ α ≤ 0.1), and the temperature difference can weaken this effect of cavitation on the stability of liquid jet, and (5) cavitation is responsible for generating smaller droplets, the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number with and without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is quite different, and temperature difference is likely to fully restrain the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number; however, cavitation is again responsible for generating smaller droplets despite the effect of temperature differences when the bubble volume fraction α = 0.1. These findings may explain some observations of practical atomizer performance.

  15. Experimental investigation of cavity stability for a gas-jet penetrating into a liquid sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qi; Chen, Wenyu; Hu, Liang; Xie, Haibo; Fu, Xin

    2015-08-01

    Generating stable cavity without droplets splatter is commonly required when process of a gas-jet penetrating into a liquid sheet is implemented in various industrial applications. In this study, experiments were carried out to investigate the cavity stability under different penetrating parameters, including different nozzle diameters, liquid sheet thicknesses, gas flow rates, and jet heights. When keeping other parameters fixed but moving the nozzle close to the liquid sheet surface, it was found that the cavity was frequently disturbed by the wall-jet and became unstable accompanied with droplets splatter at too low jet heights. Images of the cavities were captured by high speed video camera to study cavity performances, including its size, surface morphology, and droplets splatter. It was further found that violent surface waves were commonly generated by the strong wall-jet disturbance at low jet heights and droplets splatter was caused as long as Rayleigh instability happened due to higher frequency oscillation of the surface wave. Critical jet heights causing cavity stability transition were studied for different penetrating conditions, which were further expressed by a local modified Froude number as a normalized formulation. Curve fitting illustrating the conditions to generate stable penetrating cavities was given at last to provide guides for the jet controls in industry.

  16. Equilibrium configurations of a jet of an ideally conducting liquid in an external nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    Possible equilibrium configurations of the free surface of a jet of an ideally conducting liquid placed in a nonuniform magnetic field are considered. The magnetic field is generated by two thin wires that are parallel to the jet and bear oppositely directed currents. Equilibrium is due to a balance between capillary and magnetic forces. For the plane symmetric case, when the jet deforms only in the plane of its cross section, two one-parameter families of exact solutions to the problem are derived using the method of conformal mapping. According to these solutions, a jet with an initially circular cross section deforms up to splitting into two separate jets. A criterion for jet splitting is derived by analyzing approximate two-parameter solutions.

  17. Deformation, wave phenomena, and breakup outcomes of round nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform gaseous crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Chee-Loon

    Scope and method of study. An experimental and computational research is performed to study the deformation and breakup of round nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform gaseous crossflow. Pulsed photography and shadow graphy in conjunction with high-speed imaging were used to study the wave phenomena and the droplets properties/transport dynamics of a nonturbulent liquid jet injected into a uniform crossflow within the bag breakup regime. The computational study extended the previous two-dimensional study by adding the third dimension, allowing the wave properties to be modeled. The computational simulation employed the Volume of Fluid (VOF) formulation of FLUENT, and was run on a 3-processors parallel Linux cluster and P4 desktops. The validated, time-accurate, CFD simulation analyzes the surface properties of the liquid jets within the column, bag, and shear breakup regimes by considering the effects of surface tension, liquid viscosity, and crossflow Weber number at large liquid/gas density ratios (>500) and small Ohnesorge numbers (<0.1). Findings and conclusions. Present experimental results show that the column waves along the liquid jet are attributed to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the nodes layout per bag affected the breakup mechanisms of the bags. Three distinctive sizes of droplets were produced in the bag breakup regime. The size of bag-droplets normalized by the nozzle exit diameter was constant. The different trajectories for bag- and node-droplets suggested that separation of bag- and node-droplets is possible. The computational results included jet deformations, jet cross-sectional area, jet velocity, wake velocity defect, wake width, and wavelengths of column and surface waves. Present computational results yielded a similarity solution for the inner wake region. In bag breakup, the lower pressure along the sides of the jet pulled the liquid away from both the upwind and downwind surfaces of the liquid cross-section. In shear breakup, the

  18. Analytical description of the breakup of liquid jets in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    A viscous or inviscid cylindrical jet with surface tension in a vacuum tends to pinch due to the mechanism of capillary instability. Similarity solutions are constructed which describe this phenomenon as a critical time is encountered, for two physically distinct cases: inviscid jets governed by the Euler equations and highly viscous jets governed by the Stokes equations. In both cases the only assumption imposed is that at the time of pinching the jet shape has a radial length scale which is smaller than the axial length scale. For the inviscid case, we show that our solution corresponds exactly to one member of the one-parameter family of solutions obtained from slender jet theories and the shape of the jet is locally concave at breakup. For highly viscous jets our theory predicts local shapes which are monotonic increasing or decreasing indicating the formation of a mother drop connected to the jet by a thin fluid tube. This qualitative behavior is in complete agreement with both direct numerical simulations and experimental observations.

  19. High-order azimuthal instabilities on a cylindrical liquid jet driven by temporal and spatial perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1998-09-01

    A method has been developed to drive a cylindrical liquid jet unstable for deformations with axial wavelengths shorter than the circumference of the jet and azimuthal mode numbers greater than 0. The benefit of this method is that a cylindrical liquid jet can be broken into a spray with an average diameter smaller than the diameter of the initial jet. The higher-order instabilities were created by establishing initial conditions for the jet in space and time at the nozzle. An electromechanical transducer creates the applied temporal initial condition which is a sinusoidally varying velocity perturbation added to the steady velocity of the jet. The amplitude of the velocity perturbation can be as large as the jet's steady velocity and the energy in the applied velocity perturbation drives the instability. The spatial perturbation is created by placing perturbations in the circumference of the nozzle. As the velocity perturbation travels on the jet, its leading edge steepens and the trailing edge broadens in a manner analogous to the steepening of a pressure pulse in a compressible gas. If the driven velocity perturbation is sufficiently large, a shock or jump forms on the leading edge of the velocity pulse and the jet may break up into higher-order modes. A theoretical analysis of the breakup process, based on an adaptation of compressible fluid shock theory, is used to derive a fundamental lower bound on the spray's Sauter mean diameter as a function of the velocity perturbation amplitude. Techniques for approaching the theoretical minimum spray diameter by using the higher-order modes to atomize liquid jets are discussed.

  20. Liquid jet breakup and subsequent droplet dynamics under normal gravity and in microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suñol, Francesc; González-Cinca, Ricard

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental study on the characteristics of liquid jets in different configurations. We consider jets injected perpendicular to gravity, jets injected parallel to gravity, and jets injected in a microgravity environment. We study the role played by gravity in the jet breakup length and in the dynamics of the droplets generated after breakup. We analyze droplets obtained in the dripping and jetting regimes, focusing the study on their size, trajectory, oscillation, and rotation. The particularities of the considered injection configurations are analyzed. In normal gravity conditions, in the dripping and jetting regimes, the breakup length increases with the Weber number. The transition between these regimes occurs at Wecr ≈ 3.2. Droplets are notably larger in the dripping regime than in the jetting one. In the latter case, droplet mean size decreases as the liquid flow rate is increased. In microgravity conditions, droplet trajectories form a conical shape due to droplet bouncing after collision. When a collision takes place, coalescence tends to occur at low modified Weber numbers (Wem < 2) while bouncing is observed at higher values (Wem > 2). The surface of a droplet oscillates after bouncing or coalescence events, following a damped oscillator behavior. The observed oscillation frequency agrees with theoretical predictions.

  1. A numerical study on the breakup process of laminar liquid jets into a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yu; Suga, Kazuhiko

    2006-05-01

    Surface phenomena of liquid jets into still air are numerically investigated. The liquid and air are treated as a single continuum with dynamically evolving interfaces captured by the level-set method. The jets considered are laminar: the jet exit Reynolds number ranges from 480 to 2300, with the Weber number of 3.1-28 000. The liquid/air density ratios are about 103. In comparison with an empirical correlation, the present simulations reasonably predict the breakup lengths of round liquid jets at low Weber numbers. The development of the surface wave is captured and the breakup mechanisms are discussed referring to a conventional classification chart. The breakup phenomenon at high Weber and Ohnesorge numbers is also analyzed. It is then found that large-scale longitudinal-vortex motions, which are initially generated inside the liquid core by relaxation of the axial liquid velocity profile and surface shear, are amplified by surface motions due to instability. They grow up and eventually overcome inertial and surface-tension forces leading to a sudden breakup of the liquid column.

  2. Profiles of flow discharged from vertical rotating pipes: A contrast between inviscid liquid and granular jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.; Medina, A.

    2008-11-01

    The stability of viscous rotating liquid columns and their application to rotating viscous liquid jets aligned under gravity is reviewed. Experiments on stable viscous fluid flow discharged from rotating vertical pipes exhibit very weak contraction. We present an elementary liquid jet analysis to understand this phenomenon. Indeed, our inviscid model of a slender rotating inviscid liquid jet shows that rotation suppresses contraction. Next we study the comparable problem for granular flow. Our model for noncohesive granular flow emanating from a vertical pipe rotating about its central axis, valid for sufficiently large rotation rate, shows that the granular profiles blossom rather than contract. The profiles of both the liquid and granular jets depend on the same dimensionless parameters—an exit Froude number Fr0 and an exit swirl parameter χ0. The limitations of both models are discussed. Experimental data for granular jet profiles compare well with the collision-free granular flow model in its range of applicability. A criterion for the rotation rate at which particles adjacent to the inner wall of the rotating pipe cease to flow is also given and compared to experiment.

  3. Disintegration of planar liquid film impacted by two-dimensional gas jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehring, C.; Sirignano, W. A.

    2003-05-01

    The distortion and break-up of a thin planar liquid film impacted by two gas jets while discharging from a twin-fluid atomizer is studied numerically. The gas momentum vector has components normal and parallel to the liquid stream. Viscosity and compressibility are neglected in both the liquid phase and the gas phase. The reduced-dimension (lubrication) approximation is employed to describe the nonlinear distortion and breakup of the thin film. The gas-phase dynamics are modelled by using a boundary-element-method formulation. For the considered parameter range and for a given energy expenditure, direct modulation of liquid-phase velocities at the nozzle exit is found to be more effective in causing film rupture than indirect modulation via adjacent impacting gas jets. In the former case, dilational film modulation results in shorter breakup lengths than sinuous modulation. On the other hand, for gas-jet modulated films, sinuous mode forcing is more effective than dilational forcing for the same energy input. Co-flowing gas streams significantly alter wavelengths and amplitudes of film disturbances generated by direct film modulation. Large ratios of gas-jet momentum to liquid-film momentum result in "immediate" film rupture in response to the dynamics of the impacting gas jets, whereas for lower ratios films disintegration occurs further downstream after continuous growth of the initial disturbances. Film distortion is characterized by the formation of fluid blobs or long band-like films depending on Weber number values and density ratio.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  5. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen-guo Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-29

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d < 15, owing to the strong gas-liquid interaction near the orifice. By contrast, the velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 2674–2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360–1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  6. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks under both normal and zero gravity conditions. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted indicating regions where viscous forces were not significant when computing free surface shapes. The demarcation between the viscous and inviscid region was found to depend upon the flow Reynolds number and the ratio between the jet and disk radius.

  7. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-two jet and diesel fuel samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by a fluorescent indicator adsorption analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Two methods of rapid high performance liquid chromatography were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  8. Unsteady penetration of a target by a liquid jet

    PubMed Central

    Uth, Tobias; Deshpande, Vikram S.

    2013-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that ceramic armor experiences an unsteady penetration response: an impacting projectile may erode on the surface of a ceramic target without substantial penetration for a significant amount of time and then suddenly start to penetrate the target. Although known for more than four decades, this phenomenon, commonly referred to as dwell, remains largely unexplained. Here, we use scaled analog experiments with a low-speed water jet and a soft, translucent target material to investigate dwell. The transient target response, in terms of depth of penetration and impact force, is captured using a high-speed camera in combination with a piezoelectric force sensor. We observe the phenomenon of dwell using a soft (noncracking) target material. The results show that the penetration rate increases when the flow of the impacting water jet is reversed due to the deformation of the jet–target interface––this reversal is also associated with an increase in the force exerted by the jet on the target. Creep penetration experiments with a constant indentation force did not show an increase in the penetration rate, confirming that flow reversal is the cause of the unsteady penetration rate. Our results suggest that dwell can occur in a ductile noncracking target due to flow reversal. This phenomenon of flow reversal is rather widespread and present in a wide range of impact situations, including water-jet cutting, needleless injection, and deposit removal via a fluid jet. PMID:24277818

  9. Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsi-Shang

    1990-01-01

    An analytical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion. Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, were used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic cross flow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles were calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integration reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

  10. Numerical simulation of liquid-layer breakup on a moving wall due to an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Taejong; Moon, Hojoon; You, Donghyun; Kim, Dokyun; Ovsyannikov, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Jet wiping, which is a hydrodynamic method for controlling the liquid film thickness in coating processes, is constrained by a rather violent film instability called splashing. The instability is characterized by the ejection of droplets from the runback flow and results in an explosion of the film. The splashing phenomenon degrades the final coating quality. In the present research, a volume-of-fluid (VOF)-based method, which is developed at Cascade Technologies, is employed to simulate the air-liquid multiphase flow dynamics. The present numerical method is based on an unstructured-grid unsplit geometric VOF scheme and guarantees strict conservation of mass of two-phase flow, The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements such as the liquid-film thickness before and after the jet wiping, wall pressure and shear stress distributions. The trajectories of liquid droplets due to the fluid motion entrained by the gas-jet operation, are also qualitatively compared with experimental visualization. Physical phenomena observed during the liquid-layer breakup due to an impinging jet is characterized in order to develop ideas for controlling the liquid-layer instability and resulting splash generation and propagation. Supported by the Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699, the Brain Korea 21+ program, POSCO, and 2014 CTR Summer Program.

  11. Effect of mass-velocity on liquid jet atomization in Mach 1 gasflow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1988-01-01

    Interacting two-phase flow in four differently sized pneumatic two-fluid atomizers was investigated to determine the effect of gas mass-velocity on the Sauter mean diameter of sprays produced by small diameter liquid jets breaking up in high velocity gas flow. Tests were conducted primarily in the acceleration-wave regime for liquid jet atomization, where it was found that the loss of droplets due to vaporization had a marked effect on drop size measurements. A scattered-light scanner, developed at NASA Lewis Research Center, was used to measure the Sauter mean diameter, D sub 32, which was correlated with nitrogen gas mass-velocity to give the following expression: D (sup -1)(sub 32) = 11.7(rho (sub n) V (sub n)) (sup 1.33). The exponent 1.33 for the gas mass-velocity is identical to that predicted by atomization theory for liquid jet breakup in the acceleration-wave regime.

  12. Absolute And Convective Instability and Splitting of a Liquid Jet at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    The objective is to establish a definitive role of the capillary, viscous, and inertial forces at a liquid-gas interface in the absence of gravity by using the fluid dynamics problem of the stability of a liquid jet as a vehicle. The objective is achieved by reexamining known theories and new theories that can be verified completely only in microgravity. The experiments performed in the microgravity facility at NASA Glenn Research Center enable the verification of the theory with experimental data. Of particular interest are (1) to capture for the first time the image of absolute instability, (2) to elucidate the fundamental difference in the physical mechanism of the drop and spray formation from a liquid jet, and (3) to find the origin of the newly discovered phenomenon of jet splitting on earth and in space.

  13. Deformation and dewetting of thin liquid films induced by moving gas jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Darhuber, Anton A

    2013-10-01

    We study the deformation of thin liquid films subjected to impinging air-jets that are moving with respect to the substrate. The height profile and shape of the deformed liquid film is evaluated experimentally and numerically for different jet Reynolds numbers and translation speeds, for different liquids and substrate materials. Experiments and numerical results are in good agreement. On partially wetting substrates film rupture occurs. We imaged the appearance of dry spots and emergence of droplet patterns by high-speed, dual-wavelength interference microscopy. We systematically evaluated the resulting average droplet size and droplet density as a function of the experimental conditions. We show that within experimental accuracy the distribution of dry spots is dependent only on the residual film thickness and is not directly influenced by the shear stress and pressure gradients of the air-jet, nor by the speed of the substrate.

  14. Plunge location of sediment driven hyperpycnal river discharges considering bottom friction, lateral entrainment, and particle settling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, K. B.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2012-12-01

    River discharges with very high sediment loads have the potential to develop into plunging hyperpycnal flows that transition from a river jet to a turbidity current at some location basinward of the river mouth due to the density difference between the turbid river and the receiving water body. However, even if the bulk density of the turbid river is greater than that of the receiving lake or ocean, some distance is needed for the forward inertia of the river to dissipate so that the downward gravitational pull can cause the system to collapse into a subaqueous turbidity current. This collapsing at the plunge point has been found to occur when the densimetric Froude number decreases to a value between 0.3 < Frd < 0.7 (Fang and Stefan 2000, Parker and Toniolo 2007, Dai and Garcia 2010, Lamb et al. 2010). In 2D channel flow analysis at the plunge point, this has led to the concept of a two-fold criterion for plunging. The first is simply for the need of high enough suspended sediment concentration to overcome the density difference between the river fluid and the fluid of the receiving water. The second is the need for sufficiently deep water to reduce the densimetric Froude below the critical value for plunging, which leads to dependence of plunging on the receiving water basin topography (Lamb et al. 2010). In this analysis, we expand on past work by solving a system of ODE river jet equations to account for bottom friction, lateral entrainment of ambient fluid, and particle settling between the river mouth and the plunge location. Typical entrainment and bottom friction coefficients are used and the model is tested against the laboratory density current data of Fang and Stefan (1991). A suite of conditions is solved with variable river discharge velocity, aspect ratio, suspended sediment concentration, and particle size; a range of salinity values and bottom slopes are used for the receiving water body. The plunge location is then expressed as a function of the

  15. Fluid Dynamics of Submerged Gas-Particle Jets and Injection Refining of Liquid Metals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeu-Wen

    In order to model the transition of flow from bubbling to jetting flow behavior, a variety of liquids, particles and injection parameters have been used in this study to identify all the possible variables which can affect flow behavior of submerged gas-particle jets. The transition between jetting and bubbling is controlled by momentum transfer from particles to gas bubbles via the liquid phase. The ratio of drag force in liquid to buoyancy force of bubble, N(,R), can be used to predict the flow transition. When N(,R) is greater than 1300, jetting occurs. When N(,R) is less than 800, bubbling occurs. The feasibility of metal matrix composite manufacture by gas-particle injection has been investigated. Gas-particle jets could be used to make composites, if injection parameters and casting conditions are well controlled. The deoxidation of molten copper by graphite covering and gas injection have been investigated. The oxygen concentration in copper can be reduced down to 10 ppm or less by inert gas injection with graphite covering. The rate of deoxidation of molten copper by graphite with gas stirring obeys the first order rate equation and the rate constant is determined by mixed control of chemical reaction and liquid phase mass transfer. The rate constant can be calculated from the equation: 1/k = 1/k(,R) + 1/k(,L).

  16. Rupture of thin liquid films induced by impinging air-jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Kruis, Geerit C F L; Riepen, Michel; Darhuber, Anton A

    2012-07-01

    Thin liquid films on partially wetting substrates are subjected to laminar axisymmetric air-jets impinging at normal incidence. We measured the time at which film rupture occurs and dewetting commences as a function of diameter and Reynolds number of the air-jet. We developed numerical models for the air flow as well as the height evolution of the thin liquid film. The experimental results were compared with numerical simulations based on the lubrication approximation and a phenomenological expression for the disjoining pressure. We achieved quantitative agreement for the rupture times. We found that the film thickness profiles were highly sensitive to the presence of minute quantities of surface-active contaminants.

  17. Hydrodynamic performance of an annular liquid jet: Production of spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kendall, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    An annular jet flow of liquid surrounding a flow of gas at its core is extremely unstable. Axisymmetric oscillations arise spontaneously, and grow with such rapidity along the axial dimension that a pinch-off of the liquid and an encapsulation of the core gas occurs within as few as four jet diameters. The shells which result thereby may be described as thick-wall bubbles, for which van der Waals forces are unimportant. A description is given of the fluid dynamic processes by which the shells are formed, and of means for preserving and promoting the geometrical of the product. The forming of metallic shells is mentioned.

  18. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    SciTech Connect

    Thüring, T.; Rutishauser, S.; Stampanoni, M.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.; David, C.

    2013-08-26

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ∼10{sup 12} photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  19. Visualization of high speed liquid jet impaction on a moving surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Two apparatuses for examining liquid jet impingement on a high-speed moving surface are described: an air cannon device (for examining surface speeds between 0 and 25 m/sec) and a spinning disk device (for examining surface speeds between 15 and 100 m/sec). The air cannon linear traverse is a pneumatic energy-powered system that is designed to accelerate a metal rail surface mounted on top of a wooden projectile. A pressurized cylinder fitted with a solenoid valve rapidly releases pressurized air into the barrel, forcing the projectile down the cannon barrel. The projectile travels beneath a spray nozzle, which impinges a liquid jet onto its metal upper surface, and the projectile then hits a stopping mechanism. A camera records the jet impingement, and a pressure transducer records the spray nozzle backpressure. The spinning disk set-up consists of a steel disk that reaches speeds of 500 to 3,000 rpm via a variable frequency drive (VFD) motor. A spray system similar to that of the air cannon generates a liquid jet that impinges onto the spinning disc, and cameras placed at several optical access points record the jet impingement. Video recordings of jet impingement processes are recorded and examined to determine whether the outcome of impingement is splash, splatter, or deposition. The apparatuses are the first that involve the high speed impingement of low-Reynolds-number liquid jets on high speed moving surfaces. In addition to its rail industry applications, the described technique may be used for technical and industrial purposes such as steelmaking and may be relevant to high-speed 3D printing. PMID:25938331

  20. Visualization of high speed liquid jet impaction on a moving surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2015-01-01

    Two apparatuses for examining liquid jet impingement on a high-speed moving surface are described: an air cannon device (for examining surface speeds between 0 and 25 m/sec) and a spinning disk device (for examining surface speeds between 15 and 100 m/sec). The air cannon linear traverse is a pneumatic energy-powered system that is designed to accelerate a metal rail surface mounted on top of a wooden projectile. A pressurized cylinder fitted with a solenoid valve rapidly releases pressurized air into the barrel, forcing the projectile down the cannon barrel. The projectile travels beneath a spray nozzle, which impinges a liquid jet onto its metal upper surface, and the projectile then hits a stopping mechanism. A camera records the jet impingement, and a pressure transducer records the spray nozzle backpressure. The spinning disk set-up consists of a steel disk that reaches speeds of 500 to 3,000 rpm via a variable frequency drive (VFD) motor. A spray system similar to that of the air cannon generates a liquid jet that impinges onto the spinning disc, and cameras placed at several optical access points record the jet impingement. Video recordings of jet impingement processes are recorded and examined to determine whether the outcome of impingement is splash, splatter, or deposition. The apparatuses are the first that involve the high speed impingement of low-Reynolds-number liquid jets on high speed moving surfaces. In addition to its rail industry applications, the described technique may be used for technical and industrial purposes such as steelmaking and may be relevant to high-speed 3D printing.

  1. The mechanism of liquid metal jet formation in the cathode spot of vacuum arc discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gashkov, M. A.; Zubarev, N. M.; Mesyats, G. A.; Uimanov, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    We have theoretically studied the dynamics of molten metal during crater formation in the cathode spot of vacuum arc discharge. At the initial stage, a liquid-metal ridge is formed around the crater. This process has been numerically simulated in the framework of the two-dimensional axisymmetric heat and mass transfer problem in the approximation of viscous incompressible liquid. At a more developed stage, the motion of liquid metal loses axial symmetry, which corresponds to a tendency toward jet formation. The development of azimuthal instabilities of the ridge is analyzed in terms of dispersion relations for surface waves. It is shown that maximum increments correspond to instability of the Rayleigh-Plateau type. Estimations of the time of formation of liquid metal jets and their probable number are obtained.

  2. Application of underwater shock wave and laser-induced liquid jet to neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Hirano, T.; Sato, J.; Kato, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.

    2006-03-01

    Paper deals with applications of underwater shock waves to medicine. A historical development of underwater shock wave generation by using pulsed Ho:YAG laser beam irradiation in water is briefly described and an overview is given regarding potential applications of shock waves to neuro-surgery. The laser beam irradiation in a liquid-filled catheter produces water vapor bubble and shock waves intermittently produces micro-liquid jets in a controlled fashion from the exit of the catheter. Correlations between shock dynamics and bubble dynamics are emphasized. To optimize the jet motion, results of basic parametric studies are briefly presented. The liquid jet discharged from the catheter exit has an impulse high enough to clearly exhibit effectiveness for various medical purposes. In liquid jets we observed reasonably strong shock waves and hence invented a compact shock generator aiming to apply to microsurgery. We applied it to a rat's bone window and developed an effective method of brain protection against shock loading. The insertion of Gore-Tex® sheet is found to attenuate shock waves drastically even for very short stand off distance and its physical mechanism is clarified. The laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) is successfully applied to soft tissue dissection. Animal experiments were performed and results of histological observations are presented in details. Results of animal experiments revealed that LILJ can sharply dissect soft tissue with a minimum amount of liquid consumption, while blood vessels larger than 0.2 mm in diameter are preserved. Shock waves and LILJ have a potential to be indispensable tools in neuro-surgery.

  3. Optimization of drug viscosity used in gas-powered liquid jet injectors.

    PubMed

    Portaro, Rocco; Nakayama, Haruka; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of drug viscosity on the performance of gas powered liquid jet injectors. The analysis is accomplished utilizing a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that obtains the stagnation pressure at the nozzle outlet. The technique is based on previous work used to predict gas power driven injector piston velocity with time. The results depict the variation in average and peak injector stagnation pressure for three different driven pressures; driving injections which vary from 0.2 cP to 87 cP in viscosity. Furthermore, a numerical representation of jet shape is also obtained to verify the effect of viscosity on jet geometry. These results demonstrate that increasing viscosity by 10 times that of water produces only a slight decrease in injector stagnation pressure and produces jets with greater confinement, which will display better characteristics for puncturing the skin.

  4. A 24 keV liquid-metal-jet x-ray source for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, D. H.; Takman, P. A. C.; Lundstroem, U.; Burvall, A.; Hertz, H. M.

    2011-12-15

    We present a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-indium/gallium-jet anode. The 30-70 W electron beam is magnetically focused onto the jet, producing a circular 7-13 {mu}m full width half maximum x-ray spot. The measured spectral brightness at the 24.2 keV In K{sub {alpha}} line is 3 x 10{sup 9} photons/(s x mm{sup 2}x mrad{sup 2}x 0.1% BW) at 30 W electron-beam power. The high photon energy compared to existing liquid-metal-jet sources increases the penetration depth and allows imaging of thicker samples. The applicability of the source in the biomedical field is demonstrated by high-resolution imaging of a mammography phantom and a phase-contrast angiography phantom.

  5. A two-phase model for subcooled and superheated liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, R.; Jersey, G.R.; Krambeck, F.J.; Sundaresan, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a two-phase jet model for predicting the liquid rainout (capture) and composition of subcooled and superheated HF/additive pressurized liquid releases. The parent droplets of the release mixture constitute the fist phase. The second phase can in general be a vapor-liquid fog. The drops are not in equilibrium with the fog phase with which they exchange mass and energy. The fog at any location is assumed to be in local equilibrium. Correlations are developed for predicting the initial drop size for hydrodynamic breakup of jets. Applications are discussed in this paper for HF/additive mixtures. The fog phase calculations account for HF oligomerization and HF-water complex formation in the vapor phase and equilibrium between the liquid and vapor in the fog. The model incorporates jet trajectory calculations and hence can predict the amount of liquid rained out (liquid capture) and the capture distance. The HF captures predicted by the model for various release conditions are in agreement with small and large scale release experiments.

  6. A Particle-Tracking-Velocimetry (PTV) Investigation of Liquid Injection in a DC Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damiani, David; Tarlet, Dominique; Meillot, Erick

    2014-02-01

    The present article describes experimental results of liquid injection in a thermal plasma jet by particle-tracking velocimetry (PTV). This technique delivers an in-situ real-time analysis of the liquid breakup and measures the velocities and the trajectories of the particles. The observations were done within the 10 mm surrounding the injection location where the plasma brightness is considerable. First, a validation of the proposed investigation method was carried out in a slower plasma jet. Subsequently, PTV measurements within faster plasma jets, resulting in a set of trajectories, were compared with trajectories achieved through optical diagnostics based on a simple shadow-graph technique proposed by Damiani et al. [Injection d'un liquide au sein d'un jet plasma thermique: optimisation de la trajectoire des particules, Proceedings of Congrès Francophone de Techniques Laser, CFTL 2010, Vandoeuvre lès nancy, France, 2010 (in French)]. These trajectories indicated that a higher plasma flow rate was required to spray all droplet sizes in the axis of the flow, thereby enabling an optimal spraying (then coating) application for producing nanostructured thin layers. This study showed that the liquid injection parameters are of main importance to obtain optimal injection and plasma parameters to achieve the required coating properties.

  7. A new technology for revascularization of cerebral embolism using liquid jet impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Uenohara, Hiroshi

    1997-12-01

    Revascularization time is the dominant factor in the treatment of acute cerebral embolism. In this paper we describe a rapid revascularization therapy using liquid jets generated by the interaction of gas bubbles with shock waves, which impact on the thrombi. The interaction of a shock wave with a gas bubble attached to an artificial thrombus which was inserted into a tube model of a cerebral artery was investigated. The shock wave was generated by detonating a microexplosive pellet. The overpressure of the shock wave was (n = 7) and (n = 3). The initial air bubble radii were varied from 0.87 mm to 2.18 mm. The subsequent collapse of the bubble was photographed using a high-speed framing camera, and the liquid jet penetrating into the artificial thrombus was visualized using x-ray photography. The penetration depth of the liquid jet increased with increasing bubble size. There was an optimal separation distance between the bubble and the shock wave source to obtain the maximum penetration depth. Liquid jets have the potential to penetrate through thrombi in as little as a few microseconds, and with very efficient ablation.

  8. On the transfer of energy to an unstable liquid jet in a coflowing compressible airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsi-Shang; Kelly, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The transfer of energy from a compressible airstream to a coflowing unstable liquid jet via the pressure perturbation at the interface is studied as the Mach number varies continuously from subsonic to supersonic values. The 'lift' component of the pressure perturbation has been demonstrated to predominate up to slightly supersonic free-stream Mach numbers, after which the 'drag' component predominates.

  9. Hydrodynamic characteristics and geometric properties of plunging and spilling breakers over impermeable slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alagan Chella, Mayilvahanan; Bihs, Hans; Myrhaug, Dag; Muskulus, Michael

    2016-07-01

    The two-phase flow CFD model REEF3D has been used for modeling waves breaking over a sloping seabed for a spilling and a plunging breaker. This model is based on Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the level set method (LSM) for the free surface and k-ω model for turbulence. First, the characteristics and geometric properties of plunging breaking waves with different offshore wave steepnesses over slopes are examined and discussed. The study further explores the hydrodynamic characteristics of spilling and plunging breakers in terms of the wave height evolution and attenuation, horizontal and vertical velocity, free surface profile evolution, and the geometric properties during the development of the breaking process. The numerical results show a good agreement with experimental data in terms of free surface elevation, horizontal and vertical velocity, wave envelope and turbulent intensity for the spilling and plunging breakers. Results of numerical simulations describing the physical flow characteristics such as the formation of the forward overturning water jet, air pocket, splash-up, and the secondary wave during the breaking process are presented for both cases. For both cases, the physical flow process is found to have similar flow features, but the breaking process occurs at significantly different scales.

  10. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lienhard, J.H. V; Khounsary, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The combination of impinging jets and diamond substrates may provide an effective solution to a class of extremely high heat flux problems in which very localized heat loads must be removed. Some potential applications include the cooling of high-heat-load components in synchrotron x-ray, fusion, and semiconductor laser systems. Impinging liquid jets are a very effective vehicle for removing high heat fluxes. The liquid supply arrangement is relatively simple, and low thermal resistances can be routinely achieved. A jet`s cooling ability is a strong function of the size of the cooled area relative to the jet diameter. For relatively large area targets, the critical heat fluxes can approach 20 W/mm{sup 2}. In this situation, burnout usually originates at the outer edge of the cooled region as increasing heat flux inhibits the liquid supply. Limitations from liquid supply are minimized when heating is restricted to the jet stagnation zone. The high stagnation pressure and high velocity gradients appear to suppress critical flux phenomena, and fluxes of up to 400 W/mm{sup 2} have been reached without evidence of burnout. Instead, the restrictions on heat flux are closely related to properties of the cooled target. Target properties become an issue owing to the large temperatures and large temperature gradients that accompany heat fluxes over 100 W/mm{sup 2}. These conditions necessitate a target with both high thermal conductivity to prevent excessive temperatures and good mechanical properties to prevent mechanical failures. Recent developments in synthetic diamond technology present a possible solution to some of the solid-side constraints on heat flux. Polycrystalline diamond foils can now be produced by chemical vapor deposition in reasonable quantity and at reasonable cost. Synthetic single crystal diamonds as large as 1 cm{sup 2} are also available.

  11. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  12. Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

    2014-09-01

    Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

  13. Instabilities and drop formation in cylindrical liquid jets in reduced gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, A. P. R.; Osborne, B. P.; Stoltzfus, J. M.; Howes, T.; Steinberg, T. A.

    2002-10-01

    The effects of convective and absolute instabilities on the formation of drops formed from cylindrical liquid jets of glycerol/water issuing into still air were investigated. Medium-duration reduced gravity tests were conducted aboard NASA's KC-135 and compared to similar tests performed under normal gravity conditions to aid in understanding the drop formation process. In reduced gravity, the Rayleigh-Chandrasekhar Equation was found to accurately predict the transition between a region of absolute and convective instability as defined by a critical Weber number. Observations of the physics of the jet, its breakup, and subsequent drop dynamics under both gravity conditions and the effects of the two instabilities on these processes are presented. All the normal gravity liquid jets investigated, in regions of convective or absolute instability, were subject to significant stretching effects, which affected the subsequent drop and associated geometry and dynamics. These effects were not displayed in reduced gravity and, therefore, the liquid jets would form drops which took longer to form (reduction in drop frequency), larger in size, and more spherical (surface tension effects). Most observed changes, in regions of either absolute or convective instabilities, were due to a reduction in the buoyancy force and an increased importance of the surface tension force acting on the liquid contained in the jet or formed drop. Reduced gravity environments allow better investigations to be performed into the physics of liquid jets, subsequently formed drops, and the effects of instabilities on these systems. In reduced gravity, drops form up to three times more slowly and as a consequence are up to three times larger in volume in the theoretical absolute instability region than in the theoretical convective instability region. This difference was not seen in the corresponding normal gravity tests due to the masking effects of gravity. A drop is shown to be able to form and

  14. Visualization of a cryogenic jet simulating leak from a liquid hydrogen storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Tim; Agrawal, Ajay

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen is considered an alternative fuel in propulsion and power generation due to fuel economy standards and environmental pollution. However, if an accidental leak were to occur in a hydrogen storage tank, the discharged fuel could find an ignition source and produce an explosion. A barrier wall can be used to contain the leak from the storage tank, therefore protecting equipment and people from the explosion. Past studies have investigated the jet/barrier wall interaction, in a laboratory setting, with fuel stored as a gas. Hydrogen fuel stored as a liquid offers higher energy density. In this work, we have studied the leak at cryogenic conditions due to liquid storage parameters. Jet fluid structure is visualized in a laboratory setting using helium as the supersonic jet fluid. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) images are used to show instantaneous flow structure of jet (leakage point) and barrier wall interactions. Results show the jet inlet temperature leads to significant differences in the spread angle and the extent of fuel-air mixture region adjacent to the barrier wall.

  15. Droplet impact on deep liquid pools: Rayleigh jet to formation of secondary droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Orozco, Eduardo; Davanlou, Ashkan; Choudhury, Pretam K.; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-01

    The impact of droplets on a deep pool has applications in cleaning up oil spills, spray cooling, painting, inkjet printing, and forensic analysis, relying on the changes in properties such as viscosity, interfacial tension, and density. Despite the exhaustive research on different aspects of droplet impact, it is not clear how liquid properties can affect the instabilities leading to Rayleigh jet breakup and number of daughter drops formed after its pinch-off. In this article, through systematic experiments we investigate the droplet impact phenomena by varying viscosity and surface tension of liquids as well as impact speeds. Further, using numerical simulations, we show that Rayleigh-Plateau instability is influenced by these parameters, and capillary time scale is the appropriate scale to normalize the breakup time. Based on Ohnesorge number (Oh) and impact Weber number (We), a regime map for no breakup, Rayleigh jet breakup, and crown splash is suggested. Interestingly, crown splash is observed to occur at all Ohnesorge numbers; however, at high Oh, a large portion of kinetic energy is dissipated, and thus the Rayleigh jet is suppressed regardless of high impact velocity. The normalized required time for the Rayleigh jet to reach its peak varies linearly with the critical height of the jet.

  16. Droplet impact on deep liquid pools: Rayleigh jet to formation of secondary droplets.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Orozco, Eduardo; Davanlou, Ashkan; Choudhury, Pretam K; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-01

    The impact of droplets on a deep pool has applications in cleaning up oil spills, spray cooling, painting, inkjet printing, and forensic analysis, relying on the changes in properties such as viscosity, interfacial tension, and density. Despite the exhaustive research on different aspects of droplet impact, it is not clear how liquid properties can affect the instabilities leading to Rayleigh jet breakup and number of daughter drops formed after its pinch-off. In this article, through systematic experiments we investigate the droplet impact phenomena by varying viscosity and surface tension of liquids as well as impact speeds. Further, using numerical simulations, we show that Rayleigh-Plateau instability is influenced by these parameters, and capillary time scale is the appropriate scale to normalize the breakup time. Based on Ohnesorge number (Oh) and impact Weber number (We), a regime map for no breakup, Rayleigh jet breakup, and crown splash is suggested. Interestingly, crown splash is observed to occur at all Ohnesorge numbers; however, at high Oh, a large portion of kinetic energy is dissipated, and thus the Rayleigh jet is suppressed regardless of high impact velocity. The normalized required time for the Rayleigh jet to reach its peak varies linearly with the critical height of the jet. PMID:26651794

  17. Heat transfer from a liquid bath due to an impinging gas jet: A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, F.; Farouk, B.; Mutharasan, R.

    1995-12-31

    An impinging gasjet on a liquid surface is found in many industrial processes such as electric arc furnace steel-making and welding. Fundamental understanding of the interaction of a gas or plasmajet impinging on a liquid pool can provide important insights into process behavior resulting in improved efficiency. A numerical model is developed for solving both the impinging gas jet and the liquid pool temperature and flow fields along with the deformed interface shape for the above processing operation. Using curvilinear coordinates, the Navier-Stokes equations of each phase are solved separately and then coupled via continuity of static pressure, shear stress, temperature and heat flux at the interface.

  18. Intensification of liquid jet atomization through injection into the exit channel of the atomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gel'Fand, B. E.; Dranovskii, M. L.; Novikov, A. G.; Pikalov, V. P.

    The injection of a gas jet into the liquid flow at the exit of an atomizer nozzle, directly before the liquid is discharged into the ambient atmosphere, was investigated experimentally as a possible method of improving the quality of atomization. The atomizer used in the experiments had transparent side walls and a nozzle of rectangular (2 x 4 mm) cross section; the relative length of the nozzle was 1.5-1.6. It is shown that gas injection not only improves the quality of atomization but also makes it possible to lower the liquid supply pressure and to increase the atomizer nozzle diameter.

  19. Deformation and breakup of round drops and nonturbulent liquid jets in uniform crossflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aalburg, Christian

    2002-09-01

    The deformation and breakup properties of liquid drops and round liquid jets in uniform crossflows were studied computationally, motivated by applications to the behavior of sprays in crossflows found in a variety of power and propulsion systems. The objective of the present investigation was to extend the parameter range of past deformation and breakup studies, by means of numerical computations, to conditions more representative of practical high-pressure spray combustion processes. The time-dependent, incompressible and two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved on a uniform, staggered grid using the projection method of Chorin (1968) and the Level Set method of Sussman et al. (1994). Numerical simulations of the effect of crossflows on the deformation and breakup of drops and round liquid jets were carried out for the following range of parameters to study the independent effects of four dimensionless variables that fully describe the problem: Weber numbers of 0.1--2,000,000, Ohnesorge numbers of 0.001--100, Reynolds numbers of 12.5--200 and liquid/gas density ratios of 2--infinity (the last by Richardson extrapolation). The present results were in good agreement with existing measurements of deformation and breakup properties of both liquid drops and round liquid jets at large liquid/gas density ratios and with wake and drag properties of spheres and cylinders in crossflows. Similar to past experimental observations, remarkable similarities were observed between the breakup properties of round liquid jets and liquid drops. The liquid/gas density ratio was found to have a relatively small effect on deformation and breakup. Effects of Reynolds number variations were also small for conditions where the drag coefficient is relatively independent of the Reynolds number. As the Stokes flow regime is approached, however, the Weber number (We) required for breakup increases significantly due to increased drag coefficients. At large Ohnesorge number (Oh

  20. Influence of Turbulence on the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity. After the code was implemented in axisymmetric form and verified by several test cases at the NASA Glenn Research Center, the drop tower runs of Aydelott were modeled. Work last year with a laminar model was found to overpredict Aydelott's results, except at the lowest Reynolds number conditions of 400. This year, a simple turbulence model was implemented by adding a turbulent viscosity based on the mixing-length hypothesis and empirical measurements of previous works. Predictions made after this change was implemented have been much closer to experimentally observed flow patterns and geyser heights. Two model runs is shown. The first, without any turbulence correction

  1. Theoretical analysis of specimen cooling rate during impact freezing and liquid-jet freezing of freeze-etch specimens.

    PubMed

    Kopstad, G; Elgsaeter, A

    1982-11-01

    We have carried out a theoretical analysis of specimen cooling rate under ideal conditions during impact freezing and liquid-jet freezing. The analysis shows that use of liquid helium instead of liquid nitrogen as cooling medium during impact freezing results in an increase in a specimen cooling rate of no more than 30-40%. We have further shown that when both impact freezing and liquid-jet freezing are conducted at liquid nitrogen temperature, the two methods give approximately the same specimen cooling rate under ideal conditions except for a thin outer layer of the specimen. In this region impact freezing yields the highest cooling rate. PMID:7171712

  2. Self-organization of jets in electrospinning from free liquid surface: A generalized approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, David; Sarkar, Arindam; Pokorny, Pavel

    2008-04-01

    Electrospinning has enabled creation of excellent materials for a great number of applications. Previously, it was based on less productive capillary spinners. The present study is based on recent efforts to elevate electrospinning technology to an industrial level by simultaneously provoking innumerable polymeric jets from a sufficiently large liquid surface to increase productivity. Particularly, it deals with electrospinning from free surface of conductive liquids and validates a formulated hypothesis that explains self-organization of jets on one-dimensional free liquid surfaces in terms of electrohydrodynamic instability of surface waves. Here, it is shown how the hypothesis, based on a profound analysis of a dispersion law, explains that above a certain critical value of applied electric field intensity/field strength the system starts to be self-organized in mesocopic scale due to the mechanism of the "fastest forming instability." The mechanism plays a key role in selecting a particular wave with a characteristic wavelength whose amplitude boundlessly grows faster than the others. The fastest growing stationary wave, according to the hypothesis, marks the onset of electrospinning from a free liquid surface with its jets originating from the wave crests. Singularity of this approach lies in predicting critical values of the phenomenon, viz., critical field strength and corresponding critical interjet distance. The critical field strength, will, thereafter, be used in defining a unique dimensionless electrospinning number. It will, subsequently, be shown how the critical interjet distance, i.e., the maximal distance between the neighboring jets, simply depends on the capillary length. The capillary length represents a latent characteristic spatial scale of the system. The theory also predicts interjet distance for field strengths above the critical value. The said prediction is universally applicable for all conductive liquids if it is expressed in terms of

  3. Direct numerical simulation of ignition in turbulent n-heptane liquid-fuel spray jets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.; Rutland, C.J.

    2007-06-15

    Direct numerical simulation was used for fundamental studies of the ignition of turbulent n-heptane liquid-fuel spray jets. A chemistry mechanism with 33 species and 64 reactions was adopted to describe the chemical reactions. The Eulerian method is employed to solve the carrier-gas flow field and the Lagrangian method is used to track the liquid-fuel droplets. Two-way coupling interaction is considered through the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between the carrier-gas fluid and the liquid-fuel spray. The initial carrier-gas temperature was 1500 K. Six cases were simulated with different droplet radii (from 10 to 30 {mu}m) and two initial velocities (100 and 150 m/s). From the simulations, it was found that evaporative cooling and turbulence mixing play important roles in the ignition of liquid-fuel spray jets. Ignition first occurs at the edges of the jets where the fuel mixture is lean, and the scalar dissipation rate and the vorticity magnitude are very low. For smaller droplets, ignition occurs later than for larger droplets due to increased evaporative cooling. Higher initial droplet velocity enhances turbulence mixing and evaporative cooling. For smaller droplets, higher initial droplet velocity causes the ignition to occur earlier, whereas for larger droplets, higher initial droplet velocity delays the ignition time. (author)

  4. Liquid jet breakup and atomization in rocket chambers under dense spray conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuo, Kenneth K.; Cheung, Fan-Bill; Woodward, Roger D.; Garner, Kenneth N.

    1991-01-01

    Two advanced diagnostic techniques were established and employed in this project. The first technique involves the use of a real-time x ray radiography system along with a high-speed CCD Xybion camera and an advanced digital image processor to investigate the breakup processes of the liquid core. The focus of this part of the project is to determine the inner structure of the liquid jet and via thin sheets of laser light, with the scatters light being photographed by a Xybion electronic camera synchronized to the laser pulse. This technique, which is capable of recording the breakup event occurring within 25 nano-seconds, enables us to freeze the motions of the jet and liquid droplets. The focus of this part of the project is to determine the outer structure of the liquid jet and to discover the configuration of the surface waves, the spray pattern, and the droplet size distribution in the non-dilute region. Results obtained by these two advanced diagnostic techniques will provide the much needed database for model development and accurate prediction of engine performance. The present work also represents a breakthrough in the area of advanced diagnostics of dense sprays.

  5. A microfocus x-ray source based on a nonmetal liquid-jet anode

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohimaa, T.; Ewald, J.; Schlie, M.; Hertz, H. M.; Vogt, U.

    2008-06-09

    We demonstrate stable operation of a nonmetallic anode in an electron-impact x-ray source. A high-brightness electron beam is focused on a {approx}70 m/s speed, {approx}10 {mu}m diameter methanol jet producing stable x-ray emission with peak spectral brightness at {approx}5.4x10{sup 5} photons/(sx{mu}m{sup 2}xsrx0.1%BW). The jet is fully evaporated in the interaction point. The shape of a simulated spectrum using Monte Carlo methods shows good agreement with experimental data, and the theoretical brightness values give an upper limit for the achievable x-ray emission from jets with very high velocities. Using this anode concept, all compounds and elements found in liquid form are potentially usable for x-ray generation.

  6. Vehicle-scale investigation of a fluorine jet-pump liquid hydrogen tank pressurization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to evaluate the performance of a fluorine-hydrogen jet-pump injector for main tank injection (MTI) pressurization of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. The injector performance during pressurization and LH2 expulsion was determined by a series of seven tests of a full-scale injector and MTI pressure control system in a 28.3 cu m (1000 cu ft) flight-weight LH2 tank. Although the injector did not effectively jet-pump LH2 continuously, it showed improved pressurization performance compared to straight-pipe injectors tested under the same conditions in a previous program. The MTI computer code was modified to allow performance prediction for the jet-pump injector.

  7. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  8. Atomization of a small-diameter liquid jet by a high-speed gas stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Christopher Michael

    The situation of a small-diameter liquid jet exposed to a large-diameter high-speed gas jet is investigated experimentally. Flow visualization and particle-sizing techniques are employed to examine both the initial breakup process and subsequent secondary atomization of the liquid. It is shown that nearly all of the breakup takes place in the near-field and that the bulk of the atomization is completed within the potential cone of the gas jet. The resultant drop size depends primarily on the gas velocity and to a weaker extent on the liquid mass flux. It is argued that the mechanism of primary atomization is similar to that of a liquid drop suddenly exposed to a high-speed gas stream. A phenomenological breakup model is proposed for the initial droplet size, based on the accelerative destabilization of the liquid jet surface by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Measurements of droplet sizes and surface wavelengths are shown to be in good agreement with the model predictions. The downstream evolution of the droplet-size distribution is also investigated, with consideration given to several secondary mechanisms including turbulent breakup, droplet-droplet collisions, and droplet acceleration. It is argued that the relative acceleration of droplets of different size classes, and energetic collisions between droplets, are together responsible for the experimentally observed variation of the mean drop size with downstream distance from the injection plane in the far-field of the spray. The feasibility of coaxial liquid-gas injection for pulse detonation engine (PDE) applications is additionally considered. The performance of coaxial atomizers under transient operating conditions appropriate to PDEs is analyzed along with the capability of this injection scheme to produce sufficiently small droplet sizes within restricted flow regimes. The ability to tailor the radial distributions of both the liquid mass flux and droplet sizes through the addition of swirl to the coaxial

  9. Stagnation-point heat transfer during impingement of laminar liquid jets - Analysis including surface tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xin; Gabour, L. A.; Lienhard, J. H., V.

    1993-02-01

    The stagnation-zone characteristics of an impinging liquid jet are of great interest because the maximum heat transfer coefficient occurs in that region. This paper is an analytical study of the fluid flow and heat transfer in the stagnation zone of an unsubmerged liquid jet. The role of surface tension is emphasized. Stagnation-zone transport is strongly dependent on the potential flow above the boundary layer. Only a few studies have examined the potential flow of an unsubmerged jet, each using approximate potential flow theory and neglecting surface tension. In this paper, numerical solutions for a laminar unsubmerged jet are obtained, using a simulation method for steady, inviscid, incompressible flow with surface tension. A series solution that satisfies the boundary conditions in an approximate manner is constructed in terms of Legendre functions. Numerical solution of the momentum equation shows that surface tension has an effect on the stagnation-point flow field when the Weber number is small. Solutions of the associated boundary layer problem are used to obtain predictions of the influence of Weber number on the stagnation zone heat transfer. The results are validated by comparison to measurements at high Weber number.

  10. Numerical studies of the effects of jet-induced mixing on liquid-vapor interface condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions of jet-induced mixing in a partially full cryogenic tank are presented. An axisymmetric laminar jet is discharged from the central part of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface. Liquid is withdrawn at the same volume flow rate from the outer part of the tank. The jet is at a temperature lower than the interface, which is maintained at a certain saturation temperature. The interface is assumed to be flat and shear-free and the condensation-induced velocity is assumed to be negligibly small compared with radial interface velocity. Finite-difference method is used to solve the nondimensional form of steady state continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Calculations are conducted for jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 150 to 600 and Prandtl numbers ranging from 0.85 to 2.65. The effects of above stated parameters on the condensation Nusselt and Stanton numbers which characterize the steady-state interface condensation process are investigated. Detailed analysis to gain a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mixing and interface condensation is performed.

  11. Investigation on cone jetting regimes of liquid droplets subjected to pyroelectric fields induced by laser blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennari, Oriella; Battista, Luigi; Silva, Benjamin; Grilli, Simonetta; Miccio, Lisa; Vespini, Veronica; Coppola, Sara; Orlando, Pierangelo; Aprin, Laurent; Slangen, Pierre; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Electrical conductivity and viscosity play a major role in the tip jetting behaviour of liquids subjected to electrohydrodynamic (EHD) forces, thus influencing significantly the printing performance. Recently, we developed a nozzle- and electrode-free pyro-EHD system as a versatile alternative to conventional EHD configurations and we demonstrated different applications, including inkjet printing and three-dimensional lithography. However, only dielectric fluids have been used in all of those applications. Here, we present an experimental characterization of the pyro-EHD jetting regimes, induced by laser blasts, of sessile drops in case of dielectric and conductive liquids in order to extend the applicability of the system to a wider variety of fields including biochemistry and biotechnology where conductive aqueous solutions are typically used.

  12. A 9 keV electron-impact liquid-gallium-jet x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Otendal, M.; Tuohimaa, T.; Vogt, U.; Hertz, H. M.

    2008-01-15

    We demonstrate a high-brightness compact 9 keV electron-impact microfocus x-ray source based on a liquid-gallium-jet anode. A {approx}30 W, 50 kV electron gun is focused onto the {approx}20 m/s, 30 {mu}m diameter liquid-gallium-jet anode to produce an {approx}10 {mu}m full width at half maximum x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is >2x10{sup 10} photons/(s mm{sup 2} mrad{sup 2}x0.1% BW). Calculation and experiments show potential for increasing this brightness by approximately three orders of magnitude, making the source suitable for laboratory-scale x-ray crystallography and hard x-ray microscopy.

  13. Surface Breakup of A Liquid Jet Injected Into A Gaseous Crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzad Jazi, Mohsen

    The normal injection of a liquid jet into a gaseous crossflow has many engineering applications. In this thesis, detailed numerical simulations based on the level set method are employed to understand the physical mechanism underlying the jet ``surface breakup''. The numerical observations reveal the existence of hydrodynamic instabilities on the jet periphery. The temporal growth of such azimuthal instabilities leads to the formation of interface corrugations, which are eventually sheared off of the jet surface as sheet-like structures. The sheets finally undergo disintegration into ligaments and drops during the surface breakup process. Temporal linear stability analyses are employed to understand the nature of these instabilities. To facilitate the analysis, analytical solutions for the flow fields of the jet and the crossflow are derived. We identify the ``shear instability'' as the primary destabilization mechanism in the flow. This inherently inviscid mechanism opposes the previously suggested mechanism of surface breakup (known as ``boundary layer stripping''), which is based on a viscous interpretation. The influence of the jet-to-crossflow density ratio on the flow stability are also studied. The findings show that a higher density jet leads to higher wavenumber instabilities on the jet surface and thereby subsequent smaller drops and ligaments. The stability characteristics of the most amplified modes (i.e., the wavenumber and corresponding growth rate) obtained from stability analyses and numerical simulations are in good agreement. The stability results of the jet also show that the density may have a non-monotonic stabilizing/destabilizing effect on the flow stability. To investigate such effect, the concept of wave resonance are employed to physically interpret the inviscid instability mechanism in two-phase flows with sharp interfaces and linear velocity profiles. We demonstrate that neutrally stable waves are formed due to the density jump in the

  14. Capillary and acceleration wave breakup of liquid jets in axial-flow airstreams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1981-01-01

    Empirical correlations of reciprocal mean drop diameter with airstream momentum were derived from capillary and acceleration wave breakup of liquid jets atomized by cross stream injection into axial flow airstreams. A scanning radiometer was used to obtain data over an airstream momentum range of 3.7 to 25.7 g/sq cm sec. Transition from capillary to acceleration wave breakup was obtained at a critical Weber-Reynolds number of 1,000,000.

  15. Ballistic imaging of the liquid core for a steady jet in crossflow.

    PubMed

    Linne, Mark A; Paciaroni, Megan; Gord, James R; Meyer, Terrence R

    2005-11-01

    A time-gated ballistic imaging instrument is used to obtain high-spatial-resolution, single-shot images of the liquid core in a water spray issuing into a gaseous crossflow. We describe further development of the diagnostic technique to improve spatial resolution and present images and statistics for various jets under crossflow experimental conditions (different Weber numbers). Series of these images reveal a near-nozzle flow field undergoing breakup and subsequent droplet formation by stripping. One can also detect signatures of spatially periodic behavior in the liquid core and formation of small voids during breakup. PMID:16270551

  16. Free-surface liquid jet impingement on rib patterned superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynes, D.; Johnson, M.; Webb, B. W.

    2011-05-01

    We report experimental results characterizing the dynamics of a liquid jet impinging normally on hydrophilic, hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces spanning the Weber number (based on the jet velocity and diameter) range from 100 to 1900. The superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated with both hydrophobically coated silicon and polydimethylsiloxane that exhibit alternating microribs and cavities. For all surfaces a transition from a thin radially moving liquid sheet occurs. This takes the form of the classical hydraulic jump for the hydrophilic surfaces but is markedly different for the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, where the transition is significantly influenced by surface tension and a break-up into droplets is observed at high Weber number. For the superhydrophobic surfaces, the transition exhibits an elliptical shape with the major axis being aligned parallel to the ribs, concomitant with the frictional resistance being smaller in the parallel direction than in the transverse direction. However, the total projected area of the ellipse exhibits a nearly linear dependence on the jet Weber number, and was nominally invariant with varying hydrophobicity and relative size of the ribs and cavities. For the hydrophobic and superhydrophobic scenarios, the local Weber number based on the local radial velocity and local depth of the radially moving liquid sheet is observed to be of order unity at the transition location. The results also reveal that for increasing relative size of the cavities, the ratio of the ellipse axis (major-to-minor) increases.

  17. Impact of plunging breaking waves on a partially submerged cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Ikeda, C.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The impact of a deep-water plunging breaking wave on a partially submerged cube is studied experimentally in a tank that is 14.8 m long and 1.2 m wide with a water depth of 0.91 m. The breakers are created from dispersively focused wave packets generated by a programmable wave maker. The water surface profile in the vertical center plane of the cube is measured using a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique with movie frame rates ranging from 300 to 4,500 Hz. The pressure distribution on the front face of the cube is measured with 24 fast-response sensors simultaneously with the wave profile measurements. The cube is positioned vertically at three heights relative to the mean water level and horizontally at a distance from the wave maker where a strong vertical water jet is formed. The portion of the water surface between the contact point on the front face of the cube and the wave crest is fitted with a circular arc and the radius and vertical position of the fitted circle is tracked during the impact. The vertical acceleration of the contact point reaches more than 50 times the acceleration of gravity and the pressure distribution just below the free surface shows a localized high-pressure region with a very high vertical pressure gradient. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research under grant N000141110095.

  18. Exact solutions to the problem on the shape of an uncharged conducting liquid jet in a transverse electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, N. B.; Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.

    2016-05-01

    Exact solutions are obtained for the problem of an equilibrium configuration of an uncharged cylindrical jet of a conducting liquid in a transverse electric field. The transverse cross section of the jet moving between two planar electrodes is deformed under the action of electrostatic forces (capillary forces play a stabilizing role). According to the solutions obtained, the initially circular cross section of the jet may be significantly (formally, unboundedly) stretched along the lines of forces of the field, and the boundaries of the jet asymptotically approach the electrodes.

  19. Investigation on the generation process of impact-driven high-speed liquid jets using a CFD technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seehanam, W.; Pianthong, K.; Sittiwong, W.; Milton, B. E.; Takayama, K.

    2012-09-01

    High-speed liquid jets have been applied to many fields of engineering, science and medicine. It is therefore of benefit to all these areas to investigate their characteristics by modern and inexpensive methods using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. Previously, high-speed liquid jets have been studied experimentally using a momentum exchange method, called the "impact driven method (IDM)", by which the impact of a high-velocity projectile on the liquid package contained in the nozzle cavity produced the jet. The shock pulse reflections in the cavity caused by the impact then drove a multiple pulsed jet from the nozzle exit. In this study, a two-fluid simulation consisting of liquid and air can be successfully calculated by using a two-phase flow mixture model and a moving mesh for the projectile motion. The CFD results show good agreement to the results of previous experimental studies, both quantitatively and qualitatively. For the first time, the wave propagation within the liquid in the nozzle has been captured and analyzed, thereby demonstrating the dynamic characteristics of multiple pulsed high-speed liquid jets initiated by the IDM. This provides a breakthrough in the simulation of the supersonic injection of a liquid into air by using a well-known and user-friendly CFD software. It is useful fundamental knowledge for future studies of high-speed injection with applications in all its related fields.

  20. Time-resolved simulations and experiments of liquid jet break-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arienti, Marco; Soteriou, Marios; Sussman, Mark

    2008-11-01

    High-speed, high-resolution experimental visualization of the break-up of a liquid jet by a gaseous cross-flow has recently become possible due to advances in video camera technology. These visualizations can now be contrasted to high fidelity CFD simulations which are also just becoming possible due to continuing growth of computational capabilities. Such a contrast is expected to go beyond traditional comparisons of time-averaged quantities and focuses on dynamics. For example, comparisons of the characteristic break-up frequency and of the spatial instantaneous features of the jet may serve as validation of the computational model and to yield insight into the physics of the dynamic interplay between the disturbances induced by the injection device and Kelvin-Helmholtz / Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the interface. A state-of-the-art second-order coupled Level Set and Volume Of Fluid method (CLSVOF) that can capture liquid-gas interface dynamics is used for the study. High-speed videos of non-turbulent liquid injection in laminar crossflow are used to validate the time- and grid-converged capability of the code to capture upwind wave structures caused by the centrifugal acceleration of the deflected liquid. The extension to increasing air crossflow is also discussed with focus on the column break-up mechanism.

  1. Self-assembling array of magnetoelectrostatic jets from the surface of a superparamagnetic ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    King, Lyon B; Meyer, Edmond; Hopkins, Mark A; Hawkett, Brian S; Jain, Nirmesh

    2014-12-01

    Electrospray is a versatile technology used, for example, to ionize biomolecules for mass spectrometry, create nanofibers and nanowires, and propel spacecraft in orbit. Traditionally, electrospray is achieved via microfabricated capillary needle electrodes that are used to create the fluid jets. Here we report on multiple parallel jetting instabilities realized through the application of simultaneous electric and magnetic fields to the surface of a superparamagnetic electrically conducting ionic liquid with no needle electrodes. The ionic liquid ferrofluid is synthesized by suspending magnetic nanoparticles in a room-temperature molten salt carrier liquid. Two ILFFs are reported: one based on ethylammonium nitrate (EAN) and the other based on EMIM-NTf2. The ILFFs display an electrical conductivity of 0.63 S/m and a relative magnetic permeability as high as 10. When coincident electric and magnetic fields are applied to these liquids, the result is a self-assembling array of emitters that are composed entirely of the colloidal fluid. An analysis of the magnetic surface stress induced on the ILFF shows that the electric field required for transition to spray can be reduced by as much as 4.5 × 10(7) V/m compared to purely electrostatic spray. Ferrofluid mode studies in nonuniform magnetic fields show that it is feasible to realize arrays with up to 16 emitters/mm(2). PMID:25372842

  2. Two-Dimensional Optical Measurement of Waves on Liquid Lithium Jet Simulating IFMIF Target Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuhiro Itoh; Hiroyuki Koterazawa; Taro Itoh; Yutaka Kukita; Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hideo Nakamura; Hiroo Nakamura; Takeo Muroga

    2006-07-01

    Waves on a liquid-lithium jet flow, simulating a proposed high-energy beam target design, have been measured using an optical technique based on specular reflection of a single laser beam on the jet surface. The stream-wise and spanwise fluctuations of the local free-surface slope were least-square fitted with a sinusoidal curve to makeup the signals lost due to the constriction in the optical arrangement. The waveform was estimated with an assumption that wave phase speed can be calculated using the dispersion relation for linear capillary-gravity waves. The direction of propagation on the jet surface was also evaluated so that the wave amplitudes, calculated by integral of slope angle signal, agree consistently in stream-wise and spanwise direction. These measurements and analyses show that the waves at the measurement location for a jet velocity of 1.2 m/s can best be represented by oblique waves with an inclination of 1.23 rad, a wavelength of 3.8 mm and a wave amplitude of about 0.05 mm. (authors)

  3. An Experimental Study of the Droplets Produced by a Plunging Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2011-11-01

    The dynamics of droplets generated by plunging breakers are experimentally studied in a wave tank that is 12 m long and 1.22 m wide with a water depth of 0.91 m. Breakers with various breaking intensity are generated from a packet of dispersively focused waves with average frequency of 1.15 Hz by varying the amplitude of wave maker motion. The sizes and motions of droplets at various positions relative the wave crest are measured with a cinematic shadowgraph technique, while the profile histories of the breaking wave crest along the center plane of the tank are simultaneously measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique. Droplets are primarily created when strong turbulence is generated after the plunging jet impacts with the front face of the wave and when large air bubbles, entrapped during the plunging process, rise to the free surface and pop. The diameters and velocities of the droplets across one horizontal plane at an elevation just above the wave crest height are measured. The surface roughnesses of the breaking waves are estimated from the measured wave crest profile histories. The correlation between the flux of droplets and the surface roughness is investigated. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences, Grant OCE0751853.

  4. Thrust Enhancement of Flapping Wings in Tandem and Biplane Configurations by Pure Plunging Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, S. Banu; Sahin, Mehmet; Unal, M. Fevzi

    2012-11-01

    The propulsion performance of flapping NACA0012 airfoils undergoing harmonic plunging motion in tandem and biplane wing configurations is investigated numerically. An unstructured finite volume solver based on Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is utilized in order to solve the incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Four different tandem and four different biplane wing combinations are considered. Various instantaneous and time-averaged aerodynamic parameters including lift and drag coefficients, vorticity contours and streamlines are calculated for each case and compared with each other. As a reference the single wing case corresponding to the deflected jet phenomenon in Jones and Platzer (Exp. Fluids 46:799-810, 2009) is also studied. In these simulations, the Reynolds number is chosen as 252, the reduced frequency of plunging motion (k = 2 πf /U∞) is 12.3 and the plunge amplitude non-dimensionalized with respect to chord is 0.12. The solutions of the single wing case indicate dependence on the location of start-up vortices. Meanwhile the multiple wing configurations indicate that the highest thrust enhancement is obtained in one of the biplane cases where the two wings closely moving towards each other namely biplane asynchronous-closer case.

  5. New approach of a traditional analysis for predicting near-exit jet liquid instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Guillermo; Collicott, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Traditional linear instability theory for round liquid jets requires an exit-plane velocity profile be assumed so as to derive the characteristic growth rates and wavelengths of instabilities. This requires solving an eigenvalue problem for the Rayleigh Equation. In this new approach, a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile is assumed at the exit-plane of a round jet and a comparison is made with a hyperbolic secant profile. Temporal and Spatial Stability Analysis (TSA and SSA respectively) are the employed analytical tools to compare results of predicted most-unstable wavelengths from the given analytical velocity profiles and from previous experimental work. The local relevance of the velocity profile in the near-exit region of a liquid jet and the validity of an inviscid formulation through the Rayleigh equation are discussed as well. A comparison of numerical accuracy is made between two different mathematical approaches for the hyperbolic tangent profile with and without the Ricatti transformation. Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of the boundary layer at the exit plane non-dimensionalizes the problem and, the Re range, based on measurements by Portillo in 2011, is 185 to 600. Wavelength measurements are taken from Portillo's experiment. School of Mechanical Engineering at Universidad del Valle, supported by a grant from Fulbright and Colciencias. Ph.D. student at the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Purdue University.

  6. Charge and energy transferred from a plasma jet to liquid and dielectric surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussard, M. Dang Van Sung; Foucher, E.; Rousseau, A.

    2015-10-01

    A key parameter in using plasma jets for biomedical applications is the transferred energy to the living tissues. The objective of this paper is to understand which parameters control the energy transfer from the plasma jet to a liquid or a dielectric surface. The plasma jet is flown with helium and ignited by a 600 Hz ac high voltage (up to 15 kV). Capacitors are connected to two measurement electrodes placed in the plasma source region, and under the sample. Charge and energy transferred are estimated by plotting Lissajous cycles; the number of bullets and the charge probability density function are also calculated. It is shown that the applied voltage and the gap (distance between the end of the tube and the sample) have a dramatic influence on the energy deposition on the sample as well as on the charge probability density function. Surprisingly, both gap distance and voltage have very little influence on the number of bullets reaching the sample per cycle. It is also shown that the conductivity of the liquid sample has almost no influence on the energy deposition and charge probability density function.

  7. Identification of Structural Motifs of Imidazolium Based Ionic Liquids from Jet-Cooled Infrared Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Justin W.; Booth, Ryan S.; Annesley, Christopher; Stearns, Jaime A.

    2016-06-01

    Highly variable and potentially revolutionary, ionic liquids (IL) are a class of molecules with potential for numerous Air Force applications such as satellite propulsion, but the complex nature of IL structure and intermolecular interactions makes it difficult to adequately predict structure-property relationships in order to make new IL-based technology a reality. For example, methylation of imidazolium ionic liquids leads to a substantial increase in viscosity but the underlying physical mechanism is not understood. In addition the role of hydrogen bonding in ILs, especially its relationship to macroscopic properties, is a matter of ongoing research. Here, structural motifs are identified from jet-cooled infrared spectra of different imidazolium based ionic liquids, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl)imide. Measurements of the C-H stretches indicate three structural families present in the gas phase.

  8. Liquid helium inertial jet for comparative study of classical and quantum turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Duri, D.; Charvin, P.; Rousset, B.; Poncet, J.-M.; Diribarne, P.

    2011-11-15

    We present a new cryogenic wind tunnel facility developed to study the high Reynolds number developed classical or quantum turbulence in liquid {sup 4}He. A stable inertial round jet flow with a Reynolds number of 4 x 10{sup 6} can be sustained in both He I and He II down to a minimum temperature of 1.7 K. The circuit can be pressurized up to 3.5 x 10{sup 5} Pa. The system has been designed to exploit the self-similar properties of the jet far field in order to adapt to the spatial resolution of the existing probes. Multiple and complementary sensors can be simultaneously installed to obtain spatial and time resolved measurements. The technical difficulties and design details are described and the system performance is presented.

  9. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  10. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources

  11. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-06-06

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources.

  12. Photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid water, some alcohols, and pure nonane in free micro jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, Manfred; Steiner, Björn; Toennies, J. Peter

    1997-06-01

    The recently developed technique of accessing volatile liquids in a high vacuum environment by using a very thin liquid jet is implemented to carry out the first measurements of photoelectron spectra of pure liquid water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and benzyl alcohol as well as of liquid n-nonane. The apparatus, which consists of a commercial hemispherical (10 cm mean radius) electron analyzer and a hollow cathode discharge He I light source is described in detail and the problems of the sampling of the photoelectrons in such an environment are discussed. For water and most of the alcohols up to six different electronic bands could be resolved. The spectra of 1-butanol and n-nonane show two weakly discernable peaks from which the threshold ionization potential could be determined. A deconvolution of the photoelectron spectra is used to extract ionization potentials of individual molecular bands of molecules near the surface of the liquid and shifts of the order of 1 eV compared to the gas phase are observed. A molecular orientation for water molecules at the surface of liquid water is inferred from a comparison of the relative band strengths with the gas phase. Similar effects are also observed for some of the alcohols. The results are discussed in terms of a simple "Born-solvation" model.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Jet Impingement Heat Transfer Using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Brian Paul

    1997-01-01

    Jet impingement cooling of a hypersonic airfoil leading edge is experimentally investigated using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCS) to measure surface temperature. The experiment uses computer data acquisition with digital imaging of the TLCs to determine heat transfer coefficients during a transient experiment. The data reduction relies on analysis of a coupled transient conduction - convection heat transfer problem that characterizes the experiment. The recovery temperature of the jet is accounted for by running two experiments with different heating rates, thereby generating a second equation that is used to solve for the recovery temperature. The resulting solution requires a complicated numerical iteration that is handled by a computer. Because the computational data reduction method is complex, special attention is paid to error assessment. The error analysis considers random and systematic errors generated by the instrumentation along with errors generated by the approximate nature of the numerical methods. Results of the error analysis show that the experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients are accurate to within 15%. The error analysis also shows that the recovery temperature data may be in error by more than 50%. The results show that the recovery temperature data is only reliable when the recovery temperature of the jet is greater than 5 C, i.e. the jet velocity is in excess of 100 m/s. Parameters that were investigated include nozzle width, distance from the nozzle exit to the airfoil surface, and jet velocity. Heat transfer data is presented in graphical and tabular forms. An engineering analysis of hypersonic airfoil leading edge cooling is performed using the results from these experiments. Several suggestions for the improvement of the experimental technique are discussed.

  14. Low-pressure flashing mechanisms in iso-octane liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, M. M.; Simões-Moreira, J. R.

    This paper examines a flashing liquid regime that takes place at very high ratios of injection to discharge pressures in flow restrictions. Typically, the flashing phenomenon has been observed in laboratory experiments where a liquid flows through a short nozzle into a low-pressure chamber at a pressure value considerably lower than the liquid saturation pressure at the injection temperature. By using two visualization techniques, the schlieren and the back-lighting methods, it was possible to identify some compressible phenomena associated with the liquid flashing process from the nozzle exit section. The schlieren method was used to capture the image of a shock-wave structure surrounding a liquid core from which the phase change takes place, and the optical technique allowed us to observe the central liquid core itself. The work corroborates previous physical descriptions of flashing liquid jets to explain an observed choking behaviour as well as the presence of shock waves. According to the present analysis, flashing takes place on the surface of the liquid core through an evaporation wave process, which results from a sudden liquid evaporation in a discontinuous process. Downstream of the evaporation discontinuity, the two-phase flow reaches very high velocities, up to the local sonic speed that typically occurs at high expansion conditions, as inferred from experiments and the physical model. That sonic state is also a point of maximum mass flow rate and it is known as the Chapman Jouguet condition. The freshly sonic two-phase flow expands freely to increasing supersonic velocities and eventually terminates the expansion process through a shock-wave structure. This paper presents experimental results at several test conditions with iso-octane.

  15. Gas-phase flowrate effect on disintegrating cryogenic liquid-jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1990-01-01

    Two phase liquid and gaseous nitrogen flow in a pneumatic two fluid atomizer was investigated. Characteristic dropsize for cryogenic sprays were measured with a scattered light scanning instrument developed at NASA-Lewis. Tests were conducted primarily in the aerodynamic stripping regime of liquid jet atomization. At a sampling distance of bar-x =1.3 cm, the Sauter mean, D(sub 32), and volume median, D(sub v.5), drop diameters were measured and correlated with nitrogen gas flowrate, W(sub n), to give the following expressions: D sub 32 to the -1=210W(sub n) to the -1.33 and D(sub v.5) to the -1=150 W(sub n to the -1.33, where reciprocal diameters and gas flowrate are in cm (-1) and g/sec, respectively. The exponent 1.33 for nitrogen gas flowrate, W(sub n), is the same as that predicted by atomization theory for liquid-jet breakup in high velocity gasflow. When the spray was sampled at axial distances of bar-x=2.5 and 4.5 cm downstream of the atomizer, the exponent decreased to 1.2 and 0.9, respectively. This was attributed to the loss of small droplets due to their rapid vaporization.

  16. Gas-phase flowrate effect on disintegrating cryogenic liquid-jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.

    1989-01-01

    Two phase liquid and gaseous nitrogen flow in a pneumatic two fluid atomizer was investigated. Characteristic dropsize for cryogenic sprays were measured with a scattered light scanning instrument developed at NASA-Lewis. Tests were conducted primarily in the aerodynamic stripping regime of liquid jet atomization. At a sampling distance of bar-x=1.3 cm, the Sauter mean, D(sub 32), and volume median, D(sub v.5), drop diameters were measured and correlated with nitrogen gas flowrate, W(sub n), to give the following expressions: D sub 32 to the -1=210W(sub n) to the -1.33 and D(sub v.5) to the -1=150 W(sub n to the -1.33, where reciprocal diameters and gas flowrate are in cm (-1) and g/sec, respectively. The exponent 1.33 for nitrogrn gas flowrate, W(sub n), is the same as that predicted by atomization theory for liquid-jet breakup in high velocity gasflow. When the spray was sampled at axial distances of bar-x=2.5 and 4.5 cm downstream of the atomizer, the exponent decreased to 1.2 and 0.9, respectively. This was attributed to the loss of small droplets due to their rapid vaporization.

  17. Measurements of drop size at the spray edge near the nozzle in atomizing liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, K.; Reitz, R.D.; Bracco, F.V.

    1986-04-01

    The drop size distribution was measured from back-lighted spark photographs at the edge of steady sprays in the immediate vicinity of the nozzle exit. The conditions of these liquid-into-gas sprays were such that the outer surface of the liquid jets broke up into small drops at the nozzle exit. The objective was to elucidate the mechanism of breakup. At room temperature, n-hexane and n-tetradecane at pressures from 2.86 to 9.76 MPa were injected into gaseous nitrogen at 1.48 to 2.86 MPa through three straight cylindrical nozzles of different diameters, 127 and 335 ..mu..m, and length-to-diameter ratios, 4 and 10. In all cases, the drop sizes could be fitted satisfactorily with a chi-square distribution with degree of freedom equal to 28. The Sauter mean drop diameter and other average diameters were found to decrease with increasing injection velocity and decreasing liquid surface tension, to be insensitive to nozzle diameter and length, and to increase slightly with increasing gas density. The trends and magnitudes are in agreement with those predicted by the supplemented aerodynamic theory of surface breakup if it is assumed that between the jet surface where the drops are formed, that is not visible, and the edge of the spray, where the measurements were made, drops undergo collisions and coalescence. In this region of dense sprays, drop coalescence leads to a rapid increase in drop size, particularly in high gas densities.

  18. Flow visualization of Taylor-mode breakup of a viscous liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Luu, Patrick; Tam, Patrick; Roski, Gerald; Tsai, Chen S.

    1999-06-01

    We recently reported a new spray technique called ultrasound-modulated two-fluid (UMTF) atomization and the pertinent "resonant liquid capillary wave (RLCW) theory" based on linear models of Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves. In this article, flow visualizations of liquid jets near the nozzle tip are presented to verify the central assumption of the RLCW theory that the resonant liquid capillary wave in UMTF atomization is initiated by the ultrasound at the nozzle tip. Specifically, a bright band beneath the nozzle tip was seen in ultrasonic and UMTF atomization separately, but not in two-fluid atomization. The bright band can be attributed to scattering of laser light sheet by the capillary waves generated by the ultrasound on the intact liquid jet. As the capillary wave travels downstream in the direction of airflow, it is amplified by the air blowing around it and eventually collapsed into drops. Therefore, the jet breakup time can be determined by dividing the measured band length with the capillary wave velocity. The breakup times thus determined for water and glycerol/water jets are twice the values predicted by the modified Taylor's model with a sheltering parameter, and are one order of magnitude shorter than those in conventional two-fluid atomization. Furthermore, the images of the spray in the proximity of the nozzle tip obtained by 30 ns laser pulses are consistent with the drop sizes obtained 2.3-6 cm downstream from the nozzle tip by 13 s time average of continuous laser light. Also reported in this article is the good agreement between the measured viscosity effects on the drop-size and size distribution in UMTF atomization and those on the relative amplitude growth rates of capillary waves at different wavelengths predicted by Taylor's model as a result of its inclusion of higher order terms other than the first in viscosity. These new findings have led to the conclusion that UMTF atomization occurs via Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves

  19. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range.

  20. Liquid phase products and solid deposit formation from thermally stressed model jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between solid deposit formation and liquid degradation product concentration was studied for the high temperature (400 C) stressing of three hydrocarbon model fuels. A Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester was used to simulate actual engine fuel system conditions. The effects of fuel type, dissolved oxygen concentration, and hot surface contact time (reaction time) were studied. Effects of reaction time and removal of dissolved oxygen on deposit formation were found to be different for n-dodecane and for 2-ethylnaphthalene. When ten percent tetralin is added to n-dodecane to give a simpler model of an actual jet fuel, the tetralin inhibits both the deposit formation and the degradation of n-dodecane. For 2-ethylnaphthalene primary product analyses indicate a possible self-inhibition at long reaction times of the secondary reactions which form the deposit precursors. The mechanism of the primary breakdown of these fuels is suggested and the primary products which participate in these precursor-forming reactions are identified. Some implications of the results to the thermal degradation of real jet fuels are given.

  1. Exhaust emissions from a premixing, prevaporizing flame tube using liquid jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured in a burner where liquid Jet A fuel was sprayed into the heated air stream and vaporized upstream of a perforated plate flameholder. The burner was tested at inlet air temperatures at 640, 800, and 833 K, an inlet pressure of 5.6 X 100,000 N/m squared, a reference velocity of 25 m/sec, and equivalence ratios from lean blowout to 0.7. Nitrogen oxide levels of below 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel were obtained at combustion efficiencies greater than 99 percent. The measured emission levels for the liquid fuel agreed well with previously reported premixed gaseous propane data and agreed with well stirred reactor predictions. Autoignition of the premixed fuel air mixture was a problem at inlet temperatures above 650 K with 104 msec premixing time.

  2. Field investigation of suspended-sediment clouds under plunging breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, J. S.

    1988-08-01

    Breaking waves nearshore force the suspension of beach material and so play an important role in surf-zone sedimentological regimes. The analysis of cinemato-graphical records of wave breaking and bottom-sediment response for eight plunging and eight plunging-transition breakers has enabled the study of sand-cloud initiation, evolution and decay. The characteristics of the suspended-sediment clouds can be explained in terms of breaker energy dissipation. Some of the sand-cloud features are common to both plunging and plunging-transition breakers, although the total spatial and temporal history of the cloud is controlled by the water-surface profile evolution during breaking. Observations of breaker kinematics in the aerated region after breaking highlight the importance of breaker-induced vortices in controlling the initiation, concentration, elevation and longevity of suspended material in the surf zone.

  3. Black hole binary inspiral: Analysis of the plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Richard H.; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-02-01

    Binary black hole coalescence has its peak of gravitational-wave generation during the "plunge," the transition from quasicircular early motion to late quasinormal ringing (QNR). Although advances in numerical relativity have provided plunge waveforms, there is still no intuitive or phenomenological understanding of plunge comparable to that of the early and late stages. Here we make progress in developing such understanding by relying on insights of the linear mathematics of the particle perturbation model for the extreme mass limit. Our analysis, based on the Fourier-domain Green function, and a simple initial model, point to the crucial role played by the kinematics near the "light ring" (the circular photon orbit) in determining the plunge radiation and the excitation of QNR. That insight is then shown to successfully explain results obtained for particle motion in a Schwarzschild background.

  4. Vapor condensation on liquid surface due to laminar jet-induced mixing: The effects of system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of system parameters on the interface condensation rate in a laminar jet induced mixing tank are numerically studied. The physical system consists of a partially filled cylindrical tank with a slightly subcooled jet discharged from the center of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface which is at a saturation temperature corresponding to the constant tank pressure. Liquid is also withdrawn from the outer part of the tank bottom to maintain the constant liquid level. The jet velocity is selected to be low enough such that the free surface is approximately flat. The effect of vapor superheat is assumed to be negligible. Therefore, the interface condensation rate can be determined from the resulting temperature field in the liquid region alone. The nondimensional form of the steady state conservation equations are solved by a finite difference method for various system parameters including liquid height to tank diameter ratio, tank to jet diameter ratio, liquid inflow to outflow area ratio, and a heat leak parameter which characterizes the uniform wall heat flux. Detailed analyses based on the numerical solutions are performed and simplified equations are suggested for the prediction of condensation rate.

  5. Vapor condensation on liquid surface due to laminar jet-induced mixing - The effects of system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of system parameters on the interface condensation rate in a laminar jet induced mixing tank are numerically studied. The physical system consists of a partially filled cylindrical tank with a slightly subcooled jet discharged from the center of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface which is at a saturation temperature corresponding to the constant tank pressure. Liquid is also withdrawn from the outer part of the tank bottom to maintain the constant liquid level. The jet velocity is selected to be low enough such that the free surface is approximately flat. The effect of vapor superheat is assumed to be negligible. Therefore, the interface condensation rate can be determined from the resulting temperature field in the liquid region alone. The nondimensional form of the steady state conservation equations are solved by a finite difference method for various system parameters including liquid height to tank diameter ratio, tank to jet diameter ratio, liquid inflow to outflow area ratio, and a heat leak parameter which characterizes the uniform wall heat flux. Detailed analyses based on the numerical solutions are performed and simplified equations are suggested for the prediction of condensation rate.

  6. Plasma Jet (V)UV-Radiation Impact on Biologically Relevant Liquids and Cell Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresp, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Bundscherer, L.; Monden, A.; Hammer, M. U.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. V.; Reuter, S.

    2014-10-01

    In this study the generation of radicals in plasma treated liquids has been investigated. To quantify the contribution of plasma vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the species investigated, three cases have been studied: UV of plasma jet only, UV and VUV of plasma jet combined, and the plasma effluent including all reactive components. The emitted VUV has been observed by optical emission spectroscopy and its effect on radical formation in liquids has been analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Radicals have been determined in ultrapure water (dH2O), as well as in more complex, biorelevant solutions like phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, and two different cell culture media. Various compositions lead to different reactive species formation, e.g. in PBS superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals have been detected, in cell suspension also glutathione thiyl radicals have been found. This study highlights that UV has no impact on radical generation, whereas VUV is relevant for producing radicals. VUV treatment of dH2O generates one third of the radical concentration produced by plasma-effluent treatment. It is relevant for plasma medicine because although plasma sources are operated in open air atmosphere, still VUV can lead to formation of biorelevant radicals. This work is funded by German Federal Ministry of Education a Research (BMBF) (Grant # 03Z2DN12+11).

  7. On the absence of asymmetric wakes for periodically plunging finite wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, D. E.; Cleaver, D. J.; Gursul, I.; Wang, Z.

    2014-07-01

    It has previously been shown that, at high Strouhal numbers, oscillating airfoils can produce deflected jets that can create very high lift-coefficients for otherwise symmetric scenarios. These deflected jets form through pairing of the trailing-edge vortices to create asymmetric vortex couples that self-propel at an angle to the freestream, resulting in an asymmetric flow field and non-zero lift. In this paper results are presented that indicate these high-lift deflected jets cannot form for finite wings. Instead of the straight vortex tubes that pair and convect at an angle to the freestream observed for effectively infinite wings, finite wings exhibit vortex tubes that break into two branches near the tip forming double helix structures. One branch connects with the last vortex; one branch connects with the next vortex. This creates a long "daisy chain" of interconnected trailing edge vortices forming a long series of vortex loops. These symmetric flow fields are shown to persist for finite wings even to Strouhal numbers more than twice those required to produce asymmetric wakes on plunging airfoils. Two contributing reasons are discussed for why deflected jets are not observed. First the tip vortex creates three-dimensionality that discourages vortex coupling. Second, the symmetry of the circulation of the interconnected vortex loops, which has been confirmed by the experiments, is a natural consequence of the vortex topology. Therefore, the asymmetry in trailing edge vortex strength previously observed as characteristic of deflected jets cannot be supported for finite wings.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigations of the impingement of an oblique liquid jet onto a superhydrophobic surface: energy transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali

    2016-02-01

    This study presents the theory of impinging an oblique liquid jet onto a vertical superhydrophobic surface based on both experimental and numerical results. A Brassica oleracea leaf with a 160° apparent contact angle was used for the superhydrophobic surface. Distilled water was sent onto the vertical superhydrophobic surface in the range of 1750-3050 Reynolds number, with an inclination angle of 20°-40°, using a circular glass tube with a 1.75 mm inner diameter. The impinging liquid jet spread onto the surface governed by the inertia of the liquid and then reflected off the superhydrophobic surface due to the surface energy of the spreading liquid. Two different energy approaches, which have time-scale and per-unit length, were performed to determine transformation of the energy. The kinetic energy of the impinging liquid jet was transformed into the surface energy with an increasing interfacial surface area between the liquid and air during spreading. Afterwards, this surface energy of the spreading liquid was transformed into the reflection kinetic energy.

  9. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re ≪ 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such “viscous liquid” state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows. PMID:25410423

  10. Stability and debris in high-brightness liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Otendal, M.; Tuohimaa, T.; Hertz, H. M.

    2007-01-15

    We investigate the x-ray spot stability and the debris emission in liquid-metal-jet anode electron-impact x-ray sources operating in the 10-100 W microfocus regime. The x-ray spot size is 15-23 {mu}m in diameter and the electron-beam power density is up to {approx}210 kW/mm{sup 2}, an order of magnitude higher than for conventional microfocus sources. In the power range of the investigation the source is stable in terms of spot size and position. The debris emission rate increases exponentially with the applied electron-beam power but may be reduced by combining larger and faster target jets with smaller e-beam foci and by mitigation schemes. It is concluded that the investigated factors will not limit the performance and function of liquid-metal-jet-anode electron-impact microfocus sources when operating in this high-brightness regime.

  11. Absolute and convective instability of a viscous liquid jet surrounded by a viscous gas in a vertical pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Lian, Z. W.

    1993-01-01

    The absolute and convective instability of a viscous liquid jet emanating into a viscous gas in a vertical pipe is analyzed in a parameter space spanned by the Reynolds number, the Froude number, the Weber number, the viscosity ratio, the density ratio, and the diameter ratio. The numerical results of the analysis are used to demonstrate that reduction in gravity tends to enhance the Rayleigh mode of convective instability which leads to the breakup of a liquid jet into drops of diameters comparable with the jet diameter. On the contrary, the Taylor mode of convective instability that leads to atomization is retarded at reduced gravity. The Rayleigh mode becomes absolutely unstable when the Reynolds number exceeds a critical value for a given set of the rest of the relevant parameters. The domain of absolute instability is significantly enlarged when the effect of gas viscosity is not neglected.

  12. Effect of liquid droplets on turbulence in a round gaseous jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostafa, A. A.; Elghobashi, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to develop a two-equation turbulence model for dilute vaporizing sprays or in general for dispersed two-phase flows including the effects of phase changes. The model that accounts for the interaction between the two phases is based on rigorously derived equations for turbulence kinetic energy (K) and its dissipation rate epsilon of the carrier phase using the momentum equation of that phase. Closure is achieved by modeling the turbulent correlations, up to third order, in the equations of the mean motion, concentration of the vapor in the carrier phase, and the kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate for the carrier phase. The governing equations are presented in both the exact and the modeled formes. The governing equations are solved numerically using a finite-difference procedure to test the presented model for the flow of a turbulent axisymmetric gaseous jet laden with either evaporating liquid droplets or solid particles. The predictions include the distribution of the mean velocity, volume fractions of the different phases, concentration of the evaporated material in the carrier phase, turbulence intensity and shear stress of the carrier phase, droplet diameter distribution, and the jet spreading rate. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  13. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique.

  14. Modeling the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Jacqmim, David A.

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric phase field model is developed and used to model surface tension forces on liquid jets in microgravity. The previous work in this area is reviewed and a baseline drop tower experiment selected 'for model comparison. A mathematical model is developed which includes a free surface. a symmetric centerline and wall boundaries with given contact angles. The model is solved numerically with a compact fourth order stencil on a equally spaced axisymmetric grid. After grid convergence studies, a grid is selected and all drop tower tests modeled. Agreement was assessed by comparing predicted and measured free surface rise. Trend wise agreement is good but agreement in magnitude is only fair. Suspected sources of disagreement are suspected to be lack of a turbulence model and the existence of slosh baffles in the experiment which were not included in the model.

  15. Phase-contrast x-ray imaging with a liquid-metal-jet-anode microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Tuohimaa, T.; Otendal, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2007-08-13

    Phase-contrast methods increase contrast, detail, and selectivity in x-ray imaging. Present compact x-ray sources do not provide the necessary spatial coherence with sufficient power to allow the laboratory-scale high-resolution phase-contrast imaging with adequate exposure times. In this letter, the authors demonstrate phase-contrast imaging with few-micron detail employing a compact {approx}6.5 {mu}m spot liquid-metal-jet-anode high-brightness microfocus source. The 40 W source is operated at more than ten times higher electron-beam power density than present microfocus sources and is shown to provide sufficient spatial coherence as well as scalability to high power, thereby enabling the application of phase-contrast x-ray imaging with short exposure times in clinics and laboratories.

  16. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1977-01-01

    The free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks in zero gravity are determined. Zero gravity drop tower experiments yielded three distinct flow patterns that were classified in terms of the relative effects of surface tension and inertial forces. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted that indicated regions where viscous forces were not significant in the computation of free surface shapes. The free surface analysis was simplified by transforming the governing potential flow equations and boundary conditions into the inverse plane, where the stream function and velocity potential became the coordinates. The resulting nonlinear equations were solved by standard finite difference methods, and comparisons were made with the experimental data for the inertia dominated regime.

  17. Atomization and Dispersion of a Liquid Jet Injected Into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seay, J. E.; Samuelson, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, environmental regulations have become more stringent, requiring lower emissions of mainly nitrogen oxides (NOx), as well as carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). These regulations have forced the gas turbine industry to examine non-conventional combustion strategies, such as the lean burn approach. The reasoning behind operating under lean conditions is to maintain the temperature of combustion near and below temperatures required for the formation of thermal nitric oxide (NO). To be successful, however, the lean processes require careful preparation of the fuel/air mixture to preclude formation of either locally rich reaction zones, which may give rise to NO formation, or locally lean reaction zones, which may give rise to inefficient fuel processing. As a result fuel preparation is crucial to the development and success of new aeroengine combustor technologies. A key element of the fuel preparation process is the fuel nozzle. As nozzle technologies have developed, airblast atomization has been adopted for both industrial and aircraft gas turbine applications. However, the majority of the work to date has focused on prefilming nozzles, which despite their complexity and high cost have become an industry standard for conventional combustion strategies. It is likely that the new strategies required to meet future emissions goals will utilize novel fuel injector approaches, such as radial injection. This thesis proposes and demonstrates an experiment to examine, on a mechanistic level (i.e., the physics of the action), the processes associated with the atomization, evaporation, and dispersion of a liquid jet introduced, from a radial, plain-jet airblast injector, into a crossflow of air. This understanding requires the knowledge not only of what factors influence atomization, but also the underlying mechanism associated with liquid breakup and dispersion. The experimental data acquired identify conditions and geometries for improved

  18. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production.

    PubMed

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Friedman, M; Hazenshprung, N; Mardor, I; Nagler, A; Shimel, G; Tessler, M; Silverman, I

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm(3)) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the (7)Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ~200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm(2) and volume power density of ~2 MW/cm(3) at a lithium flow of ~4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF. PMID:24387433

  19. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halfon, S.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Paul, M.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Feinberg, G.; Friedman, M.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Tessler, M.; Silverman, I.

    2013-12-01

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm3) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the 7Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ˜200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm2 and volume power density of ˜2 MW/cm3 at a lithium flow of ˜4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 1-2 mA) at SARAF.

  20. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M.

    2013-12-15

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ∼200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ∼2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ∼4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  1. Linearized model for the hydrodynamic stability investigation of molten fuel jets into the coolant of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartel, K.

    1986-02-01

    The hydrodynamic stability of liquid jets in a liquid continuum, both characterized by low viscosity was analyzed. A linearized mathematical model was developed. This model enables the length necessary for fragmentation of a vertical, symmetric jet of molten fuel by hydraulic forces in the coolant of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor to be evaluated. On the basis of this model the FRAG code for numerical calculation of the hydrodynamic fragmentation mechanism was developed.

  2. Dynamical properties of non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets and their applications to plasma processing in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitano, Katsuhisa; Satoshi, Ikawa; Furusho, Hitoshi; Nagasaki, Yukio; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2007-11-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets are discussed with the emphasis on their physics and applications. Plume-like plasmas, which may be called plasma jets, have been generated in a discharge system consisting of a dielectric/metal tube (through which He gas flows at the atmospheric pressure) and a single electrode attached to the tube, to which low-frequency, high-voltage pulses (˜10kV, ˜10kHz) are applied. With visible light images taken by a high-speed ICCD camera, it has been confirmed that the plasma jet consists of a series of small ``plasma bullets'' that are emitted intermittently from the powered electrode in sync with the positive voltage pulses. The observed ``plasma bullet'' may be interpreted as a fast moving ionization front. The plasma jets are energetic enough to generate highly reactive charge-neutral radicals but their gas temperatures remain low. Therefore the plasma jets are ideal for processing of liquid based materials at low temperatures and some examples of process applications, such as reduction of cations, polymerization of liquid monomers, and sterilization, will be also presented.

  3. The Properties of Flowing Sheets Formed by Impingement of Liquid Jets on Curved Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riebling, Robert W.; Powell, Walter B.

    1966-01-01

    An applied research program was conducted to determine the properties of flat sheets of propellants formed by directing jets of liquid tangentially against concave, cylindrical deflector surfaces. The dimensions and spatial orientation of the resultant sheets were found to depend only on the orifice diameter and deflector geometry for three propellant simulants of widely-varying physical properties, over the range of injection velocities encountered in liquid rocket engines. Correlating equations, suitable for use in injector design, are presented for free-sheet width and spreading angle. Distribution of mass and velocity across the free-flowing sheets is also reported. Conditions were discovered under which true sheets do not form, or at best malformed or pulsating sheets result. An envelope of geometrical constraints for deflector design is tentatively defined in order to avoid these undesirable operating regions. The results of the present cold-flow tests are compared with firing test data for impinging-sheet injectors and combustion performance is related to single sheet behavior.

  4. An Improved Cryogen for Plunge Freezing

    PubMed Central

    Tivol, William F.; Briegel, Ariane; Jensen, Grant J.

    2011-01-01

    The use of an alkane mixture that remains liquid at 77 K to freeze specimens has advantages over the use of a pure alkane that is solid at 77 K. It was found that a mixture of methane and ethane did not give a cooling rate adequate to produce vitreous ice, but a mixture of propane and ethane did result in vitreous ice. Furthermore, the latter mixture produced less damage to specimens mounted on a very thin, fragile holey carbon substrate. PMID:18793481

  5. Non-thermal processes on ice and liquid micro-jet surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Babajide O.

    The primary focus of this research is to investigate non-thermal processes occurring on ice surfaces and the photo-ejection of ions from liquid surfaces. Processes at the air-water/ice interface are known to play a very important role in the release of reactive halogen species with atmospheric aerosols serving as catalysts. The ability to make different types of ice with various morphologies, hence, different adsorption and surface properties in vacuum, provide a useful way to probe the catalytic effect of ice in atmospheric reactions. Also, the use of the liquid jet technique provides the rare opportunity to probe liquid samples at the interface; hitherto impossible to investigate with traditional surface science techniques. In Chapter 2, the effect of ice morphology on the release of reactive halogen species from photodissociation of adsorbed organic halides on ice will be presented. Quantum state resolved measurements of neutral atomic iodine from the photon irradiation of submonolayer coverages of methyl iodide adsorbed on low temperature water ice were conducted. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of methyl iodide adsorbed on ice were performed to provide information on the effect of ice morphology on the adsorption of submonolayer methyl iodide. The interaction and autoionization of HCl on low-temperature (80{140 K) water ice surfaces has been studied using low-energy (5-250 eV) electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A detailed ESD study of the interactions of low concentrations of HCl with low-temperature porous amorphous solid water (PASW), amorphous solid water (ASW) and crystalline ice (CI) surfaces will be presented in Chapter 3. The ESD cation yields from HCl adsorbed on ice, as well as the coverage dependence, kinetic energy distributions and TPD measurements were all monitored. Probing liquid surface using traditional surface science technique is usually difficult because of the problem of

  6. Experimental observations of the breakup of multiple metal jets in a volatile liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Marciniak, M.J.

    1995-07-01

    A postulated severe loss of coolant accident in a nuclear reactor can lead to significant core damage due to residual heat generation. Subsequently, melted core materials (i.e.; corium) could migrate downward and impinge upon the lower head of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). During this relocation, the complexity of the reactor structure could segregate the molten corium into various flow paths. A perforated flow plate could readily provide the mechanism to segregate the molten corium. The resulting small (a few cm) diameter melt streams, driven by gravity, could then penetrate the remaining coolant in the RPV and cause any of the following events: impingement of the high temperature melt streams on the lower head could breach the RPV; re-agglomeration of the corium melt on the lower head could influence the coolability of the debris bed; {open_quotes}pre-mixing{close_quotes} of the melt streams with the coolant could lead to a vapor explosion; or, sufficient quenching of the melt streams by the coolant could produce a stabilized debris bed. An overview of the thermo-science issues related to core-melt accidents is presented by Theofanous. Thus, insight into the melt stream breakup mechanisms (i.e.; interfacial conditions, fragmentation, and geometric spacing) during the melt-coolant interactions is necessary to evaluate the plausibility, and characteristics, of these events. Molten Fuel Stream Breakup Simulation (MFSBS) experiments have been performed at Argonne National Laboratory in which simulant materials were used to determine a `boiling` jet breakup length correlation and to visualize the melt fragmentation mechanisms during the penetration of a single molten metal jet into a volatile liquid. The goal was to characterize the hydrodynamics of the corium-water interactions in a postulated core melt accident. The present experiment closely follows the procedures of the MFSBS.

  7. A simple pneumatic device for plunge-freezing cells grown on electron microscopy grids.

    PubMed

    Cole, R; Matuszek, G; See, C; Rieder, C L

    1990-10-01

    A detailed design for a simple and inexpensive variable-speed (1.0-5.8 m s-1) pneumatic plunge-freezing device is presented. Cultured cells, grown on Formvar-coated 75-mesh gold finder grids, are pneumatically driven into a stirring mixture of propane/isopentane (3:1) cooled by liquid nitrogen (LN2). Premature freezing of the sample in the cryogenic vapors above the cryogen is prevented by plunging through an entry tube into an insulating box, to which a partial vacuum is applied. The cryogenic vapors are drafted into the box at the level of the liquid cryogen by the vacuum, thereby preventing a layer of cold gas from collecting above the cryogen. To prevent the sample from thawing during transfer from the cryogen to the substitution medium, the box top is removed and compressed air is forced through a corrugated tube running the length of the box. The resulting boiling LN2 creates an atmosphere below -120 degrees C in which the transfer can be accomplished. PMID:2213239

  8. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Jiri Linka, Ales Tunak, Maros; Lukas, David

    2014-06-16

    The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider{sup ™} technology.

  9. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O2 plasma-jet irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Shiratani, Masaharu; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2015-07-01

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  10. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O{sub 2} plasma-jet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-07-28

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  11. Computer simulation of mobilization and mixing of kaolin with submerged liquid jets in 25,000-gallon horizontal cylindrical tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Eyler, L.L.; Mahoney, L.A.

    1995-03-01

    This report presents and analyzes results of computer model simulation of mobilization and mixing of kaolin using the TEMPEST code. The simulations are conducted in a horizontal cylindrical geometry replicating a 95 m{sup 3} (25,000 gal) test tank at ORNL, which is scaled to approximate Melton Valley Storage tanks, which are 190 m{sup 3} (50,000 gal). Mobilization and mixing is accomplished by two submerged liquid jets. Two configurations are simulated, one with the jets located at the center of the tank lengthwise and one with the jets located 1/4 tank length from one end. Computer simulations of both jet and suction configurations are performed. Total flow rates of 50, 100, and 200 gpm are modeled, corresponding to jet velocities of 1.52, 3.05, 6.10 m/s (5, 10, 20 ft/s). Calculations were performed to a time of 2 h for the center jet location and to a little over 1 h for the quarter jet location. This report presents computer and fluid properties model basis, preliminary numerical testing, and results. The results are presented in form of flow field and sludge layer contours. Degree of mobilization is presented as fraction of initial sludge layer remaining as a function of time. For the center jet location at 200 gpm, the sludge layer is completely mobilized in just over 1 h. For 100 gpm flow, about 5% of the sludge layer remains after 2 h. For 50 gpm flow, nearly 40% of the initial sludge layer remains after 2 h. For the quarter jets at 200 gpm, about 10% of the initial sludge layer remains after 1 h. For 100 gpm, about 40% of the sludge layer remains after 1 h. The boundary of the sludge layer is defined as 98% max packing for the particles. Mixing time estimates for these cases range from between 9.4 h and 16.2 h. A more critical evaluation and comparison of predictions and the test results is needed.

  12. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  13. Effects of irradiation distance on supply of reactive oxygen species to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid by an atmospheric O2/He plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Sato, Akihiro; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-05-01

    The impact of irradiation distances on plasma jet-induced specific effects on the supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid was investigated using a KI-starch gel reagent that can be employed as a ROS indicator even in water. O3 exposure experiments without plasma irradiation were also performed to elucidate the specific effects of the plasma jet. Relative concentrations of ROS transported to the bottom were evaluated using absorbance measurements. The results indicated that ROS supply to the bottom is markedly enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation at shorter irradiation distances, whereas similar results could not be obtained for the O3 exposure. In these cases, the liquid mixing in the depth direction was also enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation only, and the supply of reactive atomic oxygen to the liquid surface was markedly increased as well.

  14. Breakup of metal jets penetrating a volatile liquid. Final report, October 1, 1991--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    In a loss of coolant accident, the core may become uncovered, causing the fuel pins to melt. The molten fuel would pour onto the plenum and collect on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. The RPV internal structure includes one or more perforated plates in the lower plenum which would divide the molten fuel into small diameter streams or jets, which would break up as they penetrate the coolant in the lower plenum. The breakup of these jets would occur in two phases, each dominated by a distinct fragmentation mechanism. As a fuel jet first penetrates the coolant, a stagnation flow develops at its leading edge, causing the column to spread radially and eject molten fuel into the coolant. The jet fluid in the column is fragmented by pressure fluctuations due to the jet/ambient fluid relative motion, so that a steady jet is reduced to a field of falling drops below a critical depth called the breakup length. The present work includes analyses yielding simple correlations for jet breakup length and jet leading edge penetration.

  15. One-dimensional nonlinear instability study of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Xie-Yuan; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2016-05-01

    A one-dimensional electrified viscoelastic model is built to study the nonlinear behavior of a slightly viscoelastic, perfectly conducting liquid jet under a radial electric field. The equations are solved numerically using an implicit finite difference scheme together with a boundary element method. The electrified viscoelastic jet is found to evolve into a beads-on-string structure in the presence of the radial electric field. Although the radial electric field greatly enhances the linear instability of the jet, its influence on the decay of the filament thickness is limited during the nonlinear evolution of the jet. On the other hand, the radial electric field induces axial non-uniformity of the first normal stress difference within the filament. The first normal stress difference in the center region of the filament may be greatly decreased by the radial electric field. The regions with/without satellite droplets are illuminated on the χ (the electrical Bond number)-k (the dimensionless wave number) plane. Satellite droplets may be formed for larger wave numbers at larger radial electric fields.

  16. Splash jet and slamming generated by a rotating flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. Y.; Sun, S. L.; Ren, H. L.; Wu, G. X.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrodynamic problem of slamming generated by a rotating flap, commonly known as Oyster in the wave energy sector, plunging into water, is analysed based on the incompressible velocity potential theory. The problem is solved through the boundary element method in the time domain. Two typical case studies are undertaken. One is the flap plunging into calm water and the other into an incoming wave. The splash jet formed during the flap plunging is included in the simulation. When the jet meets the main flow, it is treated through the domain decomposition method without taking account the secondary impact, which is similar to the mathematical method of Riemann's second sheet in the complex plane. The problem is solved in each non-overlapping subdomain, and the velocity and pressure continuity condition is imposed on the interface of the subdomains. Detailed results for the flap plunging into water with different velocities or accelerations are provided. The gravity and wave effects are also investigated.

  17. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of PAHs in supersonic jets and ultracold liquid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Staicu, Angela; Krasnokutski, Serge; Henning, Thomas

    Neutral and cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are discussed as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), still unassigned astrophysical absorption features observed in the spectra of reddened stars (Salama et al. 1999). Despite the importance of this class of molecules for astrophysics and nanophysics (PAHs can be regarded as nanoscale fragments of a sheet of graphite), the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs under well-defined conditions (low temperature and collision-free environment) has remained a challenge. Recently we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer combined with a pulsed supersonic jet expansion to study neutral and cationic PAHs under astrophysical conditions. PAHs studied so far include the neutral molecules anthracene (Staicu et al. 2004) and pyrene (Rouillé et al. 2004) as well as the cationic species naphthalene+ and anthracene+ (Sukhorukov et al. 2004). Employing another molecular beam apparatus, the same molecules (except of the cationic species) were also studied in liquid helium droplets (Krasnokutski et al. 2005, Rouillé et al. 2004). This novel technique combines several advantages of conventional matrix spectroscopy with those of gas phase spectroscopy. Notable advantages are the possibility to study molecules with low vapor pressure and to use a mass spectrometer facilitating spectral assignments. The most recent studies were devoted to phenanthrene and the more complicated (2,3)-benzofluorene. These molecules were investigated in the gas phase by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and in liquid helium droplets using depletion spectroscopy. For benzofluorene the present studies constitute the first reported measurements both in the gas phase and in helium droplets. The origin of the S1 ← S0 gas phase transition could be located at 29 894.3 cm-1, and a series of vibronic bands was recorded below 31 500 cm-1. In contrast to previously studied PAHs, the shift induced by the helium droplets was very

  18. Fluid dynamics and convective heat transfer in impinging jets through implementation of a high resolution liquid crystal technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Wiedner, B.; Camci, C.

    1993-01-01

    A combined convective heat transfer and fluid dynamics investigation in a turbulent round jet impinging on a flat surface is presented. The experimental study uses a high resolution liquid crystal technique for the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficients on the impingement plate. The heat transfer experiments are performed using a transient heat transfer method. The mean flow and the character of turbulent flow in the free jet is presented through five hole probe and hot wire measurements, respectively. The flow field character of the region near the impingement plate plays an important role in the amount of convective heat transfer. Detailed surveys obtained from five hole probe and hot wire measurements are provided. An extensive validation of the liquid crystal based heat transfer method against a conventional technique is also presented. After a complete documentation of the mean and turbulent flow field, the convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on the impingement plate are presented. The near wall of the impingement plate and the free jet region is treated separately. The current heat transfer distributions are compared to other studies available from the literature. The present paper contains complete sets of information on the three dimensional mean flow, turbulent velocity fluctuations, and convective heat transfer to the plate. The experiments also prove that the present nonintrusive heat transfer method is highly effective in obtaining high resolution heat transfer maps with a heat transfer coefficient uncertainty of 5.7 percent.

  19. Visco Jet Joule-Thomson Device Characterization Tests in Liquid Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) devices have been identified as critical components for Thermodynamic Vent Systems (TVS) planned for future space exploration missions. Lee Visco Jets (The Lee Company) (Ref. 4) are one type of J-T device that may be used for LCH4 propellant systems. Visco Jets have been previously tested and characterized in LN2 and LH2 (Refs. 6 and 7), but have not been characterized in LOX or LCH4. Previous Visco Jet tests with LH2 resulted in clogging of the Visco Jet orifice under certain conditions. It has been postulated that this clogging was due to the presence of neon impurities in the LH2 that solidified in the orifices. Visco Jets therefore require testing in LCH4 to verify that they will not clog under normal operating conditions. This report describes a series of tests that were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to determine if Visco Jets would clog under normal operating conditions with LCH4 propellant. Test results from this program indicate that no decrease in flow rate was observed for the Visco Jets tested, and that current equation used for predicting flow rate appears to under-predict actual flow at high Lohm ratings.

  20. Numerical simulation in 3D of atomizing coaxial gas-liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbaglah, Gilou; Fuster, Daniel; McBain, Geordie; Popinet, Stephane; Zaleski, Stephane

    2012-11-01

    We investigate three-dimensional multiphase flows using the Volume of Fluid method. We are in particular focusing on the problem of jet atomizaton. We use a Volume of Fluid method with oct-tree adaptive finite volume discretization, mostly using the Gerris free code. Surface tension is computed by a balanced-force method. Coaxial, 3D, round and planar air-water jets similar to those investigated experimentally are studied and compared to the equivalent jets in 2D axisymetric and 2D planar setups. A mechanism for large-scale jet disruption is observed. The distribution of droplet sizes is compared to experimental measurements. The effect of grid resolution and of the presence of an explicitly modelled solid separator plate is discussed.

  1. Advanced Liquid Cooling for a Traction Drive Inverter Using Jet Impingement and Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Moreno, G.; Bennion, K.; Jeffers, J.

    2014-08-01

    Jet impingement on plain and micro-finned enhanced surfaces was compared to a traditional channel flow configuration. The jets provide localized cooling to areas heated by the insulated-gate bipolar transistor and diode devices. Enhanced microfinned surfaces increase surface area and thermal performance. Using lighter materials and designing the fluid path to manage pressure losses increases overall performance while reducing weight, volume, and cost. Powering four diodes in the center power module of the inverter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to characterize the baseline as well as jet-impingement-based heat exchangers. CFD modeling showed the thermal performance improvements should hold for a fully powered inverter. Increased thermal performance was observed for the jet-impingement configurations when tested at full inverter power (40 to 100 kW output power) on a dynamometer. The reliability of the jets and enhanced surfaces over time was also investigated. Experimentally, the junction-to- coolant thermal resistance was reduced by up to 12.5% for jet impingement on enhanced surfaces s compared to the baseline channel flow configuration. Base plate-to-coolant (convective) resistance was reduced by up to 37.0% for the jet-based configuration compared to the baseline, suggesting that while improvements to the cooling side reduce overall resistance, reducing the passive stack resistance may contribute to lowering overall junction-to-coolant resistance. Full inverter power testing showed reduced thermal resistance from the middle of the module baseplate to coolant of up to 16.5%. Between the improvement in thermal performance and pumping power, the coefficient of performance improved by up to 13% for the jet-based configuration.

  2. Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning

    PubMed Central

    Frederick, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    College and university science educators from across Connecticut gathered at Yale’s West Campus in April 2010 for a Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) program entitled “Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning.” Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and co-sponsored by the Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges (CCIC) and Yale’s McDougal Graduate Teaching Center, the event was the latest in a PKAL series of one-day conferences aimed at equipping science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) instructors with effective approaches to engaging students and training future scientists. PMID:20885897

  3. Generation of capillary instabilities by external disturbances in a liquid jet. Ph.D. Thesis - State Univ. of N.Y.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leib, S. J.

    1985-01-01

    The receptivity problem in a circular liquid jet is considered. A time harmonic axial pressure gradient is imposed on the steady, parallel flow of a jet of liquid emerging from a circular duct. Using a technique developed in plasma physics a casual solution to the forced problem is obtained over certain ranges of Weber number for a number of mean velocity profiles. This solution contains a term which grows exponentially in the downstream direction and can be identified with a capillary instability wave. Hence, it is found that the externally imposed disturbances can indeed trigger instability waves in a liquid jet. The amplitude of the instability wave generated relative to the amplitude of the forcing is computed numerically for a number of cases.

  4. High-brightness water-window electron-impact liquid-jet microfocus source

    SciTech Connect

    Skoglund, P.; Lundstroem, U.; Vogt, U.; Hertz, H. M.

    2010-02-22

    We demonstrate stable high-brightness operation of an electron-impact water-jet-anode soft x-ray source. A 30 kV, 7.8 W electron beam is focused onto a 20 mum diameter jet resulting in water-window oxygen line emission at 525 eV/2.36 nm with a brightness of 3.0x10{sup 9} ph/(sxmum{sup 2}xsrxline). Monte Carlo-based modeling shows good quantitative agreement with the experiments. The source has potential to increase the x-ray power and brightness by another 1-2 orders of magnitude and fluid-dynamical jet instabilities is determined to be the most important limiting factor. The source properties make it an attractive alternative for table-top x-ray microscopy.

  5. Experimental investigation of 2D flexible plunging hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun; Mitchell, Robert; Shu, Fangjun

    2012-11-01

    It is believed that both birds and insects benefit from their wing flexibility during the flapping flight. One of the possible benefits is higher lift force generation capability than that of rigid wing models. Both experimental and computational work has discovered that the leading edge vortex (LEV) plays an important role in this advantage of high lift force generating efficiency. In the present work, flow physics related to high lift-generating flexible wings are investigated experimentally. Both flexible and rigid hydrofoils (NACA0012) were actively plunged in glycerol-water solution with various amplitude, frequency and Reynolds number combinations. Phase-locked Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the generation and evolution of the LEVs. Lift and drag forces during plunging were also measured to uncover the relationship between the force response and the surrounding flow field development. The overall results were also compared between flexible and rigid hydrofoils to provide qualitative data for validation of computational work. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Center.

  6. Lagrangian observations of acceleration and bubble dynamics in plunging breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canals, Miguel; Amador, Andre

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the three-dimensional structure of plunging waves is one of the most difficult problems in fundamental fluid dynamics. In this presentation we provide an analysis of field data collected in breaking waves using novel Lagrangian drifters with a diameter of 5-10 cm and equipped with miniature HD cameras and inertial measurement units. These drifters were deployed, using a personal watercraft, into the breaking region of waves ranging from 1-5 meters in height. We analyze in detail the time series of particle acceleration and rotation and how these quantities relate to the imagery captured by the camera aboard the drifters. This data represents the first dedicated study of the three-dimensional particle dynamics of plunging breakers. Going beyond the basic statistical analysis of the acceleration data, we make an attempt at characterizing the intensity of the wave breaking process using the bubble size and characteristics obtained from the HD video images. We also attempt to relate the spectral statistics of acceleration and particle rotation to existing Lagrangian turbulence models in the hopes of obtaining estimates of the kinetic energy dissipation in breaking waves, while taking into account the unsteady and heterogeneous nature of the turbulent flow.

  7. Flow structure and vorticity transport on a plunging wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar

    The structure and dynamics of the flow field created by a plunging flat plate airfoil are investigated at a chord Reynolds number of 10,000 while varying plunge amplitude and Strouhal number. Digital particle image velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the shedding patterns and the interactions between the leading and trailing edge vortex structures (LEV and TEV), resulting in the development of a wake classification system based on the nature and timing of interactions between the leading- and trailing-edge vortices. The convection speed of the LEV and its resulting interaction with the TEV is primarily dependent on reduced frequency; however, at Strouhal numbers above approximately 0.4, a significant influence of Strouhal number (or plunge amplitude) is observed in which LEV convection is retarded, and the contribution of the LEV to the wake is diminished. It is shown that this effect is caused by an enhanced interaction between the LEV and the airfoil surface, due to a significant increase in the strength of the vortices in this Strouhal number range, for all plunge amplitudes investigated. Comparison with low-Reynolds-number studies of plunging airfoil aerodynamics reveals a high degree of consistency and suggests applicability of the classification system beyond the range examined in the present work. Some important differences are also observed. The three-dimensional flow field was characterized for a plunging two-dimensional flat-plate airfoil using three-dimensional reconstructions of planar PIV data. Whereas the phase-averaged description of the flow field shows the secondary vortex penetrating the leading-edge shear layer to terminate LEV formation on the airfoil, time-resolved, instantaneous PIV measurements show a continuous and growing entrainment of secondary vorticity into the shear layer and LEV. A planar control volume analysis on the airfoil indicated that the generation of secondary vorticity produced approximately one half the

  8. Evaluation of fatty acid oxidation by reactive oxygen species induced in liquids using atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2015-10-01

    We investigated fatty acid oxidation by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal helium plasma using linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, together with evaluating active species induced in liquids. If the ambient gas contains oxygen, direct plasma such as plasma jets coming into contact with the liquid surface supplies various active species, such as singlet oxygen, ozone, and superoxide anion radicals, to the liquid. The direct plasma easily oxidizes linoleic acid, indicating that fatty acid oxidation will occur in the direct plasma. In contrast, afterglow flow, where the plasma is terminated in a glass tube and does not touch the surface of the liquid sample, supplies mainly superoxide anion radicals. The fact that there was no clear observation of linoleic acid oxidation using the afterglow reveals that it may not affect lipids, even in an atmosphere containing oxygen. The afterglow flow can potentially be used for the sterilization of aqueous solutions using the reduced pH method, in medical and dental applications, because it provides bactericidal activity in the aqueous solution despite containing a smaller amount of active species.

  9. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  10. The effect of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and the resulting droplet size distributions. Third quarterly technical report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A.; Chigier, N.

    1993-12-01

    Laminar and turbulent columns of liquids issuing from capillary tubes were studied in order to determine the effects of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and to establish the influence of liquid turbulence on droplet size distributions after breakup. Two capillary tubes were chosen with diameters D{sub 1}=3.0mm and D{sub 2}=1.2mm; jet Reynolds numbers were 1000--30000, and 400--7200. For water injection into stagnant air, stability curve is bounded by a laminar portion, where a jet radius and {delta}{sub o} initial disturbance amplitude, and a fully developed turbulent portion characterized by high initial disturbance amplitude (ln(a/{delta}{sub o,T}) {approximately} 4.85). In the transition region, ln(a/{delta}{sub o}) is not single valued; it decreases with increasing Reynolds number. In absence of aerodynamic effects, turbulent jets are as stable as laminar jets. For this breakup mode turbulence propagates initial disturbances with amplitudes orders of magnitude larger than laminar jets ({delta}{sub o,T}=28{times}10{sup 6} {delta}{sub o,L}). Growth rates of initial disturbances are same for both laminar and turbulent columns with theoretical Weber values. Droplet size distribution is bi-modal; the number ratio of large (> D/2), to small (< D/2) droplets is 3 and independent of Reynolds number. For laminar flow optimum wavelength ({lambda}{sub opt}) corresponding to fastest growing disturbance is equal to 4.45D, exactly the theoretical Weber value. For turbulent flow conditions, the turbulent column segments. Typically, segments with lengths of one to several wavelengths, detach from the liquid jet. The long ligaments contract under the action of surface tension, resulting in droplet sizes larger than predicted by Rayleigh and Weber. For turbulent flow conditions, {lambda}{sub opt} = 9.2D, about 2 times the optimum Weber wavelength.

  11. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  12. Investigation of a Nonlinear Outcoupling Feature Observed in Optically-Pumped Cylindrical Liquid Jets Supporting Stimulated Raman Scattering.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruekgauer, Thomas Eric

    1995-01-01

    Two processes associated with the generation of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in optically-pumped cylindrical liquid jets are investigated. First, the mechanism of frequency selectivity occurring in a micro-cavity with a continuum of resonant frequencies is discussed. It appears that the restrictions placed on the continuous parameter beta, which describes the z dependence of the normal modes of the micro-cylinder, results in a discrete emission spectrum for the stimulated processes (e.g., dye-lasing and SRS) occurring in the dielectric micro-cylinder. A simple model, based on geometric optics, describing the gain and leakage loss for a semi-infinite dielectric slab containing a (semi-infinite) gain region is used to illuminate the role which the parameter beta plays in the generation of stimulated processes in the dielectric micro-cylinder. The results of the model, along with various experimental results, indicate that beta = 0 is the preferred condition for the stimulated processes. Second, it appears as if SRS occurring in the optically-pumped cylindrical liquid jets is responsible for the generation of a newly-observed outcoupling (scattering) feature. This geometrically well-defined feature takes the form of a thin ring, lying in the rm e_{r}-rm e_ {phi} plane, with a spatial extent along the cylinder axis direction of <=q 5 mum. The ring feature is found to be a threshold process, as it is observed to outcouple resident SRS light only above a well-defined optical pump intensity. Finally, it is observed that the ring feature can take on a periodic (in phi) character for particular liquids (ethanol and water) and over a range of optical pump intensities. An explanation for the mechanism responsible for the generation of the ring feature based on plasma generation resulting from self-focusing of the SRS fields is offered.

  13. Modified Design of Hydroturbine Wicket Gates to Include Liquid Control Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Bryan; Cimbala, John; Wouden, Alex

    2013-11-01

    With the ever-increasing penetration of alternative electricity generation, it is becoming more common to operate hydroturbines under off-design conditions in order to maintain stability in the electric power grid. Improving the off-design performance of these turbines is therefore of significant importance. As the runner blades of a Francis hydroturbine pass though the wakes created by the upstream guide vanes (wicket gates and stay vanes), they experience significant changes in the instantaneous values of absolute velocity, flow angle, and pressure. The concept of adding water jets to the trailing edge of the guide vanes is proposed as a method for reducing the dynamic load on the hydroturbine runner blades, as well as modifying the flow angle of the water entering the runner to improve turbine efficiency during off-design operation. In order to add water jets that are capable of turning the flow, a modified beveled trailing edge design is presented. Computational experiments show that a +/-5° change in swirl angle is achievable with the new design, as well as up to 4% improvement in turbine efficiency during off-design operation. This correlates to an overall improvement in machine efficiency of up to 2%, when the losses through the jet channels are taken into account. Funding for this work was provided by the DOD, through the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, and the DOE, through the Penn State Hydropower Research Grant.

  14. Conjugate heat transfer from a heated disk to a thin liquid film formed by a controlled impinging jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, A.; Thomas, S.; Rahman, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and numerical study of the heat transfer from a heated horizontal disk to a thin film of liquid is described. The liquid was delivered to the disk by a collar arrangement such that the film thickness and radial velocity were known at the outer radius of the collar. This method of delivery is termed as a controlled impinging jet. Flow visualization tests were performed and heat transfer data were collected along the radius of the disk for different volumetric flow rates and inlet temperatures in the supercritical and subcritical regions. The heat transfer coefficient was found to increase with flow rate when both supercritical and subcritical regions were present on the heated surface. A numerical simulation of this free surface problem was performed, which included the effects of conjugate heat transfer within the heated disk and the liquid. The numerical predictions agree with the experimental results and show that conjugate heat transfer has a significant effect on the local wail temperature and heat transfer coefficient.

  15. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quo by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of downstream

  16. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: Comparison with a Conventional Circular Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sung Sil; Dyussekenov, Nurzhan; Sohn, H. Y.

    2010-02-01

    The top-blow injection technique of a gas-solid mixture through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One of the inherent problems associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than a circular jet was designed in the laboratory scale. With this new configuration, solid particles leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different than with the circular lance in which the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. The results of cold model tests using an air-sand jet issuing from a circular lance and an annular lance into a water bath showed that the penetration of the annular jet is much less sensitive to the variations in particle feed rate as well as gas velocity than that of the circular jet. Correlation equations for the penetration depth for both circular and annular jets show agreement among the experimentally obtained values.

  17. Effect of Charge Relaxation in Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Primary Atomization of Electrically Charged Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtine, Emilien; van Poppel, Bret; Daily, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is an interdisciplinary topic that describes the complex interaction between fluid mechanics and electric fields. In the context of combustion applications, EHD may enable improved spray control and finer atomization so that fuel injection schemes can be inexpensively developed for small engines. Moreover, EHD may provide efficient enhancements to hydrocarbon fuel atomization that could benefit a much broader range of engines and non-combustion applications. In this work, high-fidelity numerical simulations of an electrically charged kerosene jet undergoing turbulent atomization are presented. The simulations make use of first-principle-based methods designed to accurately represent the interfacial stresses and discontinuities. Under the assumption of a large electric Reynolds number, it can be appropriate to assume that the charges do not have time to relax to the liquid-gas interface, and that they do not drift within the liquid volume. Alternatively, one can solve a free charge conservation equation to fully account for charge drift. These two approaches are compared in details, and the role of charge drift in EHD atomization is analyzed. The implementation of the charge transport equation, which is discontinuous in nature, is discussed as well.

  18. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Dynamics of formation of the liquid-drop phase of laser erosion jets near the surfaces of metal targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goncharov, V. K.; Kontsevoi, V. L.; Puzyrev, M. V.

    1995-03-01

    An investigation was made of laser erosion jets formed at 0.1-1.5 mm above the surfaces of Pb, Co, Ni, Sn, and Zn targets. A neodymium laser emitting rectangular pulses of 400 μs duration and of energy up to 400 J was used. The diameters, as well as the number density and volume fraction of the metal particles present in the jet, were measured. An analysis of the results showed that the metal liquid drops broke up near the surface and experienced additional evaporation because of their motion opposite to the laser beam.

  19. Plain-jet airblast atomization of alternative liquid petroleum fuels under high ambient air pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasuja, A. K.

    1982-04-01

    The effects that air and fuel properties have upon the spray mean drop size characteristics of a plain-jet airblast atomizer of the type employed in the gas turbine engine are investigated. The tests used kerosene, gas oil and a high-viscosity blend of gas oil in residual fuel oil, and covered a wide range of ambient air pressures. Laser light-scattering technique was employed for drop size measurements. It is concluded that the atomizer's measured mean drop size characteristics are only slightly different from those of the pre-filming type, especially when operating on low-viscosity kerosene under higher ambient air pressure. The beneficial effect of increased levels of ambient air pressure on mean drop size is shown to be much reduced in the case of high-viscosity fuels, thus making the attainment of good atomization performance on such fuels difficult. An expression is derived for correlating the obtained mean drop size data.

  20. Microbial Inactivation in the Liquid Phase Induced by Multigas Plasma Jet

    PubMed Central

    Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Sasaki, Yota; Hidekazu, Miyahara; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Ito, Norihiko; Kohno, Masahiro; Azuma, Takeshi; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Various gas atmospheric nonthermal plasmas were generated using a multigas plasma jet to treat microbial suspensions. Results indicated that carbon dioxide and nitrogen plasma had high sterilization effects. Carbon dioxide plasma, which generated the greatest amount of singlet oxygen than other gas plasmas, killed general bacteria and some fungi. On the other hand, nitrogen plasma, which generated the largest amount of OH radical, killed ≥6 log of 11 species of microorganisms, including general bacteria, fungi, acid-fast bacteria, spores, and viruses in 1–15 min. To identify reactive species responsible for bacterial inactivation, antioxidants were added to bacterial suspensions, which revealed that singlet oxygen and OH radicals had greatest inactivation effects. PMID:26173107

  1. Featured Image: A Galaxy Plunges Into a Cluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The galaxy that takes up most of the frame in this stunning image (click for the full view!) is NGC 1427A. This is a dwarf irregular galaxy (unlike the fortuitously-located background spiral galaxy in the lower right corner of the image), and its currently in the process of plunging into the center of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Marcelo Mora (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) and collaborators have analyzed observations of this galaxy made by both the Very Large Telescope in Chile and the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys, which produced the image shown here as a color composite in three channels. The team worked to characterize the clusters of star formation within NGC 1427A identifiable in the image as bright knots within the galaxy and determine how the interactions of this galaxy with its cluster environment affect the star formation within it. For more information and the original image, see the paper below.Citation:Marcelo D. Mora et al 2015 AJ 150 93. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/93

  2. Experimental study on instantaneous thrust and lift of two plunging wings in tandem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wu Qi; Jia, Bo Bo; Xi, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Two tandem wings undergoing a two-dimensional sinusoidal plunging motion are studied in a low Reynolds number water tunnel. The influence of the phase angle and leading-edge vortex (LEV) on the peak value of the instantaneous thrust and lift is studied. The instantaneous lift and thrust are measured by a force sensor; the velocity and vorticity fields are captured by digital particle image velocimetry. For the forewing, noticeable differences at various phase angles are found in the peak value of the instantaneous lift and thrust rather than in their minimum value. The LEV of the hindwing increased the maximum effective angle of attack of the forewing and enhanced the jet-like flow behind the forewing, which accounts for the increase in peak value. For the hindwing, the phase angle determines the sign of the forewing-shed LEV when the hindwing encounters this LEV. If the forewing-shed LEV before the leading edge of the hindwing has the opposite sense of rotation as the LEV of the hindwing, the velocity of the flow on the windward side of the hindwing increases, resulting in high instantaneous thrust and lift. If the two LEVs have the same sense of rotation, the forewing-shed LEV hinders the growth of the hindwing LEV because of the small effective angle of attack, leading to low instantaneous thrust and lift. Non-circulatory forces on the wings are calculated according to a potential flow model. Results show that the non-circulatory force has important effects on the peak value and symmetry of the instantaneous lift and thrust curves.

  3. Three dimensional ink-jet printing of biomaterials using ionic liquids and co-solvents.

    PubMed

    Gunasekera, Deshani H A T; Kuek, SzeLee; Hasanaj, Denis; He, Yinfeng; Tuck, Christopher; Croft, Anna K; Wildman, Ricky D

    2016-08-15

    1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2C1Im][OAc]) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C4C1Im][OAc]) have been used as solvents for the dissolution and ink-jet printing of cellulose from 1.0 to 4.8 wt%, mixed with the co-solvents 1-butanol and DMSO. 1-Butanol and DMSO were used as rheological modifiers to ensure consistent printing, with DMSO in the range of 41-47 wt% producing samples within the printable range of a DIMATIX print-head used (printability parameter < 10) at 55 °C, whilst maintaining cellulose solubility. Regeneration of cellulose from printed samples using water was demonstrated, with the resulting structural changes to the cellulose sample assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and white light interferometry (WLI). These results indicate the potential of biorenewable materials to be used in the 3D additive manufacture process to generate single-component and composite materials. PMID:27231729

  4. The Rayleigh-Plateau instability and jet formation during the extrusion of liquid metal from craters in a vacuum arc cathode spot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, G. A.; Zubarev, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    We consider the displacement of molten metal from a crater being formed on the cathode during the operation of a vacuum arc under the pressure of the cathode plasma and formulate a criterion for the formation of a thin ridge of expelled liquid metal (a sheet-like jet) at the crater edge. When the ridge height is substantially greater than its thickness, conditions arise for the development of the Rayleigh-Plateau capillary instability, which breaks the axial symmetry of the problem. Estimates are presented, which suggest that this instability is responsible for the breakup of the liquid ridge into jets, which play an important role in the self-sustained operation of a discharge.

  5. Postmortem investigation of mylohyoid hiatus and hernia: aetiological factors of plunging ranula.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John D; Kim, Ann; Al-Ali, Saad; Morton, Randall P

    2013-09-01

    The mylohyoid hiatus and hernia were discovered in the nineteenth century and were considered to explain the origin of the plunging ranula from the sublingual gland. This formed the rationale for sublingual sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula. However, a more recent, extensive histological investigation reported that hernias contained submandibular gland, which supported an origin of the plunging ranula from the submandibular gland and submandibular sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula. We therefore decided to investigate the occurrence and location of the hiatus and the histological nature of the hernia. Twenty-three adult cadavers were dissected in the submandibular region. The locations and dimensions of mylohyoid hiatuses were measured before taking biopsies of hernias. Hiatuses with associated hernias were found in ten cadavers: unilateral in six; and bilateral in four, in one of which there were three hiatuses. Sublingual gland was identified in nine hernias and fat without gland in six. This investigation supports clinical and experimental evidence that the plunging ranula originates from the sublingual gland and may enter the neck through the mylohyoid muscle. It confirms the rationale of sublingual sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula.

  6. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on emissions from a flame-tube combustor using Liquid Jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Tacina, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of uncooled exhaust gas recirculation as an inert diluent on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO + NO2) and on combustion efficiency were investigated. Ratios of recirculated combustion products to inlet airflow were varied from 10 to 80 percent by using an inlet air ejector nozzle. Liquid Jet A fuel was used. The flame-tube combustor was 10.2 cm in diameter. It was operated with and without a flameholder present. The combustor pressure was maintained constant at 0.5 MPa. The equivalence ratio was varied from 0.3 to 1.0. The inlet air temperature was varied from 590 to 800 K, and the reference velocity from 10 to 30 m/sec. Increasing the percent recirculation from 10 to 25 had the following effects: (1) the peak NOx emission was decreased by 37 percent, from 8 to 5 g NO2/kg fuel, at an inlet air temperature of 590 K and a reference velocity of 15 m/sec; (2) the combustion efficiency was increased, particularly at the higher equivalence ratios; and (3) for a high combustion efficiency of greater than 99.5 percent, the range of operation of the combustor was nearly doubled in terms of equivalence ratio. Increasing the recirculation from 25 to 50 percent did not change the emissions significantly.

  7. Low Reynolds Number Biofilm Streamers Form as Highly Viscous Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Aloke; Hassanpourfard, Mahtab; Das, Siddhartha

    2014-11-01

    There are recent experimental investigations that suggest that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re << 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms may deform into filamentous structures termed as streamers. Streamer formation time-scales usually far exceed reported rheological relaxation time scales for biofilms. Here we propose a theory that hypothesizes that streamers form due to the viscous response of the viscoelastic biofilms. The theoretical model is based on a stability analysis and can accurately explain hitherto unresolved issues, such as extremely large time needed for appearance of streamers and exponential growth of streamer dimensions after it has formed. We also provide results from our own initial experiments that indicate towards the validity of this ``liquid-state'' hypothesis.

  8. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    DOE PAGES

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian.more » Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.« less

  9. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian. Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.

  10. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-01

    Previous work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubbles from shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh0 = 1 and kh0 = 1/8, where 2h0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian. We describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff, that has the same missing area. Our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.

  11. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  12. Development of liquid-jet laser-produced plasma light source for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tamotsu; Suganuma, Takashi; Imai, Yousuke; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Someya, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Hideo; Soumagne, Georg; Komori, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Endo, Akira; Toyoda, Koichi

    2003-06-01

    The Extreme UV Lithography System Development Association (EUVA) was established in Japan in May 2002 and is supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). EUVA started the light soruce development in September 2002. This development is done by the assocaition members Gigaphoton, Ushio, Komatsu, Canon, Nikon, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Sciecne and Technology (AIST) and several Japanese universities. The target of the four-year project is the development of a EUV light source with 10W clean focus point power. For the end of the fiscal year 2003 the development of a 4W EUV light source (clean focus point power) is planned. Both, Laser-Produced-Plasma (LPP) and Discharge-Produced-Plasma (DPP) EUV light sources are investigated at first. Our group at the EUVA Hiratsuka R&D Center is working on LPP sources. We are currently focusing on the development of a driver laser and a liquid Xenon plasma target. The laser is a Nd:YAG MOPA (Master Oscillator and Power Amplifier) system oscillating at 1064 nm. Average power, repetition rate and pulse duration of the laser system are 500 Watt, 10 kHa and 30nsec, respectively. The Xenon liquefication system operates at a maximum pressure of 5MPa and a temperature range between 160 K and 190 K. The pressure inside the vacuum chamber is below 0.1Pa during system operation. This paper presents the current status of the EUV system component development as well as first experimental results of generated EUV radiation.

  13. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling.

  14. Impact of a viscoelastic jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, Henri; Néel, Baptiste; Limat, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting onto a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We observe that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break: close to the wall, the jet cross-section is faceted and radial steady liquid films (membranes) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of membranes increases with increasing viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. A mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, is presented that explains these dependences. The large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and suspended (Savart) sheets, will also be discussed.

  15. Design and Testing of an Automated System using Thermochromatic Liquid Crystals to Determine Local Heat Transfer Coefficients for an Impinging Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Benjamin

    1995-01-01

    Using thermochromatic liquid crystal to measure surface temperature, an automated transient method with time-varying free-stream temperature is developed to determine local heat transfer coefficients. By allowing the free-stream temperature to vary with time, the need for complicated mechanical components to achieve a step temperature change is eliminated, and by using the thermochromatic liquid crystals as temperature indicators, the labor intensive task of installing many thermocouples is omitted. Bias associated with human perception of the transition of the thermochromatic liquid crystal is eliminated by using a high speed digital camera and a computer. The method is validated by comparisons with results obtained by the steady-state method for a circular Jet impinging on a flat plate. Several factors affecting the accuracy of the method are evaluated.

  16. CFD based investigation on the impact acceleration when a gannet impacts with water during plunge diving.

    PubMed

    Wang, T M; Yang, X B; Liang, J H; Yao, G C; Zhao, W D

    2013-09-01

    Plunge diving is the most commonly used feeding method of a gannet, which can make the gannet transit from air to water rapidly and successfully. A large impact acceleration can be generated due to the air-to-water transition. However, the impact acceleration experienced by the gannet during plunge diving has not been studied. In this paper, this issue is investigated by using the CFD method. The effect of the dropping height and the water-entry inclination angle on the impact acceleration is considered. The results reveal that the impact acceleration along the longitudinal body axis increases with either of the two parameters. The peak time decreases with the dropping height. A quadratic relation is found between the peak impact acceleration and the initial water-entry velocity. According to the computation, when the dropping height is 30 m (most of gannets plunge from about this height), the peak impact acceleration can reach about 23 times the gravitational acceleration, which will exert a considerable force on the gannet body. Furthermore, the pressure distribution of different water-entry inclination angles indicates that the large pressure asymmetry caused by a small oblique angle may lead to a large impact acceleration in the direction perpendicular to the longitudinal body axis and cause damage to the neck of the gannet, which partly explains the reason why a gannet performing a high plunge diving in nature enters water with a large oblique angle from the perspective of impact mechanics. The investigation on the plunge-diving behavior in this paper will inspire and promote the development of a biomimetic amphibious robot that transits from air to water with the plunge-diving mode.

  17. Mathematical Modeling And Design Optimization Of Plunge Shaving Cutter For Gears With Tooth Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Shinn-Liang; Liu, Jia-Hung

    2009-10-01

    Gears are the most important components in transmission systems. Modifications of gear teeth can accommodate errors and deformations encountered in the manufacture, assembly, and operation of gear pairs. For plunge shaving gears with tooth modifications, the design criteria of cutter clearance manufactured by protuberance hob cutter is investigated. With this novel design, the cutter has better strength and stiffness to keep the shaved gear profile stable. With the analytical descriptions of crowned gear and hence plunge shaving cutter have been constructed so that the grinding wheel can be optimized to minimized the topographic error. Efficiency is greatly improved by avoiding the traditional trial and error method.

  18. Too Fast, Too Furious: A Galaxy's Fatal Plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Trailing 200,000-light-year-long streamers of seething gas, a galaxy that was once like our Milky Way is being shredded as it plunges at 4.5 million miles per hour through the heart of a distant cluster of galaxies. In this unusually violent collision with ambient cluster gas, the galaxy is stripped down to its skeletal spiral arms as it is eviscerated of fresh hydrogen for making new stars. The galaxy's untimely demise is offering new clues to solving the mystery of what happens to spiral galaxies in a violent universe. Views of the early universe show that spiral galaxies were once much more abundant in rich clusters of galaxies. But they seem to have been vanishing over cosmic time. Where have these "missing bodies" gone? Astronomers are using a wide range of telescopes and analysis techniques to conduct a "CSI" or Crime Scene Investigator-style look at what is happening to this galaxy inside its cluster's rough neighborhood. "It's a clear case of galaxy assault and battery," says William Keel of the University of Alabama. "This is the first time we have a full suite of results from such disparate techniques showing the crime being committed, and the modus operandi." Keel and colleagues are laying out the "forensic evidence" of the galaxy's late life, in a series of presentations today in Atlanta, Ga., at the 203rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Astronomers have assembled the evidence by combining a variety of diagnostic observations from telescopes analyzing the galaxy's appearance in X-ray, optical, and radio light. Parallel observations at different wavelengths trace how stars, gas, and dust are being tossed around and torn from the fragile galaxy, called C153. Though such "distressed" galaxies have been seen before, this one's demise is unusually swift and violent. The galaxy belongs to a cluster of galaxies that slammed into another cluster about 100 million years ago. This galaxy took the brunt of the beating as it fell along a trajectory

  19. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  20. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  1. Numerical heat transfer during partially-confined, confined, and free liquid jet impingement with rotation and chemical mechanical planarization process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallave Cortes, Jorge C.

    This work presents the use of numerical modeling for the analysis of transient and steady state liquid jet impingement for cooling application of electronics, and energy dissipation during a CMP process under the influence of a series of parameters that controls the transport phenomena mechanism. Seven thorough studies were done to explore how the flow structure and conjugated heat transfer in both the solid and fluid regions was affected by adding a secondary rotational flow during the jet impingement process. Axis-symmetrical numerical models of round jets with a spinning or static nozzle were developed using the following configurations: confined, partially-confined, and free liquid jet impingement on a rotating or stationary uniformly heated disk of finite thickness and radius. Calculations were done for various materials, namely copper, silver, Constantan, and silicon with a solid to fluid thermal conductivity ratio covering a range of 36.91.2222, at different laminar Reynolds numbers ranging from 220 to 2,000, under a broad rotational rate range of 0 to 1,000 RPM (Ekman number=infinity--3.31x10--5), nozzle-to-plate spacing (beta=0.25.5.0), dimensionless disk thicknesses (b/dn=0.167.1.67), confinement ratio (rp/rd=0.2.0.75), and Prandtl number (1.29.124.44) using NH3, H2O, FC.77 and MIL.7808 as working fluids. An engineering correlation relating the average Nusselt number with the above parameters was developed for the prediction of system performance. The simulation results compared reasonably well with previous experimental studies. The second major contribution of this research was the development of a three dimensional CMP model that shows the temperature distributions profile as an index of energy dissipation at the wafer and pad surfaces, and slurry interface. A finite element analysis was done with FIDAP 8.7.4 package under the influence of physical parameters, such as slurry flow rates (0.5.1.42 cc/s), polishing pressures (17.24.41.37 kPa), pad

  2. Fault-related folding during extension: Plunging basement-cored folds in the Basin and Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; John, Barbara E.

    1997-01-01

    Folds are able to form in highly extended areas where stratified cover rocks respond to basement fault offsets. The response of cover rocks to basement faulting can be studied especially well in plunging structures that expose large structural relief. The southern Basin and Range province contains plunging folds kilometres in amplitude at the corners of domino-like tilt blocks of basement rocks, where initially steep transverse and normal faults propagated upward toward the layered cover rocks. Exposed tilted cross sections, as much as 8 km thick, display transitions from faulted basement to folded cover that validate laboratory models of forced folds. The folded cover masks a deeper extensional style of brittle segmentation and uniform steep tilting.

  3. Model for Quasinormal Mode Excitation by a Particle Plunging into a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Zachary; Zimmerman, Aaron; Yang, Huan; Chen, Yanbei

    2016-03-01

    It is known that the late time gravitational waveform produced by a particle plunging into a Kerr black hole is well described by a sum of quasinormal modes. However it is not yet understood how the early part of the waveform gives way to the quasinormal mode description, which diverges at early times, nor how the inhomogenous part of the waveform contributes. Motivated by, we offer a model for quasinormal mode excitation by a particle plunging into a Schwarzschild black hole. To develop our model we study approximations to the Regge-Wheeler equation that allow for a closed-form expression for the frequency-domain Green's function, which we use to isolate the component of the waveform that should be identified with quasinormal ringing. Our description of quasinormal ringing does not diverge at early times and reveals that quasinormal ringing should be understood in analogy with a damped harmonic oscillator experiencing a transient driving source.

  4. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  5. Pool-Type Fishways: Two Different Morpho-Ecological Cyprinid Species Facing Plunging and Streaming Flows

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Paulo; Santos, José M.; Katopodis, Christos; Pinheiro, António; Ferreira, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    Fish are particularly sensitive to connectivity loss as their ability to reach spawning grounds is seriously affected. The most common way to circumvent a barrier to longitudinal connectivity, and to mitigate its impacts, is to implement a fish passage device. However, these structures are often non-effective for species with different morphological and ecological characteristics so there is a need to determine optimum dimensioning values and hydraulic parameters. The aim of this work is to study the behaviour and performance of two species with different ecological characteristics (Iberian barbel Luciobarbus bocagei–bottom oriented, and Iberian chub Squalius pyrenaicus–water column) in a full-scale experimental pool-type fishway that offers two different flow regimes–plunging and streaming. Results showed that both species passed through the surface notch more readily during streaming flow than during plunging flow. The surface oriented species used the surface notch more readily in streaming flow, and both species were more successful in moving upstream in streaming flow than in plunging flow. Streaming flow enhances upstream movement of both species, and seems the most suitable for fishways in river systems where a wide range of fish morpho-ecological traits are found. PMID:23741465

  6. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  7. Effect of a Plunge Electrode During Field Stimulation of Cardiac Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wikswo, J.; Woods, M.; Sidorov, V.; Langrill, D.; Roth, B.

    2003-03-01

    The response of cardiac tissue to strong electric fields is determined by 3-D cable properties, bidomain anisotropy, nonlinearities, and, most importantly, heterogeneities. Langrill and Roth (IEEE Trans. BME. 48:1207 (2001)) numerically studied the effect of a plunge electrode and found alternating regions of hyperpolarization and depolarization around the electrode in response to field shock. We sought to experimentally verify their results by using field stimulation and optical imaging of di-4-ANEPPS stained rabbit right ventricles with an insulated needle serving as a plunge electrode/heterogeneity. The experimental and numerical results agree qualitatively. The key discrepancy is the larger spatial extent of the polarization in the experimental data. The combination of transmural fiber rotation and fluorescence averaging over depth may cause the spatial scale to be larger than was predicted numerically. Because adjacent regions of opposite polarization are potential sources of wave front generation, our results suggest that plunge electrodes or similar-sized heterogeneities may play a role in far-field stimulation.

  8. Measurement and analysis of internal stress distributions created in gelatin simulated-brain tissue by a pulsed laser-induced liquid jet.

    PubMed

    Kato, T; Arafune, T; Washio, T; Nakagawa, A; Ogawa, Y; Tominaga, T; Sakuma, I; Kobayashi, E

    2014-01-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery is currently employed to treat complex lesions beyond the sella turcica; however, the procedure can be limited by difficulties encountered in dealing with small blood vessels, deep and narrow working spaces, and awkward working angles. To overcome these problems, we have developed a pulsed laser-induced liquid jet system that can dissect tumor tissue while preserving fine blood vessels within deep and narrow working spaces. We have previously evaluated the utility and safety of this procedure. However, the effects of the pulsejet after being injected into the brain are not yet well understood. Especially, the behavior of the stress distribution created by the jet is important because it has recently been reported that high acoustic pressures can affect the brain. In this study, we measured internal stress distributions in a gelatin simulated-brain using photoelasticity experiments. We used a high-speed camera with an image sensor on which an array of micropolarizers was attached to measure the stresses and the shear wave created when the pulsejet enters the simulated brain.

  9. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    PubMed

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-01

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  10. X-ray grating interferometry for 9.25 keV design energy at a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balles, A.; Fella, Ch.; Dittmann, J.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a grating interferometer setup with a liquid-metal-jet source and a high resolution detector. It will be shown that this source is suitable for interferometer setups as it delivers a sufficient spatial coherence that makes a source grating unnecessary. This is confirmed twice by the results of an interferometer setup and a single grating setup, respectively. Both show comparable information on the samples. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the Talbot effect due to the self-built high resolution detector with an effective pixel size of 0.67 µm and due to the coherence of the source, thanks to a small spot size of a few microns. The information on the absorption of a nylon fiber is observed to include inline phase contrast effects. The dark-field signal of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is not quite well understood because of its inhomogeneity.

  11. Mixing Time in a Cylindrical Bath Agitated by Swirling Liquid Jet Generated with J-Shaped Lance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Naoko; Iguchi, Manabu

    A novel and efficient method is proposed to agitate a molten steel bath. A water model study is carried out to understand the mixing characteristic of the bath. A water jet is generated with a J-shaped lance in a cylindrical bath. The lance exit made of glass pipe is sharpened to form a single-hole nozzle and the nozzle is placed on the centerline of the bath. Mixing time in the bath is measured with an electric conductivity sensor. An empirical equation is proposed for correlating the measured values of the mixing time as a function of the water flow rate, vessel diameter, and so on.

  12. Viscoelasticity Breaks the Symmetry of Impacting Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, H.; Néel, B.; Limat, L.

    2014-11-01

    A jet of a Newtonian liquid impacting on a wall at right angle spreads as a thin liquid sheet which preserves the radial symmetry of the jet. We report that for a viscoelastic jet (solution of polyethylene glycol in water) this symmetry can break; close to the wall, the jet cross section becomes faceted and radial steady liquid films (wings) form, which connect the cross-section vertices to the sheet. The number of wings increases with increasing the viscoelastic relaxation time of the solution, but also with increasing jet velocity and decreasing distance from the jet nozzle to the wall. We propose a mechanism for this surprising destabilization of the jet shape, which develops perpendicularly to the direction expected for a buckling mechanism, and explain these dependencies. We also discuss the large-scale consequences of the jet destabilization on the sheet spreading and fragmentation, which show through the faceting of hydraulic jumps and of suspended (Savart) sheets.

  13. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  14. Analysis of a Free Surface Film from a Controlled Liquid Impinging Jet over a Rotating Disk Including Conjugate Effects, with and without Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Rice, Jeremy; Faghri, Amir; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the liquid film characteristics and the accompanying heat transfer of a free surface controlled liquid impinging jet onto a rotating disk are presented. The computations were run on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric Eulerian mesh while the free surface was calculated with the volume of fluid method. Flow rates between 3 and 15 1pm with rotational speeds between 50 and 200 rpm are analyzed. The effects of inlet temperature on the film thickness and heat transfer are characterized as well as evaporative effects. The conjugate heating effect is modeled, and was found to effect the heat transfer results the most at both the inner and outer edges of the heated surface. The heat transfer was enhanced with both increasing flow rate and increasing rotational speeds. When evaporative effects were modeled, the evaporation was found to increase the heat transfer at the lower flow rates the most because of a fully developed thermal field that was achieved. The evaporative effects did not significantly enhance the heat transfer at the higher flow rates.

  15. Thermal Tolerance Limits of Diamondback Moth in Ramping and Plunging Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chi; Bahar, Md Habibullah; Baker, Greg; Andrew, Nigel R.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal sensitivity is a crucial determinant of insect abundance and distribution. The way it is measured can have a critical influence on the conclusions made. Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is an important insect pest of cruciferous crops around the world and the thermal responses of polyphagous species are critical to understand the influences of a rapidly changing climate on their distribution and abundance. Experiments were carried out to the lethal temperature limits (ULT0 and LLT0: temperatures where there is no survival) as well as Upper and Lower Lethal Temperature (ULT25 and LLT25) (temperature where 25% DBM survived) of lab-reared adult DBM population to extreme temperatures attained by either two-way ramping (ramping temperatures from baseline to LT25 and ramping back again) or sudden plunging method. In this study the ULT0 for DBM was recorded as 42.6°C and LLT0 was recorded as −16.5°C. DBM had an ULT25 of 41.8°C and LLT25 of −15.2°C. The duration of exposure to extreme temperatures had significant impacts on survival of DBM, with extreme temperatures and/or longer durations contributing to higher lethality. Comparing the two-way ramping temperature treatment to that of direct plunging temperature treatment, our study clearly demonstrated that DBM was more tolerant to temperature in the two-way ramping assay than that of the plunging assay for cold temperatures, but at warmer temperatures survival exhibited no differences between ramping and plunging. These results suggest that DBM will not be put under physiological stress from a rapidly changing climate, rather access to host plants in marginal habitats has enabled them to expand their distribution. Two-way temperature ramping enhances survival of DBM at cold temperatures, and this needs to be examined across a range of taxa and life stages to determine if enhanced survival is widespread incorporating a ramping recovery method. PMID:24475303

  16. Higher-Order Spectral Analysis of a Nonlinear Pitch and Plunge Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.; Strganac, Thomas W.; Hajj, Muhammad R.

    2005-01-01

    Simulated aeroelastic responses of a nonlinear pitch and plunge apparatus are analyzed using various statistical signal processing techniques including higher-order spectral methods. A MATLAB version of the Nonlinear Aeroelastic Testbed Apparatus (NATA) at the Texas A&M University is used to generate various aeroelastic response data including limit cycle oscillations (LCO). Traditional and higher-order spectral (HOS) methods are applied to the simulated aeroelastic responses. Higher-order spectral methods are used to identify critical signatures that indicate the transition from linear to nonlinear (LCO) aeroelastic behavior.

  17. Average size and size distribution of large droplets produced in a free-jet expansion of a liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Henne, U.

    1999-02-01

    The experimental parameters and fluid properties affecting the average size N¯ and the size distribution P(N) of droplets formed by fragmentation of a liquid after expansion into a vacuum are investigated. The mean droplet size is found to be a function of the surface tension of the liquid, the nozzle diameter, and a characteristic flow speed. The size distribution is found to be a linear exponential distribution; measurements deviate from this distribution at small sizes if a factor which is a function of the cluster size is included in the measuring process. Good agreement with measured distributions of both positive and negative droplet ions formed from neutral 4He droplets by electron impact is found. The strong dependence of mean droplet size on source-orifice diameter found in the present analysis indicates that earlier correlations of droplet size with specific entropy in the source were useful at best only for a fixed nozzle size.

  18. On the effect of mantle conductivity on the super-rotating jets near the liquid core surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerski, K. A.; Bajer, K.

    2007-03-01

    We consider hydromagnetic Couette flows in planar and spherical geometries with strong magnetic field (large Hartmann number, M≫1). The highly conducting bottom boundary is in steady motion that drives the flow. The top boundary is stationary and is either a highly conducting thin shell or a weakly conducting thick mantle. The magnetic field, B+b, is a combination of the strong, force-free background B and a perturbation b induced by the flow. This perturbation generates strong streamwise electromagnetic stress inside the fluid which, in some regions, forms a jet moving faster than the driving boundary. The super-velocity, in the spherical geometry called super-rotation, is particularly prominent in the region where the 'grazing' line of B has a point of tangent contact with the top boundary and where the Hartmann layer is singular. This is a consequence of topological discontinuity across that special field line. We explain why the magnitude of super-rotation already present when the top wall is insulating [Dormy, E., Jault, D., Soward, A.M., 2002. A super-rotating shear layer in magnetohydrodynamic spherical Couette flow. J. Fluid Mech. 452, 263-291], considerably increases when that wall is even slightly conducting. The asymptotic theory is valid when either the thickness of the top wall is small, δ˜M-1 and its conductivity is high, ɛ˜1 or when δ˜1 and ɛ˜M-1. The theory predicts the super-velocity enhancement of the order of δM in the first case and ɛM in the second case. We also numerically solve the planar problem outside the asymptotic regime, for ɛ=1 and δ=1, and find that with the particular B that we chose the peak super-velocity scales like M0.33. This scaling is different from M0.6 found in spherical geometry [Hollerbach, R., Skinner, S., 2001. Instabilities of magnetically induced shear layers and jets. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 457, 785-802].

  19. Coal liquefaction to increase jet fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Processing concept that increases supply of jet fuel has been developed as part of study on methods for converting coal to hydrogen, methane, and jet fuel. Concept takes advantage of high aromatic content of coal-derived liquids to make high-octane gasoline, instead of destroying aromatics to make jet fuel.

  20. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  1. Fuzzy jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets. To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets, are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  2. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Here, collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet taggingmore » variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  3. Research on the HYLIFE liquid-first-wall concept for future laser-fusion reactors: liquid jet impact experiments. Final report No. 8

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1982-08-01

    The goal of this initial scoping study was to evaluate the transient and steady state drag of a single bar and of some selected arrays of bars and to determine the momentum removed from impacting liquid slugs. In order to achieve this aim, use has been made of both the published literature and experimental data obtained from a small-scale experimental apparatus. The implications of two possible scaling laws for use in designing the small-scale experiment are discussed. The use of near-universal curves to evaluate the momentum removed during the initial transient period is described. The small-scale apparatus used to obtain steady-state drag data is described. Finally, these results are applied to the HYLIFE fusion reactor.

  4. Self-propelled swimming of a flexible plunging foil near a solid wall.

    PubMed

    Dai, Longzhen; He, Guowei; Zhang, Xing

    2016-01-01

    Numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the influences of a solid wall on the self-propelled swimming of a flexible plunging foil. It is found that the presence of a solid wall enhances the cruising speed, with the cost of increasing input power. Rigid foil can achieve high percentage increase in cruising speed when swimming near a solid wall, but the propulsive efficiency may be reduced. Foils with some flexibility can enjoy the enhancements in both cruising speed and propulsive efficiency. Another advantage of the flexible foils in near-wall swimming is that smaller averaged lateral forces are produced. The effects of wall confinement on the wake structure and the vortex dynamics are also studied in this paper. The results obtained in this study shed some light on the unsteady wall effect experienced by aquatic animals and also inform the design of bio-mimetic underwater vehicles which are capable of exploiting the wall effect. PMID:27377880

  5. Numerical investigation of the vertical plunging force of a spherical intruder into a prefluidized granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Padding, J. T.; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The plunging of a large intruder sphere into a prefluidized granular bed with various constant velocities and various sphere diameters is investigated using a state-of-the-art hybrid discrete particle and immersed boundary method, in which both the gas-induced drag force and the contact force exerted on the intruder can be investigated separately. We investigate low velocities, where velocity dependent effects first begin to appear. The results show a concave-to-convex dependence of the plunging force as a function of intruder depth. In the concave region the force fits to a power law with an exponent around 1.3, which is in good agreement with existing experimental observations. Our simulation results further show that the force exerted on the frontal hemisphere of the intruder is dominant. At larger intruder velocities, friction with the granular medium causes a velocity-dependent drag force. As long as the granular particles have not yet closed the gap behind the intruder, this drag force is independent of the actual intruder depth. In this regime, the drag force experienced by intruders of different diameter moving at different velocities all fall onto a single master curve if plotted against the Reynolds number, using a single value for the effective viscosity of the granular medium. This master curve corresponds well to the Schiller-Naumann correlation for the drag force between a sphere and a Newtonian fluid. After the gap behind the intruder has closed, the drag force increases not only with velocity but also with depth. We attribute this to the effect of increasing hydrostatic particle pressure in the granular medium, leading to an increase in effective viscosity.

  6. Visual accommodation and active pursuit of prey underwater in a plunge-diving bird: the Australasian gannet

    PubMed Central

    Machovsky-Capuska, Gabriel E.; Howland, Howard C.; Raubenheimer, David; Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin; Würsig, Bernd; Hauber, Mark E.; Katzir, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    Australasian gannets (Morus serrator), like many other seabird species, locate pelagic prey from the air and perform rapid plunge dives for their capture. Prey are captured underwater either in the momentum (M) phase of the dive while descending through the water column, or the wing flapping (WF) phase while moving, using the wings for propulsion. Detection of prey from the air is clearly visually guided, but it remains unknown whether plunge diving birds also use vision in the underwater phase of the dive. Here we address the question of whether gannets are capable of visually accommodating in the transition from aerial to aquatic vision, and analyse underwater video footage for evidence that gannets use vision in the aquatic phases of hunting. Photokeratometry and infrared video photorefraction revealed that, immediately upon submergence of the head, gannet eyes accommodate and overcome the loss of greater than 45 D (dioptres) of corneal refractive power which occurs in the transition between air and water. Analyses of underwater video showed the highest prey capture rates during WF phase when gannets actively pursue individual fish, a behaviour that very likely involves visual guidance, following the transition after the plunge dive's M phase. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of the capacity for visual accommodation underwater in a plunge diving bird while capturing submerged prey detected from the air. PMID:22874749

  7. Visual accommodation and active pursuit of prey underwater in a plunge-diving bird: the Australasian gannet.

    PubMed

    Machovsky-Capuska, Gabriel E; Howland, Howard C; Raubenheimer, David; Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin; Würsig, Bernd; Hauber, Mark E; Katzir, Gadi

    2012-10-22

    Australasian gannets (Morus serrator), like many other seabird species, locate pelagic prey from the air and perform rapid plunge dives for their capture. Prey are captured underwater either in the momentum (M) phase of the dive while descending through the water column, or the wing flapping (WF) phase while moving, using the wings for propulsion. Detection of prey from the air is clearly visually guided, but it remains unknown whether plunge diving birds also use vision in the underwater phase of the dive. Here we address the question of whether gannets are capable of visually accommodating in the transition from aerial to aquatic vision, and analyse underwater video footage for evidence that gannets use vision in the aquatic phases of hunting. Photokeratometry and infrared video photorefraction revealed that, immediately upon submergence of the head, gannet eyes accommodate and overcome the loss of greater than 45 D (dioptres) of corneal refractive power which occurs in the transition between air and water. Analyses of underwater video showed the highest prey capture rates during WF phase when gannets actively pursue individual fish, a behaviour that very likely involves visual guidance, following the transition after the plunge dive's M phase. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of the capacity for visual accommodation underwater in a plunge diving bird while capturing submerged prey detected from the air.

  8. Water Jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  9. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  10. Eccentric binary black-hole mergers: The transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; González, José A.; Brügmann, Bernd; Ansorg, Marcus

    2008-09-01

    We study the transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity by computing gravitational waveforms of nonspinning, equal-mass black-hole binaries. We consider three sequences of simulations, starting with a quasicircular inspiral completing 1.5, 2.3 and 9.6 orbits, respectively, prior to coalescence of the holes. For each sequence, the binding energy of the system is kept constant and the orbital angular momentum is progressively reduced, producing orbits of increasing eccentricity and eventually a head-on collision. We analyze in detail the radiation of energy and angular momentum in gravitational waves, the contribution of different multipolar components and the final spin of the remnant, comparing numerical predictions with the post-Newtonian approximation and with extrapolations of point-particle results. We find that the motion transitions from inspiral to plunge when the orbital angular momentum L=Lcrit≃0.8M2. For L

  11. Eccentric binary black-hole mergers: The transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Sperhake, Ulrich; Bruegmann, Bernd; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor; Gonzalez, Jose A.; Ansorg, Marcus

    2008-09-15

    We study the transition from inspiral to plunge in general relativity by computing gravitational waveforms of nonspinning, equal-mass black-hole binaries. We consider three sequences of simulations, starting with a quasicircular inspiral completing 1.5, 2.3 and 9.6 orbits, respectively, prior to coalescence of the holes. For each sequence, the binding energy of the system is kept constant and the orbital angular momentum is progressively reduced, producing orbits of increasing eccentricity and eventually a head-on collision. We analyze in detail the radiation of energy and angular momentum in gravitational waves, the contribution of different multipolar components and the final spin of the remnant, comparing numerical predictions with the post-Newtonian approximation and with extrapolations of point-particle results. We find that the motion transitions from inspiral to plunge when the orbital angular momentum L=L{sub crit}{approx_equal}0.8M{sup 2}. For L

  12. Test Cases for Flutter of the Benchmark Models Rectangular Wings on the Pitch and Plunge Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, Robert M.

    2000-01-01

    The supercritical airfoil was chosen as a relatively modem airfoil for comparison. The BOO12 model was tested first. Three different types of flutter instability boundaries were encountered, a classical flutter boundary, a transonic stall flutter boundary at angle of attack, and a plunge instability near M = 0.9 and for zero angle of attack. This test was made in air and was Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) Test 468. The BSCW model (for Benchmark SuperCritical Wing) was tested next as TDT Test 470. It was tested using both with air and a heavy gas, R-12, as a test medium. The effect of a transition strip on flutter was evaluated in air. The B64AOlO model was subsequently tested as TDT Test 493. Some further analysis of the experimental data for the BOO12 wing is presented. Transonic calculations using the parameters for the BOO12 wing in a two-dimensional typical section flutter analysis are given. These data are supplemented with data from the Benchmark Active Controls Technology model (BACT) given and in the next chapter of this document. The BACT model was of the same planform and airfoil as the BOO12 model, but with spoilers and a trailing edge control. It was tested in the heavy gas R-12, and was instrumented mostly at the 60 per cent span. The flutter data obtained on PAPA and the static aerodynamic test cases from BACT serve as additional data for the BOO12 model. All three types of flutter are included in the BACT Test Cases. In this report several test cases are selected to illustrate trends for a variety of different conditions with emphasis on transonic flutter. Cases are selected for classical and stall flutter for the BSCW model, for classical and plunge for the B64AOlO model, and for classical flutter for the BOO12 model. Test Cases are also presented for BSCW for static angles of attack. Only the mean pressures and the real and imaginary parts of the first harmonic of the pressures are included in the data for the test cases, but digitized time

  13. Potential slab deformation and plunge prior to the Tohoku, Iquique and Maule earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchon, Michel; Marsan, David; Durand, Virginie; Campillo, Michel; Perfettini, Hugo; Madariaga, Raul; Gardonio, Blandine

    2016-05-01

    Megathrust earthquakes rupture hundreds of kilometres of the shallow plate interface in subduction zones, typically at depths of less than 50 km. Intense foreshock activity preceded the 2011 Mw 9 Tohoku-oki (Japan) and 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique (Chile) megathrust earthquakes. This pre-earthquake activity was thought to be generated by slow slip in the seismogenic zone before rupture, but where this slow slip originated and how it spread rapidly over long distances are unknown. Here we analyse seismic activity deep in the subduction zone before the Tohoku-oki and Iquique ruptures, as well as before the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule earthquake in Chile. We find that, before each of these megathrust earthquakes, shallow seismicity occurred synchronously with bursts of seismic activity deep (~100 km) in the subducting slab. The extensional mechanism of these deep shocks suggests that the slab was stretched at depth. We therefore propose that, before these megathrust quakes, the slab might have started to plunge into the mantle below part of the future rupture zone. We speculate that synchronization between deep and shallow seismicity may have marked the nucleation phase for these three giant earthquakes.

  14. Pursuit plunging by northern gannets (Sula bassana) feeding on capelin (Mallotus villosus).

    PubMed Central

    Garthe, S; Benvenuti, S; Montevecchi, W A

    2000-01-01

    Northern gannets (Sula bassana) are considered to obtain prey usually by rapid, vertical, shallow plunge dives. In order to test this contention and investigate underwater foraging behaviour, we attached two types of data-logging systems to 11 parental northern gannets at Funk Island in the North-Wiest Atlantic. We documented, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, gannets performing long, flat-bottomed, U-shaped dives that involved underwater wing propulsion as well as rapid, shallow, V-shaped dives. The median and maximum dive depths and durations were 4.6 and 22.0 m and 8 and 38 s, respectively. Short, shallow dives were usually V-shaped and dives deeper than 8 m and longer than 10 s were usually U-shaped, including a period at constant depth (varying between 4 and 28s with median 8s). Diving occurred throughout the daylight period and deepest dives were performed during late morning. On the basis of motion sensors in the loggers and food collections from telemetered birds, we concluded that extended, deep dives were directed at deep schools of capelin, a small pelagic fish, and we hypothesized that V-shaped dives were aimed at larger, pelagic fishes and squids. Furthermore, these V-shaped dives allowed the birds to surprise their pelagic prey and this may be critical because the maximum swimming speeds of the prey species may exceed the maximum dive speeds of the birds. PMID:12233767

  15. Turbulent flow field and air entrainment in laboratory plunging breaking waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Byoungjoon; Chang, Kuang-An; Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Lim, Ho-Joon

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents laboratory measurements of turbulent flow fields and void fraction in deep-water plunging breaking waves using imaging and optical fiber techniques. Bubble-size distributions are also determined based on combined measurements of velocity and bubble residence time. The most excited mode of the local intermittency measure of the turbulent flow and its corresponding length scale are obtained using a wavelet-based method and found to correlate with the swirling strength and vorticity. Concentrated vortical structures with high intermittency are observed near the lower boundaries of the aerated rollers where the velocity shear is high; the length scale of the deduced eddies ranges from 0.05 to 0.15 times the wave height. The number of bubbles with a chord length less than 2 mm demonstrates good correlation with the swirling strength. The power-law scaling and the Hinze scale of the bubbles determined from the bubble chord length distribution compare favorably with existing measurements. The turbulent dissipation rate, accounting for void fraction, is estimated using mixture theory. When void fraction is not considered, the turbulent dissipation rate is underestimated by more than 70% in the initial impinging and the first splash-up roller. A significant discrepancy of approximately 67% between the total energy dissipation rate and the turbulence dissipation rate is found. Of this uncounted dissipation, 23% is caused by bubble-induced dissipation.

  16. Low electrical resistivity associated with plunging of the Nazca flat slab beneath Argentina.

    PubMed

    Booker, John R; Favetto, Alicia; Pomposiello, M Cristina

    2004-05-27

    Beneath much of the Andes, oceanic lithosphere descends eastward into the mantle at an angle of about 30 degrees (ref. 1). A partially molten region is thought to form in a wedge between this descending slab and the overlying continental lithosphere as volatiles given off by the slab lower the melting temperature of mantle material. This wedge is the ultimate source for magma erupted at the active volcanoes that characterize the Andean margin. But between 28 degrees and 33 degrees S the subducted Nazca plate appears to be anomalously buoyant, as it levels out at about 100 km depth and extends nearly horizontally under the continent. Above this 'flat slab', volcanic activity in the main Andean Cordillera terminated about 9 million years ago as the flattening slab presumably squeezed out the mantle wedge. But it is unknown where slab volatiles go once this happens, and why the flat slab finally rolls over to descend steeply into the mantle 600 km further eastward. Here we present results from a magnetotelluric profile in central Argentina, from which we infer enhanced electrical conductivity along the eastern side of the plunging slab, indicative of the presence of partial melt. This conductivity structure may imply that partial melting occurs to at least 250 km and perhaps to more than 400 km depth, or that melt is supplied from the 410 km discontinuity, consistent with the transition-zone 'water-filter' model of Bercovici and Karato.

  17. Jet impact on a soap film.

    PubMed

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale. PMID:23031009

  18. Jet impact on a soap film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale.

  19. Jet impact on a soap film.

    PubMed

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale.

  20. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  1. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in spherical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audelott, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter spherical containers in weightlessness. Complete liquid circulation flow patterns were easily established in containers that were less than half full of liquid, while for higher liquid fill conditions, vapor was drawn into the inlet of the simulated mixer unit. Increasing the liquid-jet or lowering the position at which the liquid jet entered the container caused increasing turbulence and bubble formation.

  2. Is there a clinical benefit with a smooth compensator design compared with a plunged compensator design for passive scattered protons?

    PubMed

    Tabibian, Art A; Powers, Adam; Dolormente, Keith; Oommen, Sneha; Tiwari, Akhil; Palmer, Matt; Zhu, Xiaorong R; Li, Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Wisdom, Paul; Velasco, Kyle; Erhart, Kevin; Stanley, Henry; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc T

    2015-01-01

    In proton therapy, passive scattered proton plans use compensators to conform the dose to the distal surface of the planning volume. These devices are custom made from acrylic or wax for each treatment field using either a plunge-drilled or smooth-milled compensator design. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a clinical benefit of generating passive scattered proton radiation treatment plans with the smooth compensator design. We generated 4 plans with different techniques using the smooth compensators. We chose 5 sites and 5 patients for each site for the range of dosimetric effects to show adequate sample. The plans were compared and evaluated using multicriteria (MCA) plan quality metrics for plan assessment and comparison using the Quality Reports [EMR] technology by Canis Lupus LLC. The average absolute difference for dosimetric metrics from the plunged-depth plan ranged from -4.7 to +3.0 and the average absolute performance results ranged from -6.6% to +3%. The manually edited smooth compensator plan yielded the best dosimetric metric, +3.0, and performance, + 3.0% compared to the plunged-depth plan. It was also superior to the other smooth compensator plans. Our results indicate that there are multiple approaches to achieve plans with smooth compensators similar to the plunged-depth plans. The smooth compensators with manual compensator edits yielded equal or better target coverage and normal tissue (NT) doses compared with the other smooth compensator techniques. Further studies are under investigation to evaluate the robustness of the smooth compensator design.

  3. Is there a clinical benefit with a smooth compensator design compared with a plunged compensator design for passive scattered protons?

    SciTech Connect

    Tabibian, Art A.; Powers, Adam; Dolormente, Keith; Oommen, Sneha; Tiwari, Akhil; Palmer, Matt; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Li, Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Wisdom, Paul; Velasco, Kyle; Erhart, Kevin; Stanley, Henry; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc T.

    2015-04-01

    In proton therapy, passive scattered proton plans use compensators to conform the dose to the distal surface of the planning volume. These devices are custom made from acrylic or wax for each treatment field using either a plunge-drilled or smooth-milled compensator design. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a clinical benefit of generating passive scattered proton radiation treatment plans with the smooth compensator design. We generated 4 plans with different techniques using the smooth compensators. We chose 5 sites and 5 patients for each site for the range of dosimetric effects to show adequate sample. The plans were compared and evaluated using multicriteria (MCA) plan quality metrics for plan assessment and comparison using the Quality Reports [EMR] technology by Canis Lupus LLC. The average absolute difference for dosimetric metrics from the plunged-depth plan ranged from −4.7 to +3.0 and the average absolute performance results ranged from −6.6% to +3%. The manually edited smooth compensator plan yielded the best dosimetric metric, +3.0, and performance, + 3.0% compared to the plunged-depth plan. It was also superior to the other smooth compensator plans. Our results indicate that there are multiple approaches to achieve plans with smooth compensators similar to the plunged-depth plans. The smooth compensators with manual compensator edits yielded equal or better target coverage and normal tissue (NT) doses compared with the other smooth compensator techniques. Further studies are under investigation to evaluate the robustness of the smooth compensator design.

  4. Near-bed hydrodynamics and turbulence below a large-scale plunging breaking wave over a mobile barred bed profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zanden, J.; van der A, D. A.; Hurther, D.; Cáceres, I.; O'Donoghue, T.; Ribberink, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Detailed measurements are presented of velocities and turbulence under a large-scale regular plunging breaking wave in a wave flume. Measurements were obtained at 12 cross-shore locations around a mobile medium-sand breaker bar. They focused particularly on the dynamics of the wave bottom boundary layer (WBL) and near-bed turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), measured with an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP). The breaking process and outer flow hydrodynamics are in agreement with previous laboratory and field observations of plunging waves, including a strong undertow in the bar trough region. The WBL thickness matches with previous studies at locations offshore from the bar crest, but it increases near the breaking-wave plunge point. This relates possibly to breaking-induced TKE or to the diverging flow at the shoreward slope of the bar. Outer flow TKE is dominated by wave breaking and exhibits strong spatial variation with largest TKE above the breaker bar crest. Below the plunge point, breaking-induced turbulence invades the WBL during both crest and trough half cycle. This results in an increase in the time-averaged TKE in the WBL (with a factor 3) and an increase in peak onshore and offshore near-bed Reynolds stresses (with a factor 2) from shoaling to breaking region. A fraction of locally produced TKE is advected offshore over a distance of a few meters to shoaling locations during the wave trough phase, and travels back onshore during the crest half cycle. The results imply that breaking-induced turbulence, for large-scale conditions, may significantly affect near-bed sediment transport processes.

  5. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: The Effects of the Density and Size of Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Top-blow injection of a gas-solid jet through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One problem associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than the circular jet was designed in this laboratory. With this new configuration, the solid particles fed through the center tube leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different from that with a circular lance where the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. In previous cold-model investigations in this laboratory, the effects of the gas velocity, particle feed rate, lance height of the annular lance, and the cross-sectional area of the gas jet were studied and compared with the circular lance. This study examined the effect of the density and size of the solid particles on the penetration behavior of the annular gas-solid jet, which yielded some unexpected results. The variation in the penetration depth with the density of the solid particles at the same mass feed rate was opposite for the circular lance and the annular lance. In the case of the circular lance, the penetration depth became shallower as the density of the solid particles increased; on the contrary, for the annular lance, the penetration depth became deeper with the increasing density of particles. However, at the same volumetric feed rate of the particles, the density effect was small for the circular lance, but for the annular lance, the jets with higher density particles penetrated more deeply. The variation in the penetration depth with the particle diameter was also different for the circular and the annular lances. With the circular lance, the penetration depth became deeper as the particle size decreased for all the feed rates, but with the annular lance, the effect of the particle size was

  6. The Direct Numerical Simulation of the Deflected Wake Phenomenon around a Plunging NACA0012 Airfoil at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Mehmet; Yucel, Saliha Banu; Unal, Mehmet Fevzi

    2015-11-01

    The deflected wake phenomenon reported by Jones and Platzer (2009) is investigated in detail using direct numerical simulations around a NACA0012 airfoil undergoing harmonic plunging motion. An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) formulation based on an unstructured side-centered finite volume method is utilized in order to solve the incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The Reynolds number is chosen to be 252 and the reduced frequency of plunging motion (k = 2 πfc /U∞) and the plunge amplitude non-dimensionalized with respect to chord are set to 12 . 3 and 0 . 12 , respectively, as in the experimental study of Jones and Platzer (2009). The present numerical simulations reveal a highly persistent transient effect and it takes two orders of magnitude larger duration than the heave period to reach the time-periodic state. In addition, the three-dimensional simulation reveals that the flow field is highly three-dimensional around the leading edge. The calculation reproduces the deflected wake and shows a very good agreement with the experimental wake pattern. The instantaneous vorticity contours, Finite Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) fields and particle traces are presented along with the aerodynamic parameters including the lift and thrust coefficients.

  7. Strong transient effects of the flow around a harmonically plunging NACA0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucel, S. Banu; Sahin, Mehmet; Unal, M. Fevzi

    2015-12-01

    The flow pattern around a NACA0012 airfoil undergoing harmonic plunging motion corresponding to the deflected wake phenomenon reported by Jones and Platzer (Exp Fluids 46:799-810, 2009) is investigated in detail using direct numerical simulations. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation based on an unstructured side-centered finite volume method is utilized in order to solve the incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. The Reynolds number is chosen to be 252, and the reduced frequency of plunging motion ( k = 2π fc/ U ∞) and the plunge amplitude non-dimensionalized with respect to chord are set to be 12.3 and 0.12, respectively, as in the experimental study of Jones and Platzer (2009). The present numerical simulations reveal a highly persistent transient effect, and it takes two orders of magnitude larger duration than the heave period to reach the time-periodic state. In addition, the three-dimensional simulation reveals that the flow field is three-dimensional for the parameters used herein. The calculation reproduces the deflected wake and shows a good agreement with the experimental wake pattern. The instantaneous vorticity contours, finite-time Lyapunov exponent fields and particle traces are presented along with the aerodynamic parameters including the lift and thrust coefficients.

  8. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  9. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  10. SOFT X-RAY TEMPERATURE TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS FROM STARS ON DEEP PLUNGING ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lixin; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2015-10-20

    One of the puzzles associated with tidal disruption event candidates (TDEs) is that there is a dichotomy between the color temperatures of a few × 10{sup 4} K for TDEs discovered with optical and UV telescopes and the color temperatures of a few × 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6} K for TDEs discovered with X-ray satellites. Here, we propose that high-temperature TDEs are produced when the tidal debris of a disrupted star self-intersects relatively close to the supermassive black hole, in contrast to the more distant self-intersection that leads to lower color temperatures. In particular, we note from simple ballistic considerations that greater apsidal precession in an orbit is the key to closer self-intersection. Thus, larger values of β, the ratio of the tidal radius to the pericenter distance of the initial orbit, are more likely to lead to higher temperatures of more compact disks that are super-Eddington and geometrically and optically thick. For a given star and β, apsidal precession also increases for larger black hole masses, but larger black hole masses imply a lower temperature at the Eddington luminosity. Thus, the expected dependence of the temperature on the mass of the black hole is non-monotonic. We find that in order to produce a soft X-ray temperature TDE, a deep plunging stellar orbit with β > 3 is needed and a black hole mass of ≲5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} is favored. Although observations of TDEs are comparatively scarce and are likely dominated by selection effects, it is encouraging that both expectations are consistent with current data.

  11. Unsteady Aerodynamic Testing Using the Dynamic Plunge Pitch and Roll Model Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutze, Frederick H.; Fan, Yigang

    1999-01-01

    A final report on the DyPPiR tests that were run are presented. Essentially it consists of two parts, a description of the data reduction techniques and the results. The data reduction techniques include three methods that were considered: 1) signal processing of wind on - wind off data; 2) using wind on data in conjunction with accelerometer measurements; and 3) using a dynamic model of the sting to predict the sting oscillations and determining the aerodynamic inputs using an optimization process. After trying all three, we ended up using method 1, mainly because of its simplicity and our confidence in its accuracy. The results section consists of time history plots of the input variables (angle of attack, roll angle, and/or plunge position) and the corresponding time histories of the output variables, C(sub L), C(sub D), C(sub m), C(sub l), C(sub m), C(sub n). Also included are some phase plots of one or more of the output variable vs. an input variable. Typically of interest are pitch moment coefficient vs. angle of attack for an oscillatory motion where the hysteresis loops can be observed. These plots are useful to determine the "more interesting" cases. Samples of the data as it appears on the disk are presented at the end of the report. The last maneuver, a rolling pull up, is indicative of the unique capabilities of the DyPPiR, allowing combinations of motions to be exercised at the same time.

  12. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  13. Synthetic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milanovic, Ivana M.

    2003-01-01

    Current investigation of synthetic jets and synthetic jets in cross-flow examined the effects of orifice geometry and dimensions, momentum-flux ratio, cluster of orifices, pitch and yaw angles as well as streamwise development of the flow field. This comprehensive study provided much needed experimental information related to the various control strategies. The results of the current investigation on isolated and clustered synthetic jets with and without cross-flow will be further analyzed and documented in detail. Presentations at national conferences and publication of peer- reviewed journal articles are also expected. Projected publications will present both the mean and turbulent properties of the flow field, comparisons made with the data available in an open literature, as well as recommendations for the future work.

  14. Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning: Project Kaleidoscope-Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges Conference for Science Educators.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    College and university science educators from across Connecticut gathered at Yale's West Campus in April 2010 for a Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) program entitled "Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning." Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and co-sponsored by the Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges (CCIC) and Yale's McDougal Graduate Teaching Center, the event was the latest in a PKAL series of one-day conferences aimed at equipping science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) instructors with effective approaches to engaging students and training future scientists.

  15. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  16. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  17. A novel needleless liquid jet injection methodology for improving direct cardiac gene delivery: An optimization of parameters, AAV mediated therapy and investigation of host responses in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargnoli, Anthony Samuel

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with 22 million new patients diagnosed annually. Essentially, all present therapies have significant cost burden to the healthcare system, yet fail to increase survival rates. One key employed strategy is the genetic reprogramming of cells to increase contractility via gene therapy, which has advanced to Phase IIb Clinical Trials for advanced heart failure patients. It has been argued that the most significant barrier preventing FDA approval are resolving problems with safe, efficient myocardial delivery, whereby direct injection in the infarct and remote tissue areas is not clinically feasible. Here, we aim to: (1) Improve direct cardiac gene delivery through the development of a novel liquid jet device approach (2) Compare the new method against traditional IM injection with two different vector constructions and evaluate outcome (3) Evaluate the host response resulting from both modes of direct cardiac injection, then advance a drug/gene combination with controlled release nanoparticle formulations.

  18. Turbulent Jets?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilde, B. H.; Rosen, P. A.; Foster, J. M.; Perry, T. S.; Steinkamp, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Khokhlov, A. M.; Gittings, M. L.; Coker, R. F.; Keiter, P. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Drake, R. P.; Remington, B. A.; Bennett, G. R.; Sinars, D. B.; Campbell, R. B.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    2003-10-01

    Over the last few years we have fielded numerous supersonic jet experiments on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers and Sandia's pulsed-power Z-machine in a collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Atomic Weapons Establishment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. These experiments are being conducted to help validate our radiation-hydrodynamic codes, especially the newly developing ASC codes. One of the outstanding questions is whether these types of jets should turn turbulent given their high Reynolds number. Recently we have modified our experiments to have more Kelvin-Helmholtz shear, run much later in time and therefore have a better chance of going turbulent. In order to diagnose these large (several mm) jets at very late times ( 1000 ns) we are developing point-projection imaging on both the OMEGA laser, the Sandia Z-Machine, and ultimately at NIF. Since these jets have similar Euler numbers to jets theorized to be produced in supernovae explosions, we are also collaborating with the astrophysics community to help in the validation of their new codes. This poster will present a review of the laser and pulsed-power experiments and a comparison of the data to simulations by the codes from the various laboratories. We will show results of simulations wherein these jets turn highly 3-dimensional and show characteristics of turbulence. With the new data, we hope to be able to validate the sub-grid-scale turbulent mix models (e. g. BHR) that are being incorporated into our codes.*This work is performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Laboratory Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-36, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-ENG-48, the Laboratory for Laser Energetics under Contract No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, Sandia National Laboratories under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000, the Office of Naval Research, and the NASA Astrophysical Theory Grant.

  19. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    1986-01-01

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  20. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  1. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  2. Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2014-04-15

    The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

  3. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates.

  4. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates. PMID:27375826

  5. Jets, plumes and particle-laden jets in two-dimensional environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landel, J. R.; Caulfield, C. P.; Woods, A. W.

    2009-11-01

    Results on the experimental investigation of liquid jets and plumes in a quasi Hele- Shaw cell are presented. Few experimental studies have been conducted when jets are constrained in a narrow gap whose length is two orders of magnitude smaller than the length scales of the other two dimensions. In this configuration, the dynamics shown by the jets is very rich when parameters such as the initial flow-rate and the buoyancy are changed. Furthermore, different behaviors have been observed for the front of the jet and the flow in steady state. In particular, the models for the rise of the jet and the expansion must be slightly modified between the two cases. PIV techniques have been used to measure accurately the flow field of the jets and to allow accurate comparison with the theoretical models. Finally, the results of this investigation on jets and plumes serve as a basis for more complex experiments involving particle- laden jets. A better understanding of liquid jets with varying buoyancy proves to be useful to the study of this two-phase flow.

  6. Fluid Mechanics of Liquid-Liquid Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, John Reed

    The detailed hydrodynamics of selected liquid -liquid flow systems are investigated to provide a firm foundation for the rational design of separation processes. The implementation of this objective centers on the development of a robust code to simulate liquid-liquid flows. We have applied this code to the realistic simulation of aspects of the complex fluid mechanical behavior, and developed quantitative insight into the underlying processes involved. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) method is combined with the Continuous Surface Force (CSF) algorithm to provide a numerically stable code capable of solving high Reynolds numbers free surface flows. One of the developments during the testing was an efficient method for solving the Young-Laplace equation describing the shape of the meniscus in a vertical cylinder for a constrained liquid volume. The steady-state region near the nozzle for the laminar flow of a Newtonian liquid jet injected vertically into another immiscible Newtonian liquid is investigated for various Reynolds numbers by solving the axisymmetric transient equations of motion and continuity. The analysis takes into account pressure, viscous, inertial, gravitational, and surface tension forces, and comparison with previous experimental measurements shows good agreement. Comparisons of the present numerical method with the numerical results of previous boundary-layer methods help establish their range of validity. A new approximate equation for the shape of the interface of the steady jet, based on an overall momentum balance, is also developed. The full transient from liquid-liquid jet startup to breakup into drops is also simulated numerically. In comparison with experiment, the results of the present numerical method show a greater sensitivity of the jet length to the Reynolds number than the best predictions of previous linear stability analyses. The formation of drops is investigated at low to high Reynolds numbers before and after jet formation. The

  7. Jets and Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-03-01

    This Letter applies the concept of “jets,” as constructed from calorimeter cell four-vectors, to jets composed (primarily) of photons (or leptons). Thus jets become a superset of both traditional objects such as QCD jets, photons, and electrons, and more unconventional objects such as photon jets and electron jets, defined as collinear photons and electrons, respectively. Since standard objects such as single photons become a subset of jets in this approach, standard jet substructure techniques are incorporated into the photon finder toolbox. Using a (reasonably) realistic calorimeter model we demonstrate that, for a single photon identification efficiency of 80% or above, the use of jet substructure techniques reduces the number of QCD jets faking photons by factors of 2.5 to 4. Depending on the topology of the photon jets, the substructure variables reduce the number of photon jets faking single photons by factors of 10 to 103 at a single photon identification efficiency of 80%.

  8. Separation Of Liquid And Gas In Zero Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S.; Fraser, Wilson S.

    1991-01-01

    Pair of reports describe scheme for separating liquid from gas so liquid could be pumped. Designed to operate in absence of gravitation. Jet of liquid, gas, or liquid/gas mixture fed circumferentially into cylindrical tank filled with liquid/gas mixture. Jet starts liquid swirling. Swirling motion centrifugally separates liquid from gas. Liquid then pumped from tank at point approximately diametrically opposite point of injection of jet. Vortex phase separator replaces such devices as bladders and screens. Requires no components inside tank. Pumps for gas and liquid outside tank and easily accessible for maintenance and repairs.

  9. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) stimulation of jet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) excitation of liquid jets offers an alternative to piezoelectric excitation without the complex frequency response caused by piezoelectric and mechanical resonances. In an EHD exciter, an electrode near the nozzle applies an alternating Coulomb force to the jet surface, generating a disturbance which grows until a drop breaks off downstream. This interaction is modelled quite well by a linear, long wave model of the jet together with a cylindrical electric field. The breakup length, measured on a 33 micrometer jet, agrees quite well with that predicted by the theory, and increases with the square of the applied voltage, as expected. In addition, the frequency response is very smooth, with pronounced nulls occurring only at frequencies related to the time which the jet spends inside the exciter.

  10. Dielectrophoretic deflection of ink jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiarot, Paul R.; Jones, T. B.

    2009-12-01

    In continuous ink jet systems, streams of ~10 pL liquid droplets (diameter ~30 µm) are ejected from an orifice at rates of up to 350 000 per second with velocities in excess of 20 m s-1. Applications as diverse as printing, MEMS fabrication and microarraying benefit from this technology; however, reliable manipulation of the jet, including basic on/off control and steering of the liquid droplets, remains difficult to achieve. We report a novel scheme to manipulate the trajectories of droplets that rebound at shallow angles from a solid substrate using the dielectrophoretic force exerted by patterned electrodes. Varying the voltage applied to the electrodes provides precise control of the rebounding trajectories, mainly by shifting the location of the droplet impact. This technique can also be used to implement on/off control of the droplet stream. A simple dynamic model successfully predicts the modified trajectories of the droplets.

  11. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  12. Spray formation processes of impinging jet injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, W. E.; Ryan, H. M.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1993-11-01

    A study examining impinging liquid jets has been underway to determine physical mechanisms responsible for combustion instabilities in liquid bi-propellant rocket engines. Primary atomization has been identified as an important process. Measurements of atomization length, wave structure, and drop size and velocity distribution were made under various ambient conditions. Test parameters included geometric effects and flow effects. It was observed that pre-impingement jet conditions, specifically whether they were laminar or turbulent, had the major effect on primary atomization. Comparison of the measurements with results from a two dimensional linear aerodynamic stability model of a thinning, viscous sheet were made. Measured turbulent impinging jet characteristics were contrary to model predictions; the structure of waves generated near the point of jet impingement were dependent primarily on jet diameter and independent of jet velocity. It has been postulated that these impact waves are related to pressure and momentum fluctuations near the impingement region and control the eventual disintegration of the liquid sheet into ligaments. Examination of the temporal characteristics of primary atomization (ligament shedding frequency) strongly suggests that the periodic nature of primary atomization is a key process in combustion instability.

  13. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  14. AEA Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer. Innovative Technology Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    AEA's Fluidic Pulse Jet Mixer was developed to mix and maintain the suspension of solids and to blend process liquids. The mixer can be used to combine a tank's available supernate with the sludge into a slurry that is suitable for pumping. The system uses jet nozzles in the tank coupled to a charge vessel. Then, a jet pump creates a partial vacuum in the charge vessel allowing it to be filled with waste. Next, air pressure is applied to the charge vessel, forcing sludge back into the tank and mixing it with the liquid waste. When the liquid waste contains 10% solids, a batch is pumped out of the tank.

  15. Numerical and experimental study of rotating jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Seungwon; Che, Zhizhao; Kahouadji, Lyes; Matar, Omar; Chergui, Jalel; Juric, Damir

    2015-11-01

    Rotating jets are investigated through experimental measurements and numerical simulations. The experiments are performed on a rotating jet rig and the effects of a range of parameters controlling the liquid jet are investigated, e.g. jet flow rate, rotation speed, jet diameter, etc. Different regimes of the jet morphology are identified, and the dependence on several dimensionless numbers is studied, e.g. Reynolds number, Weber number, etc. The breakup process of droplets is visualized through high speed imaging. Full three-dimensional direct numerical simulations are performed using BLUE, a massively parallel two-phase flow code. The novel interface algorithms in BLUE track the gas-liquid interface through a wide dynamic range including ligament formation, break up and rupture. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  16. A new flow focusing technique to produce very thin jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acero, A. J.; Rebollo-Muñoz, N.; Montanero, J. M.; Gañán-Calvo, A. M.; Vega, E. J.

    2013-06-01

    A new technique is proposed in this paper to produce jets, droplets, and emulsions with sizes ranging from tens of microns down to the submicrometer scale. Liquid is injected at a constant flow rate through a hypodermic needle to form a film over the needle's outer surface. This film flows toward the needle tip until a liquid ligament is steadily ejected. Both the film motion and the liquid ejection are driven by the viscous and pressure forces exerted by a coflowing fluid stream. If this stream is a high-speed gas current, the outcome is a capillary jet which breaks up into droplets due to the Rayleigh instability. Micrometer emulsions are also produced by this instability mechanism when the injected liquid is focused by a viscous liquid stream. The minimum flow rates reached with the proposed technique are two orders of magnitude lower than those of the standard flow focusing configuration. This sharp reduction of the minimum flow rate allows one to form steady jets with radii down to the submicrometer scale. The stability of this new configuration is analyzed experimentally for both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid systems. In most of the cases, the loss of stability must be attributed to the liquid source because the critical Weber (capillary) number for the gas-liquid (liquid-liquid) case was significantly greater than the value corresponding to the convective/absolute instability transition in the jet.

  17. Characterization of an impinging jet into porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Alhani, Salwan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, characteristic behavior of a liquid jet into porous hydrophobic / hydrophilic particle media is investigated. In porous media, the capillary effect becomes significant, especially when the jet Reynolds Number is low. To analyze the cavity creation phenomena, the effect of jet's diameter, speed and acceleration as well as particles' size are carefully studied. Such knowledge of fluid behavior will provide guidance for medicine injection process. This work is supported by Caltech GALCIT STEM program.

  18. The Giant Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubert, T.; Chanrion, O.; Arnone, E.; Zanotti, F.; Cummer, S.; Li, J.; Füllekrug, M.; van der Velde, O.

    2012-04-01

    Thunderstorm clouds may discharge directly to the ionosphere in spectacular luminous jets - the longest electric discharges on our planet. The electric properties of jets, such as their polarity, conductivity, and currents, have been predicted by models, but are poorly characterized by measurements. Here we present an analysis of the first gigantic jet that with certainty has a positive polarity. The jet region in the mesosphere was illuminated by an unusual sprite discharge generated by a positive cloud-to-ground lightning flash shortly after the onset of the jet. The sprite appeared with elements in a ring at ~40 km distance around the jet, the elements pointing curving away from the jet. This suggests that the field close the jet partially cancels the field driving the sprite. From a simple model of the event we conclude that a substantial portion of the positive cloud potential must be carried to ~50 km altitude, which is also consistent with the observed channel expansion and the electromagnetic radiation associated with the jet. It is further shown that blue jets are likely to substantially modify the free electron content in the lower ionosphere because of increased electron attachment driven by the jet electric field. The model further makes clear the relationship between jets, gigantic jets, and sprites. This is the first time that sprites are used for sounding the properties of the mesosphere. The observations presented here will allow evaluation of theories for jet and gigantic jet generation and of their influence on the atmosphere-ionosphere system.

  19. Blowing a liquid curtain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhuissier, H.; Brunet, P.; Dorbolo, S.

    2015-11-01

    We study the response of a steady free-falling liquid curtain perturbed by focused air jets blowing perpendicularly against it. Asymmetric and symmetric perturbations are applied by using either a single pulsed jet or two identical steady jets facing each other. The response strongly depends on the curtain flow rate, and the location and strength of the perturbation. For pulsed asymmetric perturbations of increasing amplitude, sinuous wave, drop ejection, bubble ejection, and hole opening are successively observed. For steady symmetric perturbations, a steady hole forms downstream in the wake. For this latter case, we present a model for the curtain thickness and the location of the hole inthe wake which compares favorably to the experiments providing the perturbation is small enough (jet stagnation pressure smaller than curtain stagnation pressure) and the liquid viscosity is negligible.

  20. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    To investigate the possibility of active control of jet noise, knowledge of the noise generation mechanisms in natural jets is essential. Once these mechanisms are determined, active control can be used to manipulate the noise production processes. We investigated the evolution of the flow fields and the acoustic fields of rectangular and circular jets. A predominant flapping mode was found in the supersonic rectangular jets. We hope to increase the spreading of supersonic jets by active control of the flapping mode found in rectangular supersonic jets.

  1. Analysis of the aerodynamic interaction between two plunging plates in tandem at low Reynolds number for maximum propulsive efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Casanova, Joaquin; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2015-11-01

    The thrust generated by two heaving plates in tandem is analysed for two particular sets of configurations of interest in forward flight: a plunging leading plate with the trailing plate at rest, and the two plates heaving with the same frequency and amplitude, but varying the phase difference. The thrust efficiency of the leading plate is augmented in relation to a single plate heaving with the same frequency and amplitude in most cases. In the first configuration, we characterize the range of nondimensional heaving frequencies and amplitudes of the leading plate for which the stationary trailing plate contributes positively to the global thrust. The maximum global thrust efficiency, reached for an advance ratio slightly less than unity and a reduced frequency close to 5, is about the same as the maximum efficiency for an isolated plate. But for low frequencies the tandem configuration with the trailing plate at rest is more thrust efficient than the isolated plate. In the second configuration, we find that the maximum thrust efficiency is reached for a phase lag of 180o (counterstroking), particularly for an advance ratio unity and a reduced frequency 4.4, and it is practically the same as in the other configuration and that for a single plate. Supported by the Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad of Spain Grant no. DPI2013-40479-P.

  2. Correlations of whitecap coverage and gas transfer velocity with microwave brightness temperature for plunging and spilling breaking waves

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qin; Monahan, E.C.; Asher, W.E.

    1995-07-01

    Bubbles and bubble plumes generated by wind-induced breaking waves significantly enhance the gas exchange across the interface between the ocean and atmosphere under high-wind conditions. Whitcaps, or active spilling wave crests, are the sea-surface manifestation of the bubbles and bubble plumes in the subsurface mixed layer, and the fractional area of the sea surface covered by which has been proposed to correlate linearly with the air-sea gas transfer velocity. The presence of whitecaps substantially increases the microwave brightness temperature of the sea surface. It could be possible to estimate the whitecap coverage from the sea-surface microwave brightness temperature would also be very helpful in developing a remote-sensing model for predicting air-sea gas transfer velocities from microwave brightness temperatures. As a part of an air-water gas exchange experiment conducted in an outdoor surf pool, measurements were made that were designed to investigate the correlation between whitecap coverage and microwave brightness temperature. A mechanical wave maker was located at the deep end of the pool and the generated waves propagate and break towards the shallow end of the pool. Two wave patterns characteristic of plunging and spilling breaking waves at four wave heights from 0.3 m to 1.2 m were produced.

  3. Project HyBuJET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Tom; Collet, Bill; Igar, Karyn; Kendall, Dewayne; Miklosovic, Dave; Reuss, Robyn; Ringer, Mark; Scheidt, Tony

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual Hypersonic Business Jet (HyBuJet) was examined. The main areas of concentration include: aerodynamics, propulsion, stability and control, mission profile, and atmospheric heating. In order to optimize for cruise conditions, a waverider configuration was chosen for the high lift drag ratio and low wave drag. The leading edge and lower surface of a waverider was mapped out from a known flow field and optimized for cruising at Mach 6 and at high altitudes. The shockwave generated by a waverider remains attached along the entire leading edge, allowing for a larger compression along the lower surface. Three turbofan ramjets were chosen as the propulsion of the aircraft due to the combination of good subsonic performance along with high speed propulsive capabilities. A combination of liquid silicon convective cooling for the leading edges with a highly radiative outer skin material was chosen to reduce the atmospheric heating to acceptable level.

  4. Computations Of Breakup Of A Capillary Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Nagi N.; Lundgren, Thomas S.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes computations of breakup of round jet of liquid in gas or vacuum. Breakup occurs both spontaneously and when stimulated by vibrations giving rise to surface waves, some of which grow until drops pinch off. Study focusses on formation of satellite drops, taking advantage of advanced computers and computational methods to carry theoretical analysis beyond small-perturbation, linear regime.

  5. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  6. Control of jet noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  7. A determination of the external forces required to move the benchmark active controls testing model in pure plunge and pure pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dcruz, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    In view of the strong need for a well-documented set of experimental data which is suitable for the validation and/or calibration of modern Computational Fluid Dynamics codes, the Benchmark Models Program was initiated by the Structural Dynamics Division of the NASA Langley Research Center. One of the models in the program, the Benchmark Active Controls Testing Model, consists of a rigid wing of rectangular planform with a NACA 0012 profile and three control surfaces (a trailing-edge control surface, a lower-surface spoiler, and an upper-surface spoiler). The model is affixed to a flexible mount system which allows only plunging and/or pitching motion. An approximate analytical determination of the forces required to move this model, with its control surfaces fixed, in pure plunge and pure pitch at a number of test conditions is included. This provides a good indication of the type of actuator system required to generate the aerodynamic data resulting from pure plunging and pure pitching motion, in which much interest was expressed. The analysis makes use of previously obtained numerical results.

  8. Continuous-wave laser generated jets for needle free applications.

    PubMed

    Berrospe-Rodriguez, Carla; Visser, Claas Willem; Schlautmann, Stefan; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Fernandez Rivas, David

    2016-01-01

    We designed and built a microfluidic device for the generation of liquid jets produced by thermocavitation. A continuous wave (CW) laser was focused inside a micro-chamber filled with a light-absorbing solution to create a rapidly expanding vapor bubble. The chamber is connected to a micro-channel which focuses and ejects the liquid jet through the exit. The bubble growth and the jet velocity were measured as a function of the devices geometry (channel diameter D and chamber width A). The fastest jets were those for relatively large chamber size with respect to the channel diameter. Elongated and focused jets up to 29 m/s for a channel diameter of [Formula: see text] and chamber size of [Formula: see text] were obtained. The proposed CW laser-based device is potentially a compact option for a practical and commercially feasible needle-free injector.

  9. Continuous-wave laser generated jets for needle free applications.

    PubMed

    Berrospe-Rodriguez, Carla; Visser, Claas Willem; Schlautmann, Stefan; Ramos-Garcia, Ruben; Fernandez Rivas, David

    2016-01-01

    We designed and built a microfluidic device for the generation of liquid jets produced by thermocavitation. A continuous wave (CW) laser was focused inside a micro-chamber filled with a light-absorbing solution to create a rapidly expanding vapor bubble. The chamber is connected to a micro-channel which focuses and ejects the liquid jet through the exit. The bubble growth and the jet velocity were measured as a function of the devices geometry (channel diameter D and chamber width A). The fastest jets were those for relatively large chamber size with respect to the channel diameter. Elongated and focused jets up to 29 m/s for a channel diameter of [Formula: see text] and chamber size of [Formula: see text] were obtained. The proposed CW laser-based device is potentially a compact option for a practical and commercially feasible needle-free injector. PMID:26858816

  10. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment.

  11. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment. PMID:15093276

  12. Theoretical prediction of the effect of heat transfer parameters on cooling rates of liquid-filled plastic straws used for cryopreservation of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sansinen, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Baez, R; Chirife, J

    2010-01-01

    Heat transfer plays a key role in cryopreservation of liquid semen in plastic straws. The effect of several parameters on the cooling rate of a liquid-filled polypropylene straw when plunged into liquid nitrogen was investigated using a theoretical model. The geometry of the straw containing the liquid was assimilated as two concentric finite cylinders of different materials: the fluid and the straw; the unsteady-state heat conduction equation for concentric cylinders was numerically solved. Parameters studied include external (convection) heat transfer coefficient (h), the thermal properties of straw manufacturing material and wall thickness. It was concluded that the single most important parameter affecting the cooling rate of a liquid column contained in a straw is the external heat transfer coefficient in LN2. Consequently, in order to attain maximum cooling rates, conditions have to be designed to obtain the highest possible heat transfer coefficient when the plastic straw is plunged in liquid nitrogen.

  13. Experimental investigation of a confined developing axisymmetric wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew; Vlachos, Pavlos; Garimella, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    The present work reports an experimental study of an axisymmetric, confined wall jet using planar particle image velocimetry (PIV) and the dielectric liquid HFE-7100. The wall jet is formed downstream from a confined and submerged impinging round jet, 3.75 mm in diameter. Both the developing region and self-similar region of the wall jet are investigated. The experiments are conducted for Reynolds numbers (Re = Ud/ υ) ranging from 1500 to 38000 and at a nozzle-to-plate spacing of four jet diameters. Image-preprocessing techniques are used to eliminate background noise and an ensemble correlation scheme is applied to improve the resolution of the measurement of the mean velocity field near the wall. A maximum measurement resolution of 36 μm is achieved. Profiles of the mean velocity, turbulent intensities, decay rate, spread rate and wall shear stress are used to characterize the influence of confinement on the wall jet development and inner layer scaling.

  14. Zero gravity liquid mixer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booth, F. W.; Bruce, R. A. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus for mixing liquids under conditions of zero gravity is disclosed. The apparatus is comprised of a closed reservoir for the liquids, with a means for maintaining a positive pressure on the liquids in the reservoir. A valved liquid supply line is connected to the reservoir for supplying the reservoir with the liquids to be mixed in the reservoir. The portion of the reservoir containing the liquids to be mixed is in communication with a pump which alternately causes a portion of the liquids to flow out of the pump and into the reservoir to mix the liquids. The fluids in the reservoir are in communication through a conduit with the pump which alternately causes a portion of the fluids to flow out of the pump and into the sphere. The conduit connecting the pump and sphere may contain a nozzle or other jet-forming structure such as a venturi for further mixing the fluids.

  15. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of fluid-structure interactions in plunging hydrofoils and gravity-driven falling plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun

    Two typical unsteady fluid-structure interaction problems have been investigated in the present study. One of them was about actively plunged flexible hydrofoil; the other was about gravity-driven falling plates in water. Real-time velocity field and dynamic response on the moving objects were measured to study these unsteady and highly nonlinear problems. For a long time, scientists have believed that bird and insect flight benefits greatly from the flexibility and morphing facility of their wings via flapping motion. A significant advantage flexible wing models have over quasi-steady rigid wing models is a much higher lift generation capability. Both experimental and computational studies have shown that the leading and trailing edge vortexes (LEV and TEV) play a major role in the efficient generation of such unconventionally high lift force. In this study, two NACA0012 miniature hydrofoils, one flexible and the other rigid, were actively plunged at various frequencies in a viscous glycerol-water solution to study the influence of flexibility. Two-dimensional, phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the temporal and spacial development of LEVs and TEVs. Simultaneous measurements of lift and thrust forces were recorded to reveal the relationship between hydrodynamic force and the evolution of the surrounding flow field. Results from the flexible hydrofoil were compared to those from the rigid one in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of flexibility. The second problem focused on fluid-structure interaction of gravity driven falling plates. Falling leaves and paper cards in air has drawn plenty of research interest in the past decades to investigate the interaction between the fluid flow and the falling object. In this research, time-resolved PIV were employed to experimentally visualize the flow field evolution around the gravity-driven falling plates. The plates were made of different materials with

  17. Jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2006-08-01

    Recent jet results in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV from the CDF experiment at the Tevatron are presented. The jet inclusive cross section is compared to next-to-leading order QCD prediction in different rapidity regions. The b-jet inclusive cross section is measured exploiting the long lifetime and large mass of B-hadrons. Jet shapes, W+jets and W/Z+photon cross sections are also measured and compared to expectations from QCD production.

  18. Protostellar Jets: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitorino, B. F.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.; Opher, R.

    1998-11-01

    Numerical simulations of astrophysical jets have been made in order to study their collimation and internal structure. Recently Ouyed & Pudritz (1997) did numerical simulations of axi-simetric magnetocentrifugal jets from a keplerian acretion disk employing the eulerian finite difference code Zeus-2D. During their simulation, it was raised a steady state jet confirming a lot of results of the MHD winds steady state theory. Following this scenario we did tridimensional numerial simulations of this model allowing the jet, after a perturbation, evolve into a not steady state producing the helical features observed in some protostellar jets.

  19. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Howard A.

    2006-04-25

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  20. The effect of confinement on the development of an axisymmetric wall-jet in confined jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2015-11-01

    An experimental study of a confined developing axisymmetric wall-jet is reported. The wall-jet is formed downstream of a circular, confined, impinging jet of water. Stereo particle image velocimetry (SPIV) experiments are conducted at three different nozzle-to-plate spacings (2, 4 and 8 jet diameters) and across Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 9000. Special attention is paid to the development of the wall-jet. The growth rate of the boundary layer thickness, decay rate of the local maximum velocity, and velocity profile scaling for both the inner- and outer-layer are investigated. Measurements are obtained with a maximum spatial resolution of 25 μm and a temporal resolution of 750 Hz. Both ensemble-averaged and instantaneous time-resolved three-component, two-dimensional (3C-2D) flow fields are obtained and analyzed. The upper confinement plate is found to limit the supply of ambient liquid for both the impinging-jet and wall-jet entrainment, and thus significantly influences the wall-jet development; the growth and decay rate of the wall-jet are shown to be greatest at the smallest confinement height. The influence of these confining effects on recirculation patterns and coherent-structure evolution is also reported. These flow field measurements and analyses will serve to inform a variety of practical applications that use impinging jets.

  1. Vietnam plunges ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1995-07-01

    Vietnam is moving fast. Facing the need to double its installed power generation capacity by the year 2000, Vietnam is pursuing a range of development alternatives to add an estimated 3,000 MW of new power plants. As part of the country`s progress toward a market economy, Vietnam has relaxed its rules regarding investment in power plants. The country enacted a new electricity law early in 1995, paving the way for private participation in the power sector.

  2. [Plunging and mediastinal goiters].

    PubMed

    Barrault, S; Gandon, J; Le Guillou, C

    1986-01-01

    Of 185 cases of substernal goitre operated upon between 1976 and 1985, four were patients with autonomous mediastinal goitre. Diagnosis was established from results of clinical examination, a scan of mediastinum and radiologie imaging with a cervical and mediastinal CT scan as the investigation of choice. Treatment is exclusively surgical because of the risk of mediastinal compression. Most cases in this series were operated upon through a purely cervical approach, but 22 patients required partial upper sternotomy combined with cervicotomy, this minimal approach route allowing very good exposure of upper mediastinum.

  3. Drowning: another plunge.

    PubMed

    Putman, C E; Tummillo, A M; Myerson, D A; Myerson, P J

    1975-11-01

    Hypoxia, pulmonary edema, acidosis, and aspiration compose the syndrome of near drowning. A review of 20 cases of near drowning indicated that the initial chest roentgenogram bears little weight in assessing the present or future clinical status. In some cases a 24 to 48 hour delay occurred before roentgenographic evidence for pulmonary edema was noted. The composition of fluid aspirated does not affect the outcome. The results of this report suggest that patients with a history of near drowning should be followed closely for at least 48 hours despite an initial normal chest roentgenogram.

  4. Taking the Plunge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatch, Stanley

    1987-01-01

    Describes why lake hikes practiced at Girl Scout Camp Bonnie Brae (Massachusetts) are an ideal camp activity to teach aquatic ecology and engage the senses. Discusses program benefits: camper/counselor interaction, personal and group challenge, and conflict resolution. (NEC)

  5. The Middle School Plunge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Martin; Schwerdt, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Policymakers nationwide continue to wrestle with a basic question: At what grade level should students move to a new school? In the most common grade configuration in American school districts, public school students make two school transitions, entering a middle school in grade 6 or 7 and a high school in grade 9. This pattern reflects the…

  6. On jet substructure methods for signal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Mrinal; Powling, Alexander; Siodmok, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    We carry out simple analytical calculations and Monte Carlo studies to better understand the impact of QCD radiation on some well-known jet substructure methods for jets arising from the decay of boosted Higgs bosons. Understanding differences between taggers for these signal jets assumes particular significance in situations where they perform similarly on QCD background jets. As an explicit example of this we compare the Y-splitter method to the more recently proposed Y-pruning technique. We demonstrate how the insight we gain can be used to significantly improve the performance of Y-splitter by combining it with trimming and show that this combination outperforms the other taggers studied here, at high p T . We also make analytical estimates for optimal parameter values, for a range of methods and compare to results from Monte Carlo studies.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of cavitating nozzle and jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örley, F.; Trummler, T.; Hickel, S.; Mihatsch, M. S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    We present implicit large-eddy simulations (LES) to study the primary breakup of cavitating liquid jets. The considered configuration, which consists of a rectangular nozzle geometry, adopts the setup of a reference experiment for validation. The setup is a generic reproduction of a scaled-up automotive fuel injector. Modelling of all components (i.e. gas, liquid, and vapor) is based on a barotropic two-fluid two-phase model and employs a homogenous mixture approach. The cavitating liquid model assumes thermodynamic- equilibrium. Compressibility of all phases is considered in order to capture pressure wave dynamics of collapse events. Since development of cavitation significantly affects jet break-up characteristics, we study three different operating points. We identify three main mechanisms which induce primary jet break-up: amplification of turbulent fluctuations, gas entrainment, and collapse events near the liquid-gas interface.

  8. Jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an arterial heat pipe with a capillary driven jet pump. The jet pump generates a suction which pumps vapor and noncondensible gas from the artery. The suction also forces liquid into the artery and maintains it in a primed condition. A theoretical model was developed which predicts the existence of two stable ranges. Up to a certain tilt the artery will prime by itself once a heat load is applied to the heat pipe. At higher tilts, the jet pump can maintain the artery in a primed condition but self-priming is not possible. A prototype heat pipe was tested which self-primed up to a tilt of 1.9 cm, with a heat load of 500 watts. The heat pipe continued to prime reliably when operated as a VCHP, i.e., after a large amount of noncondensible gas was introduced.

  9. Instability of Rotating Vertical Viscous Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribe, Neil; Badr, Sarah; Morris, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    We have studied experimentally and theoretically the instability of a jet of viscous fluid (corn syrup) ejected downward from a nozzle that rotates about a vertical axis with an angular velocity Ω. For small values of Ω, the jet behaves in a way similar to that of normal (Ω = 0) liquid rope coiling. Above a critical value of Ω, however, a bifurcation occurs to a whirling spiral state in which the jet is strongly deflected from the vertical almost immediately after its exit from the nozzle. Experiments conducted for Ω increasing and decreasing show that the transition between the undeflected and spiral states is hysteretic. We will report results of a linear stability analysis of the undeflected state as a function of the dimensionless parameters that characterize the system, and will compare the results with our experimental measurements.

  10. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  11. Hotspots, Jets and Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    I discuss the nature of `hotspots' and `jet knots' in the kpc-scale structures of powerful radio galaxies and their relationship to jet-environment interactions. I describe evidence for interaction between the jets of FRI sources and their local environments, and discuss its relationship to particle acceleration, but the main focus of the paper is the hotspots of FRIIs and on new observational evidence on the nature of the particle acceleration associated with them.

  12. Separation of gas from liquid in a two-phase flow system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, L. G.; Elliott, D. G.

    1973-01-01

    Separation system causes jets which leave two-phase nozzles to impinge on each other, so that liquid from jets tends to coalesce in center of combined jet streams while gas phase is forced to outer periphery. Thus, because liquid coalescence is achieved without resort to separation with solid surfaces, cycle efficiency is improved.

  13. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Jet-mixing of initially stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stuart; Markides, Christos; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    Low pipeline velocities in the oil-and-gas industry generally lead to liquid-liquid flows stratifying due to density differences. Pipeline stratified flows inherently have no single point for sub-sampling and phase slip leads to in situ phase fractions differing from input volume fractions. Establishing representative or average properties and phase fractions is therefore difficult for industry. This leads to sampling errors through measurement uncertainty. In-line mixing overcomes liquid-liquid stratification, establishing a liquid-liquid dispersion that minimises slip between phases. Here, we use jets-in-crossflow (JICF) as a means of mixing. We present results of CFD simulations using the volume-of- fluid method that demonstrate the breakup of stratification as a result of the application of JICF. A number of simple jet configurations are described, and their effectiveness in generating dispersions is compared. We also present preliminary experimental results based on the use of a matched-refractive-index method, laser-induced fluorescence, particle-tracking- and particle-image-velocimetry. Funding from Cameron for Ph.D. studentship (SW) gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Mathematical modeling of a gas jet impinging on a two phase bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delgado-Álvárez, J.; Ramírez-Argáez, Marco A.; González-Rivera, C.

    2012-09-01

    In this work a three phase 3D mathematical model was developed using the Volume Of Fluid (VOF) algorithm, which is able to accurately describe the cavity geometry and size as well as the liquid flow patterns created when a gas jet impinges on a two phase liquid free surface. These phenomena are commonly found in steelmaking operations such as in the Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) and the Basic Oxygen Furnace (BOF) where oxygen jets impinge on a steel bath and they control heat, momentum and mass transfer. The cavity formed in the liquids by the impinging jet depends on a force balance at the free surface where the inertial force of the jet governs these phenomena. The inertial force of the jet and its angle play important roles, being the lowest angle the best choice to shear the bath and promote stronger circulation and better mixing in the liquids.

  16. Refrigerated hydrogen gas jet for the Fermilab antiproton accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.H.; Kendziora, C.L.; Marinelli, M.

    1995-07-01

    A hydrogen gas jet has been built for use at Fermilab for the study of charmonium spectroscopy in proton-antiproton annihilations. The hydrogen gas jet is part of an upgrade to a previous experiment which ran in the Fermilab 1990-1991 fixed target program utilizing a jet cooled to 80 K with liquid nitrogen. The jet delivers a defined stream of hydrogen gas which travels through a series of vacuum chambers and then intersects the circulating antiproton beam. The goal of the upgrade is to provide a hydrogen gas stream at least twice as dense as used for the earlier experiment to increase the interaction rate and allow an improved study of rare processes. This is achieved by cooling the stream to below 30 K using a Gifford-McMahon refrigerator. The jet apparatus is designed to allow motion in the plane perpendicular to the gas stream as well as angular positioning at the jet nozzle to provide a means of optimizing the interaction rate. Two skimmers located in the vacuum chambers are used to define the gas stream dimensions. The jet target vacuum chambers require constant pumping with turbomolecular pumps. The vacuum space around the jet is designed to have a large system pumping speed so that the chamber pressure can be maintained below an absolute pressure of 1 Pa. The jet will operate in the next fixed target run at Fermilab. Details of the design and test results are discussed.

  17. Conversion of waste cooking oil to jet biofuel with nickel-based mesoporous zeolite Y catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Cheng, Jun; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    Three types of zeolites (Meso-Y, SAPO-34, and HY) loaded with nickel were used to convert waste cooking oil to jet biofuel. Mesoporous zeolite Y exhibited a high jet range alkane selectivity of 53% and a proper jet range aromatic hydrocarbon selectivity of 13.4% in liquid fuel products. Reaction temperature was optimized to produce quality jet biofuel. Zeolite Meso-Y exhibited a high jet range alkane yield of 40.5% and a low jet range aromatic hydrocarbon yield of 11.3% from waste cooking oil at 400°C. The reaction pathway for converting waste cooking oil to jet biofuel was proposed. Experimental results showed that waste cooking oil mainly deoxygenated to heptadecane (C17H36) and pentadecane (C15H30) through the decarbonylation pathway for the first 3h. Long chain alkanes cracked into jet range alkanes (C8-C16). Cycloalkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons were produced through cyclization and dehydrogenation pathways.

  18. Computer modeling of jet mixing in INEL waste tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, P.A.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the feasibility of using submerged jet mixing pumps to mobilize and suspend settled sludge materials in INEL High Level Radioactive Waste Tanks. Scenarios include removing the heel (a shallow liquid and sludge layer remaining after tank emptying processes) and mobilizing and suspending solids in full or partially full tanks. The approach used was to (1) briefly review jet mixing theory, (2) review erosion literature in order to identify and estimate important sludge characterization parameters (3) perform computer modeling of submerged liquid mixing jets in INEL tank geometries, (4) develop analytical models from which pump operating conditions and mixing times can be estimated, and (5) analyze model results to determine overall feasibility of using jet mixing pumps and make design recommendations.

  19. Capillary instability of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Anuj

    This thesis studies the capillary instability of a compound jet. A compound jet comprises an inner core of a primary fluid surrounded by an annulus of an immiscible secondary fluid. The compound jet is unstable due to capillarity. A compound jet finds applications in a variety of fields, such as, ink jet printing, particle sorting, extrusion, molding, particle production etc. In some of these applications such as molding, the disturbances that could cause the jet breakup start as periodic spatial disturbances of Fourier wave number k and grow in time. This is the temporal instability. In some other applications, such as, ink-jet printing, the disturbances initiate at the edge of the nozzle from which the jet issues out. These disturbances grow in space. This is the spatial instability. At small velocities, even if the initial disturbances are periodic in time, they grow exponentially in time. This is the absolute instability. We perform the temporal, spatial and the absolute stability analysis of an inviscid compound jet in a unified framework using the theory of transforms. Further, we solve the temporal instability problem for a viscous jet to understand the effect of viscosity on breakup dynamics. In the temporal analysis, we show that each interface of the compound jet contributes one mode to the instability. The modes contributed by the inner and outer interfaces grow for waves longer than the inner and the outer circumference of the undisturbed jet, respectively. The inner interface mode has a higher growth rate and hence dominates the breakup. The two interfaces grow exactly in phase in this mode and hence it is refereed to as the stretching mode. The other mode is the squeezing mode because the two interfaces grow exactly out of phase. The same two modes are also present in the spatial analysis. At high Weber numbers the predictions of the spatial theory reduce to those of the temporal theory because the waves simply convect with the jet velocity and there

  20. Biphasic nanoparticles made by electrified jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahann, Joerg

    2005-03-01

    Nano-colloids have recently attracted intense attention due to unique properties that are distinctly different from bulk solid-state materials; including unique magnetic, electronic, optical, chemical, and biological characteristics. The vision that these nano-objects could essentially act as functional components in novel device generations, which ``magically'' assemble following a master blueprint void any human manipulation, has resulted in a new ``gold rush'' in materials science. These concepts have results in the synthesis of a multitude of nano-objects, such as nano-wires, nano-rods, nano-disks, or nano-prisms.^ Recently, nano-particles with anisotropic materials distributions (biphasic nano-particles) moved in the focus of research. Our approach differs fundamentally from the above-mentioned methods in that it takes advantage of electrified polymer jets to create anisotropic materials distributions in nano-objects. jetting is a process to generate liquid jets by use of electrostatic forces. It is well-known that high electrical potentials (typically several thousand volts) applied between the jetting liquids that are fed through a capillary and a collecting substrate will induce jetting of a charged liquid. The differences in the final morphologies from similar processes are mainly determined by the properties of the jetting liquids and the process parameters. transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate the applicability of the process to control size, shape, and materials distribution at the nanoscale. The resulting anisotropic nanoparticles may have potential applications for targeted drug delivery or as electro-rehological fluids. a) F. M. Van der Kooij, K. Kassapidou and H. N. W. Lekkerkerker, Liquid crystal phase transitions in suspensions of polydisperse plate-like particles, Nature 406, 868 (2000); b) C. A. Mirkin, R. L. Letsinger, R. C. Mucic and J. J. Storhoff, A DNA

  1. Global stability of gravitationally stretched capillary jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Rubio, Mariano; Sevilla, Alejandro; Gordillo, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the global linear stability of capillary jets stretched by gravity both experimentally and theoretically, extending the work by Sauter & Buggisch (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 533, 2005, pp. 237-257). Our results reveal the essential stabilizing role played by the axial curvature of the jet, the latter effect being especially relevant for injectors with a large diameter. The theoretical description, based on the one-dimensional mass and momentum equations retaining the exact expression for the interfacial curvature, accurately predicts the onset of jet self-excited oscillations experimentally observed for wide ranges of liquid viscosity and injector diameter. The marginal self-sustained oscillations observed in the experiments are shown to correspond to the excitation of the leading global mode of the jet. The model developed in the present work shows better agreement with the experimental jetting-dripping transition events than those available in the literature, thus allowing us to conclude that, surprisingly, the size of the steady threads produced at a given distance from the exit can be reduced by increasing the nozzle diameter. The proposed formulation allows to describe the inviscid limit, and experiments are being performed to study this distinguished case. Supported by Spanish MINECO under projects DPI 2011-28356-C03-01 and DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  2. Tritium retention in jet cryopanel samples

    SciTech Connect

    Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M. ); Mayaux, C.; Obert, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The possibility that tritium might exchange with water trapped in aluminum anodize cryopanels in JET prompted a test program at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly, TSTA, Los Alamos, New Mexico. JET furnished two test pieces of cryopanel which were exposed to tritium at approximately liquid nitrogen temperature and 25 torr pressure for nearly two weeks. One specimen was removed and the retained tritium was measured. The second specimen was subjected to several increasing temperature vacuum bakeouts and the effectiveness of the bakeouts were inferred from the pressure history of the chamber. When the retained tritium in the second specimen was measured it was found that nearly 95% of the tritium, as measured in the first specimen, had been removed during the vacuum bakeouts. If the tritium retained in the cryopanel without bakeout were scaled to JET conditions according to a linear pressure time relationship, the tritium expected to become trapped in the JET cryopanels would be approximately 0.6 gram. Testing is currently underway at TSTA which will determine the tritium retention to be expected under more realistic JET operating conditions and which will assess the effectiveness of various bake or purge schemes in removing the trapped tritium. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  4. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  5. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  6. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  7. Interaction between jets during laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Patrascioiu, A.; Florian, C.; Fernández-Pradas, J. M.; Morenza, J. L.; Serra, P.; Hennig, G.; Delaporte, P.

    2014-07-07

    Simultaneous two-beam laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) was carried out for various inter-beam separations, analyzing both the resulting printing outcomes and the corresponding liquid transfer dynamics. In a first experiment, droplets of an aqueous solution were printed onto a substrate at different inter-beam distances, which proved that a significant departure from the single-beam LIFT dynamics takes places at specific separations. In the second experiment, time-resolved imaging analysis revealed the existence of significant jet-jet interactions at those separations; such interactions proceed through a dynamics that results in remarkable jet deflection for which a possible onset mechanism is proposed.

  8. Dynamics of bouncing-versus-merging response in jet collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Minglei; Saha, Abhishek; Zhu, D. L.; Sun, Chao; Law, Chung K.

    2015-08-01

    A new regime of oblique jet collision, characterized by low impact inertia and jet merging through bridge formation, is observed and thereby completes the entire suite of possible jet collision outcomes of (soft) merging, bouncing, and (hard) merging with increasing inertia. These distinct regimes, together with the observed dependence of the collision outcome on the impact angle and liquid properties, are characterized through scaling analysis by considering the competing effects of impact inertia, surface tension, and viscous thinning of the interfacial air gap leading to merging.

  9. Break-up and atomization of a round water jet by a high-speed annular air jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasheras, J. C.; Villermaux, E.; Hopfinger, E. J.

    1998-02-01

    The near- and far-field break-up and atomization of a water jet by a high-speed annular air jet are examined by means of high-speed flow visualizations and phase Doppler particle sizing techniques. Visualization of the jet's near field and measurements of the frequencies associated with the gas liquid interfacial instabilities are used to study the underlying physical mechanisms involved in the primary break-up of the water jet. This process is shown to consist of the stripping of water sheets, or ligaments, which subsequently break into smaller lumps or drops. An entrainment model of the near-field stripping of the liquid is proposed, and shown to describe the measured liquid shedding frequencies. This simplified model explains qualitatively the dependence of the shedding frequency on the air/water momentum ratio in both initially laminar and turbulent water jets. The role of the secondary liquid break-up in the far-field atomization of the water jet is also investigated, and an attempt is made to apply the classical concepts of local isotropy to explain qualitatively the measurement of the far-field droplet size distribution and its dependence on the water to air mass and momentum ratios. Models accounting for the effect of the local turbulent dissipation rate in the gas on both the break-up and coalescence of the droplets are developed and compared with the measurements of the variation of the droplet size along the jet's centreline. The total flux of kinetic energy supplied by the gas per unit total mass of the spray jet was found to be the primary parameter determining the secondary break-up and coalescence of the droplets in the far field.

  10. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  11. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  12. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  13. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  14. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  15. AngioJet thrombectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael S; Singh, Varinder; Wilentz, James R; Makkar, Raj R

    2004-10-01

    The AngioJet rheolytic thrombectomy system is designed to remove thrombus with the Venturi-Bernoulli effect, with multiple high-velocity, high-pressure saline jets which are introduced through orifices in the distal tip of the catheter to create a localized low-pressure zone, resulting in a vacuum effect with the entrainment and dissociation of bulky thrombus. Rheolytic thrombectomy with the AngioJet catheter can reduce the thrombus burden in the setting of AMI and degenerated SVGs. The long-term follow-up appears to be favorable in patients treated with rheolytic thrombectomy in the setting of acute myocardial infarction over conventional primary angioplasty. PMID:15505358

  16. Angular Scaling In Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

  17. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit. PMID:23005852

  18. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit.

  19. Laser-induced micro-jetting from armored droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marston, J. O.; Thoroddsen, S. T.

    2015-07-01

    We present findings from an experimental study of laser-induced cavitation within a liquid drop coated with a granular material, commonly referred to as "armored droplets" or "liquid marbles." The cavitation event follows the formation of plasma after a nanosecond laser pulse. Using ultra-high-speed imaging up to 320,610 fps, we investigate the extremely rapid dynamics following the cavitation, which manifests itself in the form of a plethora of micro-jets emanating simultaneously from the spaces between particles on the surface of the drop. These fine jets break up into droplets with a relatively narrow diameter range, on the order of 10 μm.

  20. Counterflowing Jet Subsystem Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca; Daso, Endwell; Pritchett, Victor; Wang, Ten-See

    2010-01-01

    A counterflowing jet design (a spacecraft and trans-atmospheric subsystem) employs centrally located, supersonic cold gas jets on the face of the vehicle, ejecting into the oncoming free stream. Depending on the supersonic free-stream conditions and the ejected mass flow rate of the counterflowing jets, the bow shock of the vehicle is moved upstream, further away from the vehicle. This results in an increasing shock standoff distance of the bow shock with a progressively weaker shock. At a critical jet mass flow rate, the bow shock becomes so weak that it is transformed into a series of compression waves spread out in a much wider region, thus significantly modifying the flow that wets the outer surfaces, with an attendant reduction in wave and skin friction drag and aerothermal loads.

  1. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  2. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  3. Experimental Study on Thermal Interaction of Ethanol Jets in High Temperature Fluorinert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sa, Rongyuan; Takahashi, Minoru

    As a fundamental study for the direct contact heat exchange which was employed for in-vessel heat exchange in the Pb-Bi-cooled direct contact boiling water small fast reactor (PBWFR) and for the steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) accident in lead alloy-cooled fast reactor (LFR), ethanol jet was injected into high temperature fluorinert (FC-3283) as a simulation experiment in order to investigate the jet boiling phenomena just after volatile water contacting with the high temperature continuous lead alloy liquid. Two series of tests (no-boiling and boiling) were initiated to evaluate the ethanol vapor volume which generated around the ethanol jet. From synchronized temperature measurement around ethanol jet, the overview of the boiling behavior showed that jet boiling occurred at bottom part of jet first and developed to the upper part within very narrow area around jet.

  4. The Jets of Enceladus: Locations, Correlations with Thermal Hot Spots, and Jet Particle Vertical Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Dinino, D.; Helfenstein, P.; Roatsch, T.; Mitchell, C. J.; Ewald, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    order 30 m/s or less, much less than either the escape speed or the thermal speed for a temperature of 273 K. From the collimation of the vapor in the jets, the Cassini UVIS team infers vertical velocities of 1000 m/s or more [Hansen et al. (2008) Nature 456, 477-479]. Schmidt et al. [(2008) Nature 451, 685-688] account for the slow particle speeds by invoking collisions with the walls of the vent. Ingersoll and Pankine [(2010) Icarus 206, 594-607] invoke short distances during which the gas velocity is high; the particles don’t have time reach escape speed. The third possibility is that the particles are so large that the gas cannot accelerate them to escape speed. This possibility is testable with Cassini ISS high-resolution images, which span phase angles up to 176 degrees and wavelengths from UV to near-IR. Our ultimate goal is to test models of how the jets form. The particles form either by condensing directly from vapor, by spallation from the icy walls of the vent, or by freezing of liquid water droplets. Images collected by Cassini thus far will help us choose among the possibilities.

  5. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  6. Calibrated single-plunge bipolar electrode array for mapping myocardial vector fields in three dimensions during high-voltage transthoracic defibrillation.

    PubMed

    Deale, O C; Ng, K T; Kim-Van Housen, E J; Lerman, B B

    2001-08-01

    Mapping of the myocardial scalar electric potential during defibrillation is normally performed with unipolar electrodes connected to voltage dividers and a global potential reference. Unfortunately, vector potential gradients that are calculated from these data tend to exhibit a high sensitivity to measurement errors. This paper presents a calibrated single-plunge bipolar electrode array (EA) that avoids the error sensitivity of unipolar electrodes. The EA is triaxial, uses a local potential reference, and simultaneously measures all three components of the myocardial electric field vector. An electrode spacing of approximately 500 microm allows the EA to be direct-coupled to high-input-impedance, isolated, differential amplifiers and eliminates the need for voltage dividers. Calibration is performed with an electrolytic tank in which an accurately measured, uniform electric field is produced. For each EA, unique calibration matrices are determined which transform potential difference readings from the EA to orthogonal components of the electric field vector. Elements of the matrices are evaluated by least squares multiple regression analysis of data recorded during rotation of the electric field. The design of the electrolytic tank and electrode holder allows the electric field vector to be rotated globally with respect to the electrode axes. The calibration technique corrects for both field perturbation by the plunge electrode body and deviations from orthogonality of the electrode axes. A unique feature of this technique is that it eliminates the need for mechanical measurement of the electrode spacing. During calibration, only angular settings and voltages are recorded. For this study, ten EAs were calibrated and their root-mean-square (rms) errors evaluated. The mean of the vector magnitude rms errors over the set of ten EAs was 0.40% and the standard deviation 0.07%. Calibrated EAs were also tested for multisite mapping in four dogs during high

  7. Cryo-electron tomography of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections to analyze the recently described bacterial cytoplasmic structure, the Stack.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Lidia; Martínez, Gema; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercadé, Elena

    2015-03-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections (CETOVIS) were used to revise and expand the structural knowledge of the "Stack", a recently described cytoplasmic structure in the Antarctic bacterium Pseudomonas deceptionensis M1(T). The advantages of both techniques can be complementarily combined to obtain more reliable insights into cells and their components with three-dimensional imaging at different resolutions. Cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM) and CET of frozen-hydrated P. deceptionensis M1(T) cells confirmed that Stacks are found at different locations within the cell cytoplasm, in variable number, separately or grouped together, very close to the plasma membrane (PM) and oriented at different angles (from 35° to 90°) to the PM, thus establishing that they were not artifacts of the previous sample preparation methods. CET of plunge-frozen whole bacteria and vitreous sections verified that each Stack consisted of a pile of oval disc-like subunits, each disc being surrounded by a lipid bilayer membrane and separated from each other by a constant distance with a mean value of 5.2±1.3nm. FM4-64 staining and confocal microscopy corroborated the lipid nature of the membrane of the Stacked discs. Stacks did not appear to be invaginations of the PM because no continuity between both membranes was visible when whole bacteria were analyzed. We are still far from deciphering the function of these new structures, but a first experimental attempt links the Stacks with a given phase of the cell replication process.

  8. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  9. Temporal instability analysis of inviscid compound jets falling under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Uddin, Jamal; Decent, Stephen P.; Afzaal, Muhammad F.

    2013-01-01

    Compound liquid jets can be used in a variety of industrial applications ranging from capsule production in pharmaceutics to enhance printing methods in ink-jet printing. An appreciation of how instability along compound jets can lead to breakup and droplet formation is thus critical in many fields in science and engineering. In this paper, we perform a theoretical analysis to examine the instability of an axisymmetric inviscid compound liquid jet which falls vertically under the influence of gravity. We use a long-wavelength, slender-jet asymptotic expansion to reduce the governing equations of the problem into a set of one-dimensional partial differential equations, which describe the evolution of the leading-order axial velocity of the jet as well as the radii of both the inner and the outer interfaces. We first determine the steady-state solutions of the one-dimensional model equations and then we perform a linear temporal instability analysis to obtain a dispersion relation, which gives us useful information about the maximum growth rate and the maximum wavenumber of the imposed wave-like disturbance. We use our results to estimate the location and qualitative nature of breakup and then compare our results with numerical simulations.

  10. Method and apparatus for water jet drilling of rock

    DOEpatents

    Summers, David A.; Mazurkiewicz, Marian; Bushnell, Dwight J.; Blaine, James

    1978-01-01

    Rock drilling method and apparatus utilizing high pressure water jets for drilling holes of relatively small diameter at speeds significantly greater than that attainable with existing drilling tools. Greatly increased drilling rates are attained due to jet nozzle geometry and speed of rotation. The jet nozzle design has two orifices, one pointing axially ahead in the direction of travel and the second inclined at an angle of approximately 30.degree. from the axis. The two orifices have diameters in the ratio of approximately 1:2. Liquid jet velocities in excess of 1,000 ft/sec are used, and the nozzle is rotated at speeds up to 1,000 rpm and higher.

  11. Comparison of heat transfer in liquid and slush nitrogen by numerical simulation of cooling rates for French straws used for sperm cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Sansinena, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-05-01

    Slush nitrogen (SN(2)) is a mixture of solid nitrogen and liquid nitrogen, with an average temperature of -207 °C. To investigate whether plunging a French plastic straw (commonly used for sperm cryopreservation) in SN(2) substantially increases cooling rates with respect to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)), a numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was used to predict cooling rates. Calculations performed using heat transfer coefficients in the range of film boiling confirmed the main benefit of plunging a straw in slush over LN(2) did not arise from their temperature difference (-207 vs. -196 °C), but rather from an increase in the external heat transfer coefficient. Numerical simulations using high heat transfer (h) coefficients (assumed to prevail in SN(2)) suggested that plunging in SN(2) would increase cooling rates of French straw. This increase of cooling rates was attributed to a less or null film boiling responsible for low heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen when the straw is placed in the solid-liquid mixture or slush. In addition, predicted cooling rates of French straws in SN(2) tended to level-off for high h values, suggesting heat transfer was dictated by heat conduction within the liquid filled plastic straw.

  12. Thermal ink jet: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezanka, Ivan

    1992-05-01

    The first public demonstration of thermal ink jet printing was done by Canon in 1981 and the first thermal ink jet product, ThinkJet, was introduced by the Hewlett-Packard Company in 1984. Since then, this powerful printing technology has assumed a strong presence in the market. In this discussion, we will first briefly review the printer market, the increasing role thermal ink jet is playing in this arena, as well as the reasons for its success. The technology discussion will follow, and will focus on several highlights in thermal ink jet physics, materials, and printing. We will conclude with our comments on future thermal ink jet developments.

  13. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  14. Unsteady jet in designing innovative drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Mazur, Paul; Cosse, Julia; Rider, Stephanie; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-11-01

    Micro-needle injections, a promising pain-free drug delivery method, is constrained by its limited penetration depth. This deficiency can be overcome by implementing fast unsteady jet that can penetrate sub-dermally. The development of a faster liquid jet would increase the penetration depth and delivery volume of micro-needles. In this preliminary work, the nonlinear transient behavior of an elastic tube balloon in providing fast discharge is analyzed. A physical model that combines the Mooney Rivlin Material model and Young-Lapalce's Law was developed and used to investigate the fast discharging dynamic phenomenon. A proof of concept prototype was constructed to demonstrate the feasibility of a simple thumb-sized delivery system to generate liquid jet with desired speed in the range of 5-10 m/s. This work is supported by ZCUBE Corporation.

  15. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  16. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  17. Jet penetration in glass

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, B.; Glenn, L.A.; Kusubov, A.

    1991-05-01

    We describe a phenomenological model which accounts for the mechanical response of glass to intense impulsive loading. An important aspect of this response is the dilatancy accompanying fracture. We have also conducted a number of experiments with 38.1-mm diameter precision shaped charges to establish the performance against various targets and to allow evaluation of our model. At 3 charge diameters standoff, the data indicate that both virgin and damaged glass offer better (Bernoulli-scaled) resistance to penetration than either of 4340 steel, or 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Time-resolved measurements indicate two distinct phases of jet penetration in glass: An initial hydrodynamic phase, and a second phase characterized by a slower penetration velocity. Our calculations show that at early time, a crater is formed around the jet and only the tip of the undisturbed jet interacts with the glass. At late time the glass has collapsed on the jet and degraded penetration continues via a disturbed and fragmented jet.

  18. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  19. Modified shielding jet model for twin-jet shielding analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, C. H.; Gilbride, J.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical model to estimate the shielding of noise emitted from a point noise source has been developed assuming the shielding jet to be a cylinder of constant radius with uniform flow across the cross section. Comparison to experiment indicated that the model overestimates diffraction of sound around the jet in the far downstream region. The shielding jet model is modified to include widening downstream of the nozzle exit. This not only represents a more realistic model of the jet, but is also expected to improve the shielding estimate downstream. The modified jet model incorporates a Mach number dependent widening rate, a corresponding decrease in flow velocity downstream and an equivalent slug flow evaluation to retain the locally parallel flow approximation of the model development. The shielding analysis with modified jet model is compared to measured data for a subsonic isothermal air jet and a simulated hot subsonic jet. Improvement of the shielding estimate is discussed.

  20. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  1. Global stability of the focusing effect of fluid jet flows.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; Rebollo-Muñoz, N; Herrada, M A; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2011-03-01

    The global stability of the steady jetting mode of liquid jets focused by coaxial gas streams is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Numerical simulations allow one to identify the physical mechanisms responsible for instability in the low viscosity and very viscous regimes of the focused liquid. The characteristic flow rates for which global instability takes place are estimated by a simple scaling analysis. These flow rates do not depend on the pressure drop (energy) applied to the system to produce the microjet. Their dependencies on the liquid viscosity are opposite for the two extremes studied: the characteristic flow rate increases (decreases) with viscosity for very low (high) viscosity liquids. Experiments confirmed the validity of these conclusions. The minimum flow rates below which the liquid meniscus becomes unstable are practically independent of the applied pressure drop for sufficiently large values of this quantity. For all the liquids analyzed, there exists an optimum value of the capillary-to-orifice distance for which the minimum flow rate attains a limiting value. That limiting value represents the lowest flow rate attainable with a given experimental configuration in the steady jetting regime. A two-dimensional stability map with a high degree of validity is plotted on the plane defined by the Reynolds and capillary numbers based on the limiting flow rate.

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  3. The ways of mass transfer intensification in industrial jet scrubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilyaev, Michael; Khromova, Helen; Shirokova, Svetlana

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to parametrical analysis of model, and is aimed at understanding its possibilities to find the most profitable conditions for the technical processes. These processes should consider the maximal extraction of gas and mechanical admixtures from the flow on the droplets of irrigating liquid and reduce the dimensions of hollow direct-flow jet scrubbers (DFJS) and Venturi scrubbers (VS).

  4. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes. PMID:24679258

  5. Renewable jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Kallio, Pauli; Pásztor, András; Akhtar, M Kalim; Jones, Patrik R

    2014-04-01

    Novel strategies for sustainable replacement of finite fossil fuels are intensely pursued in fundamental research, applied science and industry. In the case of jet fuels used in gas-turbine engine aircrafts, the production and use of synthetic bio-derived kerosenes are advancing rapidly. Microbial biotechnology could potentially also be used to complement the renewable production of jet fuel, as demonstrated by the production of bioethanol and biodiesel for piston engine vehicles. Engineered microbial biosynthesis of medium chain length alkanes, which constitute the major fraction of petroleum-based jet fuels, was recently demonstrated. Although efficiencies currently are far from that needed for commercial application, this discovery has spurred research towards future production platforms using both fermentative and direct photobiological routes.

  6. Hypersonic jet control effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D.; Stollery, J. L.; Smith, A. J.

    The present study aims to identify some of the parameters which determine the upstream extent and the lateral spreading of the separation front around an under-expanded transverse jet on a slender blunted cone. The tests were conducted in the Cranfield hypersonic facility at M∞ = 8.2, Re∞ /cm = 4.5 to 9.0 × 104 and at M∞ = 12.3, Re∞ /cm = 3.3 × 104. Air was used as the working gas for both the freestream and the jet. Schlieren pictures were used for the visualisation of the three-dimensional structures around the jet. Pressure, normal force and pitching moment measurements were conducted to quantitatively study the interaction region and its effects on the vehicle. An analytical algorithm has been developed to predict the shape of the separation front around the body.

  7. Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

    NASA Video Gallery

    Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves th...

  8. Experimental study of elliptical jet from supercritical to subcritical conditions using planar laser induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2015-03-15

    The study of fluid jet dynamics at supercritical conditions involves strong coupling between fluid dynamic and thermodynamic phenomena. Beyond the critical point, the liquid-vapor coexistence ceases to exist, and the fluid exists as a single phase known as supercritical fluid with its properties that are entirely different from liquids and gases. At the critical point, the liquids do not possess surface tension and latent heat of evaporation. Around the critical point, the fluid undergoes large changes in density and possesses thermodynamic anomaly like enhancement in thermal conductivity and specific heat. In the present work, the transition of the supercritical and near-critical elliptical jet into subcritical as well as supercritical environment is investigated experimentally with nitrogen and helium as the surrounding environment. Under atmospheric condition, a liquid jet injected from the elliptical orifice exhibits axis switching phenomena. As the injection temperature increases, the axis switching length also increases. Beyond the critical temperature, the axis switching is not observed. The investigation also revealed that pressure plays a major role in determining the thermodynamic transition of the elliptical jet only for the case of supercritical jet injected into subcritical chamber conditions. At larger pressures, the supercritical jet undergoes disintegration and formation of droplets in the subcritical environment is observed. However, for supercritical jet injection into supercritical environment, the gas-gas like mixing behavior is observed.

  9. Stationary relativistic jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we describe a simple numerical approach which allows to study the structure of steady-state axisymmetric relativistic jets using one-dimensional time-dependent simulations. It is based on the fact that for narrow jets with vz≈ c the steady-state equations of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics can be accurately approximated by the one-dimensional time-dependent equations after the substitution z=ct. Since only the time-dependent codes are now publicly available this is a valuable and efficient alternative to the development of a high-specialised code for the time-independent equations. The approach is also much cheaper and more robust compared to the relaxation method. We tested this technique against numerical and analytical solutions found in literature as well as solutions we obtained using the relaxation method and found it sufficiently accurate. In the process, we discovered the reason for the failure of the self-similar analytical model of the jet reconfinement in relatively flat atmospheres and elucidated the nature of radial oscillations of steady-state jets.

  10. Jets and QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Soper, Davison E.

    2013-06-01

    An essential element of the development of the strong interaction component of the Standard Model of particle physics, QCD, has been the evolving understanding of the "jets" of particles that appear in the final states of high energy particle collisions. In this chapter we provide a historical outline of those developments...

  11. Particle Acceleration in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    2005-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., active galactic nuclei (AGNs), gamma ray burst (GRBs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Fermi acceleration is the mechanism usually assumed for the acceleration of particles in astrophysical environments.

  12. The Jet Travel Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2007-01-01

    Airplane travelers are dismayed by the long lines and seemingly chaotic activities that precede boarding a full airplane. Surely, the one who can solve this problem is going to make many travelers happy. This article describes the Jet Travel Challenge, an activity that challenges students to create some alternatives to this now frustrating…

  13. Spectroscopy with Supersonic Jets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Anne R.; Chandler, Dean W.

    1980-01-01

    Discusses a new technique that enables spectroscopists to study gas phase molecules at temperatures below 1 K, without traditional cryogenic apparatus. This technique uses supersonic jets as samples for gas molecular spectroscopy. Highlighted are points in the theory of supersonic flow which are important for applications in molecular…

  14. Multi-jets formation using laser forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biver, Emeric; Rapp, Ludovic; Alloncle, Anne-Patricia; Delaporte, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of multi-jets formation in liquid films has been investigated using the laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) technique. This technique allows the deposition of micrometer-sized droplets with a high spatial resolution from a donor substrate to a receiver substrate. The donor was a silver nanoparticles ink-coated substrate. The interaction of the laser pulse with the donor ink layer generates an expanding bubble in the liquid which propels a jet towards the receiver. Silver lines have already been printed by depositing overlapping droplets in a “low speed” process. In order to increase the throughput, it is necessary to decrease the time between the depositions of two droplets. By scanning the beam of a high repetition rate UV picosecond laser (343 nm; 30 ps; 500 kHz) with a galvanometric mirror, successive pulses are focused on the silver nanoparticles ink-coated donor substrate. The shape and dynamics of single jets and adjacent jets have been investigated by means of a time-resolved imaging technique. By varying the distance between the laser spots, different behaviours were observed and compared to the printed droplets. A spacing of 25 μm between laser spots was found to generate both stable jets and well-controlled, reproducible droplets at high speed.

  15. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  16. Interacting jets from binary protostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, G. C.; Lery, T.; O'Sullivan, S.; Spicer, D.; Bacciotti, F.; Rosen, A.

    2008-02-01

    Aims: We investigate potential models that could explain why multiple proto-stellar systems predominantly show single jets. During their formation, stars most frequently produce energetic outflows and jets. However, binary jets have only been observed in a very small number of systems. Methods: We model numerically 3D binary jets for various outflow parameters. We also model the propagation of jets from a specific source, namely L1551 IRS 5, known to have two jets, using recent observations as constraints for simulations with a new MHD code. We examine their morphology and dynamics, and produce synthetic emission maps. Results: We find that the two jets interfere up to the stage where one of them is almost destroyed or engulfed into the second one. We are able to reproduce some of the observational features of L1551 such as the bending of the secondary jet. Conclusions: While the effects of orbital motion are negligible over the jets dynamical timeline, their interaction has significant impact on their morphology. If the jets are not strictly parallel, as in most observed cases, we show that the magnetic field can help the collimation and refocusing of both of the two jets.

  17. Jet propagation through energetic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pincosy, P; Poulsen, P

    2004-01-08

    In applications where jets propagate through energetic materials, they have been observed to become sufficiently perturbed to reduce their ability to effectively penetrate subsequent material. Analytical calculations of the jet Bernoulli flow provides an estimate of the onset and extent of such perturbations. Although two-dimensional calculations show the back-flow interaction pressure pulses, the symmetry dictates that the flow remains axial. In three dimensions the same pressure impulses can be asymmetrical if the jet is asymmetrical. The 3D calculations thus show parts of the jet having a significant component of radial velocity. On the average the downstream effects of this radial flow can be estimated and calculated by a 2D code by applying a symmetrical radial component to the jet at the appropriate position as the jet propagates through the energetic material. We have calculated the 3D propagation of a radio graphed TOW2 jet with measured variations in straightness and diameter. The resultant three-dimensional perturbations on the jet result in radial flow, which eventually tears apart the coherent jet flow. This calculated jet is compared with jet radiographs after passage through the energetic material for various material thickness and plate thicknesses. We noted that confinement due to a bounding metal plate on the energetic material extends the pressure duration and extent of the perturbation.

  18. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOEpatents

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  19. Pileup subtraction for jet shapes.

    PubMed

    Soyez, Gregory; Salam, Gavin P; Kim, Ji-Hun; Dutta, Souvik; Cacciari, Matteo

    2013-04-19

    Jets in high energy hadronic collisions often contain the fingerprints of the particles that produced them. Those fingerprints, and thus the nature of the particles that produced the jets, can be read off with the help of quantities known as jet shapes. Jet shapes are, however, severely affected by pileup, the accumulation in the detector of the residues of the many simultaneous collisions taking place in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We introduce a method to correct for pileup effects in jet shapes. Relative to earlier, limited approaches, the key advance resides in its full generality, achieved through a numerical determination, for each jet, of a given shape's susceptibility to pileup. The method rescues the possibility of using jet shapes in the high pileup environment of current and future LHC running, as we show with examples of quark-gluon discrimination and top tagging.

  20. Neutron emission profiles and energy spectra measurements at JET

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Conroy, S.; Belli, F.; Riva, M.; Gorini, G.; Horton, L.; Joffrin, E.; Lerche, E.; Murari, A.; Popovichev, S.; Syme, B.; Collaboration: JET EFDA Contributors

    2014-08-21

    The Joint European Toras (JET, Culham, UK) is the largest tokamak in the world. It is devoted to nuclear fusion experiments of magnetic confined Deuterium (D) or Deuterium-Tritium (DT) plasmas. JET has been upgraded over the years and recently it has also become a test facility of the components designed for ITER, the next step fusion machine under construction in Cadarache (France). JET makes use of many different diagnostics to measure the physical quantities of interest in plasma experiments. Concerning D or DT plasmas neutron production, various types of detectors are implemented to provide information upon the neutron total yield, emission profile and energy spectrum. The neutron emission profile emitted from the JET plasma poloidal section is reconstructed using the neutron camera (KN3). In 2010 KN3 was equipped with a new digital data acquisition system capable of high rate neutron measurements (<0.5 MCps). A similar instrument will be implemented on ITER and it is currently in its design phase. Various types of neutron spectrometers with different view lines are also operational on JET. One of them is a new compact spectrometer (KM12) based on organic liquid scintillating material which was installed in 2010 and implements a similar digital data acquisition system as for KN3. This article illustrates the measurement results of KN3 neutron emission profiles and KM 12 neutron energy spectra from the latest JET D experimental campaign C31.

  1. Enhanced heat sink with geometry induced wall-jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Mahamudul; Tikadar, Amitav; Bari, Fazlul; Morshed, A. K. M. M.

    2016-07-01

    Mini-channels embedded in solid matrix have already proven to be a very efficient way of electronic cooling. Traditional mini-channel heat sinks consist of single layer of parallel channels. Although mini-channel heat sink can achieve very high heat flux, its pumping requirement for circulating liquid through the channel increase very sharply as the flow velocity increases. The pumping requirements of the heat sink can be reduced by increasing its performance. In this paper a novel approach to increase the thermal performance of the mini-channel heat sink is proposed through geometry induced wall jet which is a passive technique. Geometric irregularities along the channel length causes abrupt pressure change between the channels which causes cross flow through the interconnections thus one channel faces suction and other channel jet action. This suction and jet action disrupts boundary layer causing enhanced heat transfer performance. A CFD model has been developed using commercially available software package FLUENT to evaluate the technique. A parametric study of the velocities and the effect of the position of the wall-jets have been performed. Significant reduction in thermal resistance has been observed for wall-jets, it is also observed that this reduction in thermal resistance is dependent on the position and shape of the wall jet.

  2. Explosive fragmentation of liquids in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.; Frost, D. L.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Petel, O.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid acceleration of a spherical shell of liquid following central detonation of a high explosive causes the liquid to form fine jets that are similar in appearance to the particle jets that are formed during explosive dispersal of a packed layer of solid particles. Of particular interest is determining the dependence of the scale of the jet-like structures on the physical parameters of the system, including the fluid properties (e.g., density, viscosity, and surface tension) and the ratio of the mass of the liquid to that of the explosive. The present paper presents computational results from a multi-material hydrocode describing the dynamics of the explosive dispersal process. The computations are used to track the overall features of the early stages of dispersal of the liquid layer, including the wave dynamics, and motion of the spall and accretion layers. The results are compared with new experimental results of spherical charges surrounded by a variety of different fluids, including water, glycerol, ethanol, and vegetable oil, which together encompass a significant range of fluid properties. The results show that the number of jet structures is not sensitive to the fluid properties, but primarily dependent on the mass ratio. Above a certain mass ratio of liquid fill-to-explosive burster (F / B), the number of jets is approximately constant and consistent with an empirical model based on the maximum thickness of the accretion layer. For small values of F / B, the number of liquid jets is reduced, in contrast with explosive powder dispersal, where small F / B yields a larger number of particle jets. A hypothetical explanation of these features based on the nucleation of cavitation is explored numerically.

  3. Turbulence Statistics of a Buoyant Jet in a Stratified Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCleney, Amy Brooke

    Using non-intrusive optical diagnostics, turbulence statistics for a round, incompressible, buoyant, and vertical jet discharging freely into a stably linear stratified environment is studied and compared to a reference case of a neutrally buoyant jet in a uniform environment. This is part of a validation campaign for computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Buoyancy forces are known to significantly affect the jet evolution in a stratified environment. Despite their ubiquity in numerous natural and man-made flows, available data in these jets are limited, which constrain our understanding of the underlying physical processes. In particular, there is a dearth of velocity field data, which makes it challenging to validate numerical codes, currently used for modeling these important flows. Herein, jet near- and far-field behaviors are obtained with a combination of planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) and multi-scale time-resolved particle image velocimetry (TR-PIV) for Reynolds number up to 20,000. Deploying non-intrusive optical diagnostics in a variable density environment is challenging in liquids. The refractive index is strongly affected by the density, which introduces optical aberrations and occlusions that prevent the resolution of the flow. One solution consists of using index matched fluids with different densities. Here a pair of water solutions - isopropanol and NaCl - are identified that satisfy these requirements. In fact, they provide a density difference up to 5%, which is the largest reported for such fluid pairs. Additionally, by design, the kinematic viscosities of the solutions are identical. This greatly simplifies the analysis and subsequent simulations of the data. The spectral and temperature dependence of the solutions are fully characterized. In the near-field, shear layer roll-up is analyzed and characterized as a function of initial velocity profile. In the far-field, turbulence statistics are reported for two different scales, one

  4. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  5. Acoustic streaming jets: A scaling and dimensional analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Botton, V. Henry, D.; Millet, S.; Ben-Hadid, H.; Garandet, J. P.

    2015-10-28

    We present our work on acoustic streaming free jets driven by ultrasonic beams in liquids. These jets are steady flows generated far from walls by progressive acoustic waves. As can be seen on figure 1, our set-up, denominated AStrID for Acoustic Streaming Investigation Device, is made of a water tank in which a 29 mm plane source emits continuous ultrasonic waves at typically 2 MHz. Our approach combines an experimental characterization of both the acoustic pressure field (hydrophone) and the obtained acoustic streaming velocity field (PIV visualization) on one hand, with CFD using an incompressible Navier-Stokes solver on the other hand.

  6. Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking down at Jet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic copy of photograph, aerial view looking down at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Edwards Test Station complex in 1961, with north toward the top of the view. Dd test station has been added to Test Stand 'D,' liquid nitrogen storage facility E-63 has been built, as well as several adjuncts to Test Stand 'C' behind earth barriers, such as oxidizer facility at 4263/E-64 and hydrogen tank at 4264/E-65. (JPL negative no. 384-3003-A, 12 December 1961) - Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Facility, Edwards Air Force Base, Boron, Kern County, CA

  7. SparkJet Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golbabaei-Asl, Mona; Knight, Doyle; Anderson, Kellie; Wilkinson, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for determining the thermal efficiency of the SparkJet is proposed. A SparkJet is attached to the end of a pendulum. The motion of the pendulum subsequent to a single spark discharge is measured using a laser displacement sensor. The measured displacement vs time is compared with the predictions of a theoretical perfect gas model to estimate the fraction of the spark discharge energy which results in heating the gas (i.e., increasing the translational-rotational temperature). The results from multiple runs for different capacitances of c = 3, 5, 10, 20, and 40 micro-F show that the thermal efficiency decreases with higher capacitive discharges.

  8. Phenomenology of photon-jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Stephen D.; Roy, Tuhin S.; Scholtz, Jakub

    2013-01-01

    One of the challenges of collider physics is to unambiguously associate detector-based objects with the corresponding elementary physics objects. A particular example is the association of calorimeter-based objects such as “jets,” identified with a standard (IR-safe) jet algorithm, with the underlying physics objects, which may be QCD-jets (arising from a scattered parton), electrons, photons or, as discussed here, photon-jets (a group of collinear photons). This separation is especially interesting in the context of Higgs search, where the signal includes events with two photons (in the Standard Model) as well as events with two photon-jets (in a variety of Beyond the Standard Model scenarios), while QCD provides ever-present background. Here we describe the implementation of techniques from the rapidly evolving area of jet substructure studies, not only to enhance the more familiar photon-QCD separation, but also to separately distinguish photon-jets, i.e., to separate usual jets into three categories: single photons, photon-jets and QCD-jets. The efficacy of these techniques for separation is illustrated through studies of simulated data.

  9. Jet-Environment Interactions as Diagnostics of Jet Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Sebastian

    2014-09-01

    In this chapter, we will explore the interaction of jets with their environments. Jets can transport a sizable fraction of accretion energy away from black holes and neutron stars. Because they are collimated, they can travel to distances far beyond the gravitational sphere of influence of the black hole. Yet, their interaction with the interstellar and intergalactic medium must eventually halt their advance and dissipate the energy they carry. The termination of the jet, and the inflation of large scale cavities of relativistic plasma offers one of the most powerful ways to constrain the physics of jets. In this chapter, we will review the inflation of radio lobes, the propagation of hot spots, the creation of shells and cavities, and the bending of jet by proper motion through their environment, both in the context of AGN jets and microquasars.

  10. Ram jet engine

    SciTech Connect

    Crispin, B.; Pohl, W.D.; Thomaier, D.; Voss, N.

    1983-11-29

    In a ram jet engine, a tubular combustion chamber is divided into a flame chamber followed by a mixing chamber. The ram air is supplied through intake diffusers located on the exterior of the combustion chamber. The intake diffusers supply combustion air directly into the flame chamber and secondary air is conveyed along the exterior of the combustion chambers and then supplied directly into the mixing chamber.

  11. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  12. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Swierkowski, S.; Ciarlo, D.

    1996-05-13

    Goal is to develop a multi-channel micromachined chemical fluid jet dispenser that is applicable to prototype tests with biological samples that demonstrate its utility for molecular biology experiments. Objective is to demonstrate a new device capable of ultrasonically ejecting droplets from 10-200 {mu}m diameter capillaries that are arranged in an array that is linear or focused. The device is based on several common fabrication procedures used in MEMS (micro electro mechanical systems) technology: piezoelectric actuators, silicon, etc.

  13. Thermal stability of coal-derived jet fuels in the autoxidative and pyrolytic regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, J.M.; Strohm, J.J.; Song, C.

    1999-07-01

    Coal-based liquids have a great potential as precursors for advanced jet fuels that meet the more stringent thermal stability requirements for the future high-Mach jet aircraft. In current commercial planes, the fuel may be exposed to temperatures up to 300 C. However, as the flight speed will be increased to high Mach numbers, the fuel is expected to experience temperatures as high as 480 C (900 F) in the future, since the jet fuel also functions as the main coolant for the different electronic and mechanical parts of the aircraft. Even though the residence time at such elevated temperatures is expected to be fairly short (matter of minutes), the jet fuels presently used have shown to form solid deposits that can lead to catastrophic malfunction of the jet aircraft. The current jet fuels are petroleum-derived and consequently rich in linear alkanes, which are highly susceptible to pyrolytic cracking resulting in coking. The thermal stability of a jet fuel in the pyrolytic regime can be greatly enhanced by utilizing liquids rich in cyclo-alkanes. This is the case for hydro-treated coal-derived liquids, where the aromatic structures have been transformed over to their corresponding cyclo-alkanes. An additional problem with jet fuels is the presence of dissolved oxygen (from air), which reacts with the fuel during the autoxidative regime (150--250 C) before the fuel and its oxygenated reaction products enter the pyrolytic regime (400--500 C). Accordingly, this study compares the thermal stability of a linear alkane (tetradecane), a cyclo-alkane (decahydronaphthalene) and a coal-derived jet-fuel as they go through the autoxidative regime into the pyrolytic regime. Differences in chemical reactivity between the linear- and cyclo-alkane have been related to the stability of the coal-derived jet-fuel.

  14. Behavior of Electrospinning Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Han; Reneker, Darrell

    2002-03-01

    During the electrospinning of jets of polymer solutions such as polyethylene oxide in water, interference colors similar to those seen in the walls of soap bubbles are seen if the proper illumination is provided. The colors can be seen both in the straight part of the jet and in the loops formed by the electrically driven bending instability. The colors were correlated with measurements of the diameter of segments of a particular color. The path of a slowly moving jet of polyisobutylene in a mixture of acetone and paraffin oil was recorded. A well-developed expanding spiral that moved downward was observed. The downward velocity of a typical segment was .13 m/s, and the radial velocity of the same segment was .23m/s. The development of the second bending instability occurred 180 ms after the first, and a third bending instability occurred 280 ms after the first. The growth of the bending instability clearly demonstrated its self-similar, fractal nature. A network of electrospun polyisobutylene fibers was collected in an isopropyl alcohol precipitation bath.

  15. Discharge characteristics and hydrodynamics behaviors of atmospheric plasma jets produced in various gas flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric nonequilibrium plasma jets have been widely employed in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, it is an important issue to understand the complicated mechanism of interaction of the plasma jet with liquid. In this study, we present analysis of the discharge characteristics of a plasma jet impinging onto the liquid surface under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. For this purpose, we analyzed gas flow patters by using a Schlieren gas-flow imaging system in detail The plasma jet impinging into the liquid surface expands along the liquid surface. The diameter of the expanded plasma increases with gas flow rate, which is well explained by an increase in the diameter of the laminar gas-flow channel. When the gas flow rate is further increased, the gas flow mode transits from laminar to turbulence in the gas flow channel, which leads to the shortening of the plasm-jet length. Our experiment demonstrated that the gas flow patterns strongly affect the discharge characteristics in the plasma-jet system. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  16. SIMULATION AND MOCKUP OF SNS JET-FLOW TARGET WITH WALL JET FOR CAVITATION DAMAGE MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wendel, Mark W; Geoghegan, Patrick J; Felde, David K

    2014-01-01

    Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory induce cavitation damage on the stainless steel target container. The cavitation damage is thought to limit the lifetime of the target for power levels at and above 1 MW. Severe through-wall cavitation damage on an internal wall near the beam entrance window has been observed in spent-targets. Surprisingly though, there is very little damage on the walls that bound an annular mercury channel that wraps around the front and outside of the target. The mercury flow through this channel is characterized by smooth, attached streamlines. One theory to explain this lack of damage is that the uni-directional flow biases the direction of the collapsing cavitation bubble, reducing the impact pressure and subsequent damage. The theory has been reinforced by in-beam separate effects data. For this reason, a second-generation SNS mercury target has been designed with an internal wall jet configuration intended to protect the concave wall where damage has been observed. The wall jet mimics the annular flow channel streamlines, but since the jet is bounded on only one side, the momentum is gradually diffused by the bulk flow interactions as it progresses around the cicular path of the target nose. Numerical simulations of the flow through this jet-flow target have been completed, and a water loop has been assembled with a transparent test target in order to visualize and measure the flow field. This paper presents the wall jet simulation results, as well as early experimental data from the test loop.

  17. Wall jets created by single and twin high pressure jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, P.; Wilson, M.

    1993-03-01

    An extensive experimental investigation into the nature of the wall jets produced by single and twin normal jet impingement has been undertaken. Wall jet velocity profiles have been recorded up to 70 jet diameters from the impingement point, at pressures representative of current VStol technology. The tests used fixed convergent nozzles, with nozzle height and spacing and jet pressure being varied. Single jet impingement displays a consistent effect of nozzle height on wall jet development. For twin jet cases a powerful reinforcement exists along the wall jet interaction plane. Remote from the interaction plane the wall jets are weaker than those produced by a single jet impingement.

  18. W + jet production at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Messina, Andrea; /INFN, Rome

    2006-10-01

    A measurement of W {yields} e{nu} + n-jet cross sections in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II (CDF II) is presented. The measurement is based on an integrated luminosity of 320 pb{sup -1}, and includes events with up to 4 or more jets. In each jet multiplicity sample the differential and cumulative cross sections with respect to the transverse energy of the i{sup th} jet are measured. For W+ {ge} 2 jets the differential cross section with respect to the 2-leading jets invariant mass m{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} and angural separation {Delta} R{sub j{sub 1}j{sub 2}} is also reported. The data are compared to predictions from Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  20. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  1. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  2. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  3. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  4. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  5. 30 CFR 56.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 56.7801 Section 56.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with— (a) A system...

  6. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  7. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  8. 30 CFR 57.7801 - Jet drills.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Jet drills. 57.7801 Section 57.7801 Mineral... HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7801 Jet drills. Jet piercing drills shall be provided with: (a)...

  9. Convective mixing mechanisms in high frequency intermittent jet ventilation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, P W; Muller, W J; Raub, J B; Haselton, F R

    1989-01-01

    A liquid flow visualization technique was used to identify the location of neutrally buoyant bead clouds injected into airway models during flows simulating high frequency intermittent jet ventilation (HFIJV) in neonatal lungs. The motions of these bead clouds show that the convective or bulk mixing that occurs during HFIJV is made up of two parts; a turbulent convective exchange with the atmosphere caused by the jet in the trachea and a streaming motion along the airways driven by an interaction between the jet and the expansion and contraction of the airways due to their compliance. These convective streaming motions combine with molecular diffusion to produce augmented diffusion which transports O2 and CO2 between the trachea and the peripheral alveoli. Optimizing HFIJV (as well as other forms of HFV) depends on maximizing these airway convective streaming flows which depend on many more lung and fluid mechanical parameters than are necessary to describe conventional mechanical ventilation.

  10. Radiation-Driven Astrophysical Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukue, Jun

    2000-10-01

    Radiative winds and jets from luminous accretion disks/tori are reviewed. Among various models of astrophysical jets, plasma outflows emanating from accretion disks/tori and accelerated by the radiation pressure is the most promising one. Here explained are the roles of radiation pressure force and radiation drag force. Rise and fall of a torus model are also discussed, following its revenge. Finally, the millennium jet model, where the multistage acceleration takes place, is proposed.

  11. Electromagnetic Models of Extragalactic Jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, M.; Blandford, R.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-22

    Relativistic jets may be confined by large-scale, anisotropic electromagnetic stresses that balance isotropic particle pressure and disordered magnetic field. A class of axisymmetric equilibrium jet models will be described and their radiative properties outlined under simple assumptions. The partition of the jet power between electromagnetic and mechanical forms and the comoving energy density between particles and magnetic field will be discussed. Current carrying jets may be recognized by their polarization patterns. Progress and prospects for measuring this using VLBI and GLAST observations will be summarized.

  12. Photon + jets at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /RWTH Aachen U.

    2009-06-01

    Photon plus jet production has been studied by the D0 experiment in Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at a centre of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Measurements of the inclusive photon, inclusive photon plus jet, photon plus heavy flavour jet cross sections and double parton interactions in photon plus three jet events are presented. They are based on integrated luminosities between 0.4 fb{sup -1} and 1.0 fb{sup -1}. The results are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in various approximations.

  13. Microplasma jet at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Yong Cheol; Uhm, Han Sup

    2006-11-27

    A nitrogen microplasma jet operated at atmospheric pressure was developed for treating thermally sensitive materials. For example, the plasma sources in treatment of vulnerable biological materials must operate near the room temperature at the atmospheric pressure, without any risk of arcing or electrical shock. The microplasma jet device operated by an electrical power less than 10 W exhibited a long plasma jet of about 6.5 cm with temperature near 300 K, not causing any harm to human skin. Optical emission measured at the wide range of 280-800 nm indicated various reactive species produced by the plasma jet.

  14. The formation of interstellar jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  15. Study on the influences of interaction behaviors between multiple combustion-gas jets on expansion characteristics of Taylor cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Xiaochun; Yu, Yonggang; Zhang, Qi

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate means of controlling the interior ballistic stability of a bulk-loaded propellant gun (BLPG). Experiments on the interaction of twin combustion gas jets and liquid medium in a cylindrical stepped-wall combustion chamber are conducted in detail to obtain time series processes of jet expansion, and a numerical simulation under the same working conditions is also conducted to verify the reliability of the numerical method by comparing numerical results and experimental results. From this, numerical simulations on mutual interference and expansion characteristics of multiple combustion gas jets (four, six, and eight jets) in liquid medium are carried out, and the distribution characteristic of pressure, velocity, temperature, and evolutionary processes of Taylor cavities and streamlines of jet flow field are obtained in detail. The results of numerical simulations show that when different numbers of combustion gas jets expand in liquid medium, there are two different types of vortices in the jet flow field, including corner vortices of liquid phase near the step and backflow vortices of gas phase within Taylor cavities. Because of these two types of vortices, the radial expansion characteristic of the jets is increased, while changing numbers of combustion gas jets can restrain Kelvin-Helmholtz instability to a certain degree in jet expansion processes, which can at last realize the goal of controlling the interior ballistic stability of a BLPG. The optimum method for both suppressing Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and promoting radial expansion of Taylor cavities can be determined by analyzing the change of characteristic parameters in a jet flow field.

  16. Field of Flow About a Jet and Effect of Jets on Stability of Jet-Propelled Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ribner, Herbert S.

    1946-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted on jet-induced flow deviation. Analysis is given of flow inclination induced outside cold and hot jets and jet deflection caused by angle of attack. Applications to computation of effects of jet on longitudinal stability and trim are explained. Effect of jet temperature on flow inclination was found small when thrust coefficient is used as criterion for similitude. The average jet-induced downwash over tail plane was obtained geometrically.

  17. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  18. 21 CFR 880.5475 - Jet lavage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Jet lavage. (a) Identification. A jet lavage is a device used to clean a wound by a pulsatile jet of..., and a means of propelling the fluid through the tubing, such as an electric roller pump....

  19. Lifted turbulent jet flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Jay A.

    Experiments were conducted on lifted, turbulent jet diffusion flames. An automated technique using a linear photodiode array was implemented to measure the temporal history of the liftoff height h. The measurements enabled accurate determination of the mean liftoff height [...] under a wide range of flow conditions, including several fuels, nozzle diameters, and exit velocities [...]. The results showed an approximately linear relationship between [...] and [...], with a slight dependence on Reynolds number. A strain-rate model for liftoff, based on far-field scaling of turbulent jets, provides an explanation for the linear dependence of [...] on [...]. Measurements were also made in which the nozzle fluid contained varying amounts of air, where it was found that the slope of the [...] vs. [...] line increases faster than predicted by far-field scaling of turbulent jets. The discrepancy is attributed to near-field effects.The amplitudes of the fluctuations in h were found to be of the order of the local large scale of the jet. There is a slight increase in normalized fluctuation level [...] with [...], and there is some variation of [...] with fuel type. The time scales of the fluctuations of h were found to be considerably longer than the local large-scale time of the turbulence [...]. By using fuels of different chemical times to vary [...], the measured correlation time [...] normalized by [...] was found to collapse with Richardson number [...]. Experiments in which the nozzles were oriented horizontally showed no change in [...], however. Additional experiments were conducted to investigate alternative explanations for the variation of [...] with [...]. These experiments included measuring the flame length L simultaneously with h, and measuring the visible radiation I simultaneously with h. L(t) was found to be nearly uncorrelated with h(t), dismissing the possibility that a feedback mechanism from L to h controls the fluctuations of h. Although I(t) is highly

  20. Behavior of Water Jet Accompanied with Air Suction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Hironobu; Ishido, Tsutomu; Ihara, Akio

    In order to atomize a liquid, the authors have investigated the behavior of air-water jets. In a series of experiments, we have discovered a strange phenomenon that the water jet accompanied with air suction from the free surface has made a periodic radial splash of water drop. The purpose of the present paper is to clear out the origin of this phenomenon and the behavior of water jet accompanied with air suction. The behavior of water jet has been photographed by a digital camera aided with a flashlight and high-speed video camera. Those experiments enable us to find the origin of a periodic radial splash due to a formation of single air bubble at the flow separation region inside the nozzle and due to explosive expansion of the bubble after injected in the free space. In order to analyze the radial splash of water, we have conducted the equation of spherical liquid membrane. The numerical results obtained have been compared with the experimental results and good agreement has been obtained in radial expansion velocity.

  1. Jet drops from bursting bubbles: How gravity and viscosity couple to inhibit droplet production.

    PubMed

    Walls, Peter L L; Henaux, Louis; Bird, James C

    2015-08-01

    When a bubble ruptures at a liquid surface the collapsing cavity produces a central jet that frequently breaks up into a series of droplets. Current experiment and theory predict that the production of jet drops will be limited by either viscous or gravitational effects. However, while there are a number of studies focusing on these two limiting cases, less is understood about the production of jet drops when both gravitational and viscous effects are significant. Here, we uncover the existence of an intermediate region where both gravitational and viscous effects play a critical role in jet-drop formation. We propose that the role of gravity is most important before rupture, and carry out simulations that demonstrate the importance of the equilibrium bubble shape in the production of jet drops.

  2. Formation of jets and water clouds on Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Y.; Showman, A. P.

    2012-12-01

    Ground-based and spacecraft observations show that Jupiter exhibits multiple banded zonal jet structures. These banded jets correlate with dark and bright clouds, often called "belts" and "zones". The mechanisms that produce these banded zonal jets and clouds are poorly understood. Our previous studies showed that the latent heat released by condensation of water vapor could produce equatorial superrotation along with multiple zonal jets in the mid-to-high latitudes. However, that previous work assumed complete and instant removal of condensate and therefore could not predict the cloud formation. Here we present an improved 3D Jupiter model to investigate some effects of cloud microphysics on large-scale dynamics using a closed water cycle that includes condensation, three-dimensional advection of cloud material by the large-scale circulation, evaporation and sedimentation. We use a simplified Betts-Miller scheme to relax the temperature and water vapor towards moist adiabat and saturation profile respectively when atmospheric columns become conditionally unstable, and apply a dry convective adjustment scheme in region deeper than the cloud base to mix heat and tracers. We further assume that the liquid particles are well mixed within the clouds during condensation. Other physics parameterizations included in our model are the bottom drag and internal heat flux as well as the Newtonian heating. We find that the active water cycle can produce numerous convective storms and multiple banded jets with equatorial superrotation. However the clouds are sporadic and not coherent with the jet structures. Here we will discuss the jet-forming mechanism compared to our previous studies and cloud morphologies under the influence of large-scale dynamics.

  3. Carbon dioxide jet spray cleaning: mechanisms and risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hills, Malina M.

    1994-10-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas/solid jet sprays have been proposed for replacing ozone depleting cleaning solvents and for on-orbit cleaning of satellite-borne sensors. We have performed experiments to ascertain the mechanisms of molecular contaminant film removal with commercial CO2 gas/solid jet spray devices. Infrared measurements of germanium plates coated with various contaminant films were made before, during, and after cleaning with a CO2 jet spray. The inferred cleaning times and overall cleaning efficiencies combined with the known solubilities of the contaminants in liquid CO2 suggest that multiple cleaning mechanisms occur: physical removal of the film and solvation of the contaminant into the CO2 particle. These mechanisms explain the selectivity in cleaning efficiencies of the CO2 jet spray for different contaminants. We have also measured the electrostatic charging induced by the jet spray on ungrounded substrates, which in some cases, charge up to several kilowatts. The charging results from the difference in work functions of the CO2 and substrate. The work function is an intrinsic material property, therefore, the extent of charging can be reduced, but not eliminated. Environmental factors that affect the charging and the resultant limitations placed on the use of this device are discussed.

  4. High-density jet fuels from coal syncrudes: Appendix 4

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Very dense jet-boiling-range hydrocarbons can be obtained by hydrotreating and hydrocracking syncrudes made from coal in direct liquefaction processes. Heteroatom impurities must be removed, and most of the aromatics must be hydrogenated at high severity in order to produce kerosene jet fuels from coal syncrudes that meet smoke point and stability specifications. The resulting hydrotreated products consist mainly of naphthenes containing from one to three rings. If hydrocracking is added as a conversion step, some four-ring naphthenes are found in the 250 to 550/sup 0/F jet fuel products. Polycyclic naphthenes are desirable components for jet fuel because of their high volumetric energy contents and low freezing points. Products from the ITSL liquefaction process from bituminous coal had the lowest paraffin contents and the highest densities (for a given boiling range and aromatic content) of any of the coal liquids studied. Actual engine tests, however, would be needed to demonstrate that these fuels qualify for service in jet aircraft. 11 refs., 6 tabs.

  5. Computational modeling of jet induced mixing of cryogenic propellants in low-G

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, J. I.; Gerhart, P. M.; Aydelot, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The SOLA-ECLIPSE Code is being developed to enable computational prediction of jet induced mixing in cryogenic propellant tanks in a low-gravity environment. Velocity fields, predicted for scale model tanks, are presented which compare favorably with the available experimental data. A full scale liquid hydrogen tank for a typical Orbit Transfer Vehicle is analyzed with the conclusion that coupling an axial mixing jet with a thermodynamic vent system appears to be a viable concept for the control of tank pressure.

  6. Jet charge at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Krohn, David; Schwartz, Matthew D; Lin, Tongyan; Waalewijn, Wouter J

    2013-05-24

    Knowing the charge of the parton initiating a light-quark jet could be extremely useful both for testing aspects of the standard model and for characterizing potential beyond-the-standard-model signals. We show that despite the complications of hadronization and out-of-jet radiation such as pileup, a weighted sum of the charges of a jet's constituents can be used at the LHC to distinguish among jets with different charges. Potential applications include measuring electroweak quantum numbers of hadronically decaying resonances or supersymmetric particles, as well as standard model tests, such as jet charge in dijet events or in hadronically decaying W bosons in tt[over ¯] events. We develop a systematically improvable method to calculate moments of these charge distributions by combining multihadron fragmentation functions with perturbative jet functions and pertubative evolution equations. We show that the dependence on energy and jet size for the average and width of the jet charge can be calculated despite the large experimental uncertainty on fragmentation functions. These calculations can provide a validation tool for data independent of Monte Carlo fragmentation models.

  7. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  8. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2008-11-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  9. Nonlinear Dynamics in Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majmudar, Trushant; Varagnat, Matthieu; McKinley, Gareth

    2009-03-01

    Instabilities in free surface continuous jets of non-Newtonian fluids, although relevant for many industrial processes, remain poorly understood in terms of fundamental fluid dynamics. Inviscid, and viscous Newtonian jets have been studied in considerable detail, both theoretically and experimentally. Instability in viscous jets leads to regular periodic coiling of the jet, which exhibits a non-trivial frequency dependence with the height of the fall. Here we present a systematic study of the effect of viscoelasticity on the dynamics of continuous jets of worm-like micellar surfactant solutions of varying viscosities and elasticities. We observe complex nonlinear spatio-temporal dynamics of the jet, and uncover a transition from periodic to quasi-periodic to a multi-frequency, broad-spectrum dynamics. Beyond this regime, the jet dynamics smoothly crosses over to exhibit the ``leaping shampoo'' or the Kaye effect. We examine different dynamical regimes in terms of scaling variables, which depend on the geometry (dimensionless height), kinematics (dimensionless flow rate), and the fluid properties (elasto-gravity number) and present a regime map of the dynamics of the jet in terms of these dimensionless variables.

  10. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  11. Gluon jets from heavy paraquarkonium

    SciTech Connect

    Kamal, A.N.; Kodaira, J.; Muta, T.

    1982-02-01

    The GGG and qq-barG jets in the decay of very heavy paraquarkonia are analyzed in perturbative quantum chromodynamics. The thrust distributions are calculated and the result is compared with the thrust distributions in the orthoquarkonium decay and in e/sup +/e/sup -/..-->..qq-barG jets.

  12. Dense Hypervelocity Plasma Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Andrew; Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Messer, Sarah; Bomgardner, Richard; Phillips, Michael; van Doren, David; Elton, Raymond; Uzun-Kaymak, Ilker

    2007-11-01

    We are developing high velocity dense plasma jets for fusion and HEDP applications. Traditional coaxial plasma accelerators suffer from the blow-by instability which limits the mass accelerated to high velocity. In the current design blow-by is delayed by a combination of electrode shaping and use of a tailored plasma armature created by injection of a high density plasma at a few eV generated by arrays of capillary discharges or sparkgaps. Experimental data will be presented for a complete 32 injector gun system built for driving rotation in the Maryland MCX experiment, including data on penetration of the plasma jet through a magnetic field. We present spectroscopic measurements of plasma velocity, temperature, and density, as well as total momentum measured using a ballistic pendulum. Measurements are in agreement with each other and with time of flight data from photodiodes and a multichannel PMT. Plasma density is above 10^15 cm-3, velocities range up to about 100 km/s. Preliminary results from a quadrature heterodyne HeNe interferometer are consistent with these results.

  13. Shape instability in thin viscous films and jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1985-01-01

    The theory of viscous liquid films and thin jets as two- and one-dimensional continua is examined. Theoretical results are presented concerning a special type of instability which leads to the loss of smoothness of the shape (wrinkling) and associated with the failure of hyperbolicity of the governing equations. The conditions for different types of such an instability are formulated in the closed analytical form.

  14. Plunging Plates Cause a Stir.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weisburd, Stefi

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current ideas and research findings related to the flow patterns of mantle rocks. Highlights the components of the two-layer convection and whole-mantle models of mantle flow. Proposes that mantle flow is the key to understanding how the earth has cooled and chemically evolved. (ML)

  15. Magnetically driven jets and winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Berk, H. L.; Contopoulos, J.

    1991-01-01

    Four equations for the origin and propagation of nonrelativistic jets and winds are derived from the basic conservation laws of ideal MHD. The axial current density is negative in the vicinity of the axis and positive at larger radii; there is no net current because this is energetically favored. The magnetic field is essential for the jet solutions in that the zz-component of the magnetic stress acts, in opposition to gravity, to drive matter through the slow magnetosonic critical point. For a representative self-consistent disk/jet solution relevant to a protostellar system, the reaction of the accreted mass expelled in the jets is 0.1, the ratio of the power carried by the jets to the disk luminosity is 0.66, and the ratio of the boundary layer to disk luminosities is less than about 0.13. The star's rotation rate decreases with time even for rotation rates much less than the breakup rate.

  16. Nucleosynthesis in Jets from Collapsars

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Nishimura, Nobuya; Hashimoto, Masa-aki

    2008-05-21

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside magnetically driven jets ejected from collapsars, or rotating magnetized stars collapsing to a black hole, based on two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the collapsars during the core collapse. We follow the evolution of the abundances of about 4000 nuclides from the collapse phase to the ejection phase using a large nuclear reaction network. We find that the r-process successfully operates only in the energetic jets (>10{sup 51} erg), so that U and Th are synthesized abundantly, even when the collapsars have a relatively small magnetic field (10{sup 10} G) and a moderately rotating core before the collapse. The abundance patterns inside the jets are similar to that of the r-elements in the solar system. The higher energy jets have larger amounts of {sup 56}Ni. Less energetic jets, which have small amounts of {sup 56}Ni, could induce GRB without supernova, such as GRB060505 and GRB060614.

  17. Flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactor by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Youzhi; Qi, Guisheng; Jiao, Weizhou; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-08-01

    The flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactors (FIJRs) were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The effects of the Reynolds number (Re) and the ratio of jet distance to jet diameter (w/d) on flow behavior were discussed for equal volumetric flow rates of the two jets. The impingement plane, instantaneous velocity, mean velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) distribution of FIJRs are measured from captured images using the PIV technique. As Re increases, the average diameter of the impingement plane linearly increases. The instability of the liquid is closely related to the jet velocity or the Re. However, the stagnation point is insensitive to the variation of the Re. The droplets break up from the turbulent liquid in the ‘wall-free’ environment of FIJRs, so that the liquid back-flow found in confined impinging jet reactors (CIJRs) is not observed. Increasing the Re from 1800–4100 or decreasing the w/d from 20–6 plays a similar role in increasing the TKE values and intensifying turbulence, which promotes the momentum transfer and mixing efficiency in FIJRs.

  18. Flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactor by particle image velocimetry (PIV) investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Youzhi; Qi, Guisheng; Jiao, Weizhou; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2016-08-01

    The flow characteristics in free impinging jet reactors (FIJRs) were investigated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The effects of the Reynolds number (Re) and the ratio of jet distance to jet diameter (w/d) on flow behavior were discussed for equal volumetric flow rates of the two jets. The impingement plane, instantaneous velocity, mean velocity, and turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) distribution of FIJRs are measured from captured images using the PIV technique. As Re increases, the average diameter of the impingement plane linearly increases. The instability of the liquid is closely related to the jet velocity or the Re. However, the stagnation point is insensitive to the variation of the Re. The droplets break up from the turbulent liquid in the ‘wall-free’ environment of FIJRs, so that the liquid back-flow found in confined impinging jet reactors (CIJRs) is not observed. Increasing the Re from 1800-4100 or decreasing the w/d from 20-6 plays a similar role in increasing the TKE values and intensifying turbulence, which promotes the momentum transfer and mixing efficiency in FIJRs.

  19. Double-focusing mixing jet for XFEL study of chemical kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Pollack, Lois; Spence, John

    2014-01-01

    Several liquid sample injection methods have been developed to satisfy the requirements for serial femtosecond X-ray nanocrystallography, which enables radiation-damage-free determination of molecular structure at room temperature. Time-resolved nanocrystallography would combine structure analysis with chemical kinetics by determining the structures of the transient states and chemical kinetic mechanisms simultaneously. A windowless liquid mixing jet device has been designed for this purpose. It achieves fast uniform mixing of substrates and enzymes in the jet within 250 µs, with an adjustable delay between mixing and probing by the X-ray free-electron laser beam of up to 1 s for each frame of a ‘movie’. The principle of the liquid mixing jet device is illustrated using numerical simulation, and experimental results are presented using a fluorescent dye. PMID:25343806

  20. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of Shear Coaxial Jet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Essam A.; Kenny, R. Jeremy; Walker, Nathan B.

    2006-01-01

    The instability and subsequent atomization of a viscous liquid jet emanated into a high-pressure gaseous surrounding is studied both computationally and experimentally. Liquid water issued into nitrogen gas at elevated pressures is used to simulate the flow conditions in a coaxial shear injector element relevant to liquid propellant rocket engines. The theoretical analysis is based on a simplified mathematical formulation of the continuity and momentum equations in their conservative form. Numerical solutions of the governing equations subject to appropriate initial and boundary conditions are obtained via a robust finite difference scheme. The computations yield real-time evolution and subsequent breakup characteristics of the liquid jet. The experimental investigation utilizes a digital imaging technique to measure resultant drop sizes. Data were collected for liquid Reynolds number between 2,500 and 25,000, aerodynamic Weber number range of 50-500 and ambient gas pressures from 150 to 1200 psia. Comparison of the model predictions and experimental data for drop sizes at gas pressures of 150 and 300 psia reveal satisfactory agreement particularly for lower values of investigated Weber number. The present model is intended as a component of a practical tool to facilitate design and optimization of coaxial shear atomizers.