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Sample records for plunging liquid jet

  1. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-24

    jet . This jet impacted at 90* a pool of water and, when a threshold velocity was exceeded, it was observed that the plunging liquid jet caused air ... Entrainment by Plunging Laminar Liquid Jets ," AIChE Journal, Vol. 12, No. 3, 563, 1966. McKeogh, E.J. and Ervine, D.A., " Air Entrainment Rate and Diffusion...transmit the fourth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid

  2. An Analysis of Pool Surface Deformation Due to a Plunging Liquid Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-31

    pool surface depression by the plunging liquid jet (which leads to the entrainment of air ) was completed...technique. INTRODUCTION The entrainment of non-condensible gases by a plunging liquid jet impacting a liquid pool is important for some practical...the surface is such that the surface tension is not large enough to keep the pool surface from getting near the plunging liquid jet and thus air

  3. An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-31

    Plunging Liquid Jet - The Air Entrainment Process". It is intended that this paper will be finalized and...the fifth quarterly report for ONR grant N00014-91-J-1271, "An Experimental Study of Plunging Liquid Jet Induced Air Carryunder and Dispersion" (Lahey...Drew - CoPI). rhis report period has been concerned with performing an analysis of the air entrainment process associated with a plunging liquid

  4. Entrainment Characteristics for variable-angle plunging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2013-11-01

    Simulations based on an algebraic VoF method are used to study the entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent pool at angles ranging from 10 to 90 deg. with pool. Our previous study of shallow plunging jets (Deshpande et al. 2012) revealed a discernible frequency in the formation of large air cavities. This contrasts the well-documented chaotic entrainment at steeper inclinations, suggesting a different entrainment mechanism exists for shallow angles. Quantitatively, it is found that larger cavities and greater volume of entrained air occur at shallower angles (10, 12 deg.). A precursor to the formation of these large cavities is the presence of a stagnation region in the zone of impingement. Using a local mass and momentum balance, we show that this stagnation region deflects the incoming jet at wide angles producing large air cavities. Entrainment in shallow jets is similar to the initial impact of the jet with a pool, but it occurs periodically. The recurrence is a consequence of jet disruption by traveling waves on the pool. Qualitative analysis, supported with simulations, demonstrates linear scaling of entrainment period with Froude number.

  5. Study of Air Entrainment by a Horizontal Plunging Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Mario; Deshpande, Suraj; Wu, Xiongjun; Chahine, Georges

    2009-11-01

    The process of air entrainment following the impact of an initially horizontal circular water jet on a pool of water has been studied computationally and experimentally. It has been found that the entrainment of air cavities in the near field region is periodic, not continuous as reported in earlier studies. The simulations are based on a Volume-of-Fluid methodology with interfacial compression using a modified version of the open source utilities, OpenFoam. Close agreement with experiments is reported on the creation of cavities in the near field, where air entrainment occurs. The period of entrainment is found to be proportional to g, and a simplified closed-form solution for this periodic event is presented. An overall physical picture of the mechanisms leading to bubble formation is given. The far field, which is characterized by the presence of small bubbles is only partially resolved computationally. Comparisons against velocity data are performed in this region leading to adequate qualitative agreement.

  6. Air entrainment by a plunging liquid jet on a liquid pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñan, Amable; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1999-11-01

    When a liquid jet impinges on liquid pool, with a velocity higher than a critical velocity, a thin air film is entrained by the jet. The thickness ha of the air film, and thus the air mass entrained by the jet, is a function of its radius a and velocity U. This function, for the realistic small values of the capillary number ɛ = μa U/σ << 1 (based on the air viscosity μa and surface tension σ) turns out to be of the form h_a/a = F(a/a_c, ɛ), where a_c=√ σ/ρl g is the capillary length (based on the acceleration of gravity and liquid density ρ_l). An analysis similar to the analysis of Levish and Landau, for the entrainment of liquid by a plate moving out of a liquid pool, shows that the dependence of h_a/a on ɛ is of the form h_a/a = ɛ^2/3f(a/a_c), where f is of order unity for a/ac << 1 and f ≈ a_c/a for large values of a_c/a

  7. An analysis of pool surface deformation due to a plunging liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Drew, D. A.; Lahey, Richard T., Jr.

    1993-10-01

    When a liquid jet impacts a pool containing the same liquid and surrounded by a still gas, a surface depression is produced. The surface shape is determined by the Weber number and the Bond number. In this work the shape of the surface is obtained as a function of the Weber number and Bond number by using a non-singular perturbation technique.

  8. Distinguishing features of shallow angle plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj S.; Trujillo, Mario F.

    2013-08-01

    Numerical simulations employing an algebraic volume-of-fluid methodology are used to study the air entrainment characteristics of a water jet plunging into a quiescent water pool at angles ranging from θ = 10° to θ = 90° measured from the horizontal. Our previous study of shallow angled jets [S. S. Deshpande, M. F. Trujillo, X. Wu, and G. L. Chahine, "Computational and experimental characterization of a liquid jet plunging into a quiescent pool at shallow inclination," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow 34, 1-14 (2012)], 10.1016/j.ijheatfluidflow.2012.01.011 revealed the existence of a clearly discernible frequency of ingestion of large air cavities. This is in contrast with chaotic entrainment of small air pockets reported in the literature in case of steeper or vertically plunging jets. In the present work, the differences are addressed by first quantifying the cavity size and entrained air volumes for different impingement angles. The results support the expected trend - reduction in cavity size (D43) as θ is increased. Time histories of cavity volumes in the vicinity of the impingement region confirm the visual observations pertaining to a near-periodic ingestion of large air volumes for shallow jets (10°, 12°), and also show that such cavities are not formed for steep or vertical jets. Each large cavity (defined as Dc/Dj ≳ 3) exists in close association with a stagnation point flow. A local mass and momentum balance shows that the high stagnation pressure causes a radial redirection of the jet, resulting in a flow that resembles the initial impact of a jet on the pool. In fact, for these large cavities, their speed matches closely Uimpact/2, which coincides with initial cavity propagation for sufficiently high Froude numbers. Furthermore, it is shown that the approximate periodicity of air entrainment scales linearly with Froude number. This finding is confirmed by a number of simulations at θ = 12°. Qualitatively, for steeper jets, such large stagnation

  9. Measurement of the Velocity Field and Void Fraction in a Planar Plunging Jet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    plunging liquid jet entrains small bubbles from the air in the Taylor bubble. These bubbles follow the Taylor bubble in the liquid slug and...effect of any changes due to surface tension variation were too small to be detected. When the liquid jet impacts the pool surface, air entrainment ... Plunging Laminar Liquid Jets ," AIChE Journal, Vol. 12, No. 3, 563, 1966. McKeogh, E.J. and Elsaway, E., " Air Retained in

  10. Laminar Plunging Jets - Interfacial Rupture and Inception of Entrainment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, Aravind

    Interfacial rupture and entrainment are commonly observed, e.g., air bubbles within a container being filled with water from a faucet. The example involves a liquid jet (density, rho, and viscosity, η) plunging into a receiving pool of liquid. Below a critical liquid-jet velocity, the interface develops a cusp-like shape within the receiving pool. The cusp becomes sharper with increasing liquid-jet velocity, and at a critical velocity ( Vc), the interface between the liquid and the surrounding fluid (density, rho0, and viscosity, η0) ruptures. Interfacial tension (sigma) can no longer preserve the integrity of the interface between the two immiscible fluids, and the plunging jet drags/entrains surrounding fluid into the receiving pool. Subsequently, the entrained fluid breaks up into bubbles within the receiving pool. The focus of this dissertation is the numerical prediction of the critical entrainment inception velocities for laminar plunging jets using the Volume-Of-Fluid (VOF) method, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to simulate multi-fluid flows. Canonical to bottle-filling operations in the industry is the plunging-jet configuration -- the liquid jet issues from a nozzle and plunges into a container filled with liquid. Simulations of this configuration require capturing flow phenomena over a large range of length scales (4 orders of magnitude). Results show severe under-prediction of critical entrainment velocities when the maximum resolution is insufficient to capture the sharpening, and eventual rupture, of the interfacial cusp. Higher resolutions resulted in computational meshes with prohibitively large number of cells, and a drastic reduction in time-step values. Experimental results in the literature suggest at least a 100-fold increase in the smallest length scale when the entrained fluid is a liquid instead of air. This narrows the range of length scales in the problem. We exploit the experimental correlation between critical capillary

  11. Computational Study of Air Entrainment by Plunging Jets-Influence of Jet Inclination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Suraj; Trujillo, Mario

    2012-11-01

    The process of air entrainment by a continuous liquid jet plunging into a quiescent liquid pool is studied computationally. Our earlier study [APS2011] focused on shallow impacts and the discernible periodicity of air cavity formation. Here, we consider the effect of jet angle. For steep impacts, we see a chaotic formation of small cavities, in agreement with the literature. To explain the difference, we track evolution of the flow from initial impact to quasi-stationary state, for different jet inclinations. The initial impact always yields a large air cavity, regardless of jet angle. Difference emerges in the quasi-stationary state where shallow jets demonstrate the periodicity but the steep jets do not. We show that this is a manifestation of the air entrainment being a function of flow disturbance. For shallow jets, the disturbance originates from strong wavelike motion of the cavity which results in a total disruption of the jet. Thus, the resulting cavities are large and occur periodically. For the steep jets, entrainment happens by collapse of a thin gas film uniformly enshrouding the submerged jet. Such a thin film is very sensitive to the local flow disturbances. Thus, its collapse occurs stochastically all around the jet causing chaotic entrainment of small air pocket.

  12. Depth of penetration of bubbles entrained by a plunging water jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanet, Christophe; Lasheras, Juan C.

    1997-07-01

    A model is proposed to predict the depth of penetration of the air bubbles entrained by a round water jet impacting into a flat, liquid pool. This depth is shown to be determined only by the initial jet momentum and by the non-monotonic nature of the bubble terminal velocities as a function of their size. The model is shown to be in excellent agreement with measurements of the depth and width of penetration of the bubbles performed over a wide range of jet diameters, velocities, and plunging angles.

  13. Numerical simulations of transient air entrainment by rough and smooth plunging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiger, Ken; Kharoua, Nabil; Khezzar, Lyes

    2012-11-01

    Plunging jets are intimately linked to the process of air or gas entrainment into liquid pools, and can play either a beneficial or detrimental role in many environmental and industrial flows. The purpose of the present work is to assess the capability of combined LES/VOF algorithms to simulate water/air plunging jet flows, starting with the transient impact of the free jet, initial cavity formation, pinch off, and evolution towards a continuous entrainment phase. We focus on what happens in the transient impact phase for weakly and highly disturbed jets, operating with impact conditions of Re = UD / ν = 10 , 500 , We = ρU2 D / σ = 300 and Fr =U2 / gD = 83 . In particular, the study investigates the ability of the simulations to capture liquid surface instabilities and the influence of the exiting jet turbulence content on the entrainment behavior. The results indicate that the qualitative behavior of the entrainment process follows very closely what is observed in experiments, with the rough jet exhibiting surface instabilities at impact that are not present in the smooth jet. These have an effect on the development of the initial air cavity and interfacial area, leading to a doubling of the interfacial area for a nominally similar entrained volume of air.

  14. Numerical Investigation of Vertical Plunging Jet Using a Hybrid Multifluid–VOF Multiphase CFD Solver

    DOE PAGES

    Shonibare, Olabanji Y.; Wardle, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    A novel hybrid multiphase flow solver has been used to conduct simulations of a vertical plunging liquid jet. This solver combines a multifluid methodology with selective interface sharpening to enable simulation of both the initial jet impingement and the long-time entrained bubble plume phenomena. Models are implemented for variable bubble size capturing and dynamic switching of interface sharpened regions to capture transitions between the initially fully segregated flow types into the dispersed bubbly flow regime. It was found that the solver was able to capture the salient features of the flow phenomena under study and areas for quantitative improvement havemore » been explored and identified. In particular, a population balance approach is employed and detailed calibration of the underlying models with experimental data is required to enable quantitative prediction of bubble size and distribution to capture the transition between segregated and dispersed flow types with greater fidelity.« less

  15. Experiments with large diameter gravity driven impacting liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storr, G. J.; Behnia, M.

    The phenomenon of a liquid jet released under gravity and falling through or impacting onto another liquid before colliding with an obstructing solid surface has been studied experimentally under isothermal conditions. Usually the jet diameter was sufficiently large to ensure jet coherency until collision. Direct flow visualization was used to study jets released into water pools with no air head space and jets impacting onto water pools after falling through an air head space. It is shown that distances predicting the onset of buoyancy and the entrainment of air using derivations from continuous plunging jets, are not applicable for impacting jets. The morphology of jet debris after collision with the solid surfaces correlates with the wetting properties of the jet liquid on the surface.

  16. Jets of incipient liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetnikov, A. V.; Mazheiko, N. A.; Skripov, V. P.

    2000-05-01

    Jets of incipient water escaping into the atmosphere through a short channel are photographed. In some experiments. complete disintegration of the jet is observed. The relationship of this phenomenon with intense volume incipience is considered. The role of the Coanda effect upon complete opening of the jet is revealed. Measurement results of the recoil force R of the jets of incipient liquids are presented. Cases of negative thrust caused by the Coanda effect are noted. Generalization of experimental data is proposed.

  17. Dynamics of a cylinder plunging into liquid: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Hang

    2012-11-01

    The impact of a cylinder on a liquid surface and subsequent events are investigated numerically. The flows are resolved by solving the Navier-Stokes equations and the Cahn-Hilliard equation. Moving contact lines are modeled by a diffuse interface model (Seppecher 1996; Jaqcmin 2000), and contact-angle hysteresis is included (Ding&Spelt 2008). The method is validated by comparison to the experiments by Aristoff and Bush (2009). Our studies focus on the dynamics of the waves induced by the impact and the cavity collapse behind the cylinder. A variety of parameters affect the flow behaviors such as wettability, impact speed, viscosity etc. Their effects on the transition of the flow phenomena are investigated through parametric simulations over relevant ranges of Weber and Reynolds numbers and contact angles. This work is supposed by the 100 Talents Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11172294).

  18. Determination of heat transfer coefficients in plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Santos, M Victoria; Sansinena, M; Chirife, J; Zaritzky, N

    2014-12-01

    The knowledge of the thermodynamic process during the cooling of reproductive biological systems is important to assess and optimize the cryopreservation procedures. The time-temperature curve of a sample immersed in liquid nitrogen enables the calculation of cooling rates and helps to determine whether it is vitrified or undergoes phase change transition. When dealing with cryogenic liquids, the temperature difference between the solid and the sample is high enough to cause boiling of the liquid, and the sample can undergo different regimes such as film and/or nucleate pool boiling. In the present work, the surface heat transfer coefficients (h) for plastic French straws plunged in liquid nitrogen were determined using the measurement of time-temperature curves. When straws filled with ice were used the cooling curve showed an abrupt slope change which was attributed to the transition of film into nucleate pool boiling regime. The h value that fitted each stage of the cooling process was calculated using a numerical finite element program that solves the heat transfer partial differential equation under transient conditions. In the cooling process corresponding to film boiling regime, the h that best fitted experimental results was h=148.12±5.4 W/m(2) K and for nucleate-boiling h=1355±51 W/m(2) K. These values were further validated by predicting the time-temperature curve for French straws filled with a biological fluid system (bovine semen-extender) which undergoes freezing. Good agreement was obtained between the experimental and predicted temperature profiles, further confirming the accuracy of the h values previously determined for the ice-filled straw. These coefficients were corroborated using literature correlations. The determination of the boiling regimes that govern the cooling process when plunging straws in liquid nitrogen constitutes an important issue when trying to optimize cryopreservation procedures. Furthermore, this information can lead to

  19. Whipping of electrified liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R.; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally. PMID:25201984

  20. Whipping of electrified liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Josefa; Rivero, Javier; Gundabala, Venkata R; Perez-Saborid, Miguel; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-09-23

    We apply an electric field to a moderately conducting liquid surrounded by another coflowing liquid, all inside a glass-based microfluidic device, to study nonaxisymmetric instabilities. We find that the bending of the electrified jet results in a steady-state, helicoidal structure with a constant opening angle. Remarkably, the characteristic phase speed of the helicoidal wave only depends on the charge carried by the jet in the helicoidal region and its stability critically depends on the properties of the coflowing liquid. In fact, the steady-state helical structure becomes chaotic when the longest characteristic time is that of the inner liquid rather than that of the outer coflowing liquid. We also perform a numerical analysis to show that the natural preference of the jet is to adopt the conical helix structure observed experimentally.

  1. Transient gas jets into liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jane Ming-Chin

    An experimental investigation of the development of high velocity, impulsively initiated gas jets into liquid was conducted in an effort to understand some of the physical processes that occur for a jet of very light fluid into a dense ambient atmosphere. Four gases, refrigerants 12 and 22, nitrogen, and helium were injected into water at nozzle exit Mach numbers from 1.0 to 2.2.The study showed that a gas jet into water develops in at least three stages: startup, transition, and global steady state. The startup is characterized by bubble growth; the growth rate is well predicted by classical bubble-growth theory. Jet transition is marked by axially directed flow, which penetrates through the startup bubble and which forms a cylindrical protrusion along the axis of symmetry. A combination of strong recirculating flow and liquid entrainment causes the startup bubble to deflate and to lift off and move downstream. In the steady state, instantaneous photographs show small-scale fluctuations of the jet boundary, but time-averaged photographs show the expected conical spreading of the steady jet; the measured spreading angles range from 18-25 degrees.However, the most significant finding of this study is that under some conditions, the gas jet into liquid never reaches the global steady state. Instead, the jet boundary exhibits chugging: large nonlinear oscillations which lead to irregular collapses of the gas column followed by explosive outward bursts of gas. The unsteadiness observed is much more violent than the familiar fluctuations typical of constant-density jets. The length scale of the motion is generally on the order of several jet diameters; the time scale is on the order of the period for bubble collapse.It was found that the amplitude and frequency of chugging are strongly dependent on the ratio of the liquid density to the gas density, the jet Mach number, and the operating pressure ratio. The conditions under which unsteadiness occurs were determined

  2. Disintegration of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haenlein, A

    1932-01-01

    This report presents an experimental determination of the process of disintegration and atomization in its simplest form, and the influence of the physical properties of the liquid to be atomized on the disintegration of the jet. Particular attention was paid to the investigation of the process of atomization.

  3. Plunging ranula.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Vivek; Mirza, Khurram; Malhotra, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    Plunging ranulas are rare cystic masses in the neck that are mucous retention pseudocysts from an obstructed sublingual gland. They "plunge" by extending inferiorly beyond the free edge of the mylohyoid muscle, or through a dehiscence of the muscle itself, to enter the submandibular space. Imaging demonstrates a simple cystic lesion in the characteristic location and can be used to delineate relevant surgical anatomy. Surgical excision of the collection and the involved sublingual gland is performed for definitive treatment. We present a case of plunging ranula in a 44 year old female who presented with a painless, slowly enlarged neck mass. Plunging ranulas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of cystic neck masses, specifically when seen extending over, or through, the mylohyoid muscle.

  4. Cooling rate and ice-crystal measurement in biological specimens plunged into liquid ethane, propane, and Freon 22.

    PubMed

    Ryan, K P; Bald, W B; Neumann, K; Simonsberger, P; Purse, D H; Nicholson, D N

    1990-06-01

    Specimens sandwiched between copper planchettes were plunged up to a depth of 430 mm into coolants used for cryofixation. Hydrated gelatin containing a miniature thermocouple was used to mimic the behaviour of tissue during freezing. Gelatin and red blood cells were used for ice-crystal analysis. Ethane produced the fastest cooling rates and the smallest ice-crystal profiles, and Freon 22 produced the slowest cooling rates and the largest crystal profiles. Smaller crystal profiles were often seen in the centre of the specimens than in subsurface zones. The results show that ethane, rather than propane, should be used for freezing metal-sandwiched freeze-fracture specimens by the plunging method, and probably also in the jet-cooling method. They further suggest that good cryofixation could occur at the centre of thin specimens rather than only at their surfaces. Comparison between theoretical and experimental ice-crystal sizes was satisfactory, indicating that where the experimental parameters can be defined then realistic predictions can be made regarding cryofixation results.

  5. Cavitation bubble behavior inside a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Etienne; Lettry, Jacques; Farhat, Mohamed; Monkewitz, Peter A.; Avellan, François

    2007-06-01

    The growth and collapse of laser-induced vapor cavities inside axisymmetric free-falling liquid water jets have been studied. Bubbles of different size are generated at various distances from the jet axis and the effects on the jet interface are recorded by means of ultrafast cinematography. The configuration is characterized by two dimensionless parameters: the bubble to jet diameter ratio δ and the eccentricity coefficient ɛ defined as the radius of bubble generation divided by the jet radius. For high δ and ɛ, microjets and droplets are ejected from the liquid jet at speeds exceeding 100m/s. The observed jet fragmentation shows similarities with experiments conducted on a liquid mercury jet hit by a pulsed proton beam, a candidate configuration for future accelerator based facilities.

  6. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. Bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they rise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  7. Instability arisen on liquid jet penetrated in flowing liquid bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Naoto; Ueno, Ichiro

    2009-11-01

    We carry out an experimental study with a special interest on a penetration process and an instability on a liquid jet impinged to a flowing liquid pool. The impinged jet penetrates into the flowing bath accompanying with an entrainment of the ambient immiscible gas without coalescing with the liquid in the pool until the air wrap around the jet collapses. The wrapping air controls instabilities arisen on the jet. We observe the dynamic behaviors of the penetrated jet and the departure of the bubble of the wrapping gas at the tip of the collapsing jet by use of a high-speed camera in order to categorize the behaviors as functions of the velocities of the jet and flow in the pool. We also evaluate an averaged thickness of the wrapping gas through the observation.

  8. Liquid jet pumped by rising gas bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hussain, N. A.; Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    From observations of a stream of gas bubbles rising through a liquid, a two-phase mathematical model is proposed for calculating the induced turbulent vertical liquid flow. The bubbles provide a large buoyancy force and the associated drag on the liquid moves the liquid upward. The liquid pumped upward consists of the bubble wakes and the liquid brought into the jet region by turbulent entrainment. The expansion of the gas bubbles as they arise through the liquid is taken into account. The continuity and momentum equations are solved numerically for an axisymmetric air jet submerged in water. Water pumping rates are obtained as a function of air flow rate and depth of submergence. Comparisons are made with limited experimental information in the literature.

  9. Dynamics of liquid films and thin jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1979-01-01

    The theory of liquid films and thin jets as one- and two-dimensional continuums is examined. The equations of motion have led to solutions for the characteristic speeds of wave propagation for the parameters characterizing the shape. The formal analogy with a compressible fluid indicates the possibility of shock wave generation in films and jets and the formal analogy to the theory of threads and membranes leads to the discovery of some new dynamic effects. The theory is illustrated by examples.

  10. Electrospinning: Distribution of charges in liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, Konstantin G.

    2011-12-01

    An analysis of the radial distribution of charges in liquid jets is presented. Two cases where considered: (1) when the charges are uniformly distributed through the jet cross-section but are allowed to concentrate at the jet surface with time; (2) when the charges reach a steady state where the Coulomb repulsion and Brownian mixing are counterbalanced keeping the charges inside the jet. Using the first model, we showed that the charge adsorption in nonpolar fluids occurs much faster than that in polar fluids. This provides the basis for the consideration of the second model applicable for polar liquids. We examined this case and found that a steady state does exist, but the concentration of charges is limited from above by a critical concentration inversely proportional to the square of the jet radius. It was shown that above this critical concentration, the charges should accumulate at the jet surface producing an infinitely large surface charge. Using this analysis, we suggest the classification of different regimes of electrospinning when the jets are mostly carrying the volume or surface charges.

  11. Supersonic Injection of Aerated Liquid Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhari, Abhijit; Sallam, Khaled

    2016-11-01

    A computational study of the exit flow of an aerated two-dimensional jet from an under-expanded supersonic nozzle is presented. The liquid sheet is operating within the annular flow regime and the study is motivated by the application of supersonic nozzles in air-breathing propulsion systems, e.g. scramjet engines, ramjet engines and afterburners. The simulation was conducted using VOF model and SST k- ω turbulence model. The test conditions included: jet exit of 1 mm and mass flow rate of 1.8 kg/s. The results show that air reaches transonic condition at the injector exit due to the Fanno flow effects in the injector passage. The aerated liquid jet is alternately expanded by Prandtl-Meyer expansion fan and compressed by oblique shock waves due to the difference between the back (chamber) pressure and the flow pressure. The process then repeats itself and shock (Mach) diamonds are formed at downstream of injector exit similar to those typical of exhaust plumes of propulsion system. The present results, however, indicate that the flow field of supersonic aerated liquid jet is different from supersonic gas jets due to the effects of water evaporation from the liquid sheet. The contours of the Mach number, static pressure of both cases are compared to the theory of gas dynamics.

  12. Bouncing and Merging of Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Abhishek; Li, Minglei; Law, Chung K.

    2014-11-01

    Collision of two fluid jets is a technique that is utilized in many industrial applications, such as in rocket engines, to achieve controlled mixing, atomization and sometimes liquid phase reactions. Thus, the dynamics of colliding jets have direct impact on the performance, efficiency and reliability of such applications. In analogy with the dynamics of droplet-droplet collision, in this work we have experimentally demonstrated, for n-alkane hydrocarbons as well as water, that with increasing impact inertia obliquely colliding jets also exhibit the same nonmonotonic responses of merging, bouncing, merging again, and merging followed by disintegration; and that the continuous entrainment of the boundary layer air over the jet surface into the colliding interfacial region leads to two distinguishing features of jet collision, namely: there exists a maximum impact angle beyond which merging is always possible, and that merging is inhibited and then promoted with increasing pressure. These distinct response regimes were mapped and explained on the bases of impact inertia, deformation of the jet surface, viscous loss within the jet interior, and the thickness and pressure build-up within the interfacial region in order to activate the attractive surface van der Waals force to effect merging.

  13. Velocity-modulation atomization of liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dressler, John L.

    1994-01-01

    A novel atomizer based on high-amplitude velocity atomization has been developed. Presently, the most common methods of atomization can use only the Rayleigh instability of a liquid cylinder and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of a liquid sheet. Our atomizer is capable of atomizing liquid jets by the excitation and destabilization of many other higher-order modes of surface deformation. The potential benefits of this sprayer are more uniform fuel air mixtures, faster fuel-air mixing, extended flow ranges for commercial nozzles, and the reduction of nozzle plugging by producing small drops from large nozzles.

  14. Receptivity of a Cryogenic Coaxial Liquid Jet to Acoustic Disturbances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    experimentally. Liquid nitrogen in the inner jet and cooled helium in the outer annular jet were used to simulate an oxygen/hydrogen liquid rocket...been explored ex- perimentally. Liquid nitrogen in the inner jet and cooled helium in the outer annular jet were used to simulate an oxygen/hydrogen...at off-node locations using an as- sumed mode shape, and the maximum acoustic velocity magnitude is estimated from the linear acoustics equa- tion

  15. The coiling of electrified liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivero Rodriguez, Javier; Pérez-Saborid, Miguel

    2013-11-01

    We have carried out a numerical study of the coiling regime which takes place when an electrified liquid jet issuing from an orifice drilled in a metal plate electrode reaches the counter electrode. Based on the slenderness assumption, we have derived the set of one-dimensional dynamical equations by averaging the underlying balance laws over the jet cross sections (Cosserat rod model). Therefore, our equations and boundary conditions are related to those obtained by N.M. Ribe (Ann. Rev Fluid Mech., 2012) for the coiling of liquid ropes, but including electrostatic effects. In a first approach, we have simplified the electrical terms entering the problem by assuming a constant external electric field between electrodes, and that the charges are convected by the jet surface interacting electrostatically with each other via the local interaction approximation (Yarin et al., 2001). We have numerically investigated the problem in order to analize how the coiling regime depends on the dimensionless parameters of the problem, i.e., the Reynolds number, the electrical Bond number and the capillary number. In particular, we have found that both the displacement of the centerline of the jet and its cross-sectional stretching greatly depend on the electrostatic effects. Thanks to the MINECO (Spain) for partial support under grant DPI2010-20450-C03-02.

  16. Analysis of High Speed Liquid Jets Emitted from Needle Free Jet Injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portaro, Rocco; Gunter, Amy-Lee; Ng, Hoi Dick

    2012-11-01

    The replacement of the traditional hypodermic needle by needle free liquid jet injectors has been of great interest to the scientific community over recent years. This study utilizes a specially designed needle free injector in order to describe the behavior of high speed liquid jets. High speed photography is used to depict the injection process, as the jet emitted from the injector penetrates biological tissue. The penetration depth of the jet will be studied by varying parameter such as the jet diameter, geometry and power. This analysis will then be used in improving the performance of liquid free injectors by maintaining more consistent injection depths and minimizing the power required to penetrate human tissue. This in turn leads to painless injections with less risk of contamination and aids in making needle free liquid jet injectors a viable alternative to hypodermic needles. This work is supported by Fonds de recherche du Quebec - Nature et technologies.

  17. Liquid Jet Cavitation via Molecular Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashurst, W. T.

    1997-11-01

    A two-dimensional molecular dynamics simulation of a liquid jet is used to investigate cavitation in a diesel-like fuel injector. A channel with a length four times its width has been examined at various system sizes (widths of 20 to 160 σ, where σ is the zero energy location in the Lennard-Jones potential). The wall boundary condition is Maxwell's diffuse reflection, similar to the work by Sun & Ebner (Phys. Rev A 46, 4813, 1992). Currently, the jet exhausts into a vacuum, but a second, low density gas will be incorporated to represent the compressed air in a diesel chamber. Four different flow rates are examined. With ρ U equal to √mɛ/σ^2 (the largest flow rate) the static pressure decreases by a factor of twenty between the channel entrance and exit. The largest flow rate has a parabolic velocity profile with almost constant density across the channel. The smallest flow rate has the same velocity profile but the density exhibits a large variation, with the minimum value in the channel center. Thus, the product ρ U is nearly constant across the channel at this flow rate. The discharge coefficient CD has a small variation with flow rate, but the velocity coefficient CV varies with the amount of two-phase fluid within the channel. The ratio of CV to CD varies from 1.3 (largest flow rate) to 2.0 (the smallest flow rate, which is one-eighth of the largest).

  18. Breakup of free liquid jets influenced by external mechanical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lad, V. N.; Murthy, Z. V. P.

    2017-02-01

    The breakup of liquid jets has been studied with various test liquids using externally imposed mechanical vibrations. Images of the jets were captured by a high speed camera up to the speed of 1000 frames per second, and analyzed to obtain the profile of the jet and breakup length. The dynamics of the jets have also been studied to understand the effects of additives—a surfactant and polymer—incorporating externally imposed mechanical vibrations. Different types of breakup modes have been explored with respect to the Weber number and Ohnesorge number. The introduction of mechanical vibrations have caused jet breakup with separated droplets at a comparatively lower Weber number. The region of jet breakup by neck formation at constant jet velocities also contracted due to mechanical vibrations.

  19. Analysis of interaction phenomena between liquid jets and materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Sang-Wook; Reitter, T.; Carlson, G.

    1995-02-01

    The interaction phenomena of high-velocity liquid jets impinging on a material surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally to gain an understanding of the physical mechanisms involved in material removal by fluidjet machining processes. Experiments were performed to determine conditions under which the liquid jet impacting a solid material will cause material removal and also to delineate possible physical mechanisms of mass removal at optimum jet-cutting conditions. We have also carried out numerical simulations of jet-induced surface pressure rises and of the material deformation and spallation behavior due to multiple droplet impacts. Results obtained from the experiments and theoretical calculations and their physical implications are also discussed.

  20. Integrated numerical prediction of atomization process of liquid hydrogen jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Jun; Ohira, Katsuhide; Okabayashi, Kazuki; Chitose, Keiko

    2008-05-01

    The 3-D structure of the liquid atomization behavior of an LH jet flow through a pinhole nozzle is numerically investigated and visualized by a new type of integrated simulation technique. The present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis focuses on the thermodynamic effect on the consecutive breakup of a cryogenic liquid column, the formation of a liquid film, and the generation of droplets in the outlet section of the pinhole nozzle. Utilizing the governing equations for a high-speed turbulent cryogenic jet flow through a pinhole nozzle based on the thermal nonequilibrium LES-VOF model in conjunction with the CSF model, an integrated parallel computation is performed to clarify the detailed atomization process of a high-speed LH2 jet flow through a pinhole nozzle and to acquire data, which is difficult to confirm by experiment, such as atomization length, liquid core shape, droplet-size distribution, spray angle, droplet velocity profiles, and thermal field surrounding the atomizing jet flow. According to the present computation, the cryogenic atomization rate and the LH2 droplets-gas two-phase flow characteristics are found to be controlled by the turbulence perturbation upstream of the pinhole nozzle, hydrodynamic instabilities at the gas-liquid interface and shear stress between the liquid core and the periphery of the LH2 jet. Furthermore, calculation of the effect of cryogenic atomization on the jet thermal field shows that such atomization extensively enhances the thermal diffusion surrounding the LH2 jet flow.

  1. Single-phase liquid jet impingement heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, B.W.; Ma, C.F.

    1995-12-31

    Impinging liquid jets have been demonstrated to be an effective means of providing high heat/mass transfer rates in industrial transport processes. When a liquid jet strikes a surface, thin hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layers from in the region directly beneath due to the jet deceleration and the resulting increase in pressure. The flow is then forced to accelerate in a direction parallel to the target surface in what is termed the wall jet or parallel flow zone. The thickness of the hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layers in the stagnation region may be of the order of tens of micrometers. Consequently, very high heat/mass transfer coefficients exist in the stagnation zone directly under the jet. Transport coefficients characteristic of parallel flow prevail in the wall jet region. The high heat transfer coefficients make liquid jet impingement an attractive cooling option where high heat fluxes are the norm. Some industrial applications include the thermal treatment of metals, cooling of internal combustion engines, and more recently, thermal control of high-heat-dissipation electronic devices. Both circular and planar liquid jets have attracted research attention. 180 refs., 35 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Stability of liquid-nitrogen-jet laser-plasma targets

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelqvist, E. Kördel, M.; Selin, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2015-11-07

    Microscopic jets of cryogenic substances such as liquid nitrogen are important regenerative high-density targets for high-repetition rate, high-brightness laser-plasma soft x-ray sources. When operated in vacuum such liquid jets exhibit several non-classical instabilities that negatively influence the x-ray source's spatial and temporal stability, yield, and brightness, parameters that all are important for applications such as water-window microscopy. In the present paper, we investigate liquid-nitrogen jets with a flash-illumination imaging system that allows for a quantitative stability analysis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Direct and indirect consequences of evaporation are identified as the key reasons for the observed instabilities. Operating the jets in an approximately 100 mbar ambient atmosphere counteracts the effects of evaporation and produces highly stable liquid nitrogen jets. For operation in vacuum, which is necessary for the laser plasmas, we improve the stability by introducing an external radiative heating element. The method significantly extends the distance from the nozzle that can be used for liquid-jet laser plasmas, which is of importance for high-average-power applications. Finally, we show that laser-plasma operation with the heating-element-stabilized jet shows improved short-term and long-term temporal stability in its water-window x-ray emission.

  3. Splattering during turbulent liquid jet impingement on solid targets

    SciTech Connect

    Bhunia, S.K.; Lienhard, J.H. V . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-06-01

    In turbulent liquid jet impingement, a spray of droplets often breaks off of the liquid layer formed on the target. This splattering of liquid alters the efficiencies of jet impingement heat transfer processes and chemical containment safety devices, and leads to problems of aerosol formation in jet impingement cleaning processes. In this paper, the authors present a more complete study of splattering and improved correlations that extend and supersede the previous reports on this topic. The authors report experimental results on the amount of splattering for jets of water, isopropanol-water solutions, and soap-water mixtures. Jets were produced by straight tube nozzles of diameter 0.8--5.8 mm, with fully developed turbulent pipe-flow upstream of the nozzle exist. These experiments cover Weber numbers between 130--31,000, Reynolds numbers between 2,700--98,000, and nozzle-to-target separations of 0.2 [<=]l/d[<=]125. Splattering of up to 75 percent of the incoming jet liquid is observed. The results show that only the Weber number and l/d affect the fraction of jet liquid splattered. The presence of surfactants does not alter the splattering. A new correlation for the onset condition for splattering is given. In addition, the authors establish the range of applicability of the model of Lienhard et al. and the authors provide a more accurate set of coefficients for their correlation.

  4. Absolute and Convective Instability of a Liquid Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.; Hudman, M.; Chen, J. N.

    1999-01-01

    The existence of absolute instability in a liquid jet has been predicted for some time. The disturbance grows in time and propagates both upstream and downstream in an absolutely unstable liquid jet. The image of absolute instability is captured in the NASA 2.2 sec drop tower and reported here. The transition from convective to absolute instability is observed experimentally. The experimental results are compared with the theoretical predictions on the transition Weber number as functions of the Reynolds number. The role of interfacial shear relative to all other relevant forces which cause the onset of jet breakup is explained.

  5. How do liquid fuel physical properties affect liquid jet development in atomisers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2016-10-01

    The influence of liquid fuel properties on atomisation remains an open question. The droplet sizes in sprays from atomisers operated with different fuels may be modified despite the small changes of the liquid properties. This paper examines experimentally the development of a liquid jet injected from a plain orifice in order to evaluate changes in its behaviour due to modifications of the liquid properties, which may influence the final atomisation characteristics. Two aviation kerosenes with similar, but not identical physical properties are considered, namely, standard JP8 kerosene as the reference fuel and bio-derived hydro-processed renewable jet fuel as an alternative biofuel. The corresponding density, dynamic viscosity, kinematic viscosity, and surface tension change by about +5%, -5%, -10%, and +5%, respectively, which are typical for "drop-in" fuel substitution. Three aspects of the liquid jet behaviour are experimentally considered. The pressure losses of the liquid jet through the nozzle are examined in terms of the discharge coefficient for different flowrates. The morphology of the liquid jet is visualised using high magnification Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) imaging. Finally, the temporal development of the liquid jet interfacial velocity as a function of distance from the nozzle exit is measured from time-dependent motion analysis of dual-frame LIF imaging measurements of the jet. The results show that for the small changes in the physical properties between the considered liquid fuels, the direct substitution of fuel did not result in a drastic change of the external morphology of the fuel jets. However, the small changes in the physical properties modify the interfacial velocities of the liquid and consequently the internal jet velocity profile. These changes can modify the interaction of the liquid jet with the surroundings, including air flows in coaxial or cross flow atomisation, and influence the atomisation characteristics during the

  6. Focusing of cylindrical liquid jets into droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Kristen; McCleney, Amy; Bardet, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    Upward angled water jets discharging in quiescent air are studied experimentally with time varying forcing. The jets issue from a 2 mm diameter tube, while highly controllable forcing is accomplished with a magnetic linear motor coupled with an arbitrary waveform generator. In particular, regimes of jet focusing are generated at various injection rates. The jets result in large droplets that can be created at various elevations. This type of flow mimics the spray generated by an Archer fish. Actual forcing functions were monitored using LDT.

  7. Cavitating Jet Method and System for Oxygenation of Liquids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chahine, Georges L.

    2012-01-01

    Reclamation and re-use of water is critical for space-based life support systems. A number of functions must be performed by any such system including removal of various contaminants and oxygenation. For long-duration space missions, this must be done with a compact, reliable system that requires little or no use of expendables and minimal power. DynaJets cavitating jets can oxidize selected organic compounds with much greater energy efficiency than ultrasonic devices typically used in sonochemistry. The focus of this work was to develop cavitating jets to simultaneously accomplish the functions of oxygenation and removal of contaminants of importance to space-structured water reclamation systems. The innovation is a method to increase the concentration of dissolved oxygen or other gasses in a liquid. It utilizes a particular form of novel cavitating jet operating at low to moderate pressures to achieve a high-efficiency means of transporting and mixing the gas into the liquid. When such a jet is utilized to simultaneously oxygenate the liquid and to oxidize organic compounds within the liquid, such as those in waste water, the rates of contaminant removal are increased. The invention is directed toward an increase in the dissolved gas content of a liquid, in general, and the dissolved oxygen content of a liquid in particular.

  8. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 7. GPGP Jet Fuels Production Program. Evaluation of Technical Uncertainties for Producing Jet Fuels from Liquid By-Products of the Great Plains Gasification Plant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    AFWAL-TR-87-2042 VOLUME VII PRODUCTION OF JET FUELS FROM COAL DERIVED LIQUIDS I VOLUME VII -- GPGP JET FUELS PRODUCTION PROGRAM -- EVALUATION OF o...from Coal Derived Liquids, Vol VII - GPGP Jet Fuels Production Program - Evaluation of Technical Uncertainties for Producing Jet Fuels from Liquid By...potential of jet fuel production from the liquid by-product streams produced by the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant ( GPGP

  9. Spraying modes in coaxial jet electrospray with outer driving liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaopeng; Jia, Laibing; Yin, Xiezhen; Cheng, Jiusheng; Lu, Jian

    2005-03-01

    Coaxial jet electrospray is a technique to generate microencapsules, which uses electric forces to create a coaxial microjet from two immiscible liquids. Compound droplets with narrow size distribution are produced after the jet breaks up. In this paper, the spraying modes are investigated experimentally with proper flow rates of the inner and outer liquids. Ethanol/glycerol/tween mixture (outer liquid) and cooking oil (inner liquid) are fed into the gap between outer and inner capillaries and the inner capillary, respectively. The spraying modes presented in our experiments are "dripping mode," "dripping mode in spindle," "cone-jet mode," "pulse mode in cone," and "multijets mode" sequentially, as the applied voltage increases. The region of stable cone-jet mode extends with decrease of the outer liquid flow rate and increase of the inner one. It is found that the spray phenomena are mainly determined by properties of the outer liquid, which is viscous and electric conductive enough. A rudimentary physical model is developed, in which both the viscosity and liquid interface tension are taken into account.

  10. Contraction of an inviscid swirling liquid jet: Comparison with results for a rotating granular jet.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, P. D.; Kubitschek, J. P.

    2007-11-01

    In honor of the tercentenary of Leonhard Euler, we report a new solution of the Euler equations for the shape of an inviscid rotating liquid jet emanating from a tube of inner radius R0 aligned with gravity. Jet contraction is dependent on the exit swirl parameter χ0 = R0 φ0/U0 where φ0 and U0 are the uniform rotation rate and axial velocity of the liquid at the exit. The results reveal that rotation reduces the rate of jet contraction. In the limit χ0-> 0 one recovers the contraction profile for a non-rotating jet and the limit χ0->∞ gives a jet of constant radius. In contrast, experiments and a kinematic model for a rotating non-cohesive granular jet show that it expands rather than contracts when a certain small angular velocity is exceeded. The blossoming profiles are parabolic in nature. The model predicts a jet of uniform radius for χ0-> 0 and a jet with an initially horizontal trajectory in the limit χ0->∞.

  11. Impinging jet separators for liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic power cycles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.

    1973-01-01

    In many liquid metal MHD power, cycles, it is necessary to separate the phases of a high-speed liquid-gas flow. The usual method is to impinge the jet at a glancing angle against a solid surface. These surface separators achieve good separation of the two phases at a cost of a large velocity loss due to friction at the separator surface. This report deals with attempts to greatly reduce the friction loss by impinging two jets against each other. In the crude impinging jet separators tested to date, friction losses were greatly reduced, but the separation of the two phases was found to be much poorer than that achievable with surface separators. Analyses are presented which show many lines of attack (mainly changes in separator geometry) which should yield much better separation for impinging jet separators).

  12. Numerical simulation of liquid jet impact on a rigid wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganin, A. A.; Guseva, T. S.

    2016-11-01

    Basic points of a numerical technique for computing high-speed liquid jet impact on a rigid wall are presented. In the technique the flows of the liquid and the surrounding gas are governed by the equations of gas dynamics in the density, velocity, and pressure, which are integrated by the CIP-CUP method on dynamically adaptive grids without explicitly tracking the gas-liquid interface. The efficiency of the technique is demonstrated by the results of computing the problems of impact of the liquid cone and the liquid wedge on a wall in the mode with the shockwave touching the wall by its edge. Numerical solutions of these problems are compared with the analytical solution of the problem of impact of the plane liquid flow on a wall. Applicability of the technique to the problems of the high-speed liquid jet impact on a wall is illustrated by the results of computing a problem of impact of a cylindrical liquid jet with the hemispherical end on a wall covered by a layer of the same liquid.

  13. Experimental investigation of charged liquid jet efflux from a capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhakin, A. I.; Belov, P. A.; Kuz'ko, A. E.

    2013-03-01

    The shapes and electrical characteristics of charged liquid (water, ethanol, glycerol, castor oil) jets emitted from a metal capillary have been experimentally studied depending on the applied high voltage. A map of efflux regimes in the flow velocity-applied voltage coordinates is constructed for water. The effects of medium viscosity, surface tension, and charge relaxation time on the laws of jet efflux are analyzed.

  14. Modeling of Turbulence Effect on Liquid Jet Atomization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, H. P.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies indicate that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effect on the atomization process. Such turbulent flow phenomena are encountered in most practical applications of common liquid spray devices. This research aims to model the effects of turbulence occurring inside a cylindrical liquid jet to its atomization process. The two widely used atomization models Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz and the Taylor analogy breakup (TAB) of O'Rourke and Amsden portraying primary liquid jet disintegration and secondary droplet breakup, respectively, are examined. Additional terms are formulated and appropriately implemented into these two models to account for the turbulence effect. Results for the flow conditions examined in this study indicate that the turbulence terms are significant in comparison with other terms in the models. In the primary breakup regime, the turbulent liquid jet tends to break up into large drops while its intact core is slightly shorter than those without turbulence. In contrast, the secondary droplet breakup with the inside liquid turbulence consideration produces smaller drops. Computational results indicate that the proposed models provide predictions that agree reasonably well with available measured data.

  15. Convective heat transfer by impingement of circular liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Lienhard, J. H. V.; Lombara, J. S.

    1991-08-01

    The impingement of circular, liquid jets provides a convenient method of cooling surfaces. Here, jet impingement cooling of uniformly heated surfaces is investigated analytically and experimentally for stable, unsubmerged, uniform velocity laminar jets in the absence of phase change. Analytical and numerical predictions are developed for a laminar radial film flow. Experiments using undisturbed laminar jets were performed to determine local Nusselt numbers from the stagnation point to radii of up to 40 diameters. Turbulent transition in the film flow is observed experimentally at a certain radius. Beyond this transition radius, a separate turbulent analysis is constructed. Integral method results are compared to numberical results, and Prandtl number effects are investigated. The predictions are found to agree well with the measurements for both laminar and turbulent flow. Predictive formulas are recommended for the entire range of radii.

  16. Convective heat transfer by impingement of circular liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Lienhard, J.H. V; Lombara, J.S. )

    1991-08-01

    The impingement of circular, liquid jets provides a convenient method of cooling surfaces. Here, jet impingement cooling of uniformly heated surfaces is investigated analytically and experimentally for stable, unsubmerged, uniform velocity laminar jets in the absence of phase change. Analytical and numerical predictions are developed for a laminar radial film flow. Experiments using undisturbed laminar jets were performed to determine local Nusselt numbers from the stagnation point to radii of up to 40 diameters. Turbulent transition in the film flow is observed experimentally at a certain radius. Beyond this transition radius, a separate turbulent analysis is constructed. Integral method results are compared to numerical results, and Prandtl number effects are investigated. The predictions are found to agree well with the measurements for both laminar and turbulent flow. Predictive formulae are recommended for the entire range of radii.

  17. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu; Chen, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. For certain flow regimes, it has been observed that the liquid jet surface is highly turbulent. This turbulence characteristic plays a key role on the breakup of the liquid jet near to the injector exit. Other experiments also showed that the breakup length of the liquid core is sharply shortened as the liquid jet is changed from the laminar to the turbulent flow conditions. In the numerical and physical modeling arena, most of commonly used atomization models do not include the turbulence effect. Limited attempts have been made in modeling the turbulence phenomena on the liquid jet disintegration. The subject correlation and models treat the turbulence either as an only source or a primary driver in the breakup process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. In the course of this study, two widely used models, Reitz's primary atomization (blob) and Taylor-Analogy-Break (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al. are examined. Additional terms are derived and implemented appropriately into these two models to account for the turbulence effect on the atomization process. Since this enhancement effort is based on a framework of the two existing atomization models, it is appropriate to denote the two present models as T-blob and T-TAB for the primary and secondary atomization predictions, respectively. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic time scales and the initial flow conditions. This treatment offers a balance of contributions of individual physical phenomena on the liquid breakup process. For the secondary breakup, an addition turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size

  18. Observations of breakup processes of liquid jets using real-time X-ray radiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Char, J. M.; Kuo, K. K.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1988-01-01

    To unravel the liquid-jet breakup process in the nondilute region, a newly developed system of real-time X-ray radiography, an advanced digital image processor, and a high-speed video camera were used. Based upon recorded X-ray images, the inner structure of a liquid jet during breakup was observed. The jet divergence angle, jet breakup length, and fraction distributions along the axial and transverse directions of the liquid jets were determined in the near-injector region. Both wall- and free-jet tests were conducted to study the effect of wall friction on the jet breakup process.

  19. Controls on Filling and Evacuation of Sediment in Waterfall Plunge Pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, J. S.; Lamb, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    Many waterfalls are characterized by the presence of deep plunge pools that experience periods of sediment fill and evacuation. These cycles of sediment fill are a first order control on the relative magnitude of lateral versus vertical erosion at the base of waterfalls, as vertical incision requires cover-free plunge pools to expose the bedrock floor, while lateral erosion can occur when pools are partially filled and plunge-pool walls are exposed. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model describing sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools, limiting our ability to predict waterfall retreat. To address this knowledge gap, we performed detailed laboratory experiments measuring plunge-pool sediment transport capacity (Qsc_pool) under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. Our experimental plunge-pool sediment transport capacity measurements match well with a mechanistic model we developed which combines existing waterfall jet theory with a modified Rouse profile to predict sediment transport capacity as a function of water discharge and suspended sediment concentration at the plunge-pool lip. Comparing the transport capacity of plunge pools to lower gradient portions of rivers (Qsc_river) shows that, for transport limited conditions, plunge pools fill with sediment under modest water discharges when Qsc_river > Qsc_pool, and empty to bedrock under high discharges when Qsc_pool > Qsc_river. These results are consistent with field observations of sand-filled plunge pools with downstream boulder rims, implying filling and excavation of plunge pools over single-storm timescales. Thus, partial filling of waterfall plunge pools may provide a mechanism to promote lateral undercutting and retreat of waterfalls in homogeneous rock in which plunge-pool vertical incision occurs during brief large floods that expose bedrock, whereas lateral erosion may prevail during smaller events.

  20. Interfacial condensation induced by sub-cooled liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rame, Enrique; Balasubramaniam, R.

    2016-11-01

    When a sub-cooled liquid jet impinges on the free surface between a liquid and its vapor, vapor will condense at a rate dependent on the sub-cooling, the jet strength and fluid properties. In 1966 and during the examination of a different type of condensation flow, Shekriladeze found an approximate result, valid at large condensation rates, that decouples the flow in the liquid phase from that of the vapor, without putting it in the context of a formal asymptotic approximation. In this talk we will develop an asymptotic approximation that contains Shekriladze's result, and extend the calculations to the case when a non-condensable gas is present in the vapor phase.

  1. Two-phase liquid-liquid flows generated by impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsaoulidis, Dimitrios; Li, Qi; Angeli, Panagiota

    2015-11-01

    Two-phase flows in intensified small-scale systems find increasing applications in (bio)chemical analysis and synthesis, fuel cells, polymerisation, and separation processes (solvent extraction). Current nuclear spent fuel reprocessing separation technologies have been developed many decades ago and have not taken account recent advances on process intensification which can drive down plant size and economics. In this work, intensified impinging jets will be developed to create dispersions by bringing the two liquid phases into contact through opposing small channels. A systematic set of experiments has been undertaken, to investigate the hydrodynamic characteristics, to develop predictive models, and enable comparisons with other contactors. Drop size distribution and mixing intensity will be investigated for liquid-liquid mixtures as a function of various parameters using high speed imaging and conductivity probes.

  2. Liquid Jet Formation in Laser-Induced Forward Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, C. Frederik

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) is a direct-write technique capable of printing precise patterns of a wide variety of materials. In this process, a laser pulse is focused through a transparent support and absorbed in a thin donor film, propelling material onto an adjacent acceptor substrate. For fluid materials, this transfer occurs through the formation of a narrow liquid jet, which eventually pinches off due to surface tension. This thesis examines in detail the fluid mechanics of the jet formation process occurring in LIFT. The main focus is on a variant of LIFT known as blister-actuated LIFT (BA-LIFT), in which the laser pulse is absorbed in an ink-coated polymer layer, rapidly deforming it locally into a blister to induce liquid jet formation. The early-time response of a fluid layer to a deforming boundary is analyzed with a domain perturbation method and potential-flow simulations, revealing scalings for energy and momentum transfer to the fluid and providing physical insight on how and why a jet forms in BA-LIFT. The remaining chapters explore more complex applications and modifications of LIFT. One is the possibility of high-repetition rate printing and limits on time delay and separation between pulses imposed by a tilting effect found for adjacent jets. Another examines a focusing effect achieved by perturbing the interface with ring-shaped disturbances. The third contains an experimental study of LIFT using a silver paste as the donor material instead of a Newtonian liquid. The transfer mechanism is significantly different, although with repeated pulses at one location, a focusing effect is again observed. All three of these chapters investigate how perturbations to the interface can strongly influence the jet formation process.

  3. Receptivity of a Cryogenic Coaxial Gas-Liquid Jet to Acoustic Disturbances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    in the inner jet and cooled helium in the outer annular jet to represent the nominal fluid dynamical conditions of an oxygen/hydrogen liquid rocket...acoustic disturbances. The shear coaxial jet flow employed liquid nitrogen in the inner jet and cooled helium in the outer annular jet to represent...shape, and the maximum acoustic velocity magnitude is estimated from the linear acoustics equation, c pu cρ ′ =′ (1) where u’ is the magnitude

  4. Sediment transport through self-adjusting, bedrock-walled waterfall plunge pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2016-05-01

    Many waterfalls have deep plunge pools that are often partially or fully filled with sediment. Sediment fill may control plunge-pool bedrock erosion rates, partially determine habitat availability for aquatic organisms, and affect sediment routing and debris flow initiation. Currently, there exists no mechanistic model to describe sediment transport through waterfall plunge pools. Here we develop an analytical model to predict steady-state plunge-pool depth and sediment-transport capacity by combining existing jet theory with sediment transport mechanics. Our model predicts plunge-pool sediment-transport capacity increases with increasing river discharge, flow velocity, and waterfall drop height and decreases with increasing plunge-pool depth, radius, and grain size. We tested the model using flume experiments under varying waterfall and plunge-pool geometries, flow hydraulics, and sediment size. The model and experiments show that through morphodynamic feedbacks, plunge pools aggrade to reach shallower equilibrium pool depths in response to increases in imposed sediment supply. Our theory for steady-state pool depth matches the experiments with an R2 value of 0.8, with discrepancies likely due to model simplifications of the hydraulics and sediment transport. Analysis of 75 waterfalls suggests that the water depths in natural plunge pools are strongly influenced by upstream sediment supply, and our model provides a mass-conserving framework to predict sediment and water storage in waterfall plunge pools for sediment routing, habitat assessment, and bedrock erosion modeling.

  5. Extremely high heat fluxes beneath impinging liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Lienhard, J. H., V.

    1993-05-01

    Measurements of jet-impingement heat fluxes up to 400 MW/sq m were obtained using a specially designed experimental arrangement where a thin metal plate was heated from one side with a plasma arc and cooled from the other side with an unsubmerged impinging water jet produced by a 34 MPa piston pump supplying a large cylindrical plenum. The results of this study, where heating was confined to the stagnation region, show no evidence of a critical heat flux, even up to the maximum power applied. The large fluxes were limited only by wall failure and the power of the heating source, and not by liquid-side thermal resistance.

  6. Multiple Pulses from Plasma Jets onto Liquid Covered Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth; Tian, Wei; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-10-01

    Atmospheric pressure plasma jets are being studied in the treatment of biological surfaces that are often covered by a thin layer of liquid. The plume of the plasma jet contains neutral radicals and charged species that solvate into the liquid and eventually form terminal species that reach the tissue below. The contribution of neutral and charged species to reactivity in the liquid is sensitive to whether the active plasma plume touches the liquid. In this paper, we discuss results from modeling the production of the aqueous species formed from the interaction of the plume of plasma jets over multiple pulses with the water layer, and the fluences of the species to the underlying tissue. The model used in this study, nonPDPSIM, solves transport equations for charged and neutral species and electron energy, Poisson's equation for the electric potential, and Navier-Stokes equations for the neutral gas flow. Radiation transport includes photoionization of O2 and H2O in the gas and liquid phases and photodissocation of H2Oaq in the liquid. Multiple pulses when the plasma plume touches and does not touch the liquid will be examined. Two regimes of hydrodynamics will be discussed - low repetition rates where the neutral radicals are blown away before the next discharge pulse, and high repetition rate when the plasma plume interacts with neutral radicals from previous pulses. The density of aqueous ions produced in the liquid layer is strongly dependent on whether the plasma effluent touches or does not touch the water surface. Work supported by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and NSF.

  7. METHOD OF LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION OF BLOOD SURROGATES FOR ASSESSING HUMAN EXPOSURE TO JET FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    A baseline method of liquid?liquid extraction for assessing human exposure to JP-8 jet fuel was established by extracting several representative compounds ranging from very volatile to semi-volatile organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, nonane, decane, undecane, tridec...

  8. Parametric Investigation of Liquid Jets in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2005-01-01

    An axisymmetric phase field model is developed and used to model surface tension forces on liquid jets in microgravity. The previous work in this area is reviewed and a baseline drop tower experiment selected for model comparison. This paper uses the model to parametrically investigate the influence of key parameters on the geysers formed by jets in microgravity. Investigation of the contact angle showed the expected trend of increasing contact angle increasing geyser height. Investigation of the tank radius showed some interesting effects and demonstrated the zone of free surface deformation is quite large. Variation of the surface tension with a laminar jet showed clearly the evolution of free surface shape with Weber number. It predicted a breakthrough Weber number of 1.

  9. Laser-induced jet formation in liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, Frederik; Arnold, Craig

    2014-11-01

    The absorption of a focused laser pulse in a liquid film generates a cavitation bubble on which a narrow jet can form. This is the basis of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a versatile printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. We study the influence of the fluid properties and laser pulse energy on jet formation using numerical simulations and time-resolved imaging. At low energies, surface tension causes the jet to retract without transferring a drop, and at high energies, the bubble breaks up into a splashing spray. We explore the parameter space of Weber number, Ohnesorge number, and ratio of film thickness to maximum bubble radius, revealing regions where uniform drops are transferred.

  10. Jet-noise reduction through liquid-base foam injection.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Burge, H. L.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been made of the sound-absorbing properties of liquid-base foams and of their ability to reduce jet noise. Protein, detergent, and polymer foaming agents were used in water solutions. A method of foam generation was developed to permit systematic variation of the foam density. The investigation included measurements of sound-absorption coefficents for both plane normal incidence waves and diffuse sound fields. The intrinsic acoustic properties of foam, e.g., the characteristic impedance and the propagation constant, were also determined. The sound emitted by a 1-in.-diam cold nitrogen jet was measured for subsonic (300 m/sec) and supersonic (422 m/sec) jets, with and without foam injection. Noise reductions up to 10 PNdB were measured.

  11. Liquid jet impinging orthogonally on a wettability-patterned surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukoravas, Theodore; Ghosh, Aritra; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2016-11-01

    Jet impingement has many technological applications because of its numerous merits, especially those related to the ability of liquids to carry away heat very efficiently. The present study introduces a new configuration employing a wettability-patterning approach to divert an orthogonally-impinging laminar water jet onto a predetermined portion of the target surface. Diverging wettable tracks on a superhydrophobic background provide the means to re-direct the impinging jet along paths determined by the shape of these tracks on the solid surface. In a heat transfer example of this method, an open-surface heat exchanger is constructed and its heat transfer performance is characterized. Since this approach facilitates prolonged liquid contact with the underlying heated surface through thin-film spreading, evaporative cooling is also promoted. We demonstrate flow cases extracting 100 W/cm2 at water flow rates of O(10 mL/min). By comparing with other jet-impingement cooling approaches, the present method provides roughly four times more efficient cooling by using less amount of coolant. The reduced coolant use, combined with the gravity-independent character of this technique, offer a new paradigm for compact heat transfer devices designed to operate in reduced- or zero-gravity environments.

  12. Global frequency response analysis of gravitationally stretched liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli-Lizzi, Paula; Coenen, Wilfried; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2013-11-01

    The convective capillary break-up of freely falling axisymmetric jets of Newtonian liquid is theoretically studied with a one-dimensional description of the mass and momentum conservation equations. Instead of using the classical quasi-parallel assumption in the stability analysis, here we compute the global linear response of the flow to harmonic inputs at the exit of the jet, allowing us to predict its break-up length in cases where the base flow is not slender. Our theory compares favourably with recent experiments by Javadi et al. (PRL 110, 144501, 2013), who measured the break-up length of unforced liquid jets of several viscosities. From the physical point of view, our main finding is that the meniscus region near the injector outlet, where the jet experiences the strongest axial stretching, delays the growth of capillary disturbances due to a spatial counterpart of the kinematic stabilizing mechanism firstly described by Tomotika (Proc. Roy. Soc. 153, 1936) in a temporal setting. Supported by Spanish MINECO under project DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  13. Nonaxisymmetric disturbances in compound liquid jets falling under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzaal, Muhammad F.; Uddin, Jamal

    2016-10-01

    The disintegration of a compound thread of fluid can be utilized in a wide variety of applications including the production of compound droplets or capsules. In this paper we investigate the linear instability of a compound inviscid liquid jet falling under gravity in a surrounding gas with respect to nonaxisymmetric waves. We derive an analytical expression for the dispersion relation, which takes into account the non-uniform nature of the jet, and which we then solve numerically. Particular attention is paid to investigating the effects of the liquid-to-gas density ratio on the growth and development of different wave modes as well as the influence of gravity. Our results show that there exists some nonaxisymmetric long wavelength disturbances that are more unstable than their asymmetric equivalents and that the influence of gravity can alter the behavior of these modes.

  14. Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2001-01-01

    Tension in Microgravity Modeled Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, jets must be contained by surface tension forces. Recent NASA experiments in microgravity (Tank Pressure Control Experiment, TPCE, and Vented Tank Pressure Experiment, VTRE) resulted in a wealth of data about jet behavior in microgravity. VTRE was surprising in that, although it contained a complex geometry of baffles and vanes, the limit on liquid inflow was the emergence of a liquid jet from the top of the vane structure. Clearly understanding the restraint of liquid jets by surface tension is key to managing fluids in low gravity. To model this phenomenon, we need a numerical method that can track the fluid motion and the surface tension forces. The fluid motion is modeled with the Navier-Stokes equation formulated for low-speed incompressible flows. The quantities of velocity and pressure are placed on a staggered grid, with velocity being tracked at cell faces and pressure at cell centers. The free surface is tracked via the introduction of a color function that tracks liquid as 1/2 and gas as -1/2. A phase model developed by Jacqmin is used. This model converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly. Previous attempts at this formulation have been criticized for smearing the interface. However, by sharpening the phase

  15. Liquid jet breakup regimes at supercritical pressures

    DOE PAGES

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-07-23

    Previously, a theory has been presented that explains how discrete vapor–liquid interfaces become diminished at certain high-pressure conditions in a manner that leads to well known qualitative trends observed from imaging in a variety of experiments. Rather than surface tension forces, transport processes can dominate over relevant ranges of conditions. In this paper, this framework is now generalized to treat a wide range of fuel-oxidizer combinations in a manner consistent with theories of capillary flows and extended corresponding states theory. Different flow conditions and species-specific molecular properties are shown to produce distinct variations of interfacial structures and local free molecularmore » paths. These variations are shown to occur over the operating ranges in a variety of propulsion and power systems. Despite these variations, the generalized analysis reveals that the envelope of flow conditions at which the transition from classical sprays to diffusion-dominated mixing occurs exhibits a characteristic shape for all liquid–gas combinations. As a result, for alkane-oxidizer mixtures, it explains that these conditions shift to higher pressure flow conditions with increasing carbon number and demonstrates that, instead of widely assumed classical spray atomization, diffusion-dominated mixing may occur under relevant high-pressure conditions in many modern devices.« less

  16. Liquid jet breakup regimes at supercritical pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Oefelein, Joseph C.; Dahms, Rainer Norbert Uwe

    2015-07-23

    Previously, a theory has been presented that explains how discrete vapor–liquid interfaces become diminished at certain high-pressure conditions in a manner that leads to well known qualitative trends observed from imaging in a variety of experiments. Rather than surface tension forces, transport processes can dominate over relevant ranges of conditions. In this paper, this framework is now generalized to treat a wide range of fuel-oxidizer combinations in a manner consistent with theories of capillary flows and extended corresponding states theory. Different flow conditions and species-specific molecular properties are shown to produce distinct variations of interfacial structures and local free molecular paths. These variations are shown to occur over the operating ranges in a variety of propulsion and power systems. Despite these variations, the generalized analysis reveals that the envelope of flow conditions at which the transition from classical sprays to diffusion-dominated mixing occurs exhibits a characteristic shape for all liquid–gas combinations. As a result, for alkane-oxidizer mixtures, it explains that these conditions shift to higher pressure flow conditions with increasing carbon number and demonstrates that, instead of widely assumed classical spray atomization, diffusion-dominated mixing may occur under relevant high-pressure conditions in many modern devices.

  17. Jet-mixing of initially-stratified liquid-liquid pipe flows: experiments and numerical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Stuart; Ibarra-Hernandes, Roberto; Xie, Zhihua; Markides, Christos; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Low pipeline velocities lead to stratification and so-called 'phase slip' in horizontal liquid-liquid flows due to differences in liquid densities and viscosities. Stratified flows have no suitable single point for sampling, from which average phase properties (e.g. fractions) can be established. Inline mixing, achieved by static mixers or jets in cross-flow (JICF), is often used to overcome liquid-liquid stratification by establishing unstable two-phase dispersions for sampling. Achieving dispersions in liquid-liquid pipeline flows using JICF is the subject of this experimental and modelling work. The experimental facility involves a matched refractive index liquid-liquid-solid system, featuring an ETFE test section, and experimental liquids which are silicone oil and a 51-wt% glycerol solution. The matching then allows the dispersed fluid phase fractions and velocity fields to be established through advanced optical techniques, namely PLIF (for phase) and PTV or PIV (for velocity fields). CFD codes using the volume of a fluid (VOF) method are then used to demonstrate JICF breakup and dispersion in stratified pipeline flows. A number of simple jet configurations are described and their dispersion effectiveness is compared with the experimental results. Funding from Cameron for Ph.D. studentship (SW) gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza

    2011-11-01

    In the recent years, development of alternative jet fuels is gaining importance owing to the demand for cleaner combustion. In addition to having energy density that matches those of conventional fuels, alternate jet fuels need to possess vital qualities such as rapid atomization and vaporization, quick re-ignition at high altitude, less emission, and poses ease of handling. The fuel preparatory steps (atomization and vaporization) and mixing in a combustion chamber play a crucial role on the subsequent combustion and emission characteristics. Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) synthetic jet fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics as a result of the absence of aromatics and sulphur. As a part of an on-going joint effort between Texas A&M at Qatar (TAMUQ), Rolls-Royce (UK), and German Aerospace Laboratory (DLR), a spray characterization experimental facility is set up at TAMUQ to study the spray characteristics of GTL fuel and highlights the influence of change in fuel composition on the spray characteristics. In this work, spray characteristics such as droplet size, velocity, and distribution of different GTL fuel blends is investigated and compared with the spray characteristics of conventional JetA1 fuel. Supported by Qatar Science and Technology Park, QSTP.

  19. Functionalization of carbon nanowalls by plasma jet in liquid treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ionita, Maria D.; Vizireanu, Sorin; Stoica, Silviu D.; Ionita, Mariana; Pandele, Andreea M.; Cucu, Ana; Stamatin, Ioan; Nistor, Leona C.; Dinescu, Gheorghe

    2016-02-01

    Submerged in liquid plasma treatment is a new approach for nanomaterials functionalization. This paper presents a surfactant free method for functionalization of graphene nano-platelets derived from carbon nanowalls through plasma jet treatment of their water suspensions. The untreated and under-liquid plasma treated suspensions were characterized in terms of their UV-Vis absorption, zeta-size, zeta-potential, pH, and conductivity. Investigation of dried material revealed that the graphene nano-sheets morphology and structure have been preserved, showing also new oxygen functional groups bonded to the carbon network after in liquid plasma treatment. The results demonstrate the efficiency of this technique in changing the properties of carbon nanowalls suspensions and also in getting functionalized multilayered graphene sheets.

  20. Nanoscale Liquid Jets Shape New Line of Business

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Just as a pistol shrimp stuns its prey by quickly closing its oversized claw to shoot out a shock-inducing, high-velocity jet of water, NanoMatrix, Inc., is sending shockwaves throughout the nanotechnology world with a revolutionary, small-scale fabrication process that uses powerful liquid jets to cut and shape objects. Emanuel Barros, a former project engineer at NASA s Ames Research Center, set out to form the Santa Cruz, California-based NanoMatrix firm and materialize the micro/nano cutting process partially inspired by the water-spewing crustacean. Early on in his 6-year NASA career, Barros led the development of re-flown flight hardware for an award-winning Spacelab project called NeuroLab. This project, the sixteenth and final Spacelab mission, focused on a series of experiments to determine the effects of microgravity on the development of the mammalian nervous system.

  1. One-Dimensional Analysis of a Liquid Jet in a Regenerative Liquid Propellant Gun

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    chamber in the form of liquid in the jet. If the jet is represented with droplets stripped from the jet which bum according to a pressure - dependent bum rate...heats, p is the gas density, b is the covolume , P is pressure and c 19 2.5 2.4 2.3 2.2 2.1? 2 1.9 1.8 ~1.7 = 1.6 ~1.5 1.4 1.3 o 1.2 - 1.1to LUMP PAR0.9...WEIGHT OF PRODUCTS(GM/GMOLI 19.062 COVOLUME OF PRODUCTS(CC/GM) 1.257 INITIAL DATA PRESSURE OF GAS(MPA) 3.400 PRESSURE OF LIQUID BOOSTER CHARGE(MPA) 2.000

  2. Penetration process and instabilities arisen on a liquid jet impinged to a liquid flowing in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Kaoru; Ueno, Ichiro

    2010-11-01

    We conduct a series of experiments with a special interest on a penetration process and instabilities arisen on a liquid jet impinged to a liquid of the same kind flowing in a channel. The impinged jet penetrates into the flowing bath accompanying with entrainment of the ambient immiscible gas, which results in the impinged jet wrapped by the entrained gas as a "sheath." This sheath formation enables the impinged jet to survive in the fluid in the channel without coalescing until the entrained-air sheath breaks down. Occasionally a "cap" of the entrained air is formed at the tip of the penetrated jet, and the jet elongates like a long balloon. Dynamic behaviors of the penetrated jet and the departure of the bubble of warring gas at the tip of the collapsing jet observed by use of a high-speed camera are discussed.

  3. Surface Properties of Turbulent Liquid Jets in Still Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallam, Khaled; Faeth, Gerard

    2001-11-01

    The mechanisms of creating drops from ligaments along the free surface of turbulent round and plane liquid jets in gases during turbulent primary breakup were investigated experimentally using pulsed holography. Jet exit conditions were limited to non-cavitating water and ethanol flows and long length-to-diameter ratio constant area injector passages at conditions where direct effects of liquid viscosity were small. Measurements involved drop/ligament diameter ratio, ligament angle, ligament slenderness ratio at the time of breakup, ligament breakup time and ligament tip velocity. The results show that the main mode of ligament breakup is Rayleigh breakup with the initial disturbance amplitude comparable to the ligament size and with drops forming at the tip of the ligament. A less common mode of drop formation involved ligament separation at its base due to velocity fluctuations. Ligament velocities were enhanced compared to the expectations of velocity fluctuations in turbulent pipe flows due to the smaller inertial resistance of the gas compared to the liquid.

  4. Numerical simulation of evaporating liquid jet in crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soteriou, Marios; Li, Xiaoyi

    2014-11-01

    Atomization of liquid fuel jets by cross-flowing air is critical to combustor performance. Ability to experimentally probe the fundamentals of this multiscale two phase flows has been hampered by limitations in experimental techniques and the challenges posed by operating conditions. Direct numerical simulation has recently emerged as a promising alternative due to advances in computer hardware and numerical methods. Using this approach, we recently demonstrated the ability to reproduce the physics of atomization of a liquid jet in cross-flow (LJIC) under ambient conditions. In this work we consider this flow in a high temperature environment. The inclusion of evaporation is the major new element. The numerical approach employs the CLSVOF method to capture the liquid-gas interface. Interface evaporation is solved directly with proper treatment of interface conditions and reproduces the relevant species/temperature fields there. A Lagrangian droplet tracking approach is used for the small droplets which are transferred from the Eulerian phase and evaporate using a traditional d2 law model. Other key algorithms of the massively parallelized solver include a ghost fluid method, a multi-grid preconditioned conjugate gradient approach and an adaptive mesh refinement technique. The overall method is verified using canonical problems. Simulations of evaporating LJIC point to the significant effect that evaporation has on the evolution of this flow and elucidate the downstream fuel species patterns.

  5. Modeling of Turbulence Effects on Liquid Jet Atomization and Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experimental investigations and physical modeling studies have indicated that turbulence behaviors within a liquid jet have considerable effects on the atomization process. This study aims to model the turbulence effect in the atomization process of a cylindrical liquid jet. Two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O Rourke et al, are further extended to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. The drop size formed from this breakup regime is estimated based on the energy balance before and after the breakup occurrence. This paper describes theoretical development of the current models, called "T-blob" and "T-TAB", for primary and secondary breakup respectivety. Several assessment studies are also presented in this paper.

  6. Acoustic excitation of liquid fuel droplets and coaxial jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Juan Ignacio

    This experimental study focuses on two important problems relevant to acoustic coupling with condensed phase transport processes, with special relevance to liquid rocket engine and airbreathing engine combustion instabilities. The first part of this dissertation describes droplet combustion characteristics of various fuels during exposure to external acoustical perturbations. Methanol, ethanol, a liquid synthetic fuel derived from coal gasification via the Fischer-Tropsch process, and a blend of aviation fuel and the synthetic fuel are used. During acoustic excitation, the droplet is situated at or near a pressure node condition, where the droplet experiences the largest velocity perturbations, and at or near a pressure antinode condition, where the droplet is exposed to minimal velocity fluctuations. For unforced conditions, the values of the droplet burning rate constant K of the different fuels are consistent with data in the literature. The location of the droplet with respect to a pressure node or antinode also has a measurable effect on droplet burning rates, which are different for different fuels and in some cases are as high as 28% above the unforced burning rate value. Estimates of flame extinction due to acoustic forcing for different fuels are also obtained. The second part of this work consists of an experimental study on coaxial jet behavior under non-reactive, cryogenic conditions, with direct applications to flow mixing and unstable behavior characterization in liquid rocket engines. These experiments, conducted with nitrogen, span a range of outer to inner jet momentum flux ratios from 0.013 to 23, and explore subcritical, nearcritical and supercritical pressure conditions, with and without acoustic excitation, for two injector geometries. Acoustic forcing at 3 kHz is utilized to maximize the pressure fluctuations within the chamber acting on the jet, reaching maximum values of 4% of the mean chamber pressure. The effect of the magnitude and phase

  7. Impinging jet spray formation using non-Newtonian liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Neil S.

    Over the past two decades there has been a heightened interest in implementing gelled propellants for rocket propulsion, especially for hypergolic bi-propellants such as monomethylhydrazine (MMH) and nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer (NTO). Due to the very high level of toxicity of hypergolic liquid rocket propellants, increasing safety is an important area of need for continued space exploration and defense operations. Gelled propellants provide an attractive solution to meeting the requirements for safety, while also potentially improving performance. A gelling agent can be added to liquid propellants exhibiting Newtonian behavior to transform the liquid into a non-Newtonian fluid with some solid-like behavior, i.e. a gel. Non-Newtonian jet impingement is very different from its Newtonian counterpart in terms of fluid flow, atomization, and combustion. This is due to the added agents changing physical properties such as the bulk rheology (viscosity) and interfacial rheology (surface tension). Spray characterization of jet impingement with Newtonian liquids has been studied extensively in existing literature. However, there is a scarcity in literature of studies that consider the spray characterization of jet impingement with gelled propellants. This is a rather critical void since a major tradeoff of utilizing gelled propellants is the difficulty with atomization due to the increased effective viscosity. However, this difficulty can be overcome by using gels that exhibit shear-thinning behavior---viscosity decreases with increasing strain rate. Shear-thinning fluids are ideal because they have the distinct advantage of only flowing easily upon pressure. Thereby, greatly reducing the amount of propellant that could be accidentally leaked during both critical functions such as liftoff or engagement in the battlefield and regular tasks like refilling propellant tanks. This experimental work seeks to help resolve the scarcity in existing literature by providing drop size

  8. Gas jet iimpingement on a liquid surface in the regime of stable oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordasov, M. M.; Savenkov, A. P.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the impingement of a gas jet on a liquid surface in a stable oscillatory regime, where by the jet-induced cavity shape in various phases of oscillations is periodically reproduced with high precision. This regime is observed during gas jet impingement at an angle of 30°-40° relative to the surface of a liquid with viscosity above 1 Pa s. A mechanism of the impingement of gas jet on liquid in the oscillatory regime is described that accounts for variation of the shape of the cavity on the liquid surface. It is established that oscillations exhibit a relaxation character. It is a specific feature of the oscillatory process that the gas stream flowing out from cavity separates from the surface of liquid. Stable oscillations in the "gas jet-liquid" system can be used for contactless measurement of the physical properties (in particular, viscosity) of liquids.

  9. Spray Characterization of Gas-to-Liquid Synthetic Jet Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannaiyan, Kumaran; Sadr, Reza; GTL jet fuel Consortium Team

    2012-11-01

    Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) Synthetic Paraffinic Kerosene (SPK) fuel obtained from Fischer-Tropsch synthesis has grabbed the global attention due to its cleaner combustion characteristics. GTL fuels are expected to meet the vital qualities such as atomization, combustion and emission characteristics of conventional jet fuels. It is imperative to understand fuel atomization in order to gain insights on the combustion and emission aspects of an alternative fuel. In this work spray characteristics of GTL-SPK, which could be used as a drop-in fuel in aircraft gas turbine engines, is studied. This work outlines the spray experimental facility, the methodology used and the results obtained using two SPK's with different chemical compositions. The spray characteristics, such as droplet size and distribution, are presented at three differential pressures across a simplex nozzle and compared with that of the conventional Jet A-1 fuel. Experimental results clearly show that although the chemical composition is significantly different between SPK's, the spray characteristics are not very different. This could be attributed to the minimal difference in fluid properties between the SPK's. Also, the spray characteristics of SPK's show close resemblance to the spray characteristics of Jet A-1 fuel.

  10. Production of jet fuels from coal-derived liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, C.L.

    1990-06-01

    Samples of jet fuel (JP-4, JP-8, JP-8X) produced from the liquid by-products of the gasification of lignite coal from the Great Plains Gasification Plant were analyzed to determine the quantity and type of organo-oxygen compounds present. Results were compared to similar fuel samples produced from petroleum. Large quantities of oxygen compounds were found in the coal-derived liquids and were removed in the refining process. Trace quantities of organo-oxygenate compounds were suspected to be present in the refined fuels. Compounds were identified and quantified as part of an effort to determine the effect of these compounds in fuel instability. Results of the analysis showed trace levels of phenols, naphthols, benzofurans, hexanol, and hydrogenated naphthols were present in levels below 100 ppM. 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet Atomization Including Turbulence Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Chen, C. P.; Balasubramanyam, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes numerical implementation of a newly developed hybrid model, T-blob/T-TAB, into an existing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program for primary and secondary breakup simulation of liquid jet atomization. This model extend two widely used models, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability of Reitz (blob model) and the Taylor-Analogy-Breakup (TAB) secondary droplet breakup by O'Rourke and Amsden to include turbulence effects. In the primary breakup model, the level of the turbulence effect on the liquid breakup depends on the characteristic scales and the initial flow conditions. For the secondary breakup, an additional turbulence force acted on parent drops is modeled and integrated into the TAB governing equation. Several assessment studies are presented and the results indicate that the existing KH and TAB models tend to under-predict the product drop size and spray angle, while the current model provides superior results when compared with the measured data.

  12. Atmospheric pressure plasma jets interacting with liquid covered tissue: touching and not-touching the liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norberg, Seth A.; Tian, Wei; Johnsen, Eric; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-11-01

    In the use of atmospheric pressure plasma jets in biological applications, the plasma-produced charged and neutral species in the plume of the jet often interact with a thin layer of liquid covering the tissue being treated. The plasma-produced reactivity must then penetrate through the liquid layer to reach the tissue. In this computational investigation, a plasma jet created by a single discharge pulse at three different voltages was directed onto a 200 µm water layer covering tissue followed by a 10 s afterglow. The magnitude of the voltage and its pulse length determined if the ionization wave producing the plasma plume reached the surface of the liquid. When the ionization wave touches the surface, significantly more charged species were created in the water layer with H3O+aq, O3-aq, and O2-aq being the dominant terminal species. More aqueous OHaq, H2O2aq, and O3aq were also formed when the plasma plume touches the surface. The single pulse examined here corresponds to a low repetition rate plasma jet where reactive species would be blown out of the volume between pulses and there is not recirculation of flow or turbulence. For these conditions, NxOy species do not accumulate in the volume. As a result, aqueous nitrites, nitrates, and peroxynitrite, and the HNO3aq and HOONOaq, which trace their origin to solvated NxOy, have low densities.

  13. Flow Visualization and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid Jet Impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafar, Farial A.; Thorpe, Graham R.; Turan, Özden F.

    2012-07-01

    Equipment used to cool horticultural produce often involves three-phase porous media. The flow field and heat transfer processes that occur in such equipment are generally quantified by means of empirical relationships amongst dimensionless groups. This work represents a first step towards the goal of harnessing the power of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to better understand the heat transfer processes that occur in beds of irrigated horticultural produce. The primary objective of the present study is to use numerical predictions towards reducing the energy and cooling water requirement in cooling horticultural produce. In this paper, flow and heat transfer predictions are presented of a single slot liquid jet impinging on flat and curved surfaces using a CFD code (FLUENT) for 2D configurations. The effects of Reynolds number, nozzle to plate spacing, nozzle width, and target surface configuration have been studied. Reynolds numbers of 250, 375, 500, 700, 1000, 1500, 1800, and 1900 are studied where the liquid medium is water. Here, the Reynolds number is defined in terms of the hydraulic nozzle diameter, inlet jet velocity, and fluid kinematic viscosity. The results show that Reynolds numbers, nozzle to plate spacing, and nozzle width have a significant effect on the flow field and heat transfer characteristics, whereas the target surface configuration at the stagnation area has no substantial impact. The use of a numerical tool has resulted in a detailed investigation of these characteristics, which has not been available in the literature previously.

  14. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, I.; Walther, M.; Lehmkühler, F.; Wochner, P.; Valerio, J.; Mager, R.; Schroer, M. A.; Lee, S.; Roseker, W.; Jain, A.; Sikorski, M.; Song, S.; Hartmann, R.; Huth, M.; Strüder, L.; Sprung, M.; Robert, A.; Fuoss, P. H.; Stephenson, G. B.; Grübel, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser.

  15. A liquid jet setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex liquids at free-electron laser sources.

    PubMed

    Steinke, I; Walther, M; Lehmkühler, F; Wochner, P; Valerio, J; Mager, R; Schroer, M A; Lee, S; Roseker, W; Jain, A; Sikorski, M; Song, S; Hartmann, R; Huth, M; Strüder, L; Sprung, M; Robert, A; Fuoss, P H; Stephenson, G B; Grübel, G

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we describe a setup for x-ray scattering experiments on complex fluids using a liquid jet. The setup supports Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS/WAXS) geometries. The jet is formed by a gas-dynamic virtual nozzle (GDVN) allowing for diameters ranging between 1 μm and 20 μm at a jet length of several hundred μm. To control jet properties such as jet length, diameter, or flow rate, the instrument is equipped with several diagnostic tools. Three microscopes are installed to quantify jet dimensions and stability in situ. The setup has been used at several beamlines performing both SAXS and WAXS experiments. As a typical example we show an experiment on a colloidal dispersion in a liquid jet at the X-ray Correlation Spectroscopy instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source free-electron laser.

  16. Effect of nozzle length-to-diameter ratio on atomization of turbulent liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osta, Anu Ranjan

    Breakup of liquid jets is of considerable interest motivated by its applicability in combustion and propulsion systems (CI and SI engines), and agricultural fertilizer/pesticide sprays, among others. Almost all of the practical liquid injectors introduce some degree of turbulence in the liquid jet leaving the injector passage and an intriguing question is the relative importance of the liquid turbulence, cavitation, and the aerodynamic forces in the breakup processes of fuel injectors. A better design of liquid fuel injector would reduce pollutants and increase the efficiency of liquid fuel combustion processes. An experimental study to investigate the effect of nozzle length to diameter ratio on the surface properties of turbulent liquid jets in gaseous crossflow and still air was carried out. Straight cavitation-free nozzles with length/diameter ratios of 10, 20 and 40 were used to generate turbulent liquid jets in gaseous crossflow. The present study was limited to small Ohnesorge number liquid jets (Oh < 0.01) injected in crossflow within the shear breakup regime (WeG > 110). The diagnostics consisted of pulsed shadowgraphy, pulsed digital holographic microscopy and x-ray diagnostics. The x-ray tests were conducted at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) facility of Argonne National Laboratory. The test matrix was designed to maintain the same aerodynamic forces in order to isolate the effects of jet turbulence on the breakup process. The measurements included liquid jet surface properties, breakup location of the liquid column as a whole, the breakup regime transitions, bubble size inside the jet and seeding particle displacement inside the jet structures. The results include the jet surface characteristics, the liquid column breakup lengths, bubble growth, and phenomenological analysis to explain the observed results. It is observed that for a jet breakup in crossflow the injector passage length does play a role in determining the breakup length as well as

  17. An Experimental Study of Droplets Produced by Plunging Breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Dai, D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    The production of droplets by breaking water waves greatly affects the heat, mass and momentum transfer between the atmosphere and the sea surface. In this study, the production of droplets by mechanically generated breaking water waves was explored in a wave tank. The breakers were generated from dispersively focused wave packets (average frequency 1.15 Hz) using a programmable wave maker. Two overall wave maker amplitudes were used to create a strong spilling and a strong plunging breaker. The profile histories of the breaking wave crests along the center plane of the tank were measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique, while the droplet diameter distributions and motions were measured at different locations along a horizontal line, which is 1 cm above the maximum height of the wave crest, using a double-pulsed cinematic shadowgraph technique. It is found that droplets are primarily generated when the plunging jet of the wave generates strong turbulence during impact with the wave's front face and when large air bubbles, entrapped during the plunging process, rise to the free surface and pop. The differences between the generation mechanisms in spilling and plunging breakers is highlighted. This work is supported by the Ocean Sciences Division of the National Science Foundation.

  18. Photoionization of Sodium Salt Solutions in a Liquid Jet

    SciTech Connect

    Grieves, G. A.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Herring-Captain, J.; Olanrewaju, B.; Aleksandrov, A.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Orlando, Thomas M.

    2008-06-05

    A liquid microjet was employed to examine the gas/liquid interface of aqueous sodium halide (Na+X-, X=Cl, Br, I) salt solutions. Laser excitation at 193 nm produced and removed cations of the form H+(H2O)n and Na+(H2O)m from liquid jet surfaces containing either NaCl, NaBr or NaI. The protonated water cluster yield varied inversely with increasing salt concentration, while the solvated sodium ion cluster yield varied by anion type. The distribution of H+(H2O)n at low salt concentration is identical to that observed from low-energy electron irradiated amorphous ice and the production of these clusters can be accounted for using a localized ionization/Coulomb expulsion model. Production of Na+(H2O)m is not accounted for by this model but requires ionization of solvation shell waters and a contact ion/Coulomb expulsion mechanism. The reduced yields of Na+(H2O)m from high concentration (10-2 and 10-1 M) NaBr and NaI solutions indicate a propensity for Br- and I- at the solution surfaces and interfaces. This is supported by the observation of multiphoton induced production and desorption of Br+ and I+ from the 10-2 and 10-1 M solution surfaces.

  19. Effect of gravity on capillary instability of liquid jets.

    PubMed

    Amini, Ghobad; Ihme, Matthias; Dolatabadi, Ali

    2013-05-01

    The effect of gravity on the onset and growth rate of capillary instabilities in viscous liquid jets is studied. To this end, a spatial linear stability analysis of Cosserat's equations is performed using a multiscale expansion technique. A dispersion relation and expressions for the perturbation amplitude are derived to evaluate the growth rate of the most unstable axisymmetric disturbance mode. Modeling results are compared with classical results in the limit of zero Bond number, confirming the validity of this approach. Expressions for the critical Weber number, demarcating the transition between convective and absolute instability are derived as functions of capillary and Bond numbers. Parametric investigations for a range of relevant operating conditions (characterized by capillary, Weber, and Bond numbers) are performed to examine the jet breakup and the perturbation growth rate. In addition to the physical insight that is obtained from this investigation, the results that are presented in this work could also be of relevance as test cases for the algorithmic development and the verification of high-fidelity multiphase simulation codes.

  20. Behavior of cylindrical liquid jets evolving in a transverse acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentier, Jean-Baptiste; Baillot, Françoise; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Dumouchel, Christophe

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and an experimental investigation of low-velocity cylindrical liquid jets submitted to transverse planar acoustic waves. For this purpose, the behavior of a liquid jet traversing the section of a Kundt tube was examined. Experiments reported that the liquid jet could be either deviated from its trajectory or deformed as a succession of lobes oriented in space and whose length and width depend on the jet acoustic environment. Furthermore, for a sufficient acoustic velocity, the jet deformation increases in such proportion that a premature and vivid atomization mechanism disintegrates the liquid flow. Theoretical models are proposed to understand these behaviors. The first one calls out for acoustic radiation pressure to explain the jet deviation. The second one consists in a modal analysis of the vibrations of a jet when submitted to a transverse stationary acoustic field. As a first approach, a simplified two-dimensional model is proposed. This model reports that a sudden exposition of the jet to an acoustic field triggers two jet eigenmodes. One of them induces jet deformations that were not experimentally observed. This part of the solution emerges due to theoretical deficiencies. However, the second mode reproduces the lobe formation and leads to atomization criteria in good agreement with the experimental results. The paper ends with an extension of the mathematical development in three dimensions in order to provide a basis to a more consistent model.

  1. Detailed Numerical Simulation of Liquid Jet In Crossflow Atomization with High Density Ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghods, Sina

    The atomization of a liquid jet by a high speed cross-flowing gas has many applications such as gas turbines and augmentors. The mechanisms by which the liquid jet initially breaks up, however, are not well understood. Experimental studies suggest the dependence of spray properties on operating conditions and nozzle geom- etry. Detailed numerical simulations can offer better understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms that lead to the breakup of the injected liquid jet. In this work, detailed numerical simulation results of turbulent liquid jets injected into turbulent gaseous cross flows for different density ratios is presented. A finite volume, balanced force fractional step flow solver to solve the Navier-Stokes equations is employed and coupled to a Refined Level Set Grid method to follow the phase interface. To enable the simulation of atomization of high density ratio fluids, we ensure discrete consistency between the solution of the conservative momentum equation and the level set based continuity equation by employing the Consistent Rescaled Momentum Transport (CRMT) method. The impact of different inflow jet boundary conditions on different jet properties including jet penetration is analyzed and results are compared to those obtained experimentally by Brown & McDonell(2006). In addition, instability analysis is performed to find the most dominant insta- bility mechanism that causes the liquid jet to breakup. Linear instability analysis is achieved using linear theories for Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin- Helmholtz instabilities and non-linear analysis is performed using our flow solver with different inflow jet boundary conditions.

  2. The effect of drainage configuration on heat transfer under an impinging liquid jet array

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, K.; Webb, B.W.

    1999-11-01

    Impinging jets provide high transport coefficients which make them attractive for use in applications such as paper drying, quenching of metals, turbine blade cooling, and thermal control of a variety of high heat flux devices (electronics, X-ray optics, etc.). Here, the heat transfer characteristics of single and dual-exit drainage configurations for arrays of liquid jets impinging normal to a heated isoflux plate has been studied experimentally. The interaction of drainage channel crossflow from upstream jets and the stagnation jets and its impact on heat transfer was the focus of the investigation. Infrared thermography was used to measure the local temperature distribution on the heated plate, from which local heat transfer coefficients were determined. A single jet diameter was used, and jet arrays with jet-to-jet spacings of 4.8, 6, 9, and 12 jet diameters were studied. Average jet Reynolds numbers in the range 400--5,000 were investigated for jet nozzle-to-impingement plate spacings of 1, 2, and 4 jet diameters for fully flooded (submerged) drainage flow. A single jet-to-plate spacing large enough to yield free-surface jets was also studied. The data reveal a complex dependence of local and average Nusselt numbers on the geometric parameters which describe the problem configuration.

  3. A numerical simulation of two-phase jet spreading using an Euler-Lagrangian technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonetto, F.; Drew, D.; Lahey, R. T., Jr.

    The objective of this paper is to study the spreading of a submerged two phase jet. A plunging liquid jet impacting on a still liquid pool may carry under bubbles by entraining the surrounding gas. For low liquid jet turbulence, the measured average bubble size was about 200 m. For low void fraction, one may assume that the liquid velocity field is not disturbed by the presence of the bubbles. This allows the use of known solutions for the velocity field in a planar liquid jet. That is, the liquid flow may be solved by using Eulerian coordinates and neglecting the effect of the bubbles. The momentum equation for the bubbles was written in Lagrangian coordinates. The resulting equations are solved for bubble trajectories in the known liquid velocity field.

  4. Normal Impingement of a Circular Liquid Jet onto a Screen in a Weightless Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Symons, E. P.

    1976-01-01

    The normal impingement of a circular liquid jet onto a fine-mesh screen in a weightless environment was investigated. Equations were developed to predict the velocity of the emerging jet on the downstream side of the screen as a function of screen and liquid parameters and of the velocity of the impinging jet. Additionally, the stability of the emerging jet was found to be Weber number dependent. In general, excepting at high velocities, the screen behaved much as a baffle, deflecting the major portion of the impinging flow.

  5. Measurement of intact-core length of atomizing liquid jets by image deconvolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, Roger; Burch, Robert; Kuo, Kenneth; Cheung, Fan-Bill

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their high liquid load fractions and hence their optical opacity. Focus was on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact-liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial-type rocket engine injectors in which liquid oxygen is injected through the center post while high velocity gaseous hydrogen is injected through a concentric annulus, providing a shear force to the liquid jet surface. Real-time x ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, is used to make the measurements. The intact-liquid-core length data were obtained and interpreted using two conceptually different methods to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure, gas-to-liquid momentum ratio, and cavitation.

  6. a Better Description of Liquid Jet Breakup Using a Spatial Model Including Viscous Effects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammerschlag, William Brian

    Theoretical models describing the operation and disintegration of a liquid jet are often based on an approximate solution of an inviscid jet in the temporal frame of reference. These models provide only a fair first order prediction of growth rate and breakoff length, and are based solely on a surface tension induced instability. A spatial model yielding jet growth rate and including both jet and surrounding atmosphere viscosity and density is now developed. This model is seen to reproduce all the features and limitations of the Weber viscous jet theory. When tested against experiments of water, water and glycerol mixes and binary eutectic tin/lead solder, only fair agreement is observed.

  7. Microfluidic liquid jet system with compatibility for atmospheric and high-vacuum conditions.

    PubMed

    Trebbin, Martin; Krüger, Kilian; DePonte, Daniel; Roth, Stephan V; Chapman, Henry N; Förster, Stephan

    2014-05-21

    We present microfluidic chip based devices that produce liquid jets with micrometer diameters while operating at very low flow rates. The chip production is based on established soft-lithographical techniques employing a three-layer design protocol. This allows the exact, controlled and reproducible design of critical parts such as nozzles and the production of nozzle arrays. The microfluidic chips reproducibly generate liquid jets exiting at perfect right angles with diameters between 20 μm and 2 μm, and under special circumstances, even down to 0.9 μm. Jet diameter, jet length, and the domain of the jetting/dripping instability can be predicted and controlled based on the theory for liquid jets in the plate-orifice configuration described by Gañán-Calvo et al. Additionally, conditions under which the device produces highly reproducible monodisperse droplets at exact and predictable rates can be achieved. The devices operate under atmospheric and under vacuum conditions making them highly relevant for a wide range of applications, for example, for free-electron lasers. Further, the straightforward integration of additional features such as a jet-in-jet is demonstrated. This device design has the potential to integrate more features based on established microfluidic components and may become a standard device for small liquid jet production.

  8. Determination of a Jet Fuel Metal Deactivator by High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    HIGH PERFORMANCE LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY Paul C. Hayes, Jr. Fuels Branch...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 19. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block number) High Performance Liquid Chromatography absorbance...SYMBOL HPLC High Performance Liquid Chromatography P-4 jet propulsion fuel, wide-boiling range, conforming to MIL-T-5624L MDA metal deactivator,

  9. Liquid jet impingement heat transfer with or without boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, C. F.; Gan, Y. P.; Tian, Y. C.; Lei, D. H.; Gomi, T.

    1993-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the important studies in the area of impingement heat transfer with or without phase change, with emphasis on the research conducted at Beijing Polytechnic University mainly with circular jets. Heat transfer characteristics of single phase jets are discussed in detail. Comment is presented on boiling heat transfer of impinging jets for steady and transient states. Some special cooling configurations of two-phase jets are also introduced.

  10. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur; McClure, John; Avila, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding were measured for a 0.5 inch diameter pin entering a 2219 aluminum alloy plate. Weld structures were preserved for metallographic observation by making emergency stops at various plunge depths. The plunging pin tool is seen to be surrounded by a very fine grained layer of recrystallized metal extending substantially below the bottom of the pin, implying a shear interface in the metal below and not at the tool-metal interface. Torque and plunge force during the initial plunge phase in Friction Stir Welding are calculated from a straight forward model based on a concept to plastic flow in the vicinity of the plunging tool compatible with structural observations. The concept: a disk of weld metal seized to and rotating with the bottom of the pin is squeezed out laterally by the plunge force and extruded upwards in a hollow cylinder around the tool. As the shear surface separating rotating disk from stationary weld metal engulfs fresh metal, the fresh metal is subjected to severe shear deformation, which results in its recrystallization. Encouraging agreement between computations and measured torque and plunge force is obtained.

  11. An application of the focused liquid jet: needle free drug injection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyama, Akihito; Katsuta, Chihiro; Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Endo, Nanami; Tanaka, Akane; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2016-11-01

    Recently, a focused liquid jet draws great attention since it can be applied to various applications (e. g. Ink jet printing, medical devices). In our research, in order to discuss its applicability for a needle-free drug injection system, we shoot a focused liquid jet to an animal skin with very high-speed. Previously, the penetration of this jet into a gelatin and an artificial skin has been performed in order to model of the jet penetration process. However, experiment for jet injection into the animal skin has not been conducted yet. In this presentation, we inject ink as the liquid jet into the skin of the hairless rat. We observe the top/back view and the cross-sectional view of the injected (ink-stained) skin. We capture the stained area of the skin in order to find characteristics of the jet penetration. We discuss the criteria for the jet penetration into the skin. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers JP26709007, JP16J08521.

  12. Features of Capillary Breakup of a Liquid Jet at Ohnesorge Numbers Larger Than Unity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronov, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the forced capillary breakup of a jet of viscous liquid at a value of the Ohnesorge number larger than unity. The regions of breakup of the jet without the formation of satellites have been determined. The dependences of the dimensions of main and satellite droplets on the wave number have been obtained for different Ohnesorge numbers.

  13. Spreading Characteristics of Newtonian Free Surface Liquid Jets Impacting a Moving Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Hatef; Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2016-11-01

    The impingement of high-speed liquid jets on a solid substrate is salient to a number of industrial processes, including surface coating in the railroad industry. The impingement of Newtonian liquid jets is studied both experimentally and through simulation. On impingement the liquid jet spreads laterally from the impingement location to form a lamella that is then convected downstream, producing an overall U-shaped liquid surface. A variety of jet and substrate velocities, liquid viscosities, and jet diameters were studied. It is found that the lamella dimensions (width (W), radius (R), thickness (h)) vary with the jet Reynolds number (Rejet) and vary inversely with the substrate Reynolds number (Resub) . Interestingly, the ratio W/R is almost constant, independent of the jet viscosity, diameter, and speed, and also independent of the substrate speed. Furthermore, the lamella radius and width scale as Rejet /√{ Resub } and the lamella thickness scales as 1 /√{ Resub } . The experimental results were in good agreement with volume-of-fluid (VOF) CFD simulations, which implies that the simulations may be used to probe the physics of impingement.

  14. Receptivity of a Cryogenic Coaxial Gas-Liquid Jet to Acoustic Disturbances (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Gas-Liquid Jet to Acoustic Disturbances 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Wegener , Forliti, Leyva...of a Cryogenic Coaxial Gas-Liquid Jet to Acoustic Disturbances 50th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference Jeff Wegener , UCLA David Forliti...DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. Previous injectors (Sophonias, 2012) New injector ( Wegener , 2013) 13Place

  15. Numerical study of three-dimensional liquid jet breakup with adaptive unstructured meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhihua; Pavlidis, Dimitrios; Salinas, Pablo; Pain, Christopher; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    Liquid jet breakup is an important fundamental multiphase flow, often found in many industrial engineering applications. The breakup process is very complex, involving jets, liquid films, ligaments, and small droplets, featuring tremendous complexity in interfacial topology and a large range of spatial scales. The objective of this study is to investigate the fluid dynamics of three-dimensional liquid jet breakup problems, such as liquid jet primary breakup and gas-sheared liquid jet breakup. An adaptive unstructured mesh modelling framework is employed here, which can modify and adapt unstructured meshes to optimally represent the underlying physics of multiphase problems and reduce computational effort without sacrificing accuracy. The numerical framework consists of a mixed control volume and finite element formulation, a 'volume of fluid' type method for the interface capturing based on a compressive control volume advection method and second-order finite element methods, and a force-balanced algorithm for the surface tension implementation. Numerical examples of some benchmark tests and the dynamics of liquid jet breakup with and without ambient gas are presented to demonstrate the capability of this method.

  16. Primary atomization of liquid jets issuing from rocket engine coaxial injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Roger D.

    1993-01-01

    The investigation of liquid jet breakup and spray development is critical to the understanding of combustion phenomena in liquid-propellant rocket engines. Much work has been done to characterize low-speed liquid jet breakup and dilute sprays, but atomizing jets and dense sprays have yielded few quantitative measurements due to their optical opacity. This work focuses on a characteristic of the primary breakup process of round liquid jets, namely the length of the intact liquid core. The specific application considered is that of shear-coaxial type rocket engine injectors. Real-time x-ray radiography, capable of imaging through the dense two-phase region surrounding the liquid core, has been used to make the measurements. Nitrogen and helium were employed as the fuel simulants while an x-ray absorbing potassium iodide aqueous solution was used as the liquid oxygen (LOX) simulant. The intact-liquid-core length data have been obtained and interpreted to illustrate the effects of chamber pressure (gas density), injected-gas and liquid velocities, and cavitation. The results clearly show that the effect of cavitation must be considered at low chamber pressures since it can be the dominant breakup mechanism. A correlation of intact core length in terms of gas-to-liquid density ratio, liquid jet Reynolds number, and Weber number is suggested. The gas-to-liquid density ratio appears to be the key parameter for aerodynamic shear breakup in this study. A small number of hot-fire, LOX/hydrogen tests were also conducted to attempt intact-LOX-core measurements under realistic conditions in a single-coaxial-element rocket engine. The tests were not successful in terms of measuring the intact core, but instantaneous imaging of LOX jets suggests that LOX jet breakup is qualitatively similar to that of cold-flow, propellant-simulant jets. The liquid oxygen jets survived in the hot-fire environment much longer than expected, and LOX was even visualized exiting the chamber nozzle

  17. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 4. GPGP Jet Fuels Production Program-Feed Analyses Compilation and Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-01

    DTICFORM70ASTOCK IS EXHAUSTED. o Volume IV 00 PRODUCTION OF JET FUELS FROM COAL DERIVED LIQUIDS SVOL IV - GPGP JET FUELS PRODUCTION PROGRAM-FEEDI ANALYSES...DERIVED LIQUIDS - VOL IV - GPGP JET FUELS PRODUCTION PROGRAM - FEED ANALYSIS COMPILATION AND REVIEW 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) R.J. Rossi 13a. TYPE OF REPORT...the gasification of lignite at the Great Plains Gasification Plant ( GPGP ) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding has been provided to the Department of

  18. On the spatial stability of a liquid jet in the presence of vapor cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Lü, Ming; Ning, Zhi Lu, Mei; Yan, Kai; Fu, Juan; Sun, Chunhua

    2013-11-15

    A dispersion equation describing the effect of temperature differences on the stability of three-dimensional cylindrical liquid jets in the presence of vapor cavities is presented by the use of linear stability analysis. The mathematical model and its solving method are verified by comparing them with the data in the literature, and then the effect of temperature differences between jet and surrounding gas on the spatial stability of liquid jet is investigated. Some conclusions can be drawn from the results of this investigation: (1) the temperature difference destabilizes the liquid jet when the jet liquid is cooler than the surrounding gas, (2) the smallest atomized droplet without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is significantly larger than that when the effect of temperature differences is taken into account, (3) the effect of temperature differences on the stability of liquid jet has little relationship with azimuthal wave modes, (4) cavitation destabilizes the liquid jet when the value of the bubble volume fraction is not greater than 0.1 (0 ≤ α ≤ 0.1), and the temperature difference can weaken this effect of cavitation on the stability of liquid jet, and (5) cavitation is responsible for generating smaller droplets, the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number with and without taking into account the effect of temperature differences is quite different, and temperature difference is likely to fully restrain the effect of cavitation on the critical wave number; however, cavitation is again responsible for generating smaller droplets despite the effect of temperature differences when the bubble volume fraction α = 0.1. These findings may explain some observations of practical atomizer performance.

  19. Analysis of liquid-metal-jet impingement cooling in a corner region and for a row of jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, R.

    1975-01-01

    A conformal mapping method was used to analyze liquid-metal-jet impingement heat transfer. The jet flow region and energy equation are transformed to correspond to uniform flow in a parallel plate channel with nonuniform heat addition along a portion of one wall. The exact solution for the wall-temperature distribution was obtained in the transformed channel, and the results are mapped back into the physical plane. Two geometries are analyzed. One is for a single slot jet directed either into an interior corner formed by two flat plates, or over the external sides of the corner; the flat plates are uniformly heated, and the corner can have various included angles. The heat-transfer coefficient at the stagnation point at the apex of the plates is obtained as a function of the corner angle, and temperature distributions are calculated along the heated walls. The second geometry is an infinite row of uniformly spaced parallel slot jets impinging normally against a uniformly heated plate. The heat-transfer behavior is obtained as a function of the spacing between the jets. Results are given for several jet Peclet numbers from 5 to 50.

  20. Cavitation induced by high speed impact of a solid surface on a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Tinguely, Marc; Rouvinez, Mathieu

    2009-11-01

    A solid surface may suffer from severe erosion if it impacts a liquid jet at high speed. The physics behind the erosion process remains unclear. In the present study, we have investigated the impact of a gun bullet on a laminar water jet with the help of a high speed camera. The bullet has a flat front and 11 mm diameter, which is half of jet diameter. The impact speed was varied between 200 and 500 ms-1. Immediately after the impact, a systematic shock wave and high speed jetting were observed. As the compression waves reflect on the jet boundary, a spectacular number of vapour cavities are generated within the jet. Depending on the bullet velocity, these cavities may grow and collapse violently on the bullet surface with a risk of cavitation erosion. We strongly believe that this transient cavitation is the main cause of erosion observed in many industrial applications such as Pelton turbines.

  1. Equilibrium configurations of a jet of an ideally conducting liquid in an external nonuniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubarev, N. M.; Zubareva, O. V.

    2016-06-01

    Possible equilibrium configurations of the free surface of a jet of an ideally conducting liquid placed in a nonuniform magnetic field are considered. The magnetic field is generated by two thin wires that are parallel to the jet and bear oppositely directed currents. Equilibrium is due to a balance between capillary and magnetic forces. For the plane symmetric case, when the jet deforms only in the plane of its cross section, two one-parameter families of exact solutions to the problem are derived using the method of conformal mapping. According to these solutions, a jet with an initially circular cross section deforms up to splitting into two separate jets. A criterion for jet splitting is derived by analyzing approximate two-parameter solutions.

  2. Evolution of the dynamic Rayleigh-Plateau instability on liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denner, Fabian; Evrard, Fabien; van Wachem, Berend; Castrejon-Pita, Alfonso Arturo; Castrejon-Pita, Jose Rafael

    2016-11-01

    The Rayleigh-Plateau instability (RPI) is the dominating mechanism leading to the breakup of surface-tension-dominated liquid jets. Although linear stability analysis has proven to be a powerful tool to study the evolution of the RPI for (quasi-)static liquid jets and filaments, in typical practical applications (e.g. inkjet printing) the inertia of liquid jets is significant, giving rise to nonlinear effects that influence the spatiotemporal evolution of the RPI and which are not captured by linear stability analysis. Using direct numerical simulation and laboratory experiments, we study the evolution of the dynamic RPI on liquid jets with different Weber and Ohnesorge numbers as well as different velocity profiles, perturbation amplitudes and wavenumbers. Our results show how inertia as well as the amplitude/wavenumber of the perturbation change the velocity and pressure fields of the liquid jet, which changes the spatiotemporal growth of the dynamic RPI and, consequently, the breakup length of the jet, with a local reversal of the RPI under certain conditions. We identify the key mechanisms that govern the complex evolution of the dynamic RPI and highlight the main differences between static and dynamic RPI. Financial support from the EPSRC (Grant EP/M021556/1), from Petrobras, from the John Fell Oxford University Press Research Fund and from the Royal Society is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Analytical description of the breakup of liquid jets in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1993-01-01

    A viscous or inviscid cylindrical jet with surface tension in a vacuum tends to pinch due to the mechanism of capillary instability. Similarity solutions are constructed which describe this phenomenon as a critical time is encountered, for two physically distinct cases: inviscid jets governed by the Euler equations and highly viscous jets governed by the Stokes equations. In both cases the only assumption imposed is that at the time of pinching the jet shape has a radial length scale which is smaller than the axial length scale. For the inviscid case, we show that our solution corresponds exactly to one member of the one-parameter family of solutions obtained from slender jet theories and the shape of the jet is locally concave at breakup. For highly viscous jets our theory predicts local shapes which are monotonic increasing or decreasing indicating the formation of a mother drop connected to the jet by a thin fluid tube. This qualitative behavior is in complete agreement with both direct numerical simulations and experimental observations.

  4. Numerical Investigation on Sensitivity of Liquid Jet Breakup to Physical Fuel Properties with Experimental Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dokyun; Bravo, Luis; Matusik, Katarzyna; Duke, Daniel; Kastengren, Alan; Swantek, Andy; Powell, Christopher; Ham, Frank

    2016-11-01

    One of the major concerns in modern direct injection engines is the sensitivity of engine performance to fuel characteristics. Recent works have shown that even slight differences in fuel properties can cause significant changes in efficiency and emission of an engine. Since the combustion process is very sensitive to the fuel/air mixture formation resulting from disintegration of liquid jet, the precise assessment of fuel sensitivity on liquid jet atomization process is required first to study the impact of different fuels on the combustion. In the present study, the breaking process of a liquid jet from a diesel injector injecting into a quiescent gas chamber is investigated numerically and experimentally for different liquid fuels (n-dodecane, iso-octane, CAT A2 and C3). The unsplit geometric Volume-of-Fluid method is employed to capture the phase interface in Large-eddy simulations and results are compared against the radiography measurement from Argonne National Lab including jet penetration, liquid mass distribution and volume fraction. The breakup characteristics will be shown for different fuels as well as droplet PDF statistics to demonstrate the influences of the physical properties on the primary atomization of liquid jet. Supported by HPCMP FRONTIER award, US DOD, Office of the Army.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of liquid jet impingement on superhydrophobic and hydrophobic convex surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali

    2017-02-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations were carried out to examine the vertical impingement a round liquid jet on the edges of horizontal convex surfaces that were either superhydrophobic or hydrophobic. The experiments examine the effects on the flow behaviour of curvature, wettability, inertia of the jet, and the impingement rate. Three copper pipes with outer diameters of 15, 22, and 35 mm were investigated. The pipes were wrapped with a piece of a Brassica oleracea leaf or a smooth Teflon sheet, which have apparent contact angles of 160° and 113°. The Reynolds number ranged from 1000 to 4500, and the impingement rates of the liquid jets were varied. Numerical results show good agreement with the experimental results for explaining flow and provide detailed information about the impingement on the surfaces. The liquid jet reflected off the superhydrophobic surfaces for all conditions. However, the jet reflected or deflected off the hydrophobic surface, depending on the inertia of the jet, the curvature of the surface, and the impingement rate. The results suggest that pressure is not the main reason for the bending of the jet around the curved hydrophobic surface.

  6. Mixing characteristics of pulsed air-assist liquid jet into an internal subsonic cross-flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Inchul; Kang, Youngsu; Koo, Jaye

    2010-04-01

    Penetration depth, spray dispersion angle, droplet sizes in breakup processes and atomization processes are very important parameters in combustor of air-breathing engine. These processes will enhance air/fuel mixing inside the combustor. Experimental results from the pulsed air-assist liquid jet injected into a cross-flow are investigated. And experiments were conducted to a range of cross-flow velocities from 42˜136 m/s. Air is injected with 0˜300kPa, with air-assist pulsation frequency of 0˜20Hz. Pulsation frequency was modulated by solenoid valve. Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer(PDPA) was utilized to quantitatively measuring droplet characteristics. High-speed CCD camera was used to obtain injected spray structure. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will offer rapid mixing and good liquid jet penetration. Air-assist makes a very fine droplet which generated mist-like spray. Pulsed air-assist liquid jet will introduce additional supplementary turbulent mixing and control of penetration depth into a cross-flow field. The results show that pulsation frequency has an effect on penetration, transverse velocities and droplet sizes. The experimental data generated in these studies are used for a development of active control strategies to optimize the liquid jet penetration in subsonic cross-flow conditions and predict combustion low frequency instability.

  7. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhen-guo Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-29

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d < 15, owing to the strong gas-liquid interaction near the orifice. By contrast, the velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 2674–2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360–1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  8. Experimental Investigation of Jet-Induced Mixing of a Large Liquid Hydrogen Storage Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Hasan, M. M.; Vandresar, N. T.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the effect of fluid mixing on the depressurization of a large liquid hydrogen storage tank. The test tank is approximately ellipsoidal, having a volume of 4.89 m(exp 3) and an average wall heat flux of 4.2 W/m(exp 2) due to external heat input. A mixer unit was installed near the bottom of the tank to generate an upward directed axial jet flow normal to the liquid-vapor interface. Mixing tests were initiated after achieving thermally stratified conditions in the tank either by the introduction of hydrogen gas into the tank or by self-pressurization due to ambient heat leak through the tank wall. The subcooled liquid jet directed towards the liquid-vapor interface by the mixer induced vapor condensation and caused a reduction in tank pressure. Tests were conducted at two jet submergence depths for jet Reynolds numbers from 80,000 to 495,000 and Richardson numbers from 0.014 to 0.52. Results show that the rate of tank pressure change is controlled by the competing effects of subcooled jet flow and the free convection boundary layer flow due to external tank wall heating. It is shown that existing correlations for mixing time and vapor condensation rate based on small scale tanks may not be applicable to large scale liquid hydrogen systems.

  9. Experimental investigation on structures and velocity of liquid jets in a supersonic crossflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhen-guo; Wu, Liyin; Li, Qinglian; Li, Chun

    2014-09-01

    Particle image velocimetry was applied in the study focusing on the structure and velocity of water jets injected into a Ma = 2.1 crossflow. The instantaneous structures of the jet, including surface waves in the near-injector region and vortices in the far-field, were visualized clearly. Spray velocity increases rapidly to 66% of the mainstream velocity in the region of x/d < 15, owing to the strong gas-liquid interaction near the orifice. By contrast, the velocity grows slowly in the far-field region, where the liquid inside the spray is accelerated mainly by the continuous driven force provided by the mainstream with the gas-liquid shear. The injection and atomization of liquid jet in a supersonic crossflow serves as a foundation of scramjet combustion process, by affecting the combustion efficiency and some other performances. With various forces acting on the liquid jet (Mashayek et al. [AIAA J. 46, 2674-2686 (2008)] and Wang et al. [AIAA J. 50, 1360-1366 (2012)]), the atomization process involves very complex flow physics. These physical processes include strong vortical structures, small-scale wave formation, stripping of small droplets from the jet surface, formations of ligaments, and droplets with a wide range of sizes.

  10. Analytical Description of the Breakup of Liquid Jets in Air

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    Papageorgiou and Orellana (1993), referred to as PO, to describe breakup of jets of one fluid into another with different density, with or without...as a small parameter. As noted by Papageorgiou and Orellana , such an ansatz can be applied to flows which have initial conditions characterized by a...formation in capillary jet breakup. Phys. Fluids A, 2, 1141-1144. " Papageorgiou, D.T. and Orellana , 0. 1993 Pinching solutions of slender

  11. Unsteady penetration of a target by a liquid jet.

    PubMed

    Uth, Tobias; Deshpande, Vikram S

    2013-12-10

    It is widely acknowledged that ceramic armor experiences an unsteady penetration response: an impacting projectile may erode on the surface of a ceramic target without substantial penetration for a significant amount of time and then suddenly start to penetrate the target. Although known for more than four decades, this phenomenon, commonly referred to as dwell, remains largely unexplained. Here, we use scaled analog experiments with a low-speed water jet and a soft, translucent target material to investigate dwell. The transient target response, in terms of depth of penetration and impact force, is captured using a high-speed camera in combination with a piezoelectric force sensor. We observe the phenomenon of dwell using a soft (noncracking) target material. The results show that the penetration rate increases when the flow of the impacting water jet is reversed due to the deformation of the jet-target interface--this reversal is also associated with an increase in the force exerted by the jet on the target. Creep penetration experiments with a constant indentation force did not show an increase in the penetration rate, confirming that flow reversal is the cause of the unsteady penetration rate. Our results suggest that dwell can occur in a ductile noncracking target due to flow reversal. This phenomenon of flow reversal is rather widespread and present in a wide range of impact situations, including water-jet cutting, needleless injection, and deposit removal via a fluid jet.

  12. Impact of Plunging Breaking Wave on a Partially Submerged Cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Ikeda, C. M.; Duncan, J. H.

    2012-11-01

    The impact of a plunging breaking wave on a partially submerged rigid cube (L = 30 . 5 cm) is studied experimentally in a wave tank that is 14.8 m long, 1.15 m wide and 2.2 m high with a water depth of 0.91 m. A single repeatable plunging breaker is generated from a dispersively focused wave packet (average frequency of 1.14 Hz) that is created with a programmable wave maker. The water surface profiles at the vertical center plane of the cube are measured with a cinematic LIF technique. The cube is centered in the width of the tank and mounted from above with the front face oriented with its normal in the vertical long center plane of the tank and tilted at angles of 0 and 20 degrees downward relative to horizontal. For the range of horizontal cube positions used here, during the wave impact, the water free surface forms a circular arc between the water contact point on the front face of the cube and the wave crest. As the wave impact continues, this arc converges to a point and a fast-moving vertical jet is formed. The effect of the submergence and tilt angle of the cube on the jet formation are explored. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research.

  13. Droplet formation from the breakup of micron-sized liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hoeve, Wim; van der Bos, Arjan; Versluis, Michel; Snoeijer, Jacco; Brenner, Michael P.; Lohse, Detlef

    2009-11-01

    Droplet formation from the breakup of a liquid jet emerging from a micron-sized circular nozzle is investigated with ultra high-speed imaging at 1 million frames per second and within a lubrication approximation model [Eggers and Dupont, Phys. Rev. Lett. 262, 1994, 205-221]. The capillary time τc= √ρr^3 / γ is extremely small -- of the order of 1μs. In the analyzed low Reynolds number regime the jet breakup is driven by surface tension forces only. Rayleigh breakup is not influenced by the surrounding air. The high- speed imaging results and those from the model calculation perfectly agree for various liquid viscosities and jet velocities, confirming a universal scaling law also for diminutive Rayleigh jets.

  14. Delivery of polymeric particles into skin using needle-free liquid jet injectors.

    PubMed

    Michinaka, Yasunari; Mitragotri, Samir

    2011-08-10

    Needle-free liquid jet injectors have been developed for the delivery of several drugs including insulin and growth hormone. Here, we assess the ability of liquid jet injectors to deliver polymeric nanoparticles into skin. As a first step, polystyrene particles of several sizes and two shapes were injected into skin using a jet injector. The dispersion area of particles, measured in the cross section of the skin, was found to inversely relate to the particle size and directly proportional to the injection volume. Environmental scanning electron microscopy studies confirmed that particles indeed penetrate into the skin and are generally located around the injection site. Next, poly lactide co-glycolide (PLGA) particles, containing a model solute, coumarin-6, were synthesized and delivered into the skin using the jet injector. PLGA particles were effectively delivered into the skin and released coumarin-6 into the skin.

  15. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-two jet and diesel fuel samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by a fluorescent indicator adsorption analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Two methods of rapid high performance liquid chromatography were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  16. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity. Ph.D. Thesis - Toledo Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the free surface shapes of circular liquid jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks under both normal and zero gravity conditions. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted indicating regions where viscous forces were not significant when computing free surface shapes. The demarcation between the viscous and inviscid region was found to depend upon the flow Reynolds number and the ratio between the jet and disk radius.

  17. Red Giant Plunging Through Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Poster Version

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (left panel) shows the 'bow shock' of a dying star named R Hydrae, or R Hya, in the constellation Hydra.

    Bow shocks are formed where the stellar wind from a star are pushed into a bow shape (illustration, right panel) as the star plunges through the gas and dust between stars. Our own Sun has a bow shock, but prior to this image one had never been observed around this particular class of red giant star.

    R Hya moves through space at approximately 50 kilometers per second. As it does so, it discharges dust and gas into space. Because the star is relatively cool, that ejecta quickly assumes a solid state and collides with the interstellar medium. The resulting dusty nebula is invisible to the naked eye but can be detected using an infrared telescope. This bow shock is 16,295 astronomical units from the star to the apex and 6,188 astronomical units thick (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The mass of the bow shock is about 400 times the mass of the Earth.

    The false-color Spitzer image shows infrared emissions at 70 microns. Brighter colors represent greater intensities of infrared light at that wavelength. The location of the star itself is drawn onto the picture in the black 'unobserved' region in the center.

  18. Correlating equations for impingement cooling of small heat sources with multiple circular liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womac, D. J.; Incropera, F. P.; Ramadhyani, S.

    1994-05-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate single-phase heat transfer from a 12.7 mm x 12.7 mm heat source to 2 x 2 and 3 x 3 arrays of free-surface and submerged jets. The objective was to study the efficacy of using arrays of free surface or submerged liquid jets to cool a small, chip-like heat source. The data are correlated by obtaining area-weighted combinations of separate correlations associated with impingement and wall jet region.

  19. Impact of a single drop on the same liquid: formation, growth and disintegration of jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agbaglah, G. Gilou; Deegan, Robert

    2015-11-01

    One of the simplest splashing scenarios results from the impact of a single drop on on the same liquid. The traditional understanding of this process is that the impact generates a jet that later breaks up into secondary droplets. Recently it was shown that even this simplest of scenarios is more complicated than expected because multiple jets can be generated from a single impact event and there are bifurcations in the multiplicity of jets. First, we study the formation, growth and disintegration of jets following the impact of a drop on a thin film of the same liquid using a combination of numerical simulations and linear stability theory. We obtain scaling relations from our simulations and use these as inputs to our stability analysis. We also use experiments and numerical simulations of a single drop impacting on a deep pool to examine the bifurcation from a single jet into two jets. Using high speed X-ray imaging methods we show that vortex separation within the drop leads to the formation of a second jet long after the formation of the ejecta sheet.

  20. Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsi-Shang

    1990-01-01

    An analytical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion. Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, were used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic cross flow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles were calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integration reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

  1. Numerical simulation of liquid-layer breakup on a moving wall due to an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Taejong; Moon, Hojoon; You, Donghyun; Kim, Dokyun; Ovsyannikov, Andrey

    2014-11-01

    Jet wiping, which is a hydrodynamic method for controlling the liquid film thickness in coating processes, is constrained by a rather violent film instability called splashing. The instability is characterized by the ejection of droplets from the runback flow and results in an explosion of the film. The splashing phenomenon degrades the final coating quality. In the present research, a volume-of-fluid (VOF)-based method, which is developed at Cascade Technologies, is employed to simulate the air-liquid multiphase flow dynamics. The present numerical method is based on an unstructured-grid unsplit geometric VOF scheme and guarantees strict conservation of mass of two-phase flow, The simulation results are compared with experimental measurements such as the liquid-film thickness before and after the jet wiping, wall pressure and shear stress distributions. The trajectories of liquid droplets due to the fluid motion entrained by the gas-jet operation, are also qualitatively compared with experimental visualization. Physical phenomena observed during the liquid-layer breakup due to an impinging jet is characterized in order to develop ideas for controlling the liquid-layer instability and resulting splash generation and propagation. Supported by the Grant NRF-2012R1A1A2003699, the Brain Korea 21+ program, POSCO, and 2014 CTR Summer Program.

  2. Absolute And Convective Instability and Splitting of a Liquid Jet at Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, S. P.

    2001-01-01

    The objective is to establish a definitive role of the capillary, viscous, and inertial forces at a liquid-gas interface in the absence of gravity by using the fluid dynamics problem of the stability of a liquid jet as a vehicle. The objective is achieved by reexamining known theories and new theories that can be verified completely only in microgravity. The experiments performed in the microgravity facility at NASA Glenn Research Center enable the verification of the theory with experimental data. Of particular interest are (1) to capture for the first time the image of absolute instability, (2) to elucidate the fundamental difference in the physical mechanism of the drop and spray formation from a liquid jet, and (3) to find the origin of the newly discovered phenomenon of jet splitting on earth and in space.

  3. Deformation and dewetting of thin liquid films induced by moving gas jets.

    PubMed

    Berendsen, Christian W J; Zeegers, Jos C H; Darhuber, Anton A

    2013-10-01

    We study the deformation of thin liquid films subjected to impinging air-jets that are moving with respect to the substrate. The height profile and shape of the deformed liquid film is evaluated experimentally and numerically for different jet Reynolds numbers and translation speeds, for different liquids and substrate materials. Experiments and numerical results are in good agreement. On partially wetting substrates film rupture occurs. We imaged the appearance of dry spots and emergence of droplet patterns by high-speed, dual-wavelength interference microscopy. We systematically evaluated the resulting average droplet size and droplet density as a function of the experimental conditions. We show that within experimental accuracy the distribution of dry spots is dependent only on the residual film thickness and is not directly influenced by the shear stress and pressure gradients of the air-jet, nor by the speed of the substrate.

  4. Confined jet impingement of liquid nitrogen onto different heat transfer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Xu, G. H.; Fu, X.; Li, C. R.

    2011-06-01

    Jet impingement of liquid nitrogen owns many applications in the cryogenic cooling aspects, such as, cooling of high-power chips in the electronic devices and cryoprobes in the cryosurgery. In the present study, we systematically investigated the confined jet impingement of liquid nitrogen from a tube of about 2.0 mm in diameter onto the heat transfer surfaces of about 5.0 mm in basement diameter with different heat transfer surface geometries and conditions, i.e., flat surface, hemispherical surface and flat surface with a needle. The effects of many influential factors, such as, the geometry of the heat transfer surface, jet velocity, distance between the nozzle exit and heat transfer surface, heat transfer surface condition, and some other, on the heat transfer were investigated. The heat transfer correlations were also proposed by using the experimental data, and it was found that the heat transfer mechanism of liquid impingement in the confined space was dominated by the convective evaporation rather than the nucleate boiling in the present case. The critical heat flux (CHF) of the confined jet impingement was measured and the visualization of the corresponding flow patterns of the confined jet impingement of liquid nitrogen was also conducted simultaneously to understand the heat transfer phenomena.

  5. Electrohydrodynamic instability of a charged liquid jet in the presence of an axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruo, An-Cheng; Chang, Min-Hsing; Chen, Falin

    2010-04-01

    Electrified liquid jets subjected to electrical destabilizing mechanisms often deform asymmetrically, creating an uncontrollable random motion that prevents the formation of uniform drops or organized microstructures. Employing a magnetic field is a potentially effective method of inhibiting the onset of unstable motion. This paper develops a theoretical model to investigate the effect of an axial magnetic field on the instability of a charged liquid jet. To demonstrate the stabilizing ability of this approach, this study uses temporal linear stability analysis to manifest the magnetic effect in various parameter domains including the Rayleigh regime, the atomization zone, and the bending instability for a viscous jet. Results show that the magnetic force induced by the motion of charged surface is insignificant in comparison with the electric force and does not have effect on the instability of a dielectric liquid jet. However, for a liquid with high electrical conductivity, the Lorentz force induced by a conducting current becomes significant, suppressing destabilizing mechanisms and substantially improving jet stability. In the atomization zone, the effect of magnetic inhibition is relatively limited because the imposed axial magnetic field does not affect long-wave nonaxisymmetric disturbances.

  6. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster in gas jet under liquid nitrogen temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han Jifeng; Yang Chaowen; Miao Jingwei; Fu Pengtao; Luo Xiaobing; Shi Miangong

    2010-09-15

    The generation of hydrogen clusters in gas jet is tested using the Rayleigh scattering method under liquid nitrogen temperature of 79 K. The self limiting effect of hydrogen cluster is studied and it is found that the cluster formation is greatly affected by the number of expanded molecules. The well designed liquid nitrogen cold trap ensured that the hydrogen cluster would keep maximum size for maximum 15 ms during one gas jet. The scattered light intensity exhibits a power scaling on the backing pressure ranging from 5 to 48 bar with the power value of 4.1.

  7. X-ray grating interferometry with a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüring, T.; Zhou, T.; Lundström, U.; Burvall, A.; Rutishauser, S.; David, C.; Hertz, H. M.; Stampanoni, M.

    2013-08-01

    A liquid-metal-jet X-ray tube is used in an X-ray phase-contrast microscope based on a Talbot type grating interferometer. With a focal spot size in the range of a few microns and a photon flux of ˜1012 photons/s×sr, the brightness of such a source is approximately one order of magnitude higher than for a conventional microfocus source. For comparison, a standard microfocus source was used with the same grating interferometer, showing significantly increased visibility for the liquid-metal-jet arrangement. Together with the increased flux, this results in improved signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Axisymmetric confined turbulent jet directed towards the liquid surface from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    A numerical simulation is presented of an axisymmetric turbulent jet discharging axially from below into a cylindrical tank and directed towards the liquid vapor interface. The liquid vapor interface is assumed to be flat and shear free. The k-epsilon turbulence model is used to calculate the eddy viscosity. The turbulence intensity distribution and the length scale associated with the k-epsilon model are calculated as functions of jet flow rates and systems parameters. Numerical results are compared with appropriate experimental data. The problems associated with the free surface boundary conditions for the turbulent quantities are discussed.

  9. Axisymmetric confined turbulent jet directed towards the liquid surface from below

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasan, Mohammad M.; Lin, Chin-Shun

    1988-01-01

    A numerical simulation is presented of an axisymmetric turbulent jet discharging axially from below into a cylindrical tank and directed towards the liquid vapor interface. The liquid vapor interface is assumed to be flat and shear free. The k-epsilon turbulence model is used to calculate the eddy viscosity. The turbulence intensity distribution and the length scale associated with the k-epsilon model are calculated as functions of jet flow rates and systems parameters. Numerical results are compared with appropriate experimental data. The problems associated with the free surface boundary conditions for the turbulent quantities are discussed.

  10. Control of ROS and RNS productions in liquid in atmospheric pressure plasma-jet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Ito, Taiki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Ikeda, Junichiro; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-09-01

    Non-thermal plasma jets are of current interest in biomedical applications such as wound disinfection and even treatment of cancer tumors. Beneficial therapeutic effects in medical applications are attributed to excited species of oxygen and nitrogen from air. However, to control the production of these species in the plasma jet is difficult because their production is strongly dependent on concentration of nitrogen and oxygen from ambient air into the plasma jet. In this study, we analyze the discharge characteristics and the ROS and RNS productions in liquid in low- and high-frequency plasma-jet systems. Our experiments demonstrated the marked effects of surrounding gas near the plasma jet on ROS and RNS productions in liquid. By controlling the surround gas, the O2 and N2 main plasma jets are selectively produced even in open air. We also show that the concentration ratio of NO2- to H2O2 in liquid is precisely tuned from 0 to 0.18 in deionized water by changing N2 gas ratio (N2 / (N2 +O2)) in the main discharge gas, where high NO2- ratio is obtained at N2 gas ratio at N2 / (N2 +O2) = 0 . 8 . The low-frequency plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas is an effective plasma source for ROS and RNS productions in liquid, and can be a useful tool for biomedical applications. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  11. Visualization of high speed liquid jet impaction on a moving surface.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuchen; Green, Sheldon

    2015-04-17

    Two apparatuses for examining liquid jet impingement on a high-speed moving surface are described: an air cannon device (for examining surface speeds between 0 and 25 m/sec) and a spinning disk device (for examining surface speeds between 15 and 100 m/sec). The air cannon linear traverse is a pneumatic energy-powered system that is designed to accelerate a metal rail surface mounted on top of a wooden projectile. A pressurized cylinder fitted with a solenoid valve rapidly releases pressurized air into the barrel, forcing the projectile down the cannon barrel. The projectile travels beneath a spray nozzle, which impinges a liquid jet onto its metal upper surface, and the projectile then hits a stopping mechanism. A camera records the jet impingement, and a pressure transducer records the spray nozzle backpressure. The spinning disk set-up consists of a steel disk that reaches speeds of 500 to 3,000 rpm via a variable frequency drive (VFD) motor. A spray system similar to that of the air cannon generates a liquid jet that impinges onto the spinning disc, and cameras placed at several optical access points record the jet impingement. Video recordings of jet impingement processes are recorded and examined to determine whether the outcome of impingement is splash, splatter, or deposition. The apparatuses are the first that involve the high speed impingement of low-Reynolds-number liquid jets on high speed moving surfaces. In addition to its rail industry applications, the described technique may be used for technical and industrial purposes such as steelmaking and may be relevant to high-speed 3D printing.

  12. Application of underwater shock wave and laser-induced liquid jet to neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tominaga, T.; Nakagawa, A.; Hirano, T.; Sato, J.; Kato, K.; Hosseini, S. H. R.; Takayama, K.

    2006-03-01

    Paper deals with applications of underwater shock waves to medicine. A historical development of underwater shock wave generation by using pulsed Ho:YAG laser beam irradiation in water is briefly described and an overview is given regarding potential applications of shock waves to neuro-surgery. The laser beam irradiation in a liquid-filled catheter produces water vapor bubble and shock waves intermittently produces micro-liquid jets in a controlled fashion from the exit of the catheter. Correlations between shock dynamics and bubble dynamics are emphasized. To optimize the jet motion, results of basic parametric studies are briefly presented. The liquid jet discharged from the catheter exit has an impulse high enough to clearly exhibit effectiveness for various medical purposes. In liquid jets we observed reasonably strong shock waves and hence invented a compact shock generator aiming to apply to microsurgery. We applied it to a rat's bone window and developed an effective method of brain protection against shock loading. The insertion of Gore-Tex® sheet is found to attenuate shock waves drastically even for very short stand off distance and its physical mechanism is clarified. The laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) is successfully applied to soft tissue dissection. Animal experiments were performed and results of histological observations are presented in details. Results of animal experiments revealed that LILJ can sharply dissect soft tissue with a minimum amount of liquid consumption, while blood vessels larger than 0.2 mm in diameter are preserved. Shock waves and LILJ have a potential to be indispensable tools in neuro-surgery.

  13. A two-phase model for subcooled and superheated liquid jets

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidhar, R.; Jersey, G.R.; Krambeck, F.J.; Sundaresan, S.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a two-phase jet model for predicting the liquid rainout (capture) and composition of subcooled and superheated HF/additive pressurized liquid releases. The parent droplets of the release mixture constitute the fist phase. The second phase can in general be a vapor-liquid fog. The drops are not in equilibrium with the fog phase with which they exchange mass and energy. The fog at any location is assumed to be in local equilibrium. Correlations are developed for predicting the initial drop size for hydrodynamic breakup of jets. Applications are discussed in this paper for HF/additive mixtures. The fog phase calculations account for HF oligomerization and HF-water complex formation in the vapor phase and equilibrium between the liquid and vapor in the fog. The model incorporates jet trajectory calculations and hence can predict the amount of liquid rained out (liquid capture) and the capture distance. The HF captures predicted by the model for various release conditions are in agreement with small and large scale release experiments.

  14. A new technology for revascularization of cerebral embolism using liquid jet impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Uenohara, Hiroshi

    1997-12-01

    Revascularization time is the dominant factor in the treatment of acute cerebral embolism. In this paper we describe a rapid revascularization therapy using liquid jets generated by the interaction of gas bubbles with shock waves, which impact on the thrombi. The interaction of a shock wave with a gas bubble attached to an artificial thrombus which was inserted into a tube model of a cerebral artery was investigated. The shock wave was generated by detonating a microexplosive pellet. The overpressure of the shock wave was (n = 7) and (n = 3). The initial air bubble radii were varied from 0.87 mm to 2.18 mm. The subsequent collapse of the bubble was photographed using a high-speed framing camera, and the liquid jet penetrating into the artificial thrombus was visualized using x-ray photography. The penetration depth of the liquid jet increased with increasing bubble size. There was an optimal separation distance between the bubble and the shock wave source to obtain the maximum penetration depth. Liquid jets have the potential to penetrate through thrombi in as little as a few microseconds, and with very efficient ablation.

  15. Heat transfer from a square source to an impinging liquid jet confined by an annular wall

    SciTech Connect

    Besserman, D.L. ); Incropera, F.P.; Ramadhyani, S. )

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this study has been to consider experimentally impingement cooling of a chiplike source by a liquid, circular jet under conditions for which single-phase convection heat transfer from the source may be influenced by annular collection of the spent fluid. The experiments were performed with water and for operating conditions that are consistent with ship cooling requirements.

  16. On the transfer of energy to an unstable liquid jet in a coflowing compressible airstream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Hsi-Shang; Kelly, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    The transfer of energy from a compressible airstream to a coflowing unstable liquid jet via the pressure perturbation at the interface is studied as the Mach number varies continuously from subsonic to supersonic values. The 'lift' component of the pressure perturbation has been demonstrated to predominate up to slightly supersonic free-stream Mach numbers, after which the 'drag' component predominates.

  17. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lienhard, J.H. V; Khounsary, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The combination of impinging jets and diamond substrates may provide an effective solution to a class of extremely high heat flux problems in which very localized heat loads must be removed. Some potential applications include the cooling of high-heat-load components in synchrotron x-ray, fusion, and semiconductor laser systems. Impinging liquid jets are a very effective vehicle for removing high heat fluxes. The liquid supply arrangement is relatively simple, and low thermal resistances can be routinely achieved. A jet`s cooling ability is a strong function of the size of the cooled area relative to the jet diameter. For relatively large area targets, the critical heat fluxes can approach 20 W/mm{sup 2}. In this situation, burnout usually originates at the outer edge of the cooled region as increasing heat flux inhibits the liquid supply. Limitations from liquid supply are minimized when heating is restricted to the jet stagnation zone. The high stagnation pressure and high velocity gradients appear to suppress critical flux phenomena, and fluxes of up to 400 W/mm{sup 2} have been reached without evidence of burnout. Instead, the restrictions on heat flux are closely related to properties of the cooled target. Target properties become an issue owing to the large temperatures and large temperature gradients that accompany heat fluxes over 100 W/mm{sup 2}. These conditions necessitate a target with both high thermal conductivity to prevent excessive temperatures and good mechanical properties to prevent mechanical failures. Recent developments in synthetic diamond technology present a possible solution to some of the solid-side constraints on heat flux. Polycrystalline diamond foils can now be produced by chemical vapor deposition in reasonable quantity and at reasonable cost. Synthetic single crystal diamonds as large as 1 cm{sup 2} are also available.

  18. Experimental investigation of inclined liquid water jet flow onto vertically located superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibar, Ali; Karabay, Hasan; Yiğit, K. Süleyman; Ucar, Ikrime O.; Erbil, H. Yıldırım

    2010-11-01

    In this study, the behaviour of an inclined water jet, which is impinged onto hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces, has been investigated experimentally. Water jet was impinged with different inclination angles (15°-45°) onto five different hydrophobic surfaces made of rough polymer, which were held vertically. The water contact angles on these surfaces were measured as 102°, 112°, 123°, 145° and 167° showing that the last surface was superhydrophobic. Two different nozzles with 1.75 and 4 mm in diameters were used to create the water jet. Water jet velocity was within the range of 0.5-5 m/s, thus the Weber number varied from 5 to 650 and Reynolds number from 500 to 8,000 during the experiments. Hydrophobic surfaces reflected the liquid jet depending on the surface contact angle, jet inclination angle and the Weber number. The variation of the reflection angle with the Weber number showed a maximum value for a constant jet angle. The maximum value of the reflection angle was nearly equal to half of the jet angle. It was determined that the viscous drag decreases as the contact angle of the hydrophobic surface increases. The drag force on the wall is reduced dramatically with superhydrophobic surfaces. The amount of reduction of the average shear stress on the wall was about 40%, when the contact angle of the surface was increased from 145° to 167°. The area of the spreading water layer decreased as the contact angle of the surface increased and as the jet inclination angle, Weber number and Reynolds number decreased.

  19. Traction Drive Inverter Cooling with Submerged Liquid Jet Impingement on Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S.; Narumanchi, S.; Moreno, G.

    2014-09-01

    Jet impingement is one means to improve thermal management for power electronics in electric-drive traction vehicles. Jet impingement on microfin-enhanced surfaces further augments heat transfer and thermal performance. A channel flow heat exchanger from a commercial inverter was characterized as a baseline system for comparison with two new prototype designs using liquid jet impingement on plain and microfinned enhanced surfaces. The submerged jets can target areas with the highest heat flux to provide local cooling, such as areas under insulated-gate bipolar transistors and diode devices. Low power experiments, where four diodes were powered, dissipated 105 W of heat and were used to validate computational fluid dynamics modeling of the baseline and prototype designs. Experiments and modeling used typical automotive flow rates using water-ethylene glycol as a coolant (50%-50% by volume). The computational fluid dynamics model was used to predict full inverter power heat dissipation. The channel flow and jet impingement configurations were tested at full inverter power of 40 to 100 kW (output power) on a dynamometer, translating to an approximate heat dissipation of 1 to 2 kW. With jet impingement, the cold plate material is not critical for the thermal pathway. A high-temperature plastic was used that could eventually be injection molded or formed, with the jets formed from a basic aluminum plate with orifices acting as nozzles. Long-term reliability of the jet nozzles and impingement on enhanced surfaces was examined. For jet impingement on microfinned surfaces, thermal performance increased 17%. Along with a weight reduction of approximately 3 kg, the specific power (kW/kg) increased by 36%, with an increase in power density (kW/L) of 12% compared with the baseline channel flow configuration.

  20. Visualization of a cryogenic jet simulating leak from a liquid hydrogen storage tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, Tim; Agrawal, Ajay

    2009-11-01

    Hydrogen is considered an alternative fuel in propulsion and power generation due to fuel economy standards and environmental pollution. However, if an accidental leak were to occur in a hydrogen storage tank, the discharged fuel could find an ignition source and produce an explosion. A barrier wall can be used to contain the leak from the storage tank, therefore protecting equipment and people from the explosion. Past studies have investigated the jet/barrier wall interaction, in a laboratory setting, with fuel stored as a gas. Hydrogen fuel stored as a liquid offers higher energy density. In this work, we have studied the leak at cryogenic conditions due to liquid storage parameters. Jet fluid structure is visualized in a laboratory setting using helium as the supersonic jet fluid. High-speed rainbow schlieren deflectometry (RSD) images are used to show instantaneous flow structure of jet (leakage point) and barrier wall interactions. Results show the jet inlet temperature leads to significant differences in the spread angle and the extent of fuel-air mixture region adjacent to the barrier wall.

  1. Droplet impact on deep liquid pools: Rayleigh jet to formation of secondary droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Orozco, Eduardo; Davanlou, Ashkan; Choudhury, Pretam K.; Kumar, Ranganathan

    2015-11-01

    The impact of droplets on a deep pool has applications in cleaning up oil spills, spray cooling, painting, inkjet printing, and forensic analysis, relying on the changes in properties such as viscosity, interfacial tension, and density. Despite the exhaustive research on different aspects of droplet impact, it is not clear how liquid properties can affect the instabilities leading to Rayleigh jet breakup and number of daughter drops formed after its pinch-off. In this article, through systematic experiments we investigate the droplet impact phenomena by varying viscosity and surface tension of liquids as well as impact speeds. Further, using numerical simulations, we show that Rayleigh-Plateau instability is influenced by these parameters, and capillary time scale is the appropriate scale to normalize the breakup time. Based on Ohnesorge number (Oh) and impact Weber number (We), a regime map for no breakup, Rayleigh jet breakup, and crown splash is suggested. Interestingly, crown splash is observed to occur at all Ohnesorge numbers; however, at high Oh, a large portion of kinetic energy is dissipated, and thus the Rayleigh jet is suppressed regardless of high impact velocity. The normalized required time for the Rayleigh jet to reach its peak varies linearly with the critical height of the jet.

  2. Pulsed laser-induced liquid jet: evolution from shock/bubble interaction to neurosurgical application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, A.; Kumabe, T.; Ogawa, Y.; Hirano, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Ohtani, K.; Nakano, T.; Sato, C.; Yamada, M.; Washio, T.; Arafune, T.; Teppei, T.; Atsushi, K.; Satomi, S.; Takayama, K.; Tominaga, T.

    2017-01-01

    The high-speed liquid (water) jet has distinctive characteristics in surgical applications, such as tissue dissection without thermal damage and small blood vessel preservation, that make it advantageous over more conventional instruments. The continuous pressurized jet has been used since the first medical application of water jets to liver surgery in the 1980s, but exhibited drawbacks partly related to the excess water supply required and unsuitability for application to microsurgical instruments intended for deep, narrow lesions (endoscopic instrumentation and catheters) due to limitations in miniaturization of the device. To solve these issues, we initiated work on the pulsed micro-liquid jet. The idea of the pulsed micro-liquid jet originated from the observation of tissue damage by shock/bubble interactions during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and evolved into experimental application for recanalization of cerebral embolisms in the 1990s. The original method of generating the liquid jet was based on air bubble formation and microexplosives as the shock wave source, and as such could not be applied clinically. The air bubble was replaced by a holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Ho:YAG) laser-induced bubble. Finally, the system was simplified and the liquid jet was generated via irradiation from the Ho:YAG laser within a liquid-filled tubular structure. A series of investigations revealed that this pulsed laser-induced liquid jet (LILJ) system has equivalent dissection and blood vessel preservation characteristics, but the amount of liquid usage has been reduced to less than 2 μ l per shot and can easily be incorporated into microsurgical, endoscopic, and catheter devices. As a first step in human clinical studies, we have applied the LILJ system for the treatment of skull base tumors through the transsphenoidal approach in 9 patients (7 pituitary adenomas and 2 chordomas), supratentorial glioma (all high grade glioma) in 8 patients, including one with

  3. Jets.

    PubMed

    Rhines, Peter B.

    1994-06-01

    This is a discussion of concentrated large-scale flows in planetary atmospheres and oceans, argued from the viewpoint of basic geophysical fluid dynamics. We give several elementary examples in which these flows form jets on rotating spheres. Jet formation occurs under a variety of circumstances: when flows driven by external stress have a rigid boundary which can balance the Coriolis force, and at which further concentration can be caused by the beta effect; when there are singular lines like the line of vanishing windstress or windstress-curl, or the Equator; when compact sources of momentum, heat or mass radiate jet-like beta plumes along latitude circles; when random external stirring of the fluid becomes organized by the beta effect into jets; when internal instability of the mass field generates zonal flow which then is concentrated into jets; when bottom topographic obstacles radiate jets, and when frontogenesis leads to shallow jet formation. Essential to the process of jet formation in stratified fluids is the baroclinic life cycle described in geostrophic turbulence studies; there, conversion from potential to kinetic energy generates eddy motions, and these convert to quasibarotropic motions which then radiate and induce jet-like large-scale circulation. Ideas of potential vorticity stirring by eddies generalize the notion of Rossby-wave radiation, showing how jets embedded in an ambient potential vorticity gradient (typically due to the spherical geometry of the rotating planet) gain eastward momentum while promoting broader, weaker westward circulation. Homogenization of potential vorticity is an important limit point, which many geophysical circulations achieve. This well-mixed state is found in subdomains of the terrestrial midlatitude oceans, the high-latitude circumpolar ocean, and episodically in the middle atmosphere. Homogenization expels potential vorticity gradients vertically to the top and bottom of the fluid, and sideways to the edges of

  4. Determination of Cavity Dimensions Induced by Impingement of Gas Jets onto a Liquid Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingming; Li, Qiang; Kuang, Shibo; Zou, Zongshu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical study on the cavity profile induced by the impingement of top-blown multiple gas jets onto a water or oil/water bath. The depth and diameter of the cavity were measured with respect to the lance height, gas flow rate, jets inclination angle, and oil volume. The experimental results show that the cavity depth increases with the increase of gas flow rate or oil thickness but the decrease of lance height or jets inclination angle. The cavity diameter is much less affected by gas flow rate compared to other variables. Then, the importance of the surface tension in the modeling of the cavity was theoretically identified. It was found that in the cratering process, the effect of the liquid surface tension on the cavity depth could be remarkably significant for a basic oxygen furnace (BOF) cold model but negligible for a real BOF steelmaking system. An improved theoretical model was hence proposed and validated using the experimental data obtained from both the single- or two-layer liquid baths. The new model includes not only the explicit consideration of the liquid surface tension but also that of the energy utilization efficiency of the jets impinging kinetic energy contributed to the cratering process.

  5. High heat flux accelerator targets cooling with liquid-metal jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, I.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.

    2005-12-01

    Accelerator targets for radioisotope production generate very high density of thermal energy in the target material, which absorbs the particles beam. The design of these targets requires efficient heat removal techniques in order to preserve the integrity of the target. Normal average heat fluxes from these targets are around 1 kW/cm2 and may reach order of magnitude higher values at hot spots. Few techniques exist to deal with such high heat fluxes. One of them is jet impingement that has been proved to be able to deal with heat fluxes as high as 40 kW/cm2 using water as coolant. However, this requires very high jet velocities of more than 100 m/s. A few theoretical and experimental studies indicate that liquid-metal coolants (e.g., gallium or gallium alloys) can improve the heat transfer efficiency in this configuration. Experimental cooling loops based on water and liquid-metal jet impingement have been designed and built at Soreq to evaluate this method. For the current liquid-metal system an eutectic alloy of gallium and indium (GaIn) is used. Initial experiments demonstrate that the GaIn cooling system can deal with heat flux of about 2 kW/cm2 over an area of 1 cm2. The jet velocity is less than 4 m/s and the required differential pressure from the pump is less than 1 bar.

  6. Plunge location of sediment driven hyperpycnal river discharges considering bottom friction, lateral entrainment, and particle settling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strom, K. B.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2012-12-01

    River discharges with very high sediment loads have the potential to develop into plunging hyperpycnal flows that transition from a river jet to a turbidity current at some location basinward of the river mouth due to the density difference between the turbid river and the receiving water body. However, even if the bulk density of the turbid river is greater than that of the receiving lake or ocean, some distance is needed for the forward inertia of the river to dissipate so that the downward gravitational pull can cause the system to collapse into a subaqueous turbidity current. This collapsing at the plunge point has been found to occur when the densimetric Froude number decreases to a value between 0.3 < Frd < 0.7 (Fang and Stefan 2000, Parker and Toniolo 2007, Dai and Garcia 2010, Lamb et al. 2010). In 2D channel flow analysis at the plunge point, this has led to the concept of a two-fold criterion for plunging. The first is simply for the need of high enough suspended sediment concentration to overcome the density difference between the river fluid and the fluid of the receiving water. The second is the need for sufficiently deep water to reduce the densimetric Froude below the critical value for plunging, which leads to dependence of plunging on the receiving water basin topography (Lamb et al. 2010). In this analysis, we expand on past work by solving a system of ODE river jet equations to account for bottom friction, lateral entrainment of ambient fluid, and particle settling between the river mouth and the plunge location. Typical entrainment and bottom friction coefficients are used and the model is tested against the laboratory density current data of Fang and Stefan (1991). A suite of conditions is solved with variable river discharge velocity, aspect ratio, suspended sediment concentration, and particle size; a range of salinity values and bottom slopes are used for the receiving water body. The plunge location is then expressed as a function of the

  7. Flow of a Two-Dimensional Liquid Metal Jet in a Strong Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molokov, S.; Reed, C. B.

    2002-01-01

    A combined effect of surface tension, gravity, inertia and a transverse nonuniform magnetic field on the steady, two-dimensional jet (or curtain) flow is studied with reference to liquid metal divertors of tokamaks and coating flows. Here main fundamental aspects of the flow are presented. More details on the assumptions, analysis and results are given in. Consider a steady flow of a viscous, electrically conducting, incompressible fluid in a jet pouring downward in the x-asterisk-direction (the direction of gravity) from a nozzle.

  8. Transferring jet engine diagnostic and control technology to liquid propellant rocket engines

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, J.F.; Hagar, S.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology for developing a diagnostic and control system for a current, operational jet engine. A description is given of each development stage, the system components and the technologies which could be transferred to liquid propellant rocket engines. Finally, the operational impact is described in terms of cost and maintenance based on actual jet engine experience. Efforts are continuing to develop new diagnostic techniques under IR D for application on the advanced technical fighter. Already improved techniques and application methods are becoming available. This technology is being evaluated and may also be transferred to rocket engine diagnostic and control system development.

  9. Influence of Turbulence on the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2002-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquidfree vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity. After the code was implemented in axisymmetric form and verified by several test cases at the NASA Glenn Research Center, the drop tower runs of Aydelott were modeled. Work last year with a laminar model was found to overpredict Aydelott's results, except at the lowest Reynolds number conditions of 400. This year, a simple turbulence model was implemented by adding a turbulent viscosity based on the mixing-length hypothesis and empirical measurements of previous works. Predictions made after this change was implemented have been much closer to experimentally observed flow patterns and geyser heights. Two model runs is shown. The first, without any turbulence correction

  10. Liquid jet impingement normal to a disk in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labus, T. L.; Dewitt, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to determine the free surface shapes of circular jets impinging normal to sharp-edged disks in zero gravity. Experiments conducted in a zero gravity drop tower yielded three distinct flow patterns which were classified in terms of the relative effects of surface tension and inertial forces. An order of magnitude analysis was conducted indicating regions where viscous forces were not significant when computing free surface shapes. The free surface analysis was simplified by transforming the governing potential flow equations and boundary conditions into the inverse plane. The resulting nonlinear equations were solved numerically and comparisons were made with the experimental data for the inertia dominated regime.

  11. Acoustic Excitation of Liquid Fuel Droplets and Coaxial Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    brakes apart from the liquid core (37). The shape of the core in a two dimensional plane intersecting the axis of symmetry of the coaxial flow...Mechanics Tool Kit, Torque Wrench, Caliper , Digital Thermometer and Multimeter. Ensure all tools associated with this experiment/test/operation are

  12. [Transoral approach for sublingual-plunging ranula].

    PubMed

    Schiel, S; Mayer, P; Ehrenfeld, M; Probst, F A

    2013-07-01

    The case of a 7-year-old boy suffering from progressive submental/submandibular swelling is reported. Following clinical and imaging diagnostics (MRI), the suspected diagnosis of a sublingual-plunging ranula was made. Surgery was performed with transoral excision of the sublingual gland in combination with excision of the ranula. Additional submandibular gland excision should be avoided.

  13. Taking the Plunge off the Ivory Tower.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mauzerall, Jorgette

    1997-01-01

    Relates the experiences of a white academic teaching in a black rural state college--a plunge into the world of black experience which shocked the academic. States that everything was different--students' names, their manner of dress, their reaction to the O.J. Simpson verdict. Finds that leaving the ivory tower was not easy, but the job exceeded…

  14. How seabirds plunge-dive without injuries.

    PubMed

    Chang, Brian; Croson, Matthew; Straker, Lorian; Gart, Sean; Dove, Carla; Gerwin, John; Jung, Sunghwan

    2016-10-25

    In nature, several seabirds (e.g., gannets and boobies) dive into water at up to 24 m/s as a hunting mechanism; furthermore, gannets and boobies have a slender neck, which is potentially the weakest part of the body under compression during high-speed impact. In this work, we investigate the stability of the bird's neck during plunge-diving by understanding the interaction between the fluid forces acting on the head and the flexibility of the neck. First, we use a salvaged bird to identify plunge-diving phases. Anatomical features of the skull and neck were acquired to quantify the effect of beak geometry and neck musculature on the stability during a plunge-dive. Second, physical experiments using an elastic beam as a model for the neck attached to a skull-like cone revealed the limits for the stability of the neck during the bird's dive as a function of impact velocity and geometric factors. We find that the neck length, neck muscles, and diving speed of the bird predominantly reduce the likelihood of injury during the plunge-dive. Finally, we use our results to discuss maximum diving speeds for humans to avoid injury.

  15. Vehicle-scale investigation of a fluorine jet-pump liquid hydrogen tank pressurization system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cady, E. C.; Kendle, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical and experimental program was performed to evaluate the performance of a fluorine-hydrogen jet-pump injector for main tank injection (MTI) pressurization of a liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank. The injector performance during pressurization and LH2 expulsion was determined by a series of seven tests of a full-scale injector and MTI pressure control system in a 28.3 cu m (1000 cu ft) flight-weight LH2 tank. Although the injector did not effectively jet-pump LH2 continuously, it showed improved pressurization performance compared to straight-pipe injectors tested under the same conditions in a previous program. The MTI computer code was modified to allow performance prediction for the jet-pump injector.

  16. Acoustically Forced Coaxial Hydrogen/Liquid Oxygen Jet Flames

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-15

    should be present 100kHz Framerate DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited. PA Clearance #16216 10 Convection Velocities x...y Extract column of pixels at each time along shear layer edge as a function of time, dark streaks represent convecting liquid structures Positive...slope streaks represent upstream traveling features Structures convect at apparent constant velocity Structures start at slow speed and

  17. Numerical studies of the effects of jet-induced mixing on liquid-vapor interface condensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun

    1989-01-01

    Numerical solutions of jet-induced mixing in a partially full cryogenic tank are presented. An axisymmetric laminar jet is discharged from the central part of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface. Liquid is withdrawn at the same volume flow rate from the outer part of the tank. The jet is at a temperature lower than the interface, which is maintained at a certain saturation temperature. The interface is assumed to be flat and shear-free and the condensation-induced velocity is assumed to be negligibly small compared with radial interface velocity. Finite-difference method is used to solve the nondimensional form of steady state continuity, momentum, and energy equations. Calculations are conducted for jet Reynolds numbers ranging from 150 to 600 and Prandtl numbers ranging from 0.85 to 2.65. The effects of above stated parameters on the condensation Nusselt and Stanton numbers which characterize the steady-state interface condensation process are investigated. Detailed analysis to gain a better understanding of the fundamentals of fluid mixing and interface condensation is performed.

  18. Investigation on cone jetting regimes of liquid droplets subjected to pyroelectric fields induced by laser blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennari, Oriella; Battista, Luigi; Silva, Benjamin; Grilli, Simonetta; Miccio, Lisa; Vespini, Veronica; Coppola, Sara; Orlando, Pierangelo; Aprin, Laurent; Slangen, Pierre; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Electrical conductivity and viscosity play a major role in the tip jetting behaviour of liquids subjected to electrohydrodynamic (EHD) forces, thus influencing significantly the printing performance. Recently, we developed a nozzle- and electrode-free pyro-EHD system as a versatile alternative to conventional EHD configurations and we demonstrated different applications, including inkjet printing and three-dimensional lithography. However, only dielectric fluids have been used in all of those applications. Here, we present an experimental characterization of the pyro-EHD jetting regimes, induced by laser blasts, of sessile drops in case of dielectric and conductive liquids in order to extend the applicability of the system to a wider variety of fields including biochemistry and biotechnology where conductive aqueous solutions are typically used.

  19. Recurrent plunging ranula of the neck.

    PubMed

    Al Ruhaimi, Khalid A

    2013-03-01

    The reported case describes a mismanaged extensive recurrent plunging ranula that occupied a large portion of the neck. The ranula is usually clinically diagnosed. However, absence of visible intra-oral signs may mislead the diagnosis and leads to improper surgical management. Presence of amylase in the aspirated fluids is an important aid in the differential diagnosis. Thereby confirming the salivary origin of the fluids and thus avoiding extensive investigations. The recurrence rate varies according to the procedure performed. Diverse methods of treating ranula have been reported in the literature with variable results. These include marsuplization, excision of the ranula, incision of the ranula and drainage of the contents, excision of the sublingual gland and drainage. The successful procedure to treat plunging ranula depends on complete excision of the affected sublingual gland and drainage of its contents. In this paper, the useful diagnostic investigations and the recommended surgical intervention procedure were described.

  20. Giant plunging ranula: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Ha; Huh, Kyung-Hoe; An, Chang-Hyeon; Park, Jin-Woo; Yi, Won-Jin

    2013-03-01

    A ranula is a bluish, transparent, and thin-walled swelling in the floor of the mouth. They originate from the extravasation and subsequent accumulation of saliva from the sublingual gland. Ranulas are usually limited to the sublingual space but they sometimes extend to the submandibular space and parapharyngeal space, which is defined as a plunging ranula. A 21-year-old woman presented with a complaint of a large swelling in the left submandibular region. On contrast-enhanced CT images, it dissected across the midline, and extended to the parapharyngeal space posteriorly and to the submandibular space inferiorly. Several septa and a fluid-fluid level within the lesion were also demonstrated. We diagnosed this lesion as a ranula rather than cystic hygroma due to the location of its center and its sublingual tail sign. As plunging ranula and cystic hygroma are managed with different surgical approaches, it is important to differentiate them radiologically.

  1. Experimental study on plunging breaking waves in deep water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Ho-Joon; Chang, Kuang-An; Huang, Zhi-Cheng; Na, Byoungjoon

    2015-03-01

    This study presents a unique data set that combines measurements of velocities and void fraction under an unsteady deep water plunging breaker in a laboratory. Flow properties in the aerated crest region of the breaking wave were measured using modified particle image velocimetry (PIV) and bubble image velocimetry (BIV). Results show that the maximum velocity in the plunging breaker reached 1.68C at the first impingement of the overturning water jet with C being the phase speed of the primary breaking wave, while the maximum velocity reached 2.14C at the beginning of the first splash-up. A similarity profile of void fraction was found in the successive impinging and splash-up rollers. In the highly foamy splashing roller, the increase of turbulent level and vorticity level were strongly correlated with the increase of void fraction when the range of void fraction was between 0 and 0.4 (from the trough level to approximately the center of the roller). The levels became constant when void fraction was greater than 0.5. The mass flux, momentum flux, kinetic energy, potential energy, and total energy were computed and compared with and without the void fraction being accounted for. The results show that all the mean and turbulence properties related to the air-water mixture are considerably overestimated unless void fraction is considered. When including the density variation due to the air bubbles, the wave energy dissipated exponentially a short distance after breaking; about 54% and 85% of the total energy dissipated within one and two wavelengths beyond the breaking wave impingement point, respectively.

  2. Thorough small-angle X-ray scattering analysis of the instability of liquid micro-jets in air.

    PubMed

    Marmiroli, Benedetta; Cacho-Nerin, Fernando; Sartori, Barbara; Pérez, Javier; Amenitsch, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Liquid jets are of interest, both for their industrial relevance and for scientific applications (more important, in particular for X-rays, after the advent of free-electron lasers that require liquid jets as sample carrier). Instability mechanisms have been described theoretically and by numerical simulation, but confirmed by few experimental techniques. In fact, these are mainly based on cameras, which is limited by the imaging resolution, and on light scattering, which is hindered by absorption, reflection, Mie scattering and multiple scattering due to complex air/liquid interfaces during jet break-up. In this communication it is demonstrated that synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) can give quantitative information on liquid jet dynamics at the nanoscale, by detecting time-dependent morphology and break-up length. Jets ejected from circular tubes of different diameters (100-450 µm) and speeds (0.7-21 m s(-1)) have been explored to cover the Rayleigh and first wind-induced regimes. Various solvents (water, ethanol, 2-propanol) and their mixtures have been examined. The determination of the liquid jet behaviour becomes essential, as it provides background data in subsequent studies of chemical and biological reactions using SAXS or X-ray diffraction based on synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers.

  3. Interaction of DC Microhollow Cathode Discharge Plasma Micro Jet with Liquid Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weidong; Lopez, Jose; Becker, Kurt

    2008-10-01

    There have been different approaches in studying the interaction between plasma and liquid, such as sustained plasmas in contact with liquids and pulsed electric discharge in liquids. Recently, we have discovered that stable plasma can be sustained within a gas cavity maintained inside liquid media. A prototype device with key dimensions in sub-millimeter range were operated successfully in de-ionized water and turbo molecular pump oil with ambient air, pure nitrogen or pure oxygen used as the operating gas. Hydrogen Peroxide production in de-ionized water with ambient air as the working gas is estimated to be about 80 mg/L after 15 minutes plasma jet-water interaction while energy consumption is only about 8-10 W. With the radicals readily generated and directly introduced into the liquid media, it could lead to applications such as in-liquid bio-waste treatment, bio-rich liquid modification, in-situ monitoring/sensing, and filtration of by-products from VOC treatment by plasma.

  4. Two-Dimensional Optical Measurement of Waves on Liquid Lithium Jet Simulating IFMIF Target Flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kazuhiro Itoh; Hiroyuki Koterazawa; Taro Itoh; Yutaka Kukita; Hiroo Kondo; Nobuo Yamaoka; Hiroshi Horiike; Mizuho Ida; Hideo Nakamura; Hiroo Nakamura; Takeo Muroga

    2006-07-01

    Waves on a liquid-lithium jet flow, simulating a proposed high-energy beam target design, have been measured using an optical technique based on specular reflection of a single laser beam on the jet surface. The stream-wise and spanwise fluctuations of the local free-surface slope were least-square fitted with a sinusoidal curve to makeup the signals lost due to the constriction in the optical arrangement. The waveform was estimated with an assumption that wave phase speed can be calculated using the dispersion relation for linear capillary-gravity waves. The direction of propagation on the jet surface was also evaluated so that the wave amplitudes, calculated by integral of slope angle signal, agree consistently in stream-wise and spanwise direction. These measurements and analyses show that the waves at the measurement location for a jet velocity of 1.2 m/s can best be represented by oblique waves with an inclination of 1.23 rad, a wavelength of 3.8 mm and a wave amplitude of about 0.05 mm. (authors)

  5. Local heat transfer coefficients under an axisymmetric, single-phase liquid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, J.; Webb, B.W. )

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to characterize local heat transfer coefficients for round, single-phase free liquid jets impinging normally against a flat uniform heat flux surface. The problems parameters investigated were jet Reynolds number Re, nozzle-to-plate spacing z, and jet diameter d. A region of near-constant Nusselt number was observed for the region bounded by 0 {le} r/d {le} 0.75, where is the radical distance from the impingement point. The local Nusselt number profiles exhibited a sharp drop for r/d > 0.75, followed by an inflection and a shower decrease thereafter. Increasing the nozzle-to-plate spacing generally decreased the heat transfer slightly. The local Nusselt number characteristics were found to be dependent on nozzle diameter. This was explained by the influence of the free-stream velocity gradient on local heat transfer, as predicted in the classical analysis of infinite jet stagnation flow and heat transfer. Correlations for local and average Nusselt numbers reveal an approximate Nusselt number dependence on Re{sup 1,3}.

  6. Splattering and heat transfer during impingement of a turbulent liquid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Lienhard, J.H. V; Liu, X.; Gabour, L.A. )

    1992-05-01

    Splattering and heat transfer due to impingement of an unsubmerged, fully turbulent liquid jet is investigated experimentally and analytically. Heat transfer measurements were made along a uniformly heated surface onto which a jet impacted, and a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer was used to measure the size, velocity, and concentration of the droplets splattered after impingement. Splattering is found to occur in proportion to the magnitude of surface disturbances to the incoming jet, and it is observed to occur only within a certain radial range, rather than along the entire film surface. A nondimensional group developed from inviscid capillary disturbance analysis of the circular jet successfully scales the splattering data, yielding predictive results for the onset of splattering results is used to formulate a prediction of local Nusselt number. Both the prediction and the experimental data reveal that the Nusselt number is enhanced for radial locations immediately following splattering, but falls below the nonsplattering Nusselt number at larger radii. The turbulent heat transfer enhancement upstream of splattering is also characterized.

  7. New approach of a traditional analysis for predicting near-exit jet liquid instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaramillo, Guillermo; Collicott, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Traditional linear instability theory for round liquid jets requires an exit-plane velocity profile be assumed so as to derive the characteristic growth rates and wavelengths of instabilities. This requires solving an eigenvalue problem for the Rayleigh Equation. In this new approach, a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile is assumed at the exit-plane of a round jet and a comparison is made with a hyperbolic secant profile. Temporal and Spatial Stability Analysis (TSA and SSA respectively) are the employed analytical tools to compare results of predicted most-unstable wavelengths from the given analytical velocity profiles and from previous experimental work. The local relevance of the velocity profile in the near-exit region of a liquid jet and the validity of an inviscid formulation through the Rayleigh equation are discussed as well. A comparison of numerical accuracy is made between two different mathematical approaches for the hyperbolic tangent profile with and without the Ricatti transformation. Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of the boundary layer at the exit plane non-dimensionalizes the problem and, the Re range, based on measurements by Portillo in 2011, is 185 to 600. Wavelength measurements are taken from Portillo's experiment. School of Mechanical Engineering at Universidad del Valle, supported by a grant from Fulbright and Colciencias. Ph.D. student at the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Purdue University.

  8. Small-animal tomography with a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsson, D. H.; Lundström, U.; Westermark, U.; Takman, P. A. C.; Burvall, A.; Arsenian Henriksson, M.; Hertz, H. M.

    2012-03-01

    X-ray tomography of small animals is an important tool for medical research. For high-resolution x-ray imaging of few-cm-thick samples such as, e.g., mice, high-brightness x-ray sources with energies in the few-10-keV range are required. In this paper we perform the first small-animal imaging and tomography experiments using liquid-metal-jet-anode x-ray sources. This type of source shows promise to increase the brightness of microfocus x-ray systems, but present sources are typically optimized for an energy of 9 keV. Here we describe the details of a high-brightness 24-keV electron-impact laboratory microfocus x-ray source based on continuous operation of a heated liquid-In/Ga-jet anode. The source normally operates with 40 W of electron-beam power focused onto the metal jet, producing a 7×7 μm2 FWHM x-ray spot. The peak spectral brightness is 4 × 109 photons / ( s × mm2 × mrad2 × 0.1%BW) at the 24.2 keV In Kα line. We use the new In/Ga source and an existing Ga/In/Sn source for high-resolution imaging and tomography of mice.

  9. Effect of Liquid Viscosity on a Liquid Jet Produced by the Collapse of a Laser-Induced Bubble near a Rigid Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu-mei; He, Jie; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao-wu

    2009-01-01

    The collapse of a laser-induced cavitation bubble near a rigid boundary and its dependence on liquid (kinematic) viscosity are investigated experimentally by fiber-coupling optical beam deflection (OBD). Cavitation bubble tests are performed using a mixture of glycerin and water of various concentrations, and the viscosity ranges from 1.004×10-6 to 51.30×10-6 m2/s. Combining the detection principles of this detector with a widely used laser ablation model, actual liquid-jet impact forces are presented for the mentioned viscosity range. In addition, based on the model of a collapsing bubble, some characteristic parameters, such as bubble lifetime, the maximum bubble radius, and liquid-jet impact pressure, are also obtained as a function of liquid viscosity. The main conclusion is that the liquid jet is a dominant factor in cavitation damage and can be modified by liquid viscosity. A high viscosity reduces the liquid-jet impact force and cavitation erosion markedly. The mechanism of the liquid viscosity effect on cavitation erosion has also been discussed.

  10. Identification of Structural Motifs of Imidazolium Based Ionic Liquids from Jet-Cooled Infrared Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Justin W.; Booth, Ryan S.; Annesley, Christopher; Stearns, Jaime A.

    2016-06-01

    Highly variable and potentially revolutionary, ionic liquids (IL) are a class of molecules with potential for numerous Air Force applications such as satellite propulsion, but the complex nature of IL structure and intermolecular interactions makes it difficult to adequately predict structure-property relationships in order to make new IL-based technology a reality. For example, methylation of imidazolium ionic liquids leads to a substantial increase in viscosity but the underlying physical mechanism is not understood. In addition the role of hydrogen bonding in ILs, especially its relationship to macroscopic properties, is a matter of ongoing research. Here, structural motifs are identified from jet-cooled infrared spectra of different imidazolium based ionic liquids, such as 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl)imide. Measurements of the C-H stretches indicate three structural families present in the gas phase.

  11. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  12. Liquid helium inertial jet for comparative study of classical and quantum turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Duri, D.; Charvin, P.; Rousset, B.; Poncet, J.-M.; Diribarne, P.

    2011-11-15

    We present a new cryogenic wind tunnel facility developed to study the high Reynolds number developed classical or quantum turbulence in liquid {sup 4}He. A stable inertial round jet flow with a Reynolds number of 4 x 10{sup 6} can be sustained in both He I and He II down to a minimum temperature of 1.7 K. The circuit can be pressurized up to 3.5 x 10{sup 5} Pa. The system has been designed to exploit the self-similar properties of the jet far field in order to adapt to the spatial resolution of the existing probes. Multiple and complementary sensors can be simultaneously installed to obtain spatial and time resolved measurements. The technical difficulties and design details are described and the system performance is presented.

  13. Direct simulation for the instability and breakup of laminar liquid jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuech, S. G.; Przekwas, A. J.; Yang, H. Q.; Gross, K. W.

    1990-01-01

    A direct numerical simulation method is described for predicting the deformation of laminar liquid jets. In the present nonlinear direct simulation, the convective term, which has been discarded in past linear analyses by Rayleigh and others, is included in the hydrodynamic equations. It is shown that only by maintaining full complexity of the nonlinear surface tension term accurate drop formation can be predicted. The continuity and momentum equations in the transient form are integrated on an adaptive grid, conforming the jet and surface wave shape. The equations, which are parabolic in time and elliptic in space, are solved by a TVD scheme with characteristic flux splitting. The results of the present work are discussed and compared with available measurements and other analyses. The comparison shows that among the predictions, the current 1-D direct simulation results agree best with the experimental data. Furthermore, the computer time requirements are much (an order of magnitude) smaller than those of previously reported multidimensional analyses.

  14. Identification of the biologically active liquid chemistry induced by a nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Wende, Kristian; Williams, Paul; Dalluge, Joe; Gaens, Wouter Van; Aboubakr, Hamada; Bischof, John; von Woedtke, Thomas; Goyal, Sagar M; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Bogaerts, Annemie; Masur, Kai; Bruggeman, Peter J

    2015-06-06

    The mechanism of interaction of cold nonequilibrium plasma jets with mammalian cells in physiologic liquid is reported. The major biological active species produced by an argon RF plasma jet responsible for cell viability reduction are analyzed by experimental results obtained through physical, biological, and chemical diagnostics. This is complemented with chemical kinetics modeling of the plasma source to assess the dominant reactive gas phase species. Different plasma chemistries are obtained by changing the feed gas composition of the cold argon based RF plasma jet from argon, humidified argon (0.27%), to argon/oxygen (1%) and argon/air (1%) at constant power. A minimal consensus physiologic liquid was used, providing isotonic and isohydric conditions and nutrients but is devoid of scavengers or serum constituents. While argon and humidified argon plasma led to the creation of hydrogen peroxide dominated action on the mammalian cells, argon-oxygen and argon-air plasma created a very different biological action and was characterized by trace amounts of hydrogen peroxide only. In particular, for the argon-oxygen (1%), the authors observed a strong negative effect on mammalian cell proliferation and metabolism. This effect was distance dependent and showed a half life time of 30 min in a scavenger free physiologic buffer. Neither catalase and mannitol nor superoxide dismutase could rescue the cell proliferation rate. The strong distance dependency of the effect as well as the low water solubility rules out a major role for ozone and singlet oxygen but suggests a dominant role of atomic oxygen. Experimental results suggest that O reacts with chloride, yielding Cl2(-) or ClO(-). These chlorine species have a limited lifetime under physiologic conditions and therefore show a strong time dependent biological activity. The outcomes are compared with an argon MHz plasma jet (kinpen) to assess the differences between these (at least seemingly) similar plasma sources.

  15. Study on three-dimensional expansion characteristics of four wall combustion-gas jets in confined liquid space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhitao; Yu, Yonggang

    2017-03-01

    To explore further the launch mechanism of the new underwater launching technology proposed in this paper, the expansion characteristics of four wall combustion-gas jets in confined liquid space must be studied firstly. The experimental device is designed, and the high-speed digital photographic system is adopted to obtain the expansion sequence processes of Taylor cavities formed by the four wall jets. Meanwhile, the influence of the injection pressure on the axial expansion property of the four wall jets is discussed. Based on the experiments, a three-dimensional unsteady mathematical model is established to simulate the turbulent flow process of the four wall jets expanding in liquid, and the temporal and spatial distribution laws of phase, pressure, temperature, and velocity and the evolution rules of vortices are illustrated in detail. Results show that, accompanied by the jets expanding downstream, the four wall combustion-gas jets get close to each other and achieve convergence eventually under induction of the interference effect between multiple jets. Meanwhile, the heads of the Taylor cavities separate from the observation chamber wall and offset to the central axis of the observation chamber with time going on. The numerical simulation results of the four wall combustion-gas jets coincide well with the experimental data.

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy of liquid water, some alcohols, and pure nonane in free micro jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faubel, Manfred; Steiner, Björn; Toennies, J. Peter

    1997-06-01

    The recently developed technique of accessing volatile liquids in a high vacuum environment by using a very thin liquid jet is implemented to carry out the first measurements of photoelectron spectra of pure liquid water, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and benzyl alcohol as well as of liquid n-nonane. The apparatus, which consists of a commercial hemispherical (10 cm mean radius) electron analyzer and a hollow cathode discharge He I light source is described in detail and the problems of the sampling of the photoelectrons in such an environment are discussed. For water and most of the alcohols up to six different electronic bands could be resolved. The spectra of 1-butanol and n-nonane show two weakly discernable peaks from which the threshold ionization potential could be determined. A deconvolution of the photoelectron spectra is used to extract ionization potentials of individual molecular bands of molecules near the surface of the liquid and shifts of the order of 1 eV compared to the gas phase are observed. A molecular orientation for water molecules at the surface of liquid water is inferred from a comparison of the relative band strengths with the gas phase. Similar effects are also observed for some of the alcohols. The results are discussed in terms of a simple "Born-solvation" model.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Jet Impingement Heat Transfer Using Thermochromic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, Brian Paul

    1997-01-01

    Jet impingement cooling of a hypersonic airfoil leading edge is experimentally investigated using thermochromic liquid crystals (TLCS) to measure surface temperature. The experiment uses computer data acquisition with digital imaging of the TLCs to determine heat transfer coefficients during a transient experiment. The data reduction relies on analysis of a coupled transient conduction - convection heat transfer problem that characterizes the experiment. The recovery temperature of the jet is accounted for by running two experiments with different heating rates, thereby generating a second equation that is used to solve for the recovery temperature. The resulting solution requires a complicated numerical iteration that is handled by a computer. Because the computational data reduction method is complex, special attention is paid to error assessment. The error analysis considers random and systematic errors generated by the instrumentation along with errors generated by the approximate nature of the numerical methods. Results of the error analysis show that the experimentally determined heat transfer coefficients are accurate to within 15%. The error analysis also shows that the recovery temperature data may be in error by more than 50%. The results show that the recovery temperature data is only reliable when the recovery temperature of the jet is greater than 5 C, i.e. the jet velocity is in excess of 100 m/s. Parameters that were investigated include nozzle width, distance from the nozzle exit to the airfoil surface, and jet velocity. Heat transfer data is presented in graphical and tabular forms. An engineering analysis of hypersonic airfoil leading edge cooling is performed using the results from these experiments. Several suggestions for the improvement of the experimental technique are discussed.

  18. Self-formed waterfall plunge pools in homogeneous rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheingross, Joel S.; Lo, Daniel Y.; Lamb, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    Waterfalls are ubiquitous, and their upstream propagation can set the pace of landscape evolution, yet no experimental studies have examined waterfall plunge pool erosion in homogeneous rock. We performed laboratory experiments, using synthetic foam as a bedrock simulant, to produce self-formed waterfall plunge pools via particle impact abrasion. Plunge pool vertical incision exceeded lateral erosion by approximately tenfold until pools deepened to the point that the supplied sediment could not be evacuated and deposition armored the pool bedrock floor. Lateral erosion of plunge pool sidewalls continued after sediment deposition, but primarily at the downstream pool wall, which might lead to undermining of the plunge pool lip, sediment evacuation, and continued vertical pool floor incision in natural streams. Undercutting of the upstream pool wall was absent, and our results suggest that vertical drilling of successive plunge pools is a more efficient waterfall retreat mechanism than the classic model of headwall undercutting and collapse in homogeneous rock.

  19. Flow visualization of Taylor-mode breakup of a viscous liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Shirley C.; Luu, Patrick; Tam, Patrick; Roski, Gerald; Tsai, Chen S.

    1999-06-01

    We recently reported a new spray technique called ultrasound-modulated two-fluid (UMTF) atomization and the pertinent "resonant liquid capillary wave (RLCW) theory" based on linear models of Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves. In this article, flow visualizations of liquid jets near the nozzle tip are presented to verify the central assumption of the RLCW theory that the resonant liquid capillary wave in UMTF atomization is initiated by the ultrasound at the nozzle tip. Specifically, a bright band beneath the nozzle tip was seen in ultrasonic and UMTF atomization separately, but not in two-fluid atomization. The bright band can be attributed to scattering of laser light sheet by the capillary waves generated by the ultrasound on the intact liquid jet. As the capillary wave travels downstream in the direction of airflow, it is amplified by the air blowing around it and eventually collapsed into drops. Therefore, the jet breakup time can be determined by dividing the measured band length with the capillary wave velocity. The breakup times thus determined for water and glycerol/water jets are twice the values predicted by the modified Taylor's model with a sheltering parameter, and are one order of magnitude shorter than those in conventional two-fluid atomization. Furthermore, the images of the spray in the proximity of the nozzle tip obtained by 30 ns laser pulses are consistent with the drop sizes obtained 2.3-6 cm downstream from the nozzle tip by 13 s time average of continuous laser light. Also reported in this article is the good agreement between the measured viscosity effects on the drop-size and size distribution in UMTF atomization and those on the relative amplitude growth rates of capillary waves at different wavelengths predicted by Taylor's model as a result of its inclusion of higher order terms other than the first in viscosity. These new findings have led to the conclusion that UMTF atomization occurs via Taylor-mode breakup of capillary waves

  20. Time-Resolved imaging Studies of Laser-Induced Jet Formation in Non-Newtonian Liquid Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkoz, Emre; Arnold, Craig

    2016-11-01

    Blister-actuated laser-induced forward transfer (BA-LIFT) is a nozzle-less printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. The lack of a nozzle allows for a wider range of inks since clogging is not a concern. In this work, a focused laser pulse is absorbed within a polymer layer coated with a thin liquid film. The pulse causes a rapidly expanding blister to be formed that induces a liquid jet. Various well-studied non-Newtonian solutions are tested to examine how the shear-thinning and shear-thickening characteristics affect jet formation. The time delay between pulses is varied along with the energy, and different regimes of transfer are identified. We explore how Ohnesorge number, Weber number and spot size affect the jet formation and evaluate parameters that lead to breakup of jets into droplets.

  1. A closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet for ultrafast spectroscopy of liquid samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picchiotti, Alessandra; Prokhorenko, Valentyn I.; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    We describe the design and provide the results of the full characterization of a closed-loop pump-driven wire-guided flow jet system. The jet has excellent optical quality with a wide range of liquids spanning from alcohol to water based solutions, including phosphate buffers used for biological samples. The thickness of the jet film varies depending on the flow rate between 90 μm and 370 μm. The liquid film is very stable, and its thickness varies only by 0.76% under optimal conditions. Measured transmitted signal reveals a long term optical stability (hours) with a RMS of 0.8%, less than the overall noise of the spectroscopy setup used in our experiments. The closed loop nature of the overall jet design has been optimized for the study of precious biological samples, in limited volumes, to remove window contributions from spectroscopic observables. This feature is particularly important for femtosecond studies in the UV range.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulations of Plunging Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-07

    Schmidt and E Turkel, Numerical Solutions of the Euler Equations by Finite Volume Methods Using Runge-Kutta Time-Stepping Schemes, AIAA paper 81-1259...Ω ( p ∂vj ∂xj − σij ∂v i ∂xj ) dV (4) Definition 1 A numerical scheme to solve the viscous Navier-Stokes equations is said to be Kinetic Energy...Direct Numerical Simulations of Plunging Airfoils Yves Allaneau∗ and Antony Jameson† Stanford University, Stanford, California, 94305, USA This paper

  3. Correct diagnosis for plunging ranula by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Li, Jun

    2014-06-01

    Plunging ranulas most commonly occupy the submandibular triangle and misdiagnosis inevitably leads to incorrect treatment. Three cases of plunging ranula are reported. The correct diagnosis resulted from the characteristic signs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Treatment consisted of the total removal of the sublingual gland and evacuation of cystic contents by the intraoral approach. The cyst gradually regressed and disappeared within two months after surgery as confirmed by ultrasonography. All three cases have not experienced recurrence in the follow-up period. MRI is a valuable method to correctly diagnosis plunging ranula. Total removal of the sublingual gland is the most reliable method to treat plunging ranula.

  4. A study of heat transfer in the surface layer of metal during the impingement of a liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koldin, A. V.; Platonov, N. I.

    2008-03-01

    We propose a model of heat transfer that takes place when a sheet of metal heated to a high temperature is cooled by a jet. The model takes into account transition and film boiling of liquid, as well as convective and radiant heat transfer in air medium. Examples are given illustrating how the temperature field of a movable metal sheet cooled by a system of jets is calculated.

  5. Liquid phase products and solid deposit formation from thermally stressed model jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, W. S.; Bittker, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between solid deposit formation and liquid degradation product concentration was studied for the high temperature (400 C) stressing of three hydrocarbon model fuels. A Jet Fuel Thermal Oxidation Tester was used to simulate actual engine fuel system conditions. The effects of fuel type, dissolved oxygen concentration, and hot surface contact time (reaction time) were studied. Effects of reaction time and removal of dissolved oxygen on deposit formation were found to be different for n-dodecane and for 2-ethylnaphthalene. When ten percent tetralin is added to n-dodecane to give a simpler model of an actual jet fuel, the tetralin inhibits both the deposit formation and the degradation of n-dodecane. For 2-ethylnaphthalene primary product analyses indicate a possible self-inhibition at long reaction times of the secondary reactions which form the deposit precursors. The mechanism of the primary breakdown of these fuels is suggested and the primary products which participate in these precursor-forming reactions are identified. Some implications of the results to the thermal degradation of real jet fuels are given.

  6. Exhaust emissions from a premixing, prevaporizing flame tube using liquid jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Papathakos, L. C.

    1976-01-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons were measured in a burner where liquid Jet A fuel was sprayed into the heated air stream and vaporized upstream of a perforated plate flameholder. The burner was tested at inlet air temperatures at 640, 800, and 833 K, an inlet pressure of 5.6 X 100,000 N/m squared, a reference velocity of 25 m/sec, and equivalence ratios from lean blowout to 0.7. Nitrogen oxide levels of below 1.0 g NO2/kg fuel were obtained at combustion efficiencies greater than 99 percent. The measured emission levels for the liquid fuel agreed well with previously reported premixed gaseous propane data and agreed with well stirred reactor predictions. Autoignition of the premixed fuel air mixture was a problem at inlet temperatures above 650 K with 104 msec premixing time.

  7. Vapor condensation on liquid surface due to laminar jet-induced mixing: The effects of system parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Chin-Shun; Hasan, Mohammad M.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of system parameters on the interface condensation rate in a laminar jet induced mixing tank are numerically studied. The physical system consists of a partially filled cylindrical tank with a slightly subcooled jet discharged from the center of the tank bottom toward the liquid-vapor interface which is at a saturation temperature corresponding to the constant tank pressure. Liquid is also withdrawn from the outer part of the tank bottom to maintain the constant liquid level. The jet velocity is selected to be low enough such that the free surface is approximately flat. The effect of vapor superheat is assumed to be negligible. Therefore, the interface condensation rate can be determined from the resulting temperature field in the liquid region alone. The nondimensional form of the steady state conservation equations are solved by a finite difference method for various system parameters including liquid height to tank diameter ratio, tank to jet diameter ratio, liquid inflow to outflow area ratio, and a heat leak parameter which characterizes the uniform wall heat flux. Detailed analyses based on the numerical solutions are performed and simplified equations are suggested for the prediction of condensation rate.

  8. Plunging ranula: an unusual multilocular presentation.

    PubMed

    Mabongo, M; Buch, B; Ngwenya, S P

    2014-10-01

    A 32-year-old male patient who was HIV positive presented at the Wits Oral Health Centre complaining of a large swelling of the left submandibular region of three years' duration. The swelling was nontender, soft and doughy on palpation and appeared to be crossing the midline. Bilateral submandibular and submental lymphadenopathy was present. Intraorally the lesion caused considerable elevation of the floor of the mouth and impaired the flow of saliva. Fluid from the lesion was aspirated and the patient sent for MRI examination. These images revealed a multilocular cystic lesion causing disruption of the mylohyold muscle. The aspirate consisted of a thick, bloody fluid which tested positive for salivary amylase. A provisional diagnosis of plunging ranula was made. The multilocular nature of the lesion seen on MRI prompted a more extensive surgical approach in order to prevent recurrence. Consequently the sublingual gland was removed via an intraoral approach while the multilocular cyst was dissected by means of a submandibular approach in order to effect complete removal. Microscopic examination of the submitted specimen confirmed the clinical diagnosis of a plunging ranula.

  9. The Plunge Phase of Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, John C.

    2005-01-01

    The many advantages of Friction Stir Welding have led to a relatively rapid acceptance in the often conservative welding community. Because the process is so different from traditional fusion welding, with which most investigators are most familiar, there remain many aspects of FSW for which there is no clear consensus. For example, the well known onion rings seen in transverse sections have been variously interpreted as grain size variations, variation in density of second phase particles and parts of the carousel of material rotating with the pin that have been shed from the carousel. Using Orientation Imaging Microscopy, Schneider has recently noted that the onion rings have a different orientation (and hence etch differently) than the surrounding material, and this orientation is consistent with slip plane orientations at the edge of the carousel. Likewise, the forces and torque exerted by the FSW tool on the work piece largely remain unaccounted for. Although these forces are routinely measured by investigators with commercial instrumented welders, they are rarely reported or even qualitatively analyzed. This paper will introduce a model based on a carousel or disk of material that rotates with the tool to estimate the torque and plunge force required to plunge a tool into the work piece. A stationary tool is modeled rather than the moving tool because effects such as thermal transients and metallurgical changes in the sample (primarily aging in aluminum) can be more easily accounted for. It is believed, however, that with some modifications the model should be applicable to a moving tool also.

  10. Plasma Jet (V)UV-Radiation Impact on Biologically Relevant Liquids and Cell Suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tresp, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Bundscherer, L.; Monden, A.; Hammer, M. U.; Masur, K.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. V.; Reuter, S.

    2014-10-01

    In this study the generation of radicals in plasma treated liquids has been investigated. To quantify the contribution of plasma vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the species investigated, three cases have been studied: UV of plasma jet only, UV and VUV of plasma jet combined, and the plasma effluent including all reactive components. The emitted VUV has been observed by optical emission spectroscopy and its effect on radical formation in liquids has been analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. Radicals have been determined in ultrapure water (dH2O), as well as in more complex, biorelevant solutions like phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, and two different cell culture media. Various compositions lead to different reactive species formation, e.g. in PBS superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals have been detected, in cell suspension also glutathione thiyl radicals have been found. This study highlights that UV has no impact on radical generation, whereas VUV is relevant for producing radicals. VUV treatment of dH2O generates one third of the radical concentration produced by plasma-effluent treatment. It is relevant for plasma medicine because although plasma sources are operated in open air atmosphere, still VUV can lead to formation of biorelevant radicals. This work is funded by German Federal Ministry of Education a Research (BMBF) (Grant # 03Z2DN12+11).

  11. A computer model for liquid jet atomization in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giridharan, M. G.; Lee, J. G.; Krishnan, A.; Yang, H. Q.; Ibrahim, E.; Chuech, S.; Przekwas, A. J.

    1991-12-01

    The process of atomization has been used as an efficient means of burning liquid fuels in rocket engines, gas turbine engines, internal combustion engines, and industrial furnaces. Despite its widespread application, this complex hydrodynamic phenomenon has not been well understood, and predictive models for this process are still in their infancy. The difficulty in simulating the atomization process arises from the relatively large number of parameters that influence it, including the details of the injector geometry, liquid and gas turbulence, and the operating conditions. In this study, numerical models are developed from first principles, to quantify factors influencing atomization. For example, the surface wave dynamics theory is used for modeling the primary atomization and the droplet energy conservation principle is applied for modeling the secondary atomization. The use of empirical correlations has been minimized by shifting the analyses to fundamental levels. During applications of these models, parametric studies are performed to understand and correlate the influence of relevant parameters on the atomization process. The predictions of these models are compared with existing experimental data. The main tasks of this study were the following: development of a primary atomization model; development of a secondary atomization model; development of a model for impinging jets; development of a model for swirling jets; and coupling of the primary atomization model with a CFD code.

  12. Impact of plunging breaking waves on a partially submerged cube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, A.; Ikeda, C.; Duncan, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The impact of a deep-water plunging breaking wave on a partially submerged cube is studied experimentally in a tank that is 14.8 m long and 1.2 m wide with a water depth of 0.91 m. The breakers are created from dispersively focused wave packets generated by a programmable wave maker. The water surface profile in the vertical center plane of the cube is measured using a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique with movie frame rates ranging from 300 to 4,500 Hz. The pressure distribution on the front face of the cube is measured with 24 fast-response sensors simultaneously with the wave profile measurements. The cube is positioned vertically at three heights relative to the mean water level and horizontally at a distance from the wave maker where a strong vertical water jet is formed. The portion of the water surface between the contact point on the front face of the cube and the wave crest is fitted with a circular arc and the radius and vertical position of the fitted circle is tracked during the impact. The vertical acceleration of the contact point reaches more than 50 times the acceleration of gravity and the pressure distribution just below the free surface shows a localized high-pressure region with a very high vertical pressure gradient. This work is supported by the Office of Naval Research under grant N000141110095.

  13. Thrust Enhancement of Flapping Wings in Tandem and Biplane Configurations by Pure Plunging Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, S. Banu; Sahin, Mehmet; Unal, M. Fevzi

    2012-11-01

    The propulsion performance of flapping NACA0012 airfoils undergoing harmonic plunging motion in tandem and biplane wing configurations is investigated numerically. An unstructured finite volume solver based on Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian formulation is utilized in order to solve the incompressible unsteady Navier-Stokes equations. Four different tandem and four different biplane wing combinations are considered. Various instantaneous and time-averaged aerodynamic parameters including lift and drag coefficients, vorticity contours and streamlines are calculated for each case and compared with each other. As a reference the single wing case corresponding to the deflected jet phenomenon in Jones and Platzer (Exp. Fluids 46:799-810, 2009) is also studied. In these simulations, the Reynolds number is chosen as 252, the reduced frequency of plunging motion (k = 2 πf /U∞) is 12.3 and the plunge amplitude non-dimensionalized with respect to chord is 0.12. The solutions of the single wing case indicate dependence on the location of start-up vortices. Meanwhile the multiple wing configurations indicate that the highest thrust enhancement is obtained in one of the biplane cases where the two wings closely moving towards each other namely biplane asynchronous-closer case.

  14. An Experimental Study of the Droplets Produced by a Plunging Breaker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Liu, X.; Duncan, J. H.

    2011-11-01

    The dynamics of droplets generated by plunging breakers are experimentally studied in a wave tank that is 12 m long and 1.22 m wide with a water depth of 0.91 m. Breakers with various breaking intensity are generated from a packet of dispersively focused waves with average frequency of 1.15 Hz by varying the amplitude of wave maker motion. The sizes and motions of droplets at various positions relative the wave crest are measured with a cinematic shadowgraph technique, while the profile histories of the breaking wave crest along the center plane of the tank are simultaneously measured with a cinematic laser-induced fluorescence technique. Droplets are primarily created when strong turbulence is generated after the plunging jet impacts with the front face of the wave and when large air bubbles, entrapped during the plunging process, rise to the free surface and pop. The diameters and velocities of the droplets across one horizontal plane at an elevation just above the wave crest height are measured. The surface roughnesses of the breaking waves are estimated from the measured wave crest profile histories. The correlation between the flux of droplets and the surface roughness is investigated. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Division of Ocean Sciences, Grant OCE0751853.

  15. OPTIMIZED DETERMINATION OF TRACE JET FUEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BLOOD USING IN-FIELD LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION WITH SUBSEQUENT LABORATORY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC-MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS AND ON-COLUMN LARGE VOLUME INJECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A practical and sensitive method to assess volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from JP-8 jet fuel in human whole blood was developed by modifying previously established liquid-liquid extraction procedures, optimizing extraction times, solvent volume, specific sample processing te...

  16. Plunging ranula of the submandibular area.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, Mahnaz; Jalalian, Faranak; Rashidipoor, Roghayeh; Mosavat, Farzaneh

    2011-12-01

    The term "ranula" is used to describe a diffuse swelling in the floor of the mouth caused by either a mucous extravasation or, less commonly, a mucous retention cyst derived from the major sublingual or submandibular salivary glands. The most common presentation of ranula is a painless, slow-growing, soft, and movable mass located in the floor of the mouth. Ranula may be simple or plunging. Simple ranula often present as masses in the floor of the mouth, limited to the mucous membranes. Diving ranulas extend through the facial plans, usually posterior to the mylohyoid muscle into the neck, and present as cervical masses. Thyroglossal duct cyst, branchial cleft cyst, cystic hygroma, submandibular sialadenitis, intramuscular hemangioma, cystic or neoplastic thyroid disease might be included in differential diagnosis. A variety of surgical procedures have been quoted in the literature ranging from marsupialization, excision of the ranula, sclerotherapy, and excision of the sublingual gland. The recurrence rate varies according to the procedure performed.

  17. Cooling of a multichip electronic module by means of confined two-dimensional jets of dielectric liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, D. C.; Mudawar, I.

    1990-11-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate single-phase heat transfer from a smooth 12.7 x 12.7-sq-mm simulated chip to a two-dimensional jet of dielectric FC-72 liquid issuing from a thin rectangular slot into a channel confined between the chip surface and nozzle plate. The effects of jet width, confinement channel height, and impingement velocity have been examined. Channel height had a negligible effect on the heat-transfer performance of the jet. A correlation for the convective heat-transfer coefficient is presented as a function of jet width, heater length, flow velocity, and fluid properties. A self-contained multichip cooling module consisting of a 3 x 3 array of heat sources confirmed the uniformity and predictability of cooling for each of the nine chips, and proved the cooling module is well suited for packaging large arrays of high-power-density chips.

  18. Cooling of a multichip electronic module by means of confined two-dimensional jets of dielectric liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, D.C.; Mudawar, I. )

    1990-11-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate single-phase heat transfer froma smooth 12.7 {times} 12.7 mm{sup 2} simulated chip to a two-dimensional jet of dielectric Fluorinert FC-72 liquid issuing from a thin rectangular slot into a channel confined between the chip surface and nozzle plate. The effects of jet width, confined channel height, and impingement velocity have been examined. Channel height had a negligible effect ont eh theat transfer performance of the jet for the conditions of the present study. A correlation for the convective heat transfer coefficient is presented as a function of jet, width, heat length, flow velocity, and fluid properties. A self-contained multichip cooling module consisting of a 3 {times} 3 array of heat sources confirmed the uniformity and predictability of cooling for each of the nine chips, and proved the cooling module is well suited for packaging large arrays of high-power density chips.

  19. Scattered-light scanner measurements of cryogenic liquid-jet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, Robert D.; Buchele, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of highly turbulent Mach 1 gas flow and high thermal gradients on drop size measurements was investigated with a scattered light scanner. The instrument, developed at NASA-Lewis, was used to measure characteristic drop diameters or cyrogenic liquid sprays. By correcting for gas turbulence and thermal gradient affects, it was possible to obtain good reproducible data with the scattered light scanner. Tests were conducted primarily in the aerodynamic-stripping regime of liquid atomization and it was found that the loss of small droplets due to vaporization and dispersion had a marketed effect on drop size measurements. The nitrogen gas flow rate exponent of 1.33 is the same as that predicted by atomization theory for liquid jet breakup in high velocity gas flow. However, when the sprays were sampled farther downstream of the atomizer, at axial distances of 2.5 and 4.5 cm, the exponent for W sub n decreased 1.2 and 0.9, respectively. This was attributed to the loss of small droplets due to vaporization when values of downstream axial distances exceeded 1.3 cm.

  20. Formation and post-formation dynamics of bacterial biofilm streamers as highly viscous liquid jets

    PubMed Central

    Das, Siddhartha; Kumar, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently reported that in presence of low Reynolds number (Re ≪ 1) transport, preformed bacterial biofilms, several hours after their formation, may degenerate in form of filamentous structures, known as streamers. In this work, we explain that such streamers form as the highly viscous liquid states of the intrinsically viscoelastic biofilms. Such “viscous liquid” state can be hypothesized by noting that the time of appearance of the streamers is substantially larger than the viscoelastic relaxation time scale of the biofilms, and this appearance is explained by the inability of a viscous liquid to withstand external shear. Further, by identifying the post formation dynamics of the streamers as that of a viscous liquid jet in a surrounding flow field, we can interpret several unexplained issues associated with the post-formation dynamics of streamers, such as the clogging of the flow passage or the exponential time growth of streamer dimensions. Overall our manuscript provides a biophysical basis for understanding the evolution of biofilm streamers in creeping flows. PMID:25410423

  1. A precision cryostat design for manual and semi-automated cryo-plunge instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Christopher J.; Scotcher, Steve; Kyte, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Here we describe a bench-top cryostat system to control the temperature of liquid ethane in a cryo-plunge apparatus designed for biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy. It comprises a foam insulated Dewar containing a copper cryostat cup, whose temperature is controlled via an active feedback system to within 0.1 K. The device can easily be incorporated into existing manual and semi-automatic cryo-plunge instruments that are not equipped with cryogenic temperature control. Over the course of normal use, we find that using a cryostat is convenient, fast, and does not require special mixtures of cryogens like ethane/propane. This simple cryostat improves the reliability and reproducibility of biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy.

  2. A precision cryostat design for manual and semi-automated cryo-plunge instruments

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Christopher J.; Scotcher, Steve; Kyte, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a bench-top cryostat system to control the temperature of liquid ethane in a cryo-plunge apparatus designed for biological specimen preparation for electron cryomi-croscopy. It comprises a foam insulated Dewar containing a copper cryostat cup, whose temperature is controlled via an active feedback system to within 0.1 K. The device can easily be incorporated into existing manual and semi-automatic cryo-plunge instruments that are not equipped with cryogenic temperature control. Over the course of normal use, we find that using a cryostat is convenient, fast, and does not require special mixtures of cryogens like ethane/propane. This simple cryostat improves the reliability and reproducibility of biological specimen preparation for electron cryomicroscopy. PMID:27910462

  3. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique.

  4. Terminal Liquid Mass Fractions and Terminal Mean Droplet Sizes in He Free-Jet Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, E. L.; Kornilov, O.; Toennies, J. P.

    2011-05-01

    The terminal liquid mass fraction in He free-jet expansions is deduced from time-of-flight measurements using conservation of energy. Both the present results and results from prior measurements are correlated using a scaling parameter which was used previously for correlating droplet size as a function of source conditions. Deduced values of the mass fraction range from 0.047 to 0.42. The terminal mean droplet size is determined using a novel technique based on a size-dependent attenuation of the beam droplets when impacted by electrons. The determined sizes are in agreement with sizes obtained previously by crossing the droplet beam with an atomic beam, confirming the suitability of the present technique, which is relatively simple in comparison with crossing the droplet beam with an atomic beam. Measured values of the terminal velocity of the droplets are compared with values calculated for a model in which real-fluid properties are used for the enthalpy in the source but conversion of heat of condensation into energy of directed motion is neglected. The deviations from perfect-gas behavior in free-jet expansions are shown to be due to real-fluid properties and condensation.

  5. Effect of liquid droplets on turbulence in a round gaseous jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mostafa, A. A.; Elghobashi, S. E.

    1986-01-01

    The main objective of this investigation is to develop a two-equation turbulence model for dilute vaporizing sprays or in general for dispersed two-phase flows including the effects of phase changes. The model that accounts for the interaction between the two phases is based on rigorously derived equations for turbulence kinetic energy (K) and its dissipation rate epsilon of the carrier phase using the momentum equation of that phase. Closure is achieved by modeling the turbulent correlations, up to third order, in the equations of the mean motion, concentration of the vapor in the carrier phase, and the kinetic energy of turbulence and its dissipation rate for the carrier phase. The governing equations are presented in both the exact and the modeled formes. The governing equations are solved numerically using a finite-difference procedure to test the presented model for the flow of a turbulent axisymmetric gaseous jet laden with either evaporating liquid droplets or solid particles. The predictions include the distribution of the mean velocity, volume fractions of the different phases, concentration of the evaporated material in the carrier phase, turbulence intensity and shear stress of the carrier phase, droplet diameter distribution, and the jet spreading rate. The predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Effects of Surface Roughness on Stagnation Heat Transfer of Impinging Liquid Jet on Metal Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungho

    The liquid jet impingement with phase change heat transfer has long been an attractive method of cooling especially in steelmaking process and heat treatment in metals. The current study focuses on making detailed measurements of the stagnation-point heat transfer as a jet impinges on the rough metal surfaces at high temperature nominally up to 900°C. The local heat flux measurements are introduced by a novel experimental technique in which test block assemblies with cartridge heaters and thermocouples are used to measure the heat flux distribution on the surface of hot steel plate as a function of heat flux gauge. The effects of surface roughness on the stagnation-point heat transfer were investigated for well-characterized four rough surfaces with root-mean-square average roughness heights ranging from 40 to 80 µm. The results show that surface protrusions on rough surface can penetrate the thermal sublayer in the stagnation point and thus increase the heat transfer. The heat transfer enhancement mechanism on roughened surface can be investigated by the different boiling regimes.

  7. Optimization of liquid jet system for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Skočovská, Katarína; Novotný, Jan; Prochazka, David; Pořízka, Pavel; Novotný, Karel; Kaiser, Jozef

    2016-04-01

    A complex optimization of geometrical and temporal parameters of a jet system (developed in Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) laboratory of Brno University of Technology) for direct elemental analysis of samples in a liquid state of matter using LIBS was carried out. First, the peristaltic pump was synchronized with the flashlamp of the ablation laser, which reduced variation of the ablated sample amount. Also, the fluctuation of the laser ray angle incident on the jet surface was diminished. Such synchronization reduced signal standard deviations and thus increased repeatability of the measurements. Then, laser energy and distance of the focusing lens from the sample were optimized. The gate delay time and the gate width were optimized for single pulse (SP) experiments; the gate delay time and the inter-pulse delay were optimized for the use of double pulse (DP) variant. Results were assessed according to the highest signal to noise ratios and the lowest relative standard deviations of the signal. The sensitivity of the single pulse and the double pulse LIBS for the detection of heavy metals traces, copper (Cu i at 324.754 nm) and lead (Pb i at 405.781 nm), in aqueous solution of copper (ii) sulfate and lead (ii) acetate, was estimated in terms of limits of detection (LODs). As a result, sensitivity improvement of DP LIBS system was observed, the LOD of Cu obtained with DP was calculated 40% lower than LOD gained from SP technique.

  8. Erosive wear of ductile metals by a particle-laden high velocity liquid jet

    SciTech Connect

    Ka-Keung Li, Simon; Humphrey, Joseph A. C.; Levy, Alan V.

    1981-11-30

    In this paper, a liquid-solid particle jet impingement flow apparatus is described and experimental measurements are reported for the accelerated erosion of copper, aluminum and mild steel sheet metal by coal suspensions in kerosene and Al2O3 and SiC suspensions in water. Slurry velocities of up to 130 ft s-1 (40 m s-1) and impingement angles of 15°–90° were investigated. The maximum particle concentration used was 40 wt.%. For high velocity the results of this work show two erosion maxima; these are found at impingement angles of 90° and 40°. However, in corresponding gas-solid particle investigations maximum erosion occurs at approximately 20°. In this work both particle concentration and composition were varied. Finally, a polynomial regression technique was used to calculate empirical and semitheoretical correlation constants.

  9. Numerical Study of Impingement Location of Liquid Jet Poured from a Tilting Ladle with Lip Spout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castilla, R.; Gamez-Montero, P. J.; Raush, G.; Khamashta, M.; Codina, E.

    2017-04-01

    A new approach for simulating liquid poured from a tilting lip spout is presented, using neither a dynamic mesh nor the moving solid solution method. In this case only the tilting ladle is moving, so we propose to rotate the gravitational acceleration at an angular velocity prescribed by a geometrical and dynamical calculation to keep the poured flow rate constant. This angular velocity is applied to modify the orientation of the gravity vector in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations using the OpenFOAM® toolbox. Also, fictitious forces are considered. The modified solver is used to calculate the impingement location for six spout geometries and compare the jet dispersion there. This method could offer an inexpensive tool to calculate optimal spout geometries to reduce sprue size in the metal casting industry.

  10. Modeling the Restraint of Liquid Jets by Surface Tension in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.; Jacqmim, David A.

    2001-01-01

    An axisymmetric phase field model is developed and used to model surface tension forces on liquid jets in microgravity. The previous work in this area is reviewed and a baseline drop tower experiment selected 'for model comparison. A mathematical model is developed which includes a free surface. a symmetric centerline and wall boundaries with given contact angles. The model is solved numerically with a compact fourth order stencil on a equally spaced axisymmetric grid. After grid convergence studies, a grid is selected and all drop tower tests modeled. Agreement was assessed by comparing predicted and measured free surface rise. Trend wise agreement is good but agreement in magnitude is only fair. Suspected sources of disagreement are suspected to be lack of a turbulence model and the existence of slosh baffles in the experiment which were not included in the model.

  11. Atomization and Dispersion of a Liquid Jet Injected Into a Crossflow of Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seay, J. E.; Samuelson, G. S.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, environmental regulations have become more stringent, requiring lower emissions of mainly nitrogen oxides (NOx), as well as carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC). These regulations have forced the gas turbine industry to examine non-conventional combustion strategies, such as the lean burn approach. The reasoning behind operating under lean conditions is to maintain the temperature of combustion near and below temperatures required for the formation of thermal nitric oxide (NO). To be successful, however, the lean processes require careful preparation of the fuel/air mixture to preclude formation of either locally rich reaction zones, which may give rise to NO formation, or locally lean reaction zones, which may give rise to inefficient fuel processing. As a result fuel preparation is crucial to the development and success of new aeroengine combustor technologies. A key element of the fuel preparation process is the fuel nozzle. As nozzle technologies have developed, airblast atomization has been adopted for both industrial and aircraft gas turbine applications. However, the majority of the work to date has focused on prefilming nozzles, which despite their complexity and high cost have become an industry standard for conventional combustion strategies. It is likely that the new strategies required to meet future emissions goals will utilize novel fuel injector approaches, such as radial injection. This thesis proposes and demonstrates an experiment to examine, on a mechanistic level (i.e., the physics of the action), the processes associated with the atomization, evaporation, and dispersion of a liquid jet introduced, from a radial, plain-jet airblast injector, into a crossflow of air. This understanding requires the knowledge not only of what factors influence atomization, but also the underlying mechanism associated with liquid breakup and dispersion. The experimental data acquired identify conditions and geometries for improved

  12. High-power liquid-lithium jet target for neutron production

    SciTech Connect

    Halfon, S.; Feinberg, G.; Arenshtam, A.; Kijel, D.; Berkovits, D.; Eliyahu, I.; Hazenshprung, N.; Mardor, I.; Nagler, A.; Shimel, G.; Silverman, I.; Paul, M.; Friedman, M.; Tessler, M.

    2013-12-15

    A compact liquid-lithium target (LiLiT) was built and tested with a high-power electron gun at the Soreq Nuclear Research Center. The lithium target, to be bombarded by the high-intensity proton beam of the Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), will constitute an intense source of neutrons produced by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction for nuclear astrophysics research and as a pilot setup for accelerator-based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. The liquid-lithium jet target acts both as neutron-producing target and beam dump by removing the beam thermal power (>5 kW, >1 MW/cm{sup 3}) with fast transport. The target was designed based on a thermal model, accompanied by a detailed calculation of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutron yield, energy distribution, and angular distribution. Liquid lithium is circulated through the target loop at ∼200 °C and generates a stable 1.5 mm-thick film flowing at a velocity up to 7 m/s onto a concave supporting wall. Electron beam irradiation demonstrated that the liquid-lithium target can dissipate electron power areal densities of >4 kW/cm{sup 2} and volume power density of ∼2 MW/cm{sup 3} at a lithium flow of ∼4 m/s while maintaining stable temperature and vacuum conditions. The LiLiT setup is presently in online commissioning stage for high-intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91–2.5 MeV, 1–2 mA) at SARAF.

  13. A ballistic compressor-based experiment for the visualization of liquid propellant jet combustion above 100 MPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, A.; Kooker, D. E.

    This paper describes the components and operation of an experimental setup for the visualization of liquid propellant (LP) jet combustion at pressures above 100 MPa. The apparatus consists of an in-line ballistic compressor and LP injector. The ballistic compressor, based on a modified 76 mm gun, provides high-pressure (ca. 55 MPa) clear hot gas for the jet ignition. A piston (projectile) is fired toward a test chamber beyond the barrel's end, and its rebound is arrested in a transition section that seals the test chamber to the barrel. The LP jet is injected once the piston is restrained, and combustion of the jet further elevates the pressure. At a preset pressure, a disc in the piston ruptures and the combustion gas vents sonically into the barrel. If a monopropellant is used, the jet injection-combustion process then resembles liquid rocket combustion but at very high pressures (ca. 140 MPa). This paper discusses the ballistics of the compression and compares experimental results to those predicted by a numerical model of the apparatus. Experimentally, a pressure of 70 MPa was achieved upon a 12.5 volumetric compression factor by firing a 10 kg piston into 1.04 MPa argon using a charge of 75 g of small-grain M1 propellant.

  14. Experiments and non-parallel theory on the natural break-up of freely falling Newtonian liquid jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Consoli-Lizzi, Paula; Coenen, Wilfried; Sevilla, Alejandro

    2014-11-01

    The capillary break-up of liquid jets issuing from a needle at a constant flow rate is studied experimentally and theoretically. In particular, we focus on globally stable jets of a Newtonian liquid that are strongly stretched by gravity, so that the region close to the injector is highly non-parallel. In this regime, the use of parallel linear stability theory, based on a local dispersion relation between the frequency and the wavelength of travelling-wave disturbances, is questionable. We therefore propose a global linear frequency response analysis based on a one-dimensional formulation of the mass and momentum equations. Our model reveals that perturbations present large damping in the initial region of strong axial stretching, followed by a growth that eventually causes the break-up of the jet. Besides the break-up length, our model also allows for the prediction of the most amplified frequency. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental observations, that comprise the natural break-up of stretched jets for a wide range of liquid viscosities, injector radii and flow rates. Supported by Spanish MINECO under Project DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  15. Nanoscale, electrified liquid jets for high-resolution printing of charge.

    PubMed

    Park, Jang-Ung; Lee, Sangkyu; Unarunotai, Sakulsuk; Sun, Yugang; Dunham, Simon; Song, Taeseup; Ferreira, Placid M; Alleyene, Andrew G; Paik, Ungyu; Rogers, John A

    2010-02-10

    Nearly all research in micro- and nanofabrication focuses on the formation of solid structures of materials that perform some mechanical, electrical, optical, or related function. Fabricating patterns of charges, by contrast, is a much less well explored area that is of separate and growing interesting because the associated electric fields can be exploited to control the behavior of nanoscale electronic and mechanical devices, guide the assembly of nanomaterials, or modulate the properties of biological systems. This paper describes a versatile technique that uses fine, electrified liquid jets formed by electrohydrodynamics at micro- and nanoscale nozzles to print complex patterns of both positive and negative charges, with resolution that can extend into the submicrometer and nanometer regime. The reported results establish the basic aspects of this process and demonstrate the capabilities through printed patterns with diverse geometries and charge configurations in a variety of liquid inks, including suspensions of nanoparticles and nanowires. The use of printed charge to control the properties of silicon nanomembrane transistors provides an application example.

  16. Ascending and plunging ranula in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Clyburn, Virginia L; Smith, Jacob E; Rumboldt, Tihana; Matheus, Maria G; Day, Terry A

    2009-06-01

    A plunging ranula is a rare phenomenon that represents mucous extravasation extending through or behind the mylohyoid. The mucous dissects the tissue planes inferiorly and usually manifests as a swelling in the submental or submandibular regions. Some plunging ranulas are believed to result from disruption of excretory ducts that originate from the sublingual gland. The currently accepted definitive treatment of a plunging ranula is resection of the ipsilateral sublingual gland and evacuation of the cyst with removal of the pseudocapsule. There have been no reported cases of "ascending" ranulas into the parapharyngeal or pterygomaxillary space. The following represents the first known case that involved an extensive ascending and plunging ranula in a pediatric patient, which recurred despite complete excision of the ranula and sublingual gland. IRB approval was not required per institutional policy on retrospective case reports.

  17. 30. CORNER OF PLUNGE POOL, AND 'MOTHER AND CHILD' BRONZE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. CORNER OF PLUNGE POOL, AND 'MOTHER AND CHILD' BRONZE SCULPTURE BY JACQUES LIPCHITZ LOOKING SOUTHWEST TO BRIDGE ACROSS BEAR RUN. - Fallingwater, State Route 381 (Stewart Township), Ohiopyle, Fayette County, PA

  18. Non-thermal processes on ice and liquid micro-jet surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olanrewaju, Babajide O.

    The primary focus of this research is to investigate non-thermal processes occurring on ice surfaces and the photo-ejection of ions from liquid surfaces. Processes at the air-water/ice interface are known to play a very important role in the release of reactive halogen species with atmospheric aerosols serving as catalysts. The ability to make different types of ice with various morphologies, hence, different adsorption and surface properties in vacuum, provide a useful way to probe the catalytic effect of ice in atmospheric reactions. Also, the use of the liquid jet technique provides the rare opportunity to probe liquid samples at the interface; hitherto impossible to investigate with traditional surface science techniques. In Chapter 2, the effect of ice morphology on the release of reactive halogen species from photodissociation of adsorbed organic halides on ice will be presented. Quantum state resolved measurements of neutral atomic iodine from the photon irradiation of submonolayer coverages of methyl iodide adsorbed on low temperature water ice were conducted. Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) studies of methyl iodide adsorbed on ice were performed to provide information on the effect of ice morphology on the adsorption of submonolayer methyl iodide. The interaction and autoionization of HCl on low-temperature (80{140 K) water ice surfaces has been studied using low-energy (5-250 eV) electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). A detailed ESD study of the interactions of low concentrations of HCl with low-temperature porous amorphous solid water (PASW), amorphous solid water (ASW) and crystalline ice (CI) surfaces will be presented in Chapter 3. The ESD cation yields from HCl adsorbed on ice, as well as the coverage dependence, kinetic energy distributions and TPD measurements were all monitored. Probing liquid surface using traditional surface science technique is usually difficult because of the problem of

  19. On the absence of asymmetric wakes for periodically plunging finite wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, D. E.; Cleaver, D. J.; Gursul, I.; Wang, Z.

    2014-07-01

    It has previously been shown that, at high Strouhal numbers, oscillating airfoils can produce deflected jets that can create very high lift-coefficients for otherwise symmetric scenarios. These deflected jets form through pairing of the trailing-edge vortices to create asymmetric vortex couples that self-propel at an angle to the freestream, resulting in an asymmetric flow field and non-zero lift. In this paper results are presented that indicate these high-lift deflected jets cannot form for finite wings. Instead of the straight vortex tubes that pair and convect at an angle to the freestream observed for effectively infinite wings, finite wings exhibit vortex tubes that break into two branches near the tip forming double helix structures. One branch connects with the last vortex; one branch connects with the next vortex. This creates a long "daisy chain" of interconnected trailing edge vortices forming a long series of vortex loops. These symmetric flow fields are shown to persist for finite wings even to Strouhal numbers more than twice those required to produce asymmetric wakes on plunging airfoils. Two contributing reasons are discussed for why deflected jets are not observed. First the tip vortex creates three-dimensionality that discourages vortex coupling. Second, the symmetry of the circulation of the interconnected vortex loops, which has been confirmed by the experiments, is a natural consequence of the vortex topology. Therefore, the asymmetry in trailing edge vortex strength previously observed as characteristic of deflected jets cannot be supported for finite wings.

  20. Effect of surface tension on a liquid-jet produced by the collapse of a laser-induced bubble against a rigid boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiu Mei; He, Jie; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiao Wu

    2009-02-01

    The effect of surface tension on the behavior of a liquid-jet is investigated experimentally by means of a fiber-coupled optical beam deflection (OBD) technique. It is found that a target under water is impacted in turn by a laser-plasma ablation force and by a high-speed liquid-jet impulse induced by bubble collapse in the vicinity of a rigid boundary. The liquid-jet impact is found to be the main damage mechanism in cavitation erosion. Furthermore, the liquid-jet increases monotonously with surface tension, so cavitation erosion rises sharply with increasing surface tension. Surface tension also reduces bubble collapse duration. From the experimental results and the modified Rayleigh theory, the maximum bubble radius is obtained and it is found to reduce with increasing surface tension.

  1. Oscillation of satellite droplets in an Oldroyd-B viscoelastic liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fang; Yin, Xie-Yuan; Yin, Xie-Zhen

    2017-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical simulation is carried out to study the oscillation characteristics of satellite droplets in the beads-on-a-string structure of an Oldroyd-B viscoelastic liquid jet. The oscillation of satellite droplets is compared with the linear oscillation of a single viscoelastic droplet. It is found that, contrary to the predictions of linear theory, the period of oscillation of satellite droplets decreases with time, despite the increase in droplet volume. The mechanism may lie in the existence of the filament, which exerts an extra resistance on droplets. On the other hand, the oscillation of droplets does not influence very much the thinning of the filament. The influence of the axial wave number, viscosity, and elasticity on the oscillation of satellite droplets is examined. Increasing the wave number may result in the decrease in the period and the increase in the decay rate of oscillation, while increasing viscosity may lead to the increase in both the period and the decay rate of oscillation. Elasticity is shown to suppress the oscillation at large wave numbers, but its influence is limited at small wave numbers.

  2. Bending instability of electrically charged liquid jets of polymer solutions in electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reneker, Darrell H.; Yarin, Alexander L.; Fong, Hao; Koombhongse, Sureeporn

    2000-05-01

    Nanofibers of polymers were electrospun by creating an electrically charged jet of polymer solution at a pendent droplet. After the jet flowed away from the droplet in a nearly straight line, it bent into a complex path and other changes in shape occurred, during which electrical forces stretched and thinned it by very large ratios. After the solvent evaporated, birefringent nanofibers were left. In this article the reasons for the instability are analyzed and explained using a mathematical model. The rheological complexity of the polymer solution is included, which allows consideration of viscoelastic jets. It is shown that the longitudinal stress caused by the external electric field acting on the charge carried by the jet stabilized the straight jet for some distance. Then a lateral perturbation grew in response to the repulsive forces between adjacent elements of charge carried by the jet. The motion of segments of the jet grew rapidly into an electrically driven bending instability. The three-dimensional paths of continuous jets were calculated, both in the nearly straight region where the instability grew slowly and in the region where the bending dominated the path of the jet. The mathematical model provides a reasonable representation of the experimental data, particularly of the jet paths determined from high speed videographic observations.

  3. Effects of gas flow on oxidation reaction in liquid induced by He/O{sub 2} plasma-jet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Uchida, Giichiro Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Sarinont, Thapanut; Amano, Takaaki; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-07-28

    We present here analysis of oxidation reaction in liquid by a plasma-jet irradiation under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. To estimate the total amount of oxidation reaction induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) in liquid, we employ a KI-starch solution system, where the absorbance of the KI-starch solution near 600 nm behaves linear to the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. The laminar flow with higher gas velocity induces an increase in the ROS distribution area on the liquid surface, which results in a large amount of oxidation reaction in liquid. However, a much faster gas flow conversely results in a reduction in the total amount of oxidation reaction in liquid under the following two conditions: first condition is that the turbulence flow is triggered in a gas flow channel at a high Reynolds number of gas flow, which leads to a marked change of the spatial distribution of the ROS concentration in gas phase. Second condition is that the dimpled liquid surface is formed by strong gas flow, which prevents the ROS from being transported in radial direction along the liquid surface.

  4. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kula, Jiri; Linka, Ales; Tunak, Maros; Lukas, David

    2014-06-01

    The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider™ technology.

  5. Image analysis of jet structure on electrospinning from free liquid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, Jiri Linka, Ales Tunak, Maros; Lukas, David

    2014-06-16

    The work analyses intra-jet distances during electrospinning from a free surface of water based poly(vinyl alcohol) solution confined by two thin metallic plates employed as a spinning electrode. A unique computer vision system and digital image processing were designed in order to track position of every polymer jet. Here, we show that jet position data are in good compliance with theoretically predicted intra-jet distances by linear stability analysis. Jet density is a critical parameter of electrospinning technology, since it determines the process efficiency and homogeneity of produced nanofibrous layer. Achievements made in this research could be used as essential approach to study jetting from two-dimensional spinning electrodes, or as fundamentals for further development of control system related to Nanospider{sup ™} technology.

  6. Surgery for plunging ranula: the lesson not yet learned?

    PubMed

    Samant, Sumit; Morton, Randall P; Ahmad, Zahoor

    2011-10-01

    Our objective is to review our experience with treatment of plunging ranula and examine the efficacy of transoral excision of sublingual gland as the principal treatment. This study comprises a case series with chart review. A secondary otolaryngology service was used as the setting. Retrospective analysis of patient records was performed for a series of 95 consecutive cases of plunging ranula, which presented to our department between January 2001 and February 2010. Clinical presentation, investigations, diagnosis, treatment, complications and outcome were recorded. Literature search was performed using MEDLINE and OLD MEDLINE. 81 cases of plunging ranula were treated surgically by transoral excision of sublingual gland and evacuation of ranula contents. Mean operating time was 75.3 min. Twelve patients had undergone previous surgery elsewhere. One patient in our series had a recurrence, needing excision of sublingual gland remnant. Two patients had trauma to submandibular duct requiring excision of submandibular gland. Other complications were minor and transient. Review of literature revealed many diverse methods of treating ranula, with varying results. Our series makes a substantial contribution to the number of plunging ranulas reported in the world, and supports the use of transoral sublingual gland excision as first-line treatment of plunging ranula.

  7. Modeling Single-Phase and Boiling Liquid Jet Impingement Cooling in Power Electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S. V. J.; Hassani, V.; Bharathan, D.

    2005-12-01

    Jet impingement has been an attractive cooling option in a number of industries over the past few decades. Over the past 15 years, jet impingement has been explored as a cooling option in microelectronics. Recently, interest has been expressed by the automotive industry in exploring jet impingement for cooling power electronics components. This technical report explores, from a modeling perspective, both single-phase and boiling jet impingement cooling in power electronics, primarily from a heat transfer viewpoint. The discussion is from the viewpoint of the cooling of IGBTs (insulated-gate bipolar transistors), which are found in hybrid automobile inverters.

  8. Application of Proper Orthogonal Decomposition to the morphological analysis of confined co-axial jets of immiscible liquids with comparable densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charalampous, Georgios; Hardalupas, Yannis

    2014-11-01

    The development of a round liquid jet under the influence of a confined coaxial flow of an immiscible liquid of comparable density (central to annular flow density ratio of 8:10) was investigated in the vicinity of the nozzle exit. Two flow regimes were considered; one where the annular flow is faster than the central jet, so the central liquid jet is accelerated and one where the annular flow is slower, so the central liquid jet is decelerated. The central jet was visualised by high speed photography. Three modes of jet development were identified and classified in terms of the Reynolds number, Re, of the central jet which was in the range of 525 < Re < 2725, a modified definition of the Weber number, We, which allows the distinction between accelerating and deceleration flows and was in the range of -22 < We < 67 and the annular to central Momentum Ratio, MR, of the two streams which was in the range of 3.6 < MR < 91. By processing the time resolved jet images using Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD), it was possible to reduce the description of jet morphology to a small number of spatial modes, which isolated the most significant morphologies of the jet development. In this way, the temporal and spatial characteristics of the instabilities on the interface were clearly identified which highlights the advantages of POD over direct observation of the images. Relationships between the flow parameters and the interfacial waves were established. The wavelength of the interfacial instability was found to depend on the velocity of the fastest moving stream, which is contrary to findings for fluids with large density differences.

  9. Effects of irradiation distance on supply of reactive oxygen species to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid by an atmospheric O2/He plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Kusumegi, Shota; Kudo, Akihiro; Sakanoshita, Tomohiro; Tsurumaru, Takuya; Sato, Akihiro; Uchida, Giichiro; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-05-01

    The impact of irradiation distances on plasma jet-induced specific effects on the supply of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to the bottom of a Petri dish filled with liquid was investigated using a KI-starch gel reagent that can be employed as a ROS indicator even in water. O3 exposure experiments without plasma irradiation were also performed to elucidate the specific effects of the plasma jet. Relative concentrations of ROS transported to the bottom were evaluated using absorbance measurements. The results indicated that ROS supply to the bottom is markedly enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation at shorter irradiation distances, whereas similar results could not be obtained for the O3 exposure. In these cases, the liquid mixing in the depth direction was also enhanced by the plasma jet irradiation only, and the supply of reactive atomic oxygen to the liquid surface was markedly increased as well.

  10. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal-Derived Liquids. Volume 14. Oxygenates Content of Coal-Derived Jet Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    Compour-W RI Rt JP-4 JP-8 BuLk JP-8X Cumilative wtX wt% wt% wt% wt% JP-4 Bulk JP- SX 1. n-C4 400.0 0.001 0.11 0.04 0.02 0.11 0.02 2. 466.0 2.837 0.21 0.07...DATA FOR COAL-DERIVED JET FUELS # Conound RI Rt JP-4 JP-8 Bulk JP-8X Cumulative wtX wtX wt% wtX wtX JP-4 Bulk JP- SX 166. C2-Decalin 1306.2 24.869 0.16...boiling cyclopentadiene ( CDP ) dimers and other material that decomposed to small sulfur-containing compounds and cycloolefins. Nitrogen base

  11. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds

    PubMed Central

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Ödeen, Anders

    2005-01-01

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory. PMID:17148194

  12. Ultraviolet vision and foraging in dip and plunge diving birds.

    PubMed

    Håstad, Olle; Ernstdotter, Emma; Odeen, Anders

    2005-09-22

    Many fishes are sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and display UV markings during courtship. As UV scatters more than longer wavelengths of light, these signals are only effective at short distances, reducing the risk of detection by swimming predators. Such underwater scattering will be insignificant for dip and plunge diving birds, which prey on fishes just below the water surface. One could therefore expect to find adaptations in the eyes of dip and plunge diving birds that tune colour reception to UV signals. We used a molecular method to survey the colour vision tuning of five families of dip or plunge divers and compared the results with those from sister taxa of other foraging methods. We found evidence of extended UV vision only in gulls (Laridae). Based on available evidence, it is more probable that this trait is associated with their terrestrial foraging habits rather than piscivory.

  13. Fluid dynamics and convective heat transfer in impinging jets through implementation of a high resolution liquid crystal technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K.; Wiedner, B.; Camci, C.

    1993-01-01

    A combined convective heat transfer and fluid dynamics investigation in a turbulent round jet impinging on a flat surface is presented. The experimental study uses a high resolution liquid crystal technique for the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficients on the impingement plate. The heat transfer experiments are performed using a transient heat transfer method. The mean flow and the character of turbulent flow in the free jet is presented through five hole probe and hot wire measurements, respectively. The flow field character of the region near the impingement plate plays an important role in the amount of convective heat transfer. Detailed surveys obtained from five hole probe and hot wire measurements are provided. An extensive validation of the liquid crystal based heat transfer method against a conventional technique is also presented. After a complete documentation of the mean and turbulent flow field, the convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on the impingement plate are presented. The near wall of the impingement plate and the free jet region is treated separately. The current heat transfer distributions are compared to other studies available from the literature. The present paper contains complete sets of information on the three dimensional mean flow, turbulent velocity fluctuations, and convective heat transfer to the plate. The experiments also prove that the present nonintrusive heat transfer method is highly effective in obtaining high resolution heat transfer maps with a heat transfer coefficient uncertainty of 5.7 percent.

  14. Fluid dynamics and convective heat transfer in impinging jets through implementation of a high resolution liquid crystal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Wiedner, B.; Camci, C.

    A combined convective heat transfer and fluid dynamics investigation in a turbulent round jet impinging on a flat surface is presented. The experimental study uses a high resolution liquid crystal technique for the determination of the convective heat transfer coefficients on the impingement plate. The heat transfer experiments are performed using a transient heat transfer method. The mean flow and the character of turbulent flow in the free jet is presented through five hole probe and hot wire measurements, respectively. The flow field character of the region near the impingement plate plays an important role in the amount of convective heat transfer. Detailed surveys obtained from five hole probe and hot wire measurements are provided. An extensive validation of the liquid crystal based heat transfer method against a conventional technique is also presented. After a complete documentation of the mean and turbulent flow field, the convective heat transfer coefficient distributions on the impingement plate are presented. The near wall of the impingement plate and the free jet region is treated separately. The current heat transfer distributions are compared to other studies available from the literature. The present paper contains complete sets of information on the three dimensional mean flow, turbulent velocity fluctuations, and convective heat transfer to the plate. The experiments also prove that the present nonintrusive heat transfer method is highly effective in obtaining high resolution heat transfer maps with a heat transfer coefficient uncertainty of 5.7 percent.

  15. Breakup of metal jets penetrating a volatile liquid. Final report, October 1, 1991--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, J.P.

    1995-07-01

    In a loss of coolant accident, the core may become uncovered, causing the fuel pins to melt. The molten fuel would pour onto the plenum and collect on the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. The RPV internal structure includes one or more perforated plates in the lower plenum which would divide the molten fuel into small diameter streams or jets, which would break up as they penetrate the coolant in the lower plenum. The breakup of these jets would occur in two phases, each dominated by a distinct fragmentation mechanism. As a fuel jet first penetrates the coolant, a stagnation flow develops at its leading edge, causing the column to spread radially and eject molten fuel into the coolant. The jet fluid in the column is fragmented by pressure fluctuations due to the jet/ambient fluid relative motion, so that a steady jet is reduced to a field of falling drops below a critical depth called the breakup length. The present work includes analyses yielding simple correlations for jet breakup length and jet leading edge penetration.

  16. Electronic absorption spectroscopy of PAHs in supersonic jets and ultracold liquid helium droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisken, Friedrich; Staicu, Angela; Krasnokutski, Serge; Henning, Thomas

    Neutral and cationic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are discussed as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), still unassigned astrophysical absorption features observed in the spectra of reddened stars (Salama et al. 1999). Despite the importance of this class of molecules for astrophysics and nanophysics (PAHs can be regarded as nanoscale fragments of a sheet of graphite), the spectroscopic characterization of PAHs under well-defined conditions (low temperature and collision-free environment) has remained a challenge. Recently we have set up a cavity ring-down spectrometer combined with a pulsed supersonic jet expansion to study neutral and cationic PAHs under astrophysical conditions. PAHs studied so far include the neutral molecules anthracene (Staicu et al. 2004) and pyrene (Rouillé et al. 2004) as well as the cationic species naphthalene+ and anthracene+ (Sukhorukov et al. 2004). Employing another molecular beam apparatus, the same molecules (except of the cationic species) were also studied in liquid helium droplets (Krasnokutski et al. 2005, Rouillé et al. 2004). This novel technique combines several advantages of conventional matrix spectroscopy with those of gas phase spectroscopy. Notable advantages are the possibility to study molecules with low vapor pressure and to use a mass spectrometer facilitating spectral assignments. The most recent studies were devoted to phenanthrene and the more complicated (2,3)-benzofluorene. These molecules were investigated in the gas phase by cavity ring-down spectroscopy and in liquid helium droplets using depletion spectroscopy. For benzofluorene the present studies constitute the first reported measurements both in the gas phase and in helium droplets. The origin of the S1 ← S0 gas phase transition could be located at 29 894.3 cm-1, and a series of vibronic bands was recorded below 31 500 cm-1. In contrast to previously studied PAHs, the shift induced by the helium droplets was very

  17. Anaesthetic management in a case of huge plunging ranula

    PubMed Central

    Sheet, Jagabandhu; Mandal, Anamitra; Sengupta, Swapnadeep; Jana, Debaleena; Mukherji, Sudakshina; Swaika, Sarbari

    2014-01-01

    Plunging ranula is a rare form of mucous retention cyst arising from submandibular and sublingual salivary glands, which may occasionally become huge occupying the whole of the floor of the mouth and extending into the neck, thus, restricting the neck movement as well as disfiguring the normal airway anatomy. Without fiberoptic assistance, blind or retrograde nasal intubation remains valuable choices in this type of situation. Here, we present a case of successful management of airway by blind nasal intubation in a patient posted for excision of a huge plunging ranula. PMID:25886120

  18. Splash jet and slamming generated by a rotating flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, S. Y.; Sun, S. L.; Ren, H. L.; Wu, G. X.

    2015-09-01

    The hydrodynamic problem of slamming generated by a rotating flap, commonly known as Oyster in the wave energy sector, plunging into water, is analysed based on the incompressible velocity potential theory. The problem is solved through the boundary element method in the time domain. Two typical case studies are undertaken. One is the flap plunging into calm water and the other into an incoming wave. The splash jet formed during the flap plunging is included in the simulation. When the jet meets the main flow, it is treated through the domain decomposition method without taking account the secondary impact, which is similar to the mathematical method of Riemann's second sheet in the complex plane. The problem is solved in each non-overlapping subdomain, and the velocity and pressure continuity condition is imposed on the interface of the subdomains. Detailed results for the flap plunging into water with different velocities or accelerations are provided. The gravity and wave effects are also investigated.

  19. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal-Derived Liquids. Volume 13. Evaluation of Storage and Thermal Stability of Jet Fuels Derived from Coal Liquids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    at the Great Plains Gasification Plant ( GPGP ) in Beulah, North Dakota. Funding was provided to the Department of Energy. (DOE), Pittsburgh Energy...Petroleum and Energy Research-(NIPER)>of the lIT Research Institute to study the storage and thermal stability of a JP-8 fuel produced from the GPGP liquid by...fuel produced from the GPGP liquid by-product streams. DOE/PETC was funded through Military Interdepartmental Purchase Request (MIPR) FY1455-86- N0657

  20. Visco Jet Joule-Thomson Device Characterization Tests in Liquid Methane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jurns, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Joule-Thomson (J-T) devices have been identified as critical components for Thermodynamic Vent Systems (TVS) planned for future space exploration missions. Lee Visco Jets (The Lee Company) (Ref. 4) are one type of J-T device that may be used for LCH4 propellant systems. Visco Jets have been previously tested and characterized in LN2 and LH2 (Refs. 6 and 7), but have not been characterized in LOX or LCH4. Previous Visco Jet tests with LH2 resulted in clogging of the Visco Jet orifice under certain conditions. It has been postulated that this clogging was due to the presence of neon impurities in the LH2 that solidified in the orifices. Visco Jets therefore require testing in LCH4 to verify that they will not clog under normal operating conditions. This report describes a series of tests that were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to determine if Visco Jets would clog under normal operating conditions with LCH4 propellant. Test results from this program indicate that no decrease in flow rate was observed for the Visco Jets tested, and that current equation used for predicting flow rate appears to under-predict actual flow at high Lohm ratings.

  1. Mechanisms of bacterial inactivation in the liquid phase induced by a remote RF cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gils, C. A. J.; Hofmann, S.; Boekema, B. K. H. L.; Brandenburg, R.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2013-05-01

    A radio-frequency atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet is used for the inactivation of bacteria (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) in solutions. The source is characterized by measurements of power dissipation, gas temperature, absolute UV irradiance as well as mass spectrometry measurements of emitted ions. The plasma-induced liquid chemistry is studied by performing liquid ion chromatography and hydrogen peroxide concentration measurements on treated distilled water samples. Additionally, a quantitative estimation of an extensive liquid chemistry induced by the plasma is made by solution kinetics calculations. The role of the different active components of the plasma is evaluated based on either measurements, as mentioned above, or estimations based on published data of measurements of those components. For the experimental conditions being considered in this work, it is shown that the bactericidal effect can be solely ascribed to plasma-induced liquid chemistry, leading to the production of stable and transient chemical species. It is shown that HNO2, ONOO- and H2O2 are present in the liquid phase in similar quantities to concentrations which are reported in the literature to cause bacterial inactivation. The importance of plasma-induced chemistry at the gas-liquid interface is illustrated and discussed in detail.

  2. Liquid jet impingement cooling with diamond substrates for extremely high heat flux applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard V, John H.; Khounsary, Ali M.

    1993-11-01

    This paper considers the potential of jet/diamond systems for removing localized high heat fluxes. Diamond substrates are compared to other candidate materials. Limits on usable thermal resistances and heat transfer rates are estimated.

  3. An approximate model of the dynamics and heat transfer of an impact cylindrical ideal liquid jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uryukov, B. A.; Belik, V. D.; Tkachenko, G. V.

    2012-03-01

    A jet model based on approximations of velocities, satisfying the continuity equation, and on the integral momentum equation is presented. The solution for the jet dynamics turned out to be nonmonotonic: as an obstacle recedes over a distance larger than a certain critical one, the jet escapes from the receiver nozzle rectilinearly and remains unchanged until the distance to the obstacle becomes equal to the critical one, whereupon the jet begins to spread. The heat transfer law has been determined on the basis of the momentum and boundary layer energy equations written in an integral form. They were solved by the Squire method. It is shown that with decrease in the distance to the obstacle, if it is smaller than the critical one, the Nusselt number at the stagnation point increases.

  4. Advanced Liquid Cooling for a Traction Drive Inverter Using Jet Impingement and Microfinned Enhanced Surfaces: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, S. K.; Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Moreno, G.; Bennion, K.; Jeffers, J.

    2014-08-01

    Jet impingement on plain and micro-finned enhanced surfaces was compared to a traditional channel flow configuration. The jets provide localized cooling to areas heated by the insulated-gate bipolar transistor and diode devices. Enhanced microfinned surfaces increase surface area and thermal performance. Using lighter materials and designing the fluid path to manage pressure losses increases overall performance while reducing weight, volume, and cost. Powering four diodes in the center power module of the inverter and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to characterize the baseline as well as jet-impingement-based heat exchangers. CFD modeling showed the thermal performance improvements should hold for a fully powered inverter. Increased thermal performance was observed for the jet-impingement configurations when tested at full inverter power (40 to 100 kW output power) on a dynamometer. The reliability of the jets and enhanced surfaces over time was also investigated. Experimentally, the junction-to- coolant thermal resistance was reduced by up to 12.5% for jet impingement on enhanced surfaces s compared to the baseline channel flow configuration. Base plate-to-coolant (convective) resistance was reduced by up to 37.0% for the jet-based configuration compared to the baseline, suggesting that while improvements to the cooling side reduce overall resistance, reducing the passive stack resistance may contribute to lowering overall junction-to-coolant resistance. Full inverter power testing showed reduced thermal resistance from the middle of the module baseplate to coolant of up to 16.5%. Between the improvement in thermal performance and pumping power, the coefficient of performance improved by up to 13% for the jet-based configuration.

  5. A study of liquid boric oxide particle growth rates in a gas stream from a simulated jet engine combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setze, Paul C

    1957-01-01

    It was experimentally determined that the liquid boric oxide particles leaving a jet engine combustor, burning a boron-containing fuel, will have diameters of 1.0 x 10(exp -5) to 2.0 x 10(exp -5) centimeter. For this size range the particle heat-transfer and drag coefficients are essentially infinite. The results may be applied to any boron-containing fuel. Equations are developed that enable the calculation of the particle size-time history. A study of boric oxide deposition mechanisms is included, and suggestions for decreading deposition rates given.

  6. Use of thermochromic liquid crystals in the study of jet impingement cooling: Sensitivity of transient heating methods

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, R.; Liburdy, J.A.

    1995-12-31

    In the cooling of surfaces jet impingement arrays have been found to provide effective surface heat transfer. Considerable work has been doe in identifying the optimal jet array geometry, including jet diameter, spacing and relative distance to the surface to be cooled. Most all of these studies rely on surface averaged heat transfer results. However, there are applications where the local distribution of the impingement heat transfer is important. The magnitude of the local variations may cause serious problems in terms of surface temperature gradients. Thermochromic liquid crystals provide a means to directly measure the surface temperature which can be used to study the local heat transfer coefficient distribution. Both steady state and transient methods have been identified. The steady state method is a direct application of Newton`s Law of Cooling. The transient method establishes a step change in the surface boundary condition and solves the conduction problem in the surface substrate. This method can have advantages of lower experimental uncertainty. However, there are practical issues of time response that need to be addressed to determine actual local heat transfer coefficient. This paper addresses the issues associated with the transient method and provides results of impingement cooling. Of primary concern is the transient response and how that is related to the actual instantaneous convective condition at the surface. Results show a non-steady convective coefficient which must be corrected based on the experimental design parameters.

  7. Use of thermochromatic liquid crystals in the study of jet impingement cooling: sensitivity of transient heating methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, Robin; Liburdy, James A.

    1995-09-01

    In the cooling of surfaces jet impingement arrays have been found to provide effective surface heat transfer. Considerable work has been done in identifying the optimal jet array geometry, including jet diameter, spacing and relative distance to the surface to be cooled. Most all of these studies rely on surface averaged heat transfer results. However, there are applications where the local distribution of the impingement heat transfer is important. The magnitude of the local variations may cause serious problems in terms of surface temperature gradients. Thermochromic liquid crystals provide a means to directly measure the surface temperature which can be used to study the local heat transfer coefficient distribution. Both steady state and transient methods have been identified. The steady state method is a direct application of Newton's Law of Cooling. The transient method establishes a step change in the surface boundary condition and solves the conduction problem in the surface substrate. This method can have advantages of lower experimental uncertainty. However, there are practical issues of time response that need to be addressed to determine actual local heat transfer coefficient. This paper addresses the issues associated with the transient method and provides results of impingement cooling. Of primary concern is the transient response and how that is related to the actual instantaneous convective condition at the surface. Results show a nonsteady convective coefficient which must be corrected based on the experimental design parameters.

  8. Evaluation of fatty acid oxidation by reactive oxygen species induced in liquids using atmospheric-pressure nonthermal plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tani, Atsushi; Fukui, Satoshi; Ikawa, Satoshi; Kitano, Katsuhisa

    2015-10-01

    We investigated fatty acid oxidation by atmospheric-pressure nonthermal helium plasma using linoleic acid, an unsaturated fatty acid, together with evaluating active species induced in liquids. If the ambient gas contains oxygen, direct plasma such as plasma jets coming into contact with the liquid surface supplies various active species, such as singlet oxygen, ozone, and superoxide anion radicals, to the liquid. The direct plasma easily oxidizes linoleic acid, indicating that fatty acid oxidation will occur in the direct plasma. In contrast, afterglow flow, where the plasma is terminated in a glass tube and does not touch the surface of the liquid sample, supplies mainly superoxide anion radicals. The fact that there was no clear observation of linoleic acid oxidation using the afterglow reveals that it may not affect lipids, even in an atmosphere containing oxygen. The afterglow flow can potentially be used for the sterilization of aqueous solutions using the reduced pH method, in medical and dental applications, because it provides bactericidal activity in the aqueous solution despite containing a smaller amount of active species.

  9. Effects of the electrical parameters and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in liquids exposed to atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Eun Jeong; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet was fabricated and studied for plasma-liquid interactions. The plasma jet consists of a quartz-covered pin electrode and outer quartz tube with a tapered nozzle. Using the current-voltage (I-V) and optical emission characteristics of the plasma jet, the plasma density and the speed of the plume were investigated. The optical emission spectra clearly indicated the excited NO, O, OH, N2, and N2+ in the plasma plumes. Then the plasma jets were applied to the deionized water. We investigated the effects of the operating parameters such as applied voltage, pulse frequency, and gas flow rate on the generation of reactive species in the gas and liquid phases. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. The nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the plasmas and liquids.

  10. Liquid Fuel Emulsion Jet-in-Crossflow Penetration and Dispersion Under High Pressure Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Guillermo Andres

    The current work focuses on the jet-in-crossflow penetration and dispersion behavior of water-in-oil emulsions in a high pressure environment. Both fuel injection strategies of using a water-in-oil emulsion and a jet-in-crossflow have demonstrated unique benefits in improving gas turbine performance from an emissions and efficiency standpoint. A jet-in-crossflow is very practical for use in gas turbine engines, rocket propulsion, and aircraft engines since it utilizes already available crossflow air to atomize fuel. Injecting water into a combustion chamber in the form of a water-in-oil emulsion allows for pollutant emissions reduction while reducing efficiency loses that may result from using a separate water or steam injection circuit. Dispersion effects on oil droplets are expected, therefore investigating the distribution of both oil and water droplets in the crossflow is an objective in this work. Understanding the synchronization and injection behavior of the two strategies is of key interest due to their combined benefits. A water-to-oil ratio and an ambient pressure parameter are developed for emulsion jet-in-crossflow trajectories. To this end, a total of 24 emulsion jet-in-crossflow tests were performed with varying ambient pressures of 2-8 atm and momentum flux ratios of 50, 85, and 120. Sobel edge filtering was applied to each averaged image obtained from a high speed video of each test case. Averaged and filtered images were used to resolve top and bottom edges of the trajectory in addition to the overall peak intensity up to 40 mm downstream of the injection point. An optimized correlation was established and found to differ from literature based correlations obtained under atmospheric pressure conditions. Overall it was found that additional parameters were not necessary for the top edge and peak intensity correlations, but a need for a unique emulsion bottom edge and width trajectory correlation was recognized. In addition to investigating emulsion

  11. Novel Laser-Based Technique for Measurements of Primary Atomization Characteristics of Liquid Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-22

    identified. The special feature of the novel technique is that the laser light is ‘ piped ’ through the liquid nozzle, which provides its unique...liquid nozzle exit (Figure ). When there is a continuous stream of conducting liquid, such as tap water , an electrical current will run through the...film photography (4) and are used here for comparison. Table 2. Range of considered atomiser conditions Water flowrate (l/min) Air flowrate (l

  12. Studies on the mixing of liquid jets and pre-atomized sprays in confined swirling air flows for lean direct injection combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huh, Jun-Young

    A lean direct injection (LDI) combustion concept was introduced recently to obtain both low NOsbx emissions and high performance for advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. It was reported that pollutant emissions, especially NOsbx, in a lean combustion mode depend significantly on the degree of mixing (mixedness) of supplied air and liquid fuel droplets. From a viewpoint of environmental protection, therefore, uniform mixing of fuel and air in a very short period of time, i.e., well-stirred mixing, is crucially important in the LDI combustion mode. In the present study, as the first stage toward understanding the combustion phenomena in a lean direct injection (LDI) mode, the hydrodynamic behavior of liquid jets and pre-atomized sprays in confined swirling air flows is investigated. Laser-based flow visualization and image analysis techniques are applied to analyze the instantaneous motion of the mixing process of the jets and pre-atomized sprays. Statistical analysis system (SAS) software is utilized to analyze the experimental data, and correlate experimental parameters. Statistical parameters, such as centrality, degree of spread, and total area ratio of particles, are defined in this study, and used to quantify the mixedness (degree of mixing) of liquid particles in confined geometry. Two empirical equations are obtained to predict jet intact lengths and spray angles, respectively, in confined swirling air flows. It is found that initial jet characteristics, such as intact length and spray angle, determine the mixing of the liquid particles resulting from the jet. It is verified that image analysis is feasible in quantitative determination of the mixedness of liquid particles. Even though substantial improvements in liquid fuel injector systems are required before they can be considered adequate for LDI combustion at high pressure and high temperature, the results and ideas obtained from the present study will help engineers find better mixing methods for LDI

  13. Heat transfer in two-dimensional jet impingement of a dielectric liquid on to a flat plate with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, C. B.; Su, G. S.; Chow, L. C.; Beam, J. E.

    1992-10-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the convective heat transfer from a two-dimensional slot jet of the dielectric liquid PAO to a smooth 15.2 mm by 9.5 mm film resistor surface. The effects of nozzle width, nozzle-to-plate distance, impinging velocity, and liquid properties bave been examined. Heat transfer correlations and a discussion of relative parametric effects are provided.

  14. Liquid mixing enhanced by pulse width modulation in a Y-shaped jet configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Qingfeng; Zhong, Shan

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, mixing between two fluid streams, which are injected into a planar mixing channel via a Y-shaped confluence section at the same volume flow rate, is studied experimentally. The injection of the two fluid streams is controlled by two separate solenoid valves, which are operated with a phase difference of 180°, using pulse width modulation. The experiments are conducted using water at a mean Reynolds number between 83 and 250, a range of pulsation frequencies and two duty cycles (25 and 50%). Both particle-image velocimetry and planar laser-induced fluorescence technique are used to visualize the flow patterns and to quantify the mixing degree in the mixing channel. This experiment shows that the pulsation of each jet produces vortical structures, which promotes mixing via vortex entrainment and vortex breakup, and at the same time the mixing is also greatly enhanced by sequential segmentation produced by a 180° out-of-phase pulsation of the two jets. This mixing enhancement method is effective at a Reynolds number greater than 125 with a mixing degree of 0.9 being achieved. For the Reynolds numbers studied in the present experiments, an optimal frequency exists, which corresponds to a Strouhal number in the range of 0.5-2. Furthermore, at a given mean Reynolds number a lower duty cycle is found to produce a better mixing due to the resultant higher instantaneous Reynolds number in the jet flow. It is also found that pulsation of only one jet can produce a similar mixing effect.

  15. Modified Design of Hydroturbine Wicket Gates to Include Liquid Control Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Bryan; Cimbala, John; Wouden, Alex

    2013-11-01

    With the ever-increasing penetration of alternative electricity generation, it is becoming more common to operate hydroturbines under off-design conditions in order to maintain stability in the electric power grid. Improving the off-design performance of these turbines is therefore of significant importance. As the runner blades of a Francis hydroturbine pass though the wakes created by the upstream guide vanes (wicket gates and stay vanes), they experience significant changes in the instantaneous values of absolute velocity, flow angle, and pressure. The concept of adding water jets to the trailing edge of the guide vanes is proposed as a method for reducing the dynamic load on the hydroturbine runner blades, as well as modifying the flow angle of the water entering the runner to improve turbine efficiency during off-design operation. In order to add water jets that are capable of turning the flow, a modified beveled trailing edge design is presented. Computational experiments show that a +/-5° change in swirl angle is achievable with the new design, as well as up to 4% improvement in turbine efficiency during off-design operation. This correlates to an overall improvement in machine efficiency of up to 2%, when the losses through the jet channels are taken into account. Funding for this work was provided by the DOD, through the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate (NDSEG) Fellowship, and the DOE, through the Penn State Hydropower Research Grant.

  16. Theoretical model for high-power diamond laser optics using high-velocity liquid-metal jet impingement cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, James R.

    1993-02-01

    In 1988 I presented a paper, `Fly's Eye Modular Optic,' in the Los Angeles Symposium that described an optic for high power laser systems that provided for a modular system of hexagonal components that were independently cooled using a high velocity jet pointed normal to the back surface of the optical faceplate. In this paper we look at the use of diamond optical materials in concert with high velocity jet impingement heat transfer of various liquid metal mediums. By using this combination of techniques and materials we can push the laser damage threshold of optical components to even higher levels of absorbed flux density. The thrust of this paper is to develop a theoretical model for use on optical elements subject to very high continuous flux density lasers and to evaluate the use of commercial diamond substrates with conventional optical thin films and conventional substrates with CVD diamond films. In order to assume the very high absorbed flux densities, it is necessary to have a heat transfer technique capable of maintaining the optical component at a stable temperature and below the damage threshold of the optical materials. For the more common materials, thermal shock and subsequent failure in bi-axial shear have proven to be one of the major constituents of the optical damage. In this paper we look at the thermal shock, vis-a-vis, the melting point of some of the materials.

  17. High fidelity simulation and analysis of liquid jet atomization in a gaseous crossflow at intermediate Weber numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoyi; Soteriou, Marios C.

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in numerical methods coupled with the substantial enhancements in computing power and the advent of high performance computing have presented first principle, high fidelity simulation as a viable tool in the prediction and analysis of spray atomization processes. The credibility and potential impact of such simulations, however, has been hampered by the relative absence of detailed validation against experimental evidence. The numerical stability and accuracy challenges arising from the need to simulate the high liquid-gas density ratio across the sharp interfaces encountered in these flows are key reasons for this. In this work we challenge this status quo by presenting a numerical model able to deal with these challenges, employing it in simulations of liquid jet in crossflow atomization and performing extensive validation of its results against a carefully executed experiment with detailed measurements in the atomization region. We then proceed to the detailed analysis of the flow physics. The computational model employs the coupled level set and volume of fluid approach to directly capture the spatiotemporal evolution of the liquid-gas interface and the sharp-interface ghost fluid method to stably handle high liquid-air density ratio. Adaptive mesh refinement and Lagrangian droplet models are shown to be viable options for computational cost reduction. Moreover, high performance computing is leveraged to manage the computational cost. The experiment selected for validation eliminates the impact of inlet liquid and gas turbulence and focuses on the impact of the crossflow aerodynamic forces on the atomization physics. Validation is demonstrated by comparing column surface wavelengths, deformation, breakup locations, column trajectories and droplet sizes, velocities, and mass rates for a range of intermediate Weber numbers. Analysis of the physics is performed in terms of the instability and breakup characteristics and the features of downstream

  18. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal-Derived Liquids. Volume 8. Heteroatom Removal by Catalytic Processing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    distillation profiles of JP-4, JP-8, and GPGP tar oil stream ....................................... 7 2 Autoclave system used during tar oil upgrading...Table Title Page 1 Properties of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X aviation turbine fuels .... 3 2 Results of the elemental analyses of the GPGP liquid by...product streams ............................................ 4 3 Proton and carbon-13 NMR data for GPGP liquid streams ......... 5 4 Results of ASTM D86

  19. Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL Karles Fellowship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    to be crucial to the advancements of these fields1, 2. Background: Atmospheric - pressure , non-equilibrium (APNE) plasmas, like low- pressure plasmas...for atmospheric pressure plasmas can also provide a larger scope or utility over the governing chemical reactions. For example, chemical reactions...to study the interaction of atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium (APNE) plasmas with static and electrified liquids, focusing on the liquid property

  20. Bullet-to-streamer transition on the liquid surface of a plasma jet in atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, S.-Y.; Kim, G.-H.; Kim, S.-J.; Bae, B.; Kim, N.-K.; Lee, H.; Bae, N.; Ryu, S.; Yoo, S. J.; Kim, S. B.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the transition of the plasma shape from a ring-shaped bullet to a pin-like streamer adjacent to the electrolyte surface in a kHz-driven helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The transition was observed by synchronized fast images, plasma propagation speed, time-resolved emission profile of Hβ, and spatially and temporally resolved helium metastable density. The transition height increased when electrolyte evaporation was enhanced. The plasma continued to discharge on the electrolyte surface even in the absence of metastable species, i.e., the discharge mechanism changed from Penning ionization between helium metastable and ambient nitrogen to electron collision on evaporated water.

  1. Effect of Charge Relaxation in Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Primary Atomization of Electrically Charged Liquid Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtine, Emilien; van Poppel, Bret; Daily, John; Desjardins, Olivier

    2012-11-01

    Electrohydrodynamics (EHD) is an interdisciplinary topic that describes the complex interaction between fluid mechanics and electric fields. In the context of combustion applications, EHD may enable improved spray control and finer atomization so that fuel injection schemes can be inexpensively developed for small engines. Moreover, EHD may provide efficient enhancements to hydrocarbon fuel atomization that could benefit a much broader range of engines and non-combustion applications. In this work, high-fidelity numerical simulations of an electrically charged kerosene jet undergoing turbulent atomization are presented. The simulations make use of first-principle-based methods designed to accurately represent the interfacial stresses and discontinuities. Under the assumption of a large electric Reynolds number, it can be appropriate to assume that the charges do not have time to relax to the liquid-gas interface, and that they do not drift within the liquid volume. Alternatively, one can solve a free charge conservation equation to fully account for charge drift. These two approaches are compared in details, and the role of charge drift in EHD atomization is analyzed. The implementation of the charge transport equation, which is discontinuous in nature, is discussed as well.

  2. Plain-jet airblast atomization of alternative liquid petroleum fuels under high ambient air pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasuja, A. K.

    1982-04-01

    The effects that air and fuel properties have upon the spray mean drop size characteristics of a plain-jet airblast atomizer of the type employed in the gas turbine engine are investigated. The tests used kerosene, gas oil and a high-viscosity blend of gas oil in residual fuel oil, and covered a wide range of ambient air pressures. Laser light-scattering technique was employed for drop size measurements. It is concluded that the atomizer's measured mean drop size characteristics are only slightly different from those of the pre-filming type, especially when operating on low-viscosity kerosene under higher ambient air pressure. The beneficial effect of increased levels of ambient air pressure on mean drop size is shown to be much reduced in the case of high-viscosity fuels, thus making the attainment of good atomization performance on such fuels difficult. An expression is derived for correlating the obtained mean drop size data.

  3. Microbial Inactivation in the Liquid Phase Induced by Multigas Plasma Jet.

    PubMed

    Takamatsu, Toshihiro; Uehara, Kodai; Sasaki, Yota; Hidekazu, Miyahara; Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Ito, Norihiko; Kohno, Masahiro; Azuma, Takeshi; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Various gas atmospheric nonthermal plasmas were generated using a multigas plasma jet to treat microbial suspensions. Results indicated that carbon dioxide and nitrogen plasma had high sterilization effects. Carbon dioxide plasma, which generated the greatest amount of singlet oxygen than other gas plasmas, killed general bacteria and some fungi. On the other hand, nitrogen plasma, which generated the largest amount of OH radical, killed ≥ 6 log of 11 species of microorganisms, including general bacteria, fungi, acid-fast bacteria, spores, and viruses in 1-15 min. To identify reactive species responsible for bacterial inactivation, antioxidants were added to bacterial suspensions, which revealed that singlet oxygen and OH radicals had greatest inactivation effects.

  4. Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL Karles Fellowship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    working electrode, in an electrochemical cell. In the second case, a discharge is produced via alternating current (AC) excitation with driving...drive the appropriate reactions eliminating the need for a cathode physically inserted into the liquid, common to electrochemical cells. Five mL

  5. Plasma Jet Interactions with Liquids in Partial Fulfillment of an NRL Karle’s Fellowship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-30

    working electrode, in an electrochemical cell. In the second case, a discharge is produced via alternating current (AC) excitation with driving...to drive the appropriate reactions eliminating the need for a cathode physically inserted into the liquid, common to electrochemical cells. Five mL

  6. Flow structure and vorticity transport on a plunging wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar

    The structure and dynamics of the flow field created by a plunging flat plate airfoil are investigated at a chord Reynolds number of 10,000 while varying plunge amplitude and Strouhal number. Digital particle image velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the shedding patterns and the interactions between the leading and trailing edge vortex structures (LEV and TEV), resulting in the development of a wake classification system based on the nature and timing of interactions between the leading- and trailing-edge vortices. The convection speed of the LEV and its resulting interaction with the TEV is primarily dependent on reduced frequency; however, at Strouhal numbers above approximately 0.4, a significant influence of Strouhal number (or plunge amplitude) is observed in which LEV convection is retarded, and the contribution of the LEV to the wake is diminished. It is shown that this effect is caused by an enhanced interaction between the LEV and the airfoil surface, due to a significant increase in the strength of the vortices in this Strouhal number range, for all plunge amplitudes investigated. Comparison with low-Reynolds-number studies of plunging airfoil aerodynamics reveals a high degree of consistency and suggests applicability of the classification system beyond the range examined in the present work. Some important differences are also observed. The three-dimensional flow field was characterized for a plunging two-dimensional flat-plate airfoil using three-dimensional reconstructions of planar PIV data. Whereas the phase-averaged description of the flow field shows the secondary vortex penetrating the leading-edge shear layer to terminate LEV formation on the airfoil, time-resolved, instantaneous PIV measurements show a continuous and growing entrainment of secondary vorticity into the shear layer and LEV. A planar control volume analysis on the airfoil indicated that the generation of secondary vorticity produced approximately one half the

  7. Lagrangian observations of acceleration and bubble dynamics in plunging breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canals, Miguel; Amador, Andre

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the three-dimensional structure of plunging waves is one of the most difficult problems in fundamental fluid dynamics. In this presentation we provide an analysis of field data collected in breaking waves using novel Lagrangian drifters with a diameter of 5-10 cm and equipped with miniature HD cameras and inertial measurement units. These drifters were deployed, using a personal watercraft, into the breaking region of waves ranging from 1-5 meters in height. We analyze in detail the time series of particle acceleration and rotation and how these quantities relate to the imagery captured by the camera aboard the drifters. This data represents the first dedicated study of the three-dimensional particle dynamics of plunging breakers. Going beyond the basic statistical analysis of the acceleration data, we make an attempt at characterizing the intensity of the wave breaking process using the bubble size and characteristics obtained from the HD video images. We also attempt to relate the spectral statistics of acceleration and particle rotation to existing Lagrangian turbulence models in the hopes of obtaining estimates of the kinetic energy dissipation in breaking waves, while taking into account the unsteady and heterogeneous nature of the turbulent flow.

  8. High amplitude surging and plunging motions at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeesoon; Colonius, Tim; Williams, David; Caltech Collaboration; IIT Collaboration

    2014-11-01

    Aerodynamic forces and flow structures associated with high amplitude oscillations of an airfoil in the streamwise (surging) and transverse (plunging) direction are investigated in two-dimensional simulations at low Reynolds number (Re = 102 ~ 103). While the unsteady aerodynamic forces for low-amplitude motions were mainly affected by the leading-edge vortex (LEV) acting in- or out-of phase with the quasi-component of velocity, large-amplitude motions involve complex vortex interactions of LEVs and trailing-edge vortices (TEVs) with the moving body. For high-amplitude surging, the TEV, instead of the LEV, induces low-pressure regions above the airfoil during the retreating portion of the cycle near the reduced frequency, k = 0.5, and enhances the time-average forces. The time required for the LEV to convect along the chord becomes an intrinsic time scale, and for plunging motions, there is a sudden change of flow structure when the period of the motion is not long enough for the LEV to convect through the whole chord.

  9. Taylor cone and jetting from liquid droplets in electrospinning of nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarin, A. L.; Koombhongse, S.; Reneker, D. H.

    2001-11-01

    Sessile and pendant droplets of polymer solutions acquire stable shapes when they are electrically charged by applying an electrical potential difference between the droplet and a flat plate, if the potential is not too large. These stable shapes result only from equilibrium of the electric forces and surface tension in the cases of inviscid, Newtonian, and viscoelastic liquids. In liquids with a nonrelaxing elastic force, that force also affects the shapes. It is widely assumed that when the critical potential φ0* has been reached and any further increase will destroy the equilibrium, the liquid body acquires a conical shape referred to as the Taylor cone, having a half angle of 49.3°. In the present work we show that the Taylor cone corresponds essentially to a specific self-similar solution, whereas there exist nonself-similar solutions which do not tend toward a Taylor cone. Thus, the Taylor cone does not represent a unique critical shape: there exists another shape, which is not self-similar. The experiments of the present work demonstrate that the observed half angles are much closer to the new shape. In this article a theory of stable shapes of droplets affected by an electric field is proposed and compared with data acquired in our experimental work on electrospinning of nanofibers from polymer solutions and melts.

  10. Fluctuation-induced dynamics of multiphase liquid jets with ultra-low interfacial tension.

    PubMed

    Sauret, Alban; Spandagos, Constantinos; Shum, Ho Cheung

    2012-09-21

    Control of fluid dynamics at the micrometer scale is essential to emulsion science and materials design, which is ubiquitous in everyday life and is frequently encountered in industrial applications. Most studies on multiphase flow focus on oil-water systems with substantial interfacial tension. Advances in microfluidics have enabled the study of multiphase flow with more complex dynamics. Here, we show that the evolution of the interface in a jet surrounded by a co-flowing continuous phase with an ultra-low interfacial tension presents new opportunities to the control of flow morphologies. The introduction of a harmonic perturbation to the dispersed phase leads to the formation of interfaces with unique shapes. The periodic structures can be tuned by controlling the fluid flow rates and the input perturbation; this demonstrates the importance of the inertial effects in flow control at ultra-low interfacial tension. Our work provides new insights into microfluidic flows at ultra-low interfacial tension and their potential applications.

  11. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on emissions from a flame-tube combustor using Liquid Jet A fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marek, C. J.; Tacina, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of uncooled exhaust gas recirculation as an inert diluent on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO + NO2) and on combustion efficiency were investigated. Ratios of recirculated combustion products to inlet airflow were varied from 10 to 80 percent by using an inlet air ejector nozzle. Liquid Jet A fuel was used. The flame-tube combustor was 10.2 cm in diameter. It was operated with and without a flameholder present. The combustor pressure was maintained constant at 0.5 MPa. The equivalence ratio was varied from 0.3 to 1.0. The inlet air temperature was varied from 590 to 800 K, and the reference velocity from 10 to 30 m/sec. Increasing the percent recirculation from 10 to 25 had the following effects: (1) the peak NOx emission was decreased by 37 percent, from 8 to 5 g NO2/kg fuel, at an inlet air temperature of 590 K and a reference velocity of 15 m/sec; (2) the combustion efficiency was increased, particularly at the higher equivalence ratios; and (3) for a high combustion efficiency of greater than 99.5 percent, the range of operation of the combustor was nearly doubled in terms of equivalence ratio. Increasing the recirculation from 25 to 50 percent did not change the emissions significantly.

  12. Plunging Ranula in Children: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Veronica; Calcaterra, Valeria; Pasqua, Noemi; Guazzotti, Marinella; Fusillo, Mario; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2016-11-17

    Few cases of plunging ranulas (PRs) occur during childhood and the lesions are frequently misdiagnosed. Here, a PR in a child is reported along with a literature review. A seven-year-old female complaining of swelling in the midline neck, left-submandibular region, was evaluated. No oral cavity or major salivary glands abnormalities were detected. On palpation, a soft, painless, and fluid-containing mass was observed. The suspicion PR was performed by ultrasound. The diagnosis was confirmed with a histopathological examination. The lesion was removed with a cervical approach, without recurrence. PR is an uncommon condition in children under 10 years of age. Differential diagnosis depends on clinical examination and ultrasonography. A computed tomography-scan and magnetic resonance imaging can be performed if the diagnosis remains uncertain. In pediatrics, the key to success of the treatment may rely on the radical excision of the cyst and sublingual gland, via an intraoral or submandibular approach.

  13. Plunging Ranula in Children: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Carlini, Veronica; Calcaterra, Valeria; Pasqua, Noemi; Guazzotti, Marinella; Fusillo, Mario; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Few cases of plunging ranulas (PRs) occur during childhood and the lesions are frequently misdiagnosed. Here, a PR in a child is reported along with a literature review. A seven-year-old female complaining of swelling in the midline neck, left-submandibular region, was evaluated. No oral cavity or major salivary glands abnormalities were detected. On palpation, a soft, painless, and fluid-containing mass was observed. The suspicion PR was performed by ultrasound. The diagnosis was confirmed with a histopathological examination. The lesion was removed with a cervical approach, without recurrence. PR is an uncommon condition in children under 10 years of age. Differential diagnosis depends on clinical examination and ultrasonography. A computed tomography-scan and magnetic resonance imaging can be performed if the diagnosis remains uncertain. In pediatrics, the key to success of the treatment may rely on the radical excision of the cyst and sublingual gland, via an intraoral or submandibular approach. PMID:28191301

  14. Effects of nonthermal plasma jet irradiation on the selective production of H2O2 and NO2- in liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Ito, Taiki; Takenaka, Kosuke; Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2016-11-01

    We present the effects of the application of a nonthermal plasma jet to a liquid surface on H2O2 and NO2- generation in the liquid. Two distinct plasma irradiation conditions, with plasma contact and with no observable plasma contact with the liquid surface, were precisely compared. When the plasma was made to touch the liquid surface, the H2O2 concentration of the plasma-treated water was much higher than the NO2- concentration. In contrast, when no observable contact of the plasma with the liquid surface occurred, the ratio of the NO2- to H2O2 concentration became over 1 and NO2- became more dominant than H2O2 in the plasma-treated water. Our experiments clearly show that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can be selectively produced in liquid using appropriate plasma-irradiation conditions of the liquid surface. The ratio of NO2- to H2O2 was controlled within a wide range of 0.02-1.2 simply by changing the plasma-irradiation distance from the liquid surface.

  15. Environmental Life Cycle Assessment of Coal-Biomass to Liquid Jet Fuel Compared to Petroleum-Derived JP-8 Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    64 Co- Gasification of Coal and Biomass ...Fuels from Biomass jet fuel components Cellulose CO + H2 “BTL or CBTL” “first generation”“second generation” Lignin gasification (or co- gasification ...than typical petroleum derived fuel resulting in a lower total GWP during the fuel’s life cycle. Gasification is breaking down the coal and biomass

  16. First application of liquid-metal-jet sources for small-animal imaging: High-resolution CT and phase-contrast tumor demarcation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, Daniel H.; Lundstroem, Ulf; Burvall, Anna; Hertz, Hans M.

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: Small-animal studies require images with high spatial resolution and high contrast due to the small scale of the structures. X-ray imaging systems for small animals are often limited by the microfocus source. Here, the authors investigate the applicability of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for such high-resolution small-animal imaging, both in tomography based on absorption and in soft-tissue tumor imaging based on in-line phase contrast. Methods: The experimental arrangement consists of a liquid-metal-jet x-ray source, the small-animal object on a rotating stage, and an imaging detector. The source-to-object and object-to-detector distances are adjusted for the preferred contrast mechanism. Two different liquid-metal-jet sources are used, one circulating a Ga/In/Sn alloy and the other an In/Ga alloy for higher penetration through thick tissue. Both sources are operated at 40-50 W electron-beam power with {approx}7 {mu}m x-ray spots, providing high spatial resolution in absorption imaging and high spatial coherence for the phase-contrast imaging. Results: High-resolution absorption imaging is demonstrated on mice with CT, showing 50 {mu}m bone details in the reconstructed slices. High-resolution phase-contrast soft-tissue imaging shows clear demarcation of mm-sized tumors at much lower dose than is required in absorption. Conclusions: This is the first application of liquid-metal-jet x-ray sources for whole-body small-animal x-ray imaging. In absorption, the method allows high-resolution tomographic skeletal imaging with potential for significantly shorter exposure times due to the power scalability of liquid-metal-jet sources. In phase contrast, the authors use a simple in-line arrangement to show distinct tumor demarcation of few-mm-sized tumors. This is, to their knowledge, the first small-animal tumor visualization with a laboratory phase-contrast system.

  17. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; Karkhanis, V.; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian. Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.

  18. On shock driven jetting of liquid from non-sinusoidal surfaces into a vacuum

    DOE PAGES

    Cherne, F. J.; Hammerberg, J. E.; Andrews, M. J.; ...

    2015-11-09

    Other work employed Richtmyer-Meshkov theory to describe the development of spikes and bubblesfrom shocked sinusoidal surfaces. Here, we discuss the effects of machining different two-dimensional shaped grooves in copper and examine the resulting flow of the material after being shocked into liquid on release. For these simulations, a high performance molecular dynamics code, SPaSM, was used with machined grooves of kh 0 = 1 and kh 0 = 1/8, where 2h 0 is the peak-to-valley height of the perturbation with wavelength λ, and k = 2π/λ. The surface morphologies studied include a Chevron, a Fly-Cut, a Square-Wave, and a Gaussian.more » Furthermore, we describe extensions to an existing ejecta source model that better captures the mass ejected from these surfaces. We also investigate the same profiles at length scales of order 1 cm for an idealized fluid equation of state using the FLASH continuum hydrodynamics code. Our findings indicate that the resulting mass can be scaled by the missing area of a sinusoidal curve with an effective wavelength, λeff , that has the same missing area. Finally, our extended ejecta mass formula works well for all the shapes considered and captures the corresponding time evolution and total mass.« less

  19. Development of liquid-jet laser-produced plasma light source for EUV lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Tamotsu; Suganuma, Takashi; Imai, Yousuke; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Someya, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Hideo; Soumagne, Georg; Komori, Hiroshi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru; Endo, Akira; Toyoda, Koichi

    2003-06-01

    The Extreme UV Lithography System Development Association (EUVA) was established in Japan in May 2002 and is supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). EUVA started the light soruce development in September 2002. This development is done by the assocaition members Gigaphoton, Ushio, Komatsu, Canon, Nikon, the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Sciecne and Technology (AIST) and several Japanese universities. The target of the four-year project is the development of a EUV light source with 10W clean focus point power. For the end of the fiscal year 2003 the development of a 4W EUV light source (clean focus point power) is planned. Both, Laser-Produced-Plasma (LPP) and Discharge-Produced-Plasma (DPP) EUV light sources are investigated at first. Our group at the EUVA Hiratsuka R&D Center is working on LPP sources. We are currently focusing on the development of a driver laser and a liquid Xenon plasma target. The laser is a Nd:YAG MOPA (Master Oscillator and Power Amplifier) system oscillating at 1064 nm. Average power, repetition rate and pulse duration of the laser system are 500 Watt, 10 kHa and 30nsec, respectively. The Xenon liquefication system operates at a maximum pressure of 5MPa and a temperature range between 160 K and 190 K. The pressure inside the vacuum chamber is below 0.1Pa during system operation. This paper presents the current status of the EUV system component development as well as first experimental results of generated EUV radiation.

  20. Development of liquid-lithium film jet-flow for the target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reactions for BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Miura, Kuniaki; Hayashizaki, Noriyosu; Aritomi, Masanori

    2014-06-01

    A feasibility study on liquid lithium target in the form of a flowing film was performed to evaluate its potential use as a neutron generation target of (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction in BNCT. The target is a windowless-type flowing film on a concave wall. Its configuration was adapted for a proton beam which is 30mm in diameter and with energy and current of up to 3MeV and 20mA, respectively. The flowing film of liquid lithium was 0.6mm in thickness, 50mm in width and 50mm in length. The shapes of the nozzle and concave back wall, which create a stable flowing film jet, were decided based on water experiments. A lithium hydrodynamic experiment was performed to observe the stability of liquid lithium flow behavior. The flowing film of liquid lithium was found to be feasible at temperatures below the liquid lithium boiling saturation of 342°C at the surface pressure of 1×10(-3)Pa. Using a proto-type liquid lithium-circulating loop for BNCT, the stability of the film flow was confirmed for velocities up to 30m/s at 220°C and 250°C in vacuum at a pressure lower than 10(-3) Pa. It is expected that for practical use, a flowing liquid lithium target of a windowless type can solve the problem of radiation damage and target cooling.

  1. [Pediatric plunging ranula and its surgery with transoral approach: a case report].

    PubMed

    Eyibilen, Ahmet; Aladağ, Ibrahim; Güven, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    The plunging ranula is an uncommon condition which presents itself as a fluctuating swelling in the neck. It is less frequent during childhood. The ranula, which is usually originated from sublingual gland, is called the plunging ranula when it affects the submandibulary space and adjacent structures in the neck. There are a lot of different methods used in surgical treatment. In this study, we present a plunging ranula case which was performed by excision of the pseudocyst and ipsilateral sublingual gland with transoral approach in a five-year-old girl. There has been no recurrence in four-year follow-up period.

  2. Design and Testing of an Automated System using Thermochromatic Liquid Crystals to Determine Local Heat Transfer Coefficients for an Impinging Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Benjamin

    1995-01-01

    Using thermochromatic liquid crystal to measure surface temperature, an automated transient method with time-varying free-stream temperature is developed to determine local heat transfer coefficients. By allowing the free-stream temperature to vary with time, the need for complicated mechanical components to achieve a step temperature change is eliminated, and by using the thermochromatic liquid crystals as temperature indicators, the labor intensive task of installing many thermocouples is omitted. Bias associated with human perception of the transition of the thermochromatic liquid crystal is eliminated by using a high speed digital camera and a computer. The method is validated by comparisons with results obtained by the steady-state method for a circular Jet impinging on a flat plate. Several factors affecting the accuracy of the method are evaluated.

  3. Ultrastructure of skeletal muscle fibers studied by a plunge quick freezing method: myofilament lengths.

    PubMed Central

    Sosa, H; Popp, D; Ouyang, G; Huxley, H E

    1994-01-01

    We have set up a system to rapidly freeze muscle fibers during contraction to investigate by electron microscopy the ultrastructure of active muscles. Glycerinated fiber bundles of rabbit psoas muscles were frozen in conditions of rigor, relaxation, isometric contraction, and active shortening. Freezing was carried out by plunging the bundles into liquid ethane. The frozen bundles were then freeze-substituted, plastic-embedded, and sectioned for electron microscopic observation. X-ray diffraction patterns of the embedded bundles and optical diffraction patterns of the micrographs resemble the x-ray diffraction patterns of unfixed muscles, showing the ability of the method to preserve the muscle ultrastructure. In the optical diffraction patterns layer lines up to 1/5.9 nm-1 were observed. Using this method we have investigated the myofilament lengths and concluded that there are no major changes in length in either the actin or the myosin filaments under any of the conditions explored. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 6 PMID:7918996

  4. Featured Image: A Galaxy Plunges Into a Cluster Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The galaxy that takes up most of the frame in this stunning image (click for the full view!) is NGC 1427A. This is a dwarf irregular galaxy (unlike the fortuitously-located background spiral galaxy in the lower right corner of the image), and its currently in the process of plunging into the center of the Fornax galaxy cluster. Marcelo Mora (Pontifical Catholic University of Chile) and collaborators have analyzed observations of this galaxy made by both the Very Large Telescope in Chile and the Hubble Advanced Camera for Surveys, which produced the image shown here as a color composite in three channels. The team worked to characterize the clusters of star formation within NGC 1427A identifiable in the image as bright knots within the galaxy and determine how the interactions of this galaxy with its cluster environment affect the star formation within it. For more information and the original image, see the paper below.Citation:Marcelo D. Mora et al 2015 AJ 150 93. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/93

  5. An Experimental Study of Droplets Produced by a Plunging Breakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erinin, Martin; Wang, Dan; Towle, David; Liu, Xinan; Duncan, James

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the production of droplets by a mechanically generated plunging breaking water wave is investigated in a wave tank. The breaker, with an amplitude of 0.070 m, is generated repeatedly with a programmable wave maker by using a dispersively focused wave packet (average frequency 1.15 Hz). The profile histories of the breaking wave crests along the center plane of the tank are measured using cinematic laser-induced fluorescence. The droplets are measured using a cinematic digital in-line holographic system positioned at 30 locations along a horizontal plane that is 1 cm above the maximum wave crest height. This measurement plane covers the entire region in the tank where the wave breaks. The holographic system is used to obtain the droplet diameters (d, for d >100 microns) and the three components of the droplet velocities. From these measurements and counting only the droplets that are moving up, the spatio-temporal distribution of droplet generation by the breaking wave is obtained. The main features of the droplet generation are correlated with the features and phases of the breaking process. The support of the National Science Foundation under Grant OCE0751853 from the Division of Ocean Sciences is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Postmortem investigation of mylohyoid hiatus and hernia: aetiological factors of plunging ranula.

    PubMed

    Harrison, John D; Kim, Ann; Al-Ali, Saad; Morton, Randall P

    2013-09-01

    The mylohyoid hiatus and hernia were discovered in the nineteenth century and were considered to explain the origin of the plunging ranula from the sublingual gland. This formed the rationale for sublingual sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula. However, a more recent, extensive histological investigation reported that hernias contained submandibular gland, which supported an origin of the plunging ranula from the submandibular gland and submandibular sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula. We therefore decided to investigate the occurrence and location of the hiatus and the histological nature of the hernia. Twenty-three adult cadavers were dissected in the submandibular region. The locations and dimensions of mylohyoid hiatuses were measured before taking biopsies of hernias. Hiatuses with associated hernias were found in ten cadavers: unilateral in six; and bilateral in four, in one of which there were three hiatuses. Sublingual gland was identified in nine hernias and fat without gland in six. This investigation supports clinical and experimental evidence that the plunging ranula originates from the sublingual gland and may enter the neck through the mylohyoid muscle. It confirms the rationale of sublingual sialadenectomy for the treatment of plunging ranula.

  7. Control of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in liquid by nonthermal plasma jet with controlled surrounding gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Taiki; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Setsuhara, Yuichi

    2017-01-01

    We present the development of a low-frequency nonthermal plasma-jet system, where the surrounding-gas condition of the plasma jet is precisely controlled in open air. By restricting the mixing of the ambient air into the plasma jet, the plasma jet can be selectively changed from a N2 main discharge to an O2 main discharge even in open air. In the plasma-jet system with the controlled surrounding gas, the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species is successfully controlled in deionized water: the concentration ratio of NO2 - to H2O2 is tuned from 0 to 0.18, and a high NO2 - concentration ratio is obtained at a N2 gas ratio of 0.80 relative to the total N2/O2 gas mixture in the main discharge gas. We also find that the NO2 - concentration is much higher in the plasma-activated medium than in the plasma-activated deionized water, which is mainly explained by the contribution of amino acids to NO2 - generation in the medium.

  8. Effect of Oscillatory Plunging Motion on Airfoil Boundary Layer and Wake Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agate, Mark; Little, Jesse; Fasel, Hermann

    2016-11-01

    The effects of small amplitude (0 . 030 < A / c < 0 . 048) high frequency (0 . 61 < πfc /U∞ < 0 . 70) plunging motion of the X-56A airfoil are examined at Re=200,000 for three angles of attack. Two angles of attack were chosen at pre-stall conditions and one angle of attack was selected to study post-stall effects. Static stall of the airfoil is 12 .25° and the examined angles are 10°, 12°, and 14°. The purpose of this research is to examine the aerodynamic influence of structural motion when the wing is vibrating close to its eigenfrequency near static stall. The aerodynamic characteristics generated by the plunging motion are considered with specific focus on the laminar separation bubble near the leading edge. For the cases examined, the static lift is greatly exceeded. At the plunging case of 10° angle of attack, experimental results are very similar to those obtained from Theodorsen's Theory. For the 12° plunging case, lift exceeds that predicted by Theodorsen's Theory and the leading edge bubble bursts during the oscillation cycle. At the static stall condition of 14°, plunging periodically reattaches the flow and the bubble bursting is much more significant. U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (FA9550-14-1-0184).

  9. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  10. Production of Jet Fuels from Coal Derived Liquids. Volume 9. Results of Bench-Scale and Pilot Plant Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    Amoco Oil Company has conducted bench- and pilot plant-scale experiments to produce jet fuels from the tar oil from the Great Plains Coal ... Gasification Plant in Beulah, North Dakota. Experiments show that the hydroprocessing conditions recommended in Task I are not severe enough to saturate the

  11. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  12. Twin Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Brenda; Bozak, Rick

    2010-01-01

    Many subsonic and supersonic vehicles in the current fleet have multiple engines mounted near one another. Some future vehicle concepts may use innovative propulsion systems such as distributed propulsion which will result in multiple jets mounted in close proximity. Engine configurations with multiple jets have the ability to exploit jet-by-jet shielding which may significantly reduce noise. Jet-by-jet shielding is the ability of one jet to shield noise that is emitted by another jet. The sensitivity of jet-by-jet shielding to jet spacing and simulated flight stream Mach number are not well understood. The current experiment investigates the impact of jet spacing, jet operating condition, and flight stream Mach number on the noise radiated from subsonic and supersonic twin jets.

  13. Numerical heat transfer during partially-confined, confined, and free liquid jet impingement with rotation and chemical mechanical planarization process modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lallave Cortes, Jorge C.

    This work presents the use of numerical modeling for the analysis of transient and steady state liquid jet impingement for cooling application of electronics, and energy dissipation during a CMP process under the influence of a series of parameters that controls the transport phenomena mechanism. Seven thorough studies were done to explore how the flow structure and conjugated heat transfer in both the solid and fluid regions was affected by adding a secondary rotational flow during the jet impingement process. Axis-symmetrical numerical models of round jets with a spinning or static nozzle were developed using the following configurations: confined, partially-confined, and free liquid jet impingement on a rotating or stationary uniformly heated disk of finite thickness and radius. Calculations were done for various materials, namely copper, silver, Constantan, and silicon with a solid to fluid thermal conductivity ratio covering a range of 36.91.2222, at different laminar Reynolds numbers ranging from 220 to 2,000, under a broad rotational rate range of 0 to 1,000 RPM (Ekman number=infinity--3.31x10--5), nozzle-to-plate spacing (beta=0.25.5.0), dimensionless disk thicknesses (b/dn=0.167.1.67), confinement ratio (rp/rd=0.2.0.75), and Prandtl number (1.29.124.44) using NH3, H2O, FC.77 and MIL.7808 as working fluids. An engineering correlation relating the average Nusselt number with the above parameters was developed for the prediction of system performance. The simulation results compared reasonably well with previous experimental studies. The second major contribution of this research was the development of a three dimensional CMP model that shows the temperature distributions profile as an index of energy dissipation at the wafer and pad surfaces, and slurry interface. A finite element analysis was done with FIDAP 8.7.4 package under the influence of physical parameters, such as slurry flow rates (0.5.1.42 cc/s), polishing pressures (17.24.41.37 kPa), pad

  14. A comparison of the pitching and plunging response of an oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carta, F. O.

    1979-01-01

    An oscillating SC1095 airfoil model was tested for its aerodynamic stability in a rigid body with a single degree of freedom pitch about its quarter chord, and also in a rigid body with single degree of freedom plunge. The ability of pitching data to model plunging motions was evaluated. A one to one correspondence was established between pairs of pitching and plunging motions according to the potential flow transformation formula alpha=ikh. The imposed variables of the experiment were mean incidence angle, amplitude of motion, free stream velocity, and oscillatory frequency. Results indicate that significant differences exist between the aerodynamic responses to the motions, particularly at high load conditions. At high load conditions, the normal force for equivalent pitch is significantly greater than that for true pitch at the geometric incidence angle.

  15. CFD based investigation on the impact acceleration when a gannet impacts with water during plunge diving.

    PubMed

    Wang, T M; Yang, X B; Liang, J H; Yao, G C; Zhao, W D

    2013-09-01

    Plunge diving is the most commonly used feeding method of a gannet, which can make the gannet transit from air to water rapidly and successfully. A large impact acceleration can be generated due to the air-to-water transition. However, the impact acceleration experienced by the gannet during plunge diving has not been studied. In this paper, this issue is investigated by using the CFD method. The effect of the dropping height and the water-entry inclination angle on the impact acceleration is considered. The results reveal that the impact acceleration along the longitudinal body axis increases with either of the two parameters. The peak time decreases with the dropping height. A quadratic relation is found between the peak impact acceleration and the initial water-entry velocity. According to the computation, when the dropping height is 30 m (most of gannets plunge from about this height), the peak impact acceleration can reach about 23 times the gravitational acceleration, which will exert a considerable force on the gannet body. Furthermore, the pressure distribution of different water-entry inclination angles indicates that the large pressure asymmetry caused by a small oblique angle may lead to a large impact acceleration in the direction perpendicular to the longitudinal body axis and cause damage to the neck of the gannet, which partly explains the reason why a gannet performing a high plunge diving in nature enters water with a large oblique angle from the perspective of impact mechanics. The investigation on the plunge-diving behavior in this paper will inspire and promote the development of a biomimetic amphibious robot that transits from air to water with the plunge-diving mode.

  16. Plunging ranula intruding into the parapharyngeal space treated with OK-432.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Makoto; Kida, Wataru; Nakahara, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    We report a very rare case of a plunging ranula extending into the parapharyngeal space, which was treated successfully with OK-432. A 27-year-old woman presented with a 4-month history of right submandibular swelling. Based on computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings, we established a diagnosis of plunging ranula intruding into the parapharyngeal space. The patient was treated with an intracystic OK-432 injection that was administered under ultrasonographic guidance. At 6 weeks after the injection, computed tomography showed complete disappearance of the cystic mass. No recurrence was noted during the 10-month follow-up.

  17. Large Plunging Ranula Presenting as Isolated Neck Swelling: Steps in Diagnosis and Surgical Steps in Management

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Neelima A.; Patil, Pankaj; Chapi, Mouneshkumar Devendrappa

    2015-01-01

    Ranula is a salivary gland cyst which typically present as localized superficial swelling over the floor of mouth. Complex or plunging ranulas develop when the mucus extravasation extends through or around the mylohyoid muscle, deeper into the neck, and present with neck lump along with or without swelling over floor of mouth. We report a case of large plunging ranula presenting as an isolated large neck mass in a 38-year-old female patient. The steps in diagnosis and surgical steps in management of the pathology are systematically described. PMID:26266141

  18. Needle-free jet injections: dependence of jet penetration and dispersion in the skin on jet power.

    PubMed

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-07-07

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, a quantitative understanding of the energetics of jet injection is still lacking. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B (SRB). The power of the jet at the nozzle was varied from 1 to 600 W by independently altering the nozzle diameter (30-560 microm) and jet velocity (100-200 m/s). The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power. Additional experiments were performed using a model material, polyacrylamide gel, to further understand the dependence of jet penetration on jet power. These experiments demonstrated that jet power also effectively describes gel erosion due to liquid impingement.

  19. X-ray grating interferometry for 9.25 keV design energy at a liquid-metal-jet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balles, A.; Fella, Ch.; Dittmann, J.; Wiest, W.; Zabler, S.; Hanke, R.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a grating interferometer setup with a liquid-metal-jet source and a high resolution detector. It will be shown that this source is suitable for interferometer setups as it delivers a sufficient spatial coherence that makes a source grating unnecessary. This is confirmed twice by the results of an interferometer setup and a single grating setup, respectively. Both show comparable information on the samples. Furthermore, it was possible to measure the Talbot effect due to the self-built high resolution detector with an effective pixel size of 0.67 µm and due to the coherence of the source, thanks to a small spot size of a few microns. The information on the absorption of a nylon fiber is observed to include inline phase contrast effects. The dark-field signal of a carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is not quite well understood because of its inhomogeneity.

  20. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  1. The plunging ranula: diagnostic difficulties and a less invasive approach to treatment.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, R; McGurk, M

    2013-11-01

    Plunging ranulas arise when a simple ranula extends beyond the floor of the mouth into the neck. Diagnosis is difficult even with modern imaging techniques as they mimic other neck lesions, and traditional treatment involves enucleation of the cyst from the neck. Despite this invasive surgery they tend to recur. We describe a less invasive approach to treatment and review the diagnostic pitfalls. From 2002 to 2011, eight patients presented with a plunging ranula. They were split into two groups: those for whom an incorrect diagnosis was made and those where a less invasive treatment approach was employed. Three patients were misdiagnosed with cervical lymphangioma and had inappropriately invasive surgery. Five patients with established plunging ranulas were treated using an intraoral approach alone, eliminating the need for a cervical incision. Misdiagnosis of a plunging ranula leads to extensive and unnecessary surgery. We propose an algorithm to simplify investigation that employs a low threshold for fine-needle aspiration cytology. The cases presented indicate that these lesions can be managed by a less invasive procedure than currently practised.

  2. Parameter dependence of vortex interactions on a two-dimensional plunging plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslam Panah, Azar; Buchholz, James H. J.

    2014-03-01

    The structure and dynamics of the flow field created by a plunging flat-plate airfoil are investigated at a chord Reynolds number of 10,000 while varying plunge amplitude and Strouhal number. Digital particle image velocimetry measurements are used to characterize the shedding patterns and the interactions between the leading- and trailing-edge vortex structures (LEV and TEV), resulting in the development of a wake classification system based on the nature and timing of interactions between the leading- and trailing-edge vortices. The streamwise advancement of the LEV during a plunge cycle and its resulting interaction with the TEV is primarily dependent on reduced frequency; however, for Strouhal numbers above approximately 0.4, significant changes are observed in the formation of vortices shed from the leading and trailing edges, as well as the circulation of the leading-edge vortex. The functional form of the relationship between leading-edge vortex circulation and Strouhal number suggests that the Strouhal number dependence is more specifically a manifestation of the effective angle of attack. Comparison with low-Reynolds-number studies of plunging airfoil aerodynamics reveals a high degree of consistency and suggests applicability of the classification system beyond the range examined in the present work.

  3. Analysis of a Free Surface Film from a Controlled Liquid Impinging Jet over a Rotating Disk Including Conjugate Effects, with and without Evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sankaran, Subramanian (Technical Monitor); Rice, Jeremy; Faghri, Amir; Cetegen, Baki M.

    2005-01-01

    A detailed analysis of the liquid film characteristics and the accompanying heat transfer of a free surface controlled liquid impinging jet onto a rotating disk are presented. The computations were run on a two-dimensional axi-symmetric Eulerian mesh while the free surface was calculated with the volume of fluid method. Flow rates between 3 and 15 1pm with rotational speeds between 50 and 200 rpm are analyzed. The effects of inlet temperature on the film thickness and heat transfer are characterized as well as evaporative effects. The conjugate heating effect is modeled, and was found to effect the heat transfer results the most at both the inner and outer edges of the heated surface. The heat transfer was enhanced with both increasing flow rate and increasing rotational speeds. When evaporative effects were modeled, the evaporation was found to increase the heat transfer at the lower flow rates the most because of a fully developed thermal field that was achieved. The evaporative effects did not significantly enhance the heat transfer at the higher flow rates.

  4. Too Fast, Too Furious: A Galaxy's Fatal Plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-01-01

    Trailing 200,000-light-year-long streamers of seething gas, a galaxy that was once like our Milky Way is being shredded as it plunges at 4.5 million miles per hour through the heart of a distant cluster of galaxies. In this unusually violent collision with ambient cluster gas, the galaxy is stripped down to its skeletal spiral arms as it is eviscerated of fresh hydrogen for making new stars. The galaxy's untimely demise is offering new clues to solving the mystery of what happens to spiral galaxies in a violent universe. Views of the early universe show that spiral galaxies were once much more abundant in rich clusters of galaxies. But they seem to have been vanishing over cosmic time. Where have these "missing bodies" gone? Astronomers are using a wide range of telescopes and analysis techniques to conduct a "CSI" or Crime Scene Investigator-style look at what is happening to this galaxy inside its cluster's rough neighborhood. "It's a clear case of galaxy assault and battery," says William Keel of the University of Alabama. "This is the first time we have a full suite of results from such disparate techniques showing the crime being committed, and the modus operandi." Keel and colleagues are laying out the "forensic evidence" of the galaxy's late life, in a series of presentations today in Atlanta, Ga., at the 203rd meeting of the American Astronomical Society. Astronomers have assembled the evidence by combining a variety of diagnostic observations from telescopes analyzing the galaxy's appearance in X-ray, optical, and radio light. Parallel observations at different wavelengths trace how stars, gas, and dust are being tossed around and torn from the fragile galaxy, called C153. Though such "distressed" galaxies have been seen before, this one's demise is unusually swift and violent. The galaxy belongs to a cluster of galaxies that slammed into another cluster about 100 million years ago. This galaxy took the brunt of the beating as it fell along a trajectory

  5. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  6. Jet injection into polyacrylamide gels: investigation of jet injection mechanics.

    PubMed

    Schramm-Baxter, Joy; Katrencik, Jeffrey; Mitragotri, Samir

    2004-08-01

    Jet injectors employ high-velocity liquid jets that penetrate into human skin and deposit drugs in the dermal or subdermal region. Although jet injectors have been marketed for a number of years, relatively little is known about the interactions of high-speed jets with soft materials such as skin. Using polyacrylamide gels as a model system, the mechanics of jet penetration, including the dependence of jet penetration on mechanical properties, was studied. Jets employed in a typical commercial injector, (orifice diameter: 152 microm, velocity: 170-180 m/s) were used to inject fluid into polyacrylamide gels possessing Young's moduli in the range of 0.06-0.77 MPa and hardness values in the range of 4-70 H(OO). Motion analysis of jet entry into polyacrylamide gels revealed that jet penetration can be divided into three distinct events: erosion, stagnation, and dispersion. During the erosion phase, the jet removed the gel at the impact site and led to the formation of a distinct cylindrical hole. Cessation of erosion induced a period of jet stagnation ( approximately 600 micros) characterized by constant penetration depth. This stage was followed by dispersion of the liquid into the gel. The dispersion took place by crack propagation and was nearly symmetrical with the exception of injections into 10% acrylamide (Young's modulus of 0.06 MPa). The penetration depth of the jets as well as the rate of erosion decreased with increasing Young's modulus. The mechanics of jet penetration into polyacrylamide gels provides an important tool for understanding jet injection into skin.

  7. Evaluation of the sensitivity and response of IR thermography from a transparent heater under liquid jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haustein, H. D.; Rohlfs, W.; Al-Sibai, F.; Kneer, R.

    2012-11-01

    The feasibility of a visible/IR transparent heater and its suitability for IR thermography is experimentally examined. The most common transparent conductive coating, Indium Tin Oxide (ITO), is quite reflective and its optical properties depend on thickness and manufacturing process. Therefore, the optical properties of several thicknesses and types of ITO, coated on an IR window (BaF2), are examined. A highly transparent Cadmium Oxide (CdO) coating on a ZnS window, also examined, is found to be unusable. Transmissivity is found to increase with a decrease in coating thickness, and total emittance is relatively low. A thick ITO coating was examined for IR thermography in the challenging test case of submerged water jet impingement, where temperature differences were characteristically small and distributed. The measurements under steady state conditions were found to agree well with the literature, and the method was validated. Comparison of two IR cameras did not show the LWIR low-temperature advantage, up to the maximal acquisition rate examined, 1.3KHz. Rather the MWIR camera had a stronger signal to noise ratio, due to the higher emissivity of the heater in this range. The transient response of the transparent heater showed no time-delay, though the substrate dampens the thermal response significantly. Therefore, only qualitative transient measurements are shown for the case of pulsating free-surface jet impingement, showing that the motion of the hydraulic jump coincides with thermal measurements. From these results, recommendations are made for coating/window combination in IR thermography.

  8. A Fundamental Classification of Atomization Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-12

    for example. Both spilling and plunging breakers, described in the Disturbance Breakdown section, entrain air and create a number of bubbles in... liquid turbulence category of disturbance formation, but does not produce droplets itself. Plunging breakers create a jet which plunges into the film...turbulent liquid films [65] have observed ligament collapse producing droplets in a mechanism similar to the jet collapse in plunging breakers [124

  9. Jetting tool

    SciTech Connect

    Szarka, D.D.; Schwegman, S.L.

    1991-07-09

    This patent describes an apparatus for hydraulically jetting a well tool disposed in a well, the well tool having a sliding member. It comprises positioner means for operably engaging the sliding member of the well tool; and a jetting means, connected at a rotatable connection to the positioner means so that the jetting means is rotatable relative to the positioner means and the well tool, for hydraulically jetting the well tool as the jetting means is rotated relative thereto.

  10. Coal liquefaction to increase jet fuel production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Processing concept that increases supply of jet fuel has been developed as part of study on methods for converting coal to hydrogen, methane, and jet fuel. Concept takes advantage of high aromatic content of coal-derived liquids to make high-octane gasoline, instead of destroying aromatics to make jet fuel.

  11. On the effect of mantle conductivity on the super-rotating jets near the liquid core surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizerski, K. A.; Bajer, K.

    2007-03-01

    We consider hydromagnetic Couette flows in planar and spherical geometries with strong magnetic field (large Hartmann number, M≫1). The highly conducting bottom boundary is in steady motion that drives the flow. The top boundary is stationary and is either a highly conducting thin shell or a weakly conducting thick mantle. The magnetic field, B+b, is a combination of the strong, force-free background B and a perturbation b induced by the flow. This perturbation generates strong streamwise electromagnetic stress inside the fluid which, in some regions, forms a jet moving faster than the driving boundary. The super-velocity, in the spherical geometry called super-rotation, is particularly prominent in the region where the 'grazing' line of B has a point of tangent contact with the top boundary and where the Hartmann layer is singular. This is a consequence of topological discontinuity across that special field line. We explain why the magnitude of super-rotation already present when the top wall is insulating [Dormy, E., Jault, D., Soward, A.M., 2002. A super-rotating shear layer in magnetohydrodynamic spherical Couette flow. J. Fluid Mech. 452, 263-291], considerably increases when that wall is even slightly conducting. The asymptotic theory is valid when either the thickness of the top wall is small, δ˜M-1 and its conductivity is high, ɛ˜1 or when δ˜1 and ɛ˜M-1. The theory predicts the super-velocity enhancement of the order of δM in the first case and ɛM in the second case. We also numerically solve the planar problem outside the asymptotic regime, for ɛ=1 and δ=1, and find that with the particular B that we chose the peak super-velocity scales like M0.33. This scaling is different from M0.6 found in spherical geometry [Hollerbach, R., Skinner, S., 2001. Instabilities of magnetically induced shear layers and jets. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A 457, 785-802].

  12. Membrane damage and active but nonculturable state in liquid cultures of Escherichia coli treated with an atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Dolezalova, Eva; Lukes, Petr

    2015-06-01

    Electrical discharge plasmas can efficiently inactivate various microorganisms. Inactivation mechanisms caused by plasma, however, are not fully understood because of the complexity of both the plasma and biological systems. We investigated plasma-induced inactivation of Escherichia coli in water and mechanisms by which plasma affects bacterial cell membrane integrity. Atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet generated at ambient air in direct contact with bacterial suspension was used as a plasma source. We determined significantly lower counts of E. coli after treatment by plasma when they were assayed using a conventional cultivation technique than using a fluorescence-based LIVE/DEAD staining method, which indicated that bacteria may have entered the viable-but-nonculturable state (VBNC). We did not achieve resuscitation of these non-culturable cells, however, we detected their metabolic activity through the analysis of cellular mRNA, which suggests that cells may have been rather in the active-but-nonculturable state (ABNC). We hypothesize that peroxidation of cell membrane lipids by the reactive species produced by plasma was an important pathway of bacterial inactivation. Amount of malondialdehyde and membrane permeability of E. coli to propidium iodide increased with increasing bacterial inactivation by plasma. Membrane damage was also demonstrated by detection of free DNA in plasma-treated water.

  13. Fault-related folding during extension: Plunging basement-cored folds in the Basin and Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; John, Barbara E.

    1997-01-01

    Folds are able to form in highly extended areas where stratified cover rocks respond to basement fault offsets. The response of cover rocks to basement faulting can be studied especially well in plunging structures that expose large structural relief. The southern Basin and Range province contains plunging folds kilometres in amplitude at the corners of domino-like tilt blocks of basement rocks, where initially steep transverse and normal faults propagated upward toward the layered cover rocks. Exposed tilted cross sections, as much as 8 km thick, display transitions from faulted basement to folded cover that validate laboratory models of forced folds. The folded cover masks a deeper extensional style of brittle segmentation and uniform steep tilting.

  14. Model for Quasinormal Mode Excitation by a Particle Plunging into a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Zachary; Zimmerman, Aaron; Yang, Huan; Chen, Yanbei

    2016-03-01

    It is known that the late time gravitational waveform produced by a particle plunging into a Kerr black hole is well described by a sum of quasinormal modes. However it is not yet understood how the early part of the waveform gives way to the quasinormal mode description, which diverges at early times, nor how the inhomogenous part of the waveform contributes. Motivated by, we offer a model for quasinormal mode excitation by a particle plunging into a Schwarzschild black hole. To develop our model we study approximations to the Regge-Wheeler equation that allow for a closed-form expression for the frequency-domain Green's function, which we use to isolate the component of the waveform that should be identified with quasinormal ringing. Our description of quasinormal ringing does not diverge at early times and reveals that quasinormal ringing should be understood in analogy with a damped harmonic oscillator experiencing a transient driving source.

  15. Vortex diode jet

    DOEpatents

    Houck, Edward D.

    1994-01-01

    A fluid transfer system that combines a vortex diode with a jet ejector to transfer liquid from one tank to a second tank by a gas pressurization method having no moving mechanical parts in the fluid system. The vortex diode is a device that has a high resistance to flow in one direction and a low resistance to flow in the other.

  16. Pool-Type Fishways: Two Different Morpho-Ecological Cyprinid Species Facing Plunging and Streaming Flows

    PubMed Central

    Branco, Paulo; Santos, José M.; Katopodis, Christos; Pinheiro, António; Ferreira, Maria T.

    2013-01-01

    Fish are particularly sensitive to connectivity loss as their ability to reach spawning grounds is seriously affected. The most common way to circumvent a barrier to longitudinal connectivity, and to mitigate its impacts, is to implement a fish passage device. However, these structures are often non-effective for species with different morphological and ecological characteristics so there is a need to determine optimum dimensioning values and hydraulic parameters. The aim of this work is to study the behaviour and performance of two species with different ecological characteristics (Iberian barbel Luciobarbus bocagei–bottom oriented, and Iberian chub Squalius pyrenaicus–water column) in a full-scale experimental pool-type fishway that offers two different flow regimes–plunging and streaming. Results showed that both species passed through the surface notch more readily during streaming flow than during plunging flow. The surface oriented species used the surface notch more readily in streaming flow, and both species were more successful in moving upstream in streaming flow than in plunging flow. Streaming flow enhances upstream movement of both species, and seems the most suitable for fishways in river systems where a wide range of fish morpho-ecological traits are found. PMID:23741465

  17. Elemental Water Impact Test: Phase 3 Plunge Depth of a 36-Inch Aluminum Tank Head

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    Spacecraft are being designed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. The Elemental Water Impact Test (EWIT) series was undertaken to assess the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact simulations. Phase 3 featured a composite tank head that was tested at a range of heights to verify the ability to predict structural failure of composites. To support planning for Phase 3, a test series was conducted with an aluminum tank head dropped from heights of 2, 6, 10, and 12 feet to verify that the test article would not impact the bottom of the test pool. This report focuses on the comparisons of the measured plunge depths to LS-DYNA predictions. The results for the tank head model demonstrated the following. 1. LS-DYNA provides accurate predictions for peak accelerations. 2. LS-DYNA consistently under-predicts plunge depth. An allowance of at least 20% should be added to the LS-DYNA predictions. 3. The LS-DYNA predictions for plunge depth are relatively insensitive to the fluid-structure coupling stiffness.

  18. Pool-type fishways: two different morpho-ecological cyprinid species facing plunging and streaming flows.

    PubMed

    Branco, Paulo; Santos, José M; Katopodis, Christos; Pinheiro, António; Ferreira, Maria T

    2013-01-01

    Fish are particularly sensitive to connectivity loss as their ability to reach spawning grounds is seriously affected. The most common way to circumvent a barrier to longitudinal connectivity, and to mitigate its impacts, is to implement a fish passage device. However, these structures are often non-effective for species with different morphological and ecological characteristics so there is a need to determine optimum dimensioning values and hydraulic parameters. The aim of this work is to study the behaviour and performance of two species with different ecological characteristics (Iberian barbel Luciobarbus bocagei-bottom oriented, and Iberian chub Squalius pyrenaicus-water column) in a full-scale experimental pool-type fishway that offers two different flow regimes-plunging and streaming. Results showed that both species passed through the surface notch more readily during streaming flow than during plunging flow. The surface oriented species used the surface notch more readily in streaming flow, and both species were more successful in moving upstream in streaming flow than in plunging flow. Streaming flow enhances upstream movement of both species, and seems the most suitable for fishways in river systems where a wide range of fish morpho-ecological traits are found.

  19. The method of assessment of the grinding wheel cutting ability in the plunge grinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadolny, Krzysztof

    2012-09-01

    This article presents the method of comparative assessment of the grinding wheel cutting ability in the plunge grinding kinematics. A new method has been developed to facilitate multicriterial assessment of the working conditions of the abrasive grains and the bond bridges, as well as the wear mechanisms of the GWAS, which occur during the grinding process, with simultaneous limitation of the workshop tests range. The work hereby describes the methodology of assessment of the grinding wheel cutting ability in a short grinding test that lasts for 3 seconds, for example, with a specially shaped grinding wheel, in plunge grinding. The grinding wheel macrogeometry modification applied in the developed method consists in forming a cone or a few zones of various diameters on its surface in the dressing cut. It presents an exemplary application of two variants of the method in the internal cylindrical plunge grinding, in 100Cr6 steel. Grinding wheels with microcrystalline corundum grains and ceramic bond underwent assessment. Analysis of the registered machining results showed greater efficacy of the method of cutting using a grinding wheel with zones of various diameters. The method allows for comparative tests upon different grinding wheels, with various grinding parameters and different machined materials.

  20. Determination of guanine and adenine by high-performance liquid chromatography with a self-fabricated wall-jet/thin-layer electrochemical detector at a glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yaping; Yan, Hongling; Xie, Qingji; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive wall-jet/thin-layer amperometric electrochemical detector (ECD) coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for simultaneous determination of guanine (G) and adenine (A). The analytes were detected at a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and the HPLC-ECD calibration curves showed good linearity (R(2)>0.997) under optimized conditions. Limits of detection for G and A are 0.6 nM and 1.4 nM (S/N=3), respectively, which are lower than those obtained with an UV-vis detector and a commercial electrochemical detector. We have successfully applied this HPLC-ECD to assess the contents of G and A in hydrochloric acid-digested calf thymus double-stranded DNA. In addition, we compared in detail the analysis of G and A by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and by the HPLC-ECD system on both bare GCE and electroreduced graphene oxide (ERGO) modified GCE. We found that the adsorption of G and A on the electrode surfaces can vary their anodic CV peaks and the competitive adsorption of G and A on the limited sites of the electrode surfaces can cause crosstalk effects on their anodic CV peak signals, but the HPLC-ECD system is insensitive to such electrode-adsorption and can give more reliable analytical results.

  1. Fuzzy jets

    SciTech Connect

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; Stansbury, Conrad

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variables in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.

  2. Fuzzy jets

    DOE PAGES

    Mackey, Lester; Nachman, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Ariel; ...

    2016-06-01

    Collimated streams of particles produced in high energy physics experiments are organized using clustering algorithms to form jets . To construct jets, the experimental collaborations based at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) primarily use agglomerative hierarchical clustering schemes known as sequential recombination. We propose a new class of algorithms for clustering jets that use infrared and collinear safe mixture models. These new algorithms, known as fuzzy jets , are clustered using maximum likelihood techniques and can dynamically determine various properties of jets like their size. We show that the fuzzy jet size adds additional information to conventional jet tagging variablesmore » in boosted topologies. Furthermore, we study the impact of pileup and show that with some slight modifications to the algorithm, fuzzy jets can be stable up to high pileup interaction multiplicities.« less

  3. Uniting the family of jets of single cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supponen, Outi; Obreschkow, Danail; Tinguely, Marc; Kobel, Philippe; Dorsaz, Nicolas; Farhat, Mohamed

    2016-11-01

    Micro-jets are high-speed liquid jets that are produced when a cavitation bubble experiences a non-spherical collapse. Such jets may be driven by any anisotropy in the liquid, such as those induced by near surfaces, gravity, pressure gradients in flows or shock waves. Here we unify this diverse family of micro-jets by describing their dynamics with a single anisotropy parameter ζ >= 0 that represents a dimensionless version of the liquid momentum at the collapse point. We observe, experimentally and numerically, that the dimensionless jet parameters describing the jet speed, jet impact time, bubble displacement, bubble volume at jet impact and vapor-jet volume, all reduce to functions of ζ. Consequently, a measurement of a single parameter, such as the bubble displacement, may be used to estimate any other parameter, such as the jet speed. The jets are phenomenologically categorized into three visually distinct regimes: weak jets that hardly pierce the bubble, intermediate jets that pierce the bubble late during the collapse, and strong jets that pierce the bubble at an early stage of the collapse. In the weak and intermediate jet regimes, that is, when ζ < 0 . 1 , the dimensionless jet parameters scale as simple power laws of ζ independently of the jet driver. Swiss National Science Foundation, University of Western Australia Research Collaboration Award, European Space Agency.

  4. Very viscous electrically forced jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higuera, F. J.

    2005-11-01

    The dynamics of an axisymmetric jet of a very viscous liquid issuing into a region of uniform electric field, which is of interest for electrospinning, is described numerically using the leaky dielectric model. The jet is continuously strained by surface electric stresses. The flow depends on a capillary number Ca based on the liquid flow rate; an electric Bond number that measures the ratio of electric to surface tension stresses; the dielectric constant of the liquid; and the ratio T of a mechanical (viscous-capillary) time to the electric relaxation time required for the charge that is brought to the surface by the electric field to screen the liquid from the field. The electric current and the radius of the jet increase with Ca and tend to well defined limits for large values of this parameter, whereas a stationary jet ceases to exist when Ca decreases below a certain minimum. The radius of the jet decreases when the electric Bond number increases, due to the increased straining, and also when the time ratio T increases, which suggests that charge relaxation effects are always important in the formation of the jet.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Confined Multiple Transverse Jets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    relevant for gas turbine burners and new liquid rocket engine preburners. The main flow Reynolds number was 1.7 x 105 and the jet -to-main flow... jets issuing radially into an axisymmetric main flow, a configuration relevant for gas turbine burners and new liquid rocket engine preburners. The...in a liquid rocket engine preburner or gas turbine, vertical and short take-off and landing (V/STOL) aircraft, and film cooling of turbine blades

  6. Palaeomagnetic analysis of plunging fold structures: Errors and a simple fold test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Simon A.

    1995-02-01

    The conventional corrections for bedding dip in palaeomagnetic studies involve either untilting about strike or about some inclined axis—the choice is usually governed by the perceived fold hinge orientation. While it has been recognised that untilting bedding about strike can be erroneous if the beds lie within plunging fold structures, there are several types of fold which have plunging hinges, but whose limbs have rotated about horizontal axes. Examples are interference structures and forced folds; restoration about inclined axes may be incorrect in these cases. The angular errors imposed upon palaeomagnetic lineation data via the wrong choice of rotation axis during unfolding are calculated here and presented for lineations in any orientation which could be associated with an upright, symmetrical fold. This extends to palaeomagnetic data previous analyses which were relevant to bedding-parallel lineations. This numerical analysis highlights the influence of various parameters which describe fold geometry and relative lineation orientation upon the angular error imparted to lineation data by the wrong unfolding method. The effect of each parameter is described, and the interaction of the parameters in producing the final error is discussed. Structural and palaeomagnetic data are cited from two field examples of fold structures which illustrate the alternative kinematic histories. Both are from thin-skinned thrust belts, but the data show that one is a true plunging fold, formed by rotation about its inclined hinge, whereas the other is an interference structure produced by rotation of the limbs about non-parallel horizontal axes. Since the angle between the palaeomagnetic lineations and the inclined fold hinge is equal on both limbs in the former type of structure, but varies from limb to limb in the latter, a simple test can be defined which uses palaeomagnetic lineation data to identify rotation axes and hence fold type. This test can use pre- or syn

  7. Analytical and computational investigations of airfoils undergoing high-frequency sinusoidal pitch and plunge motions at low Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Gregory Z.

    Current interests in Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) technologies call for the development of aerodynamic-design tools that will aid in the design of more efficient platforms that will also have adequate stability and control for flight in gusty environments. Influenced largely by nature MAVs tend to be very small, have low flight speeds, and utilize flapping motions for propulsion. For these reasons the focus is, specifically, on high-frequency motions at low Reynolds numbers. Toward the goal of developing design tools, it is of interest to explore the use of elementary flow solutions for simple motions such as pitch and plunge oscillations to predict aerodynamic performance for more complex motions. In the early part of this research, a validation effort was undertaken. Computations from the current effort were compared with experiments conducted in a parallel, collaborative effort at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). A set of pure-pitch and pure-plunge sinusoidal oscillations of the SD7003 airfoil were examined. Phase-averaged measurements using particle image velocimetry in a water tunnel were compared with computations using two flow solvers: (i) an incompressible Navier-Stokes Immersed Boundary Method and (ii) an unsteady compressible Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) solver. The motions were at a reduced frequency of k = 3.93, and pitch-angle amplitudes were chosen such that a kinematic equivalence in amplitudes of effective angle of attack (from plunge) was obtained. Plunge cases showed good qualitative agreement between computation and experiment, but in the pitch cases, the wake vorticity in the experiment was substantially different from that predicted by both computations. Further, equivalence between the pure-pitch and pure-plunge motions was not attained through matching effective angle of attack. With the failure of pitch/plunge equivalence using equivalent amplitudes of effective angle of attack, the effort shifted to include pitch-rate and

  8. Precission plunge milling for angled vertical walls, on three axis machining center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralea, B.; Nagit, GH

    2016-11-01

    In this study the authors will construct a type of milling based on the plunge milling and raster milling toolpath strategy, only this time it is not going to be used for roughing but only for finishing vertical and angled surfaces of particular components of injection molds, with the help of a three axis vertical machining center. This particular toolpath strategy designed, with a commercial CAM program, for finishing the vertical and angled walls, offers a better surface roughness, and a better dimensional control (accuracy), both for the milling tool and also for the work piece.

  9. Thermal tolerance limits of diamondback moth in ramping and plunging assays.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Chi; Bahar, Md Habibullah; Baker, Greg; Andrew, Nigel R

    2014-01-01

    Thermal sensitivity is a crucial determinant of insect abundance and distribution. The way it is measured can have a critical influence on the conclusions made. Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is an important insect pest of cruciferous crops around the world and the thermal responses of polyphagous species are critical to understand the influences of a rapidly changing climate on their distribution and abundance. Experiments were carried out to the lethal temperature limits (ULT₀ and LLT₀: temperatures where there is no survival) as well as Upper and Lower Lethal Temperature (ULT₂₅ and LLT₂₅) (temperature where 25% DBM survived) of lab-reared adult DBM population to extreme temperatures attained by either two-way ramping (ramping temperatures from baseline to LT₂₅ and ramping back again) or sudden plunging method. In this study the ULT0 for DBM was recorded as 42.6°C and LLT₀ was recorded as -16.5°C. DBM had an ULT₂₅ of 41.8°C and LLT25 of -15.2°C. The duration of exposure to extreme temperatures had significant impacts on survival of DBM, with extreme temperatures and/or longer durations contributing to higher lethality. Comparing the two-way ramping temperature treatment to that of direct plunging temperature treatment, our study clearly demonstrated that DBM was more tolerant to temperature in the two-way ramping assay than that of the plunging assay for cold temperatures, but at warmer temperatures survival exhibited no differences between ramping and plunging. These results suggest that DBM will not be put under physiological stress from a rapidly changing climate, rather access to host plants in marginal habitats has enabled them to expand their distribution. Two-way temperature ramping enhances survival of DBM at cold temperatures, and this needs to be examined across a range of taxa and life stages to determine if enhanced survival is widespread incorporating a ramping recovery method.

  10. Finite element analysis and computer graphics visualization of flow around pitching and plunging airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bratanow, T.; Ecer, A.

    1973-01-01

    A general computational method for analyzing unsteady flow around pitching and plunging airfoils was developed. The finite element method was applied in developing an efficient numerical procedure for the solution of equations describing the flow around airfoils. The numerical results were employed in conjunction with computer graphics techniques to produce visualization of the flow. The investigation involved mathematical model studies of flow in two phases: (1) analysis of a potential flow formulation and (2) analysis of an incompressible, unsteady, viscous flow from Navier-Stokes equations.

  11. Numerical simulation of a plunging flexible hydrofoil and its experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Martin-Alarcon, Leonardo; Wei, Mingjun; Shu, Fangjun

    2011-11-01

    A monolithic approach for simulation of flexible flapping wings in fully-coupled motion has recently been developed. The methodology is based on a uniform description of fluid and structure in Eulerian framework. Immersed boundary technique is used to represent solid stress, solid-fluid interface, and active flapping motion in an overall Cartesian coordinate. In the current presentation, the focus is to apply the method on a simple two-dimensional problem of plunging flexible hydrofoil and then compare to the experimental results for validation. The three-dimensional results and experimental validations will also be discussed. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Research Center.

  12. Thermal Tolerance Limits of Diamondback Moth in Ramping and Plunging Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chi; Bahar, Md Habibullah; Baker, Greg; Andrew, Nigel R.

    2014-01-01

    Thermal sensitivity is a crucial determinant of insect abundance and distribution. The way it is measured can have a critical influence on the conclusions made. Diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.) (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae) is an important insect pest of cruciferous crops around the world and the thermal responses of polyphagous species are critical to understand the influences of a rapidly changing climate on their distribution and abundance. Experiments were carried out to the lethal temperature limits (ULT0 and LLT0: temperatures where there is no survival) as well as Upper and Lower Lethal Temperature (ULT25 and LLT25) (temperature where 25% DBM survived) of lab-reared adult DBM population to extreme temperatures attained by either two-way ramping (ramping temperatures from baseline to LT25 and ramping back again) or sudden plunging method. In this study the ULT0 for DBM was recorded as 42.6°C and LLT0 was recorded as −16.5°C. DBM had an ULT25 of 41.8°C and LLT25 of −15.2°C. The duration of exposure to extreme temperatures had significant impacts on survival of DBM, with extreme temperatures and/or longer durations contributing to higher lethality. Comparing the two-way ramping temperature treatment to that of direct plunging temperature treatment, our study clearly demonstrated that DBM was more tolerant to temperature in the two-way ramping assay than that of the plunging assay for cold temperatures, but at warmer temperatures survival exhibited no differences between ramping and plunging. These results suggest that DBM will not be put under physiological stress from a rapidly changing climate, rather access to host plants in marginal habitats has enabled them to expand their distribution. Two-way temperature ramping enhances survival of DBM at cold temperatures, and this needs to be examined across a range of taxa and life stages to determine if enhanced survival is widespread incorporating a ramping recovery method. PMID:24475303

  13. Water Jetting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Hi-Tech Inc., a company which manufactures water jetting equipment, needed a high pressure rotating swivel, but found that available hardware for the system was unsatisfactory. They were assisted by Marshall, which had developed water jetting technology to clean the Space Shuttles. The result was a completely automatic water jetting system which cuts rock and granite and removes concrete. Labor costs have been reduced; dust is suppressed and production has been increased.

  14. Cosmic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    The evidence that active galactic nuclei produce collimated plasma jets is summarised. The strongest radio galaxies are probably energised by relativistic plasma jets generated by spinning black holes interacting with magnetic fields attached to infalling matter. Such objects can produce e(+)-e(-) plasma, and may be relevant to the acceleration of the highest-energy cosmic ray primaries. Small-scale counterparts of the jet phenomenon within our own galaxy are briefly reviewed.

  15. Jet dynamics post drop impact on a deep pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michon, Guy-Jean; Josserand, Christophe; Séon, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    We investigate experimentally the jet formed by the collapse of a cavity created by the impact of a drop on a pool of the same aqueous liquid. We show that jets can emerge with very different shapes and velocities, depending on the impact parameters, thus generating droplets with various initial sizes and velocities. After presenting the jet velocity and top drop radius variation as a function of the impact parameters, we discuss the influence of the liquid parameters on the jet velocity. This allows us to define two different regimes: the singular jet and the cavity jet regimes, where the mechanisms leading to the cavity retraction and subsequent jet dynamics are drastically different. In particular, we demonstrate that in the first regime, a singular capillary wave collapse sparks the whole jet dynamics, making the jet's fast, thin, liquid parameters dependent and barely reproducible. On the contrary, in the cavity jet regime, defined for higher impact Froude numbers, the jets are fat and slow. We show that jet velocity is simply proportional to the capillary velocity √{γ /ρlDd }, where γ is the liquid surface tension, ρl the liquid density, and Dd the impacting drop diameter, and it is in particular independent of viscosity, impact velocity, and gravity, even though the cavity is larger than the capillary length. Finally, we demonstrate that capillary wave collapse and cavity retraction are correlated in the singular regime and decorrelated in the cavity jet regime.

  16. Sublingual-plunging ranula as a complication of supraomohyoid neck dissection.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Eva-Maria; Vasilios, Banikas; Maria, Lazaridou; Styliani, Papaemmanouil; Konstantinos, Antoniades

    2011-01-01

    Ranulas are rare cystic lesions resulting from damage or rupture of one or more of the ducts of the sublingual gland, that lead to mucus extravasation or dilatation of the gland's duct. Extravasation cysts are more common than retention cysts. We present a case of a 45-year-old male with a squamous cell carcinoma of the ventral surface of the tongue that was treated with excision of the oral lesion and bilateral supraomohyoid neck dissection without supplementary radiotherapy. A left myocutaneous platysma flap was raised for defect closure. Ten months postoperatively he presented complaining of swelling of the right submandibular region. The diagnosis, based on his medical anamnesis and the CT imaging, was a sublingual-plunging ranula. It is postulated that the ranula resulted from damage to the ducts of the sublingual gland during selective neck dissection. One year postoperatively there are no signs of recurrence either of the ranula or of the cancer. We suggest that sublingual gland excision and intraoral cyst marsupialization is a logical treatment for sublingual-plunging ranulas.

  17. Small mass plunging into a Kerr black hole: Anatomy of the inspiral-merger-ringdown waveforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taracchini, Andrea; Buonanno, Alessandra; Khanna, Gaurav; Hughes, Scott A.

    2014-10-01

    We numerically solve the Teukolsky equation in the time domain to obtain the gravitational-wave emission of a small mass inspiraling and plunging into the equatorial plane of a Kerr black hole. We account for the dissipation of orbital energy using the Teukolsky frequency-domain gravitational-wave fluxes for circular, equatorial orbits, down to the light-ring. We consider Kerr spins -0.99≤q≤0.99, and compute the inspiral-merger-ringdown (2,2), (2,1), (3,3), (3,2), (4,4), and (5,5) modes. We study the large-spin regime, and find a great simplicity in the merger waveforms, thanks to the extremely circular character of the plunging orbits. We also quantitatively examine the mixing of quasinormal modes during the ringdown, which induces complicated amplitude and frequency modulations in the waveforms. Finally, we explain how the study of small mass-ratio black-hole binaries helps extending effective-one-body models for comparable-mass, spinning black-hole binaries to any mass ratio and spin magnitude.

  18. Transitory Control of the Aerodynamic Loads on an Airfoil in Dynamic Pitch and Plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yuehan; Crittenden, Thomas; Glezer, Ari

    2016-11-01

    Transitory control and regulation of trapped vorticity concentrations are exploited in wind tunnel experiments for control of the aerodynamic loads on an airfoil moving in time-periodic 2-DOF (pitch and plunge) beyond the dynamic stall margin. Actuation is effected using a spanwise array of integrated miniature chemical (combustion based) high-impulse actuators that are triggered intermittently relative to the airfoil's motion. Each actuation pulse has sufficient control authority to alter the global aerodynamic performance throughout the motion cycle on a characteristic time scale that is an order of magnitude shorter than the airfoil's convective time scale. The effects of the actuation on the aerodynamic characteristics of the airfoil are assessed using time-dependent measurements of the lift force and pitching moment coupled with time-resolved particle image velocimetry that is acquired phased-locked to the motion of the airfoil. It is shown that the aerodynamic loads can be significantly altered using actuation programs based on multiple actuation pulses during the time-periodic pitch/plunge cycle. Superposition of such actuation programs leads to enhancement of cycle lift and pitch stability, and reduced cycle hysteresis and peak pitching moment. Supported by GT-VLRCOE.

  19. A Fast and Effective Microfluidic Spraying-Plunging Method for High-Resolution Single-Particle Cryo-EM.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiangsong; Fu, Ziao; Kaledhonkar, Sandip; Jia, Yuan; Shah, Binita; Jin, Amy; Liu, Zheng; Sun, Ming; Chen, Bo; Grassucci, Robert A; Ren, Yukun; Jiang, Hongyuan; Frank, Joachim; Lin, Qiao

    2017-03-06

    We describe a spraying-plunging method for preparing cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM) grids with vitreous ice of controllable, highly consistent thickness using a microfluidic device. The new polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based sprayer was tested with apoferritin. We demonstrate that the structure can be solved to high resolution with this method of sample preparation. Besides replacing the conventional pipetting-blotting-plunging method, one of many potential applications of the new sprayer is in time-resolved cryo-EM, as part of a PDMS-based microfluidic reaction channel to study short-lived intermediates on the timescale of 10-1,000 ms.

  20. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in spherical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Audelott, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter spherical containers in weightlessness. Complete liquid circulation flow patterns were easily established in containers that were less than half full of liquid, while for higher liquid fill conditions, vapor was drawn into the inlet of the simulated mixer unit. Increasing the liquid-jet or lowering the position at which the liquid jet entered the container caused increasing turbulence and bubble formation.

  1. Axial jet mixing of ethanol in cylindrical containers during weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted to examine the liquid flow patterns that result from the axial jet mixing of ethanol in 10-centimeter-diameter cylindrical tanks in weightlessness. A convex hemispherically ended tank and two Centaur liquid-hydrogen-tank models were used for the study. Four distinct liquid flow patterns were observed to be a function of the tank geometry, the liquid-jet velocity, the volume of liquid in the tank, and the location of the tube from which the liquid jet exited.

  2. Size of the top jet drop produced by bubble bursting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Séon, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    As a bubble bursts at a liquid-air interface, a tiny liquid jet rises and can release the so-called jet drops. In this paper the size of the top jet drop produced by a bubble bursting is investigated experimentally. We determine and discuss the first scaling law enabling the determination of the top jet drop size as a function of the corresponding mother bubble radius and the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension, and density), along with its regime of existence. Furthermore, with the aim of decoupling experimentally the effects of bubble collapse and jet dynamics on the drop detachment, we propose a scaling providing the top drop size only as a function of the jet velocity and liquid parameters. In particular, this allows us to untangle the intricate roles of viscosity, gravity, and surface tension in the end pinching of the bubble bursting jet.

  3. Jet impact on a soap film.

    PubMed

    Kirstetter, Geoffroy; Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck

    2012-09-01

    We experimentally investigate the impact of a liquid jet on a soap film. We observe that the jet never breaks the film and that two qualitatively different steady regimes may occur. The first one is a refractionlike behavior obtained at small incidence angles when the jet crosses the film and is deflected by the film-jet interaction. For larger incidence angles, the jet is absorbed by the film, giving rise to a new class of flows in which the jet undulates along the film with a characteristic wavelength. Besides its fundamental interest, this paper presents a different way to guide a micrometric flow of liquid in the inertial regime and to probe foam stability submitted to violent perturbations at the soap film scale.

  4. Bouncing Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadhwa, Navish; Vlachos, Pavlos; Jung, Sunghwan

    2011-11-01

    Contrary to common intuition, free jets of fluid can ``bounce'' off each other on collision in mid-air, through the effect of a lubricating air film that separates the jets. We have developed a simple experimental setup to stably demonstrate and study the non-coalescence of jets on collision. We present the results of an experimental investigation of oblique collision between two silicone oil jets, supported by a simple analytical explanation. Our focus is on elucidating the role of various physical forces at play such as viscous stresses, capillary force and inertia. A parametric study conducted by varying the nozzle diameter, jet velocity, angle of inclination and fluid viscosity reveals the scaling laws for the quantities involved such as contact time. We observed a transition from bouncing to coalescence with an increase in jet velocity and inclination angle. We propose that a balance between the contact time of jets and the time required for drainage of the trapped air film can provide a criterion for transition from non-coalescence to coalescence.

  5. The Penetration Behavior of an Annular Gas-Solid Jet Impinging on a Liquid Bath: The Effects of the Density and Size of Solid Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. S.; Sohn, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    Top-blow injection of a gas-solid jet through a circular lance is used in the Mitsubishi Continuous Smelting Process. One problem associated with this injection is the severe erosion of the hearth refractory below the lances. A new configuration of the lance to form an annular gas-solid jet rather than the circular jet was designed in this laboratory. With this new configuration, the solid particles fed through the center tube leave the lance at a much lower velocity than the gas, and the penetration behavior of the jet is significantly different from that with a circular lance where the solid particles leave the lance at the same high velocity as the gas. In previous cold-model investigations in this laboratory, the effects of the gas velocity, particle feed rate, lance height of the annular lance, and the cross-sectional area of the gas jet were studied and compared with the circular lance. This study examined the effect of the density and size of the solid particles on the penetration behavior of the annular gas-solid jet, which yielded some unexpected results. The variation in the penetration depth with the density of the solid particles at the same mass feed rate was opposite for the circular lance and the annular lance. In the case of the circular lance, the penetration depth became shallower as the density of the solid particles increased; on the contrary, for the annular lance, the penetration depth became deeper with the increasing density of particles. However, at the same volumetric feed rate of the particles, the density effect was small for the circular lance, but for the annular lance, the jets with higher density particles penetrated more deeply. The variation in the penetration depth with the particle diameter was also different for the circular and the annular lances. With the circular lance, the penetration depth became deeper as the particle size decreased for all the feed rates, but with the annular lance, the effect of the particle size was

  6. Self-propelled swimming of a flexible plunging foil near a solid wall.

    PubMed

    Dai, Longzhen; He, Guowei; Zhang, Xing

    2016-07-05

    Numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the influences of a solid wall on the self-propelled swimming of a flexible plunging foil. It is found that the presence of a solid wall enhances the cruising speed, with the cost of increasing input power. Rigid foil can achieve high percentage increase in cruising speed when swimming near a solid wall, but the propulsive efficiency may be reduced. Foils with some flexibility can enjoy the enhancements in both cruising speed and propulsive efficiency. Another advantage of the flexible foils in near-wall swimming is that smaller averaged lateral forces are produced. The effects of wall confinement on the wake structure and the vortex dynamics are also studied in this paper. The results obtained in this study shed some light on the unsteady wall effect experienced by aquatic animals and also inform the design of bio-mimetic underwater vehicles which are capable of exploiting the wall effect.

  7. An archival study of eyewitness memory of the Titanic's final plunge.

    PubMed

    Riniolo, Todd C; Koledin, Myriah; Drakulic, Gregory M; Payne, Robin A

    2003-01-01

    A handful of real-life studies demonstrate that most eyewitnesses accurately recall central details (i.e., the gist of what happened) from traumatic events. The authors evaluated the accuracy of archival eyewitness testimony from survivors of the Titanic disaster who witnessed the ship's final plunge. The results indicate that most eyewitness testimony (15 eyewitnesses of 20) is consistent with forensic evidence that demonstrates that the Titanic was breaking apart while it was still on the ocean's surface. Despite the methodological limitations of archival research, the authors provide evidence from a single-occurrence traumatic event (with a large-scale loss of life) that the majority of eyewitnesses accurately recall central details.

  8. Gravitational waves from a plunge into a nearly extremal Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2016-10-01

    We study numerically in the time domain the linearized gravitational waves emitted from a plunge into a nearly extremal Kerr black hole by solving the inhomogeneous Teukolsky equation. We consider spinning black holes for which the specific spin angular momentum a /M =1 -ɛ , and we consider values of ɛ ≥10-6. We find an effective transient behavior for the quasinormal ringdown: the early phase of the quasinormal ringdown is governed by a decay according to inverse time, with frequency equaling twice the black hole's horizon frequency. The smaller ɛ is, the later the transition from this transient inverse-time decay to exponential decay. Such sources, if they exist, may be interesting potential sources for terrestrial or space-borne gravitational-wave observatories.

  9. Visual accommodation and active pursuit of prey underwater in a plunge-diving bird: the Australasian gannet

    PubMed Central

    Machovsky-Capuska, Gabriel E.; Howland, Howard C.; Raubenheimer, David; Vaughn-Hirshorn, Robin; Würsig, Bernd; Hauber, Mark E.; Katzir, Gadi

    2012-01-01

    Australasian gannets (Morus serrator), like many other seabird species, locate pelagic prey from the air and perform rapid plunge dives for their capture. Prey are captured underwater either in the momentum (M) phase of the dive while descending through the water column, or the wing flapping (WF) phase while moving, using the wings for propulsion. Detection of prey from the air is clearly visually guided, but it remains unknown whether plunge diving birds also use vision in the underwater phase of the dive. Here we address the question of whether gannets are capable of visually accommodating in the transition from aerial to aquatic vision, and analyse underwater video footage for evidence that gannets use vision in the aquatic phases of hunting. Photokeratometry and infrared video photorefraction revealed that, immediately upon submergence of the head, gannet eyes accommodate and overcome the loss of greater than 45 D (dioptres) of corneal refractive power which occurs in the transition between air and water. Analyses of underwater video showed the highest prey capture rates during WF phase when gannets actively pursue individual fish, a behaviour that very likely involves visual guidance, following the transition after the plunge dive's M phase. This is to our knowledge the first demonstration of the capacity for visual accommodation underwater in a plunge diving bird while capturing submerged prey detected from the air. PMID:22874749

  10. Numerical investigation of the vertical plunging force of a spherical intruder into a prefluidized granular bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Padding, J. T.; Kuipers, J. A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The plunging of a large intruder sphere into a prefluidized granular bed with various constant velocities and various sphere diameters is investigated using a state-of-the-art hybrid discrete particle and immersed boundary method, in which both the gas-induced drag force and the contact force exerted on the intruder can be investigated separately. We investigate low velocities, where velocity dependent effects first begin to appear. The results show a concave-to-convex dependence of the plunging force as a function of intruder depth. In the concave region the force fits to a power law with an exponent around 1.3, which is in good agreement with existing experimental observations. Our simulation results further show that the force exerted on the frontal hemisphere of the intruder is dominant. At larger intruder velocities, friction with the granular medium causes a velocity-dependent drag force. As long as the granular particles have not yet closed the gap behind the intruder, this drag force is independent of the actual intruder depth. In this regime, the drag force experienced by intruders of different diameter moving at different velocities all fall onto a single master curve if plotted against the Reynolds number, using a single value for the effective viscosity of the granular medium. This master curve corresponds well to the Schiller-Naumann correlation for the drag force between a sphere and a Newtonian fluid. After the gap behind the intruder has closed, the drag force increases not only with velocity but also with depth. We attribute this to the effect of increasing hydrostatic particle pressure in the granular medium, leading to an increase in effective viscosity.

  11. Business Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Citation Jet, developed by Cessna Aircraft Company, Wichita, KS, is the first business jet to employ Langley Research Center's natural laminar flow (NLF) technology. NLF reduces drag and therefore saves fuel by using only the shape of the wing to keep the airflow smooth, or laminar. This reduces friction between the air and wing, and therefore, reduces drag. NASA's Central Industrial Applications Center, Rural Enterprises, Inc., Durant, OK, its Kansas affiliate, and Wichita State University assisted in the technology transfer.

  12. Emerging jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro; Stolarski, Daniel; Weiler, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this work, we propose a novel search strategy for new physics at the LHC that utilizes calorimeter jets that (i) are composed dominantly of displaced tracks and (ii) have many different vertices within the jet cone. Such emerging jet signatures are smoking guns for models with a composite dark sector where a parton shower in the dark sector is followed by displaced decays of dark pions back to SM jets. No current LHC searches are sensitive to this type of phenomenology. We perform a detailed simulation for a benchmark signal with two regular and two emerging jets, and present and implement strategies to suppress QCD backgrounds by up to six orders of magnitude. At the 14 TeV LHC, this signature can be probed with mediator masses as large as 1.5 TeV for a range of dark pion lifetimes, and the reach is increased further at the high-luminosity LHC. The emerging jet search is also sensitive to a broad class of long-lived phenomena, and we show this for a supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. Possibilities for discovery at LHCb are also discussed.

  13. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  14. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  15. Liquid sampling system

    DOEpatents

    Larson, Loren L.

    1987-01-01

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  16. A novel needleless liquid jet injection methodology for improving direct cardiac gene delivery: An optimization of parameters, AAV mediated therapy and investigation of host responses in ischemic heart failure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargnoli, Anthony Samuel

    Heart disease remains the leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with 22 million new patients diagnosed annually. Essentially, all present therapies have significant cost burden to the healthcare system, yet fail to increase survival rates. One key employed strategy is the genetic reprogramming of cells to increase contractility via gene therapy, which has advanced to Phase IIb Clinical Trials for advanced heart failure patients. It has been argued that the most significant barrier preventing FDA approval are resolving problems with safe, efficient myocardial delivery, whereby direct injection in the infarct and remote tissue areas is not clinically feasible. Here, we aim to: (1) Improve direct cardiac gene delivery through the development of a novel liquid jet device approach (2) Compare the new method against traditional IM injection with two different vector constructions and evaluate outcome (3) Evaluate the host response resulting from both modes of direct cardiac injection, then advance a drug/gene combination with controlled release nanoparticle formulations.

  17. Gas Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaplygin, S.

    1944-01-01

    A brief summary of the contents of this paper is presented here. In part I the differential equations of the problem of a gas flow in two dimensions is derived and the particular integrals by which the problem on jets is solved are given. Use is made of the same independent variables as Molenbroek used, but it is found to be more suitable to consider other functions. The stream function and velocity potential corresponding to the problem are given in the form of series. The investigation on the convergence of these series in connection with certain properties of the functions entering them forms the subject of part II. In part III the problem of the outflow of a gas from an infinite vessel with plane walls is solved. In part IV the impact of a gas jet on a plate is considered and the limiting case where the jet expands to infinity changing into a gas flow is taken up in more detail. This also solved the equivalent problem of the resistance of a gaseous medium to the motion of a plate. Finally, in part V, an approximate method is presented that permits a simpler solution of the problem of jet flows in the case where the velocities of the gas (velocities of the particles in the gas) are not very large.

  18. Liquid atomization in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Missoum, Azzedine

    An experimental investigation of the atomization of a round liquid jet by coaxial, costream injection into a supersonic, Mach 1.5 air flow is reported. Extensive flow visualization was conducted using schlieren/shadowgraph, flash photography, and short duration (ns) laser imaging. The finer details of the jet were revealed when viewed under high magnification with the help of a microscope. The liquid and air pressures were varied individually. Photographic evidence indicates the presence of three regions within the liquid jet: a primary region enclosed by the first shock cell where the primary breakup occurs, a secondary region in which the jet is totally broken because of its interaction with the supersonic wave structure, and a third, subsonic region further downstream. It was found that the breakup mechanism of liquid jets in supersonic airstreams is quite complex. The breakup seems to be initiated by the growth of the turbulent structure on the liquid surface and the subsequent detachment of the three-dimensional structure as fine droplets by the intense shear at the liquid-gas interface. This seems to confirm the boundary layer stripping mechanism. The liquid jet expands into a bubble like formation as it interacts with the first set of waves. Higher liquid injection pressures resulted in higher initial spray angles. The liquid jet displayed a geometry strongly dependent on the pressure distribution resulting from the wave structure present in the supersonic jet. Droplet size and velocity distributions were measured by the P/DPA (Phase/Doppler Particle Analyzer) system. The Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) was measured at several axial and radial locations at various liquid and air pressures. The SMD shows a decrease with increase in both the air-to-liquid mass flow ratio and the Weber number. The drop size decreased towards the outer edges of the jet. The results lead one to conclude that the coaxial, coflowing configuration is very attractive for atomizing

  19. Jet Propellant 8 versus Alternative Jet Fuels: A Life-Cycle Perspective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    United States imports.26 The CBTL process uses three existing technologies to convert coal and biomass into liquid fuel: gasification , FT synthesis...and carbon capture and storage. Gasification converts coal and biomass into CO and H2, a mixture commonly referred to as “syngas.” FT synthesis...com- pare petroleum-derived jet fuel (i.e., JP-8) to an alternative jet fuel derived from a coal- biomass -to-liquid (CBTL) process. The EIO- LCA

  20. Gravitational waves from a plunge into a nearly extremal Kerr black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burko, Lior M.; Khanna, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    We study numerically in the time domain the linearized gravitational waves emitted from a plunge into a nearly extremal Kerr black hole by solving the inhomogeneous Teukolsky equation in the extreme mass-ratio domain. We consider spinning black holes for which the specific spin angular momentum a / M = 1 - ɛ , and we consider values of ɛ >=10-6 . We find an effective transient behavior for the quasi-normal ringdown: the early phase of the quasi-normal ringdown is governed by a decay according to inverse time, with frequency equaling twice the black hole's horizon frequency. Our results confirm that a similar phenomenon, first found by Yang, Zimmerman, and Lehner for source-free scalar fields, occurs also for sourced gravitational waves. We find that the smaller ɛ the later the transition from this transient inverse time decay to exponential decay. Such sources, if exist, may be interesting potential sources for terrestrial or space borne gravitational wave observatories. We briefly discuss some of the observational features of such sources for gravitational-wave astronomy, extending previous results by Gralla, Hughes, and Warburton for the ``smoking gun'' features of such sources from the pre-ISCO phase of the coalescence to the ringdown phase.

  1. Pursuit plunging by northern gannets (Sula bassana) feeding on capelin (Mallotus villosus).

    PubMed Central

    Garthe, S; Benvenuti, S; Montevecchi, W A

    2000-01-01

    Northern gannets (Sula bassana) are considered to obtain prey usually by rapid, vertical, shallow plunge dives. In order to test this contention and investigate underwater foraging behaviour, we attached two types of data-logging systems to 11 parental northern gannets at Funk Island in the North-Wiest Atlantic. We documented, for the first time to the authors' knowledge, gannets performing long, flat-bottomed, U-shaped dives that involved underwater wing propulsion as well as rapid, shallow, V-shaped dives. The median and maximum dive depths and durations were 4.6 and 22.0 m and 8 and 38 s, respectively. Short, shallow dives were usually V-shaped and dives deeper than 8 m and longer than 10 s were usually U-shaped, including a period at constant depth (varying between 4 and 28s with median 8s). Diving occurred throughout the daylight period and deepest dives were performed during late morning. On the basis of motion sensors in the loggers and food collections from telemetered birds, we concluded that extended, deep dives were directed at deep schools of capelin, a small pelagic fish, and we hypothesized that V-shaped dives were aimed at larger, pelagic fishes and squids. Furthermore, these V-shaped dives allowed the birds to surprise their pelagic prey and this may be critical because the maximum swimming speeds of the prey species may exceed the maximum dive speeds of the birds. PMID:12233767

  2. Low electrical resistivity associated with plunging of the Nazca flat slab beneath Argentina.

    PubMed

    Booker, John R; Favetto, Alicia; Pomposiello, M Cristina

    2004-05-27

    Beneath much of the Andes, oceanic lithosphere descends eastward into the mantle at an angle of about 30 degrees (ref. 1). A partially molten region is thought to form in a wedge between this descending slab and the overlying continental lithosphere as volatiles given off by the slab lower the melting temperature of mantle material. This wedge is the ultimate source for magma erupted at the active volcanoes that characterize the Andean margin. But between 28 degrees and 33 degrees S the subducted Nazca plate appears to be anomalously buoyant, as it levels out at about 100 km depth and extends nearly horizontally under the continent. Above this 'flat slab', volcanic activity in the main Andean Cordillera terminated about 9 million years ago as the flattening slab presumably squeezed out the mantle wedge. But it is unknown where slab volatiles go once this happens, and why the flat slab finally rolls over to descend steeply into the mantle 600 km further eastward. Here we present results from a magnetotelluric profile in central Argentina, from which we infer enhanced electrical conductivity along the eastern side of the plunging slab, indicative of the presence of partial melt. This conductivity structure may imply that partial melting occurs to at least 250 km and perhaps to more than 400 km depth, or that melt is supplied from the 410 km discontinuity, consistent with the transition-zone 'water-filter' model of Bercovici and Karato.

  3. Volumetric measurements and simulations of the vortex structures generated by low aspect ratio plunging wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, D. E.; Wang, Z.; Gursul, I.; Visbal, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Volumetric three-component velocimetry measurements have been performed on low aspect ratio wings undergoing a small amplitude pure plunging motion. This study focuses on the vortex flows generated by rectangular and elliptical wings set to a fixed geometric angle of attack of α = 20°. An investigation into the effect of Strouhal number illustrates the highly three-dimensional nature of the leading edge vortex as well as its inherent ability to improve lift performance. Computational simulations show good agreement with experimental results, both demonstrating the complex interaction between leading, trailing, and tip vortices generated in each cycle. The leading edge vortex, in particular, may deform significantly throughout the cycle, in some cases developing strong spanwise undulations. These are at least both Strouhal number and planform dependent. One or two arch-type vortical structures may develop, depending on the aspect ratio and Strouhal number. At sufficiently high Strouhal numbers, a tip vortex ring may also develop, propelling itself away from the wing in the spanwise direction due to self-induced velocity.

  4. A computational study on effect of pitch difference in pure plunging tandem wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasani, M. R.; Nuawi, M. Z.; Mahmood, W. M. F. W.; Harun, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Flapping wing in tandem configuration may offer enhanced aerodynamic performance at low Reynolds number, in which micro air vehicles operate. The present study aims to investigate the effect of fore-hind wing pitch difference on the aerodynamic performance of tandem wings. To that end, two-dimensional, laminar flow around two thin flat airfoils that are sinusoidally plunging in phase with each other, were computationally simulated at a Reynolds number of 10000, using a flow solver in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian framework. The fore wing pitch angle was fixed to 10°, while the hind wing pitch angle was varied between -10°, 0°, 10° and 20°. Numerical results shows that aerodynamic performance of the fore wing may be affected by the hind wing pitch angle and that tandem wings may offer improved lift to drag efficiency at some optimal fore-hind wing pitch difference compared to twice the results of a similar single wing case. In addition, the complex fore-hind wing vortex interaction is also affected by the hind wing pitch angle.

  5. Near-bed hydrodynamics and turbulence below a large-scale plunging breaking wave over a mobile barred bed profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zanden, J.; van der A, D. A.; Hurther, D.; Cáceres, I.; O'Donoghue, T.; Ribberink, J. S.

    2016-08-01

    Detailed measurements are presented of velocities and turbulence under a large-scale regular plunging breaking wave in a wave flume. Measurements were obtained at 12 cross-shore locations around a mobile medium-sand breaker bar. They focused particularly on the dynamics of the wave bottom boundary layer (WBL) and near-bed turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), measured with an Acoustic Concentration and Velocity Profiler (ACVP). The breaking process and outer flow hydrodynamics are in agreement with previous laboratory and field observations of plunging waves, including a strong undertow in the bar trough region. The WBL thickness matches with previous studies at locations offshore from the bar crest, but it increases near the breaking-wave plunge point. This relates possibly to breaking-induced TKE or to the diverging flow at the shoreward slope of the bar. Outer flow TKE is dominated by wave breaking and exhibits strong spatial variation with largest TKE above the breaker bar crest. Below the plunge point, breaking-induced turbulence invades the WBL during both crest and trough half cycle. This results in an increase in the time-averaged TKE in the WBL (with a factor 3) and an increase in peak onshore and offshore near-bed Reynolds stresses (with a factor 2) from shoaling to breaking region. A fraction of locally produced TKE is advected offshore over a distance of a few meters to shoaling locations during the wave trough phase, and travels back onshore during the crest half cycle. The results imply that breaking-induced turbulence, for large-scale conditions, may significantly affect near-bed sediment transport processes.

  6. Is there a clinical benefit with a smooth compensator design compared with a plunged compensator design for passive scattered protons?

    SciTech Connect

    Tabibian, Art A.; Powers, Adam; Dolormente, Keith; Oommen, Sneha; Tiwari, Akhil; Palmer, Matt; Zhu, Xiaorong R.; Li, Heng; Sahoo, Narayan; Wisdom, Paul; Velasco, Kyle; Erhart, Kevin; Stanley, Henry; Nguyen, Bao-Ngoc T.

    2015-04-01

    In proton therapy, passive scattered proton plans use compensators to conform the dose to the distal surface of the planning volume. These devices are custom made from acrylic or wax for each treatment field using either a plunge-drilled or smooth-milled compensator design. The purpose of this study was to investigate if there is a clinical benefit of generating passive scattered proton radiation treatment plans with the smooth compensator design. We generated 4 plans with different techniques using the smooth compensators. We chose 5 sites and 5 patients for each site for the range of dosimetric effects to show adequate sample. The plans were compared and evaluated using multicriteria (MCA) plan quality metrics for plan assessment and comparison using the Quality Reports [EMR] technology by Canis Lupus LLC. The average absolute difference for dosimetric metrics from the plunged-depth plan ranged from −4.7 to +3.0 and the average absolute performance results ranged from −6.6% to +3%. The manually edited smooth compensator plan yielded the best dosimetric metric, +3.0, and performance, + 3.0% compared to the plunged-depth plan. It was also superior to the other smooth compensator plans. Our results indicate that there are multiple approaches to achieve plans with smooth compensators similar to the plunged-depth plans. The smooth compensators with manual compensator edits yielded equal or better target coverage and normal tissue (NT) doses compared with the other smooth compensator techniques. Further studies are under investigation to evaluate the robustness of the smooth compensator design.

  7. Helium jet dispersion to atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Hasna J.

    On the event of loss of vacuum guard of superinsulated helium dewar, high rate of heat transfer into the tank occurs. The rapid boiling of liquid helium causes the burst disk to rupture at four atmospheres and consequently the helium passes to the atmosphere through vent lines. The gaseous helium forms a vertical buoyant jet as it exits the vent line into a stagnant environment. Characterization of the gaseous jet is achieved by detailed analysis of the axial and radial dependence of the flow parameters.

  8. Waveforms produced by a scalar point particle plunging into a Schwarzschild black hole: Excitation of quasinormal modes and quasibound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décanini, Yves; Folacci, Antoine; Ould El Hadj, Mohamed

    2015-07-01

    With the possibility of testing massive gravity in the context of black hole physics in mind, we consider the radiation produced by a particle plunging from slightly below the innermost stable circular orbit into a Schwarzschild black hole. In order to circumvent the difficulties associated with black hole perturbation theory in massive gravity, we use a toy model in which we replace the graviton field with a massive scalar field and consider a linear coupling between the particle and this field. We compute the waveform generated by the plunging particle and study its spectral content. This permits us to highlight and interpret some important effects occurring in the plunge regime which are not present for massless fields, such as (i) the decreasing and vanishing, as the mass parameter increases, of the signal amplitude generated when the particle moves on quasicircular orbits near the innermost stable circular orbit; and (ii) in addition to the excitation of the quasinormal modes, the excitation of the quasibound states of the black hole.

  9. Investigation of the Plunging Pressure Pulsation in a Swirling Flow with Precessing Vortex Rope in a Straight Diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntean, S.; Tănasă, C.; Bosioc, A. I.; Moş, D. C.

    2016-11-01

    The paper investigates an unexpected feature of the unsteady pressure field resulting from the self-induced instability of the decelerated swirling flow in a straight diffuser. Firstly, the self-induced instability is experimentally investigated on the swirl generator test rig. As a result, the asynchronous (rotating) pressure pulsation associated with the rotating vortex rope of 15 Hz and it second harmonic are discriminated. Also, a low frequency synchronous (plunging) pulsation around of 2.5 Hz is identified based on unsteady pressure field measured at the wall and LDV measurement of the velocity components in the flow. The low frequency plunging pressure fluctuations is superimposed on the rotating pressure pulsations associated with the vortex rope. The numerical simulations are performed to explore the vortex rope dynamics. The numerical results are compared against experimental data to assess the accuracy of the models. Next, the pressure pulsation dynamics is correlated with the time evolution of the vortex rope. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis of the vortex rope evolution in time is that the cycle with low frequency is responsible for the plunging (synchronous) pressure fluctuations superimposed over the rotating (asynchronous) pressure field associated with the precession of the vortex rope.

  10. Experimental study of elliptical jet from sub to supercritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Muthukumaran, C. K.; Vaidyanathan, Aravind

    2014-04-15

    The jet mixing at supercritical conditions involves fluid dynamics as well as thermodynamic phenomena. All the jet mixing studies at critical conditions to the present date have focused only on axisymmetric jets. When the liquid jet is injected into supercritical environment, the thermodynamic transition could be well understood by considering one of the important fluid properties such as surface tension since it decides the existence of distinct boundary between the liquid and gaseous phase. It is well known that an elliptical liquid jet undergoes axis-switching phenomena under atmospheric conditions due to the presence of surface tension. The experimental investigations were carried out with low speed elliptical jet under supercritical condition. Investigation of the binary component system with fluoroketone jet and N{sub 2} gas as environment shows that the surface tension force dominates for a large downstream distance, indicating delayed thermodynamic transition. The increase in pressure to critical state at supercritical temperature is found to expedite the thermodynamic transition. The ligament like structures has been observed rather than droplets for supercritical pressures. However, for the single component system with fluoroketone jet and fluoroketone environment shows that the jet disintegrates into droplets as it is subjected to the chamber conditions even for the subcritical pressures and no axis switching phenomenon is observed. For a single component system, as the pressure is increased to critical state, the liquid jet exhibits gas-gas like mixing behavior and that too without exhibiting axis-switching behavior.

  11. Direct patterning using aerodynamically assisted electrohydrodynamic jet printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Sangyeon; Seong, Baekhoon; Lee, Wonyoung; Byun, Doyoung

    2014-11-01

    Electrical force and aerodynamic force are considered to be preferred sources for generating a liquid jet to emit the target fluid on a tiny scale. The former is known as an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet, while the latter is called flow focusing. Here, we report the effect of a combined energy source on the micro scale jet and patterns and investigate the scaling law of pattern width according to the ratio of two energy sources. In a conventional EHD jet, after a short length of straight section the charged viscous jet turns into complex shape which occurs difficulty in patterning fine lines. A coaxially driven gas stream smoothed the asymmetric jet lengthening the straight section of the jet. The jet could be issued constantly within the range that did not exceed the stable region in the parametric space. Under such stable conditions, the jet became narrow as compared to the one from the normal EHD jet. Hence, the patterns formed at a high gas pressure were noticeably smaller than the others, demonstrating the controllability of jet thickness. Various liquids had been used as the target fluids to investigate the effect of liquid properties. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) (Grand Number: 2014-023284.

  12. AC electrified jets in a flow-focusing device: Jet length scaling.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Elena; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Alzaga-Gimeno, Javier; Tan, Say Hwa; Baret, Jean-Christophe; Ramos, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We use a microfluidic flow-focusing device with integrated electrodes for controlling the production of water-in-oil drops. In a previous work, we reported that very long jets can be formed upon application of AC fields. We now study in detail the appearance of the long jets as a function of the electrical parameters, i.e., water conductivity, signal frequency, and voltage amplitude. For intermediate frequencies, we find a threshold voltage above which the jet length rapidly increases. Interestingly, this abrupt transition vanishes for high frequencies of the signal and the jet length grows smoothly with voltage. For frequencies below a threshold value, we previously reported a transition from a well-behaved uniform jet to highly unstable liquid structures in which axisymmetry is lost rather abruptly. These liquid filaments eventually break into droplets of different sizes. In this work, we characterize this transition with a diagram as a function of voltage and liquid conductivity. The electrical response of the long jets was studied via a distributed element circuit model. The model allows us to estimate the electric potential at the tip of the jet revealing that, for any combination of the electrical parameters, the breakup of the jet occurs at a critical value of this potential. We show that this voltage is around 550 V for our device geometry and choice of flow rates.

  13. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop Hα macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Å snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T ~ 104 - 105 K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  14. Dichotomy of Solar Coronal Jets: Standard Jets and Blowout Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. L.; Cirtain, J. W.; Sterling, A. C.; Falconer, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/XRT coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H alpha macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major CMEs. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 Angstrom snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 5) K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  15. DICHOTOMY OF SOLAR CORONAL JETS: STANDARD JETS AND BLOWOUT JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; Sterling, Alphonse C.; Falconer, David A.

    2010-09-01

    By examining many X-ray jets in Hinode/X-Ray Telescope coronal X-ray movies of the polar coronal holes, we found that there is a dichotomy of polar X-ray jets. About two thirds fit the standard reconnection picture for coronal jets, and about one third are another type. We present observations indicating that the non-standard jets are counterparts of erupting-loop H{alpha} macrospicules, jets in which the jet-base magnetic arch undergoes a miniature version of the blowout eruptions that produce major coronal mass ejections. From the coronal X-ray movies we present in detail two typical standard X-ray jets and two typical blowout X-ray jets that were also caught in He II 304 A snapshots from STEREO/EUVI. The distinguishing features of blowout X-ray jets are (1) X-ray brightening inside the base arch in addition to the outside bright point that standard jets have, (2) blowout eruption of the base arch's core field, often carrying a filament of cool (T {approx} 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} K) plasma, and (3) an extra jet-spire strand rooted close to the bright point. We present cartoons showing how reconnection during blowout eruption of the base arch could produce the observed features of blowout X-ray jets. We infer that (1) the standard-jet/blowout-jet dichotomy of coronal jets results from the dichotomy of base arches that do not have and base arches that do have enough shear and twist to erupt open, and (2) there is a large class of spicules that are standard jets and a comparably large class of spicules that are blowout jets.

  16. Molecular Beam Studies of Volatile Liquids and Fuel Surrogates Using Liquid Microjets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-18

    wide range of high-vapor pressure liquids, including octane , isooctane, dodecane, squalane, methylnaphthalene, ethylene glycol, and Jet A and JP-8 fuels...technique and its application to helium evaporation from octane , isooctane, dodecane, squalane, 1-methylnapthalene, Jet A, and JP-8. We first...the jet into droplets as they minimize their surface area, and the number of collisions that occur within the vapor cloud surrounding the liquid jet

  17. SOFT X-RAY TEMPERATURE TIDAL DISRUPTION EVENTS FROM STARS ON DEEP PLUNGING ORBITS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Lixin; McKinney, Jonathan C.; Miller, M. Coleman

    2015-10-20

    One of the puzzles associated with tidal disruption event candidates (TDEs) is that there is a dichotomy between the color temperatures of a few × 10{sup 4} K for TDEs discovered with optical and UV telescopes and the color temperatures of a few × 10{sup 5}–10{sup 6} K for TDEs discovered with X-ray satellites. Here, we propose that high-temperature TDEs are produced when the tidal debris of a disrupted star self-intersects relatively close to the supermassive black hole, in contrast to the more distant self-intersection that leads to lower color temperatures. In particular, we note from simple ballistic considerations that greater apsidal precession in an orbit is the key to closer self-intersection. Thus, larger values of β, the ratio of the tidal radius to the pericenter distance of the initial orbit, are more likely to lead to higher temperatures of more compact disks that are super-Eddington and geometrically and optically thick. For a given star and β, apsidal precession also increases for larger black hole masses, but larger black hole masses imply a lower temperature at the Eddington luminosity. Thus, the expected dependence of the temperature on the mass of the black hole is non-monotonic. We find that in order to produce a soft X-ray temperature TDE, a deep plunging stellar orbit with β > 3 is needed and a black hole mass of ≲5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} is favored. Although observations of TDEs are comparatively scarce and are likely dominated by selection effects, it is encouraging that both expectations are consistent with current data.

  18. Unsteady Aerodynamic Testing Using the Dynamic Plunge Pitch and Roll Model Mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutze, Frederick H.; Fan, Yigang

    1999-01-01

    A final report on the DyPPiR tests that were run are presented. Essentially it consists of two parts, a description of the data reduction techniques and the results. The data reduction techniques include three methods that were considered: 1) signal processing of wind on - wind off data; 2) using wind on data in conjunction with accelerometer measurements; and 3) using a dynamic model of the sting to predict the sting oscillations and determining the aerodynamic inputs using an optimization process. After trying all three, we ended up using method 1, mainly because of its simplicity and our confidence in its accuracy. The results section consists of time history plots of the input variables (angle of attack, roll angle, and/or plunge position) and the corresponding time histories of the output variables, C(sub L), C(sub D), C(sub m), C(sub l), C(sub m), C(sub n). Also included are some phase plots of one or more of the output variable vs. an input variable. Typically of interest are pitch moment coefficient vs. angle of attack for an oscillatory motion where the hysteresis loops can be observed. These plots are useful to determine the "more interesting" cases. Samples of the data as it appears on the disk are presented at the end of the report. The last maneuver, a rolling pull up, is indicative of the unique capabilities of the DyPPiR, allowing combinations of motions to be exercised at the same time.

  19. The effect of turbulence on the stability of liquid jets and the resulting droplet size distributions. Fourth quarterly technical report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, A.; Chigier, N.

    1993-12-31

    In this progress report the authors report on progress in making experimental measurements to describe the rheological properties of non-Newtonian fluids. Non-Newtonian liquids exhibit a non linear relationship between the shear stress and the shear rate. A typical time-dependent rheological phenomenon is thixotropy. Thixotropic fluids show a limited decrease in the shear viscosity of the fluid with time under a suddenly applied constant stress. Thixotropic fluids also show a hysteresis loop and a decaying stress on the shear stress-shear rate plot. Here the authors are using a power law model to describe the behavior of such non-Newtonian liquids.

  20. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) stimulation of jet breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowley, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) excitation of liquid jets offers an alternative to piezoelectric excitation without the complex frequency response caused by piezoelectric and mechanical resonances. In an EHD exciter, an electrode near the nozzle applies an alternating Coulomb force to the jet surface, generating a disturbance which grows until a drop breaks off downstream. This interaction is modelled quite well by a linear, long wave model of the jet together with a cylindrical electric field. The breakup length, measured on a 33 micrometer jet, agrees quite well with that predicted by the theory, and increases with the square of the applied voltage, as expected. In addition, the frequency response is very smooth, with pronounced nulls occurring only at frequencies related to the time which the jet spends inside the exciter.

  1. Coalescing binary systems of compact objects to (post)5/2-Newtonian order. III. Transition from inspiral to plunge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidder, Lawrence E.; Will, Clifford M.; Wiseman, Alan G.

    1993-04-01

    Late in its evolution, a binary system of compact objects will undergo a transition from an adiabatic inspiral induced by gravitational radiation damping to an unstable plunge, induced by strong spacetime curvature. This transition from inspiral to plunge is studied in detail using higher-order post-Newtonian methods. First, we study the innermost stable circular orbits of binary systems of nonrotating, compact objects of arbitrary mass ratio in the absence of gravitational radiation reaction. The method uses ``hybrid'' two-body equations of motion that are valid through (post)2-Newtonian order [order (Gm/rc2)2 ], but that also include the test-body limit in the Schwarzschild geometry exactly. Using a critical-point analysis, we show that circular orbits inside this innermost orbit are unstable to plunge. The separation of the innermost stable orbit (in harmonic, or de Donder coordinates) is found to vary with mass ratio, from the test-body value of 5m to about 6m for equal masses, where m is the total mass of the system. The orbital energy, angular momentum, and frequency of the innermost stable orbit are also determined as a function of the ratio of the two masses. We study the sensitivity of these values to higher-order post-Newtonian corrections. Incorporating gravitational radiation reaction in the hybrid equations of motion, we evaluate such variables as radial velocity, angular velocity, energy, and angular momentum for a coalescing binary at the corresponding innermost stable orbit, as a function of mass ratio. These variables could be used as initial conditions for numerical calculations of the ensuing coalescence.

  2. Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning: Project Kaleidoscope-Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges Conference for Science Educators.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    College and university science educators from across Connecticut gathered at Yale's West Campus in April 2010 for a Project Kaleidoscope (PKAL) program entitled "Taking the Plunge: Next Steps in Engaged Learning." Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and co-sponsored by the Connecticut Conference of Independent Colleges (CCIC) and Yale's McDougal Graduate Teaching Center, the event was the latest in a PKAL series of one-day conferences aimed at equipping science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) instructors with effective approaches to engaging students and training future scientists.

  3. Inclusive Jets in PHP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roloff, P.

    Differential inclusive-jet cross sections have been measured in photoproduction for boson virtualities Q^2 < 1 GeV^2 with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 300 pb^-1. Jets were identified in the laboratory frame using the k_T, anti-k_T or SIScone jet algorithms. Cross sections are presented as functions of the jet pseudorapidity, eta(jet), and the jet transverse energy, E_T(jet). Next-to-leading-order QCD calculations give a good description of the measurements, except for jets with low E_T(jet) and high eta(jet). The cross sections have the potential to improve the determination of the PDFs in future QCD fits. Values of alpha_s(M_Z) have been extracted from the measurements based on different jet algorithms. In addition, the energy-scale dependence of the strong coupling was determined.

  4. Experimental study on flow kinematics and impact pressure in liquid sloshing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Youn Kyung; Chang, Kuang-An; Ryu, Yonguk; Kwon, Sun Hong

    2013-09-01

    This paper experimentally studied flow kinematics and impact pressure of a partially filled liquid sloshing flow produced by the periodic motion of a rectangular tank. The study focused on quantifying the flow velocities and impact pressures induced by the flow. Filled with water at a 30 % filling ratio, the tank oscillated at a resonant frequency and generated the violent sloshing flow. The flow propagated like breaking waves that plunged on both side walls and formed up-rushing jets that impacted on the top wall. Velocities of the multiphase flow were measured using the bubble image velocimetry technique. A total of 15 pressure sensors were mounted on the top wall and a side wall to measure the impact pressures. The local kinetic energy obtained by the measured local velocities was used to correlate with the corresponding pressures and determine the impact coefficient. In the sloshing flow, the flow direction was dominantly horizontal in the same direction of the tank motion before the wave crest broke and impinged on a side wall. At this stage, the maximum flow velocities reached 1.6 C with C being the wave phase speed. After the wave impingement, the uprising jet moved in the vertical direction with a maximum velocity reached 3.6 C before it impacted on the top wall. It was observed that the impact coefficients differed by almost one order of magnitude between the side wall impact and the top wall impact, mainly due to the large difference between the local velocities. A nearly constant impact coefficient was found for both side wall and top wall impacts if the impact pressures were directly correlated with the flow kinetic energy calculated using C instead of the local velocities.

  5. Characterization of an impinging jet into porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cong; Alhani, Salwan; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-11-01

    In this work, characteristic behavior of a liquid jet into porous hydrophobic / hydrophilic particle media is investigated. In porous media, the capillary effect becomes significant, especially when the jet Reynolds Number is low. To analyze the cavity creation phenomena, the effect of jet's diameter, speed and acceleration as well as particles' size are carefully studied. Such knowledge of fluid behavior will provide guidance for medicine injection process. This work is supported by Caltech GALCIT STEM program.

  6. Corporate Jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, Savannah, GA, used a version of a NASA program called WIBCO to design a wing for the Gulfstream IV (G-IV) which will help to reduce transonic drag (created by shock waves that develop as an airplane approaches the speed of sound). The G-IV cruises at 88 percent of the speed of sound, and holds the international record in its class for round-the-world flight. They also used the STANS5 and Profile programs in the design. They will use the NASA program GASP to help determine the gross weight, range, speed, payload and optimum wing area of an intercontinental supersonic business jet being developed in cooperation with Sukhoi Design Bureau, a Soviet organization.

  7. Jet inclusive cross sections

    SciTech Connect

    Del Duca, V.

    1992-11-01

    Minijet production in jet inclusive cross sections at hadron colliders, with large rapidity intervals between the tagged jets, is evaluated by using the BFKL pomeron. We describe the jet inclusive cross section for an arbitrary number of tagged jets, and show that it behaves like a system of coupled pomerons.

  8. [Development of a novel liquid injection system].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai; Lv, Yong-Gui

    2009-11-01

    A liquid jet injector employs compressed gas or spring to produce a high-velocity stream to deliver liquid drug into human body through skin. There are many clinical jet injection products available, none of which is domestic. A new liquid jet injector is designed based on a comprehensive analysis of the current products. The injector consists of an ejector, trigger and a re-positioning mechanism. The jets characteristics of sample injector are tested, and the results show that the maximum exit pressure is above 15 MPa, a threshold value for penetrating into the skin.

  9. General review of flashing jet studies.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Geanette; Holdø, Arne Erik; Munday, George

    2010-01-15

    The major concern on the management of superheated liquids, in industrial environments, is the large potential hazards involved in cases of any accidental release. There is a possibility that a violent phase change could take place inside the fluid released generating a flashing jet. This violent phase change might produce catastrophic consequences, such as explosions, fires or toxic exposure, in the installations and in the surroundings. The knowledge and understanding of the mechanisms involved in those releases become an important issue in the prevention of these consequences and the minimization of their impact. This work presents a comprehensive review of information about flashing processes. The review begins with a description of the single phase jet followed by a description of the two-phase flashing jet. The concepts and implications of the thermodynamic and mechanical effects on the behaviour of the jets are considered at the beginning of the review. Following the review is devoted to the classification of the different study approaches used to understand flashing processes in the past, highlighting various critical parameters on the behaviour and the hazard consequences of flashing jets. The review also contains an extensive compilation of experimental, theoretical and numerical data relating to these phenomena, which includes information on the distinct characteristics of the jet, since type of jet, velocity distribution, expansion angle and mass phase change all require individual estimation.

  10. Project HyBuJET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Tom; Collet, Bill; Igar, Karyn; Kendall, Dewayne; Miklosovic, Dave; Reuss, Robyn; Ringer, Mark; Scheidt, Tony

    1990-01-01

    A conceptual Hypersonic Business Jet (HyBuJet) was examined. The main areas of concentration include: aerodynamics, propulsion, stability and control, mission profile, and atmospheric heating. In order to optimize for cruise conditions, a waverider configuration was chosen for the high lift drag ratio and low wave drag. The leading edge and lower surface of a waverider was mapped out from a known flow field and optimized for cruising at Mach 6 and at high altitudes. The shockwave generated by a waverider remains attached along the entire leading edge, allowing for a larger compression along the lower surface. Three turbofan ramjets were chosen as the propulsion of the aircraft due to the combination of good subsonic performance along with high speed propulsive capabilities. A combination of liquid silicon convective cooling for the leading edges with a highly radiative outer skin material was chosen to reduce the atmospheric heating to acceptable level.

  11. Jet fuels from synthetic crudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antoine, A. C.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the technical problems in the conversion of a significant portion of a barrel of either a shale oil or a coal synthetic crude oil into a suitable aviation turbine fuel. Three syncrudes were used, one from shale and two from coal, chosen as representative of typical crudes from future commercial production. The material was used to produce jet fuels of varying specifications by distillation, hydrotreating, and hydrocracking. Attention is given to process requirements, hydrotreating process conditions, the methods used to analyze the final products, the conditions for shale oil processing, and the coal liquid processing conditions. The results of the investigation show that jet fuels of defined specifications can be made from oil shale and coal syncrudes using readily available commercial processes.

  12. Understanding jet noise.

    PubMed

    Karabasov, S A

    2010-08-13

    Jets are one of the most fascinating topics in fluid mechanics. For aeronautics, turbulent jet-noise modelling is particularly challenging, not only because of the poor understanding of high Reynolds number turbulence, but also because of the extremely low acoustic efficiency of high-speed jets. Turbulent jet-noise models starting from the classical Lighthill acoustic analogy to state-of-the art models were considered. No attempt was made to present any complete overview of jet-noise theories. Instead, the aim was to emphasize the importance of sound generation and mean-flow propagation effects, as well as their interference, for the understanding and prediction of jet noise.

  13. Coaxial atomizer liquid intact lengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eroglu, Hasan; Chigier, Norman; Farago, Zoltan

    1991-01-01

    Average intact lengths of round liquid jets generated by airblast coaxial atomizer were measured from over 1500 photographs. The intact lengths were studied over a jet Reynolds number range of 18,000 and Weber number range of 260. Results are presented for two different nozzle geometries. The intact lengths were found to be strongly dependent on Re and We numbers. An empirical equation was derived as a function of these parameters. A comparison of the intact lengths for round jets and flat sheets shows that round jets generate shorter intact lengths.

  14. Control of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreck, Stefan

    1993-01-01

    This reports describes experiments conducted at the High-Speed Jet Facility at the University of Southern California on supersonic jets. The goal of the study was to develop methods for controlling the noise emitted from supersonic jets by passive and/or active means. Work by Seiner et al (1991) indicates that eddy Mach wave radiation is the dominant noise source in a heated high speed jet. Eddy Mach radiation is caused by turbulent eddies traveling at supersonic speed in the shear layer of the jet. The convection velocity of the eddies decays with increasing distance from the nozzle exit due to the mixing of the jet stream with the ambient fluid. Once the convection speed reaches subsonic velocities, eddy Mach wave radiation ceases. To control noise, a rapid decay of the convection velocity is desired. This may be accomplished by enhanced mixing in the jet. In this study, small aspect ratio rectangular jet nozzles were tested. A flapping mode was noticed in the jets. By amplifying screech components of the jets and destabilizing the jet columns with a collar device, the flapping mode was excited. The result was a rapid decay of the jet velocity. A reduction in eddy Mach radiation in rectangular supersonic jets may be achieved with this device.

  15. Intracystic injection of pingyangmycin (PYM) might be a more favorable option for treatment of oral and plunging ranulas.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiu-juan; Zheng, Jia-wei; Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Shan-yong; Yang, Chi

    2010-08-01

    Ranulas are mucoceles that develop as a result of mucous extravasation from the sublingual gland and typically present in the floor of mouth. The treatment of ranulas are various, mainly including surgical and nonsurgical methods. The preferred treatment of oral and plunging ranulas is still uncertain. According to the complications associated with surgical therapy, nonsurgical sclerotherapy has been advocated by clinicians for its advantages of less injury, no scar, less suffering, etc. Recently, it was reported that OK-432 was a relatively effective sclerosing agent for both lymphatic malformations and ranulas, although it has a high rate of recurrence after treating ranulas. Pingyangmycin is another reported conventional sclerosing agent for lymphatic malformations. Herein, we hypothesize that intracystic injection of pingyangmycin may be an optimal method for the treatment of ranulas.

  16. Continuous-wave laser generated jets for needle free applications

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Claas Willem; Schlautmann, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We designed and built a microfluidic device for the generation of liquid jets produced by thermocavitation. A continuous wave (CW) laser was focused inside a micro-chamber filled with a light-absorbing solution to create a rapidly expanding vapor bubble. The chamber is connected to a micro-channel which focuses and ejects the liquid jet through the exit. The bubble growth and the jet velocity were measured as a function of the devices geometry (channel diameter D and chamber width A). The fastest jets were those for relatively large chamber size with respect to the channel diameter. Elongated and focused jets up to 29 m/s for a channel diameter of 250 μm and chamber size of 700 μm were obtained. The proposed CW laser-based device is potentially a compact option for a practical and commercially feasible needle-free injector. PMID:26858816

  17. Thermal visualization of heat-transfer characteristics for single impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Liguo; Zhu, Yun; Zhang, Jingzhou; Yu, Wei

    The local heat-transfer characteristics of an impingement-cooling jet are presently ascertained, for cases with and without crossflow, through the use of a combined metal heating-element and cholesteric liquid crystal system. The results obtained indicate that the impingement Nusselt numbers of double-peak values increase with rising jet Reynolds number. A moving cylindrical jet-source model is used to simulate and analyze the jet's impingement heat transfer.

  18. Plunging Ranulas Revisited: A CT Study with Emphasis on a Defect of the Mylohyoid Muscle as the Primary Route of Lesion Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Young; Lee, Hee Young; Jeong, Han Sin; Kim, Yi-Kyung; Cha, Jihoon; Kim, Sung Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to clarify the pathogenesis of plunging ranulas in regard of the pathway of lesion propagation using CT scans. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed CT scans of 41 patients with plunging ranula. We divided plunging ranulas into two types: type 1 was defined as those directly passing through a defect of the mylohyoid muscle with the presence (type 1A) or absence (type 1B) of the tail sign and type 2 as those through the traditional posterior route along the free edge of the mylohyoid muscle. Images were also analyzed for the extent of the lesion in respect to the spaces involved. As for type 1 lesions, we recorded the location of the defect of the mylohyoid muscle and the position of the sublingual gland in relation to the defect. Results CT scans demonstrated type 1 lesion in 36 (88%), including type 1A in 14 and type 1B in 22, and type 2 lesion in 5 (12%). Irrespective of the type, the submandibular space was seen to be involved in all cases either alone or in combination with one or more adjacent spaces. Of the 36 patients with type 1 lesions, the anterior one-third was the most common location of the defect of the mylohyoid muscle, seen in 22 patients. The sublingual gland partially herniated in 30 patients. Conclusion Our results suggest that the majority of plunging ranulas take an anterior shortcut through a defect of the mylohyoid muscle. PMID:26957912

  19. Theoretical prediction of the effect of heat transfer parameters on cooling rates of liquid-filled plastic straws used for cryopreservation of spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sansinen, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Baez, R; Chirife, J

    2010-01-01

    Heat transfer plays a key role in cryopreservation of liquid semen in plastic straws. The effect of several parameters on the cooling rate of a liquid-filled polypropylene straw when plunged into liquid nitrogen was investigated using a theoretical model. The geometry of the straw containing the liquid was assimilated as two concentric finite cylinders of different materials: the fluid and the straw; the unsteady-state heat conduction equation for concentric cylinders was numerically solved. Parameters studied include external (convection) heat transfer coefficient (h), the thermal properties of straw manufacturing material and wall thickness. It was concluded that the single most important parameter affecting the cooling rate of a liquid column contained in a straw is the external heat transfer coefficient in LN2. Consequently, in order to attain maximum cooling rates, conditions have to be designed to obtain the highest possible heat transfer coefficient when the plastic straw is plunged in liquid nitrogen.

  20. Risk factors of jet fuel combustion products.

    PubMed

    Tesseraux, Irene

    2004-04-01

    Air travel is increasing and airports are being newly built or enlarged. Concern is rising about the exposure to toxic combustion products in the population living in the vicinity of large airports. Jet fuels are well characterized regarding their physical and chemical properties. Health effects of fuel vapors and liquid fuel are described after occupational exposure and in animal studies. Rather less is known about combustion products of jet fuels and exposure to those. Aircraft emissions vary with the engine type, the engine load and the fuel. Among jet aircrafts there are differences between civil and military jet engines and their fuels. Combustion of jet fuel results in CO2, H2O, CO, C, NOx, particles and a great number of organic compounds. Among the emitted hydrocarbons (HCs), no compound (indicator) characteristic for jet engines could be detected so far. Jet engines do not seem to be a source of halogenated compounds or heavy metals. They contain, however, various toxicologically relevant compounds including carcinogenic substances. A comparison between organic compounds in the emissions of jet engines and diesel vehicle engines revealed no major differences in the composition. Risk factors of jet engine fuel exhaust can only be named in context of exposure data. Using available monitoring data, the possibilities and limitations for a risk assessment approach for the population living around large airports are presented. The analysis of such data shows that there is an impact on the air quality of the adjacent communities, but this impact does not result in levels higher than those in a typical urban environment.

  1. Glottal jet inertance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mphail, Michael; Krane, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Estimates of an inertive contribution of the glottal jet to glottal aerodynamic resistance is presented. Given that inertance of the flow in a constriction can be expressed in terms of the kinetic energy of the flow, and that a jet is a maximum kinetic energy flow pattern, it is argued that the glottal jet possesses its own inertance which is at least as large as that of the vocal tract. These arguments are supported by estimates of inertance obtained from simulations of an unsteady flow through an axisymmetric orifice, and of a compliant constriction with the approximate shape and mechanical properties of the vocal folds. It is further shown that the inertive effect of the glottal jet depends on the jet path and jet mixing, with a slowly diffusing, symmetric jet showing higher inertance than an asymmetric jet which rapidly mixes with supraglottal air. Acknowledge support of NIH Grant 2R01DC005642-10A1.

  2. Laser ablation of liquid surface in air induced by laser irradiation through liquid medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Yuji; Kajiwara, Takashi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito; Kubota, Shiro; Nakahara, Motonao

    2010-10-01

    The pulse laser ablation of a liquid surface in air when induced by laser irradiation through a liquid medium has been experimentally investigated. A supersonic liquid jet is observed at the liquid-air interface. The liquid surface layer is driven by a plasma plume that is produced by laser ablation at the layer, resulting in a liquid jet. This phenomenon occurs only when an Nd:YAG laser pulse (wavelength: 1064 nm) is focused from the liquid onto air at a low fluence of 20 J/cm2. In this case, as Fresnel’s law shows, the incident and reflected electric fields near the liquid surface layer are superposed constructively. In contrast, when the incident laser is focused from air onto the liquid, a liquid jet is produced only at an extremely high fluence, several times larger than that in the former case. The similarities and differences in the liquid jets and atomization processes are studied for several liquid samples, including water, ethanol, and vacuum oil. The laser ablation of the liquid surface is found to depend on the incident laser energy and laser fluence. A pulse laser light source and high-resolution film are required to observe the detailed structure of a liquid jet.

  3. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    PubMed

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  4. Fountain-Jet Turbulence.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    and 3 times higher than expected from free- jet results. Hill et al., (Reference 6) in work with foun- tain jets impacting fuselage models, detected ...delineate the origins of the turbulent anomalies associated with fountain jets by extending the previous studies. The results are presented herein...jet velocities were detected with a Thermal Systems Inc. Model 1050 dual-channel constant-temperature anemometer equipped with a Thermal Systems Inc

  5. Observation of Birefringence of an Electrospinning Jet in Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kaiyi; Reneker, Darrell

    2013-03-01

    Solutions of polystyrene in N,N-dimethylformamide, polyacrylonitrile in N,N-dimethylformamide, and polyethylene oxide in water were electrospun. The charged liquid jets in flight were illuminated with polarized light converged on the jets by a Fresnel lens with a black background at the center, and were observed using a high speed camera, coaxial with the Fresnel lens, behind an analyzer which was crossed with a polarizer in front of the light source. The first several turns of coiled jet after the onset of electrical bending instability showed birefringence for all solutions, while no obvious birefringence was observed in the straight segments of the jets. This indicated that molecular chains in the coiled jet were aligned under elongation to a higher extent than those in the thicker straight jet.

  6. Large bouncing jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardin, Karl; Weislogel, Mark

    2016-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the phenomena of large jet rebound (bounce), a mode of fluid transfer following oblique jet impacts on hydrophobic surfaces. We initially seek to describe the regimes of such jet bounce in tests conducted in the weightless environment of a drop tower. A parametric study reveals the dependence of the rebound mode on the relevant dimensionless groups such as Weber number We⊥ defined on the velocity component perpendicular to the surface. We show that significantly larger diameter jets behave similarly as much smaller jets demonstrated during previous terrestrial investigations when We⊥ 1 . For We⊥ > 1 , large jet impacts create fishbone-like structures. We also explore rebounds from nonplanar substrates. Improving our understanding of such jet rebound opens avenues for unique transport capabilities. NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX12A047A.

  7. Hydroacoustic pulsating jet generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unrau, A.; Meier, G. E. A.

    1987-04-01

    A high pressure turbulent jet generator connected to a low pressure hydraulic tube is studied to investigate water hammer in tubes with fast flow variations, generating high pressure pulsating water jets. The pulsating jet generator consists of a tube, a hydraulic valve, a spring, and a water container. The jet is the effect of the combination of turbulent pipe flow with a valve for flow nozzle. The jet pressure depends on specific oscillation impedance and flow velocity variations. For inlet pressure of 0.5 to 2 bar the pressure rises to 40 bar. The described pulsating jet generator is more effective than the earlier model. A piezoelectric pressure controller is used to register pressure signals and high speed photos are made of the jet. Test results are consistent with theoretical calculation.

  8. Fluid jet electric discharge source

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Howard A.

    2006-04-25

    A fluid jet or filament source and a pair of coaxial high voltage electrodes, in combination, comprise an electrical discharge system to produce radiation and, in particular, EUV radiation. The fluid jet source is composed of at least two serially connected reservoirs, a first reservoir into which a fluid, that can be either a liquid or a gas, can be fed at some pressure higher than atmospheric and a second reservoir maintained at a lower pressure than the first. The fluid is allowed to expand through an aperture into a high vacuum region between a pair of coaxial electrodes. This second expansion produces a narrow well-directed fluid jet whose size is dependent on the size and configuration of the apertures and the pressure used in the reservoir. At some time during the flow of the fluid filament, a high voltage pulse is applied to the electrodes to excite the fluid to form a plasma which provides the desired radiation; the wavelength of the radiation being determined by the composition of the fluid.

  9. On plane submerged laminar jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, Wilfried; Sanchez, Antonio L.

    2016-11-01

    We address the laminar flow generated when a developed stream of liquid of kinematic viscosity ν flowing along channel of width 2 h discharges into an open space bounded by two symmetric plane walls departing from the channel rim with an angle α 1 . Attention is focused on values of the jet volume flux 2 Q such that the associated Reynolds number Re = Qh / ν is of order unity. The formulation requires specification of the boundary conditions far from the channel exit. If the flow is driven by the volume flux, then the far-field solution corresponds to Jeffery-Hamel self-similar flow. However, as noted by Fraenkel (1962), such solutions exist only for α <129o in a limited range of Reynolds numbers 0 <=Re <=Rec (α) (e.g. Rec = 1 . 43 for α = π / 2). It is reasoned that an alternative solution, driven by a fraction of the momentum flux of the feed stream, may also exist for all values of Re and α, including a near-centerline Bickley jet, a surrounding Taylor potential flow driven by the jet entrainment, and a Falkner-Skan near-wall boundary layer. Numerical integrations of the Navier-Stokes equations are used to ascertain the existence of these different solutions.

  10. Deformation of a Thin Film by a Wall Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammoud, Naima; Al-Housseiny, Talal; Stone, Howard

    2012-11-01

    A variety of industrial processes such as jet stripping or jet wiping involve a high speed stream of gas flowing over a liquid film. In this work, we model this kind of situation by considering a thin viscous liquid film, over which a high Reynolds number laminar wall jet (or Glauert jet) is flowing. We study the shape of the thin liquid film, which is deformed due to the shear stress induced by a jet of a low-viscosity fluid. The mechanics of the jet, which is modeled by boundary-layer theory, is coupled to the mechanics of the thin film, which includes the influence of surface tension and buoyancy. We describe the unsteady shape of the film using the lubrication description to derive a nonlinear PDE that is coupled to the Glauert jet via interfacial stresses. For the steady state, we obtain analytical solutions in different asymptotic regimes. We compare our theoretical findings to numerical simulations conducted with the finite volume solver FLUENT.

  11. Partitioning of Aromatic Constituents into Water from Jet Fuels.

    PubMed

    Tien, Chien-Jung; Shu, Youn-Yuen; Ciou, Shih-Rong; Chen, Colin S

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive study of the most commonly used jet fuels (i.e., Jet A-1 and JP-8) was performed to properly assess potential contamination of the subsurface environment from a leaking underground storage tank occurred in an airport. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the concentration ranges of the major components in the water-soluble fraction of jet fuels and to estimate the jet fuel-water partition coefficients (K fw) for target compounds using partitioning experiments and a polyparameter linear free-energy relationship (PP-LFER) approach. The average molecular weight of Jet A-1 and JP-8 was estimated to be 161 and 147 g/mole, respectively. The density of Jet A-1 and JP-8 was measured to be 786 and 780 g/L, respectively. The distribution of nonpolar target compounds between the fuel and water phases was described using a two-phase liquid-liquid equilibrium model. Models were derived using Raoult's law convention for the activity coefficients and the liquid solubility. The observed inverse, log-log linear dependence of the K fw values on the aqueous solubility were well predicted by assuming jet fuel to be an ideal solvent mixture. The experimental partition coefficients were generally well reproduced by PP-LFER.

  12. Jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an arterial heat pipe with a capillary driven jet pump. The jet pump generates a suction which pumps vapor and noncondensible gas from the artery. The suction also forces liquid into the artery and maintains it in a primed condition. A theoretical model was developed which predicts the existence of two stable ranges. Up to a certain tilt the artery will prime by itself once a heat load is applied to the heat pipe. At higher tilts, the jet pump can maintain the artery in a primed condition but self-priming is not possible. A prototype heat pipe was tested which self-primed up to a tilt of 1.9 cm, with a heat load of 500 watts. The heat pipe continued to prime reliably when operated as a VCHP, i.e., after a large amount of noncondensible gas was introduced.

  13. Cavitating vortex generation by a submerged jet

    SciTech Connect

    Belyakov, G. V.; Filippov, A. N.

    2006-05-15

    The surface geometry of a cavitating vortex is determined in the limit of inviscid incompressible flow. The limit surface is an ovaloid of revolution with an axis ratio of 5: 3. It is shown that a cavitating vortex ring cannot develop if the cavitation number is lower than a certain critical value. Experiments conducted at various liquid pressures and several jet exit velocities confirm the existence of a critical cavitation number close to 3. At cavitation numbers higher than the critical one, the cavitating vortex ring does not develop. At substantially lower cavitation numbers (k {<=} 0.1), an elongated asymmetric cavitation bubble is generated, with an axial reentrant jet whose length can exceed the initial jet length by several times. This flow structure is called an asymmetric cavitating vortex, even though steady motion of this structure has not been observed.

  14. Contact Angle Influence on Geysering Jets in Microgravity Investigated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2004-01-01

    Microgravity poses many challenges to the designer of spacecraft tanks. Chief among these are the lack of phase separation and the need to supply vapor-free liquid or liquid-free vapor to the spacecraft processes that require fluid. One of the principal problems of phase separation is the creation of liquid jets. A jet can be created by liquid filling, settling of the fluid to one end of the tank, or even closing a valve to stop the liquid flow. Anyone who has seen a fountain knows that jets occur in normal gravity also. However, in normal gravity, the gravity controls and restricts the jet flow. In microgravity, with gravity largely absent, surface tension forces must be used to contain jets. To model this phenomenon, a numerical method that tracks the fluid motion and the surface tension forces is required. Jacqmin has developed a phase model that converts the discrete surface tension force into a barrier function that peaks at the free surface and decays rapidly away. Previous attempts at this formulation were criticized for smearing the interface. This can be overcome by sharpening the phase function, double gridding the fluid function, and using a higher-order solution for the fluid function. The solution of this equation can be rewritten as two coupled Poisson equations that also include the velocity.

  15. Conversion of waste cooking oil to jet biofuel with nickel-based mesoporous zeolite Y catalyst.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Cheng, Jun; Huang, Rui; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2015-12-01

    Three types of zeolites (Meso-Y, SAPO-34, and HY) loaded with nickel were used to convert waste cooking oil to jet biofuel. Mesoporous zeolite Y exhibited a high jet range alkane selectivity of 53% and a proper jet range aromatic hydrocarbon selectivity of 13.4% in liquid fuel products. Reaction temperature was optimized to produce quality jet biofuel. Zeolite Meso-Y exhibited a high jet range alkane yield of 40.5% and a low jet range aromatic hydrocarbon yield of 11.3% from waste cooking oil at 400°C. The reaction pathway for converting waste cooking oil to jet biofuel was proposed. Experimental results showed that waste cooking oil mainly deoxygenated to heptadecane (C17H36) and pentadecane (C15H30) through the decarbonylation pathway for the first 3h. Long chain alkanes cracked into jet range alkanes (C8-C16). Cycloalkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons were produced through cyclization and dehydrogenation pathways.

  16. Vortex interaction of tandem pitching and plunging plates: a two-dimensional model of hovering dragonfly-like flight.

    PubMed

    Rival, David; Schönweitz, Dirk; Tropea, Cameron

    2011-03-01

    The force evolution and associated vortex dynamics on a nominal two-dimensional tandem pitching and plunging configuration inspired by hovering dragonfly-like flight have been investigated experimentally using time-resolved particle image velocimetry. The aerodynamic forces acting on the flat plates have been determined using a classic control-volume approach, i.e. a momentum balance. It was found that only the tandem phasing of ψ = 90° was capable of generating similar levels of thrust when compared to the single-plate reference case. For this tandem configuration, however, a much more constant thrust generation was developed over the cycle. Further examination showed that the force and vortex development on the fore-plate was unaffected by the tandem configuration and that nearly all variations in performance could be attributed to the vortex interaction on the hind-plate. By calculating the trajectory and strength of the hind-plate's trailing-edge vortex, the chain-like vortex interaction mechanism responsible for improved performance at ψ = 90° could be identified. The underlying result from this study suggests that the dominant vortex interaction in dragonfly flight is two dimensional and that the spanwise flow generated by root-flapping kinematics is not entirely necessary for efficient propulsion but potentially due to evolutionary restrictions in nature.

  17. Simulations of dynamics of plunge and pitch of a three-dimensional flexible wing in a low Reynolds number flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dewei; Liu, Yingming; Shyy, Wei; Aono, Hikaru

    2010-09-01

    The lattice Boltzmann flexible particle method (LBFPM) is used to simulate fluid-structure interaction and motion of a flexible wing in a three-dimensional space. In the method, a beam with rectangular cross section has been discretized into a chain of rigid segments. The segments are connected through ball and socket joints at their ends and may be bent and twisted. Deformation of flexible structure is treated with a linear elasticity model through bending and twisting. It is demonstrated that the flexible particle method (FPM) can approximate the nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam equation without resorting to a nonlinear elasticity model. Simulations of plunge and pitch of flexible wing at Reynolds number Re=136 are conducted in hovering condition by using the LBFPM. It is found that both lift and drag forces increase first, then decrease dramatically as the bending rigidity in spanwise direction decreases and that the lift and drag forces are sensitive to rigidity in a certain range. It is shown that the downwash flows induced by wing tip and trailing vortices in wake area are larger for a flexible wing than for a rigid wing, lead to a smaller effective angle of attack, and result in a larger lift force.

  18. Steam-water jet analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kashiwa, B.A.; Harlow, F.H.; Demuth, R.B.; Ruppel, H.M.

    1984-05-01

    This report presents the results of a theoretical study on the effects of the steam-water jet emitted from a hypothetical rupture in the high-pressure piping pf a nuclear power plant. A set of calculations is presented, incorporating increasingly complex formulations for mass and momentum exchange between the liquid and vapor flow fields. Comparisons between theory and detailed experimental data are given. The study begins with a thorough evaluation of the specification of equilibrium mass and momentum exchange (homogeneous equilibrium) throughout the flow region, a model that generally overpredicts the rate of jet momentum divergence. The study finds that a near-equilibrium momentum exchange rate and a strongly nonequilibrium momentum exchange rate are needed in the region of large vapor-volume fraction to explain the impingement data for fully developed two-phase jets. This leads to the viewpoint that the large-scale jet is characterized by a flow of large liquid entities that travel relatively unaffected by the strongly diverging vapor flow field. The study also finds circumstances in which a persistent core of metastable superheated water can cause much larger impingement pressures than would otherwise be possible. Existing engineering methods are evaluated for jet-loading predictions in plant design. The existing methods appear to be conservative in most possible rupture circumstances with one exception: when the impingement target is about one pipe-diameter away, large enough to capture the full jet, and the rupture flow area is equal to the full pipe flow area, the existing method can produce loadings that are slightly lower than observed for subcooled, flashing discharge. Recommendations have been made to improve the prediction of existing methods under these conditions.

  19. The jet in crossflowa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karagozian, Ann R.

    2014-10-01

    The jet in crossflow, or transverse jet, is a flowfield that has relevance to a wide range of energy and propulsion systems. Over the years, our group's studies on this canonical flowfield have focused on the dynamics of the vorticity associated with equidensity and variable density jets in crossflow, including the stability characteristics of the jet's upstream shear layer, as a means of explaining jet response to altered types of excitation. The jet's upstream shear layer is demonstrated to exhibit convectively unstable behavior at high jet-to-crossflow momentum flux ratios, transitioning to absolutely unstable behavior at low momentum flux and/or density ratios, with attendant differences in shear layer vorticity evolution and rollup. These differences in stability characteristics are shown to have a significant effect on how one optimally employs external excitation to control jet penetration and spread, depending on the flow regime and specific engineering application. Yet recent unexpected observations on altered transverse jet structure under different flow conditions introduce a host of unanswered questions, primarily but not exclusively associated with the nature of molecular mixing, that make this canonical flowfield one that is of great interest for more extensive exploration.

  20. A determination of the external forces required to move the benchmark active controls testing model in pure plunge and pure pitch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dcruz, Jonathan

    1993-01-01

    In view of the strong need for a well-documented set of experimental data which is suitable for the validation and/or calibration of modern Computational Fluid Dynamics codes, the Benchmark Models Program was initiated by the Structural Dynamics Division of the NASA Langley Research Center. One of the models in the program, the Benchmark Active Controls Testing Model, consists of a rigid wing of rectangular planform with a NACA 0012 profile and three control surfaces (a trailing-edge control surface, a lower-surface spoiler, and an upper-surface spoiler). The model is affixed to a flexible mount system which allows only plunging and/or pitching motion. An approximate analytical determination of the forces required to move this model, with its control surfaces fixed, in pure plunge and pure pitch at a number of test conditions is included. This provides a good indication of the type of actuator system required to generate the aerodynamic data resulting from pure plunging and pure pitching motion, in which much interest was expressed. The analysis makes use of previously obtained numerical results.

  1. Biphasic nanoparticles made by electrified jetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahann, Joerg

    2005-03-01

    Nano-colloids have recently attracted intense attention due to unique properties that are distinctly different from bulk solid-state materials; including unique magnetic, electronic, optical, chemical, and biological characteristics. The vision that these nano-objects could essentially act as functional components in novel device generations, which ``magically'' assemble following a master blueprint void any human manipulation, has resulted in a new ``gold rush'' in materials science. These concepts have results in the synthesis of a multitude of nano-objects, such as nano-wires, nano-rods, nano-disks, or nano-prisms.^ Recently, nano-particles with anisotropic materials distributions (biphasic nano-particles) moved in the focus of research. Our approach differs fundamentally from the above-mentioned methods in that it takes advantage of electrified polymer jets to create anisotropic materials distributions in nano-objects. jetting is a process to generate liquid jets by use of electrostatic forces. It is well-known that high electrical potentials (typically several thousand volts) applied between the jetting liquids that are fed through a capillary and a collecting substrate will induce jetting of a charged liquid. The differences in the final morphologies from similar processes are mainly determined by the properties of the jetting liquids and the process parameters. transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning laser confocal microscopy, we demonstrate the applicability of the process to control size, shape, and materials distribution at the nanoscale. The resulting anisotropic nanoparticles may have potential applications for targeted drug delivery or as electro-rehological fluids. a) F. M. Van der Kooij, K. Kassapidou and H. N. W. Lekkerkerker, Liquid crystal phase transitions in suspensions of polydisperse plate-like particles, Nature 406, 868 (2000); b) C. A. Mirkin, R. L. Letsinger, R. C. Mucic and J. J. Storhoff, A DNA

  2. Jetting instability mechanisms of particles from explosive dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, R. C.; Zhang, F.

    2014-05-01

    The formation of post-detonation 'particle' jets is widely observed in many problems associated with explosive dispersal of granular materials and liquids. Jets have been shown to form very early, however the mechanism controlling the number of jetting instabilities remains unresolved despite a number of active theories. Recent experiments involving cylindrical charges with a range of central explosive masses for dispersal of dry solid particles and pure liquid are used to formulate macroscopic numerical models for jet formation and growth. The number of jets is strongly related to the dominant perturbation during the shock interaction timescale that controls the initial fracturing of the particle bed and liquid bulk. Perturbations may originate at the interfaces between explosive, shock-dispersed media, and outer edge of the charge due to Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. The inner boundary controls the number of major structures, while the outer boundary may introduce additional overlapping structures and microjets that are overtaken by the major structures. In practice, each interface may feature a thin casing material that breaks up, thereby influencing or possibly dominating the instabilities. Hydrocode simulation is used to examine the role of each interface in conjunction with casing effects on the perturbation leading to jet initiation. The subsequent formation of coherent jet structures requires dense multiphase flow of particles and droplets that interact though inelastic collision, agglomeration, and turbulent flow. Macroscopic multiphase flow simulation shows dense particle clustering and major jet structures overtaking smaller instabilities. Late-time dispersal is controlled by particle drag and evaporation of droplets. Numerical results for dispersal and jetting evolution are compared with experiments.

  3. Mixing of Liquid Cryogens in the Simulation of Liquid Hydrogen/Liquid Oxygen Explosion Hazards

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    properties of all of the fluids used in the experiments are listed in Table 1. More information caa cryogenic fluid properties can be found in Barron 161...MIXING OF LIQUID CRYOGENS IN THE SIMULATION OF LIQUID HYDROGEN/LIQUID OXYGEN EXPLOSION HAZARDS T.S. Luchik, K.M. Aaron, E.Y. Kwack, P. Shakkottai...planetary missions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) use Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) as part of the spacecraft’s power system

  4. Tritium retention in jet cryopanel samples

    SciTech Connect

    Walthers, C.R.; Jenkins, E.M. ); Mayaux, C.; Obert, W. )

    1991-01-01

    The possibility that tritium might exchange with water trapped in aluminum anodize cryopanels in JET prompted a test program at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly, TSTA, Los Alamos, New Mexico. JET furnished two test pieces of cryopanel which were exposed to tritium at approximately liquid nitrogen temperature and 25 torr pressure for nearly two weeks. One specimen was removed and the retained tritium was measured. The second specimen was subjected to several increasing temperature vacuum bakeouts and the effectiveness of the bakeouts were inferred from the pressure history of the chamber. When the retained tritium in the second specimen was measured it was found that nearly 95% of the tritium, as measured in the first specimen, had been removed during the vacuum bakeouts. If the tritium retained in the cryopanel without bakeout were scaled to JET conditions according to a linear pressure time relationship, the tritium expected to become trapped in the JET cryopanels would be approximately 0.6 gram. Testing is currently underway at TSTA which will determine the tritium retention to be expected under more realistic JET operating conditions and which will assess the effectiveness of various bake or purge schemes in removing the trapped tritium. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Global stability of gravitationally stretched capillary jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Rubio, Mariano; Sevilla, Alejandro; Gordillo, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the global linear stability of capillary jets stretched by gravity both experimentally and theoretically, extending the work by Sauter & Buggisch (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 533, 2005, pp. 237-257). Our results reveal the essential stabilizing role played by the axial curvature of the jet, the latter effect being especially relevant for injectors with a large diameter. The theoretical description, based on the one-dimensional mass and momentum equations retaining the exact expression for the interfacial curvature, accurately predicts the onset of jet self-excited oscillations experimentally observed for wide ranges of liquid viscosity and injector diameter. The marginal self-sustained oscillations observed in the experiments are shown to correspond to the excitation of the leading global mode of the jet. The model developed in the present work shows better agreement with the experimental jetting-dripping transition events than those available in the literature, thus allowing us to conclude that, surprisingly, the size of the steady threads produced at a given distance from the exit can be reduced by increasing the nozzle diameter. The proposed formulation allows to describe the inviscid limit, and experiments are being performed to study this distinguished case. Supported by Spanish MINECO under projects DPI 2011-28356-C03-01 and DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  6. Enhancement of single-phase heat transfer and critical heat flux from an ultra-high-flux simulated microelectronic heat source to a rectangular impinging jet of dielectric liquid

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, D.C.; Mudawar, I. )

    1992-08-01

    Jet impingement is encountered in numerous applications demanding high heating or cooling fluxes. Examples include annealing of metal sheets and cooling of turbine blades, x-ray medical devices, laser weapons, and fusion blankets. The attractive heat transfer attributes of jet impingement have also stimulated research efforts on cooling of high-heat-flux microelectronic devices. These devices are fast approaching heat fluxes in excess of 100 W/cm[sup 2], which have to be dissipated using coolants that are both electrically and chemically compatible with electronic components. Unfortunately, fluids satisfying these requirements tend to possess poor transport properties, creating a need for significant enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient by such means as increased coolant flow rate and phase change. The cooling problem is compounded by a need to cool large arrays of heat sources in minimal volume, and to reduce the spacing between adjacent circuit boards. These requirements place severe constraints on the packaging of jet impingement cooling hardware.

  7. Liquid film target impingement scrubber

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.; Coleman, Charles F.

    1977-03-15

    An improved liquid film impingement scrubber is provided wherein particulates suspended in a gas are removed by jetting the particle-containing gas onto a relatively small thin liquid layer impingement target surface. The impingement target is in the form of a porous material which allows a suitable contacting liquid from a pressurized chamber to exude therethrough to form a thin liquid film target surface. The gas-supported particles collected by impingement of the gas on the target are continuously removed and flushed from the system by the liquid flow through each of a number of pores in the target.

  8. Rapid leak detection with liquid crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heisman, R. M.; Iceland, W. F.; Ruppe, E. P.

    1978-01-01

    Small leaks in vacuum lines are detected by applying liquid-crystal coating, warming suspected area, and observing color change due to differential cooling by leak jet. Technique is used on inside or outside walls of vacuum-jacketed lines.

  9. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  10. Acute, Five- and Ten-Day Inhalation Study of Hydroprocessed Esters and Fatty Acids-Mixed Fats (HEFA-F) Jet Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    64, Spraying Systems Co., Wheaton IL). A liquid metering pump ( FMI , Fluid Metering, Inc., Syosset NY) transferred liquid jet fuel from a glass...Preamplifier Buxco Data Acquisition Software FMI Pump House Air Jaeger Nose-only Exposure Unit H-1000 Mixing Chamber Mixing Chamber S-8 Jet Fuel Reservoir... FMI , Fluid Metering, Inc., Syosset NY) pumped liquid jet fuel from a glass bottle reservoir to the nozzle. Compressed instrument air at

  11. Jet lag modification.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Emily; McGrane, Owen; Wedmore, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Athletes often are required to travel for sports participation, both for practice and competition. A number of those crossing multiple time zones will develop jet lag disorder with possible negative consequences on their performance. This review will discuss the etiology of jet lag disorder and the techniques that are available to shorten or minimize its effects. This includes both pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches.

  12. Jet measurements in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loch, Peter; ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-11-01

    The reconstruction of jets generated in the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of TeV with the ATLAS detector is discussed. Beginning with a brief review of the calorimeter signal definitions relevant for jet finding, and the use of reconstructed charged particle tracks, the jet reconstruction strategy is described in some detail. Emphasis is put on the jet energy scale (JES) calibration strategy applied for first data, which is based on a short sequence of data driven and simulation based calibrations and corrections to restore the measured jet energy to particle level. The level of understanding of the signal patterns entering the JES corrections is shown for selected variables in comparisons to simulations. The present systematic uncertainties on the JES, which can be as low as 2% for central jets, are presented and analyzed with respect to the individual fractional contributions entering their determination. Some characteristic jet reconstruction performance and selected results from the first year of jet physics with ATLAS in a newly accessible kinematic domain are shown in conclusion.

  13. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  14. Relativistic Jets and Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Woosley, S. E.

    2001-05-01

    In order to study the relativistic jets from collapsars, we have developed a special relativistic multiple-dimensional hydrodynamics code similar to the GENESIS code (Aloy et al., ApJS, 122, 151). The code is based on the PPM interpolation algorithm and Marquina's Riemann solver. Using this code, we have simulated the propagation of axisymmetric jets along the rotational axis of collapsed rotating stars (collapsars). Using the progenitors of MacFadyen, Woosley, and Heger, a relativistic jet is injected at a given inner boundary radius. This radius, the opening angle of the jet, its Lorentz factor, and its total energy are parameters of the problem. A highly collimated, relativistic outflow is observed at the surface of the star several seconds later. We will discuss the hydrodynamical focusing of the jet, it's break out properties, time evolution, and sensitivity to the adopted parameters.

  15. Description of Jet Breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.

    1996-01-01

    In this article we review recent results on the breakup of cylindrical jets of a Newtonian fluid. Capillary forces provide the main driving mechanism and our interest is in the description of the flow as the jet pinches to form drops. The approach is to describe such topological singularities by constructing local (in time and space) similarity solutions from the governing equations. This is described for breakup according to the Euler, Stokes or Navier-Stokes equations. It is found that slender jet theories can be applied when viscosity is present, but for inviscid jets the local shape of the jet at breakup is most likely of a non-slender geometry. Systems of one-dimensional models of the governing equations are solved numerically in order to illustrate these differences.

  16. Instability of rectangular jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Christopher K. W.; Thies, Andrew T.

    1992-01-01

    The instability of rectangular jets is investigated using a vortex sheet model. It is shown that such jets support four linearly independent families of instability waves. Within each family there are infinitely many modes. A way to classify these modes according to the characteristics of their mode shapes or eigenfunctions is proposed. A parametric study of the instability wave characteristics has been carried out. A sample of the numerical results is reported here. It is found that the first and third modes of each instability wave family are corner modes. The pressure fluctuations associated with these instability waves are localized near the corners of the jet. The second mode, however, is a center mode with maximum fluctuations concentrated in the central portion of the jet flow. The center mode has the largest spatial growth rate. It is anticipated that as the instability waves propagate downstream the center mode would emerge as the dominant instability of the jet.

  17. Jet physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Melese, P.

    1997-05-01

    We present high E{sub T} jet measurements from CDF at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The incfilusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 1800 GeV with {approximately} 5 times more data is compared to the published CDF results, preliminary D0 results, and next-to-leading order QCD predictions. The {summation}E{sub T} cross section is also compared to QCD predictions and the dijet angular distribution is used to place a limit on quark compositeness. The inclusive jet cross section at {radical}s = 630 GeV is compared with that at 1800 GeV to test the QCD predictions for the scaling of jet cross sections with {radical}s. Finally, we present momentum distributions of charged particles in jets and compare them to Modified Leading Log Approximation predictions.

  18. Experimental and theoretical study of fluid-structure interactions in plunging hydrofoils and gravity-driven falling plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ruijun

    Two typical unsteady fluid-structure interaction problems have been investigated in the present study. One of them was about actively plunged flexible hydrofoil; the other was about gravity-driven falling plates in water. Real-time velocity field and dynamic response on the moving objects were measured to study these unsteady and highly nonlinear problems. For a long time, scientists have believed that bird and insect flight benefits greatly from the flexibility and morphing facility of their wings via flapping motion. A significant advantage flexible wing models have over quasi-steady rigid wing models is a much higher lift generation capability. Both experimental and computational studies have shown that the leading and trailing edge vortexes (LEV and TEV) play a major role in the efficient generation of such unconventionally high lift force. In this study, two NACA0012 miniature hydrofoils, one flexible and the other rigid, were actively plunged at various frequencies in a viscous glycerol-water solution to study the influence of flexibility. Two-dimensional, phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were conducted to investigate the temporal and spacial development of LEVs and TEVs. Simultaneous measurements of lift and thrust forces were recorded to reveal the relationship between hydrodynamic force and the evolution of the surrounding flow field. Results from the flexible hydrofoil were compared to those from the rigid one in order to quantitatively analyze the effects of flexibility. The second problem focused on fluid-structure interaction of gravity driven falling plates. Falling leaves and paper cards in air has drawn plenty of research interest in the past decades to investigate the interaction between the fluid flow and the falling object. In this research, time-resolved PIV were employed to experimentally visualize the flow field evolution around the gravity-driven falling plates. The plates were made of different materials with

  19. Directional transport of impinging capillary jet on wettability engineered surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Aritra; Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine

    2015-11-01

    Impingement of capillary jet on a surface is important for applications like heat transfer, or for liquid manipulation in bio-microfluidic devices. Using wettability engineered surfaces, we demonstrate pump-less and directional transport of capillary jet on a flat surface. Spatial contrast of surface energy and a wedge-shape geometry of the wettability confined track on the substrate facilitate formation of instantaneous spherical bulges upon jet impingement; these bulges are further transported along the superhydrophilic tracks due to Laplace pressure gradient. Critical condition warranted for formation of liquid bulge along the varying width of the superhydrophilic track is calculated analytically and verified experimentally. The work throws light on novel fluid phenomena of unidirectional jet impingement on wettability confined surfaces and provides a platform for innovative liquid manipulation technique for further application. By varying the geometry and wettability contrast on the surface, one can achieve volume flow rates of ~ O(100 μL/sec) and directionally guided transport of the jet liquid, pumplessly at speeds of ~ O(10cm/sec).

  20. Optimal Jet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, D. Yu.; Jankowski, E.; Tkachov, F. V.

    2003-09-01

    We describe a FORTRAN 77 implementation of the optimal jet definition for identification of jets in hadronic final states of particle collisions. We discuss details of the implementation, explain interface subroutines and provide a usage example. The source code is available from http://www.inr.ac.ru/~ftkachov/projects/jets/. Program summaryTitle of program: Optimal Jet Finder (OJF_014) Catalogue identifier: ADSB Program Summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADSB Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: Any computer with the FORTRAN 77 compiler Tested with: g77/Linux on Intel, Alpha and Sparc; Sun f77/Solaris (thwgs.cern.ch); xlf/AIX (rsplus.cern.ch); MS Fortran PowerStation 4.0/Win98 Programming language used: FORTRAN 77 Memory required: ˜1 MB (or more, depending on the settings) Number of bytes in distributed program, including examples and test data: 251 463 Distribution format: tar gzip file Keywords: Hadronic jets, jet finding algorithms Nature of physical problem: Analysis of hadronic final states in high energy particle collision experiments often involves identification of hadronic jets. A large number of hadrons detected in the calorimeter is reduced to a few jets by means of a jet finding algorithm. The jets are used in further analysis which would be difficult or impossible when applied directly to the hadrons. Grigoriev et al. [ hep-ph/0301185] provide a brief introduction to the subject of jet finding algorithms and a general review of the physics of jets can be found in [Rep. Prog. Phys. 36 (1993) 1067]. Method of solution: The software we provide is an implementation of the so-called optimal jet definition ( OJD). The theory of OJD was developed by Tkachov [Phys. Rev. Lett. 73 (1994) 2405; 74 (1995) 2618; Int. J. Mod. Phys. A 12 (1997) 5411; 17 (2002) 2783]. The desired jet configuration is obtained as the one that minimizes Ω R, a certain function of the input particles and jet

  1. Simulations of Solar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-02-01

    Formation of a coronal jet from twisted field lines that have reconnected with the ambient field. The colors show the radial velocity of the plasma. [Adapted from Szente et al. 2017]How do jets emitted from the Suns surface contribute to its corona and to the solar wind? In a recent study, a team of scientists performed complex three-dimensional simulations of coronal jets to answer these questions.Small ExplosionsCoronal jets are relatively small eruptions from the Suns surface, with heights of roughly 100 to 10,000 km, speeds of 10 to 1,000 km/s, and lifetimes of a few minutes to around ten hours. These jets are constantly present theyre emitted even from the quiet Sun, when activity is otherwise low and weve observed them with a fleet of Sun-watching space telescopes spanning the visible, extreme ultraviolet (EUV), and X-ray wavelength bands.A comparison of simulated observations based on the authors model (left panels) to actual EUV and X-ray observations of jets (right panels). [Szente et al. 2017]Due to their ubiquity, we speculate that these jets might contribute to heating the global solar corona (which is significantly hotter than the surface below it, a curiosity known as the coronal heating problem). We can also wonder what role these jets might play in driving the overall solar wind.Launching a JetLed by Judit Szente (University of Michigan), a team of scientists has explored the impact of coronal jets on the global corona and solar wind with a series of numerical simulations. Szente and collaborators used three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations that provide realistic treatment of the solar atmosphere, the solar wind acceleration, and the complexities of heat transfer throughout the corona.In the authors simulations, a jet is initiated as a magnetic dipole rotates at the solar surface, winding up field lines. Magnetic reconnection between the twisted lines and the background field then launches the jet from the dense and hot solar

  2. Comparison of burnout characteristics in jet impingement cooling and stray cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, C. S. K.; Wu, K.

    Characteristics of spray cooling and jet impingement methods were investigated. The jet impingement cooling method created a large dry area on the test surface when the burnout heat flux was approached. In the spray cooling method, a liquid film with nucleate boiling was maintained for the entire experiment until a burnout was occurred. The spray cooling method produced a higher burnout heat flux than the jet impingement cooling method for the same liquid flow rate. In the spray cooling method, sprayed droplet velocity was a parameter for determining the burnout heat flux. The burnout heat flux in jet impingement cooling also showed dependency on the liquid jet velocity. Results of two methods for cooling the surface area were compared and correlated with the Weber number.

  3. Numerical simulation of electrospray in the cone-jet mode.

    PubMed

    Herrada, M A; López-Herrera, J M; Gañán-Calvo, A M; Vega, E J; Montanero, J M; Popinet, S

    2012-08-01

    We present a robust and computationally efficient numerical scheme for simulating steady electrohydrodynamic atomization processes (electrospray). The main simplification assumed in this scheme is that all the free electrical charges are distributed over the interface. A comparison of the results with those calculated with a volume-of-fluid method showed that the numerical scheme presented here accurately describes the flow pattern within the entire liquid domain. Experiments were performed to partially validate the numerical predictions. The simulations reproduced accurately the experimental shape of the liquid cone jet, providing correct values of the emitted electric current even for configurations very close to the cone-jet stability limit.

  4. The effect of jet shape on jet injection.

    PubMed

    Park, Geehoon; Modak, Ashin; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2015-01-01

    The effects of the dispersion pattern of a needle-free jet injector are explored. The shape of the jets were compared using a high-speed video camera and jet injections of collimated and dispersed fluid jets with a Lorentz-force actuated jet injector were made into acrylamide gel and post-mortem porcine tissue. A custom-built high-speed X-ray imaging system was used in order to observe the dynamics of the dispersion mechanism for each injection in real time. We show that a collimated jet stream results in greater tissue penetration than a dispersed jet stream.

  5. Stable jets of viscoelastic fluids and self-assembled cylindrical capsules by hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Edmond, K V; Schofield, A B; Marquez, Manuel; Rothstein, J P; Dinsmore, A D

    2006-10-10

    We demonstrate formation of long-lived cylindrical jets of a viscoelastic fluid using hydrodynamic focusing. A solution of polyacrylamide in water is driven coaxially with immiscible oil and subjected to strong extensional flow. At high flow rates, the aqueous phase forms jets that are 4-90 microm in diameter and several centimeters long. The liquid surfaces of these jets are then used as templates for assembly of microspheres into novel rigid and hollow cylinders.

  6. Synthetic Fence Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigurdson, Lorenz; Apps, Christopher

    2000-11-01

    "Synthetic Jets" have previously been produced where an oscillating flow with zero net mass flux acts on the edges of an orifice. The resulting flow is similar to a normal jet. We have proposed and verified that another type of jet called a "Synthetic Fence Jet" (SFJ or "fe-je") can also be created. We introduced a fence perpendicular to both a wall and an oscillating velocity field. Under certain conditions a jet was formed by vortices of alternating sign. The vortices were shed from the fence and they induced each other away from it. This phenomenon could be used as a method of flow control. The objective of this project was to use flow visualization to prove the existence of and characterize this jet. A test rig was used which incorporates smoke-wire flow visualization; independent oscillation level and frequency control; and computer- controlled data acquisition. It has been discovered that the jet direction can be vectored by altering the forcing waveform shape. To explain this a theory was developed that is based on the Biot-Savart law of vortex dynamics.

  7. Solar coronal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzyck, D.

    The solar jets were first observed by SOHO instruments (EIT, LASCO, UVCS) during the previous solar minimum. They were small, fast ejections originating from flaring UV bright points within large polar coronal holes. The obtained data provided us with estimates of the jet plasma conditions, dynamics, evolution of the electron temperature and heating rate required to reproduce the observed ionization state. To follow the polar jets through the solar cycle a special SOHO Joint Observing Program (JOP 155) was designed. It involves a number of SOHO instruments (EIT, CDS, UVCS, LASCO) as well as TRACE. The coordinated observations have been carried out since April 2002. The data enabled to identify counterparts of the 1996-1998 solar minimum jets. Their frequency of several events per day appear comparable to the frequency from the previous solar minimum. The jets are believed to be triggered by field line reconnection between emerging magnetic dipole and pre-existing unipolar field. Existing models predict that the hot jet is formed together with another jet of a cool material. The particular goal of the coordinated SOHO and TRACE observations was to look for possible association of the hot and cool plasma ejections. Currently there is observational evidence that supports these models.

  8. Jet Noise Suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Brausch, J. F.; Majjigi, R. K.; Lee, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this chapter are to review and summarize the jet noise suppression technology, to provide a physical and theoretical model to explain the measured jet noise suppression characteristics of different concepts, and to provide a set of guidelines for evolving jet noise suppression designs. The underlying principle for all jet noise suppression devices is to enhance rapid mixing (i.e., diffusion) of the jet plume by geometric and aerothermodynamic means. In the case of supersonic jets, the shock-cell broadband noise reduction is effectively accomplished by the elimination or mitigation of the shock-cell structure. So far, the diffusion concepts have predominantly concentrated on jet momentum and energy (kinetic and thermal) diffusion, in that order, and have yielded better noise reduction than the simple conical nozzles. A critical technology issue that needs resolution is the effect of flight on the noise suppression potential of mechanical suppressor nozzles. A more thorough investigation of this mechanism is necessary for the successful development and design of an acceptable noise suppression device for future high-speed civil transports.

  9. Jet Physics at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Sally Seidel

    2004-06-28

    Jets have been studied by the CDF Collaboration [1] as a means of searching for new particles and interactions, testing a variety of perturbative QCD predictions, and providing input for the global parton distribution function (PDF) fits. Unless otherwise indicated below, the jets were reconstructed using a cone algorithm [2] with cone radius R = 0.7 from data taken at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run 2, 2001-2003, with {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Central jets, in the pseudorapidity range relative to fixed detector coordinates 0.1 < |{eta}| < 0.7, are used.

  10. Transient cooling of a hot metal plate with an impinging water jet

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shinju; Kubo, Ryo; Kawazoe, Masataka

    1995-12-31

    Transient boiling heat-transfer rate of a two-dimensional impinging water jet was measured throughout the surface of a 20 x 150 mm rectangle, during cooling from approximately 400 C to 100 C. Time-dependent surface-temperature distributions and the progress of a solid-liquid contact front were obtained for jet subcooling from 14 K to 50 K. Solid-liquid contact at the stagnation line starts from the moment of jet impingement, where violent boiling occurs and generated vapor splashes the water film; this results in deprivation of water supply to the outer region of the surface. The temperature of the outer surface remains high up to the time when the solid-liquid contact front reaches it and a large temperature gradient appears near the front. The surface temperature for the initiation of solid-liquid contact is higher at locations nearer the stagnation line and with higher jet subcooling.

  11. The Jets of Enceladus: Locations, Correlations with Thermal Hot Spots, and Jet Particle Vertical Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C.; Ingersoll, A. P.; Dinino, D.; Helfenstein, P.; Roatsch, T.; Mitchell, C. J.; Ewald, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    order 30 m/s or less, much less than either the escape speed or the thermal speed for a temperature of 273 K. From the collimation of the vapor in the jets, the Cassini UVIS team infers vertical velocities of 1000 m/s or more [Hansen et al. (2008) Nature 456, 477-479]. Schmidt et al. [(2008) Nature 451, 685-688] account for the slow particle speeds by invoking collisions with the walls of the vent. Ingersoll and Pankine [(2010) Icarus 206, 594-607] invoke short distances during which the gas velocity is high; the particles don’t have time reach escape speed. The third possibility is that the particles are so large that the gas cannot accelerate them to escape speed. This possibility is testable with Cassini ISS high-resolution images, which span phase angles up to 176 degrees and wavelengths from UV to near-IR. Our ultimate goal is to test models of how the jets form. The particles form either by condensing directly from vapor, by spallation from the icy walls of the vent, or by freezing of liquid water droplets. Images collected by Cassini thus far will help us choose among the possibilities.

  12. Astrophysics: Cosmic jet engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Andy

    2010-02-01

    In some galaxies, matter falling onto a supermassive black hole is ejected in narrow jets moving at close to the speed of light. New observations provide insight into the workings of these cosmic accelerators.

  13. Dilution jet mixing program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srinivasan, R.; Coleman, E.; Johnson, K.

    1984-01-01

    Parametric tests were conducted to quantify the mixing of opposed rows of jets (two-sided injection) in a confined cross flow. Results show that jet penetrations for two sided injections are less than that for single-sided injections, but the jet spreading rates are faster for a given momentum ratio and orifice plate. Flow area convergence generally enhances mixing. Mixing characteristics with asymmetric and symmetric convergence are similar. For constant momentum ratio, the optimum S/H(0) with in-line injections is one half the optimum value for single sided injections. For staggered injections, the optimum S/H(0) is twice the optimum value for single-sided injection. The correlations developed predicted the temperature distributions within first order accuracy and provide a useful tool for predicting jet trajectory and temperature profiles in the dilution zone with two-sided injections.

  14. Jet propulsion for airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckingham, Edgar

    1924-01-01

    This report is a description of a method of propelling airplanes by the reaction of jet propulsion. Air is compressed and mixed with fuel in a combustion chamber, where the mixture burns at constant pressure. The combustion products issue through a nozzle, and the reaction of that of the motor-driven air screw. The computations are outlined and the results given by tables and curves. The relative fuel consumption and weight of machinery for the jet, decrease as the flying speed increases; but at 250 miles per hour the jet would still take about four times as much fuel per thrust horsepower-hour as the air screw, and the power plant would be heavier and much more complicated. Propulsion by the reaction of a simple jet can not compete with air screw propulsion at such flying speeds as are now in prospect.

  15. Vietnam plunges ahead

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, M.T.

    1995-07-01

    Vietnam is moving fast. Facing the need to double its installed power generation capacity by the year 2000, Vietnam is pursuing a range of development alternatives to add an estimated 3,000 MW of new power plants. As part of the country`s progress toward a market economy, Vietnam has relaxed its rules regarding investment in power plants. The country enacted a new electricity law early in 1995, paving the way for private participation in the power sector.

  16. Temporal instability analysis of inviscid compound jets falling under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Uddin, Jamal; Decent, Stephen P.; Afzaal, Muhammad F.

    2013-01-01

    Compound liquid jets can be used in a variety of industrial applications ranging from capsule production in pharmaceutics to enhance printing methods in ink-jet printing. An appreciation of how instability along compound jets can lead to breakup and droplet formation is thus critical in many fields in science and engineering. In this paper, we perform a theoretical analysis to examine the instability of an axisymmetric inviscid compound liquid jet which falls vertically under the influence of gravity. We use a long-wavelength, slender-jet asymptotic expansion to reduce the governing equations of the problem into a set of one-dimensional partial differential equations, which describe the evolution of the leading-order axial velocity of the jet as well as the radii of both the inner and the outer interfaces. We first determine the steady-state solutions of the one-dimensional model equations and then we perform a linear temporal instability analysis to obtain a dispersion relation, which gives us useful information about the maximum growth rate and the maximum wavenumber of the imposed wave-like disturbance. We use our results to estimate the location and qualitative nature of breakup and then compare our results with numerical simulations.

  17. Sessile drop deformations under an impinging jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, James Q.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of steady axisymmetric deformations of a liquid sessile drop on a flat solid surface under an impinging gas jet is of interest for understanding the fundamental behavior of free surface flows as well as for establishing the theoretical basis in process design for the Aerosol direct-write technology. It is studied here numerically using a Galerkin finite-element method, by computing solutions of Navier-Stokes equations. For effective material deposition in Aerosol printing, the desired value of Reynolds number for the laminar gas jet is found to be greater than ~500. The sessile drop can be severely deformed by an impinging gas jet when the capillary number is approaching a critical value beyond which no steady axisymmetric free surface deformation can exist. Solution branches in a parameter space show turning points at the critical values of capillary number, which typically indicate the onset of free surface shape instability. By tracking solution branches around turning points with an arc-length continuation algorithm, critical values of capillary number can be accurately determined. Near turning points, all the free surface profiles in various parameter settings take a common shape with a dimple at the center and bulge near the contact line. An empirical formula for the critical capillary number for sessile drops with contact angle is derived for typical ranges of jet Reynolds number and relative drop sizes especially pertinent to Aerosol printing.

  18. Relativistic Jets from Collapsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aloy, M. A.; Müller, E.; Ibáñez, J. M.; Martí, J. M.; MacFadyen, A.

    2000-03-01

    Using a collapsar progenitor model of MacFadyen & Woosley, we have simulated the propagation of an axisymmetric jet through a collapsing rotating massive star with the GENESIS multidimensional relativistic hydrodynamic code. The jet forms as a consequence of an assumed (constant or variable) energy deposition in the range of 1050-1051 ergs s-1 within a 30 deg cone around the rotation axis. The jet flow is strongly beamed (approximately less than a few degrees), spatially inhomogeneous, and time dependent. The jet reaches the surface of the stellar progenitor (R*=2.98x1010 cm) intact. At breakout, the maximum Lorentz factor of the jet flow is 33. After breakout, the jet accelerates into the circumstellar medium, whose density is assumed to decrease exponentially and then become constant, ρext=10-5 g cm-3. Outside the star, the flow begins to expand laterally also (v~c), but the beam remains very well collimated. At a distance of 2.54 R*, where the simulation ends, the Lorentz factor has increased to 44.

  19. Radiation from Relativistic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Mizuno, Y.; Hardee, P.; Sol, H.; Medvedev, M.; Zhang, B.; Nordlund, A.; Frederiksen, J. T.; Fishman, G. J.; Preece, R.

    2008-01-01

    Nonthermal radiation observed from astrophysical systems containing relativistic jets and shocks, e.g., gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and Galactic microquasar systems usually have power-law emission spectra. Recent PIC simulations of relativistic electron-ion (electron-positron) jets injected into a stationary medium show that particle acceleration occurs within the downstream jet. In the presence of relativistic jets, instabilities such as the Buneman instability, other two-streaming instability, and the Weibel (filamentation) instability create collisionless shocks, which are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. The simulation results show that the Weibel instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields. These magnetic fields contribute to the electron's transverse deflection behind the jet head. The 'jitter' radiation from deflected electrons in small-scale magnetic fields has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation, a case of diffusive synchrotron radiation, may be important to understand the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  20. Axisymmetric wall jet development in confined jet impingement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianqi; Rau, Matthew J.; Vlachos, Pavlos P.; Garimella, Suresh V.

    2017-02-01

    The flow field surrounding an axisymmetric, confined, impinging jet was investigated with a focus on the early development of the triple-layered wall jet structure. Experiments were conducted using stereo particle image velocimetry at three different confinement gap heights (2, 4, and 8 jet diameters) across Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 9000. The rotating flow structures within the confinement region and their interaction with the surrounding flow were dependent on the confinement gap height and Reynolds number. The recirculation core shifted downstream as the Reynolds number increased. For the smallest confinement gap height investigated, the strong recirculation caused a disruption of the wall jet development. The radial position of the recirculation core observed at this small gap height was found to coincide with the location where the maximum wall jet velocity had decayed to 15% of the impinging jet exit velocity. After this point, the self-similarity hypothesis failed to predict the evolution of the wall jet further downstream. A reduction in confinement gap height increased the growth rates of the wall jet thickness but did not affect the decay rate of the wall jet maximum velocity. For jet Reynolds numbers above 2500, the decay rate of the maximum velocity in the developing region of the wall jet was approximately -1.1, which is close to previous results reported for the fully developed region of radial wall jets. A much higher decay rate of -1.5 was found for the wall jet formed by a laminar impinging jet at Re = 1000.

  1. Comparison of heat transfer in liquid and slush nitrogen by numerical simulation of cooling rates for French straws used for sperm cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Sansinena, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-05-01

    Slush nitrogen (SN(2)) is a mixture of solid nitrogen and liquid nitrogen, with an average temperature of -207 °C. To investigate whether plunging a French plastic straw (commonly used for sperm cryopreservation) in SN(2) substantially increases cooling rates with respect to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)), a numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was used to predict cooling rates. Calculations performed using heat transfer coefficients in the range of film boiling confirmed the main benefit of plunging a straw in slush over LN(2) did not arise from their temperature difference (-207 vs. -196 °C), but rather from an increase in the external heat transfer coefficient. Numerical simulations using high heat transfer (h) coefficients (assumed to prevail in SN(2)) suggested that plunging in SN(2) would increase cooling rates of French straw. This increase of cooling rates was attributed to a less or null film boiling responsible for low heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen when the straw is placed in the solid-liquid mixture or slush. In addition, predicted cooling rates of French straws in SN(2) tended to level-off for high h values, suggesting heat transfer was dictated by heat conduction within the liquid filled plastic straw.

  2. Mixing in High Schmidt Number Turbulent Jets.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Paul Lewis

    This thesis is an experimental investigation of the passive scalar (species concentration) field in the far-field of round, axisymmetric, high Schmidt number (liquid phase), turbulent jets issuing into a quiescent reservoir, by means of a quantitative laser-induced fluorescence technique. Single -point concentration measurements are made on the jet centerline, at axial locations from 100 to 305 nozzle diameters downstream, and Reynolds numbers of 3,000 to 102,000, yielding data with a resolved temporal dynamic range up to 2.5 times 10^5, and capturing as many as 504 large-scale structure passages. Long-time statistics of the jet concentration are found to converge slowly. Between 100 and 300 large-scale structure passages are required to reduce the uncertainty in the mean to 1%, or so. The behavior of the jet varies with Reynolds number. The centerline concentration pdf's become taller and narrower with increasing Re, and the normalized concentration variances correspondingly decrease with Re. The concentration power spectra also evolve with Re. The behavior of the spectral slopes is examined. No constant -1 (Batchelor) spectral slope range is present. Rather, in the viscous region, the power spectra exhibit log-normal behavior, over a range of scales exceeding a factor of 40, in some cases. The frequency of the beginning of this log-normal range scales like Re^{3/4} (Kolmogorov scaling). Mixing in the far-field is found to be susceptible to initial conditions. Disturbances in the jet plenum fluid and near the nozzle exit strongly influence the scalar variance, with larger disturbances causing larger variances, i.e., less homogeneous mixing. The plenum/nozzle geometry also influences the variance. These effects of initial conditions persist for hundreds of diameters from the nozzle exit, over hundreds of large scales. Mixing in these jets differs from gas-phase, order unity Sc, jet mixing. At low to moderate Re, the higher Sc jet is less well mixed. The difference

  3. Method and apparatus for water jet drilling of rock

    DOEpatents

    Summers, David A.; Mazurkiewicz, Marian; Bushnell, Dwight J.; Blaine, James

    1978-01-01

    Rock drilling method and apparatus utilizing high pressure water jets for drilling holes of relatively small diameter at speeds significantly greater than that attainable with existing drilling tools. Greatly increased drilling rates are attained due to jet nozzle geometry and speed of rotation. The jet nozzle design has two orifices, one pointing axially ahead in the direction of travel and the second inclined at an angle of approximately 30.degree. from the axis. The two orifices have diameters in the ratio of approximately 1:2. Liquid jet velocities in excess of 1,000 ft/sec are used, and the nozzle is rotated at speeds up to 1,000 rpm and higher.

  4. Instability of water jet: Aerodynamically induced acoustic and capillary waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, Göran I.; Rudenko, Oleg V.

    2012-09-01

    High-speed water jet cutting has important industrial applications. To further improve the cutting performance it is critical to understand the theory behind the onset of instability of the jet. In this paper, instability of a water jet flowing out from a nozzle into ambient air is studied. Capillary forces and compressibility of the liquid caused by gas bubbles are taken into account, since these factors have shown to be important in previous experimental studies. A new dispersion equation, generalizing the analogous Rayleigh equation, is derived. It is shown how instability develops because of aerodynamic forces that appear at the streamlining of an initial irregularity of the equilibrium shape of the cross-section of the jet and how instability increases with increased concentration of gas bubbles. It is also shown how resonance phenomena are responsible for strong instability. On the basis of the theoretical explanations given, conditions for stable operation are indicated.

  5. A physical theory of the instabilities of electrically driven jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohman, Moses Macduff

    Electrospinning and electrospraying produce nanoscale fibers and drops from liquid pushed through a millimeter-scale nozzle. This thesis argues that both phenomena can be understood by analyzing the instability of electrically forced fluid jets with increasing field strength. We present a systematic study of the development of the instability to derive the essential mechanisms from first principles. An asymptotic approximation of the equations of electrohydrodynamics is developed so that quantitative comparisons with experiment can be carried out. The approximation governs long wavelength axisymmetric distortions of the jet as well as long wavelength oscillations of the jet centerline. Three different instabilities are identified: the classical (axisymmetric) Rayleigh instability, and electric field induced varicose and whipping instabilities. At increasing field strengths, the electrical instabilities are enhanced while the Rayleigh instability is suppressed. Which electric instability wins depends strongly on the surface charge density and radius of the jet. Through a combination of theory and experiments the surface charge density on the jet as it thins from the nozzle is determined. Quantitative agreement between theory and experiment requires taking into account both the fringe fields of the nozzle and the local charge distribution in the vicinity of the nozzle. Combining the jet shapes and charge densities with the stability analysis yields predictions for the instabilities that agree with experiments. In total, the work suggests that the most useful paradigm for understanding electrospraying and electrospinning is not a Taylor cone, but instead that of a rapidly whipping jet.

  6. Integrated coke, asphalt and jet fuel production process and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Shang, Jer Y.

    1991-01-01

    A process and apparatus for the production of coke, asphalt and jet fuel m a feed of fossil fuels containing volatile carbon compounds therein is disclosed. The process includes the steps of pyrolyzing the feed in an entrained bed pyrolyzing means, separating the volatile pyrolysis products from the solid pyrolysis products removing at least one coke from the solid pyrolysis products, fractionating the volatile pyrolysis products to produce an overhead stream and a bottom stream which is useful as asphalt for road pavement, condensing the overhead stream to produce a condensed liquid fraction and a noncondensable, gaseous fraction, and removing water from the condensed liquid fraction to produce a jet fuel-containing product. The disclosed apparatus is useful for practicing the foregoing process. the process provides a useful method of mass producing and jet fuels from materials such as coal, oil shale and tar sands.

  7. Global stability of the focusing effect of fluid jet flows.

    PubMed

    Montanero, J M; Rebollo-Muñoz, N; Herrada, M A; Gañán-Calvo, A M

    2011-03-01

    The global stability of the steady jetting mode of liquid jets focused by coaxial gas streams is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. Numerical simulations allow one to identify the physical mechanisms responsible for instability in the low viscosity and very viscous regimes of the focused liquid. The characteristic flow rates for which global instability takes place are estimated by a simple scaling analysis. These flow rates do not depend on the pressure drop (energy) applied to the system to produce the microjet. Their dependencies on the liquid viscosity are opposite for the two extremes studied: the characteristic flow rate increases (decreases) with viscosity for very low (high) viscosity liquids. Experiments confirmed the validity of these conclusions. The minimum flow rates below which the liquid meniscus becomes unstable are practically independent of the applied pressure drop for sufficiently large values of this quantity. For all the liquids analyzed, there exists an optimum value of the capillary-to-orifice distance for which the minimum flow rate attains a limiting value. That limiting value represents the lowest flow rate attainable with a given experimental configuration in the steady jetting regime. A two-dimensional stability map with a high degree of validity is plotted on the plane defined by the Reynolds and capillary numbers based on the limiting flow rate.

  8. The Effect of Surfactants on the Breakup of an Axisymmetric Laminar Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Justin; Calabrese, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The breakup of a laminar axisymmetric jet is a well-studied fluid dynamics phenomenon, first studied by Savart (1833) and Rayleigh (1879). Many papers have been published over the years describing the theory of jet breakup, such as the paper by Tomotika (1935). More recently, many studies have been performed using various computational simulations to better understand the mechanics of jet breakup, notable among these are Homma et al. (2006). Despite the extensive literature on the topic, the impact of surface active agents on jet breakup has received limited attention, whether due to the system's inherent complexity or a poor understanding of the mechanics of the action of surface active agents themselves. In this study, the drop size distribution and jet breakup length resulting from the breakup of liquid jet systems were studied experimentally. Jets were formed by forcing a fluid through a narrow capillary using pneumatic pressure. Experiments involving oil-water jets with aqueous surfactants were performed. Several distinct regimes were identified based on hydrodynamic and physicochemical conditions. Jet length was found to increase with surfactant concentration, while droplet diameter was found to decrease (dependent on jet regime). A Semiempirical model to predict the breakup length of Jets in the presence of surfactants is also proposed.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of jets laden with evaporating drops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leboissetier, A.; Okong'o, N.; Bellan, J.

    2004-01-01

    LES of a circular jet laden with evaporating liquid drops are conducted to assess computational-drop modeling and three different SGS-flux models: the Scale Similarity model (SSC), using a constant coefficient calibrated on a temporal mixing layer DNS database, and dynamic-coefficient Gradient and Smagorinsky models.

  10. Impulsively started incompressible turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect

    Witze, P O

    1980-10-01

    Hot-film anemometer measurements are presented for the centerline velocity of a suddenly started jet of air. The tip penetration of the jet is shown to be proportional to the square-root of time. A theoretical model is developed that assumes the transient jet can be characterized as a spherical vortex interacting with a steady-state jet. The model demonstrates that the ratio of nozzle radius to jet velocity defines a time constant that uniquely characterizes the behavior and similarity of impulsively started incompressible turbulent jets.

  11. An experimental study of air entrainment and oxygen transfer at a water jet from a nozzle with air holes.

    PubMed

    Baylar, Ahmet; Emiroglu, M Emin

    2004-01-01

    An adequate supply of dissolved oxygen is important in natural rivers and in some water treatment processes. The dissolved oxygen concentration can be enhanced by entraining air bubbles in a receiving pool. When a water jet impinges a receiving pool at rest, air bubbles may be entrained and carried away below the pool free surface. This process is called plunging water jet entrainment and aeration. This paper describes an experimental study of the air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency of circular nozzles with and without air holes. In particular, the effect of varying the number, positions, and open/close status of the air holes is investigated. A negative pressure occurred depending on the air holes opened on the circular nozzles. This phenomenon affected the water jet expansion, water jet shape, air entrainment, and bubble penetration depth and, hence, the oxygen transfer efficiency. It was demonstrated that the air entrainment rate and the oxygen transfer efficiency of the circular nozzles with air holes were better than those of the circular nozzles without air holes. Therefore, adding air holes to a simple, circular nozzle could lead to a significantly increased air entrainment rate and oxygen transfer efficiency.

  12. Ram-jet Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cervenko, A. J.; Friedman, R.

    1956-01-01

    The ram jet is basically one of the most dimple types of aircraft engine. It consists only of an inlet diffuser, a combustion system, and an exit nozzle. A typical ram-jet configuration is shown in figure 128. The engine operates on the Brayton cycle, and ideal cycle efficiency depends only on the ratio of engine to ambient pressure. The increased, engine pressures are obtained by ram action alone, and for this reason the ram jet has zero thrust at zero speed. Therefore, ram-jet-powered aircraft must be boosted to flight speeds close to a Mach number of 1.0 before appreciable thrust is generated by the engine. Since pressure increases are obtained by ram action alone, combustor-inlet pressures and temperatures are controlled by the flight speed, the ambient atmospheric condition, and by the efficiency of the inlet diffuser. These pressures and temperatures, as functions of flight speed and altitude, are shown in figure 129 for the NACA standard atmosphere and for practical values of diffuser efficiency. It can be seen that very wide ranges of combustor-inlet temperatures and pressures may be encountered over the ranges of flight velocity and altitude at which ram jets may be operated. Combustor-inlet temperatures from 500 degrees to 1500 degrees R and inlet pressures from 5 to 100 pounds per square inch absolute represent the approximate ranges of interest in current combustor development work. Since the ram jet has no moving parts in the combustor outlet, higher exhaust-gas temperatures than those used in current turbojets are permissible. Therefore, fuel-air ratios equivalent to maximum rates of air specific impulse or heat release can be used, and, for hydrocarbon fuels, this weight ratio is about 0.070. Lower fuel-air ratios down to about 0.015 may also be required to permit efficient cruise operation. This fuel-air-ratio range of 0.015 to 0.070 used in ram jets can be compared with the fuel-air ratios up to 0.025 encountered in current turbojets. Ram-jet

  13. The M87 Jet. "Rosetta Stone" of AGN Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masanori; Asada, Keiichi

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the structure and dynamics of the M87 jet based on multi-frequency VLBI observations and MHD jet theories. Millimeter VLBI cores are considered as innermost jet emissions. The jet structure up to ~ 105 rs is described as a parabolic streamline, indicating the lateral expansion under a confinement by the stratified ISM. Thus, the jet collimation maintains in five orders of magnitude in the distance starting from the vicinity of the supermassive black hole (SMBH), less than 10 rs. We here examine the jet parabolic structure in order to identify the property of a bulk acceleration; observed sub-to-superluminal motions indicate an MHD acceleration from non-relativistic to relativistic regimes. We propose that the M87 jet consists of Poynting-flux dominated flows, powered by nonlinear torsional Alfvén waves. Future sub-mm VLBI observations play an important role in resolving the origin of the M87 jets.

  14. B-jets and z + b-jets at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Jeans, Daniel; /Rome U.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present CDF cross-section measurements for the inclusive production of b jets and the production of b jets in association with a Z{sup 0} boson. Both measurements are in reasonable agreement with NLO QCD predictions.

  15. The Twin Jet Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    M2-9 is a striking example of a 'butterfly' or a bipolar planetary nebula. Another more revealing name might be the 'Twin Jet Nebula.' If the nebula is sliced across the star, each side of it appears much like a pair of exhausts from jet engines. Indeed, because of the nebula's shape and the measured velocity of the gas, in excess of 200 miles per second, astronomers believe that the description as a super-super-sonic jet exhaust is quite apt. This is much the same process that takes place in a jet engine: The burning and expanding gases are deflected by the engine walls through a nozzle to form long, collimated jets of hot air at high speeds. M2-9 is 2,100 light-years away in the constellation Ophiucus. The observation was taken Aug. 2, 1997 by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. In this image, neutral oxygen is shown in red, once-ionized nitrogen in green, and twice-ionized oxygen in blue.

  16. Jet propulsion without inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spagnolie, Saverio E.; Lauga, Eric

    2010-08-01

    A body immersed in a highly viscous fluid can locomote by drawing in and expelling fluid through pores at its surface. We consider this mechanism of jet propulsion without inertia in the case of spheroidal bodies and derive both the swimming velocity and the hydrodynamic efficiency. Elementary examples are presented and exact axisymmetric solutions for spherical, prolate spheroidal, and oblate spheroidal body shapes are provided. In each case, entirely and partially porous (i.e., jetting) surfaces are considered and the optimal jetting flow profiles at the surface for maximizing the hydrodynamic efficiency are determined computationally. The maximal efficiency which may be achieved by a sphere using such jet propulsion is 12.5%, a significant improvement upon traditional flagella-based means of locomotion at zero Reynolds number, which corresponds to the potential flow created by a source dipole at the sphere center. Unlike other swimming mechanisms which rely on the presentation of a small cross section in the direction of motion, the efficiency of a jetting body at low Reynolds number increases as the body becomes more oblate and limits to approximately 162% in the case of a flat plate swimming along its axis of symmetry. Our results are discussed in the light of slime extrusion mechanisms occurring in many cyanobacteria.

  17. Jet engine testing apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Zweifel, T.L.

    1987-03-24

    An apparatus is described for testing jet engines mounted on an aircraft, the jet engines of the type having a high speed rotor and a low speed rotor, comprising: representative signal means for providing first representative signals representative of rotation rates of the low speed rotor in the jet engines and second representative signals representative of rotation rates of the high speed rotor in the jet engines; equivalent signal means coupled to receive the second representative signals for deriving equivalent signals representative of low speed rotor rotation rates of normally operating jet engines having high speed rotor rotation rates represented by the second representative signals; first difference signal means coupled to receive the first representative signals and the equivalent signals for providing first difference signals representative of differences between the first representative signals and the equivalent signals; means for providing threshold signals; first detector means coupled to the threshold signal means and the first difference signal means for comparing the threshold signals and the first difference signals to provide first detected signals representative of values of the first difference signals relative to the threshold signals; and engine failure indicator means coupled to receive the detected signals for determination of engine failures.

  18. Sweeping Jet Optimization Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melton, LaTunia Pack; Koklu, Mehti; Andino, Marlyn; Lin, John C.; Edelman, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Progress on experimental efforts to optimize sweeping jet actuators for active flow control (AFC) applications with large adverse pressure gradients is reported. Three sweeping jet actuator configurations, with the same orifice size but di?erent internal geometries, were installed on the flap shoulder of an unswept, NACA 0015 semi-span wing to investigate how the output produced by a sweeping jet interacts with the separated flow and the mechanisms by which the flow separation is controlled. For this experiment, the flow separation was generated by deflecting the wing's 30% chord trailing edge flap to produce an adverse pressure gradient. Steady and unsteady pressure data, Particle Image Velocimetry data, and force and moment data were acquired to assess the performance of the three actuator configurations. The actuator with the largest jet deflection angle, at the pressure ratios investigated, was the most efficient at controlling flow separation on the flap of the model. Oil flow visualization studies revealed that the flow field controlled by the sweeping jets was more three-dimensional than expected. The results presented also show that the actuator spacing was appropriate for the pressure ratios examined.

  19. Aeroacoustic Experiments with Twin Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozak, Richard F.; Henderson, Brenda S.

    2012-01-01

    While the noise produced by a single jet is azimuthally symmetric, multiple jets produce azimuthally varying far-field noise. The ability of one jet to shield another reduces the noise radiated in the plane of the jets, while often increasing the noise radiated out of the plane containing the jets. The present study investigates the shielding potential of twin jet configurations over subsonic and over-expanded supersonic jet conditions with simulated forward flight. The experiments were conducted with 2 in. throat diameter nozzles at four jet spacings from 2.6d to 5.5d in center-to-center distance, where d is the nozzle throat diameter. The current study found a maximum of 3 dB reduction in overall sound pressure level relative to two incoherent jets in the peak jet noise direction in the plane containing the jets. However, an increase of 3 dB was found perpendicular to the plane containing the jets. In the sideline direction, shielding is observed for all jet spacings in this study.

  20. Microbicidal activities of low frequency atmospheric pressure plasma jets on oral pathogens.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiromitsu; Ohshima, Tomoko; Tsubota, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Jayawardena, Jayanetti Asiri; Nishimura, Yasushi

    2011-01-01

    Research using low frequency atmospheric pressure plasma jets (LF jet) is becoming increasingly more common. We carried out experiments to evaluate the sterilizing effects of this technology on oral pathogenic microorganisms (S.mutans, C.albicans and E. faecalis) and to determine its potential for clinical application. We performed the direct exposure test on a solid surface, indirect exposure test on a liquid phase, and ROS (reactive oxygen species) inhibitory test. The results showed the LF jet had microbicidal effects on oral pathogens, and that the ROS influenced this sterilization effect. The experiments of this study revealed that LF jet had a sterilizing effect on oral pathogenic microorganisms present in both the solid and liquid phases. The sterilizing mechanism was considered to be related to the effect of superoxide anion radicals. These results indicate that LF jets may represent a novel technology that can be applied to the field of clinical dentistry.