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Sample records for pms2 mutation positive

  1. PMS2 monoallelic mutation carriers: the known unknown

    PubMed Central

    Goodenberger, McKinsey L.; Thomas, Brittany C.; Riegert-Johnson, Douglas; Boland, C. Richard; Plon, Sharon E.; Clendenning, Mark; Ko Win, Aung; Senter, Leigha; Lipkin, Steven M.; Stadler, Zsofia K.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Lynch, Henry T.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Syngal, Sapna; Lynch, Patrick; Parry, Susan; Jenkins, Mark A.; Gallinger, Steven; Holter, Spring; Aronson, Melyssa; Newcomb, Polly A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Pichurin, Pavel; Hampel, Heather; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Lu, Karen H.; Thibodeau, Stephen; Lindor, Noralane M.

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 have been shown to cause Lynch syndrome. The penetrance for cancer and tumor spectrum has been repeatedly studied and multiple professional societies have proposed clinical management guidelines for affected individuals. Several studies have demonstrated a reduced penetrance for monoallelic carriers of PMS2 mutations compared to the other mismatch repair (MMR) genes, but clinical management guidelines have largely proposed the same screening recommendations for all MMR gene carriers. The authors considered whether enough evidence existed to propose new screening guidelines specific to PMS2 mutation carriers with regard to age of onset and frequency of colonic screening. Published reports of PMS2 germline mutations were combined with unpublished cases from the authors’ research registries and clinical practices, and a discussion of potential modification of cancer screening guidelines was pursued. A total of 234 monoallelic PMS2 mutation carriers from 170 families were included. Approximately 8% of those with CRC were diagnosed under age 30 and each of these tumors presented on the left-side of the colon. As it is currently unknown what causes the early-onset of CRC in some families with monoallelic PMS2 germline mutations, the authors recommend against reducing cancer surveillance guidelines in families found having monoallelic PMS2 mutations in spite of the documented reduced penetrance. PMID:25856668

  2. Germline mutations in PMS2 and MLH1 in individuals with solitary loss of PMS2 expression in colorectal carcinomas from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Rosty, Christophe; Clendenning, Mark; Walsh, Michael D; Eriksen, Stine V; Southey, Melissa C; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Boussioutas, Alex; Parry, Susan; Arnold, Julie; Young, Joanne P; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Gallinger, Steven; Le Marchand, Loïc; Newcomb, Polly A; Potter, John D; DeRycke, Melissa; Lindor, Noralane M; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Baron, John A; Win, Aung Ko; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Immunohistochemistry for DNA mismatch repair proteins is used to screen for Lynch syndrome in individuals with colorectal carcinoma (CRC). Although solitary loss of PMS2 expression is indicative of carrying a germline mutation in PMS2, previous studies reported MLH1 mutation in some cases. We determined the prevalence of MLH1 germline mutations in a large cohort of individuals with a CRC demonstrating solitary loss of PMS2 expression. Design This cohort study included 88 individuals affected with a PMS2-deficient CRC from the Colon Cancer Family Registry Cohort. Germline PMS2 mutation analysis (long-range PCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification) was followed by MLH1 mutation testing (Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification). Results Of the 66 individuals with complete mutation screening, we identified a pathogenic PMS2 mutation in 49 (74%), a pathogenic MLH1 mutation in 8 (12%) and a MLH1 variant of uncertain clinical significance predicted to be damaging by in silico analysis in 3 (4%); 6 (9%) carried variants likely to have no clinical significance. Missense point mutations accounted for most alterations (83%; 9/11) in MLH1. The MLH1 c.113A> G p.Asn38Ser mutation was found in 2 related individuals. One individual who carried the MLH1 intronic mutation c.677+3A>G p.Gln197Argfs*8 leading to the skipping of exon 8, developed 2 tumours, both of which retained MLH1 expression. Conclusions A substantial proportion of CRCs with solitary loss of PMS2 expression are associated with a deleterious MLH1 germline mutation supporting the screening for MLH1 in individuals with tumours of this immunophenotype, when no PMS2 mutation has been identified. PMID:26895986

  3. The E705K mutation in hPMS2 exerts recessive, not dominant, effects on mismatch repair

    PubMed Central

    Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Tomer, Guy; Nguyen, Megan; Erdeniz, Naz; Juba, Nicole C.; Sepúlveda, Natalia; Pisani, Jenna E.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    The hPMS2 mutation E705K is associated with Turcot syndrome. To elucidate the pathogenesis of hPMS2-E705K, we modeled this mutation in yeast and characterized its expression and effects on mutation avoidance in mammalian cells. We found that while hPMS2-E705K (pms1-E738K in yeast) did not significantly affect hPMS2 (Pms1p in yeast) stability or interaction with MLH1, it could not complement the mutator phenotype in MMR-deficient mouse or yeast cells. Further-more, hPMS2-E705K/pms1-E738K inhibited MMR in wild-type (WT) mammalian cell extracts or yeast cells only when present in excess amounts relative to WT PMS2. Our results strongly suggest that hPMS2-E705K is a recessive loss-of-function allele. PMID:17029773

  4. Germline MLH1 Mutations Are Frequently Identified in Lynch Syndrome Patients With Colorectal and Endometrial Carcinoma Demonstrating Isolated Loss of PMS2 Immunohistochemical Expression.

    PubMed

    Dudley, Beth; Brand, Randall E; Thull, Darcy; Bahary, Nathan; Nikiforova, Marina N; Pai, Reetesh K

    2015-08-01

    Current guidelines on germline mutation testing for patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome are not entirely clear in patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression. We analyzed the clinical and pathologic features of patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression in an attempt to (1) determine the frequency of germline MLH1 and PMS2 mutations and (2) correlate mismatch-repair protein immunohistochemistry and tumor histology with germline mutation results. A total of 3213 consecutive colorectal carcinomas and 215 consecutive endometrial carcinomas were prospectively analyzed for DNA mismatch-repair protein expression by immunohistochemistry. In total, 32 tumors from 31 patients demonstrated isolated loss of PMS2 immunohistochemical expression, including 16 colorectal carcinomas and 16 endometrial carcinomas. Microsatellite instability (MSI) polymerase chain reaction was performed in 29 tumors from 28 patients with the following results: 28 tumors demonstrated high-level MSI, and 1 tumor demonstrated low-level MSI. Twenty of 31 (65%) patients in the study group had tumors demonstrating histopathology associated with high-level MSI. Seventeen patients underwent germline mutation analysis with the following results: 24% with MLH1 mutations, 35% with PMS2 mutations, 12% with PMS2 variants of undetermined significance, and 29% with no mutations in either MLH1 or PMS2. Three of the 4 patients with MLH1 germline mutations had a mutation that results in decreased stability and quantity of the MLH1 protein that compromises the MLH1-PMS2 protein complex, helping to explain the presence of immunogenic but functionally inactive MLH1 protein within the tumor. The high frequency of MLH1 germline mutations identified in our study has important implications for testing strategies in patients suspected of having Lynch syndrome and indicates that patients with tumors demonstrating isolated loss of PMS2 expression

  5. Levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA to AAA mutation: response to 4-ABP-treatment and Pms2-deficiency.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Barbara L; Delongchamp, Robert R; Beland, Frederick A; Heflich, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiencies result in increased frequencies of spontaneous mutation and tumor formation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that a chemically-induced mutational response would be greater in a mouse with an MMR-deficiency than in the MMR-proficient mouse models commonly used to assay for chemical carcinogenicity. To accomplish this, the induction of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation was examined in Pms2 knockout mice (Pms2-/-, C57BL/6 background) and sibling wild-type mice (Pms2+/+). Groups of five or six neonatal male mice were treated with 0.3 micromol 4-aminobiphenyl (4-ABP) or the vehicle control, dimethylsulfoxide. Eight months after treatment, liver DNAs were isolated and analysed for levels of H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutation using allele-specific competitive blocker-PCR. In Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, 4-ABP treatment caused an increase in mutant fraction (MF) from 1.65x10(-5) to 2.91x10(-5) and from 3.40x10(-5) to 4.70x10(-5), respectively. Pooling data from 4-ABP-treated and control mice, the approximately 2-fold increase in MF observed in Pms2-deficient as compared with Pms2-proficient mice was statistically significant (P=0.0207) and consistent with what has been reported previously in terms of induction of G:C-->T:A mutation in a Pms2-deficient background. Pooling data from both genotypes, the increase in H-ras MF in 4-ABP-treated mice, as compared with control mice, did not reach the 95% confidence level of statistical significance (P=0.0606). The 4-ABP treatment caused a 1.76-fold and 1.38-fold increase in average H-ras MF in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice, respectively. Furthermore, the levels of induced mutation in Pms2-proficient and Pms2-deficient mice were nearly identical (1.26x10(-5) and 1.30x10(-5), respectively). We conclude that Pms2-deficiency does not result in an amplification of the H-ras codon 61 CAA-->AAA mutational response induced by 4-ABP.

  6. Café-au-lait macules and pediatric malignancy caused by biallelic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene PMS2.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carl-Christian; Holter, Spring; Pollett, Aaron; Clendenning, Mark; Chou, Shirley; Senter, Leigha; Ramphal, Raveena; Gallinger, Steven; Boycott, Kym

    2008-06-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with a T4 sigmoid adenocarcinoma, <10 colonic adenomas and multiple café-au-lait macules. Family history was not suggestive of a dominant hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Evaluation of the tumor revealed abnormal immunohistochemical staining of the PMS2 protein and high frequency microsatellite instability. Germline analysis identified biallelic PMS2 missense mutations. A new cancer syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in the mismatch repair genes, including PMS2, is now emerging and is characterized by café-au-lait macules, colonic polyps and a distinctive tumor spectrum.

  7. Two co-existing germline mutations P53 V157D and PMS2 R20Q promote tumorigenesis in a familial cancer syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuoyun; Sun, Yihua; Gao, Bin; Lu, Yi; Fang, Rong; Gao, Yijun; Xiao, Tian; Liu, Xin-Yuan; Pao, William; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Haiquan; Ji, Hongbin

    2014-01-01

    Germline mutations are responsible for familial cancer syndromes which account for approximately 5-10% of all types of cancers. These mutations mainly occur at tumor suppressor genes or genome stability genes, such as DNA repair genes. Here we have identified a cancer predisposition family, in which eight members were inflicted with a wide spectrum of cancer including one diagnosed with lung cancer at 22years old. Sequencing analysis of tumor samples as well as histologically normal specimens identified two germline mutations co-existing in the familial cancer syndrome, the mutation of tumor suppressor gene P53 V157D and mismatch repair gene PMS2 R20Q. We further demonstrate that P53 V157D and/or PMS2 R20Q mutant promotes lung cancer cell proliferation. These two mutants are capable of promoting colony formation in soft agar as well as tumor formation in transgenic drosophila system. Collectively, these data have uncovered the important role of co-existing germline P53 and PMS2 mutations in the familial cancer syndrome development.

  8. Ovarian metastasis from uveal melanoma with MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in a patient with germline MLH1 mutated Lynch syndrome: consequence or coincidence?

    PubMed

    Lobo, João; Pinto, Carla; Freitas, Micaela; Pinheiro, Manuela; Vizcaino, Rámon; Oliva, Esther; Teixeira, Manuel R; Jerónimo, Carmen; Bartosch, Carla

    2017-03-01

    Currently, uveal melanoma is not considered within the Lynch syndrome tumor spectrum. However, there are studies suggesting a contribution of microsatellite instability in sporadic uveal melanoma tumorigenesis. We report a 45-year-old woman who was referred for genetic counseling due to a family history of Lynch syndrome caused by a MLH1 mutation. She originally underwent enucleation of the right eye secondary to a uveal spindle cell melanoma diagnosed at age 25. The tumor recurred 22 years later presenting as an ovarian metastasis and concurrently a microscopic endometrial endometrioid carcinoma, grade 1/3 was diagnosed. Subsequent studies highlighted that the uveal melanoma showed high microsatellite instability and loss of MLH1 and PMS2 protein expression, with no MLH1 promoter methylation or BRAF mutation. Additionally, a GNAQ mutation was found. We conclude that our patient's uveal melanoma is most likely related to MLH1 germline mutation and thus Lynch syndrome related. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of uveal melanoma showing MLH1/PMS2 protein loss in the context of Lynch syndrome.

  9. An intact Pms2 ATPase domain is not essential for male fertility

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Jared M; Dudley, Sandra; Miller, Ashleigh J; Liskay, R Michael

    2016-01-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) machinery in mammals plays critical roles in both mutation avoidance and spermatogenesis. Meiotic analysis of knockout mice of two different MMR genes, Mlh1 and Mlh3, revealed both male and female infertility associated with a defect in meiotic crossing over. In contrast, another MMR gene knockout, Pms2 (Pms2ko/ko), which contained a deletion of a portion of the ATPase domain, produced animals that were male sterile but female fertile. However, the meiotic phenotype of Pms2ko/ko males was less clear-cut than for Mlh1- or Mlh3-deficient meiosis. More recently, we generated a different Pms2 mutant allele (Pms2cre), which results in deletion of the same portion of the ATPase domain. Surprisingly, Pms2cre/cre male mice were completely fertile, suggesting that the ATPase domain of Pms2 is not required for male fertility. To explore the difference in male fertility, we examined the Pms2 RNA and found that alternative splicing of the Pms2cre allele results in a predicted Pms2 containing the C-terminus, which contains the Mlh1-interaction domain, a possible candidate for stabilizing Mlh1 levels. To study further the basis of male fertility, we examined Mlh1 levels in testes and found that whereas Pms2 loss in Pms2ko/ko mice results in severely reduced levels of Mlh1 expression in the testes, Mlh1 levels in Pms2cre/cre testes were reduced to a lesser extent. Thus, we propose that a primary function of Pms2 during spermatogenesis is to stabilize Mlh1 levels prior to its critical crossing over function with Mlh3. PMID:26753533

  10. Mutagenesis in PMS2- and MSH2-deficient mice indicates differential protection from transversions and frameshifts.

    PubMed

    Andrew, S E; Xu, X S; Baross-Francis, A; Narayanan, L; Milhausen, K; Liskay, R M; Jirik, F R; Glazer, P M

    2000-07-01

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency leads to an increased mutation frequency and a predisposition to neoplasia. 'Knockout' mice deficient in the MMR proteins Msh2 and Pms2 crossed with mutation detection reporter (supF, lacI and cII) transgenic mice have been used to facilitate a comparison of the changes in mutation frequency and spectra. We find that the mutation frequency was consistently higher in Msh2-deficient mice than Pms2-deficient mice. The lacI target gene, which is highly sensitive to point mutations, demonstrated that both Msh2- and Pms2-deficient mice accumulate transition mutations as the predominant mutation. However, when compared with Msh2(-/-) mice, lacI and cII mutants from Pms2-deficient mice revealed an increased proportion of +/-1 bp frameshift mutations and a corresponding decrease in transversion mutations. The supF target gene, which is sensitive to frameshift mutations, and the cII target gene revealed a strong tendency for -1 bp deletions over +1 bp insertions in Msh2(-/-) compared with Pms2(-/-) mice. These data indicate that Msh2 and Pms2 deficiency have subtle but differing effects on mutation avoidance which may contribute to the differences in tumor spectra observed in the two 'knockout' mouse models. These variances in mutation accumulation may also play a role, in part, in the differences seen in prevalence of MSH2 and PMS2 germline mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer patients.

  11. Functional role of DNA mismatch repair gene PMS2 in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuhara, Shinichiro; Chang, Inik; Mitsui, Yozo; Chiyomaru, Takeshi; Yamamura, Soichiro; Majid, Shahana; Saini, Sharanjot; Deng, Guoren; Gill, Ankurpreet; Wong, Darryn K; Shiina, Hiroaki; Nonomura, Norio; Lau, Yun-Fai C; Dahiya, Rajvir; Tanaka, Yuichiro

    2015-06-30

    DNA mismatch repair (MMR) enzymes act as proofreading complexes that maintains genomic integrity and MMR-deficient cells show an increased mutation rate. MMR has also been shown to influence cell signaling and the regulation of tumor development. MMR consists of various genes and includes post-meiotic segregation (PMS) 2 which is a vital component of mutL-alpha. In prostate, the functional role of this gene has never been reported and in this study, our aim was to investigate the effect of PMS2 on growth properties of prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Previous studies have shown PMS2 to be deficient in DU145 cells and this lack of expression was confirmed by Western blotting whereas normal prostatic PWR-1E and RWPE-1 cells expressed this gene. PMS2 effects on various growth properties of DU145 were then determined by creating stable gene transfectants. Interestingly, PMS2 caused decreased cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and in vivo growth; and increased apoptosis as compared to vector control. We further analyzed genes affected by PMS2 expression and observe the apoptosis-related TMS1 gene to be significantly upregulated whereas anti-apoptotic BCL2A1 was downregulated. These results demonstrate a functional role for PMS2 to protect against PCa progression by enhancing apoptosis of PCa cells.

  12. Detection of large scale 3' deletions in the PMS2 gene amongst Colon-CFR participants: have we been missing anything?

    PubMed

    Clendenning, Mark; Walsh, Michael D; Gelpi, Judith Balmana; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane; Potter, John D; Newcomb, Polly; LeMarchand, Loic; Haile, Robert; Gallinger, Steve; Hopper, John L; Jenkins, Mark A; Rosty, Christophe; Young, Joanne P; Buchanan, Daniel D

    2013-09-01

    Current screening practices have been able to identify PMS2 mutations in 78 % of cases of colorectal cancer from the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry (Colon CFR) which showed solitary loss of the PMS2 protein. However the detection of large-scale deletions in the 3' end of the PMS2 gene has not been possible due to technical difficulties associated with pseudogene sequences. Here, we utilised a recently described MLPA/long-range PCR-based approach to screen the remaining 22 % (n = 16) of CRC-affected probands for mutations in the 3' end of the PMS2 gene. No deletions encompassing any or all of exons 12 through 15 were identified; therefore, our results suggest that 3' deletions in PMS2 are not a frequent occurrence in such families.

  13. Relationship between MLH-1, MSH-2, PMS-2,MSH-6 expression and clinicopathological features in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Birgül; Argon, Asuman; Yıldırım, Mehmet; Vardar, Enver

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancers are the third most common in both sexes and they are the second most common cause of cancer-related death. 12-15% of colorectal cancers develop through microsatellite instability (the hereditary mutation in at least one of DNA mismatch repair genes) pathway and they are 2-5% hereditary. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the clinicopathological features themselves and also the correlation between them and the immunohistochemical MLH-1, MSH-2, PMS-2, MSH-6 expressions in a total of 186 resection materials with colorectal adenocarcinoma between 2008 and 2012. All the cases were retrospectively evaluated in terms of age, sex, localization, size, accompanying polyp, multiple tumor, arising from polyp, differentiation, mucinous differentiation, pathological tumor stage, lymphovascular and perineural invasion, lymphocyte amount in the tumor microenvironment, surgical border and lymph node metastasis. We prepared multiple tissue blocks which had 4-millimeter tumor. Immunohistochemically, MLH-1, MSH-2, PMS-2, MSH-6 primary antibodies were studied. Statistically, "Kruskal-Wallis" ve "Pearson's chi-squared" tests were used. We found a positive correlation between loss of MLH-1 and PMS-2 expressions and the right-colon location, poor and mucinous differentiation and dense lymphocytic infiltration. In addition, loss of MSH-2 and MSH-6 expressions was correlated with the right-colon location, poor and mucinous differentiation. We found a meaningful relationship between immunohistochemical markers and clinicopathological features usually observed in tumors with microsatellite instability. This finding may arouse suspicion for MSI. However, the findings in our study must be supported with studies conducted in large series including molecular methods.

  14. [Introduction of mutations in insulin molecule: positive and negative mutations].

    PubMed

    Ksenofontova, O I

    2014-01-01

    Introduction of mutations in an insulin molecule is one of the important approaches to drug development for treatment of diabetes mellitus. Generally, usage of mutations is aimed at activation of insulin and insulin receptor interaction. Such mutations can be considered as positive. Mutations that reduce the binding efficacy are negative. There are neutral mutations as well. This article considers both natural mutations that are typical for various members of the insulin superfamily and artificial ones which are introduced to improve the insulin pharmacological characteristics. Data presented here can be useful in developing new effective insulin analogues for treatment of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Vicarious absolute radiometric calibration of GF-2 PMS2 sensor using permanent artificial targets in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yaokai; Li, Chuanrong; Ma, Lingling; Wang, Ning; Qian, Yonggang; Tang, Lingli

    2016-10-01

    GF-2, launched on August 19 2014, is one of the high-resolution land resource observing satellite of the China GF series satellites plan. The radiometric performance evaluation of the onboard optical pan and multispectral (PMS2) sensor of GF-2 satellite is very important for the further application of the data. And, the vicarious absolute radiometric calibration approach is one of the most useful way to monitor the radiometric performance of the onboard optical sensors. In this study, the traditional reflectance-based method is used to vicarious radiometrically calibrate the onboard PMS2 sensor of GF-2 satellite using three black, gray and white reflected permanent artificial targets located in the AOE Baotou site in China. Vicarious field calibration campaign were carried out in the AOE-Baotou calibration site on 22 April 2016. And, the absolute radiometric calibration coefficients were determined with in situ measured atmospheric parameters and surface reflectance of the permanent artificial calibration targets. The predicted TOA radiance of a selected desert area with our determined calibrated coefficients were compared with the official distributed calibration coefficients. Comparison results show a good consistent and the mean relative difference of the multispectral channels is less than 5%. Uncertainty analysis was also carried out and a total uncertainty with 3.87% is determined of the TOA radiance.

  16. HUMAN KINASES DISPLAY MUTATIONAL HOTSPOTS AT COGNATE POSITIONS WITHIN CANCER.

    PubMed

    Gallion, Jonathan; Wilkins, Angela D; Lichtarge, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of driver genes is a major pursuit of cancer genomics, usually based on observing the same mutation in different patients. But the heterogeneity of cancer pathways plus the high background mutational frequency of tumor cells often cloud the distinction between less frequent drivers and innocent passenger mutations. Here, to overcome these disadvantages, we grouped together mutations from close kinase paralogs under the hypothesis that cognate mutations may functionally favor cancer cells in similar ways. Indeed, we find that kinase paralogs often bear mutations to the same substituted amino acid at the same aligned positions and with a large predicted Evolutionary Action. Functionally, these high Evolutionary Action, non-random mutations affect known kinase motifs, but strikingly, they do so differently among different kinase types and cancers, consistent with differences in selective pressures. Taken together, these results suggest that cancer pathways may flexibly distribute a dependence on a given functional mutation among multiple close kinase paralogs. The recognition of this "mutational delocalization" of cancer drivers among groups of paralogs is a new phenomena that may help better identify relevant mechanisms and therefore eventually guide personalized therapy.

  17. [Afatinib as first-line therapy in mutation-positive EGFR. Results by type of mutation].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Óscar Juan

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has laid the foundations for personalized medicine in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In phase III trials, the first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib and erlotinib, demonstrated greater efficacy compared with chemotherapy in patients with EGFR mutations, achieving progression-free survival of 8-13.5 months. Afatinib, a second-generation irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor, is the first TKI that has shown a benefit in overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC when used as first-line treatment. Exon 19 deletion (Del19) and the single-point substitution mutation (L858R) in exon 21, called activating mutations due to their ability to confer sensitivity to TKI, represent approximately 90% of the EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Distinct sensitivity to TKI has been observed depending on the type of mutation, with greater progression-free survival in patients with the Del19 mutation. The analysis of OS in the LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6 trials showed a statistically significant increase in survival in afatinib-treated patients with the Del 19 mutation, but no significant increase in that of patients with the L858R mutation. Direct comparison of afatinib and gefitinib as first-line therapy (LUX-Lung 7 trial) showed a statistically-significant increase in progression-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.95; p=0.0165) with afatinib. In the analysis by type of mutation, this benefit was observed for both the Del19 and the L858R mutations.

  18. Variation in cancer risks, by mutation position, in BRCA2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Thompson, D; Easton, D

    2001-02-01

    Cancer occurrence in 164 families with breast/ovarian cancer and germline BRCA2 mutations was studied to evaluate the evidence for genotype-phenotype correlations. Mutations in a central portion of the gene (the "ovarian cancer cluster region" [OCCR]) were associated with a significantly higher ratio of cases of ovarian:breast cancer in female carriers than were mutations 5' or 3' of this region (P<.0001), extending previous observations. The optimal definition of the OCCR, as judged on the basis of deviance statistics, was bounded by nucleotides 3059-4075 and 6503-6629. The relative and absolute risks of breast and ovarian cancer associated with OCCR and non-OCCR mutations were estimated by a conditional likelihood approach, conditioning on the set of mutations observed in the families. OCCR mutations were associated both with a highly significantly lower risk of breast cancer (relative risk [RR] 0.63; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.46-0.84; P=.0012) and with a significantly higher risk of ovarian cancer (RR = 1.88; 95% CI = 1.08-3.33; P=.026). No other differences in breast or ovarian cancer risk, by mutation position, were apparent. There was some evidence for a lower risk of prostate cancer in carriers of an OCCR mutation (RR = 0.52; 95% CI = 0.24-1.00; P=.05), but there was no evidence of a difference in breast cancer risk in males. By age 80 years, the cumulative risk of breast cancer in male carriers of a BRCA2 mutation was estimated as 6.92% (95% CI = 1.20%-38.57%). Possible mechanisms for the variation in cancer risk are suggested by the coincidence of the OCCR with the RAD51-binding domain.

  19. Increased mitochondrial mutation frequency after an island colonization: positive selection or accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations?

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Emilie A; Tautz, Diethard

    2013-04-23

    Island colonizations are excellent models for studying early processes of evolution. We found in a previous study on mice that had colonized the sub-Antarctic Kerguelen Archipelago about 200 years ago that they were derived from a single founder lineage and that this showed an unexpectedly large number of new mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop. To assess whether positive selection has played a role in the emergence of these variants, we have obtained 16 full mitochondrial genome sequences from these mice. For comparison, we have compiled 57 mitochondrial genome sequences from laboratory inbred lines that became established about 100 years ago, also starting from a single founder lineage. We find that the island mice and the laboratory lines show very similar mutation frequencies and patterns. None of the patterns in the Kerguelen mice provides evidence for positive selection. We conclude that nearly neutral evolutionary processes that assume the presence of slightly deleterious variants can fully explain the patterns. This supports the notion of time-dependency of molecular evolution and provides a new calibration point. Based on the observed mutation frequency, we calculate an average evolutionary rate of 0.23 substitutions per site per Myr for the earliest time frame of divergence, which is about six times higher than the long-term rate of 0.037 substitutions per site per Myr.

  20. Deoxyinosine triphosphate induces MLH1/PMS2- and p53-dependent cell growth arrest and DNA instability in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoneshima, Yasuto; Abolhassani, Nona; Iyama, Teruaki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoko; Mori, Masahiko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Noda, Tetsuo; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyinosine (dI) occurs in DNA either by oxidative deamination of a previously incorporated deoxyadenosine residue or by misincorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) from the nucleotide pool during replication. To exclude dITP from the pool, mammals possess specific hydrolysing enzymes, such as inosine triphosphatase (ITPA). Previous studies have shown that deficiency in ITPA results in cell growth suppression and DNA instability. To explore the mechanisms of these phenotypes, we analysed ITPA-deficient human and mouse cells. We found that both growth suppression and accumulation of single-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of ITPA-deficient cells depended on MLH1/PMS2. The cell growth suppression of ITPA-deficient cells also depended on p53, but not on MPG, ENDOV or MSH2. ITPA deficiency significantly increased the levels of p53 protein and p21 mRNA/protein, a well-known target of p53, in an MLH1-dependent manner. Furthermore, MLH1 may also contribute to cell growth arrest by increasing the basal level of p53 activity. PMID:27618981

  1. People with "MECP2" Mutation-Positive Rett Disorder Who Converse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, A. M.; Archer, H. L.; Evans, J. C.; Prescott, R. J.; Gibbon, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with useful speech after regression constitute a distinct group of those with mutation-positive Rett disorder, 6% (20/331) reported among mutation-positive people in the British Survey. We aimed to determine the physical, mental and genetic characteristics of this group and to gain insight into their experience of Rett syndrome.…

  2. Mutation position within evolutionary subclonal architecture in AML.

    PubMed

    Welch, John S

    2014-10-01

    Cytogenetic data suggest that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops through a process of branching evolution, especially during relapse and progression. Recent genomic data from AML cases using digital sequencing, temporal comparisons, xenograft cloning, and single-cell analysis indicate that most, if not all, AML cases emerge through branching evolution. According to a review of the current literature, the balanced translocations (t[15;17], t[8;21], and inv[16]) and nucleotide variants in DNMT3A and TET2 most commonly occur in the founding clone at diagnosis. These mutations are rarely gained or lost at relapse, and the latter 2 mutations are observed in elderly subjects with mosaic hematopoiesis antedating overt leukemia. In contrast, +8, +13, +22, -X, -Y, and nucleotide variants in FLT3, NRAS/KRAS, WT1, and KIT frequently occur in subclones and are observed either to emerge or to be lost at relapse. Because drugs that target mutations within a subclone are unlikely to eliminate all leukemic cells, it will be essential to understand not only which mutations a patient has but also how they organize within the leukemic subclonal architecture.

  3. Spectrum of mutations in CRM-positive and CRM-reduced hemophilia A

    SciTech Connect

    McGinniss, M.J.; Kazazian, H.H. Jr.; Bi, L.; Antonarakis, S.E. ); Hoyer, L.W. ); Inaba, H. )

    1993-02-01

    Hemophilia A is due to the functional deficiency of factor VIII (FVIII, gene locus F8C). Although half the patients have no detectable FVIII protein in their plasma, the more rare patients ([approximately]5%) have normal levels of a dysfunctional FVIII and are termed cross-reacting material (CRM)-positive. More commonly ([approximately]45%), patients have plasma FVIII protein reduced to an extent roughly comparable to the level of FVIII activity and are designated CRM-reduced. We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations within the F8C gene of 11 patients (6CRM-positive, 5 CRM-reduced) and identified 9 different mutations in 9 patients after analyses of all 26 exons, the promoter region, and the polyadenylation site. Six mutations have not been described previously. Five weree missense (Ser289Leu, Ser558Phe, Val634Ala, Val634Met, Asn1441Lys), and the sixth was a 3-bp deletion ([Delta]Phe652). A review of the literature and the assay of FVIII antigen in 5 hemophilia A patients with previously identified missense mutations from this laboratory yielded a total of 20 other unique CRM-reduced and CRM-positive mutations. Almost all CRM-positive/reduced mutations (24/26) were missense, and many (12/26) occurred at CpG dinucleotides. We examined 19 missense mutation for evolutionary conservation using the portions of the porcine and murine F8C sequences that are known, and 18/19 amino acid residue altered by mutation in these patients wer conserved. Almost 50% of mutations (11/26) clustered in the A2 domain, suggesting that this region is critical for the function of FVIII. The results indicate a nonrandom distribution of mutations and suggest that mutations in a limited number of FVIII regions may cause CRM-positive and CRM-reduced heomphilia A. 48 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Prospective study of breast cancer risk for mutation negative women from BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation positive families.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S L; Milne, R L; McLachlan, S A; Friedlander, M L; Birch, K E; Weideman, P; Goldgar, D; Hopper, J L; Phillips, K A

    2011-12-01

    Published studies have reached contradictory conclusions regarding breast cancer risk for women from families segregating a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation who do not carry the family-specific mutation. Accurate estimation of breast cancer risk is crucial for appropriate counselling regarding risk management. The aim of this study is to prospectively assess whether breast cancer risk for mutation negative women from families segregating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations is greater than for women in the general population. Eligible women were 722 first-, second- and third-degree relatives of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carrier from 224 mutation positive (128 BRCA1, 96 BRCA2) families, had no personal cancer history at baseline, and had been tested and found not to carry the family-specific mutation. Self-reported family history of cancer, preventive interventions and verified cancer diagnoses were collected at baseline, and every 3 years thereafter. Median follow-up was 6.1 years (range 0.1-12.4 years). Time at risk of breast cancer was censored at cancer diagnosis or risk-reducing surgery. Standardised incidence ratios (SIR) were estimated by comparing observed to population incidences of invasive breast cancer using Australian Cancer Incidence and Mortality Books. Six cases of invasive breast cancer were observed. The estimated SIRs were 1.14 (95% CI: 0.51-2.53) overall (n = 722), 1.29 (95% CI: 0.58-2.88) when restricted to first- and second-degree relatives of an affected mutation carrier (n = 442) and 0.48 (95% CI: 0.12-1.93) when restricted to those with no family history of breast cancer in the non-mutation carrying parental lineage (n = 424). There was no evidence that mutation negative women from families segregating BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations are at increased risk of breast cancer. Despite this being the largest prospective cohort to assess this issue, moderately increased breast cancer risk (2-fold) cannot be ruled out.

  5. High frequency strand slippage mutations in CTCF in MSI-positive endometrial cancers.

    PubMed

    Zighelboim, Israel; Mutch, David G; Knapp, Amy; Ding, Li; Xie, Mingchao; Cohn, David E; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2014-01-01

    Tumors with defective mismatch repair acquire large numbers of strand slippage mutations including frameshifts in coding sequence repeats. We identified a mutational hotspot, p.T204fs, in the insulator-binding protein (CTCF) in MSI-positive endometrial cancers. Although CTCF was described as a significantly mutated gene by the endometrial cancer TCGA, the A₇ track variants leading to T204 frameshifts were not reported. Reanalysis of TCGA data using Pindel revealed frequent T204fs mutations, confirming CTCF is an MSI target gene and revealed the same frameshifts in tumors with intact mismatch repair. We show that T204fs transcripts are subject to nonsense-mediated decay and as such, T204fs mutations are unlikely to act as dominant negatives. The spectrum and pattern of mutations observed is consistent with CTCF acting as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor.

  6. Functional analysis of 'a' determinant mutations associated with occult HBV in HIV-positive South Africans.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eleanor A; Boyce, Ceejay L; Gededzha, Maemu P; Selabe, Selokela G; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T

    2016-07-01

    Occult hepatitis B is defined by the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation during immune suppression, and virus transmission. Viral mutations contribute significantly to the occult HBV phenotype. Mutations in the 'a' determinant of HBsAg are of particular interest, as these mutations are associated with immune escape, vaccine escape and diagnostic failure. We examined the effects of selected occult HBV-associated mutations identified in a population of HIV-positive South Africans on HBsAg production in vitro. Mutations were inserted into two different chronic HBV backbones and transfected into a hepatocyte-derived cell line. HBsAg levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while the detectability of mutant HBsAg was determined using an HA-tagged HBsAg expression system. Of the seven mutations analysed, four (S132P, C138Y, N146D and C147Y) resulted in decreased HBsAg expression in one viral background but not in the second viral background. One mutation (N146D) led to a decrease in HBsAg detected as compared to HA-tag, indicating that this mutation compromises the ability of the ELISA to detect HBsAg. The contribution of occult-associated mutations to the HBsAg-negative phenotype of occult HBV cannot be determined adequately by testing the effect of the mutation in a single viral background, and rigorous analysis of these mutations is required.

  7. Detection of false positive mutations in BRCA gene by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Suryavanshi, Moushumi; Kumar, Dushyant; Panigrahi, Manoj Kumar; Chowdhary, Meenakshi; Mehta, Anurag

    2016-11-15

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes are implicated in 20-25% of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. New age sequencing platforms have revolutionized massively parallel sequencing in clinical practice by providing cost effective, rapid, and sensitive sequencing. This study critically evaluates the false positives in multiplex panels and suggests the need for careful analysis. We employed multiplex PCR based BRCA1 and BRCA2 community Panel with ion torrent PGM machine for evaluation of these mutations. Out of all 41samples analyzed for BRCA1 and BRCA2 five were found with 950_951 insA(Asn319fs) at Chr13:32906565 position and one sample with 1032_1033 insA(Asn346fs) at Chr13:32906647, both being frame-shift mutations in BRCA2 gene. 950_951 insA(Asn319fs) mutation is reported as pathogenic allele in NCBI dbSNP. On examination of IGV for all these samples, it was seen that both mutations had 'A' nucleotide insertion at 950, and 1032 position in exon 10 of BRCA2 gene. Sanger Sequencing did not confirm these insertions. Next-generation sequencing shows great promise by allowing rapid mutational analysis of multiple genes in human cancer but our results indicate the need for careful sequence analysis to avoid false positive results.

  8. High burden and pervasive positive selection of somatic mutations in normal human skin

    PubMed Central

    Martincorena, Iñigo; Roshan, Amit; Gerstung, Moritz; Ellis, Peter; Van Loo, Peter; McLaren, Stuart; Wedge, David C.; Fullam, Anthony; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Tubio, Jose M.; Stebbings, Lucy; Menzies, Andrew; Widaa, Sara; Stratton, Michael R.; Jones, Philip H.; Campbell, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    How somatic mutations accumulate in normal cells is central to understanding cancer development, but is poorly understood. We performed ultra-deep sequencing of 74 cancer genes in small (0.8-4.7mm2) biopsies of normal skin. Across 234 biopsies of sun-exposed eyelid epidermis from four individuals, the burden of somatic mutations averaged 2-6 mutations/megabase/cell, similar to many cancers, and exhibited characteristic signatures of ultraviolet light exposure. Remarkably, multiple cancer genes are under strong positive selection even in physiologically normal skin, including most of the key drivers of cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. Positively selected ‘driver’ mutations were found in 18-32% of normal skin cells at a density of ~140/cm2. We observed variability in the driver landscape among individuals and variability in sizes of clonal expansions across genes. Thus, aged, sun-exposed skin is a patchwork of thousands of evolving clones, with over a quarter of cells carrying cancer-causing mutations while maintaining the physiological functions of epidermis. PMID:25999502

  9. Identification of the mismatch repair genes PMS2 and MLH1 as p53 target genes by using serial analysis of binding elements

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiguo; Sadowski, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    The ability to determine the global location of transcription factor binding sites in vivo is important for a comprehensive understanding of gene regulation in human cells. We have developed a technology, called serial analysis of binding elements (SABE), involving subtractive hybridization of chromatin immunoprecipitation-enriched DNA fragments followed by the generation and analysis of concatamerized sequence tags. We applied the SABE technology to search for p53 target genes in the human genome, and have identified several previously described p53 targets in addition to numerous potentially novel targets, including the DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and PMS2. Both of these genes were determined to be responsive to DNA damage and p53 activation in normal human fibroblasts, and have p53-response elements within their first intron. These two genes may serve as a sensor in DNA repair mechanisms and a critical determinant for the decision between cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. These results also demonstrate the potential for use of SABE as a broadly applicable means to globally identify regulatory elements for human transcription factors in vivo. PMID:15781865

  10. Mismatch Repair Proteins and Microsatellite Instability in Colorectal Carcinoma (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2): Histopathological and Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Ismael, Nour El Hoda S.; El Sheikh, Samar A.; Talaat, Suzan M.; Salem, Eman M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Microsatellite instability (MSI) is detected in about 15% of all colorectal cancers. CRC with MSI has particular characteristics such as improved survival rates and better prognosis. They also have a distinct sensitivity to the action of chemotherapy. AIM: The aim of the study was to detect microsatellite instability in a cohort of colorectal cancer Egyptian patients using the immunohistochemical expression of mismatch repair proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Cases were divided into Microsatellite stable (MSS), Microsatellite unstable low (MSI-L) and Microsatellite unstable high (MSI-H). This Microsatellite stability status was correlated with different clinicopathological parameters. RESULTS: There was a statistically significant correlation between the age of cases, tumor site & grade and the microsatellite stability status. There was no statistically significant correlation between the gender of patients, tumor subtype, stage, mucoid change, necrosis, tumor borders, lymphocytic response, lymphovascular emboli and the microsatellite stability status. CONCLUSION: Testing for MSI should be done for all colorectal cancer patients, especially those younger than 50 years old, right sided and high-grade CRCs. PMID:28293308

  11. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutation rates in Pneumocystis jirovecii strains obtained from Iranian HIV-positive and non-HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Maryam-Fatemeh; Sadraei, Javid; Farnia, Parisa; Forozandeh Moghadam, Mehdi; Emadikochak, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    The dihydropteroate sulfate (DHPS) gene is associated with resistance to sulfa/sulfone drugs in Pneumocystis jirovecii. We investigated the DHPS mutation rate in three groups of Iranian HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients by polymerase chain reaction-restricted fragment length polymorphism analysis. Furthermore, an association between P. jirovecii DHPS mutations and strain typing was investigated based on direct sequencing of internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) and ITS2. The overall P. jirovecii DHPS mutation rate was (5/34; 14.7%), the lowest rate identified was in HIV-positive patients (1/16; 6.25%) and the highest rate was in malignancies patients (3/11; 27.3%). A moderate rate of mutation was detected in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients (1/7; 14.3%). Most of the isolates were wild type (29/34; 85.3%). Double mutations in DHPS were detected in patients with malignancies, whereas single mutations at codons 55 and 57 were identified in the HIV-positive and COPD patients, respectively. In this study, two new and rare haplotypes were identified with DHPS mutations. Additionally, a positive relationship between P. jirovecii strain genotypes and DHPS mutations was identified. In contrast, no DHPS mutations were detected in the predominant (Eg) haplotype. This should be regarded as a warning of an increasing incidence of drug-resistant P. jirovecii strains.

  12. Cross-reactivity of EGFR mutation-specific immunohistochemistry assay in HER2-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Verdu, Montse; Trias, Isabel; Roman, Ruth; Rodon, Natalia; Pubill, Carme; Arraiza, Nuria; Martinez, Begonya; Garcia-Pelaez, Beatriz; Serrano, Teresa; Puig, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    The coexpression of HER2 and EGFR L858R in a solitary nodule removed from the lung, whose mutation was not confirmed by molecular techniques, made us think about the possible existence of a cross-reaction between HER2 and the EGFR L858R-specific antibody. Our study was designed to further analyze the existence of this cross-reaction and stress the need to exclude a metastatic breast cancer when dealing with EGFR L858R-positive cases. The series consists of 42 primary breast carcinomas, 22 HER2 positive for overexpression and amplification, and 20 negative for both. EGFR mutations were studied by immunohistochemistry and confirmed using real-time PCR when positive. Immunohistochemistry assay with EGFR L858R was positive in 19 (86%) of the HER2-positive breast carcinomas and negative in all HER2-negative carcinomas. The EGFR L858R antibody gives false-positive results in most of the breast carcinomas with HER2 overexpression/amplification. As a consequence, it is essential to confirm any EGFR L858R-positive cases by molecular methods or at least discard the presence of HER2 overexpression/amplification before rendering a diagnosis. It is also important to consider that HER2 has been described in other carcinomas such as urothelial, gastric or ovarian, as well as lung, although infrequently.

  13. Clinical Implications of ESR1 Mutations in Hormone Receptor-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reinert, Tomas; Saad, Everardo D.; Barrios, Carlos H.; Bines, José

    2017-01-01

    Hormone receptor-positive breast cancer is the most frequent breast cancer subtype. Endocrine therapy (ET) targeting the estrogen receptor (ER) pathway represents the main initial therapeutic approach. The major strategies include estrogen deprivation and the use of selective estrogen modulators or degraders, which show efficacy in the management of metastatic and early-stage disease. However, clinical resistance associated with progression of disease remains a significant therapeutic challenge. Mutations of the ESR1 gene, which encodes the ER, have been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of ET resistance, with a prevalence that ranges from 11 to 39%. The majority of these mutations are located within the ligand-binding domain and result in an estrogen-independent constitutive activation of the ER and, therefore, resistance to estrogen deprivation therapy such as aromatase inhibition. ESR1 mutations, most often detected from liquid biopsies, have been consistently associated with a worse outcome and are being currently evaluated as a potential biomarker to guide therapeutic decisions. At the same time, targeted therapy directed to ESR1-mutated clones is an appealing concept with preclinical and clinical work in progress. PMID:28361033

  14. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor–positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Luis J.; Fox, Emily M.; Balko, Justin M.; Garrett, Joan T.; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B.; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A.; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C.; Meszoely, Ingrid M.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor–positive (ER+) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER+ tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER+ breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER+ LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYND189Y has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYND189Y exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYNWT. Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYND189Y overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER+ breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER+ xenografts but not LYND189Y-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER+ breast cancers. PMID:25401474

  15. Lack of positive allosteric modulation of mutated alpha(1)S267I glycine receptors by cannabinoids.

    PubMed

    Foadi, Nilufar; Leuwer, Martin; Demir, Reyhan; Dengler, Reinhard; Buchholz, Vanessa; de la Roche, Jeanne; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud; Ahrens, Jörg

    2010-05-01

    Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. Ajulemic acid and HU210 are non-psychotropic, synthetic cannabinoids. Cannabidiol is a non-psychotropic plant constituent of cannabis sativa. There are hints that non-cannabinoid receptor mechanisms of these cannabinoids might be mediated via glycine receptors. In this study, we investigated the impact of the amino acid residue serine at position 267 on the glycine-modulatory effects of ajulemic acid, cannabidiol and HU210. Mutated alpha(1)S267I glycine receptors transiently expressed in HEK293 cells were studied by utilising the whole-cell clamp technique. The mutation of the alpha(1) subunit TM2 serine residue to isoleucine abolished the co-activation and the direct activation of the glycine receptor by the investigated cannabinoids. The nature of the TM2 (267) residue of the glycine alpha(1) subunit is crucial for the glycine-modulatory effect of ajulemic acid, cannabidiol and HU210. An investigation of the impact of such mutations on the in vivo interaction of cannabinoids with glycine receptors should permit a better understanding of the molecular determinants of action of cannabinoids.

  16. High Incidence of Germline BRCA Mutation in Patients with ER low positive/PR low positive/HER-2 neu negative Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Rachel Ann; Song, Juhee; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Profato, Jessica; Woodson, Ashley; Litton, Jennifer Keating; Bedrosian, Isabelle; Albarracin, Constance T.; Valero, Vicente; Arun, Banu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose 2015 NCCN guidelines recommend genetic counseling and germline BRCA mutation testing be offered to women under age 60 with triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). As a result of the 2010 ASCO/CAP guidelines in breast cancer, patients with breast cancers that are ER or PR low-positive (1–9% on immunohistochemistry) are no longer strictly considered to have TNBC and may not be referred for genetic counseling. However, the incidence of BRCA mutation in patients with hormone receptor (HR) low-positive breast cancers remains unknown, and current ASCO/CAP guidelines may result in under-testing for BRCA mutation. Methods We reviewed a prospectively maintained research database of breast cancer patients evaluated at UT MD Anderson Cancer Center between 2004 and 2014, identifying 314 patients with ER<10%, PR<10%, HER-2 neu negative breast cancers with known BRCA mutation status. Results 314 patients had breast cancers expressing ER and PR <10%; 238 (75.8%) had HR negative (ER and PR <1%) cancers and 76 (24.2%) had HR low-positive (ER and/or PR 1–9%) cancers. Among patients with HR negative tumors, 86 of 238 (36.1%) had a BRCA 1/2 mutation, while among the HR low-positive group, 30 of 76 (39.5%) had a BRCA 1/2 mutation. In multivariate analysis, HR status (HR<1% vs. HR 1–9%) was not significantly associated with BRCA 1/2 mutation. Conclusion The incidence of BRCA 1/2 mutation is similar in patients with HR low-positive and HR negative breast cancers. We recommend offering genetic counseling and BRCA testing to patients under age 60 with ER low-positive breast cancers. PMID:26280679

  17. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations Using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C; Donald, Bruce R

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (Reeve et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112(3):749-754, 2015), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned continuous rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme's catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor.

  18. OSPREY Predicts Resistance Mutations using Positive and Negative Computational Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Ojewole, Adegoke; Lowegard, Anna; Gainza, Pablo; Reeve, Stephanie M.; Georgiev, Ivelin; Anderson, Amy C.; Donald, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Drug resistance in protein targets is an increasingly common phenomenon that reduces the efficacy of both existing and new antibiotics. However, knowledge of future resistance mutations during pre-clinical phases of drug development would enable the design of novel antibiotics that are robust against not only known resistant mutants, but also against those that have not yet been clinically observed. Computational structure-based protein design (CSPD) is a transformative field that enables the prediction of protein sequences with desired biochemical properties such as binding affinity and specificity to a target. The use of CSPD to predict previously unseen resistance mutations represents one of the frontiers of computational protein design. In a recent study (1), we used our OSPREY (Open Source Protein REdesign for You) suite of CSPD algorithms to prospectively predict resistance mutations that arise in the active site of the dihydrofolate reductase enzyme from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (SaDHFR) in response to selective pressure from an experimental competitive inhibitor. We demonstrated that our top predicted candidates are indeed viable resistant mutants. Since that study, we have significantly enhanced the capabilities of OSPREY with not only improved modeling of backbone flexibility, but also efficient multi-state design, fast sparse approximations, partitioned rotamers for more accurate energy bounds, and a computationally efficient representation of molecular-mechanics and quantum-mechanical energy functions. Here, using SaDHFR as an example, we present a protocol for resistance prediction using the latest version of OSPREY. Specifically, we show how to use a combination of positive and negative design to predict active site escape mutations that maintain the enzyme’s catalytic function but selectively ablate binding of an inhibitor. PMID:27914058

  19. The tRNA-Tyr gene family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: agents of phenotypic variation and position effects on mutation frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Ito-Harashima, Sayoko; Hartzog, Phillip E; Sinha, Himanshu; McCusker, John H

    2002-01-01

    Extensive phenotypic diversity or variation exists in clonal populations of microorganisms and is thought to play a role in adaptation to novel environments. This phenotypic variation or instability, which occurs by multiple mechanisms, may be a form of cellular differentiation and a stochastic means for modulating gene expression. This work dissects a case of phenotypic variation in a clinically derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain involving a cox15 ochre mutation, which acts as a reporter. The ochre mutation reverts to sense at a low frequency while tRNA-Tyr ochre suppressors (SUP-o) arise at a very high frequency to produce this phenotypic variation. The SUP-o mutations are highly pleiotropic. In addition, although all SUP-o mutations within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family suppress the ochre mutation reporter, there are considerable phenotypic differences among the different SUP-o mutants. Finally, and of particular interest, there is a strong position effect on mutation frequency within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family, with one locus, SUP6, mutating at a much higher than average frequency and two other loci, SUP2 and SUP8, mutating at much lower than average frequencies. Mechanisms for the position effect on mutation frequency are evaluated. PMID:12196388

  20. Allogeneic Transplant in ELANE and MEFV Mutation Positive Severe Cyclic Neutropenia: Review of Prognostic Factors for Secondary Severe Events

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective and Importance. Cyclic neutropenia (CyN) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder due to the mutation ELANE primarily affecting bone marrow stem cells and is characterized by recurrent neutropenia every 2 to 4 weeks. Symptoms vary from benign to severe, including death. Postulations on the cause of wide spectrum in symptom presentation include the possibility of other genetic mutations, such as MEFV. Recommended treatment for CyN is G-CSF to keep ANC higher to minimize risk of infection. Case. A 25-year-old male diagnosed with CyN, on G-CSF but worsening quality of life. Pretransplant investigations revealed ELANE mutation positive severe CyN along with familial Mediterranean fever (MEFV) mutation. Intervention. Bone marrow transplantation as treatment for dual mutation (ELANE and MEFV mutation) positive severe CyN. Conclusion. BMT may be considered as an alternative treatment for severe CyN in patients who are refractory to G-CSF. It is postulated that in our patient the combined mutations (CyN and MEFV) may have contributed to the severity of this individual's symptoms. We suggest CyN patients who present with severe symptoms have evaluation with ELANE mutation testing, Periodic Fever Syndromes Panel, and routine marrow assessment with FISH, conventional cytogenetics, and morphological evaluation for MDS/AML. PMID:28197346

  1. Development of positive control materials for DNA-based detection of cystic fibrosis: Cloning and sequencing of 31 mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Iovannisci, D.; Brown, C.; Winn-Deen, E.

    1994-09-01

    The cloning and sequencing of the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) now provides the opportunity for earlier detection and carrier screening through DNA-based detection schemes. To date, over 300 mutations have been reported to the CF Consortium; however, only 30 mutations have been observed frequently enough world-wide to warrant routine screening. Many of these mutations are not available as cloned material or as established tissue culture cell lines to aid in the development of DNA-based detection assays. We have therefore cloned the 30 most frequently reported mutations, plus the mutation R347H due to its association with male infertility (31 mutations, total). Two approaches were employed: direct PCR amplification, where mutations were available from patient sources, and site-directed PCR mutagenesis of normal genomic DNA to generate the remaining mutations. After amplification, products were cloned into a sequencing vector, bacterial transformants were screened by a novel method (PCR/oligonucleotide litigation assay/sequence-coded separation), and plamid DNA sequences determined by automated fluorescent methods on the Applied Biosystems 373A. Mixing of the clones allows the construction of artificial genotypes useful as positive control material for assay validation. A second round of mutagenesis, resulting in the construction of plasmids bearing multiple mutations, will be evaluated for their utility as reagent control materials in kit development.

  2. Positive fragile X microsatellite associations point to a common mechanism of dynamic mutation evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Zhong, N.; Dobkin, C.

    1996-03-01

    We recently reported that the size of fragile X gene (FMR1) triplet repeats and two nearby microsatellites show positive allele-size associations. The larger alleles of microsatellite DXS548, located {approximately}150 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, and of FRAXAC1 (AC1), located 7 kb proximal to the FMR1 CGG repeat, tend to occur together, and smaller alleles also tend to occur together. Also, fragile X chromosomes are more commonly found on the larger combined microsatellite-allele haplotypes. We now have extended these observations to include two other nearby repeats, FRAXAC2 (AC2), a complex three-part polymorphism located 12 kb distal, and the FRAXE triplet repeat, located 600 kb distal. We divided the chromosomes into controls with FMR1 repeats of <60 and fragile X chromosomes with repeats {>=}60, since FMR1 alleles with repeats {>=}60 show high intergenerational instability. In the 133 controls, previously analyzed for AGG interspersions, and in 119 fragile X chromosomes, we found that these repeats show nonrandom size associations. To describe this numerically, we calculated correlation coefficients for the repeat lengths. These repeats showed significantly positive correlations with each other. Although FRAXE alleles showed no correlation with the control repeats, they did have positive correlations with fragile X chromosome microsatellites (AC1 and AC2 but not DXS548), which may reflect the larger recombinational distances involved and the possibly more recent origin of the fragile X mutations. The correlations tended to be higher for the number of 3{prime} pure CGGs than for total FMR1 repeats in controls. These findings strengthen our hypothesis that there may be a common underlying mutational mechanism that simultaneously affects these repeat loci. 13 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Mito-nuclear co-evolution: the positive and negative sides of functional ancient mutations.

    PubMed

    Levin, Liron; Blumberg, Amit; Barshad, Gilad; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Most cell functions are carried out by interacting factors, thus underlying the functional importance of genetic interactions between genes, termed epistasis. Epistasis could be under strong selective pressures especially in conditions where the mutation rate of one of the interacting partners notably differs from the other. Accordingly, the order of magnitude higher mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation rate as compared to the nuclear DNA (nDNA) of all tested animals, should influence systems involving mitochondrial-nuclear (mito-nuclear) interactions. Such is the case of the energy producing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and mitochondrial translational machineries which are comprised of factors encoded by both the mtDNA and the nDNA. Additionally, the mitochondrial RNA transcription and mtDNA replication systems are operated by nDNA-encoded proteins that bind mtDNA regulatory elements. As these systems are central to cell life there is strong selection toward mito-nuclear co-evolution to maintain their function. However, it is unclear whether (A) mito-nuclear co-evolution befalls only to retain mitochondrial functions during evolution or, also, (B) serves as an adaptive tool to adjust for the evolving energetic demands as species' complexity increases. As the first step to answer these questions we discuss evidence of both negative and adaptive (positive) selection acting on the mtDNA and nDNA-encoded genes and the effect of both types of selection on mito-nuclear interacting factors. Emphasis is given to the crucial role of recurrent ancient (nodal) mutations in such selective events. We apply this point-of-view to the three available types of mito-nuclear co-evolution: protein-protein (within the OXPHOS system), protein-RNA (mainly within the mitochondrial ribosome), and protein-DNA (at the mitochondrial replication and transcription machineries).

  4. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Luis J; Fox, Emily M; Balko, Justin M; Garrett, Joan T; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-12-01

    Estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER(+) tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER(+) breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER(+) LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYN(D189Y) has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYN(D189Y) exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYN(WT). Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYN(D189Y) overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER(+) xenografts but not LYN(D189Y)-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER(+) breast cancers.

  5. Importance of carbohydrate positioning in the recognition of mutated CPY for ER-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Zlatka; Wolf, Dieter H

    2005-04-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), N-linked glycans (N-glycans) function as signals to recruit the lectin chaperones involved in protein folding, quality control and ER-associated degradation. We undertook a systematic study of the four N-glycans of mutated carboxypeptidase yscY (CPY*) to determine whether there are positional differences between the glycans in ER-associated degradation. We constructed hypoglycosylated CPY* variants containing one, two or three N-glycans in various combinations and studied their degradation kinetics. We found that the four carbohydrate chains on CPY* are not equal in their signaling function: presence of the Asn368-linked glycan is necessary and sufficient for efficient degradation of CPY*. We also analysed the involvement of the ER lectins Htm1p and Cne1p (yeast calnexin) in the glycan-based recognition process with respect to number and position of N-glycans. We observed that Htm1p function depends on the presence of N-glycans in general but that there is no positional preference for a particular glycan. Cne1p, however, is selective with respect to substrate, and participates in the quality control only of some underglycosylated variants. For cases in which both lectins are involved, Cne1p and Htm1p play competing roles in targeting the substrate for degradation: loss of Cne1p accelerates degradation, whereas loss of Htm1p stabilizes the substrate.

  6. Secretion-Positive LGI1 Mutations Linked to Lateral Temporal Epilepsy Impair Binding to ADAM22 and ADAM23 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Belluzzi, Elisa; Malacrida, Sandro; Vitiello, Libero; Greggio, Elisa; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADTLE) is a focal epilepsy syndrome caused by mutations in the LGI1 gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Most ADLTE-causing mutations inhibit LGI1 protein secretion, and only a few secretion-positive missense mutations have been reported. Here we describe the effects of four disease-causing nonsynonymous LGI1 mutations, T380A, R407C, S473L, and R474Q, on protein secretion and extracellular interactions. Expression of LGI1 mutant proteins in cultured cells shows that these mutations do not inhibit protein secretion. This finding likely results from the lack of effects of these mutations on LGI1 protein folding, as suggested by 3D protein modelling. In addition, immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that all four mutations significantly impair interaction of LGI1 with the ADAM22 and ADAM23 receptors on the cell surface. These results support the existence of a second mechanism, alternative to inhibition of protein secretion, by which ADLTE-causing LGI1 mutations exert their loss-of-function effect extracellularly, and suggest that interactions of LGI1 with both ADAM22 and ADAM23 play an important role in the molecular mechanisms leading to ADLTE. PMID:27760137

  7. Positive selection during the evolution of the blood coagulation factors in the context of their disease-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M; Orengo, Christine A; Studer, Romain A; Perkins, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII-FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy.

  8. Positive Selection during the Evolution of the Blood Coagulation Factors in the Context of Their Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M.; Orengo, Christine A.; Studer, Romain A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy. PMID:25158795

  9. Positional cloning of Kreisler, a mutation that causes deafness and segmentation abnormalities in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, S.P.; Barsh, G.S.

    1994-09-01

    The identification and analysis of mouse deafness mutations is of great interest to human geneticists, not only because deafness is a common problem in clinical genetics, but also because the molecular mechanisms leading to deafness can underly fundamental aspects of mammalian development. Approximately 10 to 20 genes when mutated can lead to deafness in mice or in humans, but none have yet been identified at the molecular level. In mice homozygous for the kreisler (kr) mutation, abnormal development of the hindbrain and otic vesicle leads to neurosensory deafness and loss of vestibular function. Using the techniques of positional cloning combined with ENU mutagenesis, we have now cloned the kr gene and find that it predicts a transcription factor whose absence leads to defects in Hox gene expression and hindbrain segmentation. We used a backcross between different strains of laboratory mice to sublocalize kr on the meiotic map close to the Src gene on mouse chromosome 2. A probe from the Src gene detected high molecular weight restriction fragments of altered size in kr/kr DNA, suggesting that kr was due to a chromosomal rearrangement. Based on the meiotic map location of kr{sup ENU}, a new kr allele that we generated by ENU mutagenesis, cDNAs were selected from 8.5 day mouse embryos using genomic clones that spanned the distal inversion breakpoint. One cDNA that predicted a basic domain leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor was found to be expressed in the caudal hindbrain, and was confirmed to encode the kr gene by analysis of the kr{sup ENU} allele, in which a Ser was substituted for an Asn residue conserved in the DNA binding domain of all known bZip family members. kr is not expressed in the otic vesicle, suggesting that abnormal otic development is a consequence of defects in hindbrain segmentation. kr is the first mammalian deafness gene to be isolated, and should provide insights into embryologic mechanisms that underly hindbrain and otic development.

  10. Microfluidic Deletion/Insertion Analysis for Rapid Screening of KIT and PDGFRA Mutations in CD117-Positive Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zamò, Alberto; Bertolaso, Anna; Franceschetti, Ilaria; Weirich, Gregor; Capelli, Paola; Pecori, Sara; Chilosi, Marco; Hoefler, Heinz; Menestrina, Fabio; Scarpa, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) frequently harbor mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes, the presence and type of which correlate with the response to the kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate. Because most GIST mutations are deletions/insertions, we used a microfluidic apparatus to detect these size variations in polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA. This approach, termed microfluidic deletion/insertion analysis (MIDIA), identified mutations in 30 of 50 DNA samples from paraffin-embedded CD117-positive GISTs (60%), comprising 25 deletions and five insertions. Sequencing of 14 MIDIA-positive samples confirmed the deletions/insertions, including two 3-bp alterations. Sequencing of all 20 MIDIA-negative samples also showed highly consistent results with MIDIA because 10 cases were wild type and eight displayed a single base substitution in which detection by MIDIA was not expected. Sequencing also revealed a 3-bp deletion undetected by MIDIA, thus establishing the resolution limit of MIDIA at deletions/insertions ≥3 bp. Denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis confirmed all mutations detected by MIDIA and sequencing. We propose MIDIA as the first step in mutational screening of GIST because it allowed the detection of 75% of mutated cases (94% of deletions/insertions) in less than 30 minutes after polymerase chain reaction amplification and at a lower cost compared with denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and sequencing, which might then be used only for MIDIA-negative cases. PMID:17384206

  11. Drug response to HER2 gatekeeper T798M mutation in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuli; Li, Yongfeng; Tang, Hongchao; Mao, Weimin; Yang, Hongjian; Wang, Xiaojia; Ding, Xianfeng; Xie, Shangnao

    2016-02-01

    The gatekeeper T798M mutation in HER2 kinase domain has been observed to considerably shift drug sensitivity to HER2 in breast cancer therapy. Here, drug response of clinical tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) to the mutation was profiled using a synthetic biology protocol. It was found that TKIs can be grouped into three classes in terms of their response behavior to T798M mutation: class I inhibitors exhibit drug resistance upon the mutation, such as lapatinib, TAK-285 and AEE788; class II inhibitors are insensitive to the mutation, such as erlotinib and gefitinib; and class III inhibitors can be sensitized by the mutation, such as staurosporine. However, kinetic study indicated that the mutation has only a modest effect on the binding of substrate ATP to HER2. Binding free energy analysis revealed that the drug response is primarily determined by direct interaction between the kinase and inhibitors, but not by indirect kinase interaction with competitive ATP. This is different to the molecular mechanism of "generic" drug resistance conferring from EGFR gatekeeper T790M mutation, which is caused by increased ATP affinity upon the mutation. Structural analysis of kinase-inhibitor complexes unraveled that HER2 T798M mutation induces significant steric hindrance to class I inhibitors, but can establish additional nonbonded interactions for class III inhibitors.

  12. Cancer Signature Investigation: ERBB2 (HER2)-Activating Mutation and Amplification-Positive Breast Carcinoma Mimicking Lung Primary.

    PubMed

    Shih, Jennifer; Bashir, Babar; Gustafson, Karen S; Andrake, Mark; Dunbrack, Roland L; Goldstein, Lori J; Boumber, Yanis

    2015-08-01

    Next-generation sequencing of primary and metachronous metastatic cancer lesions may impact patient care. We present a case of relapsed metastatic breast cancer with a dominant pulmonary lesion originally identified as lung adenocarcinoma. A 72-year-old, never-smoker woman with a protracted cough was found to have a large lung mass and regional lymphadenopathy on a chest CT. Lung mass biopsy showed adenocarcinoma with focal TTF-1 (thyroid transcription factor 1) positivity, favoring a lung primary. In addition to stereotactic brain radiation for cerebral metastases, she was started on carboplatin/pemetrexed. As part of the workup, the tumor was analyzed by a 50-gene targeted mutation panel, which detected 3 somatic mutations: ERBB2 (HER2) D769H activating missense mutation, TP53 Y126 inactivating truncating mutation, and SMARCB1 R374Q missense mutation. Of note, the patient had a history of stage IIA triple-negative grade 3 invasive ductal carcinoma of the left breast 1.5 years ago and received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and adjuvant radiation, and underwent a lumpectomy. Further analysis of her primary breast tumor showed a mutational profile identical to that of the lung tumor. Fluorescence in situ hybridization revealed HER2 amplification in the lung tumor, with a HER2/CEP17 ratio of 3.9. The patient was diagnosed with recurrent HER2-positive metastatic breast carcinoma with a coexisting ERBB2 (HER2) activating mutation. Chemotherapy was adjusted to include dual HER2-targeted therapy containing trastuzumab and pertuzumab, resulting in an ongoing partial response. This case demonstrates that a unique genetic mutational profile can clarify whether a tumor represents a metastatic lesion or new malignancy when conventional morphological and immunohistochemical methods are indeterminate, and can directly impact treatment decisions.

  13. Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine suppress position-effect variegation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, J.; Rasmuson-Lestander, A.; Zhang, Jingpu

    1996-06-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the study of trans-acting modifier mutations of position-effect variegation and Polycomb group (Pc-G) genes have been useful tools to investigate genes involved in chromatin structure. We have cloned a modifier gene, Suppressor of zeste 5 (Su(z)5), which encodes S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, and we present here molecular results and data concerning its expression in mutants and genetic interactions. The mutant alleles Su(z)5, l(2)R23 and l(2)M6 show suppression of w{sup m4} and also of two white mutants induced by roo element insertions in the regulatory region i.e., w{sup is} (in combination with z{sup 1}) and w{sup sp1}. Two of the Su(z)5 alleles, as well as a deletion of the gene, also act as enhancers of Polycomb by increasing the size of sex combes on midleg. The results suggest that Su(z)5 is connected with regulation of chromatin structure. The enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthetase is involved in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine, a methyl group donor and also, after decarboxylation, a propylamino group donor in the biosynthesis of polyamines. Our results from HPLC analysis show that in ovaries from heterozygous Su(z)5 mutants the content of spermine is significantly reduced. Results presented here suggest that polyamines are an important molecule class in the regulation of chromatin structure. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Pooled analysis of clinical outcome for EGFR TKI-treated patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Paz-Ares, Luis; Soulières, Denis; Moecks, Joachim; Bara, Ilze; Mok, Tony; Klughammer, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) appear to gain particular benefit from treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) if their disease tests positive for EGFR activating mutations. Recently, several large, controlled, phase III studies have been published in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumours. Given the increased patient dataset now available, a comprehensive literature search for EGFR TKIs or chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC was undertaken to update the results of a previously published pooled analysis. Pooling eligible progression-free survival (PFS) data from 27 erlotinib studies (n = 731), 54 gefitinib studies (n = 1802) and 20 chemotherapy studies (n = 984) provided median PFS values for each treatment. The pooled median PFS was: 12.4 months (95% accuracy intervals [AI] 11.6-13.4) for erlotinib-treated patients; 9.4 months (95% AI 9.0-9.8) for gefitinib-treated patients; and 5.6 months (95% AI 5.3-6.0) for chemotherapy. Both erlotinib and gefitinib resulted in significantly longer PFS than chemotherapy (permutation testing; P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively). Data on more recent TKIs (afatinib, dacomitinib and icotinib) were insufficient at this time-point to carry out a pooled PFS analysis on these compounds. The results of this updated pooled analysis suggest a substantial clear PFS benefit of treating patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC with erlotinib or gefitinib compared with chemotherapy.

  15. EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancers are sensitive to intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) complete treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongjuan; Zhan, Cheng; Ke, Ji; Xue, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Aiqun; Xu, Kaifeng; Shen, Zhirong; Yu, Lei; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-19

    Lung cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths. A significant portion of lung cancer patients harbor kinase domain mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) effectively shrink tumors harboring mutant EGFR, clinical efficacy is limited by the development of TKI resistance. Effective alternatives are desperately needed in clinic for treating EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer. In our clinic in treating M1a lung cancer patients through intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) followed by cycles of systemic chemotherapy (we termed this procedure IPHC complete treatment, IPHC-CT), we found dramatic tumor shrinkage in mutant EGFR-positive patients. We further confirmed the sensitivity of EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer cell lines derived from patients to HC (hyperthermic chemotherapy) treatment. We found that hyperthermia promoted accumulation of cisplatin in lung cancer cells. Hyperthermia and cisplatin synergistically downregulated the EGFR protein level, leading to quenching of signal from EGFR and induction of apoptosis. Our work therefore showed IPHC-CT is an effective treatment for EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer patients.

  16. Impact of mutational profiles on response of primary oestrogen receptor-positive breast cancers to oestrogen deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Segal, Corrinne V.; Gao, Qiong; López-Knowles, Elena; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Dodson, Andrew; Li, Tiandao; Miller, Christopher A.; Lu, Charles; Mardis, Elaine R.; Gillman, Alexa; Morden, James; Graf, Manuela; Sidhu, Kally; Evans, Abigail; Shere, Michael; Holcombe, Christopher; McIntosh, Stuart A.; Bundred, Nigel; Skene, Anthony; Maxwell, William; Robertson, John; Bliss, Judith M.; Smith, Ian; Dowsett, Mitch; Johnston, Stephen; Todd, Radha; Horgan, Kieran; Chan, Stephen; Holt, Simon D. H.; Parton, Marina; Laidlaw, Ian; Vaidya, Jayant S.; Irvine, Tracey; Hoar, Fiona; Khattak, Ilyas; Kothari, Ashutosh; Brazil, Lucy; Gallegos, Nicholas; Wheatley, Duncan; Johnson, Tayo; Sparrow, Geoffrey; Ledwidge, Serena; Mortimer, Caroline; Ornstein, Marcus; Ferguson, Douglas; Adamson, Douglas; Cutress, Ramsey; Johnson, Richard; Crowley, Clare; Winters, Zoe; Hamed, Hisham; Burcombe, Russell; Cleator, Susan; Kelleher, Muireann; Roberts, Jonathan; Vesty, Sarah; Hadaki, Maher; Quigley, Mary; Doughty, Julie; Laws, Siobhan; Seetharam, Seema; Thorne, Amanda; Donnelly, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Pre-surgical studies allow study of the relationship between mutations and response of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer to aromatase inhibitors (AIs) but have been limited to small biopsies. Here in phase I of this study, we perform exome sequencing on baseline, surgical core-cuts and blood from 60 patients (40 AI treated, 20 controls). In poor responders (based on Ki67 change), we find significantly more somatic mutations than good responders. Subclones exclusive to baseline or surgical cores occur in ∼30% of tumours. In phase II, we combine targeted sequencing on another 28 treated patients with phase I. We find six genes frequently mutated: PIK3CA, TP53, CDH1, MLL3, ABCA13 and FLG with 71% concordance between paired cores. TP53 mutations are associated with poor response. We conclude that multiple biopsies are essential for confident mutational profiling of ER+ breast cancer and TP53 mutations are associated with resistance to oestrogen deprivation therapy. PMID:27827358

  17. Importance of mutant position in Ramachandran plot for predicting protein stability of surface mutations.

    PubMed

    Gromiha, M Michael; Oobatake, Motohisa; Kono, Hidetoshi; Uedaira, Hatsuho; Sarai, Akinori

    2002-08-05

    Understanding the mechanisms by which mutations affect protein stability is one of the most important problems in molecular biology. In this work, we analyzed the relationship between changes in protein stability caused by surface mutations and changes in 49 physicochemical, energetic, and conformational properties of amino acid residues. We found that the hydration entropy was the major contributor to the stability of surface mutations in helical segments; other properties responsible for size and volume of molecule also correlated significantly with stability. Classification of coil mutations based on their locations in the (phi-psi) map improved the correlation significantly, demonstrating the existence of a relationship between stability and strain energy, which indicates that the role of strain energy is very important for the stability of surface mutations. We observed that the inclusion of sequence and structural information raised the correlation, indicating the influence of surrounding residues on the stability of surface mutations. Further, we examined the previously reported "inverse relationship" between stability and hydrophobicity, and observed that the inverse hydrophobic effect was generally applicable only to coil mutations. The present study leads to a simple method for predicting protein stability changes caused by amino acid substitutions, which will be useful for protein engineering in designing novel proteins with increased stability and altered function.

  18. BCR-ABL1 compound mutations combining key kinase domain positions confer clinical resistance to ponatinib in Ph chromosome-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zabriskie, Matthew S; Eide, Christopher A; Tantravahi, Srinivas K; Vellore, Nadeem A; Estrada, Johanna; Nicolini, Franck E; Khoury, Hanna J; Larson, Richard A; Konopleva, Marina; Cortes, Jorge E; Kantarjian, Hagop; Jabbour, Elias J; Kornblau, Steven M; Lipton, Jeffrey H; Rea, Delphine; Stenke, Leif; Barbany, Gisela; Lange, Thoralf; Hernández-Boluda, Juan-Carlos; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Press, Richard D; Chuah, Charles; Goldberg, Stuart L; Wetzler, Meir; Mahon, Francois-Xavier; Etienne, Gabriel; Baccarani, Michele; Soverini, Simona; Rosti, Gianantonio; Rousselot, Philippe; Friedman, Ran; Deininger, Marie; Reynolds, Kimberly R; Heaton, William L; Eiring, Anna M; Pomicter, Anthony D; Khorashad, Jamshid S; Kelley, Todd W; Baron, Riccardo; Druker, Brian J; Deininger, Michael W; O'Hare, Thomas

    2014-09-08

    Ponatinib is the only currently approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) that suppresses all BCR-ABL1 single mutants in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) leukemia, including the recalcitrant BCR-ABL1(T315I) mutant. However, emergence of compound mutations in a BCR-ABL1 allele may confer ponatinib resistance. We found that clinically reported BCR-ABL1 compound mutants center on 12 key positions and confer varying resistance to imatinib, nilotinib, dasatinib, ponatinib, rebastinib, and bosutinib. T315I-inclusive compound mutants confer high-level resistance to TKIs, including ponatinib. In vitro resistance profiling was predictive of treatment outcomes in Ph(+) leukemia patients. Structural explanations for compound mutation-based resistance were obtained through molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings demonstrate that BCR-ABL1 compound mutants confer different levels of TKI resistance, necessitating rational treatment selection to optimize clinical outcome.

  19. Human Slack potassium channel mutations increase positive cooperativity between individual channels

    PubMed Central

    Barcia, Giulia; Quraishi, Imran H.; Martin, Hilary C.; Blair, Edward; Taylor, Jenny C.; Dulac, Olivier; Colleaux, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Summary Disease-causing mutations in ion channels generally alter intrinsic gating properties such as activation, inactivation or voltage-dependence. We examined nine different mutations of the KCNT1 (Slack) Na+-activated K+ channel that give rise to three distinct forms of epilepsy. All produced many fold-increases in current amplitude over that of the wild type channel. This could not be accounted for by increases in the intrinsic open probability of individual channels. Rather, greatly increased opening was a consequence of cooperative interactions between multiple channels in a patch. The degree of cooperative gating was much greater for all of the mutant channels than for the wild type channel, and could explain increases in current even in a mutant with reduced unitary conductance. We also found that the same mutation gives rise to different forms of epilepsy in different individuals. Our findings indicate that a major consequence of the mutations is to alter channel-channel interactions. PMID:25482562

  20. Human slack potassium channel mutations increase positive cooperativity between individual channels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Grace E; Kronengold, Jack; Barcia, Giulia; Quraishi, Imran H; Martin, Hilary C; Blair, Edward; Taylor, Jenny C; Dulac, Olivier; Colleaux, Laurence; Nabbout, Rima; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    2014-12-11

    Disease-causing mutations in ion channels generally alter intrinsic gating properties such as activation, inactivation, and voltage dependence. We examined nine different mutations of the KCNT1 (Slack) Na(+)-activated K(+) channel that give rise to three distinct forms of epilepsy. All produced many-fold increases in current amplitude compared to the wild-type channel. This could not be accounted for by increases in the intrinsic open probability of individual channels. Rather, greatly increased opening was a consequence of cooperative interactions between multiple channels in a patch. The degree of cooperative gating was much greater for all of the mutant channels than for the wild-type channel, and could explain increases in current even in a mutant with reduced unitary conductance. We also found that the same mutation gave rise to different forms of epilepsy in different individuals. Our findings indicate that a major consequence of these mutations is to alter channel-channel interactions.

  1. Acquired Gitelman Syndrome in an Anti-SSA Antibody-positive Patient with a SLC12A3 Heterozygous Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kusuda, Takeshi; Hosoya, Tadashi; Mori, Takayasu; Ihara, Katsuhito; Nishida, Hidenori; Chiga, Motoko; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Koike, Ryuji; Uchida, Shinichi; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman developed hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis after anti SS-A antibody was found to be positive. Diuretic loading test results were compatible with Gitelman syndrome (GS). The patient had a heterozygous mutation in SLC12A3, which encodes for thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCCT). While the mutation may be responsible for a latent hypofunction of NCCTs, the underlying anti-SSA antibody-associated autoimmunity induced the manifestation of its hypofunction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate that anti SS-A antibody-associated autoimmunity may induce GS in a patient with a SLC12A3 heterozygous mutation. PMID:27803420

  2. Naturally occurring accessory gene mutations lead to persistent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of CD4-positive T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, M; Zheng, Y H; Bahmani, M K; Tokunaga, K; Takahashi, H; Kakinuma, M; Lai, P K; Nonoyama, M; Luftig, R B; Ikuta, K

    1995-01-01

    Proviral DNA from cells surviving severe but transient cytopathic effects, mediated by infection with recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) carrying a single gene mutation at vif, vpr, or vpu, was characterized by use of HIV-1-specific primer pairs in a two-step PCR. Deletion mutations were detected in a region that spanned the vif and vpr open reading frames. Cloning and sequencing of the amplified DNA from this region revealed frequent large deletions in a limited number of nucleotide positions. Analyses of the deletions suggested that (i) genetic recombination, (ii) template-primer slippage, and (iii) misalignment of the growing point during reverse transcription of the HIV-1 genome might be the mechanisms that generated the mutations. Apart from the large deletions, smaller deletions that gave frameshift mutations in vif and/or vpr prevailed. In addition, cells infected with a triple mutant defective in vif, vpr, and vpu did not show any cytopathic effect. Thus, mutations generating multiple accessory gene defects during HIV-1 replication correlate with viral persistence and loss of cytopathogenicity. PMID:7494257

  3. Pooled analysis of clinical outcome for EGFR TKI-treated patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Ares, Luis; Soulières, Denis; Moecks, Joachim; Bara, Ilze; Mok, Tony; Klughammer, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) appear to gain particular benefit from treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) if their disease tests positive for EGFR activating mutations. Recently, several large, controlled, phase III studies have been published in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumours. Given the increased patient dataset now available, a comprehensive literature search for EGFR TKIs or chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC was undertaken to update the results of a previously published pooled analysis. Pooling eligible progression-free survival (PFS) data from 27 erlotinib studies (n = 731), 54 gefitinib studies (n = 1802) and 20 chemotherapy studies (n = 984) provided median PFS values for each treatment. The pooled median PFS was: 12.4 months (95% accuracy intervals [AI] 11.6–13.4) for erlotinib-treated patients; 9.4 months (95% AI 9.0–9.8) for gefitinib-treated patients; and 5.6 months (95% AI 5.3–6.0) for chemotherapy. Both erlotinib and gefitinib resulted in significantly longer PFS than chemotherapy (permutation testing; P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively). Data on more recent TKIs (afatinib, dacomitinib and icotinib) were insufficient at this time-point to carry out a pooled PFS analysis on these compounds. The results of this updated pooled analysis suggest a substantial clear PFS benefit of treating patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC with erlotinib or gefitinib compared with chemotherapy. PMID:25100284

  4. High Intellectual Function in Individuals with Mutation-Positive Microform Holoprosencephaly.

    PubMed

    Solomon, B D; Pineda-Alvarez, D E; Gropman, A L; Willis, M J; Hadley, D W; Muenke, M

    2012-09-01

    Holoprosencephaly is the most common malformation of the forebrain and typically results in severe neurocognitive impairment with accompanying midline facial anomalies. Holoprosencephaly is heterogeneous and may be caused by chromosome aberrations or environmental factors, occur in the context of a syndrome or be due to heterozygous mutations in over 10 identified genes. The presence of these mutations may result in an extremely wide spectrum of severity, ranging from brain malformations incompatible with life to individuals with normal brain findings and subtle midline facial differences. Typically, clinicians regard intellectual disability as a sign that a parent or relative of a severely affected patient may be a mildly affected mutation 'carrier' with what is termed microform holoprosencephaly. Here we present 5 patients with clear phenotypic signs of microform holoprosencephaly, all of whom have evidence of above-average intellectual function. In 4 of these 5 individuals, the molecular cause of holoprosencephaly has been identified and includes mutations affecting SHH, SIX3, GLI2, and FGF8. This report expands the phenotypic spectrum of holoprosencephaly and is important in the counseling of patient and affected families.

  5. [Efficacy of first-line afatinib versus chemotherapy in EGFR mutation positive pulmonary adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sárosi, Veronika; Balikó, Zoltán

    2014-12-01

    Therapy of patients with advanced NSCLC has lately changed due to the algorithm based on the presence or absence of oncogenic mutations. There is an agreement nowadays that in the presence of activating EGFR mutations, the administration of EGFR TKI (gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib) is the most efficacious initial treatment. Unlike the first-generation TKIs, afatinib is a new, irreversible ErbB blocker, selectively and effectively blocking signals from the ErbB family receptors. Afatinib's marketing authorization is based on a large, randomized, phase III clinical trial, LUX-Lung 3, where patients in the control arm were treated with the best available chemotherapy (pemetrexed/cisplatin combination). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Patients with common EGFR mutations showed a PFS of 13.6 months when treated with afatinib, while treatment in the control arm resulted in a PFS of 6.9 months. Overall survival (OS) was 31.6 and 28.2 months, respectively. LUX-Lung 3 has been followed by the LUX-Lung 6 trial, comparing afatinib treatment to traditional chemotherapy (gemcitabine/cisplatin) in Asian patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations. This clinical trial has also proved benefit of afatinib: PFS was 11.0 months in the afatinib arm and 5.6 months in the control arm by independent reviewer, while OS was 23.6 months and 23.5 months, respectively. Similarity of the OS values in both trials is explained by the cross-over treatment. When further analyzing OS data, a statistically significant difference between the afatinib and the control arm was seen in the EGFR exon 19 del subgroup (LUX-Lung 3: 33.3 vs. 21.1 months, LUX-Lung 6: 31.4 vs. 18.4 months, respectively).

  6. Origin of mutational effects at the C3 and G8 positions on hammerhead ribozyme catalysis from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tai-Sung; York, Darrin M

    2008-06-11

    A series of ten 60 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the native and mutated full length hammerhead ribozymes in the reactant state and in an activated precursor state (G8:2'OH deprotonated) are reported. Mutant simulations include the C3U, G8A, and G8I single mutants and a C3U/G8A double mutant that exhibits an experimental rescue effect. The results provide critical details into the origin of the observed mutation effects and support a mechanism where the 2'OH of G8 acts as a general acid catalyst that is held in position through Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding between G8 and C3.

  7. Altered expression and new mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes MLH1 and MSH2 in melanoma brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Korabiowska, Monika; König, Fatima; Verheggen, Raphaela; Schlott, Thilo; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Romeike, Bernd; Brinck, Ulrich

    2004-01-01

    Brain metastases, including those of malignant melanoma (known for its high genomic instability), are the most common intracranial tumors. The main objective of this study was to investigate expression and mutation in the DNA mismatch repair system in melanoma brain metastases. Expression of MLH1, MSH2, PMS1 and PMS2 was investigated immunohistochemically in 31 melanoma metastatic tumors. Mutational analysis of MLH1 and MSH2 was performed in 17 melanoma brain metastases. Loss of MLH1 and MSH2 expression was found in 10/31 and 12/31 tumors. PMS1 (27/31) and PMS2 (28/31) expression was preserved in the majority of lesions. Potential missense mutation was found in MSH2 (exon 13) in 2/17 melanomas. Mutation in the intron sequence between exon 14 and 15 of MLH1 (exon 15) was observed in 4/17 cases. Our results indicate that the two major DNA mismatch repair genes, MLH1 and MSH2, are more frequently affected by alterations in the DNA mismatch repair system than the helper genes PMS1 and PMS2. The presence of mutations of MSH2 and MLH1 in melanoma brain metastases, which has not been found in primary melanomas, indicates the high genomic instability of melanoma brain metastases.

  8. Polyclonal Secondary FGFR2 Mutations Drive Acquired Resistance to FGFR Inhibition in Patients with FGFR2 Fusion-Positive Cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Lipika; Saha, Supriya K; Liu, Leah Y; Siravegna, Giulia; Leshchiner, Ignaty; Ahronian, Leanne G; Lennerz, Jochen K; Vu, Phuong; Deshpande, Vikram; Kambadakone, Avinash; Mussolin, Benedetta; Reyes, Stephanie; Henderson, Laura; Sun, Jiaoyuan Elisabeth; Van Seventer, Emily E; Gurski, Joseph M; Baltschukat, Sabrina; Schacher-Engstler, Barbara; Barys, Louise; Stamm, Christelle; Furet, Pascal; Ryan, David P; Stone, James R; Iafrate, A John; Getz, Gad; Porta, Diana Graus; Tiedt, Ralph; Bardelli, Alberto; Juric, Dejan; Corcoran, Ryan B; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Zhu, Andrew X

    2017-03-01

    Genetic alterations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) pathway are promising therapeutic targets in many cancers, including intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC). The FGFR inhibitor BGJ398 displayed encouraging efficacy in patients with FGFR2 fusion-positive ICC in a phase II trial, but the durability of response was limited in some patients. Here, we report the molecular basis for acquired resistance to BGJ398 in three patients via integrative genomic characterization of cell-free circulating tumor DNA (cfDNA), primary tumors, and metastases. Serial analysis of cfDNA demonstrated multiple recurrent point mutations in the FGFR2 kinase domain at progression. Accordingly, biopsy of post-progression lesions and rapid autopsy revealed marked inter- and intralesional heterogeneity, with different FGFR2 mutations in individual resistant clones. Molecular modeling and in vitro studies indicated that each mutation led to BGJ398 resistance and was surmountable by structurally distinct FGFR inhibitors. Thus, polyclonal secondary FGFR2 mutations represent an important clinical resistance mechanism that may guide the development of future therapeutic strategies.Significance: We report the first genetic mechanisms of clinical acquired resistance to FGFR inhibition in patients with FGFR2 fusion-positive ICC. Our findings can inform future strategies for detecting resistance mechanisms and inducing more durable remissions in ICC and in the wide variety of cancers where the FGFR pathway is being explored as a therapeutic target. Cancer Discov; 7(3); 252-63. ©2016 AACR.See related commentary by Smyth et al., p. 248This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 235.

  9. Mutational analysis of the residue at position 48 in the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium PhoQ sensor kinase.

    PubMed

    Sanowar, Sarah; Martel, Alexandre; Moual, Hervé Le

    2003-03-01

    The PhoP/PhoQ two-component regulatory system of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium plays an essential role in controlling virulence by mediating the adaptation to Mg(2+) depletion. The pho-24 allele of phoQ harbors a single amino acid substitution (T48I) in the periplasmic domain of the PhoQ histidine kinase sensor. This mutation has been shown to increase net phosphorylation of the PhoP response regulator. We analyzed the effect on signaling by PhoP/PhoQ of various amino acid substitutions at this position (PhoQ-T48X [X = A, S, V, I, or L]). Mutations T48V, T48I, and T48L were found to affect signaling by PhoP/PhoQ both in vivo and in vitro. Mutations PhoQ-T48V and PhoQ-T48I increased both the expression of the mgtA::lacZ transcriptional fusion and the net phosphorylation of PhoP, conferring to cells a PhoP constitutively active phenotype. In contrast, mutation PhoQ-T48L barely responded to changes in the concentration of external Mg(2+), in vivo and in vitro, conferring to cells a PhoP constitutively inactive phenotype. By analyzing in vitro the individual catalytic activities of the PhoQ-T48X sensors, we found that the PhoP constitutively active phenotype observed for the PhoQ-T48V and PhoQ-T48I proteins is solely due to decreased phosphatase activity. In contrast, the PhoP constitutively inactive phenotype observed for the PhoQ-T48L mutant resulted from both decreased autokinase activity and increased phosphatase activity. Our data are consistent with a model in which the residue at position 48 of PhoQ contributes to a conformational switch between kinase- and phosphatase-dominant states.

  10. Targeting the Gatekeeper: Osimertinib in EGFR T790M Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Skoulidis, Ferdinandos; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki A

    2017-02-01

    In 2015, the FDA approved an unprecedented number of new therapies for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among them therapies addressing specific genomic tumor subsets in the setting of development of resistance to first-line targeted therapy. Osimertinib (Tagrisso, formerly AZD9291; AstraZeneca) is indicated for patients with metastatic EGFR T790M mutation-positive NSCLC, as detected by an FDA-approved test, who have progressed on or after EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy. It received breakthrough therapy designation, priority review status, and accelerated approval from the FDA. Clin Cancer Res; 23(3); 618-22. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Positive selection for new disease mutations in the human germline: evidence from the heritable cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) is a highly aggressive thyroid cancer syndrome. Since almost all sporadic cases are caused by the same nucleotide substitution in the RET proto-oncogene, the calculated disease incidence is 100-200 times greater than would be expected based on the genome average mutation frequency. In order to determine whether this increased incidence is due to an elevated mutation rate at this position (true mutation hot spot) or a selective advantage conferred on mutated spermatogonial stem cells, we studied the spatial distribution of the mutation in 14 human testes. In donors aged 36-68, mutations were clustered with small regions of each testis having mutation frequencies several orders of magnitude greater than the rest of the testis. In donors aged 19-23 mutations were almost non-existent, demonstrating that clusters in middle-aged donors grew during adulthood. Computational analysis showed that germline selection is the only plausible explanation. Testes of men aged 75-80 were heterogeneous with some like middle-aged and others like younger testes. Incorporating data on age-dependent death of spermatogonial stem cells explains the results from all age groups. Germline selection also explains MEN2B's male mutation bias and paternal age effect. Our discovery focuses attention on MEN2B as a model for understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of germline selection. Since RET function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells has been extensively studied, we are able to suggest that the MEN2B mutation provides a selective advantage by altering the PI3K/AKT and SFK signaling pathways. Mutations that are preferred in the germline but reduce the fitness of offspring increase the population's mutational load. Our approach is useful for studying other disease mutations with similar characteristics and could uncover additional germline selection pathways or identify true mutation hot spots.

  12. In Their Own Words: Treating Very Young BRCA1/2 Mutation-Positive Women with Care and Caution

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Lindsey M.; Werner-Lin, Allison; Greene, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Young women who have been identified as carrying a deleterious mutation in BRCA1 or BRCA2 face a unique set of challenges related to managing cancer risk during a demographically-dense stage of life. They may struggle with decision-making in the absence of clear age-specific guidelines for medical management and because they have not yet fully developed the capacity to make life-altering decisions confidently. This study sought a patient-centered perspective on the dilemmas faced by 18–24 year olds who completed BRCA1/2 gene mutation testing prior to their 25th birthdays. Patients and Method This study integrated qualitative data from three independent investigations of BRCA1/2-positive women recruited through cancer risk clinics, hospital-based research centers, and online organizations. All 32 participants were women aged 21–25 who tested positive for a BRCA1/2 gene mutation between 2 and 60 months prior to data collection. Investigators used techniques of grounded theory and interpretive description to conduct both within and cross-study analysis. Results Participants expressed needs for (1) greater clarity in recommendations for screening and prevention before age 25, especially with consideration of early and regular exposure to radiation associated with mammography or to hormones used in birth control, and (2) ongoing contact with providers to discuss risk management protocols as they become available. Conclusions Health care needs during the young adult years evolve with the cognitive capacity to address abrupt and pressing change. Specific needs of women in this population include a desire to balance autonomous decision-making with supportive guidance, a need for clear, accurate and consistent medical recommendations. Optimally, these women are best cared for by a team of genetically-oriented providers as part of a sustained program of ongoing support, rather than seen in an episodic, crisis-driven fashion. A discussion of insurance issues and

  13. The chemokine receptor CCR5 deletion mutation is associated with MS in HLA-DR4-positive Russians.

    PubMed

    Favorova, O O; Andreewski, T V; Boiko, A N; Sudomoina, M A; Alekseenkov, A D; Kulakova, O G; Slanova, A V; Gusev, E I

    2002-11-26

    The authors studied the possible association between the presence of a 32-base pair deletion allele in CC chemokine receptor 5 gene [3p21] (CCR5 Delta 32 allele) and the occurrence of MS. The presence of CCR5 Delta 32 homozygotes among patients with MS indicates that the absence of CCR5 did not protect against MS. Moreover, the CCR5 Delta 32 mutation was associated with MS in HLA-DR4-positive Russians (p(corr) < 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 25.0). The (CCR5 Delta 32,DR4)-positive phenotype was negatively associated with early MS onset (at ages < or = 18 years) (p = 0.0115, OR = 0.1).

  14. 4-Quinolone antibiotics: positive genotoxic screening tests despite an apparent lack of mutation induction.

    PubMed

    Bredberg, A; Brant, M; Riesbeck, K; Azou, Y; Forsgren, A

    1989-03-01

    The effects of different 4-quinolone antibiotic derivatives (4-Qs) in a number of short-term tests commonly employed for the evaluation of genetic toxicity were studied. Incorporation of [3H]thymidine into mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes was strongly enhanced at a low concentration (1.56 micrograms/ml) for most of the tested 4-Qs, whereas DNA strand breakage in lymphoblastoid cells was evident only for ciprofloxacin (10 micrograms/ml and upwards), ofloxacin (80 micrograms/ml) and norfloxacin (160 micrograms/ml). Ciprofloxacin induced a significant amount of unscheduled DNA synthesis, but was found to be negative in a shuttle vector plasmid mutation test. Ciprofloxacin (80 micrograms/ml) did not inhibit enzymes involved in the early steps of pyrimidine biosynthesis. Cell growth was slightly depressed at a concentration of 20 micrograms/ml, becoming marked at 80 micrograms/ml. In conclusion, this study seeks to contribute to an improved evaluation of genotoxic screening test data, by focusing attention on the conflicting effects imposed by the 4-Qs on a battery of such tests.

  15. High frequency of mutations in exon 10 of the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in patients with a CRIM-positive subtype of acute intermittent porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.F.; Rooij, F. de; Voortman, G.; Velde, K.T.; Nordmann, Y.; Grandchamp, B.

    1992-09-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase. Different subtypes of the disease have been defined, and more than 10 different mutations have been described. The authors focused their study on exon 10, since they previously found that three different mutations were located in this exon and that two of them seemed to be relatively common. They used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) after in vitro amplification to detect all possible mutations in exon 10 in 41 unrelated AIP patients. In about one-fourth of these patients they could distinguish three abnormal migration patterns, indicating the presence of various mutations. Additional sequencing demonstrated the presence of three different single-base substitutions. Two of these mutations had already been described. A third one consisted of a C-to-T transition located at position 499 of the PBG deaminase mRNA and resulted in an Arg-to-Trp substitution. All three mutations were found in patients with crossreacting immunological material (CRIM)-positive forms of AlP. The high frequency of these mutations make DGGE analysis of exon 10 a useful approach allowing the direct detection of the DNA abnormality in most of the families with the CRIM-positive subtype of AlP. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. slan-defined subsets of CD16-positive monocytes: impact of granulomatous inflammation and M-CSF receptor mutation.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Thomas P; Zawada, Adam M; Frankenberger, Marion; Skokann, Kerstin; Satzl, Anna A; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Schuberth, Madeleine; Levin, Johannes; Danek, Adrian; Rotter, Björn; Heine, Gunnar H; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems

    2015-12-10

    Human monocytes are subdivided into classical, intermediate, and nonclassical subsets, but there is no unequivocal strategy to dissect the latter 2 cell types. We show herein that the cell surface marker 6-sulfo LacNAc (slan) can define slan-positive CD14(+)CD16(++) nonclassical monocytes and slan-negative CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes. Gene expression profiling confirms that slan-negative intermediate monocytes show highest expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II genes, whereas a differential ubiquitin signature is a novel feature of the slan approach. In unsupervised hierarchical clustering, the slan-positive nonclassical monocytes cluster with monocytes and are clearly distinct from CD1c(+) dendritic cells. In clinical studies, we show a selective increase of the slan-negative intermediate monocytes to >100 cells per microliter in patients with sarcoidosis and a fivefold depletion of the slan-positive monocytes in patients with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS), which is caused by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor mutations. These data demonstrate that the slan-based definition of CD16-positive monocyte subsets is informative in molecular studies and in clinical settings.

  17. TERT Polymorphism rs2736100-C Is Associated with EGFR Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yonglan; Niu, Xiaomin; Weng, Xiaoling; Zhang, Hong; Favus, Murray; Zhang, Lanjun; Jia, Weihua; Zeng, Yixin; Amos, Christopher I; Lu, Shun; Wang, Hui-Yun; Liu, Yun; Liu, Wanqing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive (EGFRmut+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may be a unique orphan disease. Previous studies suggested that the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene polymorphism is associated with demographic and clinical features strongly associated with EGFR mutations, e.g. adenocarcinoma histology, never-smoking history and female gender. We aim to test the association between TERT polymorphism and EGFRmut+ NSCLC. Experimental Design We conducted a genetic association study in Chinese NSCLC patients (n=714) and healthy controls (n=2,520), between the rs2736100 polymorphism and EGFRmut+ NSCLC. We further tested the association between the EGFR mutation status and mean leukocyte telomere length (LTL). The potential function of rs2736100 in lung epithelial cells was also explored. Results The rs2736100-C allele was significantly associated with EGFRmut+ NSCLC (OR=1.52, 95%CI=1.28–1.80, p=1.6×10−6) but not EGFRmut− NSCLC (OR=1.07, 95%CI=0.92–1.24, p=0.4). While NSCLC patients as a whole have significantly longer LTL compared to healthy controls (p≤10−13), the EGFRmut+ patients have even longer LTL compared to EGFRmut-patients (p=0.008). Meanwhile, rs2736100 was significantly associated with TERT mRNA expression in both normal and tumor lung tissues. All results remained significant after controlling for age, gender, smoking status and histology (p<0.05 for all tests). Moreover, the rs2736100 DNA sequence has an allele-specific affinity to nuclear proteins extracted from lung epithelial cells, which led to an altered enhancer activity of the sequence in vitro. Conclusion Our study suggests that telomerase and telomere function may be essential for carcinogenesis of EGFRmut+ NSCLC. Further investigation for the underlying mechanism is warranted. PMID:26149460

  18. Positional cloning of the PIS mutation in goats and its impact on understanding mammalian sex-differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    In goats, the PIS (polled intersex syndrome) mutation is responsible for both the absence of horns in males and females and sex-reversal affecting exclusively XX individuals. The mode of inheritance is dominant for the polled trait and recessive for sex-reversal. In XX PIS-/- mutants, the expression of testis-specific genes is observed very precociously during gonad development. Nevertheless, a delay of 4–5 days is observed in comparison with normal testis differentiation in XY males. By positional cloning, we demonstrate that the PIS mutation is an 11.7-kb regulatory-deletion affecting the expression of two genes, PISRT1 and FOXL2 which could act synergistically to promote ovarian differentiation. The transcriptional extinction of these two genes leads, very early, to testis-formation in XX homozygous PIS-/- mutants. According to their expression profiles and bibliographic data, we propose that FOXL2 may be an ovary-differentiating gene, and the non-coding RNA PISRT1, an anti-testis factor repressing SOX9, a key regulator of testis differentiation. Under this hypothesis, SRY, the testis-determining factor would inhibit these two genes in the gonads of XY males, to ensure testis differentiation. PMID:15601595

  19. Genetic Testing and Post-Testing Decision Making among BRCA-Positive Mutation Women: A Psychosocial Approach.

    PubMed

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene; An, Chen

    2016-10-01

    Through an analysis of an online survey of women who tested positive for the BRCA genetic mutation for breast cancer, this research uses a social constructionist and feminist standpoint lens to understand the decision-making process that leads BRCA-positive women to choose genetic testing. Additionally, this research examines how they socially construct and understand their risk for developing breast cancer, as well as which treatment options they undergo post-testing. BRCA-positive women re-frame their statistical medical risk for developing cancer and their post-testing treatment choices through a broad psychosocial context of engagement that also includes their social networks. Important psychosocial factors drive women's medical decisions, such as individual feelings of guilt and vulnerability, and the degree of perceived social support. Women who felt guilty and fearful that they might pass the BRCA gene to their children were more likely to undergo risk reducing surgery. Women with at least one daughter and women without children were more inclined toward the risk reducing surgery compared to those with only sons. These psychosocial factors and social network engagements serve as a "nexus of decision making" that does not, for the most part, mirror the medical assessments of statistical odds for hereditary cancer development, nor the specific treatment protocols outlined by the medical establishment.

  20. Chemical mutagenesis testing in Drosophila. I. Comparison of positive and negative control data for sex-linked recessive lethal mutations and reciprocal translocations in three laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Woodruff, R.C.; Mason, J.M.; Valencia, R.; Zimmering, S.

    1984-01-01

    As part of the validation phase of the Drosophila melanogaster segment of the National Toxicology Program, a comparison has been made of positive and negative controls for sex-linked recessive lethal mutations and reciprocal translocations from three laboratories. This comparison involves approximately 700,000 spontaneous recessive lethal mutation tests, 70,000 spontaneous translocation tests, and screens for genetic damage induced by N-nitrosodimethylamine and ..beta..-propiolactone. Spontaneous frequencies for lethal mutations and translocations were homogeneous in the laboratories regardless of solvent or broods sampled. Inhomogeneity was observed in induced frequencies among laboratories, but the variation was no greater than that found within a laboratory.

  1. Microfluidic deletion/insertion analysis for rapid screening of KIT and PDGFRA mutations in CD117-positive gastrointestinal stromal tumors: diagnostic applications and report of a new KIT mutation.

    PubMed

    Zamò, Alberto; Bertolaso, Anna; Franceschetti, Ilaria; Weirich, Gregor; Capelli, Paola; Pecori, Sara; Chilosi, Marco; Hoefler, Heinz; Menestrina, Fabio; Scarpa, Aldo

    2007-04-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) frequently harbor mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes, the presence and type of which correlate with the response to the kinase inhibitor imatinib mesylate. Because most GIST mutations are deletions/insertions, we used a microfluidic apparatus to detect these size variations in polymerase chain reaction-amplified DNA. This approach, termed microfluidic deletion/insertion analysis (MIDIA), identified mutations in 30 of 50 DNA samples from paraffin-embedded CD117-positive GISTs (60%), comprising 25 deletions and five insertions. Sequencing of 14 MIDIA-positive samples confirmed the deletions/insertions, including two 3-bp alterations. Sequencing of all 20 MIDIA-negative samples also showed highly consistent results with MIDIA because 10 cases were wild type and eight displayed a single base substitution in which detection by MIDIA was not expected. Sequencing also revealed a 3-bp deletion undetected by MIDIA, thus establishing the resolution limit of MIDIA at deletions/insertions >or=3 bp. Denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis confirmed all mutations detected by MIDIA and sequencing. We pro-pose MIDIA as the first step in mutational screening of GIST because it allowed the detection of 75% of mutated cases (94% of deletions/insertions) in less than 30 minutes after polymerase chain reaction amplification and at a lower cost compared with denaturing high-pressure liquid chromatography and sequencing, which might then be used only for MIDIA-negative cases.

  2. From Whole Gene Deletion to Point Mutations of EP300-Positive Rubinstein-Taybi Patients: New Insights into the Mutational Spectrum and Peculiar Clinical Hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Negri, Gloria; Magini, Pamela; Milani, Donatella; Colapietro, Patrizia; Rusconi, Daniela; Scarano, Emanuela; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Priolo, Manuela; Crippa, Milena; Mazzanti, Laura; Wischmeijer, Anita; Tamburrino, Federica; Pippucci, Tommaso; Finelli, Palma; Larizza, Lidia; Gervasini, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth deficiency, skeletal abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and intellectual disability. Causative mutations in CREBBP and EP300 genes have been identified in ∼55% and ∼8% of affected individuals. To date, only 28 EP300 alterations in 29 RSTS clinically described patients have been reported. EP300 analysis of 22 CREBBP-negative RSTS patients from our cohort led us to identify six novel mutations: a 376-kb deletion depleting EP300 gene; an exons 17-19 deletion (c.(3141+1_3142-1)_(3590+1_3591-1)del/p.(Ile1047Serfs*30)); two stop mutations, (c.3829A>T/p.(Lys1277*) and c.4585C>T/p.(Arg1529*)); a splicing mutation (c.1878-12A>G/p.(Ala627Glnfs*11)), and a duplication (c.4640dupA/p.(Asn1547Lysfs*3)). All EP300-mutated individuals show a mild RSTS phenotype and peculiar findings including maternal gestosis, skin manifestation, especially nevi or keloids, back malformations, and a behavior predisposing to anxiety. Furthermore, the patient carrying the complete EP300 deletion does not show a markedly severe clinical picture, even if a more composite phenotype was noticed. By characterizing six novel EP300-mutated patients, this study provides further insights into the EP300-specific clinical presentation and expands the mutational repertoire including the first case of a whole gene deletion. These new data will enhance EP300-mutated cases identification highlighting distinctive features and will improve the clinical practice allowing a better genotype-phenotype correlation.

  3. Mutations affecting a putative MutLα endonuclease motif impact multiple mismatch repair functions

    PubMed Central

    Erdeniz, Naz; Nguyen, Megan; Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) lead to increased mutation rates and higher recombination between similar, but not identical sequences, as well as resistance to certain DNA methylating agents. Recently, a component of human MMR machinery, MutLα, has been shown to display a latent endonuclease activity. The endonuclease active site appears to include a conserved motif, DQHA(X)2E(X)4E, within the COOH-terminus of human PMS2. Substitution of the glutamic acid residue (E705) abolished the endonuclease activity and mismatch-dependent excision in vitro. Previously, we showed that the PMS2-E705K mutation and the corresponding mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were both recessive loss of function alleles for mutation avoidance in vivo. Here, we show that mutations impacting this endonuclease motif also significantly affect MMR-dependent suppression of homeologous recombination in yeast and responses to Sn1-type methylating agents in both yeast and mammalian cells. Thus, our in vivo results suggest that the endonuclease activity of MutLα is important not only in MMR-dependent mutation avoidance but also for recombination and damage response functions. PMID:17567544

  4. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  5. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  6. EGFR C797S mutation mediates resistance to third-generation inhibitors in T790M-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhang; Tsui, Stella T; Liu, Christina; Song, Yongping; Liu, Delong

    2016-07-22

    T790M mutation is the most common mechanism for resistance to first- and second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Several third-generation EGFR mutant selective TKIs are being explored to conquer this resistance. AZD9291 (osimertinib, tagrisso) has been approved for treatment of the metastatic EGFR T790M mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer. Resistance to AZD9291 has been described. C797S mutation was reported to be a major mechanism for resistance to T790M-targeting EGFR inhibitors. This review summarizes the latest development in identifying the C797S mutation and EAI045, the novel selective inhibitor overcoming the C797S mutant.

  7. An integrative analysis of PIK3CA mutation, PTEN, and INPP4B expression in terms of trastuzumab efficacy in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sueta, Aiko; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Hayashi, Mitsuhiro; Takeshita, Takashi; Yamamoto, Satoko; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    The phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is commonly deregulated in breast cancer through several mechanisms, including PIK3CA mutation and loss of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase-II (INPP4B). We aimed to evaluate the predictive relevance of these biomarkers to trastuzumab efficacy in HER2-positive disease. We evaluated the effect of trastuzumab in 43 breast cancer patients with HER2-overexpression who received neoadjuvant treatment. PIK3CA mutation was examined by direct sequencing and digital PCR assay, and PIK3CA copy number was assessed by digital PCR assay of pretreatment tissues. PTEN, pAkt, and INPP4B were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Direct sequencing detected mutant DNA in 21% of all patients, but the incidence increased to 49% using digital PCR. The pathological complete response (pCR) rate in patients with PIK3CA mutations was 29% compared with 67% for those without PIK3CA mutations (P = 0.093), when the mutation was defined as positive if the mutant proportion was more than 10% of total genetic content by digital PCR. Low PTEN expression was associated with less pCR compared to high expression (33% versus 72%, P = 0.034). There were no significant associations of PIK3CA copy number, pAKt, or INPP4B with trastuzumab efficacy. In multivariate analysis, activation of the PI3K pathway due to either PIK3CA mutation or low PTEN were related to poorer response to trastuzumab (OR of predictive pCR was 0.11, 95%CI; 0.03-0.48). In conclusion, activating the PI3K pathway is associated with low pCR to trastuzumab-based treatment in HER2-positive breast cancer. Combined analysis of PIK3CA mutation and PTEN expression may serve as critical indicators to identify patients unlikely to respond to trastuzumab.

  8. Heterogeneity and clinical significance of ESR1 mutations in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer patients receiving fulvestrant

    PubMed Central

    Spoerke, Jill M.; Gendreau, Steven; Walter, Kimberly; Qiu, Jiaheng; Wilson, Timothy R.; Savage, Heidi; Aimi, Junko; Derynck, Mika K.; Chen, Meng; Chan, Iris T.; Amler, Lukas C.; Hampton, Garret M.; Johnston, Stephen; Krop, Ian; Schmid, Peter; Lackner, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ESR1 have been associated with resistance to aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in patients with ER+ metastatic breast cancer. Little is known of the impact of these mutations in patients receiving selective oestrogen receptor degrader (SERD) therapy. In this study, hotspot mutations in ESR1 and PIK3CA from ctDNA were assayed in clinical trial samples from ER+ metastatic breast cancer patients randomized either to the SERD fulvestrant or fulvestrant plus a pan-PI3K inhibitor. ESR1 mutations are present in 37% of baseline samples and are enriched in patients with luminal A and PIK3CA-mutated tumours. ESR1 mutations are often polyclonal and longitudinal analysis shows distinct clones exhibiting divergent behaviour over time. ESR1 mutation allele frequency does not show a consistent pattern of increases during fulvestrant treatment, and progression-free survival is not different in patients with ESR1 mutations compared with wild-type patients. ESR1 mutations are not associated with clinical resistance to fulvestrant in this study. PMID:27174596

  9. Extracellular signal-related kinase positively regulates ataxia telangiectasia mutated, homologous recombination repair, and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Golding, Sarah E; Rosenberg, Elizabeth; Neill, Steven; Dent, Paul; Povirk, Lawrence F; Valerie, Kristoffer

    2007-02-01

    The accurate joining of DNA double-strand breaks by homologous recombination repair (HRR) is critical to the long-term survival of the cell. The three major mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, and c-Jun-NH(2)-kinase (JNK), regulate cell growth, survival, and apoptosis. To determine the role of MAPK signaling in HRR, we used a human in vivo I-SceI-based repair system. First, we verified that this repair platform is amenable to pharmacologic manipulation and show that the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase is critical for HRR. The ATM-specific inhibitor KU-55933 compromised HRR up to 90% in growth-arrested cells, whereas this effect was less pronounced in cycling cells. Then, using well-characterized MAPK small-molecule inhibitors, we show that ERK1/2 and JNK signaling are important positive regulators of HRR in growth-arrested cells. On the other hand, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway generated an almost 2-fold stimulation of HRR. When ERK1/2 signaling was stimulated by oncogenic RAF-1, an approximately 2-fold increase in HRR was observed. KU-55933 partly blocked radiation-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, suggesting that ATM regulates ERK1/2 signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK)/ERK signaling resulted in severely reduced levels of phosphorylated (S1981) ATM foci but not gamma-H2AX foci, and suppressed ATM phosphorylation levels >85% throughout the cell cycle. Collectively, these results show that MAPK signaling positively and negatively regulates HRR in human cells. More specifically, ATM-dependent signaling through the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway is critical for efficient HRR and for radiation-induced ATM activation, suggestive of a regulatory feedback loop between ERK and ATM.

  10. A multi-case report of the pathways to and through genetic testing and cancer risk management for BRCA mutation-positive women aged 18–25

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Lin, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Much of the extant literature addressing the psychosocial aspects of BRCA1/2 mutation testing and risk management aggregates mutation carriers of all ages in study recruitment, data analysis, and interpretation. This analytic strategy does not adequately address the needs of the youngest genetic testing consumers, i.e., women aged 18–25. Despite low absolute cancer risk estimates before age 30, BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women aged 18–25 feel vulnerable to a cancer diagnosis but find themselves in a management quandary because the clinical utility of screening and prevention options are not yet well defined for such young carriers. We present three cases, selected from a larger study of 32 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women who completed or considered genetic testing before age 25, to demonstrate the unique developmental, relational and temporal influences, as well as the challenges, experienced by very young BRCA mutation-positive women as they complete genetic testing and initiate cancer risk management. The first case describes the maturation of a young woman whose family participated in a national cancer registry. The second addresses the experiences and expectations of a young woman who completed genetic testing after learning that her unaffected father was a mutation carrier. The third case highlights the experiences of a young woman parentally bereaved in childhood, who presented for genetic counseling and testing due to intense family pressure. Together, these cases suggest that BRCA1/2-positive women aged 18–25 are challenged to reconcile their burgeoning independence from their families with risk-related support needs. Loved ones acting in ways meant to care for these young women may inadvertently apply pressure, convoluting family support dynamics and autonomous decision-making. Ongoing support from competent healthcare professionals will enable these young women to remain informed and receive objective counsel about their risk-management decisions

  11. Molecular characterization of a novel HEXA mutation at the +3 position of intron 8 in a Tay-Sachs disease patient

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.; Triggs-Raine, B.; Natowicz, M.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from mutations in the HEXA gene that cause a deficiency in the activity of that enzyme {beta}-hexosaminidase A (Hex A). This deficiency leads to the build-up of G{sub M2} ganglioside, resulting in neurodegeneration and death. Biochemical analysis of a non-Jewish patient with a late-infantile form of Tay-Sachs disease revealed a substantial level of Hex A activity (38.4%) when 4-MUG was used as the substrate. However, when a substrate (4-MUGS) specific for the {alpha}-subunit of Hex A ({alpha}{beta}) was used, almost no activity was detected in the HEXA gene of the patient using SSCP analysis followed by sequencing. The first mutation, a G533A substitution in exon 5, is previously described and associated with the B1 form of Tay-Sachs disease. The second mutation is a novel a-to-g base change at the +3 position of intron 8. This was confirmed using the AIRS method, whereby a MaeIII site was created in the presence of the mutation. Normal and patient mRNA was reverse transcribed and exons 7 to 9 were PCR-amplified from the cDNA. An abnormally sized amplification product detected only in the patient cDNA was sequenced; exon 8 had been deleted and exons 7 and 9 were spliced together. A substantial level of normally-sized PCR product was also detected in the patient`s cDNA. Experiments are in progress to determine if this is produced from the allele harboring the G533A mutation. Given that previous mutations of this type have been associated with 97-100% abnormal splicing, this mutation is likely to be the cause, together with the G533A mutation, of Tay-Sachs disease in this patient.

  12. Association of high CD4-positive T cell infiltration with mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Surmann, Eva-Maria; Voigt, Anita Y; Michel, Sara; Bauer, Kathrin; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Ferrone, Soldano; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Besides being expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells, HLA class II antigens are expressed on various tumors of non-lymphoid origin, including a subset of colorectal cancers (CRC). Information about the regulation of HLA class II antigen expression is important for a better understanding of their role in the interactions between tumor and immune cells. Whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in tumors reflects the selective immune destruction of HLA class II antigen-expressing tumor cells is unknown. To address this question, we tested whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in CRC was associated with immune cell infiltration. We selected microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) CRC, because they show pronounced tumor antigen-specific immune responses and, in a subset of tumors, lack of HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations inactivating HLA class II-regulatory genes. We examined HLA class II antigen expression, mutations in regulatory genes, and CD4-positive T cell infiltration in 69 MSI-H CRC lesions. Mutations in RFX5, CIITA, and RFXAP were found in 13 (28.9%), 3 (6.7%), and 1 (2.2%) out of 45 HLA class II antigen-negative tumors. CD4-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in HLA class II antigen-negative tumors harboring mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes (107.4 T cells per 0.25 mm(2)) compared to tumors without mutations (55.5 T cells per 0.25 mm(2), p = 0.008). Our results suggest that the outgrowth of tumor cells lacking HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations of regulatory genes is favored in an environment of dense CD4-positive T cell infiltration.

  13. Mutation from guanine to adenine in 25S rRNA at the position equivalent to E. coli A2058 does not confer erythromycin sensitivity in Sacchromyces cerevisae

    PubMed Central

    Bommakanti, Ananth S.; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    The macrolide erythromycin binds to the large subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome near the peptidyltransferase center (PTC) and inhibits elongation of new peptide chains beyond a few amino acids. Nucleotides A2058 and A2059 (E. coli numbering) in 23S rRNA play a crucial role in the binding of erythromycin, and mutation of nucleotide A2058 confers erythromycin resistance in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. There are high levels of sequence and structural similarity in the PTC of prokaryotic and eukaryotic ribosomes. However, eukaryotic ribosomes are resistant to erythromycin and the presence of a G at the position equivalent to E. coli nucleotide A2058 is believed to be the reason. To test this hypothesis, we introduced a G to A mutation at this position of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae 25S rRNA and analyzed sensitivity toward erythromycin. Neither growth studies nor erythromycin binding assays on mutated yeast ribosomes indicated any erythromycin sensitivity in mutated yeast strains. These results suggest that the identity of nucleotide 2058 is not the only determinant responsible for the difference in erythromycin sensitivity between yeast and prokaryotes. PMID:18218702

  14. Frequent p53 mutation in brain (fetal)-type glycogen phosphorylase positive foci adjacent to human ‘de novo’olorectal carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, S; Shiomori, K; Tashima, S; Tsuruta, J; Ogawa, M

    2001-01-01

    ‘de novo’ carcinogenesis has been advocated besides ‘adenoma carcinoma sequence’ as another dominant pathway leading to colorectal carcinoma. Our recent study has demonstrated that the distribution of brain (fetal)-type glycogen phosphorylase (BGP) positive foci (BGP foci) has a close relationship with the location of ‘de novo’ carcinoma. The aims of the present study are to investigate genetic alteration in the BGP foci and to characterize them in the ‘de novo’ carcinogenesis. 17 colorectal carcinomas without any adenoma component expressing both immunoreactive p53 and BGP protein were selected from 96 resected specimens from our previous study. Further investigations to examine the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-labelling index, and the p53 and the codon 12 of K-ras mutation using the polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism were performed in the BGP foci, BGP negative mucosa and carcinoma. The BGP foci were observed sporadically in the transitional mucosa adjacent to the carcinoma in all cases. The PCNA labelling index in the BGP foci was significantly higher than that in the BGP negative mucosa (P< 0.001). p53 mutations were observed in 8 carcinomas, but no K-ras mutation was detected. Interestingly, although none of the overexpressions of p53 protein was detected immunohistochemically in the BGP positive foci, the p53 gene frequently (41.2% of the BGP foci tested) mutated in spite of no K-ras mutation. The present study demonstrates potentially premalignant foci in the colorectal transitional mucosa with frequent p53 gene mutation. It is suggested that BGP foci are promising candidates for the further investigation of ‘de novo’ colorectal carcinogenesis. © 2001Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11384100

  15. [Atypical serological profiles in hepatitis B infections: investigation of S gene mutations in cases with concurrently positive for HBsAg and anti-HBs].

    PubMed

    Aydın, Neriman; Kırdar, Sevin; Uzun, Nilgül; Eyigör, Mete; Sayan, Murat

    2016-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) causes different clinical manifestations, ranging from asymptomatic carriage to fulminant or chronic hepatitis. Serological tests are widely used for the diagnosis of HBV infections to detect viral markers. However, facing with atypical serological profiles in some patients leads to problems in interpreting of the results and management of the patients. The aims of this study were to investigate the atypical serologic profiles seen in patients screened for HBV infection and the S gene mutations in patients with concurrent positivity of HBsAg and anti-HBs. A total of 592 sera from patients (332 male, 260 female; age range: 13-84 years, mean age: 43.9 years) prediagnosed as HBV infection between January to September 2013, and screened for HBV markers (HBsAg, anti-HBs, HBeAg, anti-HBe, anti-HBc-IgM, anti-HBc-total and HBV-DNA) were included in the study. Of those samples 364 were screened only for HBsAg and anti-HBs markers. S gene mutations were investigated by direct sequencing method in sera which were concurrent positive for HBsAg and anti-HBs. In our study, 5.2% (31/592) of the sera yielded atypical serologic profiles. Of these 13 cases were concurrently positive for HBsAg and anti-HBs; nine were HBeAg positive, anti-HBe and HBV-DNA negative; eight were HBeAg, anti-HBe and HBV-DNA positive; and one was HBsAg and anti-HBs negative, anti-HBe and HBV-DNA positive. The rate of concurrent positivity of HBsAg and anti-HBs was 3.6% (13/364), while 76.9% (10/13) of those cases were also positive for HBV-DNA. DNA sequencing was performed for seven out of 10 samples which were positive for HBsAg, anti-HBs and HBV-DNA, however three samples were not used because of the low amounts. Sequence analysis of seven samples showed S gene mutations in two samples, one was sS143L with sS193L, a HBV vaccine escape mutation, and the other was sP120R, a HBV immune escape mutation. Of the patients 2.7% (10/364) was negative for both HBsAg and anti-HBs; in which

  16. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. ||

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  17. Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in Southern African blacks: P gene-associated haplotypes suggest a major mutation in the 5{prime} region of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, M.; Stevens, G.; Beukering, J. van

    1994-09-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) occurs with a prevalence of 1 in 3900 among Southern African (SA) blacks. The major contributors to morbidity and mortality are skin cancer and decreased visual acuity. Two distinct phenotypes occur, namely individuals with ephelides (darkly pigmented patches) and those without. There is complete concordance with regard to ephelus status among siblings. The disorder is linked to markers on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, and no obligatory cross-overs were observed with polymophic markers at the human homolog, P, of the mouse pink eyed dilute gene, p. Contrary to what has been shown for Caucasoid ty-pos OCA, this condition shows locus homogeneity among SA blacks. The P gene is an excellent candidate for ty-pos OCA and mutations in this gene will confirm its role in causing the common form of albinism in SA. Numerous P gene mutations have been described in other populations. In an attempt to detect mutations, the P gene cDNA was used to search for structural rearrangements or polymorphisms. Six polymorphisms (plR10/Scal, 912/Xbal, 912/HincII, 912/TaqI, 1412/TaqI [two systems] and 1412/HindIII) were detected with subclones of the P cDNA and haplotypes were determined in each family. None were clearly associated with an albinism-related rearrangement. However, strong linkage disequilibrium was observed with alleles at loci toward the 5{prime} region of the gene ({triangle}=0.65, 0.57 and 0.80 for the three polymorphisms detected with the 912 subclone), suggesting a major ty-pos OCA mutation in this region. Haplotype analysis provides evidence for a major mutation associated with the same haplotype in individuals with ephelides (8/12 OCA chromosomes) and those without ephelides (24:30). The presence of other ty-pos OCA associated haplotypes indicates several other less common mutations.

  18. Mutation analysis of 13 driver genes of colorectal cancer-related pathways in Taiwanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuli Christine; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Liu, Ta-Chih; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yang, Shu-Fen; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Chang, Ya-Sian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the driver gene mutations associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in the Taiwanese population. METHODS: In this study, 103 patients with CRC were evaluated. The samples consisted of 66 men and 37 women with a median age of 59 years and an age range of 26-86 years. We used high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) and direct DNA sequencing to characterize the mutations in 13 driver genes of CRC-related pathways. The HRM assays were conducted using the LightCycler® 480 Instrument provided with the software LightCycler® 480 Gene Scanning Software Version 1.5. We also compared the clinicopathological data of CRC patients with the driver gene mutation status. RESULTS: Of the 103 patients evaluated, 73.79% had mutations in one of the 13 driver genes. We discovered 18 novel mutations in APC, MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, SMAD4 and TP53 that have not been previously reported. Additionally, we found 16 de novo mutations in APC, BMPR1A, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH and PMS2 in cancerous tissues previously reported in the dbSNP database; however, these mutations could not be detected in peripheral blood cells. The APC mutation correlates with lymph node metastasis (34.69% vs 12.96%, P = 0.009) and cancer stage (34.78% vs 14.04%, P = 0.013). No association was observed between other driver gene mutations and clinicopathological features. Furthermore, having two or more driver gene mutations correlates with the degree of lymph node metastasis (42.86% vs 24.07%, P = 0.043). CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm the importance of 13 CRC-related pathway driver genes in the development of CRC in Taiwanese patients. PMID:26900293

  19. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; MacKenzie, R J; Eide, C A; Davare, M A; Watanabe-Smith, K; Tognon, C E; Mongoue-Tchokote, S; Park, B; Braziel, R M; Tyner, J W; Druker, B J

    2015-06-04

    To understand the role of cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis, we designed a functional RNA interference (RNAi) screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen, we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for a JAK3(A572V) mutation-positive acute myeloid leukemia cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3(A572V), as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3-activating mutations such as JAK3(M511I). In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant, but not wild-type JAK3, increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall, we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation-positive leukemia. In addition, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth.

  20. Characteristics of BRCA1/2 Mutation-Positive Breast Cancers in Korea: A Comparison Study Based on Multicenter Data and the Korean Breast Cancer Registry

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jong-Han; Son, Byung Ho; Kim, Sung-Won; Park, Sue K.; Lee, Min Hyuk; Kim, Lee Su; Noh, Woo-Chul; Kim, Eun-Kyu; Yoon, Dae Sung; Lee, Jeeyeon; Jung, Jin Hyang; Jung, Sang Seol; Gong, Gyungyup; Ahn, Sei-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in BRCA genes are the main cause of hereditary breast cancer in Korea. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of breast cancers involving BRCA1 (BRCA1 group) and BRCA2 (BRCA2 group) mutations. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with BRCA1 (BRCA1 group) or BRCA2 (BRCA2 group) mutation positive breast cancer from multiple centers and compared the data to that of the Korean Breast Cancer Society registry (registry group). Results The patients of the BRCA1 group were diagnosed at a younger age (median age, 37 years) and had tumors of higher histological (61.3% with histological grade 3) and nuclear (37.5% with nuclear grade 3) grade than those of the registry group. In addition, the frequency of ductal carcinoma in situ in the BRCA1 group was lower (3.7%) than in the registry group, and the BRCA1 group were more likely to be triple-negative breast cancer (61.3%). Patients in the BRCA2 group were also younger at diagnosis (mean age, 41 years) and were more likely to have involvement of the axillary node than the registry group (45.5% vs. 33.5%, p=0.002). The BRCA1 and BRCA2 groups did not show a correlation between tumor size and axillary node involvement. Conclusion We report the characteristics of BRCA mutation positive breast cancer patients in the Korean population through multicenter data and nation-wide breast cancer registry study. However, BRCA-mutated breast cancers appear highly complex, and further research on their molecular basis is needed in Korea. PMID:25013433

  1. Low prevalence of HER2 positivity amongst BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers and in primary BRCA screens.

    PubMed

    Evans, D G; Lalloo, F; Howell, S; Verhoef, S; Woodward, E R; Howell, A

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to delineate more clearly the prevalence of HER2+ breast cancer in women with germline BRCA1/2 mutations. For this purpose, we analysed primary mutation screens on women with breast cancer with unequivocal HER2 amplification and assessed the proportion of BRCA1 and BRCA2 breast cancers that were HER2+ comparing this with the existing literature. The results are that 1063 primary BRCA screens had confirmed tumour HER2 status. If HER2+ only 2.5 % (4/156) and 3.2 % (5/156) of women had a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation identified respectively; compared to 27.7 % (115/415) and 8.2 % (34/415) with triple negative tumours. Only 2.1 % (4/195) women with BRCA1-related breast cancer had HER2 amplified breast cancers rising to 6.8 % (n = 12, p = 0.04) in BRCA2. These rates are in keeping with most of the existing literature except a recent large multicenter report which documented higher rates but with no control group. The study concluded that true HER2-amplified breast cancers are rare amongst BRCA1 mutation carriers and are less common in BRCA2 than background rates.

  2. No correlation between NF1 mutation position and risk of optic pathway glioma in 77 unrelated NF1 patients.

    PubMed

    Hutter, Sonja; Piro, Rosario M; Waszak, Sebastian M; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Lassaletta, Alvaro; Witt, Olaf; Korbel, Jan O; Lichter, Peter; Schuhmann, Martin U; Pfister, Stefan M; Tabori, Uri; Mautner, Victor F; Jones, David T W

    2016-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common monogenic disorder whereby affected individuals are predisposed to developing CNS tumors, including optic pathway gliomas (OPGs, occurring in ~15 to 20 % of cases). So far, no definite genotype-phenotype correlation determining NF1 patients at risk for tumor formation has been described, although enrichment for mutations in the 5' region of the NF1 gene in OPG patients has been suggested. We used whole exome sequencing, targeted sequencing, and copy number analysis to screen 77 unrelated NF1 patients with (n = 41) or without (n = 36; age ≥10 years) optic pathway glioma for germline NF1 alterations. We identified germline NF1 mutations in 69 of 77 patients (90 %), but no genotype-phenotype correlation was observed. Our data using a larger patient cohort did not confirm the previously reported clustering of mutations in the 5' region of the NF1 gene in patients with OPG. Thus, NF1 mutation location should not currently be used as a clinical criterion to assess the risk of developing OPGs.

  3. Chromoendoscopy in combination with random biopsies does not improve detection of gastric cancer foci in CDH1 mutation positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Hüneburg, Robert; Marwitz, Tim; van Heteren, Peer; Weismüller, Tobias J.; Trebicka, Jonel; Adam, Ronja; Aretz, Stefan; Perez Bouza, Alberto; Pantelis, Dimitrios; Kalff, Jörg C.; Nattermann, Jacob; Strassburg, Cristian P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HGGC), an autosomal dominant tumor-syndrome, accounts for 1 % to 3 % of gastric cancers worldwide. Presumably 30 % to 40 % of all patients fulfilling the clinical guidelines for HDGC are carriers of a pathogenic mutation in the CDH1 gene. Patients often show multiple foci of signet ring cell carcinoma at early age and are advised to undergo prophylactic total gastrectomy (PTG). Our aim was to improve the endoscopic detection of HDGC by using an enhanced endoscopic protocol. Patient and methods: Patients with a proven CDH1 germline mutation identified in our institute were prospectively included. Patients were advised to undergo PTG and offered a baseline endoscopic examination prior surgery. Examination was performed by using high-resolution white-light endoscopy and pan-gastric chromoendoscopy with indigo carmine as dye combined with targeted and multiple random biopsies assessed by an expert histopathologist. Postoperative histopathology was compared with results from endoscopic biopsies. Results: Between September 2012 and November 2014 8 patients with a proven CDH1 germline mutation were included. We conducted 44 targeted (6.3/patient) and 225 random (32.1/patient) biopsies in 7 patients. We detected 1 gastric cancer by random biopsy (14 %). All other examinations showed no signs of cancer. Histopathology of gastrectomy specimen revealed multiple foci of gastric carcinoma in 6 patients (86 %) with a total number of 27 cancer foci. Conclusions: Examination with targeted and random biopsies combined with chromoendoscopy is not able to detect small foci of gastric cancer in CDH1 mutation carriers. Therefore PTG is advocated in these patients. PMID:27995193

  4. Treatment choice in epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive non-small cell lung carcinoma: latest evidence and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Oscar; Popat, Sanjay

    2017-01-01

    Discovery of sensitizing mutations in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the subsequent development of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have substantially changed the treatment of lung cancer. First-line treatment with EGFR TKIs (gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib) has demonstrated a superior response rate and progression-free survival (PFS) compared with chemotherapy in EGFR-mutation positive patients. However, a number of open questions remain, such as choice between the three EGFR TKIs licensed, treatment of patients unsuitable for chemotherapy due to morbidity or advanced age, management of acquired resistance and optimal biological sample to determine EGFR status. Recently the first head-to-head trial comparing gefitinib and afatinib (LUX-Lung 7) has been reported. Moreover, third-generation EGFR TKIs such as osimertinib, rociletinib, olmutinib and ASP8273, with preferential activity against T790M mutant tumours, the commonest resistance mechanism to EGFR TKIs, have shown promising results in early clinical trials, with osimertinib now licensed. In this review, we summarize latest advances in the treatment of EGFR-mutation positive patients focusing on controversial areas and emerging challenges to optimally treat these patients in the future. PMID:28344665

  5. Single-base mutations at position 2661 of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA increase efficiency of translational proofreading.

    PubMed Central

    Melançon, P; Tapprich, W E; Brakier-Gingras, L

    1992-01-01

    Two single-base substitutions were constructed in the 2660 loop of Escherichia coli 23S rRNA (G2661-->C or U) and were introduced into the rrnB operon cloned in plasmid pKK3535. Ribosomes were isolated from bacteria transformed with the mutated plasmids and assayed in vitro in a poly(U)-directed system for their response to the misreading effect of streptomycin, neomycin, and gentamicin, three aminoglycoside antibiotics known to impair the proofreading control of translational accuracy. Both mutations decreased the stimulation of misreading by these drugs, but neither interfered with their binding to the ribosome. The response of the mutant ribosomes to these drugs suggests that the 2660 loop, which belongs to the elongation factor Tu binding site, is involved in the proofreading step of the accuracy control. In vivo, both mutations reduced read-through of nonsense codons and frameshifting, which can also be related to the increased efficiency in proofreading control which they confer to ribosomes. PMID:1281147

  6. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    PubMed

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource.

  7. PF-114, a potent and selective inhibitor of native and mutated BCR/ABL is active against Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias harboring the T315I mutation.

    PubMed

    Mian, A A; Rafiei, A; Haberbosch, I; Zeifman, A; Titov, I; Stroylov, V; Metodieva, A; Stroganov, O; Novikov, F; Brill, B; Chilov, G; Hoelzer, D; Ottmann, O G; Ruthardt, M

    2015-05-01

    Targeting BCR/ABL with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) is a proven concept for the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias. Resistance attributable to either kinase mutations in BCR/ABL or nonmutational mechanisms remains the major clinical challenge. With the exception of ponatinib, all approved TKIs are unable to inhibit the 'gatekeeper' mutation T315I. However, a broad spectrum of kinase inhibition increases the off-target effects of TKIs and may be responsible for cardiovascular issues of ponatinib. Thus, there is a need for more selective options for the treatment of resistant Ph+ leukemias. PF-114 is a novel TKI developed with the specifications of (i) targeting T315I and other resistance mutations in BCR/ABL; (ii) achieving a high selectivity to improve safety; and (iii) overcoming nonmutational resistance in Ph+ leukemias. PF-114 inhibited BCR/ABL and clinically important mutants including T315I at nanomolar concentrations. It suppressed primary Ph+ acute lymphatic leukemia-derived long-term cultures that either displayed nonmutational resistance or harbor the T315I. In BCR/ABL- or BCR/ABL-T315I-driven murine leukemia as well as in xenograft models of primary Ph+ leukemia harboring the T315I, PF-114 significantly prolonged survival to a similar extent as ponatinib. Our work supports clinical evaluation of PF-114 for the treatment of resistant Ph+ leukemia.

  8. Circulating-free DNA Mutation Associated with Response of Targeted Therapy in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qing; Qi, Fan; Bian, Li; Zhang, Shao-Hua; Wang, Tao; Jiang, Ze-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Background: The addition of anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeted drugs, such as trastuzumab, lapatinib, and trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1), to chemotherapy significantly improved prognosis of HER2-positive breast cancer patients. However, it was confused that metastatic patients vary in the response of targeted drug. Therefore, methods of accurately predicting drug response were really needed. To overcome the spatial and temporal limitations of biopsies, we aimed to develop a more sensitive and less invasive method of detecting mutations associated with anti-HER2 therapeutic response through circulating-free DNA (cfDNA). Methods: From March 6, 2014 to December 10, 2014, 24 plasma samples from 20 patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer who received systemic therapy were eligible. We used a panel for detection of hot-spot mutations from 50 oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, and then used targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) to identify somatic mutation of these samples in those 50 genes. Samples taken before their first trastuzumab administration and subsequently proven with clinical benefit were grouped into sensitive group. The others were collected after disease progression of the trastuzumab-based therapy and were grouped into the resistant group. Results: A total of 486 single-nucleotide variants from 46 genes were detected. Of these 46 genes, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase catalytic subunit alpha (PIK3CA), proto-oncogene c-Kit (KIT), and tumor protein p53 (TP53) were the most common mutated genes. Seven genes, including epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), G protein subunit alpha S (GNAS), HRas proto-oncogene (HRAS), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), cadherin 1 (CDH1), neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), and NOTCH1, that only occurred mutations in the resistant group were associated with the resistance of targeted therapy. In addition, we detected a HER2 S855I mutation in two patients who had

  9. Mutation at positively selected positions in the binding site for HLA-C shows that KIR2DL1 is a more refined but less adaptable NK cell receptor than KIR2DL3.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Hugo G; Vago, Luca; Older Aguilar, Anastazia M; Moesta, Achim K; Graef, Thorsten; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Norman, Paul J; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Parham, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Through recognition of HLA class I, killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) modulate NK cell functions in human immunity and reproduction. Although a minority of HLA-A and -B allotypes are KIR ligands, HLA-C allotypes dominate this regulation, because they all carry either the C1 epitope recognized by KIR2DL2/3 or the C2 epitope recognized by KIR2DL1. The C1 epitope and C1-specific KIR evolved first, followed several million years later by the C2 epitope and C2-specific KIR. Strong, varying selection pressure on NK cell functions drove the diversification and divergence of hominid KIR, with six positions in the HLA class I binding site of KIR being targets for positive diversifying selection. Introducing each naturally occurring residue at these positions into KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3 produced 38 point mutants that were tested for binding to 95 HLA- A, -B, and -C allotypes. Modulating specificity for HLA-C is position 44, whereas positions 71 and 131 control cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11:02. Dominating avidity modulation is position 70, with lesser contributions from positions 68 and 182. KIR2DL3 has lower avidity and broader specificity than KIR2DL1. Mutation could increase the avidity and change the specificity of KIR2DL3, whereas KIR2DL1 specificity was resistant to mutation, and its avidity could only be lowered. The contrasting inflexibility of KIR2DL1 and adaptability of KIR2DL3 fit with C2-specific KIR having evolved from C1-specific KIR, and not vice versa. Substitutions restricted to activating KIR all reduced the avidity of KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3, further evidence that activating KIR function often becomes subject to selective attenuation.

  10. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M.; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I.; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P.; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S.; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; von der Weid, Nicolas; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O.; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    TCF3-HLF-fusion positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Employing an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression, and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. Recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 were identified in constellation with TCF3-HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin towards a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics, but sensitivity towards glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  11. Chemotherapeutic agents circumvent emergence of dasatinib-resistant BCR-ABL kinase mutations in a precise mouse model of Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Nidal; Mulder, Heather L; Calabrese, Christopher R; Morrison, Jeffrey B; Rehg, Jerold E; Relling, Mary V; Sherr, Charles J; Williams, Richard T

    2011-03-31

    The introduction of cultured p185(BCR-ABL)-expressing (p185+) Arf (-/-) pre-B cells into healthy syngeneic mice induces aggressive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that genetically and phenotypically mimics the human disease. We adapted this high-throughput Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) ALL animal model for in vivo luminescent imaging to investigate disease progression, targeted therapeutic response, and ALL relapse in living mice. Mice bearing high leukemic burdens (simulating human Ph(+) ALL at diagnosis) entered remission on maximally intensive, twice-daily dasatinib therapy, but invariably relapsed with disseminated and/or central nervous system disease. Although relapse was frequently accompanied by the eventual appearance of leukemic clones harboring BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations that confer drug resistance, their clonal emergence required prolonged dasatinib exposure. KD P-loop mutations predominated in mice receiving less intensive therapy, whereas high-dose treatment selected for T315I "gatekeeper" mutations resistant to all 3 Food and Drug Administration-approved BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors. The addition of dexamethasone and/or L-asparaginase to reduced-intensity dasatinib therapy improved long-term survival of the majority of mice that received all 3 drugs. Although non-tumor-cell-autonomous mechanisms can prevent full eradication of dasatinib-refractory ALL in this clinically relevant model, the emergence of resistance to BCR-ABL kinase inhibitors can be effectively circumvented by the addition of "conventional" chemotherapeutic agents with alternate antileukemic mechanisms of action.

  12. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Development of an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the Mycoplasma pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and distinguish the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yu; Seto, Junji; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Yahagi, Kazue; Mizuta, Katsumi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Hongo, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae harboring a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is increasing, and rapid detection assays are needed for clinical management. We developed an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and determine the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063 (A2063G, A2063T and A2063C mutations). This A2063B genotyping assay detected more than 50 copies/reaction of the M. pneumoniae gene in every nucleotide mutation at position 2063. Of 42 clinical specimens, 3 were positive without mutation, 6 were positive with the A2063G mutation, and 33 were negative. The results were confirmed using nested PCR with the sequencing of the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene, and a high sensitivity (90%), specificity (100%), and coincidence ratio (kappa coefficient=0.93) were obtained. Therefore, the A2063B genotyping assay is useful for the rapid discrimination of macrolide resistance mutations at position 2063.

  14. Radiosensitization of EGFR/HER2 positive pancreatic cancer is mediated by inhibition of Akt independent of Ras mutational status

    PubMed Central

    Kimple, Randall J.; Vaseva, Angelina V.; Cox, Adrienne D.; Baerman, Kathryn M.; Calvo, Benjamin F.; Tepper, Joel E.; Shields, Janiel M.; Sartor, Carolyn I.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Epidermal growth factor receptor family members (e.g., EGFR, HER2, HER3, and HER4) are commonly overexpressed in pancreatic cancer. We investigated the effects of inhibition of EGFR/HER2 signaling on pancreatic cancer to elucidate the role(s) of EGFR/HER2 in radiosensitization and to provide evidence in support of further clinical investigations. Experimental Design Expression of EGFR family members in pancreatic cancer lines was assessed by qRT-PCR. Cell growth inhibition was determined by MTS assay. The effects of inhibition of EGFR family receptors and downstream signaling pathways on in vitro radiosensitivity were evaluated using clonogenic assays. Growth delay was used to evaluate the effects of nelfinavir on in vivo tumor radiosensitivity. Results Lapatinib inhibited cell growth in four pancreatic cancer cell lines, but radiosensitized only wild-type K-ras-expressing T3M4 cells. Akt activation was blocked in a wild-type K-ras cell line, whereas constitutive phosphorylation of Akt and ERK was seen in lines expressing mutant K-ras. Overexpression of constitutively-active K-ras(G12V) abrogated lapatinib-mediated inhibition of both Akt phosphorylation and radiosensitization. Inhibition of MEK/ERK signaling with U0126 had no effect on radiosensitization, whereas inhibition of activated Akt with LY294002 (enhancement ratio 1.2–1.8) or nelfinavir (enhancement ratio 1.2–1.4) radiosensitized cells regardless of K-ras mutation status. Oral nelfinavir administration to mice bearing mutant K-ras-containing Capan-2 xenografts resulted in a greater than additive increase in radiation-mediated tumor growth delay (synergy assessment ratio of 1.5). Conclusions Inhibition of EGFR/HER2 enhances radiosensitivity in wild-type K-ras pancreatic cancer. Nelfinavir, and other PI3K/Akt inhibitors, are effective pancreatic radiosensitizers regardless of K-ras mutation status. PMID:20103665

  15. Mutations in CG8878, a Novel Putative Protein Kinase, Enhance P Element Dependent Silencing (PDS) and Position Effect Variegation (PEV) in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Allen; Locke, John

    2014-01-01

    Genes in multicellular organisms are expressed as part of a developmental program that is largely dependent on self-perpetuating higher-order chromatin states. The mechanism of establishing and maintaining these epigenetic events is well studied in Drosophila. The first known example of an epigenetic effect was that of (PEV) in Drosophila, which has been shown to be due to gene silencing via heterochromatin formation. We are investigating a process similar to Position Effect Variegation (PEV) using a mini-w transgene, called Pci, inserted in the upstream regulatory region of ci. The mini-white+ transgene in Pci is expressed throughout the adult eye; however, when other P or KP elements are present, a variegated eye phenotype results indicating random w+ silencing during development. This P element dependent silencing (PDS) can be modified by the haplo-suppressors/triplo-enhancers, Su(var)205 and Su(var)3–7, indicating that these heterochromatic modifiers also act dose dependently in PDS. Here we use a spontaneous derivative mutation of Pci called PciE1 (E1) that variegates like PDS in the absence of P elements, presumably due to an adjacent gypsy element insertion, to screen for second-site modifier mutations that enhance variable silencing of white+ in E1. We isolated 7 mutations in CG8878, an essential gene, that enhance the E1 variegated phenotype. CG8878, a previously uncharacterized gene, potentially encodes a serine/threonine kinase whose closest Drosophila paralogue, ballchen (nhk-1), phosphorylates histones. These mutant alleles enhance both PDS at E1 and Position Effect Variegation (PEV) at wm4, indicating a previously unknown common silencing mechanism between the two. PMID:24614804

  16. Effects of particle size, food, and capsule shell composition on the oral bioavailability of dabrafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, in patients with BRAF mutation-positive tumors.

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Daniele; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Limentani, Giselle; Nebot, Noelia; Lan, Kevin; Knowles, Lara; Gordon, Michael S; Sharma, Sunil; Infante, Jeffrey R; Lorusso, Patricia M; Pande, Girish; Krachey, Elizabeth C; Blackman, Samuel C; Carson, Stanley W

    2013-09-01

    Dabrafenib is a small-molecule inhibitor of BRAF kinase activity that is currently being developed for the treatment of BRAF V600 mutation-positive melanoma. This clinical, open-label, two-cohort (n = 14 per cohort), randomized study was designed to evaluate the effect of drug substance particle size, and food on the plasma pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of dabrafenib in patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive solid tumors. In addition, an exploratory cross-cohort comparison of the relative bioavailability of single-dose dabrafenib administered in gelatin and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) capsules was performed. Higher bioavailability was noted with nonmicronized drug substance (larger particle size), under fasting conditions, and with HPMC capsules. Initial dissolution results at pH 1.2 showed higher dissolution of gelatin relative to HPMC capsules inconsistent with clinical data. Subsequent in vitro dissolution studies were conducted in fasted-state simulated gastric fluid over a 24-h period and showed that HPMC capsules reached a higher percentage of dabrafenib dissolved than gelatin capsules. The presence of HPMC is believed to inhibit precipitation of dabrafenib as the freebase, thereby maintaining a supersaturated solution over an extended period of time. Dabrafenib has been administered in pivotal clinical studies on an empty stomach using micronized drug substance in HPMC capsules.

  17. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism gene shows locus homogeneity on chromosome 15q11-q13 and evidence of multiple mutations in southern African negroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kedda, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Manga, P.; Viljoen, C.; Jenkins, T.; Ramsay, M. Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg )

    1994-06-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin pigmentary system. South African ty-pos OCA individuals occur with two distinct phenotypes, with or without darkly pigmented patches (ephelides, or dendritic freckles) on exposed areas of the skin. These phenotypes are concordant within families, suggesting that there may be more than one mutation at the ty-pos OCA locus. Linkage studies carried out in 41 families have shown linkage between markers in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on chromosome 15q11-q13 and ty-pos OCA. Analysis showed no obligatory crossovers between the alleles at the D15S12 locus and ty-pos OCA, suggesting that the D15S12 locus is very close to or part of the disease locus, which is postulated to be the human homologue, P, of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene, p. Unlike caucasoid [open quotes]ty-pos OCA[close quotes] individuals, negroid ty-pos OCA individuals do not show any evidence of locus heterogeneity. Studies of allelic association between the polymorphic alleles detected at the D15S12 locus and ephelus status suggest that there was a single major mutation giving rise to ty-pos OCA without ephelides. There may, however, be two major mutations causing ty-pos OCA with ephelides, one associated with D15S12 allele 1 and the other associated with D15S12 allele 2. The two loci, GABRA5 and D15S24, flanking D15S12, are both hypervariable, and many different haplotypes were observed with the alleles at the three loci on both ty-pos OCA-associated chromosomes and [open quotes]normal[close quotes] chromosomes. No haplotype showed statistically significant association with ty-pos OCA, and thus none could be used to predict the origins of the ty-pos OCA mutations. On the basis of the D15S12 results, there is evidence for multiple ty-pos OCA mutations in southern African negroids. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. GATA3 mRNA expression, but not mutation, associates with longer progression-free survival in ER-positive breast cancer patients treated with first-line tamoxifen for recurrent disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingjing; Prager-van der Smissen, Wendy J C; Look, Maxime P; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Smid, Marcel; Meijer-van Gelder, Marion E; Foekens, John A; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M

    2016-06-28

    In breast cancer, GATA3 mutations have been associated with a favorable prognosis and the response to neoadjuvant aromatase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, we investigated whether GATA3 mutations predict the outcome of tamoxifen treatment in the advanced setting. In a retrospective study consisting of 235 hormone-naive patients with ER-positive breast cancer who received tamoxifen as first-line treatment for recurrent disease, GATA3 mutations (in 14.0% of patients) did not significantly associate with either the overall response rate (ORR) or with the length of progression-free survival (PFS) after the start of tamoxifen therapy. Interestingly, among 148 patients for whom both mutation and mRNA expression data were available, GATA3 mutations associated with an increased expression of GATA3. However, only 23.7% of GATA3 high tumors had a mutation. Evaluation of the clinical significance of GATA3 mRNA revealed that it was associated with prolonged PFS, but not with the ORR, also in multivariate analysis. Thus, GATA3 mRNA expression, but not GATA3 mutation, is an independent predictor of prolonged PFS in ER-positive breast cancer patients who received first-line tamoxifen for recurrent disease. Besides GATA3 mutation, other mechanisms must exist that underlie increased GATA3 levels.

  19. Positional cloning and next-generation sequencing identified a TGM6 mutation in a large Chinese pedigree with acute myeloid leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Li-li; Huang, Yuan-mao; Wang, Min; Zhuang, Xiao-e; Luo, Dong-feng; Guo, Shi-cheng; Zhang, Zhi-shun; Huang, Qing; Lin, Sheng-long; Wang, Shao-yuan

    2015-01-01

    An inherited predisposition to acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is exceedingly rare, but the investigation of these families will aid in the delineation of the underlying mechanisms of the more common, sporadic cases. Three AML predisposition genes, RUNX1, CEBPA and GATA2, have been recognised, but the culprit genes in the majority of AML pedigrees remain obscure. We applied a combined strategy of linkage analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology in an autosomal-dominant AML Chinese family with 11 cases in four generations. A genome-wide linkage scan using a 500K SNP genotyping array was conducted to identify a previously unreported candidate region on 20p13 with a maximum multipoint heterogeneity LOD (HLOD) score of 3.56 (P=0.00005). Targeted NGS within this region and whole-exome sequencing (WES) revealed a missense mutation in TGM6 (RefSeq, NM_198994.2:c.1550T>G, p.(L517W)), which cosegregated with the phenotype in this family, and was absent in 530 healthy controls. The mutated amino acid was located in a highly conserved position, which may be deleterious and affect the activation of TGM6. Our results strongly support the candidacy of TGM6 as a novel familial AML-associated gene. PMID:24755948

  20. Incongruent Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genetic Structure of New World Screwworm Fly Populations Due to Positive Selection of Mutations Associated with Dimethyl- and Diethyl-Organophosphates Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bergamo, Luana Walravens; Fresia, Pablo; Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria L.

    2015-01-01

    that these mutations evolved under positive selection. PMID:26030866

  1. Vemurafenib for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BRAF V600 mutation-positive malignant melanoma: a NICE single technology appraisal.

    PubMed

    Beale, Sophie; Dickson, Rumona; Bagust, Adrian; Blundell, Michaela; Dundar, Yenal; Boland, Angela; Marshall, Ernie; Plummer, Ruth; Proudlove, Chris

    2013-12-01

    Vemurafenib is an oral BRAF inhibitor licenced for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BRAF V600-mutation positive malignant melanoma. The manufacturer of vemurafenib, Roche Products Limited, was invited by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to submit evidence of the drug's clinical- and cost-effectiveness for its licenced indication, to inform the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG) for this appraisal. This article summarises the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the manufacturer and also includes a summary of the NICE Appraisal Committee (AC) decision. The ERG reviewed the clinical- and cost-effectiveness evidence in accordance with the decision problem defined by NICE. The ERG's analysis of the submitted economic model assessed the appropriateness of the approach taken by the manufacturer in modelling the decision problem. It also included an assessment of the reliability of model implementation and the extent of conformity to published standards and prevailing norms of practice within the health economics modelling community. Particular attention was paid to issues likely to impact substantially on the base-case cost-effectiveness results. The clinical evidence was derived from BRIM 3 (BRAF Inhibitor in Melanoma 3), a well-designed, multi-centre, multi-national, phase III, randomised controlled trial (RCT). Clinical outcome results from the October 2011 data cut showed that median overall survival for patients treated with vemurafenib was 13.2 months compared with 9.6 months for those treated with dacarbazine. The ERG's main concern with the trial was the potential for confounding because of the early introduction of the crossover from the comparator drug to vemurafenib or another BRAF inhibitor. The submitted incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER

  2. Some Synonymous and Nonsynonymous gyrA Mutations in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lead to Systematic False-Positive Fluoroquinolone Resistance Results with the Hain GenoType MTBDRsl Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ajileye, Adebisi; Alvarez, Nataly; Merker, Matthias; Walker, Timothy M.; Akter, Suriya; Brown, Kerstin; Moradigaravand, Danesh; Schön, Thomas; Andres, Sönke; Schleusener, Viola; Omar, Shaheed V.; Coll, Francesc; Huang, Hairong; Diel, Roland; Ismail, Nazir; de Jong, Bouke C.; Peto, Tim E. A.; Crook, Derrick W.; Niemann, Stefan; Robledo, Jaime; Smith, E. Grace; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this study, using the Hain GenoType MTBDRsl assays (versions 1 and 2), we found that some nonsynonymous and synonymous mutations in gyrA in Mycobacterium tuberculosis result in systematic false-resistance results to fluoroquinolones by preventing the binding of wild-type probes. Moreover, such mutations can prevent the binding of mutant probes designed for the identification of specific resistance mutations. Although these mutations are likely rare globally, they occur in approximately 7% of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis strains in some settings. PMID:28137812

  3. In situ single-cell analysis identifies heterogeneity for PIK3CA mutation and HER2 amplification in HER2-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Janiszewska, Michalina; Liu, Lin; Almendro, Vanessa; Kuang, Yanan; Paweletz, Cloud; Sakr, Rita A; Weigelt, Britta; Hanker, Ariella B; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; King, Tari A; Reis-Filho, Jorge S; Arteaga, Carlos L; Park, So Yeon; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2015-10-01

    Detection of minor, genetically distinct subpopulations within tumors is a key challenge in cancer genomics. Here we report STAR-FISH (specific-to-allele PCR-FISH), a novel method for the combined detection of single-nucleotide and copy number alterations in single cells in intact archived tissues. Using this method, we assessed the clinical impact of changes in the frequency and topology of PIK3CA mutation and HER2 (ERBB2) amplification within HER2-positive breast cancer during neoadjuvant therapy. We found that these two genetic events are not always present in the same cells. Chemotherapy selects for PIK3CA-mutant cells, a minor subpopulation in nearly all treatment-naive samples, and modulates genetic diversity within tumors. Treatment-associated changes in the spatial distribution of cellular genetic diversity correlated with poor long-term outcome following adjuvant therapy with trastuzumab. Our findings support the use of in situ single cell-based methods in cancer genomics and imply that chemotherapy before HER2-targeted therapy may promote treatment resistance.

  4. BRCA Mutation Frequency and Patterns of Treatment Response in BRCA Mutation–Positive Women With Ovarian Cancer: A Report From the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Meldrum, Cliff; deFazio, Anna; Emmanuel, Catherine; George, Joshy; Dobrovic, Alexander; Birrer, Michael J.; Webb, Penelope M.; Stewart, Colin; Friedlander, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in women with ovarian cancer is unclear; reports vary from 3% to 27%. The impact of germ-line mutation on response requires further investigation to understand its impact on treatment planning and clinical trial design. Patients and Methods Women with nonmucinous ovarian carcinoma (n = 1,001) enrolled onto a population-based, case-control study were screened for point mutations and large deletions in both genes. Survival outcomes and responses to multiple lines of chemotherapy were assessed. Results Germ-line mutations were found in 14.1% of patients overall, including 16.6% of serous cancer patients (high-grade serous, 22.6%); 44% had no reported family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Patients carrying germ-line mutations had improved rates of progression-free and overall survival. In the relapse setting, patients carrying mutations more frequently responded to both platin- and nonplatin-based regimens than mutation-negative patients, even in patients with early relapse after primary treatment. Mutation-negative patients who responded to multiple cycles of platin-based treatment were more likely to carry somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. Conclusion BRCA mutation status has a major influence on survival in ovarian cancer patients and should be an additional stratification factor in clinical trials. Treatment outcomes in BRCA1/2 carriers challenge conventional definitions of platin resistance, and mutation status may be able to contribute to decision making and systemic therapy selection in the relapse setting. Our data, together with the advent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor trials, supports the recommendation that germ-line BRCA1/2 testing should be offered to all women diagnosed with nonmucinous, ovarian carcinoma, regardless of family history. PMID:22711857

  5. Influence of mutations at the proximal histidine position on the Fe-O2 bond in hemoglobin from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todde, Guido; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2016-03-01

    Four mutated hemoglobin (Hb) variants and wild type hemoglobin as a reference have been investigated using density functional theory methods focusing on oxygen binding. Dispersion-corrected B3LYP functional is used and found to provide reliable oxygen binding energies. It also correctly reproduces the spin distribution of both bound and free heme groups as well as provides correct geometries at their close vicinity. Mutations in hemoglobin are not only an intrigued biological problem and it is also highly important to understand their effects from a clinical point of view. This study clearly shows how even small structural differences close to the heme group can have a significant effect in reducing the oxygen binding of mutated hemoglobins and consequently affecting the health condition of the patient suffering from the mutations. All of the studied mutated Hb variants did exhibit much weaker binding of molecular oxygen compared to the wild type of hemoglobin.

  6. Endometrial tumour BRAF mutations and MLH1 promoter methylation as predictors of germline mismatch repair gene mutation status: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, Alexander M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2014-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) that displays high microsatellite instability (MSI-H) can be caused by either germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, or non-inherited transcriptional silencing of the MLH1 promoter. A correlation between MLH1 promoter methylation, specifically the 'C' region, and BRAF V600E status has been reported in CRC studies. Germline MMR mutations also greatly increase risk of endometrial cancer (EC), but no systematic review has been undertaken to determine if these tumour markers may be useful predictors of MMR mutation status in EC patients. Endometrial cancer cohorts meeting review inclusion criteria encompassed 2675 tumours from 20 studies for BRAF V600E, and 447 tumours from 11 studies for MLH1 methylation testing. BRAF V600E mutations were reported in 4/2675 (0.1%) endometrial tumours of unknown MMR mutation status, and there were 7/823 (0.9%) total sequence variants in exon 11 and 27/1012 (2.7%) in exon 15. Promoter MLH1 methylation was not observed in tumours from 32 MLH1 mutation carriers, or for 13 MSH2 or MSH6 mutation carriers. MMR mutation-negative individuals with tumour MLH1 and PMS2 IHC loss displayed MLH1 methylation in 48/51 (94%) of tumours. We have also detailed specific examples that show the importance of MLH1 promoter region, assay design, and quantification of methylation. This review shows that BRAF mutations occurs so infrequently in endometrial tumours they can be discounted as a useful marker for predicting MMR-negative mutation status, and further studies of endometrial cohorts with known MMR mutation status are necessary to quantify the utility of tumour MLH1 promoter methylation as a marker of negative germline MMR mutation status in EC patients.

  7. Low somatic K-ras mutation frequency in colorectal cancer diagnosed under the age of 45 years.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Kathryn; Mead, Leeanne; Smith, Letitia D; Royce, Simon G; Tesoriero, Andrea A; Young, Joanne P; Haydon, Andrew; Grubb, Garry; Giles, Graham G; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C

    2006-07-01

    Somatic mutation of K-ras is known to be a common event in colorectal cancer tumourigenesis however its association with age at onset has not been widely explored. In this study, we have analyzed tumours from a population-based study of colorectal cancer diagnosed before the age of 45 years, in which cases had been previously screened for germ-line mismatch repair gene mutations and for microsatellite instability. We used a micro-dissection and sequencing approach to search for somatic K-ras mutations in codons 12, 13 and 61 in 101 early-onset colorectal cancers. Six (6%) somatic K-ras mutations were detected; five in codon 12 (4 G>T transitions and 1 G>A) and one in codon 13 (G>A transition). All codon 12 mutations were identified in microsatellite stable tumours and the codon 13 mutation was identified in a MSI-high tumour. Four cases with K-ras mutations had no reported family history of colorectal cancer and two had some family history of colorectal cancer. None were known to carry a germ-line mutation in hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6 or hPMS2. The role of somatic K-ras mutations in early-onset colorectal cancer carcinogenesis appears to be minor, in contrast to its significant role in colorectal cancer of later age of onset.

  8. Prevalence of dural ectasia in 63 gene-mutation-positive patients with features of Marfan syndrome type 1 and Loeys-Dietz syndrome and report of 22 novel FBN1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Söylen, B; Singh, K K; Abuzainin, A; Rommel, K; Becker, H; Arslan-Kirchner, M; Schmidtke, J

    2009-03-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder involving different organ systems. Marfan syndrome type 1 (MFS1) is caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. Heterozygosity for mutations in the TGFBR1 or TGFBR2 genes cause Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) types 2A and 2B that overlap with MFS1 in their clinical features. The phenotype of MFS1 is defined by the Ghent nosology, which classifies the clinical manifestations in major and minor criteria. Dural ectasia is one of the major criteria for Marfan syndrome but it is rarely tested for. We here report 22 novel and 9 recurrent mutations in the FBN1 gene in 36 patients with clinical features of Marfan syndrome. Sixty patients with identified mutations in the FBN1 gene and three patients with mutations in the TGFBR1 or TGFBR2 genes were examined for dural ectasia. Forty-seven of the 60 patients (78%) with MFS1 showed the dural ectasia criterion and 13 (22%) did not. Thirty-three (55%) patients were suspected of having Marfan syndrome and 24 (73%) of them had dural ectasia. Two of the three patients with LDS had dural ectasia.

  9. Amyloid Angiopathy and Variability in Amyloid β Deposition Is Determined by Mutation Position in Presenilin-1-Linked Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mann, David M. A.; Pickering-Brown, Stuart M.; Takeuchi, Ayano; Iwatsubo, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    The presenilins (PSs) are components of large molecular complexes that contain β-catenin and function as γ-secretase. We report here a striking correlation between amyloid angiopathy and the location of mutation in PS-1 linked Alzheimer’s disease. The amount of amyloid β protein, Aβ42(43), but not Aβ40, deposited in the frontal cortex of the brain is increased in 54 cases of early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease, encompassing 25 mutations in the presenilin-1 (PS-1) gene, compared to sporadic Alzheimer’s disease. The amount of Aβ40 in PS-1 Alzheimer’s disease varied according to the copy number of ε4 alleles of the Apolipoprotein E gene. Although the amounts of Aβ40 and Aβ42(43) deposited did not correlate with the genetic location of the mutation in a strict linear sense, the histological profile did so vary. Cases with mutations between codon 1 and 200 showed, in frontal cortex, many diffuse plaques, few cored plaques, and mild or moderate amyloid angiopathy. Cases with mutations occurring after codon 200 also showed many diffuse plaques, but the number and size of cored plaques were increased (even when ε4 allele was not present) and these were often clustered around blood vessels severely affected by amyloid angiopathy. Similarly, diverging histological profiles, mainly according to the degree of amyloid angiopathy, were seen in the cerebellum. Mutations in the PS-1 gene may therefore alter the topology of the PS-1 protein so as to favor Aβ formation and deposition, generally, but also to facilitate amyloid angiopathy particularly in cases in which the mutation lies beyond codon 200. Finally we report that the amount of Aβ42(43) deposited in the brain correlated with the amount of this produced in culture by cells bearing the equivalent mutations. PMID:11395394

  10. The predictive and prognostic role of phosphatase phosphoinositol-3 (PI3) kinase (PIK3CA) mutation in HER2-positive breast cancer receiving HER2-targeted therapy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Ezzeldin M; Kazkaz, Ghieth A; Al-Mansour, Mubarak M; Al-Foheidi, Meteb E

    2015-08-01

    The association between PIK3CA mutation and resistance to anti-HER2 therapy (AHT) is not precisely defined. This meta-analysis intended to explore the clinical utility of PIK3CA mutation in HER2-positive breast cancer treated with AHT. Literature search identified 19 eligible studies. There were 1720 patients with advanced, 828 with early and 1290 patients treated in the neoadjuvant setting. In metastatic breast cancer, AHT showed no differential objective response benefit between the wild type (WT) and the mutated type (MT) PIK3CA subgroups (odds ratio [OR] = 1.09; 95 % CI 0.60-2.00; P = 0.78). AHT favorable affected progression-free survival (PFS) irrespective of PIK3CA mutation. There was no PFS difference between WT and MT regardless of the offered therapy. In early breast cancer, trastuzumab combined with the same chemotherapy conferred consistent relapse-free survival benefit in WT and MT subgroups (WT: HR = 0.59; 95 % CI 0.44-0.80; P < 0.001 vs. MT: HR = 0.42; 95 % CI 0.24-0.74; P < 0.001). In the neoadjuvant setting, AHT-based therapy produced a 72 % higher pathologic complete response (pCR) rate in WT as compared with that in MT PIK3CA tumors (OR = 1.72; 95 % CI 1.29-2.13; P < 0.001). In that setting, there was no disease-free or overall survival difference based on PIK3CA mutational status. In this meta-analysis, AHT did not achieve differential benefit according to PIK3CA mutation in HER2-positive metastatic or early breast cancer; however, in the neoadjuvant setting, patients harboring WT PIK3CA tumors attained a higher pCR rate.

  11. Hepatitis B virus basal core promoter mutations A1762T/G1764A are associated with genotype C and a low serum HBsAg level in chronically-infected HBeAg-positive Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chun-Hui; Zhao, Cheng-Yu; Ding, Hai; Peng, Ya-Qin; Jin, Peng-Yuan; Yan, Ling; Zhuang, Hui; Li, Tong

    2012-11-01

    The present study was aimed to obtain baseline information of basal core promoter A1762T/G1764A and precore G1896A mutations of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in 192 HBeAg-positive chronically-infected Chinese patients, who were potential candidates for antiviral treatment. The detection of these mutations (including minor mutant subpopulations) was achieved by direct sequencing, whose sensitivity for minor mutant subpopulations identification was confirmed by clone sequencing. Patients enrolled were infected with either genotype B (46.35%) or C (53.65%) HBV identified by routine tests in our laboratory. The A1762T/G1764A or G1896A mutations were detected in 125specimens (125/192, 65.10%), in which 77 (77/125, 61.60%) existed as subpopulations. The A1762T/G1764A mutations were found to be more prevalent in genotype C than that in genotype B HBV [62.14% (64/103) vs. 20.22% (18/89), P<0.0001]. There is no statistically significant link between G1896A and genotypes. The emergence of A1762T/G1764A mutations was also found to be associated with an older age, an elevated ALT/AST level, and a lower HBsAg level in serum [wild-type vs. mutant: 4.57 (3.46-5.42) vs. 3.93 (2.51-5.36), P<0.0001]. In conclusion, HBV basal core promoter mutations A1762T/G1764A are associated with genotype C and a low serum HBsAg level in chronically-infected HBeAg-positive Chinese patients.

  12. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  13. Seven New Mutations in hMSH2, an HNPCC Gene, Identified by Denaturing Gradient-Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Wijnen, Juul; Vasen, Hans; Khan, P. Meera; Menko, Fred H.; van der Klift, Heleen; van Leeuwen, Claus; van den Broek, Marianne; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, Inge; Nagengast, Fokko; Meijers-Heijboer, Anne; Lindhout, Dick; Griffioen, Gerrit; Cats, Annemieke; Kleibeuker, Jan; Varesco, Liliana; Bertario, Lucio; Bisgaard, Marie Luise; Mohr, Jan; Fodde, Riccardo

    1995-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a relatively common autosomal dominant cancer-susceptibility condition. The recent isolation of the DNA mismatch repair genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2) responsible for HNPCC has allowed the search for germ-line mutations in affected individuals. In this study we used denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis to screen for mutations in the hMSH2 gene. Analysis of all the 16 exons of hMSH2, in 34 unrelated HNPCC kindreds, has revealed seven novel pathogenic germ-line mutations resulting in stop codons either directly or through frameshifts. Additionally, nucleotide substitutions giving rise to one missense, two silent, and one useful polymorphism have been identified. The proportion of families in which hMSH2 mutations were found is 21%. Although the spectrum of mutations spread at the hMSH2 gene among HNPCC patients appears extremely heterogeneous, we were not able to establish any correlation between the site of the individual mutations and the corresponding tumor spectrum. Our results indicate that, given the genomic size and organization of the hMSH2 gene and the heterogeneity of its mutation spectrum, a rapid and efficient mutation detection procedure is necessary for routine molecular diagnosis and presymptomatic detection of the disease in a clinical setup. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7726159

  14. Primary erythromelalgia in a 12-year-old boy: positive response to sodium channel blockers despite negative SCN9A mutations.

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Creutzfeldt, R; Staszewski, O; Winterpacht, A; Berner, R; Hufnagel, M

    2012-09-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent pain attacks, swelling and redness in the distal extremities. The primary forms of the disorder are caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels. Treatment is difficult and controlled therapeutic studies offer little to no guidance. We report on a 12-year-old boy and his first occurrence of primary erythromelalgia. Genetic findings for mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes for the α-subunit of sodium channel NaV1.7, were negative. Although initial treatment with sodium nitroprusside was ineffective, subsequent medication with lidocaine and mexiletine, in combination with gabapentin, was successful. Despite negative findings for mutations in the sodium channels, the use of sodium channel blockers should be considered in these patients.

  15. Epidermal growth factor receptor T790M mutation-positive metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: focus on osimertinib (AZD9291)

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Nibal; Poudel, Aarati; Basnet, Alina; Gajra, Ajeet

    2017-01-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common type of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Adenocarcinoma with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations accounts for 8%–30% of all cases of NSCLC depending on the geography and ethnicity. EGFR-mutated NSCLC usually responds to first-line therapy with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). However, there is eventual loss of efficacy to TKIs due to development of resistance. The most frequent cause for resistance is a second EGFR mutation in exon 20 (T790M), which is encountered in up to 62% of patients. Osimertinib is one of the third-generation EGFR TKIs with a high selective potency against T790M mutants. In Phase I trial of osimertinib in advanced lung cancer after progression on EGFR TKIs, the response rate and disease control rate were 61% and 95%, respectively. A subsequent Phase II (AURA2) trial demonstrated a disease control rate of 92%, a response rate of 71%, a median duration of response of 7.8 months, and a median progression-free survival of 8.6 months. Osimertinib was approved by the US Food & Drug Administration in November 2015 for patients whose tumors exhibited T790M mutation and for those with progressive disease on other EGFR TKIs. In this review, we address the role of EGFR TKIs in the management of EGFR mutation lung cancer and the mechanisms of resistance to TKIs with a focus on the role of osimertinib. Data from completed trials of osimertinib, ongoing trials, as well as novel diagnostic methods to detect EGFR T790M mutation are reviewed. PMID:28367058

  16. Impact of JAK2V617F Mutation Burden on Disease Phenotype in Chinese Patients with JAK2V617F-positive Polycythemia Vera (PV) and Essential thrombocythemia (ET).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shixiang; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Yang; Feng, Yufeng; Sheng, Wenhong; Cen, Jiannong; Wu, Depei; Han, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and half of essential thrombocythemia (ET) possess an activating JAK2V617F mutation. The objective of this study was to better define the effect of JAK2V617F mutant allele burden on clinical phenotypes in Chinese patients, especially thrombosis. By real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the JAK2V617F mutation burden was detected in 170 JAK2V617F-positive patients, including 54 PV and 116 ET. The results showed that JAK2V617F allele burden was higher in PV than in ET (P< 0.001). Higher percentage of patients had JAK2V617F allele burden over 20% in PV than in ET (68.5% VS 26.7%) (P< 0.001). In PV patients, higher JAK2V617F allele burden was observed in female (P< 0.05) and leukocytosis patients (WBC above 10 × 10(9)/L) (P< 0.001). Meanwhile, ET patients showed increased JAK2V617F allele burden in the group with higher hemoglobin (HGB above 150 g/L) (P< 0.05), leukocytosis (WBC above 10 × 10(9)/L) (P< 0.001), splenomegaly (P< 0.05) and thrombosis (P< 0.05). In conclusion, the JAK2V617F mutation allele burden is higher in Chinese patients with PV than ET. In PV patients, JAK2V617F mutation burden had influence on WBC counts. And the clinical characteristics of ET patients, such as WBC counts, hemoglobin level, splenomegaly and thrombosis, were influenced by JAK2V617F mutation burden. Male, high hemoglobin (HGB above 150 g/L), and increased JAK2V617F mutation burden (JAK2V617F allele burden ≥ 16.5%) were risks of thrombosis (P< 0.05) for ET patients by Logistic Regression.

  17. Osimertinib in the treatment of patients with epidermal growth factor receptor T790M mutation-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer: clinical trial evidence and experience.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Ivana; Planchard, David

    2016-12-01

    Patients with advanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are particularly sensitive to treatment with first- or second-generation EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib, which block the cell-signaling pathways that drive the growth of tumor cells. Unfortunately, the majority of patients develop resistance to them after a median duration of response of around 10 months, and in over half of these patients the emergence of the EGFR T790M resistance mutation is detected. Osimertinib is an oral, highly selective, irreversible inhibitor of both EGFR-activating mutations and the T790M-resistance mutation, while sparing the activity of wild-type EGFR This article reviews clinical trial development of osimertinib in patients with NSCLC, presenting efficacy and safety evidence for its value in the EGFR T790M mutation-positive population and in different settings, including patients with metastatic disease. The preclinical background of clinically acquired resistance to osimertinib is presented and the combination tactics being investigated in an attempt to circumvent this are addressed.

  18. Identification and surveillance of 19 Lynch syndrome families in southern Italy: report of six novel germline mutations and a common founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Lastella, Patrizia; Patruno, Margherita; Forte, Giovanna; Montanaro, Alba; Di Gregorio, Carmela; Sabbà, Carlo; Suppressa, Patrizia; Piepoli, Adalgisa; Panza, Anna; Andriulli, Angelo; Resta, Nicoletta; Stella, Alessandro

    2011-06-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), or hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), is an autosomal dominant condition responsible for early onset cancer mostly in the colonrectum and endometrium as well as in other organ sites. Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes, prevalently in hMSH2, hMLH1, and less frequently in hMSH6 and hPMS2. Twenty-nine non-related index cases with colorectal cancer (CRC) were collected from a region in southeast Italy (Apulia). Among this set of patients, fifteen fulfilled the Amsterdam criteria II. The presence of tumor microsatellite instability (MSI) was assessed in all index cases and 19 (15 AC+/4 AC-) were classified as MSI-H. Mutation analysis performed on all patients, identified 15 pathogenic mutations in hMLH1 and 4 in hMSH2. 4/15 mutations in hMLH1 and 2/4 hMSH2 mutations have not been previously reported. Three previously reported mutations were further investigated for the possibility of a common founder effect. Genetic counseling was offered to all probands and extended to 183 relatives after molecular testing and 85 (46%) mutation carriers were identified. Eighty mutation carriers underwent an accurate clinical and instrumental surveillance protocol. Our results confirm that the identification of LS patients based exclusively on family history may miss patients carrying germline mutations in the MMR genes. Moreover, our results demonstrated that molecular screening and subsequent instrumental surveillance are very effective in identifying CRCs at earlier stages and reducing the number of deaths from secondary cancers in HNPCC patients.

  19. Prognostic factors analysis in EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer with brain metastases treated with whole brain-radiotherapy and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    WEI, HANGPING; SU, MENG; LIN, RUIFANG; LI, HUIFANG; ZOU, CHANGLIN

    2016-01-01

    The survival time of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with brain metastases has been previously reported to be 6.5–10.0 months, even with systematic treatment. Patients that possess a certain epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation alongside NSCLC with brain metastases also have a short survival rate, and a reliable prognostic model for these patients demonstrates a strong correlation between the outcome and treatment recommendations. The Cox proportional hazards regression and classification tree models were used to explore the prognostic factors in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients with brain metastases following whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) treatment. A total of 66 EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients with brain metastases were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses by Cox proportional hazards regression were then performed. The classification tree model was applied in order to identify prognostic groups of the patients. In the survival analysis, age, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and status of the primary tumor were prognostic factors for progression free survival (P=0.006, 0.014 and 0.005, respectively) and overall survival (P=0.009, 0.013 and 0.009, respectively). The classification tree model was subsequently applied, which revealed 3 patient groups with significantly different survival times: Group I, age <65 years and CEA ≤10 µg/ml; Group II, age <65 years and CEA >10 µg/ml or age ≥65 years and CEA ≤10 µg/ml; and Group III, age ≥65 years and CEA >10 µg/ml. The major prognostic predictors for EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients with brain metastases following WBRT and EGFR-TKI were age and CEA. In addition, primary tumor control may be important for predicting survival. PMID:26998157

  20. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Ortiz, Jose Miguel; Ayala-Madrigal, María de la Luz; Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Maciel-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Franco-Topete, Ramón Antonio; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucia; Rhees, Jennifer; Gutiérrez-Angulo, Melva

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS) is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC) and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC), and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del) and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs) in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel. PMID:27247567

  1. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P; Cleary, Sean P; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G; MacInnis, Robert J; Tucker, Katherine M; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understandin g the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.19-50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95% CI 0.63-5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative.

  2. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene

    PubMed Central

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C.; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P.; Cleary, Sean P.; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G.; MacInnis, Robert J.; Tucker, Katherine M.; Winship, Ingrid M.; Macrae, Finlay A.; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Lindor, Noralane M.; Hopper, John L.; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understanding the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 9.19–50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95 % CI 0.63–5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative. PMID:26202870

  3. Treatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME provides a survival advantage in a mouse model of Kras mutation-positive, non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, MengMeng; Counter, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the gene KRAS are commonly detected in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This disease is inherently difficult to treat, and combinations involving platinum-based drugs remain the therapeutic mainstay. In terms of novel, pharmacologically actionable targets, nitric oxide synthases (NOS) have been implicated in the etiology of KRAS-driven cancers, including lung cancer, and small molecular weight NOS inhibitors have been developed for the treatment of other diseases. Thus, we evaluated the anti-neoplastic activity of the oral NOS inhibitor L-NAME in a randomized preclinical trial using a genetically engineered mouse model of Kras and p53 mutation-positive NSCLC. We report here that L-NAME decreased lung tumor growth in vivo, as assessed by sequential radiological imaging, and provided a survival advantage, perhaps the most difficult clinical parameter to improve upon. Moreover, L-NAME enhanced the therapeutic benefit afforded by carboplatin chemotherapy, provided it was administered as maintenance therapy after carboplatin. Collectively, these results support the clinical evaluation of L-NAME for the treatment of KRAS mutation-positive NSCLC. PMID:27285753

  4. The safety and efficacy of osimertinib for the treatment of EGFR T790M mutation positive non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Le, Xiuning; Costa, Daniel B

    2016-01-01

    First- and second-generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are the evidence-based first-line treatment for metastatic non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) that harbor sensitizing EGFR mutations (i.e. exon 19 deletions or L858R). However, acquired resistance to EGFR TKI monotherapy occurs invariably within a median time frame of one year. The most common form of biological resistance is through the selection of tumor clones harboring the EGFR T790M mutation, present in >50% of repeat biopsies. The presence of the EGFR T790M mutation negates the inhibitory activity of gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib. A novel class of third-generation EGFR TKIs has been identified by probing a series of covalent pyrimidine EGFR inhibitors that bind to amino-acid residue C797 of EGFR and preferentially inhibit mutant forms of EGFR versus the wild-type receptor. We review the rapid clinical development and approval of the third-generation EGFR TKI osimertinib for treatment of NSCLCs with EGFR-T790M.

  5. Breast and ovarian cancer screening of non-carriers from BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families: 2-year follow-up of cohorts from France and Quebec

    PubMed Central

    Dorval, Michel; Noguès, Catherine; Berthet, Pascaline; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Picard, Claude; Plante, Marie; Simard, Jacques; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2011-01-01

    We described and compared breast and ovarian screening practices in the 2-year period following test result disclosure in female non-carriers from BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families living in two countries, France and Quebec, Canada, which provide universal health care. Four hundred and two (France n=293; Quebec n=109) unaffected female non-carriers from BRCA-proven mutation families provided information about the uptake of mammography, clinical breast examination, breast self-examination, and ovarian ultrasounds using self-administered questionnaires. The frequency of screening practices between study cohorts were compared using logistic regression. Annual mammography was conducted in 23 and 43% of French and Quebecer women participants <50 years of age, respectively (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08–6.81). In women ≥50 years of age, mammography was conducted in 49 and 65% of French and Quebecer participants (aOR=1.77; 95% CI, 0.07–4.51). Overall, 33% of French women and 39% of Quebecer women underwent at least one ovarian ultrasound during the 2-year period following BRCA1/2 test result with no significant difference between cohorts of women <50 years of age. Among older women, Quebecers reported more frequently than French women that they had undergone ultrasound once (aOR=3.00; 95% CI, 1.02–8.83). The frequency of cancer screening practices for female non-carriers from BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families in both France and Quebec exceeded those recommended for similarly aged women in the general population. Our findings highlight the need for clearcut recommendations on the follow-up of women from BRCA1/2 families who are not themselves carriers of a BRCA1/2 mutation. PMID:21248744

  6. Germline Mutations in Predisposition Genes in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonson, Michael N.; Gruber, Tanja A.; Easton, John; Hedges, Dale; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhou, Xin; Yergeau, Donald A.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Chen, Xiang; McGee, Rose B.; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Nuccio, Regina; Quinn, Emily; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Rusch, Michael; Patel, Aman; Becksfort, Jared B.; Wang, Shuoguo; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence and spectrum of predisposing mutations among children and adolescents with cancer are largely unknown. Knowledge of such mutations may improve the understanding of tumorigenesis, direct patient care, and enable genetic counseling of patients and families. METHODS In 1120 patients younger than 20 years of age, we sequenced the whole genomes (in 595 patients), whole exomes (in 456), or both (in 69). We analyzed the DNA sequences of 565 genes, including 60 that have been associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes, for the presence of germline mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutations was determined by a panel of medical experts with the use of cancer-specific and locus-specific genetic databases, the medical literature, computational predictions, and second hits identified in the tumor genome. The same approach was used to analyze data from 966 persons who did not have known cancer in the 1000 Genomes Project, and a similar approach was used to analyze data from an autism study (from 515 persons with autism and 208 persons without autism). RESULTS Mutations that were deemed to be pathogenic or probably pathogenic were identified in 95 patients with cancer (8.5%), as compared with 1.1% of the persons in the 1000 Genomes Project and 0.6% of the participants in the autism study. The most commonly mutated genes in the affected patients were TP53 (in 50 patients), APC (in 6), BRCA2 (in 6), NF1 (in 4), PMS2 (in 4), RB1 (in 3), and RUNX1 (in 3). A total of 18 additional patients had protein-truncating mutations in tumor-suppressor genes. Of the 58 patients with a predisposing mutation and available information on family history, 23 (40%) had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Germline mutations in cancer-predisposing genes were identified in 8.5% of the children and adolescents with cancer. Family history did not predict the presence of an underlying predisposition syndrome in most patients. (Funded by the American

  7. Prenatal monitoring in a family at high risk for ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency: A new mutation of an A-to-C transversion in position +4 of intron 1 of the OTC gene that is likely to abolish enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshide, Ryuuji; Matsuura, Toshinobu; Endo, Fumio

    1996-08-23

    DNA analysis of a male propositus with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency documented an A-to-C substitution in position +4 of intron 1. No other abnormalities were observed in the OTC gene, or at 563 bp upstream of the 5{prime} site, which included a promoter region, or at 383 bp downstream of the termination codon, which included a polyadenylation signal sequence. This mutation produces an RsaI site in the sequence, which was used for prenatal monitoring in the fourth and fifth pregnancies. DNA from amniotic cells in the former case were positive for RsaI digestion and the SRY gene (sex determinant region Y), indicating hemizygosity for the mutant allele. OTC activity was not measureable, and mRNA of the OTC gene was not detected by Northern blotting in the affected fetal liver. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) demonstrated only the wild-type allele. Thus, the mutation interferes with RNA processing, and an extremely low amount of normally spliced mRNA for the OTC gene seems to have caused the disease in our patient. The fetus of the fifth pregnancy was a normal male, as confirmed postnatally. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes.

  9. The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Consensus Statement on Optimizing Management of EGFR Mutation-Positive Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Status in 2016.

    PubMed

    Tan, Daniel S W; Yom, Sue S; Tsao, Ming S; Pass, Harvey I; Kelly, Karen; Peled, Nir; Yung, Rex C; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Yatabe, Yasushi; Unger, Michael; Mack, Philip C; Wynes, Murry W; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Weder, Walter; Yankelevitz, David; Herbst, Roy S; Gandara, David R; Carbone, David P; Bunn, Paul A; Mok, Tony S K; Hirsch, Fred R

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR) represent one of the most frequent "actionable" alterations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Typified by high response rates to targeted therapies, EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are now established first-line treatment options and have transformed the treatment paradigm for NSCLC. With the recent breakthrough designation and approval of the third-generation EGFR TKI osimertinib, available systemic and local treatment options have expanded, requiring new clinical algorithms that take into account individual patient molecular and clinical profiles. In this International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer commissioned consensus statement, key pathologic, diagnostic, and therapeutic considerations, such as optimal choice of EGFR TKI and management of brain metastasis, are discussed. In addition, recommendations are made for clinical guidelines and research priorities, such as the role of repeat biopsies and use of circulating free DNA for molecular studies. With the rapid pace of progress in treating EGFR-mutant NSCLC, this statement provides a state-of-the-art review of the contemporary issues in managing this unique subgroup of patients.

  10. Rapid detection of the Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 tcdC gene frame shift mutation at position 117 by real-time PCR and melt curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolff, D; Brüning, T; Gerritzen, A

    2009-08-01

    The emergence of the hypervirulent strain Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027 has increased the necessity for rapid C. difficile typing tests for clinical and epidemiological purposes. We developed a rapid real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for the detection of C. difficile. As the target, we chose the tcdC gene, which encodes for a negative regulator in toxin production. A deletion at position 117 of the tcdC gene, which is associated with severe tcdC truncation, is well conserved in all PCR ribotype 027 isolates. Probe sequences of the real-time PCR test were designed to result in distinct melt profiles for sequence variations at positions 117 to 120 of the tcdC gene. The tcdC gene deletion at position 117 was easily detected with real-time PCR and melt curve analysis in all C. difficile ribotype 027 isolates. In five non-027 strains and 46 hospitalised patient samples, melt curve analysis detected no deletion. PCR results were confirmed by DNA sequencing. The combination of real-time PCR and melt curve analysis is a rapid and accurate method for the detection of C. difficile DNA and simultaneous screening for the tcdC gene deletion at position 117, which is closely related to the C. difficile PCR ribotype 027 strain.

  11. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis.

  12. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010–2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%–2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%–3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%–7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%–10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  13. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010-2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%-2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%-10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB.

  14. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-02-29

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a "physical tethering" model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface.

  15. KRAS mutation-positive bronchial surface epithelium (BSE)-type lung adenocarcinoma with strong expression of TTF-1: a case providing a further insight as for the role of TTF-1 in the oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yusuke; Tajima, Shogo; Hayakawa, Takamitsu; Neyatani, Hiroshi; Funai, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial surface epithelium (BSE)-type lung adenocarcinoma is a subtype of non-terminal respiratory unit (TRU)-type lung adenocarcinoma originating in the bronchial surface epithelium. However, there are few known cases of BSE-type adenocarcinoma with marked expression of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1). This paper describes a very rare case of KRAS mutation-positive BSE-type adenocarcinoma that exhibited strong expression of TTF-1 that was putatively involved in oncogenesis. An 84-year-old woman, a never smoker, was referred to our hospital because of an abnormal chest radiograph. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed a solid mass lesion, 15 mm × 10 mm, with a relatively smooth margin in the left upper lobe. The patient underwent partial resection of the left upper lobe for strongly suspected lung cancer with a clinical stage of cT1aN0M0. Histopathological findings showed continuous migration of papillary, hyperplastic, atypical columnar tumor cells originating from normal bronchial surface epithelium, leading to a diagnosis of BSE-type adenocarcinoma. TTF-1 was strongly expressed in almost 100% of the tumor cells, which tested positive for the KRAS mutation. TTF-1 has recently attracted attention as an oncogene, and it is purportedly involved in the carcinogenesis and survival of lung adenocarcinoma cells. There is typically an inverse correlation between the respective expressions of KRAS and TTF-1, but in the present study, they appeared simultaneously and were both putatively involved as oncogenic driver alterations. This case is important in that it sheds some light on the largely unknown pathogenic mechanism of BSE-type adenocarcinoma.

  16. Prognostic value of PIK3CA mutation status, PTEN and androgen receptor expression for metastasis-free survival in HER2-positive breast cancer patients treated with trastuzumab in adjuvant setting.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Agnieszka; Niemiec, Joanna; Janecka, Anna; Harazin-Lechowska, Agnieszka; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Grela-Wojewoda, Aleksandra; Domagała-Haduch, Małgorzata; Cedrych, Ida; Majchrzyk, Kaja; Kruczak, Anna; Ryś, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to trastuzumab in patients with HER2-overexpressing breast cancer is associated with higher risk of progression or cancer death, and might be related to activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR and Ras/Raf/MAPK signaling cascades and a decreased level of their inhibitor (PTEN). HER2-overexpressing breast cancer patients (n=75) treated with radical local therapy and trastuzumab in adjuvant setting were included into the study. Deoxyribonucleic acid isolated from paraffin sections was used to assess mutational status of the PIK3CA gene (p.H1047R and p.E545K mutations) by the quantitative polymerase chain reaction technique. Expression of selected proteins (ER, PgR, AR, Ki-67, EGFR) was assessed using immunohistochemistry. In the studied group we found significantly higher Ki-67LI in EGFR-positive carcinomas (p=0.048). Moreover, EGFR immunonegativity was observed more frequently in low-grade (G1/G2) carcinomas as well as in estrogen/progesterone and androgen receptor immunopositive tumors (p=0.042, p=0.016, p=0.044, respectively). Favorable metastasis-free survival was observed in patients with pN0 and pN1 (vs. pN2+3) stage (p=0.040) and with tumors characterized by low Ki-67LI (≤50% vs. >50%) (p=0.014). Patients with tumor androgen receptor immunonegativity (weak or lack of expression) or strong PTEN expression survived 3 years without metastases (p=0.007). The results of our study suggest that androgen receptor and PTEN status might be considered as indicators of trastuzumab sensitivity.

  17. Phase II study of erlotinib plus tivantinib (ARQ 197) in patients with locally advanced or metastatic EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer just after progression on EGFR-TKI, gefitinib or erlotinib

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Koichi; Hirashima, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Okamoto, Isamu; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Nishio, Makoto; Hirata, Taizo; Kubota, Kaoru; Kasahara, Kazuo; Hida, Toyoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroshige; Nakanishi, Kaoru; Akinaga, Shiro; Nishio, Kazuto; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) respond well to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs), but eventually become resistant in most cases. The hepatocyte growth factor/c-Met (HGF/c-Met) pathway is reported as a poor prognostic factor in various cancers. As c-Met is involved in EGFR-TKI resistance, a c-Met inhibitor and EGFR-TKI combination may reverse the resistance. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of a c-Met selective inhibitor, tivantinib (ARQ 197), in combination with erlotinib, in Japanese EGFR mutation-positive patients with NSCLC who progressed while on EGFR-TKIs. Methods This study enrolled 45 patients with NSCLC with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs, who were orally administered a daily combination of tivantinib/erlotinib. The primary end point was the overall response rate (ORR) and secondary end points included disease control rate, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). The patients underwent a mandatory second biopsy just after progression on EGFR-TKIs. The predictive biomarkers were extensively analysed using tumour and blood samples. Results The ORR was 6.7% (95% CI 1.4% to 18.3%), and the lower limit of 95% CI did not exceed the target of 5%. The median PFS (mPFS) and median OS (mOS) were 2.7 months (95% CI 1.4 to 4.2) and 18.0 months (95% CI 13.4 to 22.2), respectively. Both were longer in c-Met high patients (c-Met high vs low: mPFS 4.1 vs 1.4 months; mOS 20.7 vs 13.9 months). Partial response was observed in three patients, all of whom were c-Met and HGF high. The common adverse events and their frequencies were similar to those known to occur with tivantinib or erlotinib alone. Conclusions Although this study did not prove clinical benefit of tivantinib in patients with acquired resistance to EGFR-TKIs, activated HGF/c-Met signalling, a poor prognostic factor, may define a patient subset associated with longer

  18. Activation of constitutive 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) receptor by a series of mutations in the BBXXB motif: positioning of the third intracellular loop distal junction and its G(o)alpha protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, P J; Gouble, A; Wurch, T

    1999-01-01

    Constitutive activity of the recombinant human 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) (5-HT(1B)) receptor (RC code 2.1.5HT.01.B) was investigated by mutagenesis of the BBXXB motif (in which B represents a basic residue and X a non-basic residue) located in the C-terminal portion of the third intracellular loop. In contrast with wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptors, three receptor mutants (Thr(313)-->Lys, Thr(313)-->Arg and Thr(313)-->Gln) increased their agonist-independent guanosine 5'-[gamma-[(35)S]thio]triphosphate binding response by 26-41%. This activity represented approx. 30% of the maximal response induced by 5-HT and could be reversed by the inverse agonists methiothepin and 3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-4-hydroxy-N-(4-pyridin-4-yl phenyl)-benzenamide (GR 55562). Enhanced agonist-independent and agonist-dependent 5-HT(1B) receptor activation was provided by co-expression of a pertussis toxin-resistant rat G(o)alpha Cys(351)-->Ile protein. The wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptor displayed a doubling in basal activity, whereas a spectrum of enhanced basal activities (313-571%) was observed with a series of diverse amino acid substitutions (isoleucine, glycine, asparagine, alanine, lysine, phenylalanine, glutamine and arginine) at the 5-HT(1B) receptor position 313 in the presence of pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml). Consequently, the constitutive 5-HT(1B) receptor activity can be modulated by the mutation of Thr(313), and displays a graded range between 11% and 59% of maximal 5-HT(1B) receptor activation by 5-HT. No clear pattern is apparent in the framework of traditionally cited amino acid characteristics (i.e. residue size, charge or hydrophobicity) to explain the observed constitutive activities. The various amino acid substitutions that yielded enhanced activity are unlikely to make similar intramolecular interactions within the 5-HT(1B) receptor. It is hypothesized that the positioning of the junction between the third intracellular loop and transmembrane domain VI is altered by mutation of

  19. The iodide-transport-defect-causing mutation R124H: a δ-amino group at position 124 is critical for maturation and trafficking of the Na+/I- symporter.

    PubMed

    Paroder, Viktoriya; Nicola, Juan P; Ginter, Christopher S; Carrasco, Nancy

    2013-08-01

    Na(+)/I(-) symporter (NIS)-mediated active accumulation of I(-) in thyrocytes is a key step in the biosynthesis of the iodine-containing thyroid hormones T3 and T4. Several NIS mutants have been identified as a cause of congenital I(-) transport defect (ITD), and their investigation has yielded valuable mechanistic information on NIS. Here we report novel findings derived from the thorough characterization of the ITD-causing mutation R124H, located in the second intracellular loop (IL-2). R124H NIS is incompletely glycosylated and colocalizes with endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein markers. As a result, R124H NIS is not targeted to the plasma membrane and therefore does not mediate any I(-) transport in transfected COS-7 cells. Strikingly, however, the mutant is intrinsically active, as revealed by its ability to mediate I(-) transport in membrane vesicles. Of all the amino acid substitutions we carried out at position 124 (K, D, E, A, W, N and Q), only Gln restored targeting of NIS to the plasma membrane and NIS activity, suggesting a key structural role for the δ-amino group of R124 in the transporter's maturation and cell surface targeting. Using our NIS homology model based on the structure of the Vibrio parahaemolyticus Na(+)/galactose symporter, we propose an interaction between the δ-amino group of either R or Q124 and the thiol group of C440, located in IL-6. We conclude that the interaction between IL-2 and IL-6 is critical for the local folding required for NIS maturation and plasma membrane trafficking.

  20. Defective kinetics of cytochrome c oxidase and alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential in fibroblasts and cytoplasmic hybrid cells with the mutation for myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibres ('MERRF') at position 8344 nt.

    PubMed Central

    Antonická, H; Floryk, D; Klement, P; Stratilová, L; Hermanská, J; Houstková, H; Kalous, M; Drahota, Z; Zeman, J; Houstek, J

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated pathogenic effects of the tRNA(Lys) A8344G mutation associated with the syndrome myoclonus epilepsy with ragged-red fibres (MERRF) by using fibroblasts and fibroblast-derived cytoplasmic hybrid cells harbouring different percentages of mutated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The activity of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) in patient fibroblasts with 89% mutated mtDNA was decreased to 20% of the control levels. COX exhibited altered kinetics, with a decreased V(max) for both the low-affinity and high-affinity phases; however, the K(m) values were not significantly changed. The substrate-dependent synthesis of ATP was decreased to 50% of the control. Analysis of the mitochondrial membrane potential, DeltaPsi, in digitonin-treated cells with tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester (TMRM) with the use of flow cytometry showed a 80% decrease in DeltaPsi at state 4 and an increased sensitivity of DeltaPsi to an uncoupler in fibroblasts from the patient. The investigation of transmitochondrial cytoplasmic hybrid clones derived from the patient's fibroblasts enabled us to characterize the relationship between heteroplasmy of the MERRF mutation, COX activity and DeltaPsi. Within the range of 87-73% mutated mtDNA, COX activity was decreased to 5-35% and DeltaPsi was decreased to 6-78%. These results demonstrate that the MERRF mutation affects COX activity and DeltaPsi in different proportions with regard to mutation heteroplasmy and indicate that the biochemical manifestation of the MERRF mutation exerts a very steep threshold of DeltaPsi inhibition. PMID:10477264

  1. Reversal of clavulanate resistance conferred by a Ser-244 mutant of TEM-1 beta-lactamase as a result of a second mutation (Arg to Ser at position 164) that enhances activity against ceftazidime.

    PubMed Central

    Imtiaz, U; Manavathu, E K; Mobashery, S; Lerner, S A

    1994-01-01

    The mutation of Arg-244 to Ser (Arg-244-->Ser mutation) in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase has been shown to produce resistance to inactivation by clavulanate in the mutant enzyme and resistance to ampicillin plus clavulanate in a strain of Escherichia coli producing this enzyme. The Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase (TEM-12 enzyme) is known to enhance the activity of the enzyme against ceftazidime, resulting in resistance to the drug in a strain producing the mutant enzyme (D. A. Weber, C. C. Sanders, J. S. Bakken, and J. P. Quinn, J. Infect. Dis. 162:460-465, 1990). The doubly mutated derivative of the TEM-1 enzyme (Ser-164/Ser-244) retains the characteristics of the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., enhanced activity against ceftazidime and sensitivity to inactivation by clavulanate. It also confers the same phenotype as the Ser-164 mutant enzyme, i.e., resistance to ceftazidime and ampicillin, with reversal of this resistance in the presence of clavulanate. Thus, the Arg-164-->Ser mutation in the TEM-1 beta-lactamase suppresses the effect of the Arg-244-->Ser mutation which, by itself, reduces the sensitivity of the enzyme to inactivation by clavulanate. PMID:8067751

  2. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Somatic Mutation: Animal Model; Somatic Mutation: Human; Heritable Mutation: Animal Model; Heritable Mutation: Approaches to Human Induction Rates; Heritable Mutation: Human Risk; Epidemiology: Population Studies on Genotoxicity; and Epidemiology: Workplace Studies of Genotoxicity.

  3. Involvement of p53 mutation and mismatch repair proteins dysregulation in NNK-induced malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Zhang, Shuilian; Huang, Xiaobin; Chen, Kailin; Shen, Jing; Wang, Zhengyang

    2014-01-01

    Genome integrity is essential for normal cellular functions and cell survival. Its instability can cause genetic aberrations and is considered as a hallmark of most cancers. To investigate the carcinogenesis process induced by tobacco-specific carcinogen NNK, we studied the dynamic changes of two important protectors of genome integrity, p53 and MMR system, in malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells after NNK exposure. Our results showed that the expression of MLH1, one of the important MMR proteins, was decreased early and maintained the downregulation during the transformation in a histone modification involved and DNA methylation-independent manner. Another MMR protein PMS2 also displayed a declined expression while being in a later stage of transformation. Moreover, we conducted p53 mutation analysis and revealed a mutation at codon 273 which led to the replacement of arginine by histidine. With the mutation, DNA damage-induced activation of p53 was significantly impaired. We further reintroduced the wild-type p53 into the transformed cells, and the malignant proliferation can be abrogated by inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These findings indicate that p53 and MMR system play an important role in the initiation and progression of NNK-induced transformation, and p53 could be a potential therapeutic target for tobacco-related cancers.

  4. Heterozygosity increases microsatellite mutation rate

    PubMed Central

    Amos, William

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of families of Arabidopsis has recently lent strong support to the heterozygote instability (HI) hypothesis that heterozygosity locally increases mutation rate. However, there is an important theoretical difference between the impact on base substitutions, where mutation rate increases in regions surrounding a heterozygous site, and the impact of HI on sequences such as microsatellites, where mutations are likely to occur at the heterozygous site itself. At microsatellite loci, HI should create a positive feedback loop, with heterozygosity and mutation rate mutually increasing each other. Direct support for HI acting on microsatellites is limited and contradictory. I therefore analysed AC microsatellites in 1163 genome sequences from the 1000 genomes project. I used the presence of rare alleles, which are likely to be very recent in origin, as a surrogate measure of mutation rate. I show that rare alleles are more likely to occur at locus-population combinations with higher heterozygosity even when all populations carry exactly the same number of alleles. PMID:26740567

  5. Calreticulin Exon 9 Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background Calreticulin (CALR) mutations were recently discovered in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We studied the frequency and type of CALR mutations and their hematological characteristics. Methods A total of 168 MPN patients (36 polycythemia vera [PV], 114 essential thrombocythemia [ET], and 18 primary myelofibrosis [PMF] cases) were included in the study. CALR mutation was analyzed by the direct sequencing method. Results CALR mutations were detected in 21.9% of ET and 16.7% of PMF patients, which accounted for 58.5% and 33.3% of ET and PMF patients without Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogenes (MPL) mutations, respectively. A total of five types of mutation were detected, among which, L367fs*46 (53.6%) and K385fs*47 (35.7%) were found to be the most common. ET patients with CALR mutation had lower leukocyte counts and ages compared with JAK2-mutated ET patients. Conclusion Genotyping for CALR could be a useful diagnostic tool for JAK2-or MPL-negative ET or PMF patients. CALR mutation may be a distinct disease group, with different hematological characteristics than that of JAK2-positive patients. PMID:25553276

  6. Gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nisar A; Malek, Sami N

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of genes mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has stimulated new research into the role of these genes in CLL pathogenesis. CLL cases carry approximately 5-20 mutated genes per exome, a lower number than detected in many human tumors. Of the recurrently mutated genes in CLL, all are mutated in 10% or less of patients when assayed in unselected CLL cohorts at diagnosis. Mutations in TP53 are of major clinical relevance, are often associated with del17p and gain in frequency over time. TP53 mutated and associated del17p states substantially lower response rates, remission duration, and survival in CLL. Mutations in NOTCH1 and SF3B1 are recurrent, often associated with progressive CLL that is also IgVH unmutated and ZAP70-positive and are under investigation as targets for novel therapies and as factors influencing CLL outcome. There are an estimated 20-50 additional mutated genes with frequencies of 1%-5% in CLL; more work is needed to identify these and to study their significance. Finally, of the major biological aberration categories influencing CLL as a disease, gene mutations will need to be placed into context with regard to their ultimate role and importance. Such calibrated appreciation necessitates studies incorporating multiple CLL driver aberrations into biological and clinical analyses.

  7. Parent-progeny sequencing indicates higher mutation rates in heterozygotes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sihai; Wang, Long; Huang, Ju; Zhang, Xiaohui; Yuan, Yang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Hurst, Laurence D; Tian, Dacheng

    2015-07-23

    Mutation rates vary within genomes, but the causes of this remain unclear. As many prior inferences rely on methods that assume an absence of selection, potentially leading to artefactual results, we call mutation events directly using a parent-offspring sequencing strategy focusing on Arabidopsis and using rice and honey bee for replication. Here we show that mutation rates are higher in heterozygotes and in proximity to crossover events. A correlation between recombination rate and intraspecific diversity is in part owing to a higher mutation rate in domains of high recombination/diversity. Implicating diversity per se as a cause, we find an ∼3.5-fold higher mutation rate in heterozygotes than in homozygotes, with mutations occurring in closer proximity to heterozygous sites than expected by chance. In a genome that is a patchwork of heterozygous and homozygous domains, mutations occur disproportionately more often in the heterozygous domains. If segregating mutations predispose to a higher local mutation rate, clusters of genes dominantly under purifying selection (more commonly homozygous) and under balancing selection (more commonly heterozygous), might have low and high mutation rates, respectively. Our results are consistent with this, there being a ten times higher mutation rate in pathogen resistance genes, expected to be under positive or balancing selection. Consequently, we do not necessarily need to evoke extremely weak selection on the mutation rate to explain why mutational hot and cold spots might correspond to regions under positive/balancing and purifying selection, respectively.

  8. Natural radioactivity and human mitochondrial DNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Forster, Lucy; Forster, Peter; Lutz-Bonengel, Sabine; Willkomm, Horst; Brinkmann, Bernd

    2002-01-01

    Radioactivity is known to induce tumors, chromosome lesions, and minisatellite length mutations, but its effects on the DNA sequence have not previously been studied. A coastal peninsula in Kerala (India) contains the world's highest level of natural radioactivity in a densely populated area, offering an opportunity to characterize radiation-associated DNA mutations. We sampled 248 pedigrees (988 individuals) in the high-radiation peninsula and in nearby low-radiation islands as a control population. We sequenced their mtDNA, and found that the pedigrees living in the high-radiation area have significantly (P < 0.01) increased germ-line point mutations between mothers and their offspring. In each mutation case, we confirmed maternity by autosomal profiling. Strikingly, the radioactive conditions accelerate mutations at nucleotide positions that have been evolutionary hot spots for at least 60,000 years. PMID:12370437

  9. Mutation studies in ascidians: a review.

    PubMed

    Crocetta, Fabio; Marino, Rita; Cirino, Paola; Macina, Alberto; Staiano, Leopoldo; Esposito, Rosaria; Pezzotti, Maria Rosa; Racioppi, Claudia; Toscano, Francesco; De Felice, Elena; Locascio, Annamaria; Ristoratore, Filomena; Spagnuolo, Antonietta; Zanetti, Laura; Branno, Margherita; Sordino, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Historically, mutations have had a significant impact on the study of developmental processes and phenotypic evolution. Lesions in DNA are created by artificial methods or detected by natural genetic variation. Random mutations are then ascribed to genetic change by direct sequencing or positional cloning. Tunicate species of the ascidian genus Ciona represent nearly fully realized model systems in which gene function can be investigated in depth. Additionally, tunicates are valuable organisms for the study of naturally occurring mutations due to the capability to exploit genetic variation down to the molecular level. Here, we summarize the available information about how mutations are studied in ascidians with examples of insights that have resulted from these applications. We also describe notions and methodologies that might be useful for the implementation of easy and tight procedures for mutations studies in Ciona.

  10. Recent Origin and Spread of a Common Lithuanian Mutation, G197del LDLR, Causing Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Positive Selection Is Not Always Necessary to Account for Disease Incidence among Ashkenazi Jews

    PubMed Central

    Durst, Ronen; Colombo, Roberto; Shpitzen, Shoshi; Avi, Liat Ben; Friedlander, Yechiel; Wexler, Roni; Raal, Frederick J.; Marais, David A.; Defesche, Joep C.; Mandelshtam, Michail Y.; Kotze, Maritha J.; Leitersdorf, Eran; Meiner, Vardiella

    2001-01-01

    G197del is the most prevalent LDL receptor (LDLR) mutation causing familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) in Ashkenazi Jew (AJ) individuals. The purpose of this study was to determine the origin, age, and population distribution of G197del, as well as to explore environmental and genetic effects on disease expression. Index cases from Israel (n=46), South Africa (n=24), Russia (n=7), The Netherlands (n=1), and the United States (n=1) were enlisted. All trace their ancestry to Lithuania. A highly conserved haplotype (D19S221:104-D19S865:208-D19S413:74) was identified in G197del chromosomes, suggesting the occurrence of a common founder. When two methods were used for analysis of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between flanking polymorphic markers and the disease locus and for the study of the decay of LD over time, the estimated age of the deletion was found to be 20 ± 7 generations (the 95% confidence interval is 15–26 generations), so that the most recent common ancestor of the mutation-bearing chromosomes would date to the 14th century. This corresponds with the founding of the Jewish community of Lithuania (1338 a.d.), as well as with the great demographic expansion of AJ individuals in eastern Europe, which followed this settlement. The penetrance of mutation-linked severe hypercholesterolemia is high (94% of heterozygotes have a baseline concentration of LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) that is >160 mg/dl), and no significant differences in the mean baseline lipid level of G197del carriers from different countries were found. Polymorphisms of apolipoprotein E and of scavenger-receptor class B type I were observed to have minor effects on the plasma lipid profile. With respect to determinative genetic influences on the biochemical phenotype, there is no evidence that could support the possibility of a selective evolutionary metabolic advantage. Therefore, the founder effect in a rapidly expanding population from a limited number of families remains a simple, parsimonious

  11. Compound EGFR mutation is frequently detected with co-mutations of actionable genes and associated with poor clinical outcome in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Cho, Eun Na; Park, Heae Surng; Hong, Ji Young; Lim, Seri; Youn, Jong Pil; Hwang, Seung Yong; Chang, Yoon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Compound EGFR mutations, defined as double or multiple mutations in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain, are frequently detected with advances in sequencing technology but its clinical significance is unclear. This study analyzed 61 cases of EGFR mutation positive lung adenocarcinoma using next-generation sequencing (NGS) based repeated deep sequencing panel of 16 genes that contain actionable mutations and investigated clinical implication of compound EGFR mutations. Compound EGFR mutation was detected in 15 (24.6%) of 61 cases of EGFR mutation-positive lung adenocarcinoma. The majority (12/15) of compound mutations are combination of the atypical mutation and typical mutations such as exon19 deletion, L858R or G719X substitutions, or exon 20 insertion whereas 3 were combinations of rare atypical mutations. The patients with compound mutation showed shorter overall survival than those with simple mutations (83.7 vs. 72.8 mo; P = 0.020, Breslow test). Among the 115 missense mutations discovered in the tested genes, a few number of actionable mutations were detected irrelevant to the subtype of EGFR mutations, including ALK rearrangement, BCL2L11 intron 2 deletion, KRAS c.35G>A, PIK3CA c.1633G>A which are possible target of crizotinib, BH3 mimetics, MEK inhibitors, and PI3K-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, respectively. 31 missense mutations were detected in the cases with simple mutations whereas 84 in those with compound mutation, showing that the cases with compound missense mutation have higher burden of missense mutations (P = 0.001, independent sample t-test). Compound EGFR mutations are detected at a high frequency using NGS-based repeated deep sequencing. Because patients with compound EGFR mutations showed poor clinical outcomes, they should be closely monitored during follow-up.

  12. Reverse mutations in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Nolin, S.; Houck, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Yet new mutations have not been described and no affected child has been born to a carrier mother having less than 60 FMR-1 CGG triplet repeats. Reverse mutations also appear to be very rare. We have previously identified the daughter of a premutation mother (95 CGGs) who inherited a normal repeat size of 35 as a reverse mutation. In the process of carrier testing by PCR, we have now identified two additional females with reverse mutations. All three of these reverse mutation women were previously tested by linkage as part of known fragile X families (subsequently confirmed by direct analysis), and assigned a > 99% risk as a carrier. In the second family, the mother carries a premutation allele of 95 repeats and the daughter inherited a 43 repeat allele. Prior to direct DNA testing, she had a positive prenatal diagnosis by linkage (> 99% risk) and cytogenetics with 3/450 cells apparently positive. Subsequent retesting of the products of conception by PCR now reveals a 43 repeat allele from her carrier mother with an 82 repeat allele. Testing with close CA markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548) confirmed that these women inherited the same chromosome and their full mutation brothers. Further analysis is pending. These examples of reverse mutations are the only ones we have identified in our study of offspring of more than 200 carriers (400+ meioses) examined to date. Therefore, we conclude the frequency of fragile X back mutations is likely to be less than 1%. Retesting of linkage positive carriers is recommended to detect reverse mutations and assure accurate genetic counseling.

  13. A novel mutation in exon 2 of FGB caused by c.221G>T (†) substitution, predicting the replacement of the native Arginine at position 74 with a Leucine (p.Arg74Leu (†) ) in a proband from a Kurdish family with dysfibrinogenaemia and familial venous and arterial thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Shlebak, Abdul A; Katsarou, Alexia D; Adams, George; Fernando, Fiona

    2017-02-01

    Dysfibrinogenaemias may present in either congenital or acquired form and are disorders of fibrinogen structure which may or may not be associated with abnormal function. More than 100 point mutations with single amino acid substitutions have been identified in over 400 families. These lead to defective DNA in the translated fibrinogen molecule. Such cases have improved our understanding of the fibrinogen-fibrin structure. Six members of a consanguineous family including a female proband, a female sibling, three male siblings and a daughter, with ages between 29 years and 53 years presented with early onset venous and premature arterial thromboembolic disease were investigated for a pro-thrombotic tendency associated with dysfibrinogenaemia. The family was investigated using standard coagulation assays and DNA sequencing of the genes encoding the FGA, FGB and FGG. All cases have dysfibrinogenaemia with a fibrinogen level 1.4 to 1.5 (1.9-4.3 g/L). Thrombophilia testing (including AT, PS & PC, F5 G1691A (FV Leiden)/F2 (prothombin G20210A) genotypes, homocysteine, antiphosphlipid antibody, paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria by flow cytometry and Janus Kinase-2 (exon 14)) were normal. PCR amplification and sequencing of exon 2 of FBG revealed a heterozygous mutation for a c.221G> T (†) substitution, predicting the replacement of the native Arginine at position 74 with a Leucine (p.Arg74Leu (†) ). In silico analysis of p.Arg74Leu strongly support pathogenicity. A novel mutation was identified in exon 2 of FGB caused by c.221G> T (†) substitution, predicting the replacement of Arginine at position 74 with a Leucine (p.Arg74Leu (†) ) in a proband from a Kurdish family with dysfibrinogenaemia and familial venous and arterial thrombosis.

  14. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  15. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J.; Phillips, James G.; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84–4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25–11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  16. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve.

  17. A germ-line-selective advantage rather than an increased mutation rate can explain some unexpectedly common human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2008-07-22

    Two nucleotide substitutions in the human FGFR2 gene (C755G or C758G) are responsible for virtually all sporadic cases of Apert syndrome. This condition is 100-1,000 times more common than genomic mutation frequency data predict. Here, we report on the C758G de novo Apert syndrome mutation. Using data on older donors, we show that spontaneous mutations are not uniformly distributed throughout normal testes. Instead, we find foci where C758G mutation frequencies are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining tissue. We conclude this nucleotide site is not a mutation hot spot even after accounting for possible Luria-Delbruck "mutation jackpots." An alternative explanation for such foci involving positive selection acting on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonia experiencing the rare mutation could not be rejected. Further, the two youngest individuals studied (19 and 23 years old) had lower mutation frequencies and smaller foci at both mutation sites compared with the older individuals. This implies that the mutation frequency of foci increases as adults age, and thus selection could explain the paternal age effect for Apert syndrome and other genetic conditions. Our results, now including the analysis of two mutations in the same set of testes, suggest that positive selection can increase the relative frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying such mutations, although individuals who inherit them have reduced fitness. In addition, we compared the anatomical distribution of C758G mutation foci with both new and old data on the C755G mutation in the same testis and found their positions were not correlated with one another.

  18. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, ihas long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p <0.001). Sex was known for 4897 mutations showing a female dominance (57.2%) and females carrying negative mutations were significantly younger. TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice. PMID:27626311

  19. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-04

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of overexpressed protein has long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p <0.001). Sex was known for 4897 mutations showing a female dominance (57.2%) and females carrying negative mutations were significantly younger. TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice.

  20. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  1. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  2. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  3. Novel progranulin mutation: screening for PGRN mutations in a Portuguese series of FTD/CBS cases.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Rita Joao; Santana, Isabel; Bras, Jose Miguel; Revesz, Tamas; Rebelo, Olinda; Ribeiro, Maria Helena; Santiago, Beatriz; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John

    2008-07-15

    Mutations in the progranulin (PGRN) gene were recently described as the cause of ubiquitin positive frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in many families. Different frequencies of these genetic changes have been reported in diverse populations leading us to determine if these mutations were a major cause of FTD in the Portuguese population. The entire coding sequence plus exon 0 of PGRN were sequenced in a consecutive series of 46 FTD/CBS Portuguese patients. Two mutations were found: a novel pathogenic insertion (p.Gln300GlnfsX61) and a previously described point variant (p.T182M) of unclear pathogenicity. Pathogenic mutations in the PGRN gene were found in one of the 36 probands studied (3% of the probands in our series) who had a corticobasal syndrome presentation, indicating that in the Portuguese population, mutations in this gene are not a major cause of FTD.

  4. IFITM5 mutations and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2016-03-01

    Interferon-induced transmembrane protein 5 (IFITM5) is an osteoblast-specific membrane protein that has been shown to be a positive regulatory factor for mineralization in vitro. However, Ifitm5 knockout mice do not exhibit serious bone abnormalities, and thus the function of IFITM5 in vivo remains unclear. Recently, a single point mutation (c.-14C>T) in the 5' untranslated region of IFITM5 was identified in patients with osteogenesis imperfecta type V (OI-V). Furthermore, a single point mutation (c.119C>T) in the coding region of IFITM5 was identified in OI patients with more severe symptoms than patients with OI-V. Although IFITM5 is not directly involved in the formation of bone in vivo, the reason why IFITM5 mutations cause OI remains a major mystery. In this review, the current state of knowledge of OI pathological mechanisms due to IFITM5 mutations will be reviewed.

  5. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations by Ethnicity and Mutation Location in BRCA Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Soley; Jackson, Michelle; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Liu, Diane; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Brandt, Amanda; Woodson, Ashley; Litton, Jennifer; Lu, Karen H; Valero, Vicente; Arun, Banu K

    2015-01-01

    The genotype-phenotype correlations of the specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in multi-ethnic populations in USA have not yet been fully investigated. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of ethnicity at specific mutation locations and breast/ovarian cancer phenotypes. Our cohort included 445 women with different ethnic backgrounds who underwent BRCA genetic testing between 1997 and 2010. Known clinical and pathologic characteristics were compared with Chi-Square Analysis or Fisher's Exact test as appropriate. The three most common mutation locations in BRCA1 (exons 2, 11, and 20) and BRCA2 (exons 10, 11, and 25) genes were chosen. Prevalence of BRCA1 exon 2 mutations were significantly higher in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women compared to Caucasians (41% versus 15%; p = 0.001). Similarly, AJ women with breast cancer were more likely to have BRCA1 exon 2 mutation (47% positivity in AJ women versus 0-12.5% positivity in other ethnicities; p = 0.004). Women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation had the highest probability of having combined breast and ovarian cancers compared to women carrying other exon mutations (p = 0.05). The median age at initial cancer diagnosis, phenotypic features of breast cancer tumors, and overall survival did not vary significantly by ethnicity or mutation location. Our data suggest that ethnicity does not affect age of onset, overall survival or confer different risks of breast and ovarian cancer development in BRCA carriers. These results also suggest that women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation may warrant mutation-specific counseling and be more aggressively managed for risk reduction.

  6. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  7. Progenitor genotyping reveals a complex clonal architecture in a subset of CALR-mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sarah; Wright, Casey M; Scott, Linda M

    2017-04-01

    The identification of acquired CALR mutations in patients with essential thrombocythaemia (ET) or myelofibrosis (MF) has meant that disease-initiating mutations can now be detected in about 90% of all patients with a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN). Here, we show that only those CALR mutations that cause a +1 frameshift, thereby altering the carboxy-terminus of calreticulin, promote cytokine independence in vitro; in-frame deletions were not functional, and are unlikely to be the pathogenetic mutation underlying some MPN cases. Expression of the thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, was also necessary for factor-independence. Although the CALR mutations are considered to occur only in JAK2 V617F-negative cases and in a heterozygous state, progenitor genotyping revealed that this is not always true. Notably, CALR mutation-positive MPNs can be polyclonal: in one case, two distinct CALR mutation-positive subpopulations could be identified; in another, separate populations of JAK2 V617F-positive and CALR-mutated cells were present. Mitotic recombination involving chromosome 19 in a third instance resulted in the emergence of a CALR mutation-homozygous subclone. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that occasional patients with CALR mutation-positive ET or MF carry other MPN-initiating genetic mutations (including JAK2 V617F), acquire "secondary mutations" before or after the CALR mutation, or evolve over time to being CALR mutation-homozygous.

  8. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... breast with your other hand. The Clutch or Football Hold This is also a good position for ... same time may also choose this position. The football hold allows babies to take milk more easily — ...

  9. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  10. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  11. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  12. p53 gene mutations in asbestos associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, B C; Fu, D C; Miao, Q; Wang, H H; You, B R

    1998-09-01

    The accumulation of mutant p53 protein in cancer cells was observed by immunohistochemistry analysis. DNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. Exons 5, 7 and 8 were amplified and studied by PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis. Ten cases of asbestos associated cancer tissue were studied, of which five cases had adenocarcinoma, and the other five had mesothelioma, squamous carcinoma, small cell lung cancer, adenosquamous carcinoma and malignant lymphoma respectively. Employing monoclonal antibody PAb1801, five cases were found to be mutant p53 protein positive. Seven cases were found to have mutations by PCR-SSCP. A total of 7 cases (8 mutations) were found to be positive and 4 cases were found to be positive by both of these analyses. Of the 8 mutations found by SSCP analysis, 4(50%, 4/8) were clustered in exon 8. A high mutation frequency was noticed in adenocarcinoma (80%, 4/5). Sequencing analysis on two specimens revealed two hotspot mutations. In codon 234, TAC for tyrosin was mutated to AAC for asparagine by a T to A transversion of the first letter. In codon 273, CGT for arginine was mutated to AGT for serine by a C to A transversion of the first letter. In conclusion, the mutation of p53 gene is common in asbestos associated cancers. However, the mutational spectrum of asbestos associated cancers might be different from that of non-asbestos associated cancers.

  13. EGFR mutation specific immunohistochemistry is a useful adjunct which helps to identify false negative mutation testing in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Houang, Michelle; Sioson, Loretta; Clarkson, Adele; Watson, Nicole; Farzin, Mahtab; Toon, Christopher W; Raut, Aditi; O'Toole, Sandra A; Cooper, Wendy A; Pavlakis, Nick; Mead, Scott; Chou, Angela; Gill, Anthony J

    2014-10-01

    Mutations in EGFR guide treatment in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The most common mutations, exon 19 (delE746-A750) and exon 21 (L858R), can be identified by mutation specific immunohistochemistry (IHC). We present our prospective experience of universal reflex IHC and molecular testing in non-squamous NSCLC in the routine clinical setting.A total of 411 specimens from 332 patients were encountered over two years. Of these, 326 (98%) patients underwent EGFR IHC, 15 (5%) were positive for exon 19 deletions and 27 (8%) for exon 21 (L858R); 244 (73%) patients underwent molecular testing. Seventy-six mutations in 64 patients (19% of all patients encountered; 26% with sufficient material for testing) were identified. These comprised nine exon 18 (G719X) mutations, three also with exon 20 mutations; 24 exon 19 deletions, six also with exon 20 mutations; 23 exon 21 (L858R), three also with exon 20 mutations; and 8 exon 20 alone.All 15 exon 19 IHC positive patients were proven mutated (100% specificity, 63% sensitivity). Twenty-two of 27 exon 21 IHC positive cases were proven mutated while three patients had insufficient material for molecular testing (92% specificity, 96% sensitivity). The overall specificity and sensitivity of IHC for any EGFR mutation was 95% and 58%. Five patients initially thought to be wild type for EGFR but IHC positive underwent repeat molecular testing because of the discrepancy which confirmed the IHC result in three cases (60%).We conclude IHC is very specific but not sensitive. Whilst IHC cannot replace molecular testing, it is a useful adjunct which requires minimal tissue and identifies false negative molecular results which occurred in 5% of our patients with eventually confirmed EGFR mutations.

  14. Application of Markov chain to the pattern of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-01

    This research explains how Markov chain used to model the pattern of deoxyribonucleic acid mutations in mitochondrial (mitochondrial DNA). First, sign test was used to see a pattern of nucleotide bases that will appear at one position after the position of mutated nucleotide base. Results obtained from the sign test showed that for most cases, there exist a pattern of mutation except in the mutation cases of adenine to cytosine, adenine to thymine, and cytosine to guanine. Markov chain analysis results on data of mutations that occur in mitochondrial DNA indicate that one and two positions after the position of mutated nucleotide bases tend to be occupied by particular nucleotide bases. From this analysis, it can be said that the adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine will mutate if the nucelotide base at one and/or two positions after them is cytosine.

  15. EXOSC3 mutations in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1: novel mutations and genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) represents a group of neurodegenerative disorders with prenatal onset. Eight subtypes have been described thus far (PCH1-8) based on clinical and genetic features. Common characteristics include hypoplasia and atrophy of the cerebellum, variable pontine atrophy, and severe mental and motor impairments. PCH1 is distinctly characterized by the combination with degeneration of spinal motor neurons. Recently, mutations in the exosome component 3 gene (EXOSC3) have been identified in approximately half of the patients with PCH subtype 1. Methods We selected a cohort of 99 PCH patients (90 families) tested negative for mutations in the TSEN genes, RARS2, VRK1 and CASK. Patients in this cohort were referred with a tentative diagnose PCH type 1, 2, 4, 7 or unclassified PCH. Genetic analysis of the EXOSC3 gene was performed using Sanger sequencing. Clinical data, MR images and autopsy reports of patients positive for EXOSC3 mutations were analyzed. Results EXOSC3 mutations were found in twelve families with PCH subtype 1, and were not found in patients with other PCH subtypes. Identified mutations included a large deletion, nonsense and missense mutations. Examination of clinical data reveals a prolonged disease course in patients with a homozygous p.D132A mutation. MRI shows variable pontine hypoplasia in EXOSC3 mediated PCH, where the pons is largely preserved in patients with a homozygous p.D132A mutation, but attenuated in patients with other mutations. Additionally, bilateral cerebellar cysts were found in patients compound heterozygous for a p.D132A mutation and a nonsense allele. Conclusions EXOSC3 mediated PCH shows clear genotype-phenotype correlations. A homozygous p.D132A mutation leads to PCH with possible survival into early puberty, and preservation of the pons. Compound heterozygosity for a p.D132A mutation and a nonsense or p.Y109N allele, a homozygous p.G31A mutation or a p.G135E mutation causes a more rapidly

  16. Calreticulin mutation burden--is it a stable clone in patients with essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis?

    PubMed

    Shuly, Yulia; Nagar, Meital; Ben-Asaf, Lior; Kneller, Abraham; Steinberg, David M; Amariglio, Ninette; Salomon, Ophira

    2015-12-01

    Calreticulin mutation represents the second most frequent mutation after JAK2 V617F in myeloproliferative disorder and is considered to be a driving mutation. Herein the mutation burden was evaluated in patients with essential thrombocythemia or myelofibrosis and found to increase by 5.7% over time unrelated to the time elapsed from the initial to the final positive test. The longer the course of the disease when first tested (range 0-30 years, mean 7.9 years) the lower mutation burden was observed. The mutated clone was larger in type II in comparison with type I mutation when first tested but the difference in mutation burden from the final to the first positive test was significantly higher in those with type I. Similarly, the difference in mutation burden was higher in patients with essential thrombocythemia reaching almost 8% in comparison to 1.3% in post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis. Thus a repeat calreticulin quantitative test is not warranted.

  17. Splice, insertion-deletion and nonsense mutations that perturb the phenylalanine hydroxylase transcript cause phenylketonuria in India.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Kiran, Manjari; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu A; Devi, Radha Rama; Ranganath, Prajnya; Dalal, Ashwin; Bashyam, Leena; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Muranjan, Mamta; Puri, Ratna D; Verma, Ishwar C; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Kadandale, Jayarama S

    2014-03-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder caused by mutational inactivation of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. Missense mutations are the most common PAH mutation type detected in PKU patients worldwide. We performed PAH mutation analysis in 27 suspected Indian PKU families (including 7 from our previous study) followed by structure and function analysis of specific missense and splice/insertion-deletion/nonsense mutations, respectively. Of the 27 families, disease-causing mutations were detected in 25. A total of 20 different mutations were identified of which 7 "unique" mutations accounted for 13 of 25 mutation positive families. The unique mutations detected exclusively in Indian PKU patients included three recurrent mutations detected in three families each. The 20 mutations included only 5 missense mutations in addition to 5 splice, 4 each nonsense and insertion-deletion mutations, a silent variant in coding region and a 3'UTR mutation. One deletion and two nonsense mutations were characterized to confirm significant reduction in mutant transcript levels possibly through activation of nonsense mediated decay. All missense mutations affected conserved amino acid residues and sequence and structure analysis suggested significant perturbations in the enzyme activity of respective mutant proteins. This is probably the first report of identification of a significantly low proportion of missense PAH mutations from PKU families and together with the presence of a high proportion of splice, insertion-deletion, and nonsense mutations, points to a unique PAH mutation profile in Indian PKU patients.

  18. Mutational status of nevus associated-melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Shitara, D.; Tell-Martí, G.; Badenas, C.; Enokihara, M.M.S.S.; Alós, L.; Larque, A.B.; Michalany, Nilceo; Puig-Butille, J.; Carrera, C.; Malvehy, J.; Puig, S.; Bagatin, E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Melanoma origin has always been a debated subject, as well as the role of adjacent melanocytic nevi. Epidemiological and histopathological studies point to melanomas arising either de novo or from a nevus. Methods Sixty-one melanomas found in association with a preexisting nevus were microdissected, after careful selection of cell subpopulations and submitted to Sanger sequencing of the BRAF, NRAS, C-KIT, PPP6C, STK19 and RAC1 genes. Each gene was evaluated twice in all samples by sequencing or by sequencing and another confirmation method, allele-specific fluorescent polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and capillary electrophoresis detection, or by SNaPshot Analysis. Only mutations confirmed via two different molecular methods or twice by sequencing were considered positive. Results The majority of cases presented concordance of mutational status between melanoma and the associated nevus for all 6 genes (40/60; 66.7%). Nine cases presented concomitant BRAF and NRAS mutations, including one case, in which both the melanoma and the adjacent nevus harbored V600E and Q61K double mutations. In two cases, both melanoma and associated nevus, located on acral sites were BRAF mutated, including an acral lentiginous melanoma. Conclusions This is the largest nevus-associated melanoma series molecularly evaluated to our knowledge. The majority of melanomas and adjacent nevi in our sample share the same mutational profile, corroborating the theory that the adjacent nevus and melanoma are clonally related and that melanoma originated within a nevus. PMID:25857817

  19. RELN Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Dawn B.; Howell, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH), accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis. PMID:27064498

  20. GJB2 gene mutations in childhood deafness.

    PubMed

    Angeli, S; Utrera, R; Dib, S; Chiossone, E; Naranjo, C; Henríquez, O; Porta, M

    2000-03-01

    The frequency of childhood deafness is estimated at 1:1,000 and at least half of these cases are genetic. Recently, mutations in the GJB2 gene have been found in a great number of familial and sporadic cases of congenital deafness in Caucasians. The most common mutation (70%) is the frameshift mutation of a single guanine in position 35 (35delG). More than 20 mutations in the GJB2 gene are associated with DFNB1, a prevalent type of autosomal recessive non-syndromic neurosensory deafness. Last year we initiated a systematic screening programme to evaluate the causes of deafness in the population of prelingually deaf children who are referred to our cochlear implant programme. All of the deaf children and their parents undergo a comprehensive medical review, directed to identify causes of acquired deafness and manifestations of syndromic hearing impairment. DNA is extracted from the blood of all of the children. The technique AS-PCR (allele-specific polymerase chain reaction) is used for the identification of the mutation 35delG. Screening for other GJB2 gene mutations is carried out by single-strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCP). Our results on the identification of DFNB1 will be presented, as well as a discussion on the implications of an aetiological diagnosis in cochlear implantation.

  1. Highly prevalent TERT promoter mutations in aggressive thyroid cancers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Bishop, Justin; Shan, Yuan; Pai, Sara; Liu, Dingxie; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Sun, Hui; El-Naggar, Adel K; Xing, Mingzhao

    2013-08-01

    Mutations 1 295 228 C>T and 1 295 250 C>T (termed C228T and C250T respectively), corresponding to -124 C>T and -146 C>T from the translation start site in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene, have recently been reported in human cancers, but not in thyroid cancers yet. We explored these mutations in thyroid cancers by genomic sequencing of a large number of primary tumor samples. We found the C228T mutation in 0 of 85 (0.0%) benign thyroid tumors, 30 of 257 (11.7%) papillary thyroid cancers (PTC), 9 of 79 (11.4%) follicular thyroid cancers (FTC), 3 of 8 (37.5%) poorly differentiated thyroid cancers (PDTC), 23 of 54 (42.6%) anaplastic thyroid cancers (ATC), and 8 of 12 (66.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. The C250T mutation was uncommon, but mutually exclusive with the C228T mutation, and the two mutations were collectively found in 11 of 79 (13.9%) FTC, 25 of 54 (46.3%) ATC, and 11 of 12 (91.7%) thyroid cancer cell lines. Among PTC variants, the C228T mutation was found in 4 of 13 (30.8%) tall-cell PTC (TCPTC), 23 of 187 (12.3%) conventional PTC, and 2 of 56 (3.6%) follicular variant PTC samples. No TERT mutation was found in 16 medullary thyroid cancer samples. The C228T mutation was associated with the BRAF V600E mutation in PTC, being present in 19 of 104 (18.3%) BRAF mutation-positive PTC vs 11 of 153 (7.2%) the BRAF mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). Conversely, BRAF mutation was found in 19 of 30 (63.3%) C228T mutation-positive PTC vs 85 of 227 (37.4%) C228T mutation-negative PTC samples (P=0.0094). We thus for the first time, to our knowledge, demonstrate TERT promoter mutations in thyroid cancers, that are particularly prevalent in the aggressive thyroid cancers TCPTC, PDTC, ATC and BRAF mutation-positive PTC, revealing a novel genetic background for thyroid cancers.

  2. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  3. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  4. MoKCa database—mutations of kinases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Christopher J.; Gao, Qiong; Mitsopoulous, Costas; Zvelebil, Marketa; Pearl, Laurence H.; Pearl, Frances M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the protein kinase family are amongst the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer, and both mutated and activated protein kinases have proved to be tractable targets for the development of new anticancer therapies The MoKCa database (Mutations of Kinases in Cancer, http://strubiol.icr.ac.uk/extra/mokca) has been developed to structurally and functionally annotate, and where possible predict, the phenotypic consequences of mutations in protein kinases implicated in cancer. Somatic mutation data from tumours and tumour cell lines have been mapped onto the crystal structures of the affected protein domains. Positions of the mutated amino-acids are highlighted on a sequence-based domain pictogram, as well as a 3D-image of the protein structure, and in a molecular graphics package, integrated for interactive viewing. The data associated with each mutation is presented in the Web interface, along with expert annotation of the detailed molecular functional implications of the mutation. Proteins are linked to functional annotation resources and are annotated with structural and functional features such as domains and phosphorylation sites. MoKCa aims to provide assessments available from multiple sources and algorithms for each potential cancer-associated mutation, and present these together in a consistent and coherent fashion to facilitate authoritative annotation by cancer biologists and structural biologists, directly involved in the generation and analysis of new mutational data. PMID:18986996

  5. EGFR exon 20 insertion mutation in Japanese lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hidefumi; Endo, Katsuhiko; Takada, Minoru; Kawahara, Masaaki; Kitahara, Naoto; Tanaka, Hisaichi; Okumura, Meinoshin; Matsumura, Akihide; Iuchi, Keiji; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Kawano, Osamu; Yukiue, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Tomoki; Yano, Motoki; Fujii, Yoshitaka

    2007-12-01

    Mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene have been reported in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in female, never smoker patients with adenocarcinoma. Some common somatic mutations in EGFR, including deletion mutations in exon 19 and leucine to arginine substitution at amino acid position 858 (L858R) in exon 21, have been examined for their ability to predict sensitivity to gefitinib or erlotinib. On the other hand, previous report has shown that the insertion mutation at exon 20 is related to gefitinib resistance. We investigated the exon 20 EGFR mutation statuses in 322 surgically treated non-small cell lung cancer cases. Two hundred and five adenocarcinoma cases were included. The presence or absence of EGFR mutations of kinase domains was analyzed by direct sequences. EGFR insertion mutations at exon 20 were found from 7 of 322 (2.17%) lung cancer patients. We also detected the 18 deletion type mutations in exon 19, and 25 L858R type mutations in exon 21. There was a tendency towards higher exon 20 insertion ratio in never smoker (never smoker 4.4% versus smoker 1.3%, p=0.0996) and female (female 4.5% versus male 1.3%, p=0.0917). Two exon 20 insertion cases were treated with gefitinib and failed to response. EGFR insertion mutation in exon 20 could not be ignored from Japanese lung cancers.

  6. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ... a mother. As you become more used to breastfeeding your baby, you can try different positions or ...

  7. Positive Proof.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoffrey

    1988-01-01

    Presents experiments which show that in electrostatics there are logical reasons for describing charged materials as positive or negative. Indicates that static and current electricity are not separate areas of physics. Diagrams of experiments and circuits are included. (RT)

  8. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  9. Recurrent occurrences of CDKL5 mutations in patients with epileptic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Shimojima, Keiko; Kimura, Nobusuke; Mogami, Yukiko; Usui, Daisuke; Takayama, Rumiko; Ikeda, Hiroko; Imai, Katsumi

    2015-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) is recognized as one of the genes responsible for epileptic encephalopathy. We identified CDKL5 mutations in five Japanese patients (one male and four female) with epileptic encephalopathy. Although all mutations were of de novo origin, they were located in the same positions as previously reported pathogenic mutations. These recurrent occurrences of de novo mutations in the same loci may indicate hot spots of nucleotide alteration. PMID:27081548

  10. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  11. HRAS mutation analysis in Costello syndrome: genotype and phenotype correlation.

    PubMed

    Gripp, Karen W; Lin, Angela E; Stabley, Deborah L; Nicholson, Linda; Scott, Charles I; Doyle, Daniel; Aoki, Yoko; Matsubara, Yoichi; Zackai, Elaine H; Lapunzina, Pablo; Gonzalez-Meneses, Antonio; Holbrook, Jennifer; Agresta, Cynthia A; Gonzalez, Iris L; Sol-Church, Katia

    2006-01-01

    Costello syndrome is a rare condition comprising mental retardation, distinctive facial appearance, cardiovascular abnormalities (typically pulmonic stenosis, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and/or atrial tachycardia), tumor predisposition, and skin and musculoskeletal abnormalities. Recently mutations in HRAS were identified in 12 Japanese and Italian patients with clinical information available on 7 of the Japanese patients. To expand the molecular delineation of Costello syndrome, we performed mutation analysis in 34 North American and 6 European (total 40) patients with Costello syndrome, and detected missense mutations in HRAS in 33 (82.5%) patients. All mutations affected either codon 12 or 13 of the protein product, with G12S occurring in 30 (90.9%) patients of the mutation-positive cases. In two patients, we found a mutation resulting in an alanine substitution in position 12 (G12A), and in one patient, we detected a novel mutation (G13C). Five different HRAS mutations have now been reported in Costello syndrome, however genotype-phenotype correlation remains incomplete.

  12. Multi-nucleotide de novo Mutations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sulem, Patrick; Helgason, Agnar; Helgason, Hannes; Kristjansson, Helgi; Jonasdottir, Aslaug; Jonasdottir, Adalbjorg; Magnusson, Olafur Th.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Masson, Gisli; Kong, Augustine; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Stefansson, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Mutation of the DNA molecule is one of the most fundamental processes in biology. In this study, we use 283 parent-offspring trios to estimate the rate of mutation for both single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and short length variants (indels) in humans and examine the mutation process. We found 17812 SNVs, corresponding to a mutation rate of 1.29 × 10−8 per position per generation (PPPG) and 1282 indels corresponding to a rate of 9.29 × 10−10 PPPG. We estimate that around 3% of human de novo SNVs are part of a multi-nucleotide mutation (MNM), with 558 (3.1%) of mutations positioned less than 20kb from another mutation in the same individual (median distance of 525bp). The rate of de novo mutations is greater in late replicating regions (p = 8.29 × 10−19) and nearer recombination events (p = 0.0038) than elsewhere in the genome. PMID:27846220

  13. Backtracking RAS mutations in high hyperdiploid childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wiemels, Joseph L; Kang, Michelle; Chang, Jeffrey S; Zheng, Lily; Kouyoumji, Carina; Zhang, Luoping; Smith, Martyn T; Scelo, Ghislaine; Metayer, Catherine; Buffler, Patricia; Wiencke, John K

    2010-10-15

    High hyperdiploidy is the single largest subtype of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is defined by the presence of 51-68 chromosomes in a karyotype. The 5 or more extra chromosomes characterizing this subtype are known to occur in a single mitotic event, prenatally. We screened for RAS mutations among 517 acute childhood leukemias (including 437 lymphocytic, of which 393 were B-cell subtypes) and found mutations in 30% of high hyperdiploids compared to only 10% of leukemias of other subtypes (P<0.0001). We assessed whether KRAS mutations occurred before birth using a PCR-restriction enzyme-mediated Taqman quantitative PCR reaction, and found no evidence for prenatal KRAS mutations in 14 patients tested. While RAS mutations were previously associated with prior chemical exposures in childhood and adult leukemias, in this study RAS-mutated cases were not significantly associated with parental smoking when compared to study controls. IGH rearrangements were backtracked in three RAS-positive patients (which were negative for KRAS mutation at birth) and found to be evident before birth, confirming a prenatal origin for the leukemia clone. We posit a natural history for hyperdiploid leukemia in which prenatal mitotic catastrophe is followed by a postnatal RAS mutation to produce the leukemic cell phenotype.

  14. Positive psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Martin E P; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C

    2006-11-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported them to be "life-changing." Delivered on the Web, positive psychology exercises relieved depressive symptoms for at least 6 months compared with placebo interventions, the effects of which lasted less than a week. In severe depression, the effects of these Web exercises were particularly striking. This address reports two preliminary studies: In the first, PPT delivered to groups significantly decreased levels of mild-to-moderate depression through 1-year follow-up. In the second, PPT delivered to individuals produced higher remission rates than did treatment as usual and treatment as usual plus medication among outpatients with major depressive disorder. Together, these studies suggest that treatments for depression may usefully be supplemented by exercises that explicitly increase positive emotion, engagement, and meaning. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Positive Psychologists on Positive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001). In their article, the authors offered compelling evidence that constructs such as forgiveness and optimism can have both beneficial and adverse consequences, depending on the context. Their caution about labeling particular psychological processes as "positive" is…

  16. Gene Positioning

    PubMed Central

    Ferrai, Carmelo; de Castro, Inês Jesus; Lavitas, Liron; Chotalia, Mita; Pombo, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is an intricate multistep process, regulated within the cell nucleus through the activation or repression of RNA synthesis, processing, cytoplasmic export, and translation into protein. The major regulators of gene expression are chromatin remodeling and transcription machineries that are locally recruited to genes. However, enzymatic activities that act on genes are not ubiquitously distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, but limited to specific and spatially defined foci that promote preferred higher-order chromatin arrangements. The positioning of genes within the nuclear landscape relative to specific functional landmarks plays an important role in gene regulation and disease. PMID:20484389

  17. POSITIONING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wall, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.

    1959-09-15

    A positioner is described for a vertical reactor-control rod. The positioner comprises four grooved friction rotatable members that engage the control rod on all sides and shift it longitudinally. The four friction members are drivingly interconnected for conjoint rotation and comprise two pairs of coaxial members. The members of each pair are urged toward one another by hydraulic or pneumatic pressure and thus grip the control rod so as to hold it in any position or adjust it. Release of the by-draulic or pneumatic pressure permits springs between the friction members of each pair to force them apart, whereby the control rod moves quickly by gravity into the reactor.

  18. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  19. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  20. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, M.A.; Alter, P.

    1983-07-07

    An apparatus is provided for precisely adjusting the position of an article relative to a beam emerging from a neutron source disposed in a housing. The apparatus includes a support pivotably mounted on a movable base plate and freely suspended therefrom. The support is gravity biased toward the housing and carries an article holder movable in a first direction longitudinally of the axis of said beam and normally urged into engagement against said housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the suspended holder in two mutually perpendicular directions, respectively, normal to the axis of the beam.

  1. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  2. Better position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    The U.S. Global Positioning System (GPS) will soon become more accurate for civilian users, improving the quality of navigation and of some types of scientific research. The Clinton Administration announced March 29 that within a decade, the federal government will stop degrading the civilian GPS signal and will allow nonmilitary users access to the same clear signals that U.S. troops rely upon.Designed as dual-use system with primary use by the American military, the GPS is a constellation of 24 satellites that allows soldiers to determine their exact positions (in latitude and longitude) anywhere in the world. While the GPS is operated by the Department of Defense (DoD), scientists and adventurous civilians have been able to purchase small, portable GPS devices. However, the U.S. military has kept to itself a capability known as “selective availability” that provides a much more precise signal than is available to the public. According to the White House, that selected signal will be available to all users within 4-10 years.

  3. Synonymous mutations frequently act as driver mutations in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Supek, Fran; Miñana, Belén; Valcárcel, Juan; Gabaldón, Toni; Lehner, Ben

    2014-03-13

    Synonymous mutations change the sequence of a gene without directly altering the sequence of the encoded protein. Here, we present evidence that these "silent" mutations frequently contribute to human cancer. Selection on synonymous mutations in oncogenes is cancer-type specific, and although the functional consequences of cancer-associated synonymous mutations may be diverse, they recurrently alter exonic motifs that regulate splicing and are associated with changes in oncogene splicing in tumors. The p53 tumor suppressor (TP53) also has recurrent synonymous mutations, but, in contrast to those in oncogenes, these are adjacent to splice sites and inactivate them. We estimate that between one in two and one in five silent mutations in oncogenes have been selected, equating to ~6%- 8% of all selected single-nucleotide changes in these genes. In addition, our analyses suggest that dosage-sensitive oncogenes have selected mutations in their 3' UTRs.

  4. BRCA1/2 germline mutations and their clinical importance in Turkish breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cecener, Gulsah; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Erturk, Elif; Ak, Secil; Gokgoz, Sehsuvar; Tasdelen, Ismet; Tezcan, Gulcin; Demirdogen, Elif; Bayram, Nuran; Avci, Nilufer; Evrensel, Turkkan

    2014-10-01

    BRCA1/BRCA2 genes were screened in 117 patients with breast cancer by sequencing. Fourteen percent of patients tested positive for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Four frame shift mutations, four pathogenic missense mutations, and 25 different sequence variations were detected. BRCA mutation positivity was significantly associated with Ki67 (p = .001). BRCA protein expressions were decreased in the patients harboring important mutations and polymorphisms (BRCA1;P508 stop, V1740G, Q1182R, Q1756P and BRCA2;V2466A) related with disease. Our findings contribute significantly to the types of germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and their biological effects in Turkish women. These data could help guide the management of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-carrying patients when considering breast-conserving therapy.

  5. Characterization of breast cancers with PI3K mutations in an academic practice setting using SNaPshot profiling.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Vandana G; Cooper Lloyd, M; Ballinger, Tarah; Sanders, Melinda E; Du, Liping; Lai, Darson; Su, Zengliu; Mayer, Ingrid; Levy, Mia; LaFrance, Delecia R; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Shyr, Yu; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Pao, William; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the PIK3CA gene are common in breast cancer and represent a clinically useful therapeutic target. Several larger, population-based studies have shown a positive prognostic significance associated with these mutations. This study aims to further identify characteristics of patients harboring PIK3CA mutations while evaluating the clinical impact of genomic testing for these mutations. Tumors from 312 patients at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center were analyzed for PIK3CA mutations using a multiplex screening assay (SNaPshot). Mutation rates, receptor status, histopathologic characteristics, and time to recurrence were assessed. The number of patients participating in clinical trials, specifically trials relating to the PIK3CA mutation, was examined. Statistically significant differences between wild-type and mutated tumors were determined using the Wilcoxon, Pearson, and Fischer exact tests. The PIK3CA mutation was found in 25 % of tumors tested. Patients with PIK3CA mutations were significantly more likely to express hormone receptors, be of lower combined histological grade, and have a reduced time to recurrence. Patients found to have a PIK3CA mutation were significantly more likely to enter a PIK3CA-specific clinical trial. In addition to confirming previously established positive prognostic characteristics of tumors harboring PIK3CA mutations, this study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of mutation profiling in a clinical setting. PIK3CA mutation testing impacted treatment and resulted in more patients entering mutation-specific clinical trials.

  6. Comprehensive BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational profile in Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Janavičius, Ramūnas; Rudaitis, Vilius; Mickys, Ugnius; Elsakov, Pavel; Griškevičius, Laimonas

    2014-05-01

    There is limited knowledge about the BRCA1/2 mutational profile in Lithuania. We aimed to define the full BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutational spectrum and the clinically relevant prevalence of these gene mutations in Lithuania. A data set of 753 unrelated probands, recruited through a clinical setting, was used and consisted of 380 female breast cancer cases, 213 epithelial ovarian cancer cases, 20 breast and ovarian cancer cases, and 140 probands with positive family history of breast or ovarian cancer. A comprehensive mutation analysis of the BRCA1/2 genes by high resolution melting analysis coupled with Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis was performed. Genetic analysis revealed 32 different pathogenic germline BRCA1/2 mutations: 20 in the BRCA1 gene and 12 in the BRCA2 gene, including four different large genomic rearrangements in the BRCA1 gene. In all, 10 novel BRCA1/2 mutations were found. Nine different recurrent BRCA1 mutations and two recurrent BRCA2 mutations were identified, which comprised 90.4% of all BRCA1/2 mutations. BRCA1 exon 1-3 deletion and BRCA2 c.658_659del are reported for the first time as recurrent mutations, pointing to a possible Baltic founder effect. Approximately 7% of breast cancer and 22% of ovarian cancer patients without family history and an estimated 0.5-0.6% of all Lithuanian women were found to be carriers of mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.

  7. Homeochaos: dynamics stability of a symbiotic network with population dynamics and evolving mutation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko; Ikegami, Takashi

    1992-06-01

    Evolution of mutation rates is studied, in a population model with mutation of species coded by bit sequences and mutation rates. Even without interaction among species, the mutation rate is initially enhanced to search for fitted species and then is lowered towards zero. This enhancement opens a possibility of automatic simulated annealing. With the interaction among species (hosts versus parasites), high mutation rates are sustained. The rates go up with the interaction strength abruptly if the fitness landscape is rugged. A large cluster of species, connected by mutation, is formed by a sustained high mutation rate. With the formation of this symbiotic network resolved is the paradox of mutation rates; paradox on the stability of a rule to change itself. Population dynamics of each species shows high-dimensional chaos with small positive Lyapunov exponents. Stability of our symbiotic network is dynamically sustained through this weak high-dimensional chaos, termed “homeochaos”.

  8. Exome Sequencing Identifies Potentially Druggable Mutations in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Yock Ping; Tan, Lu Ping; Chai, San Jiun; Abdul Aziz, Norazlin; Choo, Siew Woh; Lim, Paul Vey Hong; Pathmanathan, Rajadurai; Mohd Kornain, Noor Kaslina; Lum, Chee Lun; Pua, Kin Choo; Yap, Yoke Yeow; Tan, Tee Yong; Teo, Soo Hwang; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we first performed whole exome sequencing of DNA from 10 untreated and clinically annotated fresh frozen nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies and matched bloods to identify somatically mutated genes that may be amenable to targeted therapeutic strategies. We identified a total of 323 mutations which were either non-synonymous (n = 238) or synonymous (n = 85). Furthermore, our analysis revealed genes in key cancer pathways (DNA repair, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, immune response, lipid signaling) were mutated, of which those in the lipid-signaling pathway were the most enriched. We next extended our analysis on a prioritized sub-set of 37 mutated genes plus top 5 mutated cancer genes listed in COSMIC using a custom designed HaloPlex target enrichment panel with an additional 88 NPC samples. Our analysis identified 160 additional non-synonymous mutations in 37/42 genes in 66/88 samples. Of these, 99/160 mutations within potentially druggable pathways were further selected for validation. Sanger sequencing revealed that 77/99 variants were true positives, giving an accuracy of 78%. Taken together, our study indicated that ~72% (n = 71/98) of NPC samples harbored mutations in one of the four cancer pathways (EGFR-PI3K-Akt-mTOR, NOTCH, NF-κB, DNA repair) which may be potentially useful as predictive biomarkers of response to matched targeted therapies. PMID:28256603

  9. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  10. Mutator and MULE Transposons.

    PubMed

    Lisch, Damon

    2015-04-01

    The Mutator system of transposable elements (TEs) is a highly mutagenic family of transposons in maize. Because they transpose at high rates and target genic regions, these transposons can rapidly generate large numbers of new mutants, which has made the Mutator system a favored tool for both forward and reverse mutagenesis in maize. Low copy number versions of this system have also proved to be excellent models for understanding the regulation and behavior of Class II transposons in plants. Notably, the availability of a naturally occurring locus that can heritably silence autonomous Mutator elements has provided insights into the means by which otherwise active transposons are recognized and silenced. This chapter will provide a review of the biology, regulation, evolution and uses of this remarkable transposon system, with an emphasis on recent developments in our understanding of the ways in which this TE system is recognized and epigenetically silenced as well as recent evidence that Mu-like elements (MULEs) have had a significant impact on the evolution of plant genomes.

  11. Septin Mutations in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Angelis, Dimitrios; Spiliotis, Elias T.

    2016-01-01

    Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4, and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers. PMID:27882315

  12. Estimation of spontaneous mutation rates.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Loki; Berry, Charles C; Gasche, Christoph

    2003-09-01

    Spontaneous or randomly occurring mutations play a key role in cancer progression. Estimation of the mutation rate of cancer cells can provide useful information about the disease. To ascertain these mutation rates, we need mathematical models that describe the distribution of mutant cells. In this investigation, we develop a discrete time stochastic model for a mutational birth process. We assume that mutations occur concurrently with mitosis so that when a nonmutant parent cell splits into two progeny, one of these daughter cells could carry a mutation. We propose an estimator for the mutation rate and investigate its statistical properties via theory and simulations. A salient feature of this estimator is the ease with which it can be computed. The methods developed herein are applied to a human colorectal cancer cell line and compared to existing continuous time models.

  13. Novel Insight into Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Mambo, Elizabeth; Choudhary, Ashish; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Hadd, Andrew; Latham, Gary; Danilova, Ludmila V.; Bishop, Justin; Li, Ryan J.; Westra, William H.; Hennessey, Patrick; Koch, Wayne M.; Ochs, Michael F.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sun, Wenyue

    2014-01-01

    Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46%) studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection. PMID:24667986

  14. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  15. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  16. Asparaginase II of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: selection of four mutations that cause derepressed enzyme synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kamerud, J Q; Roon, R J

    1986-01-01

    A positive selection method was used to isolate four Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutations that cause derepressed synthesis of asparaginase II. The four mutations (and1, and2, and3, and4) were neither closely linked to each other nor linked to previously characterized mutations (asp3, asp6) which cause the complete loss of asparaginase II activity. One of the new mutations (and4) was shown to be allelic to gdh-CR, a pleiotropic mutation which causes derepressed synthesis of a number of enzymes of nitrogen catabolism.

  17. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Birgit G

    2014-12-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR PCR kit, Qiagen, UK; reference method). For immunohistochemistry, antibodies against exon19 deletions (clone 6B6), exon21 mutations (clone 43B2) from Cell Signaling Technology (Boston, USA) and EGFR variantIII (clone 218C9) from Dako (Copenhagen, DK) were applied. Protein expression was evaluated, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94.4-99.4%). Sensitivity of exon19 antibody was 63.2% (95% confidence interval=38.4-83.7%) and of exon21 antibody was 80.0% (95% confidence interval=44.4-97.5%). Seven exon19 and four exon21 mutations were false negatives (immunohistochemistry negative, RT-PCR positive). Two exon19 and three exon21 mutations were false positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC

  18. MECP2 mutations in males

    PubMed Central

    Villard, Laurent

    2007-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS; MIM 312750) is a severe neurological disorder affecting exclusively females. Its prevalence is about 1 in 10 000 female births, and it is a prominent cause of profound mental handicap in women. RS is caused by mutations in the X‐linked methyl CpG‐binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene. These mutations were initially thought to be lethal in males. However, MECP2 mutations are now frequently identified in mentally retarded male patients. The frequency of disease‐causing MECP2 mutations in this population is between 1.3% and 1.7%. Surprisingly, MECP2 mutations in males are responsible for a wide spectrum of neurological disorders, ranging from mild mental retardation to severe neonatal encephalopathy. The aim of this review is to describe the nature of the MECP2 mutations identified in male patients to date and their associated phenotypes. PMID:17351020

  19. Mutation rate estimation for 15 autosomal STR loci in a large population from Mainland China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhuo; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Hua; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yuan; Sun, Li; Zhang, Hui

    2015-09-01

    STR, short tandem repeats, are well known as a type of powerful genetic marker and widely used in studying human population genetics. Compared with the conventional genetic markers, the mutation rate of STR is higher. Additionally, the mutations of STR loci do not lead to genetic inconsistencies between the genotypes of parents and children; therefore, the analysis of STR mutation is more suited to assess the population mutation. In this study, we focused on 15 autosomal STR loci. DNA samples from a total of 42,416 unrelated healthy individuals (19,037 trios) from the population of Mainland China collected between Jan 2012 and May 2014 were successfully investigated. In our study, the allele frequencies, paternal mutation rates, maternal mutation rates and average mutation rates were detected. Furthermore, we also investigated the relationship between paternal ages, maternal ages, area, the time of pregnancy and average mutation rate. We found that the paternal mutation rate was higher than the maternal mutation rate and the paternal, maternal, and average mutation rates had a positive correlation with paternal age, maternal age and the time of pregnancy respectively. Additionally, the average mutation rate of coastal areas was higher than that of inland areas.

  20. BRAF V600E and TERT Promoter Mutations in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jie; Ren, Xinyu; Teng, Lianghong; Duan, Huanli; Lin, Yansong; Li, Xiaoyi; Zhang, Bo; Liang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The BRAF V600E and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations have been reported in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). The aim of this retrospective cross-sectional study was to add further information regarding the prevalence of the BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in Chinese PTC and their clinicopathological associations. Methods We detected the BRAF V600E mutation and TERT promoter mutations in 455 Chinese PTC patients and analyzed the association of these mutations with several clinicopathological features. Results The BRAF V600E mutation was detected in 343 (75.4%) of 455 cases and was significantly associated with older age (p<0.001) and conventional subtype (p = 0.003). TERT promoter mutations were detected in 19 (4.4%) of 434 PTCs and were associated with older age (p<0.001), larger tumor size (p = 0.024), and advanced TNM stage(p<0.001). Of the 19 patients that were positive for TERT promoter mutations, 18 (94.7%) also harbored the BRAF V600E mutation. Conclusion We determined the prevalence and clinicopathological associations of BRAF V600E and TERT promoter mutations in Chinese PTC patients. TERT promoter mutations but not the BRAF V600E mutation were associated with more advanced TNM stage upon diagnosis. PMID:27064992

  1. Effects of point mutations on the thermostability of B. subtilis lipase: investigating nonadditivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bipin; Bulusu, Gopalakrishnan; Mitra, Abhijit

    2016-10-01

    Molecular level understanding of mutational effects on stability and activity of enzymes is challenging particularly when several point mutations are incorporated during the directed evolution experiments. In our earlier study, we have suggested the lack of consistency in the effect of point mutations incorporated during the initial generations of directed evolution experiments, towards conformational stabilization of B. subtilis lipase mutants of later generations. Here, we report that the cumulative point mutations incorporated in mutants 2M (with two point mutations) to 6M (with six point mutations) possibly do not retain their original stabilizing nature in the most thermostable 12M mutant (with 12 point mutations). We have carried out MD simulations using structures incorporating reversal of different sets of point mutations to assess their effect on the conformational stability and activity of 12M. Our analysis has revealed that reversal of certain point mutations in 12M had little effect on its conformational stability, suggesting that these mutations were probably inconsequential towards the thermostability of the 12M mutant. Interestingly these mutations involved evolutionarily conserved residues. On the other hand, some of the other point mutations incorporated in nonconserved regions, appeared to contribute significantly towards the conformational stability and/or activity of 12M. Based on the analysis of dynamics of in silico mutants generated using the consensus sequence, we identified experimentally verifiable residue positions to further increase the conformational stability and activity of the 12M mutant.

  2. BRAF Mutations in Canine Cancers.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Kennedy, Katherine; Shapiro, Susan G; Breen, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the BRAF gene lead to constitutive activation of the MAPK pathway. Although many human cancers carry the mutated BRAF gene, this mutation has not yet been characterized in canine cancers. As human and canine cancers share molecular abnormalities, we hypothesized that BRAF gene mutations also exist in canine cancers. To test this hypothesis, we sequenced the exon 15 of BRAF, mutation hot spot of the gene, in 667 canine primary tumors and 38 control tissues. Sequencing analysis revealed that a single nucleotide T to A transversion at nucleotide 1349 occurred in 64 primary tumors (9.6%), with particularly high frequency in prostatic carcinoma (20/25, 80%) and urothelial carcinoma (30/45, 67%). This mutation results in the amino acid substitution of glutamic acid for valine at codon 450 (V450E) of canine BRAF, corresponding to the most common BRAF mutation in human cancer, V600E. The evolutional conservation of the BRAF V600E mutation highlights the importance of MAPK pathway activation in neoplasia and may offer opportunity for molecular diagnostics and targeted therapeutics for dogs bearing BRAF-mutated cancers.

  3. Recurrent gene mutations in CLL.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Quesada, Víctor; Villamor, Neus; Puente, Xose S; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of whole genomes and exomes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has provided the first comprehensive view of somatic mutations in this disease. Subsequent studies have characterized the oncogenic pathways and clinical implications of a number of these mutations. The global number of somatic mutations per case is lower than those described in solid tumors but is in agreement with previous estimates of less than one mutation per megabase in hematological neoplasms. The number and pattern of somatic mutations differ in tumors with unmutated and mutated IGHV, extending at the genomic level the clinical differences observed in these two CLL subtypes. One of the striking conclusions of these studies has been the marked genetic heterogeneity of the disease, with a relatively large number of genes recurrently mutated at low frequency and only a few genes mutated in up to 10-15 % of the patients. The mutated genes tend to cluster in different pathways that include NOTCH1 signaling, RNA splicing and processing machinery, innate inflammatory response, Wnt signaling, and DNA damage and cell cycle control, among others. These results highlight the molecular heterogeneity of CLL and may provide new biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets for the diagnosis and management of the disease.

  4. A novel assay to detect calreticulin mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rosso, Valentina; Petiti, Jessica; Bracco, Enrico; Pedrola, Roberto; Carnuccio, Francesca; Signorino, Elisabetta; Carturan, Sonia; Calabrese, Chiara; Bot-Sartor, Giada; Ronconi, Michela; Serra, Anna; Saglio, Giuseppe; Frassoni, Francesco; Cilloni, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    The myeloproliferative neoplasms are chronic myeloid cancers divided in Philadelphia positive (Ph+), chronic myeloid leukemia, or negative: polycythemia vera (PV) essential thrombocythemia (ET), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Most Ph negative cases have an activating JAK2 or MPL mutation. Recently, somatic mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) were detected in 56–88% of JAK2/MPL-negative patients affected by ET or PMF. The most frequent mutations in CARL gene are type-1 and 2. Currently, CALR mutations are evaluated by sanger sequencing. The evaluation of CARL mutations increases the diagnostic accuracy in patients without other molecular markers and could represent a new therapeutic target for molecular drugs. We developed a novel detection assay in order to identify type-1 and 2 CALR mutations by PNA directed PCR clamping. Seventy-five patients affected by myeloproliferative neoplasms and seven controls were examined by direct DNA sequencing and by PNA directed PCR clamping. The assay resulted to be more sensitive, specific and cheaper than sanger sequencing and it could be applied even in laboratory not equipped for more sophisticated analysis. Interestingly, we report here a case carrying both type 1 and type2 mutations in CALR gene. PMID:28031530

  5. Germline TP53 mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms in children.

    PubMed

    Valva, Pamela; Becker, Pablo; Streitemberger, Patricia; Lombardi, García Mercedes; Rey, Guadalupe; Guzman, Carlos A; Preciado, María Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Mutations in the gene TP53, which codifies the tumor suppressor protein p53, are found in about 50% of tumors. These mutations can occur not only at somatic level, but also in germline. Pediatric cancer patients, mostly with additional family history of malignancy, should be considered as potential TP53 germline mutation carriers. Germline TP53 mutations and polymorphisms have been widely studied to determine their relation with different tumors' pathogenesis. Our aim was to analyze the occurrence frequency of germline TP53 mutations and polymorphisms and to relate these to tumor development in a pediatric series. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples from 26 children with solid tumors [PST] and 21 pediatric healthy donors [HD] were analyzed for germline mutations and polymorphisms in TP53 gene spanning from exon 5 to 8 including introns 5 and 7. These PCR amplified fragments were sequenced to determine variations. A heterozygous mutation at codon 245 was found in 1/26 PST and 0/21 HD. Comparative polymorphisms distribution, at position 14181 and 14201(intron 7), between HD and PST revealed a trend of association (p= 0.07) with cancer risk. HD group disclosed a similar polymorphism distribution as published data for Caucasian and Central/South American populations. This is the first study about TP53 variant frequency and distribution in healthy individuals and cancer patients in Argentina.

  6. Deleterious mutation accumulation in asexual Timema stick insects.

    PubMed

    Henry, Lee; Schwander, Tanja; Crespi, Bernard J

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is extremely widespread in spite of its presumed costs relative to asexual reproduction, indicating that it must provide significant advantages. One postulated benefit of sex and recombination is that they facilitate the purging of mildly deleterious mutations, which would accumulate in asexual lineages and contribute to their short evolutionary life span. To test this prediction, we estimated the accumulation rate of coding (nonsynonymous) mutations, which are expected to be deleterious, in parts of one mitochondrial (COI) and two nuclear (Actin and Hsp70) genes in six independently derived asexual lineages and related sexual species of Timema stick insects. We found signatures of increased coding mutation accumulation in all six asexual Timema and for each of the three analyzed genes, with 3.6- to 13.4-fold higher rates in the asexuals as compared with the sexuals. In addition, because coding mutations in the asexuals often resulted in considerable hydrophobicity changes at the concerned amino acid positions, coding mutations in the asexuals are likely associated with more strongly deleterious effects than in the sexuals. Our results demonstrate that deleterious mutation accumulation can differentially affect sexual and asexual lineages and support the idea that deleterious mutation accumulation plays an important role in limiting the long-term persistence of all-female lineages.

  7. Five mutations in the promoter region of the araBAD operon of Escherichia coli B/r.

    PubMed

    Miyada, C G; Sheppard, D E; Wilcox, G

    1983-11-01

    Five mutations that result in reduced expression of the araBAD operon were cloned onto the plasmid pBR322. The position of each mutation was determined by DNA sequence analysis. Three of the mutations were located in the RNA polymerase binding site of the araBAD promoter. The first, ara-1016, was a one-base-pair deletion at position -35; the second, ara-1036, was a transversion at position -13; the third, ara-1027, was a nine-base-pair deletion from +5 to +13. S1 nuclease mapping showed that mutations ara-1016 and ara-1036 greatly reduced transcription and that mutation ara-1027 had little, if any, effect on transcription. Two other mutations resulted from the transposition of the insertion element, IS1, downstream from the transcriptional start site of the operon. Molecular mechanisms for all of the mutations are discussed.

  8. Mutation in δ-Sg Gene in Familial Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Marzieh; Foo, Roger; Salehi, Ahmad Reza; Salehi, Rasoul; Samienasab, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Mutations in different genes including dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex caused familial dilated cardiomyopathy which is a genetically heterogeneous disease. The δ-SG gene contains nine exons spanning a 433-kb region of genomic DNA. It encodes a 35-kDa, singlepass, and type II transmembrane glycoprotein. Materials and Methods: In this study for the first time in Iran we screened 6 patients of a large family that they had positive family history of MI or sudden death by next generation sequencing method. Results: By employing NGS method we found missense mutation (p.R97Q) of δ-SG gene in 2 of 6 patients. Conclusions: The missense mutation (p.R97Q) in familial DCM patients is reported for the first time in Iranian patients with cardiac disease. Although this mutation is already known in other populations in Iran, it is not reported before.

  9. Association of CFTR gene mutation with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Nutan; Awasthi, Shally; Dixit, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Mutation on both the copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in cystic fibrosis (CF), which is a recessively transmitted genetic disorder. It is hypothesized that individuals heterozygous for CFTR gene mutation may develop obstructive pulmonary diseases like asthma. There is great heterogeneity in the phenotypic presentation and severity of CF lung disease. This could be due to genetic or environmental factors. Several modifier genes have been identified which may directly or indirectly interact with CFTR pathway and affect the severity of disease. This review article discusses the information related to the association of CFTR gene mutation with asthma. Association between CFTR gene mutation and asthma is still unclear. Report ranges from studies showing positive or protective association to those showing no association. Therefore, studies with sufficiently large sample size and detailed phenotype are required to define the potential contribution of CFTR in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:22664493

  10. Epilepsy in hemiplegic migraine: Genetic mutations and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Prontera, P; Sarchielli, P; Caproni, S; Bedetti, C; Cupini, L M; Calabresi, P; Costa, C

    2017-01-01

    Objective We performed a systematic review on the comorbidities of familial/sporadic hemiplegic migraine (F/SHM) with seizure/epilepsy in patients with CACNA1A, ATP1A2 or SCN1A mutations, to identify the genotypes associated and investigate for the presence of mutational hot spots. Methods We performed a search in MEDLINE and in the Human Gene Mutation and Leiden Open Variation Databases for mutations in the CACNA1A, ATP1A2 and SCN1A genes. After having examined the clinical characteristics of the patients, we selected those having HM and seizures, febrile seizures or epilepsy. For each gene, we determined both the frequency and the positions at protein levels of these mutations, as well as the penetrance of epilepsy within families. Results Concerning F/SHM-Epilepsy1 (F/SHME1) and F/SHME2 endophenotypes, we observed a prevalent involvement of the transmembrane domains, and a strong correlation in F/SHME1 when the positively charged amino acids were involved. The penetrance of epilepsy within the families was highest for patients carrying mutation in the CACNA1A gene (60%), and lower in those having SCN1A (33.3%) and ATP1A2 (30.9%) mutations. Conclusion Among the HM cases with seizure/epilepsy, we observed mutational hot spots in the transmembrane domains of CACNA1A and ATP1A2 proteins. These findings could lead to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms underlying migraine and epilepsy, therein guaranteeing the most appropriate therapeutic approach.

  11. Exposing synonymous mutations.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Ryan C; Simhadri, Vijaya L; Iandoli, Matthew; Sauna, Zuben E; Kimchi-Sarfaty, Chava

    2014-07-01

    Synonymous codon changes, which do not alter protein sequence, were previously thought to have no functional consequence. Although this concept has been overturned in recent years, there is no unique mechanism by which these changes exert biological effects. A large repertoire of both experimental and bioinformatic methods has been developed to understand the effects of synonymous variants. Results from this body of work have provided global insights into how biological systems exploit the degeneracy of the genetic code to control gene expression, protein folding efficiency, and the coordinated expression of functionally related gene families. Although it is now clear that synonymous variants are important in a variety of contexts, from human disease to the safety and efficacy of therapeutic proteins, there is no clear consensus on the approaches to identify and validate these changes. Here, we review the diverse methods to understand the effects of synonymous mutations.

  12. In Japanese patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma, TERT promoter mutation is associated with poor prognosis, in contrast to BRAF (V600E) mutation.

    PubMed

    Nasirden, Almira; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Fukumura, Yuki; Hara, Kieko; Akaike, Keisuke; Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Asahina, Miki; Yamashita, Atsushi; Tomomasa, Ran; Hayashi, Takuo; Arakawa, Atsushi; Yao, Takashi

    2016-12-01

    The prognostic value of BRAF (V600E) and TERT promoter mutation in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is controversial. We examined alterations in BRAF (V600E) and TERT promoter by PCR-direct sequencing in PTC of 144 Japanese patients. Alternative lengthening of telomeres was examined as another mechanism of telomere maintenance by immunohistochemical staining for ATRX and DAXX. Of the clinicopathological characteristics, regional lymph node metastasis, extra-thyroid extension, multifocality/intrathyroidal spread, and advanced stage (III/V) were associated with shorter disease-free survival rate (DFSR). TERT promoter mutation was found in eight patients (6 %), and this was significantly associated with total thyroidectomy, multifocality/intrathyroidal spread, lymph node metastasis and advanced stage. The BRAF (V600E) mutation was found in 53 patients (38.2 %) but was not associated with any clinicopathological factors. TERT mutations were not correlated with BRAF (V600E) mutation status. TERT mutation-positive tumors (TERT+) showed lower DFSR than BRAF (V600E) -mutation-positive tumors (BRAF (V600E) +), and TERT+/BRAF (V600E) + tumors showed lower DFSR than BRAF (V600E) + tumors. No cases showed loss of ATRX/DAXX expression by immunohistochemistry. TERT promoter mutations showed a lower prevalence in our series and appeared to be associated with aggressive behavior. In PTCs, telomerase activation by TERT promoter mutation might be more important than alternative lengthening of telomeres.

  13. Mutation screening of the RYR1 gene in malignant hyperthermia: Detection of a novel Tyr to ser mutation in a pedigree with associated centrl cores

    SciTech Connect

    Quane, K.A.; Keating, K.E.; Healy, J.M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) has been shown to be mutated in a small number of malignant hyperthermia (MH) predigrees. Missense mutations in this gene have also been identified in two families with central core disease (CCD), a rare myopathy closely associated with MH. In an effort to identify other RYR1 mutations responsible for MH and CCD, we used a SSCP approach to screen the RYR1 gene for mutations in a family exhibiting susceptibility to MH (MHS) where some of the MHS individuals display core regions in their muscle. Sequence analysis of a unique aberrant SSCP has allowed us to identify a point mutation cosegregating with MHS in the described family. The mutation changes a conserved tyrosine residue at position 522 to a serine residue. This mutation is positioned relatively close to five of the six MHS/CCD mutations known to date and provides further evidence that MHS/CCD mutations may cluster in the amino terminal region of the RYR1 protein.

  14. PTCH mutations: distribution and analyses.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Erika; Shimokawa, Takashi; Toftgård, Rune; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G

    2006-03-01

    Mutations in the PTCH (PTCH1) gene are the underlying cause of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), and are also found in many different sporadic tumors in which PTCH is thought to act as a tumor suppressor gene. To investigate the distribution pattern of these mutations in tumors and NBCCS, we analyzed 284 mutations and 48 SNPs located in the PTCH gene that were compiled from our PTCH mutation database. We found that the PTCH mutations were mainly clustered into the predicted two large extracellular loops and the large intracellular loop. The SNPs appeared to be clustered around the sterol sensing domain and the second half of the protein. The NBCCS cases and each class of tumor analyzed revealed a different distribution of the mutations in the various PTCH domains. Moreover, the types of mutations were also unique for the different groups. Finally, the PTCH gene harbors mutational hot spot residues and regions, including a slippage-sensitive sequence in the N-terminus.

  15. Diagnostic Value of RAS Mutations in Indeterminate Thyroid Nodules.

    PubMed

    Clinkscales, William; Ong, Adrian; Nguyen, Shaun; Harruff, Elizabeth Emily; Gillespie, Marion Boyd

    2017-03-01

    Objectives To determine the diagnostic value of HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS mutations in fine-needle aspiration biopsies of thyroid nodules that are nondiagnostic on cytology. Data Sources PubMed, Scopus, Embase, CINAHL. Review Methods Two authors independently searched the data sources. To be included, studies reported the RAS mutational status and postoperative histopathologic diagnosis of nodules that exhibited indeterminate cytology after fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Data were extracted to calculate sensitivity, specificity, and positive/negative predictive values of any HRAS, KRAS, or NRAS mutation. A meta-analysis was performed to generate pooled values for each parameter. Results A total of 7 studies with a combined 1025 patients met inclusion criteria. The pooled sensitivity of a RAS mutation for detecting cancer was 0.343 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.198-0.506), while the pooled specificity was 0.935 (95% CI, 0.882-0.973). The weighted averages for positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 78.0% and 64.0%, respectively, with 68.0% accuracy. The positive likelihood ratio was 4.235 (95% CI, 1.506-11.910), and the negative likelihood ratio was 0.775 (95% CI, 0.630-0.953). Conclusion Our data suggest that testing for any RAS mutation is unlikely to change the clinical management of thyroid nodules that have indeterminate cytology. While a RAS mutation may rule in malignancy, the sensitivity of testing is low enough to merit further mutational analysis, repeat fine-needle aspiration, or surgical excision, even in the presence of a negative test.

  16. ENAM Mutations with Incomplete Penetrance

    PubMed Central

    Seymen, F.; Lee, K.-E.; Koruyucu, M.; Gencay, K.; Bayram, M.; Tuna, E.B.; Lee, Z.H.; Kim, J.-W.

    2014-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a genetic disease affecting tooth enamel formation. AI can be an isolated entity or a phenotype of syndromes. To date, more than 10 genes have been associated with various forms of AI. We have identified 2 unrelated Turkish families with hypoplastic AI and performed mutational analysis. Whole-exome sequencing identified 2 novel heterozygous nonsense mutations in the ENAM gene (c.454G>T p.Glu152* in family 1, c.358C>T p.Gln120* in family 2) in the probands. Affected individuals were heterozygous for the mutation in each family. Segregation analysis within each family revealed individuals with incomplete penetrance or extremely mild enamel phenotype, in spite of having the same mutation with the other affected individuals. We believe that these findings will broaden our understanding of the clinical phenotype of AI caused by ENAM mutations. PMID:25143514

  17. Identification of cell-type-specific mutations in nodal T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, T B; Sakata-Yanagimoto, M; Asabe, Y; Matsubara, D; Kano, J; Yoshida, K; Shiraishi, Y; Chiba, K; Tanaka, H; Miyano, S; Izutsu, K; Nakamura, N; Takeuchi, K; Miyoshi, H; Ohshima, K; Minowa, T; Ogawa, S; Noguchi, M; Chiba, S

    2017-01-01

    Recent genetic analysis has identified frequent mutations in ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2), DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) and ras homolog family member A (RHOA) in nodal T-cell lymphomas, including angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified. We examined the distribution of mutations in these subtypes of mature T-/natural killer cell neoplasms to determine their clonal architecture. Targeted sequencing was performed for 71 genes in tumor-derived DNA of 87 cases. The mutations were then analyzed in a programmed death-1 (PD1)-positive population enriched with tumor cells and CD20-positive B cells purified by laser microdissection from 19 cases. TET2 and DNMT3A mutations were identified in both the PD1+ cells and the CD20+ cells in 15/16 and 4/7 cases, respectively. All the RHOA and IDH2 mutations were confined to the PD1+ cells, indicating that some, including RHOA and IDH2 mutations, being specific events in tumor cells. Notably, we found that all NOTCH1 mutations were detected only in the CD20+ cells. In conclusion, we identified both B- as well as T-cell-specific mutations, and mutations common to both T and B cells. These findings indicate the expansion of a clone after multistep and multilineal acquisition of gene mutations. PMID:28157189

  18. Somatic mutational analysis of MED12 exon 2 in uterine leiomyomas of Iranian women

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi, Shirin; Fatahi, Neda; Amini-Moghaddam, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are steroid-hormone dependent tumors of myometrial smooth muscle cells that affect numerous women throughout the world. Based on previous studies, we evaluated the mutations of MED12 gene which encodes a co-activator protein involved in transcription regulation of the vast majority of RNA polymerase II-dependent genes. Exon 2 of MED12 gene was genotyped by PCR-sequencing method. To determine the proportion of mutation-containing transcripts, RNA was extracted from the tissue samples and the corresponding amplified cDNA was sequenced. We observed 11 mutation positive lesions, 7 of them were located in codon 44. The c.131G>A was found to be the most common somatic mutation in this study. Our investigation also demonstrated two unreported mutations , one large deletion and one insertion. cDNA analyzing revealed that the mutated transcripts were predominantly expressed in almost all changes including the new insertion mutation c.122-123ins15. Our study provides further evidence that the MED12 somatic mutations occur in a heterozygous manner and are mostly missense mutations in codon 44. The results displayed 47.8% mutation positive lesions in Iranian patients confirming the diversity between the populations. PMID:26396919

  19. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  20. ERBB2 mutations associated with solid variant of high-grade invasive lobular breast carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Bidard, François-Clément; Vacher, Sophie; Schnitzler, Anne; Chemlali, Walid; Trémoulet, Laurence; Fuhrmann, Laetitia; Cottu, Paul; Rouzier, Roman; Bièche, Ivan; Vincent-Salomon, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ERBB2 and ERBB3 somatic gain-of-function mutations, which may be targeted by anti-ERBB2 therapies, were reported by high-throughput sequencing studies in 1% and 2% of invasive breast cancers respectively. Our study aims to determine ERBB2 and ERBB3 mutations frequencies in grade 3 and/or ERBB2-positive invasive lobular breast carcinomas (ILC). All the 529 ILC surgically-excised registered at Institut Curie in the years 2005 to 2008 were reviewed. Thirty-nine grade 3 ERBB2-negative ILC and 16 ERBB2-positive ILC were retrieved and subjected to Sanger sequencing of the ERBB2 and ERBB3 activation mutation hotspots (ERBB2: exons 8, 17, 19, 20, 21; ERBB3: exons 3, 6, 7, 8). Among the 39 grade 3 ERBB2-negative ILC, six tumors were found to have at least one detectable ERBB2 activating mutation (incidence rate: 15%, 95%CI [4%-27%]). No ERBB2 mutation was found among the 16 ERBB2-positive ILC. No ERBB3 mutation was found in any of the 55 ILC. ERBB2 mutations were statistically associated with solid ILC features (p=0.01). Survival analyses showed no significant prognostic impact of ERBB2 mutations. Our study demonstrates that high grade ERBB2-negative ILC display a high frequency of ERBB2 mutations, and should be subjected to systematic genetic screening. PMID:27602491

  1. Mutational landscape, clonal evolution patterns, and role of RAS mutations in relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koichi; Khiabanian, Hossein; da Silva-Almeida, Ana C.; Tzoneva, Gannie; Abate, Francesco; Ambesi-Impiombato, Alberto; Sanchez-Martin, Marta; Carpenter, Zachary; Penson, Alex; Perez-Garcia, Arianne; Eckert, Cornelia; Nicolas, Concepción; Balbin, Milagros; Sulis, Maria Luisa; Kato, Motohiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Paganin, Maddalena; Basso, Giuseppe; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Devidas, Meenakshi; Loh, Mignon L.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A.

    2016-01-01

    Although multiagent combination chemotherapy is curative in a significant fraction of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients, 20% of cases relapse and most die because of chemorefractory disease. Here we used whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing to analyze the mutational landscape at relapse in pediatric ALL cases. These analyses identified numerous relapse-associated mutated genes intertwined in chemotherapy resistance-related protein complexes. In this context, RAS-MAPK pathway-activating mutations in the neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS), kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), and protein tyrosine phosphatase, nonreceptor type 11 (PTPN11) genes were present in 24 of 55 (44%) cases in our series. Interestingly, some leukemias showed retention or emergence of RAS mutant clones at relapse, whereas in others RAS mutant clones present at diagnosis were replaced by RAS wild-type populations, supporting a role for both positive and negative selection evolutionary pressures in clonal evolution of RAS-mutant leukemia. Consistently, functional dissection of mouse and human wild-type and mutant RAS isogenic leukemia cells demonstrated induction of methotrexate resistance but also improved the response to vincristine in mutant RAS-expressing lymphoblasts. These results highlight the central role of chemotherapy-driven selection as a central mechanism of leukemia clonal evolution in relapsed ALL, and demonstrate a previously unrecognized dual role of RAS mutations as drivers of both sensitivity and resistance to chemotherapy. PMID:27655895

  2. A genotypic mutation system measuring mutations in restriction recognition sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Felley-Bosco, E; Pourzand, C; Zijlstra, J; Amstad, P; Cerutti, P

    1991-01-01

    The RFLP/PCR approach (restriction fragment length polymorphism/polymerase chain reaction) to genotypic mutation analysis described here measures mutations in restriction recognition sequences. Wild-type DNA is restricted before the resistant, mutated sequences are amplified by PCR and cloned. We tested the capacity of this experimental design to isolate a few copies of a mutated sequence of the human c-Ha-ras1 gene from a large excess of wild-type DNA. For this purpose we constructed a 272 bp fragment with 2 mutations in the PvuII recognition sequence 1727-1732 and studied the rescue by RFLP/PCR of a few copies of this 'PvuII mutant standard'. Following amplification with Taq-polymerase and cloning into lambda gt10, plaques containing wild-type sequence, PvuII mutant standard or Taq-polymerase induced bp changes were quantitated by hybridization with specific oligonucleotide probes. Our results indicate that 10 PvuII mutant standard copies can be rescued from 10(8) to 10(9) wild-type sequences. Taq polymerase errors originating from unrestricted, residual wild-type DNA were sequence dependent and consisted mostly of transversions originating at G.C bp. In contrast to a doubly mutated 'standard' the capacity to rescue single bp mutations by RFLP/PCR is limited by Taq-polymerase errors. Therefore, we assessed the capacity of our protocol to isolate a G to T transversion mutation at base pair 1698 of the MspI-site 1695-1698 of the c-Ha-ras1 gene from excess wild-type ras1 DNA. We found that 100 copies of the mutated ras1 fragment could be readily rescued from 10(8) copies of wild-type DNA. Images PMID:1676153

  3. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  4. Succinate Dehydrogenase Gene Mutations in Cardiac Paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, Victoria L.; Emaminia, Abbas; del Rivero, Jaydira; Lechan, Ronald M.; Magoon, Bindiya T.; Galia, Analyza; Fojo, Tito; Leung, Steve; Lorusso, Roberto; Jimenez, Camilo; Shulkin, Barry L.; Audibert, Jennifer L.; Adams, Karen T.; Rosing, Douglas R.; Vaidya, Anand; Dluhy, Robert G.; Horvath, Keith A.; Pacak, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are chromaffin cell tumors arising from neuroendocrine cells. At least one third of paragangliomas are related to germline mutations in one of 17 genes. While these tumors can occur throughout the body, cardiac paragangliomas are very rare, accounting for less than 0.3% of mediastinal tumors. The purpose of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of patients with cardiac paragangliomas, particularly focusing on their genetic backgrounds. A retrospective chart analysis of fifteen patients with cardiac paraganglioma was performed to determine clinical presentation, genetic background, diagnostic work-up, and outcomes. The average age at diagnosis was 41.9 years. Typical symptoms of paraganglioma (e.g., hypertension, sweating, palpitations, headache) were reported at initial presentation in 13 patients (86.7%); the remaining 2, as well as 4 symptomatic patients, initially presented with cardiac-specific symptoms (e.g., chest pain, dyspnea). Genetic testing was done in 13 cases (86.7%); 10 (76.9%) were positive for mutations in succinate dehydrogenase (SDHx) subunits B, C, or D. Thirteen cases (86.7%) underwent surgery to remove the paraganglioma with no intraoperative morbidity or mortality; one additional patient underwent surgical resection but experienced intraoperative complications after removal of the tumor due to comorbities and did not survive. SDHx mutations are known to be associated with mediastinal locations and malignant behavior of paragangliomas. In this report, we extend the locations of predominantly SDHx-related paragangliomas to cardiac tumors. In conclusion, cardiac paragangliomas are frequently associated with underlying SDHx germline mutations, suggesting a need for genetic testing of all patients with this rare tumor. PMID:25896150

  5. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  6. Fibrillin mutations in the Marfan syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Price, C.E.; Wang, M.; Wang, J.; Godfrey, M.

    1994-09-01

    The Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue manifested by variable and pleiotropic defect in the skeletal, ocular, and cardiovascular systems. We have recently begun to use intron-specific primers that have become available through the International Marfan Syndrome Consortium to screen for fibrillin mutations in MFS patients. Using the genomic PCR-based approach in addition to RT-PCR methodologies, we have identified several novel mutations. A single base insertion was identified in all affected individuals of one family. The insertion of an {open_quote}A{close_quote} at position 1891 in exon 15 causes a premature stop codon and thus a truncated polypeptide. The truncated protein of 617 amino acids has an expected molecular weight of 63 kD. Metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation studies are in progress. A C{r_arrow}T transition at position 1634 in exon 12 causing a 5th position Cys to Phe substitution in an EGF-like motif was observed in another MFS patient. Finally, we have identified a G{r_arrow}A transition at the +1 position of the donor splice site that causes the deletion of fibrillin exon 32 in a patient with the neonatal form of MFS. Exon 32 is a precursor EGF-like calcium binding motif that is located in a single stretch of 12 similar domains. We had previously identified the skipping of this exon due to an A{r_arrow}T transversion at the -2 position of the consensus acceptor splice site in another patient with neonatal MFS. The reason that the skipping of exon 32 causes a neonatal lethal MFS phenotype is presently unclear. These studies will help elucidate the role of diverse regions of fibrillin.

  7. Detection of beta-catenin mutations in paraffin-embedded sporadic desmoid-type fibromatosis by mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion (MSRED): an ancillary diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    Amary, Maria Fernanda C; Pauwels, Patrick; Meulemans, Els; Roemen, Guido M; Islam, Lily; Idowu, Bernadine; Bousdras, Konstantinos; Diss, Timothy C; O'Donnell, Paul; Flanagan, Adrienne M

    2007-09-01

    Desmoid-type fibromatosis is a locally aggressive deep soft tissue tumor. Some cases are associated with adenosis polyposis coli germline mutations whereas others harbor somatic beta-catenin point mutations mainly in exon 3, codons 41 and 45. These mutations result in stabilization of beta-catenin, and activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. The aim of this study was to determine the specificity and sensitivity of these 3 most common beta-catenin mutations in the diagnosis of desmoid-type fibromatosis using paraffin-embedded material. The results were compared with nuclear expression of beta-catenin. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion methodology was employed to detect the 3 mutations. One hundred and thirty-three cases were analyzed, including 76 desmoid-type, and 18 superficial fibromatosis, in addition to a further 39 fibromatosis mimics. A restriction site was present for analysis of the codon 41 mutation. Mismatch primers were designed for the codon 45 mutations. Mutations were detected in 66 cases (87%) of 76 desmoid-type fibromatosis (71 extra-abdominal). Of these, 34 (45%) were in codon 45 (TCT>TTT), 27 (35%) in codon 41 (ACC>GCC), and 5 (7%) in codon 45 (TCT>CCT). No mutations were detected in the other lesions studied. All desmoid-type fibromatosis cases and 72% of the mimics tested showed nuclear positivity for beta-catenin indicating immunohistochemistry is a sensitive but not a specific test for desmoid-type fibromatosis. In contrast, to date, beta-catenin mutations have not been detected in any lesions which mimic desmoid-type fibromatosis. Mutation-specific restriction enzyme digestion, a simple and efficient means of detecting the common beta-catenin mutations in desmoid-type fibromatosis, complements light microscopy in reaching a diagnosis.

  8. Pneumocystis carinii mutations associated with sulfa and sulfone prophylaxis failures in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, W; Meshnick, S; Kazanjian, P

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that mutations in two amino acid positions of the Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthase gene are significantly more common in immunocompromised patients with P. carinii pneumonia who fail sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis. This paper reviews the studies that suggest that these mutations may be responsible for some failures of prophylaxis in P. carinii.

  9. Independent origins of cystic fibrosis mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849 + 10kbC-->T provide evidence of mutation recurrence in the CFTR gene.

    PubMed Central

    Morral, N.; Llevadot, R.; Casals, T.; Gasparini, P.; Macek, M.; Dörk, T.; Estivill, X.

    1994-01-01

    Microsatellite analysis of chromosomes carrying particular cystic fibrosis mutations has shown different haplotypes in four cases: R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849 + 10kbC-->T. To investigate the possibility of recurrence of these mutations, analysis of intra- and extragenic markers flanking these mutations has been performed. Recurrence is the most plausible explanation, as it becomes necessary to postulate either double recombinations or single recombinations in conjunction with slippage at one or more microsatellite loci, to explain the combination of mutations and microsatellites if the mutations arose only once. Also in support of recurrence, mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849 + 10kbC-->T involve CpG dinucleotides, which are known to have an increased mutation rate. Although only 15.7% of point mutations in the coding sequence of CFTR have occurred at CpG dinucleotides, approximately half of these CpG sites have mutated at least once. Specific nucleotide positions of the coding region of CFTR, distinct from CpG sequences, also seem to have a higher mutation rate, and so it is possible that the mutations observed are recurrent. G-->A transitions are the most common change found in those positions involved in more than one mutational event in CFTR. PMID:7526685

  10. Independent orgins of cystic ribrosis mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T provide evidence of mutation recurrence in the CFTR gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morral, N.; Llevadot, R.; Casals, T.; Estivill, X.; Gasparini, P.; Macek, M. Jr.; Doerk, T.

    1994-11-01

    Microsatellite analysis of chromosomes carrying particular cystic fibrosis mutations has shown different haplotypes in four cases: R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T. To investigate the possibility of recurrence of these mutations, analysis of intra- and extragenic markers flanking these mutations has been performed. Recurrence is the most plausible explanation, as it becomes necessary to postulate either double recombinations or single recombinations in conjunction with slippage at one or more microsatellite loci, to explain the combination of mutations and microsatellites if the mutations arose only once. Also in support of recurrence, mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T involve CpG dinucleotides, which are known to have an increased mutation rate. Although only 15.7% of point mutations in the coding sequence of CFTR have occurred at CpG dinucleotides, approximately half of these CpG sites have mutated at least once. Specific nucleotide positions of the coding region of CFTR, distinct from CpG sequences, also seem to have a higher mutation rate, and so it is possible that the mutations observed are recurrent. G{yields}A transitions are the most common change found in those positions involved in more than one mutational event in CFTR. 65 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  11. Studies Of Positive-Position-Feedback Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James L.; Caughey, Thomas K.

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses theoretical and experimental studies of positive-position-feedback control for suppressing vibrations in large flexible structures. Positive-position-feedback control involves placement of actuators and sensors on structure; control voltages applied to actuators in response to outputs of sensors processed via compensator algorithm. Experiments demonstrate feasibility of suppressing vibrations by positive position feedback, and spillover of vibrational energy into uncontrolled modes has stabilizing effect if control gain sufficiently small.

  12. Clusters of mutations from transient hypermutability.

    PubMed

    Drake, John W; Bebenek, Anna; Kissling, Grace E; Peddada, Shyamal

    2005-09-06

    Collections of mutants usually contain more mutants bearing multiple mutations than expected from the mutant frequency and a random distribution of mutations. This excess is seen in a variety of organisms and also after DNA synthesis in vitro. The excess is unlikely to originate in mutator mutants but rather from transient hypermutability resulting from a perturbation of one of the many transactions that maintain genetic fidelity. The multiple mutations are sometimes clustered and sometimes randomly distributed. We model some spectra as populations comprising a majority with a low mutation frequency and a minority with a high mutation frequency. In the case of mutants produced in vitro by a bacteriophage RB69 mutator DNA polymerase, mutants with two mutations are in approximately 10-fold excess and mutants with three mutations are in even greater excess. However, phenotypically undetectable mutations seen only as hitchhikers with detectable mutations are approximately 5-fold more frequent than mutants bearing detectable mutations, indicating that they arose in a subpopulation with a higher mutation frequency. Excess multiple mutations may contribute critically to carcinogenesis and to adaptive mutation, including the adaptations of pathogens as they move from host to host. In the case of the rapidly mutating riboviruses, the viral population appears to be composed of a majority with a mutation frequency substantially lower than the average and a minority with a huge mutational load.

  13. Enhanced Ratio of Signals Enables Digital Mutation Scanning for Rare Allele Detection

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R.; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence. PMID:25772705

  14. Mutation breeding by ion implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zengliang; Deng, Jianguo; He, Jianjun; Huo, Yuping; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Xuedong; Lui, Guifu

    1991-07-01

    Ion implantation as a new mutagenic method has been used in the rice breeding program since 1986, and for mutation breeding of other crops later. It has been shown, in principle and in practice, that this method has many outstanding advantages: lower damage rate; higher mutation rate and wider mutational spectrum. Many new lines of rice with higher yield rate; broader disease resistance; shorter growing period but higher quality have been bred from ion beam induced mutants. Some of these lines have been utilized for the intersubspecies hybridization. Several new lines of cotton, wheat and other crops are now in breeding. Some biophysical effects of ion implantation for crop seeds have been studied.

  15. Identification of a founder BRCA2 mutation in Sardinia

    PubMed Central

    Pisano, M; Cossu, A; Persico, I; Palmieri, G; Angius, A; Casu, G; Palomba, G; Sarobba, M G; Rocca, P C Ossu; Dedola, M F; Olmeo, N; Pasca, A; Budroni, M; Marras, V; Pisano, A; Farris, A; Massarelli, G; Pirastu, M; Tanda, Francesco

    2000-01-01

    Sardinian population can be instrumental in defining the molecular basis of cancer, using the identity-by-descent method. We selected seven Sardinian breast cancer families originating from the northern-central part of the island with multiple affected members in different generations. We genotyped 106 members of the seven families and 20 control nuclear families with markers flanking BRCA2 locus at 13q12–q13. The detection of a common haplotype shared by four out of seven families (60%) suggests the presence of a founder BRCA2 mutation. Direct sequencing of BRCA2 coding exons of patients carrying the shared haplotype, allowed the identification of a ‘frame-shift’ mutation at codon 2867 (8765delAG), causing a premature termination-codon. This mutation was found in breast cancer patients as well as one prostate and one bladder cancer patient with shared haplotype. We then investigated the frequency of 8765delAG in the Sardinian breast cancer population by analysing 270 paraffin-embedded normal tissue samples from breast cancer patients. Five patients (1.7%) were found to be positive for the 8765delAG mutation. Discovery of a founder mutation in Sardinia through the identity-by-descent method demonstrates that this approach can be applied successfully to find mutations either for breast cancer or for other types of tumours. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10682665

  16. Diagnostic application of KRAS mutation testing in uterine microglandular proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Abi-Raad, Rita; Alomari, Ahmed K; Hui, Pei; Buza, Natalia

    2015-07-01

    Microglandular proliferations often pose a diagnostic challenge in small endocervical and endometrial biopsies. Microglandular hyperplasia (MGH) is one of the most common pseudoneoplastic glandular proliferations of uterine cervix, which can closely mimic endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC) with a microglandular pattern (microglandular EAC). Although MGH is typically characterized by relatively uniform nuclei and rare to absent mitoses, atypical forms with architectural and/or cytologic deviation from the usual morphology have been previously described. Recently, a series of MGH with high mitotic activity has also been documented. Although careful morphological assessment and immunohistochemical workup can resolve the diagnostic dilemma in some cases, additional differential diagnostic tools are needed to separate both the common and atypical variants of MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern. Frequent KRAS mutation has been previously reported in endometrial complex mucinous lesions and endometrial mucinous carcinomas. However, the diagnostic utility of KRAS mutation analysis has not yet been explored in the context of cervical and endometrial microglandular lesions. Twelve mitotically active MGH cases and 15 cases of EAC with microglandular growth pattern were selected for the study. KRAS mutation analysis was performed in all cases by highly sensitive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Clinical history and follow-up data were retrieved from electronic medical records. KRAS mutation was absent in all MGH cases, whereas 9 (60%) of 15 microglandular EAC cases tested positive for KRAS mutation. Our data indicate that KRAS mutation analysis may offer additional discriminatory power in separating benign MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern.

  17. CFTR mutation analysis and haplotype associations in CF patients.

    PubMed

    Cordovado, S K; Hendrix, M; Greene, C N; Mochal, S; Earley, M C; Farrell, P M; Kharrazi, M; Hannon, W H; Mueller, P W

    2012-02-01

    Most newborn screening (NBS) laboratories use second-tier molecular tests for cystic fibrosis (CF) using dried blood spots (DBS). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's NBS Quality Assurance Program offers proficiency testing (PT) in DBS for CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection. Extensive molecular characterization on 76 CF patients, family members or screen positive newborns was performed for quality assurance. The coding, regulatory regions and portions of all introns were sequenced and large insertions/deletions were characterized as well as two intronic di-nucleotide microsatellites. For CF patient samples, at least two mutations were identified/verified and four specimens contained three likely CF-associated mutations. Thirty-four sequence variations in 152 chromosomes were identified, five of which were not previously reported. Twenty-seven of these variants were used to predict haplotypes from the major haplotype block defined by HapMap data that spans the promoter through intron 19. Chromosomes containing the F508del (p.Phe508del), G542X (p.Gly542X) and N1303K (p.Asn1303Lys) mutations shared a common haplotype subgroup, consistent with a common ancient European founder. Understanding the haplotype background of CF-associated mutations in the U.S. population provides a framework for future phenotype/genotype studies and will assist in determining a likely cis/trans phase of the mutations without need for parent studies.

  18. Mutation analysis of the Smad3 gene in human osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jun-Yan; Wang, Yan; An, Jing; Mao, Chun-Ming; Hou, Ning; Lv, Ya-Xin; Wang, You-Liang; Cui, Fang; Huang, Min; Yang, Xiao

    2003-09-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common joint disease worldwide. Recent studies have shown that targeted disruption of Smad3 in mouse results in OA. To reveal the possible association between the Smad3 gene mutation and human OA, we employed polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism and sequencing to screen mutations in all nine exons of the Smad3 gene in 32 patients with knee OA and 50 patients with only bone fracture. A missense mutation of the Smad3 gene was found in one patient. The single base mutation located in the linker region of the SMAD3 protein was A --> T change in the position 2 of codon 197 and resulted in an asparagine to isoleucine amino-acid substitution. The expressions of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 in sera of the patient carrying the mutation were higher than other OA patients and controls. This is the first report showing that the Smad3 gene mutations could be associated with the pathogenesis of human OA.

  19. PDCD10 gene mutations in multiple cerebral cavernous malformations.

    PubMed

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype.

  20. Mutational profiling reveals PIK3CA mutations in gallbladder carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The genetics of advanced biliary tract cancers (BTC), which encompass intra- and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas as well as gallbladder carcinomas, are heterogeneous and remain to be fully defined. Methods To better characterize mutations in established known oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes we tested a mass spectrometric based platform to interrogate common cancer associated mutations across a panel of 77 formalin fixed paraffin embedded archived BTC cases. Results Mutations among three genes, KRAS, NRAS and PIK3CA were confirmed in this cohort. Activating mutations in PIK3CA were identified exclusively in GBC (4/32, 12.5%). KRAS mutations were identified in 3 (13%) intra-hepatic cholangiocarcinomas and 1 (33%) perihillar cholangiocarcinoma but were not identified in gallbladder carcinomas and extra-hepatic cholangiocarcinoma. Conclusions The presence of activating mutations in PIK3CA specifically in GBC has clinical implications in both the diagnosis of this cancer type, as well as the potential utility of targeted therapies such as PI3 kinase inhibitors. PMID:21303542

  1. Genetic and Molecular Analysis of Suppressors of Ras Mutations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    mediated signal transduction pathway during C. elegans vulval development. Mutations in sur-8 were identified as suppressors of an activated let-60...positively regulates an RTK-Ras-MAP kinase signaling cascade during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval induction. Although reduction of sur-6 PP2A-B function...Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and also positively regulates an RTK-Ras-MAP kinase signaling cascade during Caenorhabditis elegans vulval induction

  2. Electron holes appear to trigger cancer-implicated mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Villagran, Martha

    Malignant tumors are caused by mutations, which also affect their subsequent growth and evolution. We use a novel approach, computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)], to compute spectra of enhanced hole probability based on actual sequence data. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of reveal a correlation between hole spectrum peaks and spikes in human mutation frequencies. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with cancer-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential cancer `driver' mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could also prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions, and sites of driver mutations, in the vast non-protein-coding genome. Supported by the State of Texas through the Texas Ctr. for Superconductivity.

  3. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing.

    PubMed

    Francke, Uta; Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y; Mountain, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown. Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service(®) report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned. Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation-positive participants

  4. Nutlin-3a selects for cells harbouring TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kucab, Jill E; Hollstein, Monica; Arlt, Volker M; Phillips, David H

    2017-02-15

    TP53 mutations occur in half of all human tumours. Mutagen-induced or spontaneous TP53 mutagenesis can be studied in vitro using the human TP53 knock-in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalisation assay (HIMA). TP53 mutations arise in up to 30% of mutagen-treated, immortalised HUFs; however, mutants are not identified until TP53 sequence analysis following immortalisation (2-5 months) and much effort is expended maintaining TP53-WT cultures. In order to improve the selectivity of the HIMA for HUFs harbouring TP53 mutations, we explored the use of Nutlin-3a, an MDM2 inhibitor that leads to stabilisation and activation of wild-type (WT) p53. First, we treated previously established immortal HUF lines carrying WT or mutated TP53 with Nutlin-3a to examine the effect on cell growth and p53 activation. Nutlin-3a induced the p53 pathway in TP53-WT HUFs and inhibited cell growth, whereas most TP53-mutated HUFs were resistant to Nutlin-3a. We then assessed whether Nutlin-3a treatment could discriminate between TP53-WT and TP53-mutated cells during the HIMA (n = 72 cultures). As immortal clones emerged from senescent cultures, each was treated with 10 µM Nutlin-3a for 5 days and observed for sensitivity or resistance. TP53 was subsequently sequenced from all immortalised clones. We found that all Nutlin-3a-resistant clones harboured TP53 mutations, which were diverse in position and functional impact, while all but one of the Nutlin-3a-sensitive clones were TP53-WT. These data suggest that including a Nutlin-3a counter-screen significantly improves the specificity and efficiency of the HIMA, whereby TP53-mutated clones are selected prior to sequencing and TP53-WT clones can be discarded.

  5. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is not conserved, then it is likely that its counterpart will also be mutated. For each target protein, protein databases were searched for the primary amino acid sequences of all known members of distinct protein families. Primary sequence alignment was carried out using PileUp algorithms in the GCG package. To search for correlated mutations, we listed only the positions where cysteine residues were highly conserved and emphasized the mutated residues. In proteins of known three-dimensional structure, a striking pattern of paired cysteine mutations correlated with the positions of known disulfide bridges. For proteins of unknown architecture, the mutation maps showed several positions where disulfide bridging might occur. PMID:8563638

  6. Whole-genome sequencing of bladder cancers reveals somatic CDKN1A mutations and clinicopathological associations with mutation burden.

    PubMed

    Cazier, J-B; Rao, S R; McLean, C M; Walker, A K; Walker, A L; Wright, B J; Jaeger, E E M; Kartsonaki, C; Marsden, L; Yau, C; Camps, C; Kaisaki, P; Taylor, J; Catto, J W; Tomlinson, I P M; Kiltie, A E; Hamdy, F C

    2014-04-29

    Bladder cancers are a leading cause of death from malignancy. Molecular markers might predict disease progression and behaviour more accurately than the available prognostic factors. Here we use whole-genome sequencing to identify somatic mutations and chromosomal changes in 14 bladder cancers of different grades and stages. As well as detecting the known bladder cancer driver mutations, we report the identification of recurrent protein-inactivating mutations in CDKN1A and FAT1. The former are not mutually exclusive with TP53 mutations or MDM2 amplification, showing that CDKN1A dysfunction is not simply an alternative mechanism for p53 pathway inactivation. We find strong positive associations between higher tumour stage/grade and greater clonal diversity, the number of somatic mutations and the burden of copy number changes. In principle, the identification of sub-clones with greater diversity and/or mutation burden within early-stage or low-grade tumours could identify lesions with a high risk of invasive progression.

  7. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  8. Absolute Positioning Using the Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has becom a useful tool In providing relativ survey...Includes the development of a low cost navigator for wheeled vehicles. ABSTRACT The Global Positioning System ( GPS ) has become a useful tool In providing...technique of absolute or point positioning involves the use of a single Global Positioning System ( GPS ) receiver to determine the three-dimenslonal

  9. Immunostaining with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies: a reliable screening method for lung adenocarcinomas harboring EGFR mutation in biopsy and resection samples.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiangshan; Liu, Biao; Xu, Haodong; Yu, Bo; Shi, Shanshan; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Jiandong; Lu, Zhenfeng; Ma, Henghui; Zhou, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Mutation analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is essential in determining the therapeutic strategy for lung adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies of del E746-A750 in exon 19 and L858R in exon 21 has been evaluated in resection specimens in a few studies but rarely in biopsy samples. A total of 169 cases (78 biopsies and 91 resected specimens) of lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutation status predefined by direct DNA sequencing were histologically examined, and IHC was performed using EGFR mutation-specific antibodies of del E746-A750 and L858R. The cases with positive results by IHC but negative results by direct DNA sequencing were examined by amplified refractory mutation system. Our results showed that the frequency of EGFR mutations for both E746-A750 deletion and L858R mutation was 38.5% (65/169) by DNA sequencing or amplified refractory mutation system and 34.3% (58/169) by IHC in lung adenocarcinomas. Based on molecular test results, the overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of IHC using these 2 antibodies in all (biopsy/resection) cases were 87.7% (80%/94.3%), 99.0% (97.9%/100%), 98.3% (96%/100%), and 92.8% (88.7%/96.6%), respectively. Lung adenocarcinomas with a predominant acinar, papillary, lepidic, or solid growth pattern more often harbor EGFR mutation of del E746-A750 or L858R. In conclusion, the immunostaining with EGFR del E746-A750 and L858R mutation antibodies is a reliable screening method with high specificity and sensitivity for identifying the EGFR mutation in both resected and biopsied lung adenocarcinomas.

  10. Rare mutations in evolutionary dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amadori, Anna Lisa; Calzolari, Antonella; Natalini, Roberto; Torti, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we study the effect of rare mutations, driven by a marked point process, on the evolutionary behavior of a population. We derive a Kolmogorov equation describing the expected values of the different frequencies and prove some rigorous analytical results about their behavior. Finally, in a simple case of two different quasispecies, we are able to prove that the rarity of mutations increases the survival opportunity of the low fitness species.

  11. Recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 2 vaccine candidates containing a 3′ genomic promoter mutation and L polymerase mutations are attenuated and protective in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Sheila M.; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Bradley, Konrad; Kim, Olivia S.; Bier, Stacia; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Surman, Sonja R.; Davis, Stephanie; St. Claire, Marisa; Elkins, Randy; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Schaap-Nutt, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we identified several attenuating mutations in the L polymerase protein of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) and genetically stabilized those mutations using reverse genetics (Nolan et al., 2005). Here we describe the discovery of an attenuating mutation at nucleotide 15 (15T→C) in the 3′ genomic promoter that was also present in the previously characterized mutants. We evaluated the properties of this promoter mutation alone and in various combinations with the L polymerase mutations. Amino acid substitutions at L protein positions 460 (460A or 460P) or 948 (948L), or deletion of amino acids 1724 and 1725 (Δ1724), each conferred a temperature sensitivity (ts) phenotype whereas the 15T→C mutation did not. The 460A and 948L mutations each contributed to restricted replication in the lower respiratory tract of African green monkeys, but the Δ1724 mutation increased attenuation only in certain combinations with other mutations. We constructed two highly attenuated viruses, rV94(15C)/460A/948L and rV94(15C)/948L/Δ1724, that were immunogenic and protective against challenge with wild-type HPIV2 in African green monkeys and, therefore, appear to be suitable for evaluation in humans. PMID:17658669

  12. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications.

  13. Correlation between germline mutations in MMR genes and microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Akbari, Mohammad R; Zhang, Shiyu; Cragun, Deborah; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Coppola, Domenico; McLaughlin, John; Risch, Harvey A; Rosen, Barry; Shaw, Patricia; Sellers, Thomas A; Schildkraut, Joellen; Narod, Steven A; Pal, Tuya

    2017-02-07

    A high proportion of ovarian cancers from women who carry germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes demonstrate microsatellite instability (MSI). The utility of pre-screening ovarian cancer specimens for MSI to identify potential patients for germline screening for MMR mutations is uncertain. 656 women with malignant ovarian cancer underwent both MSI testing and germline mutation testing for large rearrangements in three MMR genes, MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. Germline DNA sequencing data for the same genes was available. Among the 656 women, only four (0.6%) carried a clearly pathogenic MMR mutation. All four cancers from patients with mutations had loss of two or more microsatellite markers (MSI-high). Eighty-four of 652 (13.0%) women without a mutation had MSI-high ovarian cancers. Using MSI-high as a prescreening criterion, the sensitivity of MSI testing to identify germline MMR gene mutations was 100% and the positive predictive value was 4.5%. Germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 are rare among unselected cases of ovarian cancer. Patients with germline mutations often will have MSI-positive cancers and pre-screening of ovarian cancer specimens may be an efficient way of identifying patients with Lynch syndrome.

  14. Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus with a novel mutation in the aquaporin 2 gene.

    PubMed

    Park, Youn Jong; Baik, Haing Woon; Cheong, Hae Il; Kang, Ju Hyung

    2014-07-01

    Congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (CNDI) is a rare disorder caused by mutations of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) V2 receptor or aquaporin 2 (AQP2) genes. The current study presented the case of CNDI in a 1-month-old male with a novel mutation in the AQP2 gene. The patient was referred due to the occurrence of hypernatremia and mild-intermittent fever since birth. An AVP stimulation test was compatible with CNDI as there was no significant response to desmopressin. Molecular genetic analysis demonstrated two mutations in exon 1 of the AQP2 gene: C to T transition, which resulted in a missense mutation of (108)Thr (ACG) to Met (ATG); and a 127, 128 delCA, which resulted in a deletion mutation of glutamine in position 43 at codon CAG as the first affected amino acid, with the new reading frame endign in a termination codon at position 62. The molecular genetic analysis of the parents showed that the missense mutation was inherited maternally and the deletion mutation was inherited paternally. The parents showed no signs or symptoms of CNDI, indicating autosomal recessive inheritance. The (108)Thr (ACG) to Met (ATG) mutation was confirmed as a novel mutation. Therefore, the molecular identification of the AQP2 gene has clinical significance, as early recognition of CNDI in infants that show only non-specific symptoms, can be facilitated. Thus, repeated episodes of dehydration, which may cause physical and mental retardation can be avoided.

  15. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    de Vogel, Stefan; van Engeland, Manon; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Roemen, Guido M J M; Lentjes, Marjolein H F M; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; de Goeij, Anton F P M; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2006-12-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between dietary folate intake and colorectal cancer risk with (APC(+)) and without (APC(-)) truncating APC mutations, accounting for hMLH1 expression and K-ras mutations. In total, 528 cases and 4200 subcohort members were available for data analyses of the study cohort (n = 120,852) from a follow-up period between 2.3 and 7.3 y after baseline. Adjusted gender-specific incidence rate ratios (RR) over tertiles of folate intake were calculated in case-cohort analyses for colon and rectal cancer. Although relatively high folate intake was not associated with overall colorectal cancer risk, it reduced the risk of APC(-)colon tumors in men (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.32-1.05, P(trend) = 0.06 for the highest vs. lowest tertile of folate intake). In contrast, it was positively associated with APC(+) colon tumors in men (highest vs. lowest tertile: RR 2.77, 95% CI 1.29-5.95, P(trend) = 0.008) and was even stronger when the lack of hMLH1 expression and K-ras mutations were excluded (RR 3.99, 95% CI 1.43-11.14, P(trend) = 0.007). Such positive associations were not observed among women; nor was folate intake associated with rectal cancer when APC mutation status was taken into account. Relatively high folate consumption reduced the risk of APC(-) colon tumors, but folate intake was positively associated with APC(+) colon tumors among men. These opposite results may indicate that folate enhances colorectal carcinogenesis through a distinct APC mutated pathway.

  16. Characteristics, causes and evolutionary consequences of male-biased mutation.

    PubMed

    Ellegren, Hans

    2007-01-07

    Mutation has traditionally been considered a random process, but this paradigm is challenged by recent evidence of divergence rate heterogeneity in different genomic regions. One facet of mutation rate variation is the propensity for genetic change to correlate with the number of germ cell divisions, reflecting the replication-dependent origin of many mutations. Haldane was the first to connect this association of replication and mutation to the difference in the number of cell divisions in oogenesis (low) and spermatogenesis (usually high), and the resulting sex difference in the rate of mutation. The concept of male-biased mutation has been thoroughly analysed in recent years using an evolutionary approach, in which sequence divergence of autosomes and/or sex chromosomes are compared to allow inference about the relative contribution of mothers and fathers in the accumulation of mutations. For instance, assuming that a neutral sequence is analysed, that rate heterogeneity owing to other factors is cancelled out by the investigation of many loci and that the effect of ancestral polymorphism is properly taken into account, the male-to-female mutation rate ratio, alpham, can be solved from the observed difference in rate of X and Y chromosome divergence. The male mutation bias is positively correlated with the relative excess of cell divisions in the male compared to the female germ line, as evidenced by a generation time effect: in mammals, alpham is estimated at approximately 4-6 in primates, approximately 3 in carnivores and approximately 2 in small rodents. Another life-history correlate is sexual selection: when there is intense sperm competition among males, increased sperm production will be associated with a larger number of mitotic cell divisions in spermatogenesis and hence an increase in alpham. Male-biased mutation has implications for important aspects of evolutionary biology such as mate choice in relation to mutation load, sexual selection and the

  17. Characteristics, causes and evolutionary consequences of male-biased mutation

    PubMed Central

    Ellegren, Hans

    2006-01-01

    Mutation has traditionally been considered a random process, but this paradigm is challenged by recent evidence of divergence rate heterogeneity in different genomic regions. One facet of mutation rate variation is the propensity for genetic change to correlate with the number of germ cell divisions, reflecting the replication-dependent origin of many mutations. Haldane was the first to connect this association of replication and mutation to the difference in the number of cell divisions in oogenesis (low) and spermatogenesis (usually high), and the resulting sex difference in the rate of mutation. The concept of male-biased mutation has been thoroughly analysed in recent years using an evolutionary approach, in which sequence divergence of autosomes and/or sex chromosomes are compared to allow inference about the relative contribution of mothers and fathers in the accumulation of mutations. For instance, assuming that a neutral sequence is analysed, that rate heterogeneity owing to other factors is cancelled out by the investigation of many loci and that the effect of ancestral polymorphism is properly taken into account, the male-to-female mutation rate ratio, αm, can be solved from the observed difference in rate of X and Y chromosome divergence. The male mutation bias is positively correlated with the relative excess of cell divisions in the male compared to the female germ line, as evidenced by a generation time effect: in mammals, αm is estimated at approximately 4–6 in primates, approximately 3 in carnivores and approximately 2 in small rodents. Another life-history correlate is sexual selection: when there is intense sperm competition among males, increased sperm production will be associated with a larger number of mitotic cell divisions in spermatogenesis and hence an increase in αm. Male-biased mutation has implications for important aspects of evolutionary biology such as mate choice in relation to mutation load, sexual selection and the

  18. Genetic (Co)Variation for Life Span in Rhabditid Nematodes: Role of Mutation, Selection, and History

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ambuj; Salomon, Matthew P.; Grigaltchik, Veronica; Baer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms maintaining genetic variation in life span, particularly post-reproductive life span, are poorly understood. We characterized the effects of spontaneous mutations on life span in the rhabditid nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae and standing genetic variance for life span and correlation of life span with fitness in C. briggsae. Mutations decreased mean life span, a signature of directional selection. Mutational correlations between life span and fitness were consistently positive. The average selection coefficient against new mutations in C. briggsae was approximately 2% when homozygous. The pattern of phylogeographic variation in life span is inconsistent with global mutation–selection balance (MSB), but MSB appears to hold at the local level. Standing genetic correlations in C. briggsae reflect mutational correlations at a local scale but not at a broad phylogeographic level. At the local scale, results are broadly consistent with predictions of the “mutation accumulation” hypothesis for the evolution of aging. PMID:19671885

  19. [A novel mutation in β-globin gene of a patient with β-thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Peng, Yun-Sheng; Sun, Shun-Chang; Chen, Qun-Rong; Wang, Qing; Mo, Bao-Mei

    2012-04-01

    This study was aimed to analyze the β-globin gene mutations in a patient with β-thalassemia minor. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood cells of the patient. The full-length DNA sequence coding for β-globin was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the gene mutation was determined by DNA sequencing. The results indicated that a heterogeneous A→G mutation was found at position 129 in intron 1 of the β-thalassemia minor patient. It is concluded that the IVS-I-129(A→G) mutation is a splicing site mutation leading to a splicing error in immature messenger RNA and a protein translation error for the β-globin gene. Thus, the IVS-I-129(A→G) is a novel mutation.

  20. An enhanced MITOMAP with a global mtDNA mutational phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lott, Marie T.; Procaccio, Vincent; Poole, Jason C.; Brandon, Marty C.; Mishmar, Dan; Yi, Christina; Kreuziger, James; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    The MITOMAP () data system for the human mitochondrial genome has been greatly enhanced by the addition of a navigable mutational mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenetic tree of ∼3000 mtDNA coding region sequences plus expanded pathogenic mutation tables and a nuclear-mtDNA pseudogene (NUMT) data base. The phylogeny reconstructs the entire mutational history of the human mtDNA, thus defining the mtDNA haplogroups and differentiating ancient from recent mtDNA mutations. Pathogenic mutations are classified by both genotype and phenotype, and the NUMT sequences permits detection of spurious inclusion of pseudogene variants during mutation analysis. These additions position MITOMAP for the implementation of our automated mtDNA sequence analysis system, Mitomaster. PMID:17178747

  1. Expression of Von Hippel – Lindau (VHL) gene mutation in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Shahzad, Humera; Kehar, Shahnaz Imdad; Ali, Shahzad; Tariq, Naila

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the expression of Von Hippel Lindau (VHL) gene in diagnosed cases of renal cell carcinoma. Methods: This cross sectional study was conducted in department of Pathology, Basic Medical Sciences Institute, JPMC, Karachi, from January 2007 to December 2012. Paraffin embedded blocks of 30 cases of radical nephrectomy specimens diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma including CCRCC 21 (70%) CCPRCC, 3 (10%), PRCC 2 (6.79%), hybrid tumor 4 (13.3%), chromophobe tumor (0%) processed for VHL gene expression on Polymerase Chain Reaction. Results: All the 30 cases previously diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma were processed on PCR, VHL gene mutations were seen in 20 (95.23%) of CCRCC while a single case was negative for VHL mutations. All CCPRCC were negative for VHL mutation. Among the hybrid tumor 03 cases with foci of clear cells show VHL mutation while a single case showing combination of clear cells and chromophobe cells was negative for mutation. Both the cases of PRCC were positive for mutation. Exon 3 mutation at base pair 194 seen in 8 (32%) cases and Exon 2 mutation at base pair 150-159 seen in 17 (68%) cases. None of the cases showed Exon 1 mutation. Conclusion: The present study shows that majority of CCRCC showed VHL mutation including the hybrid tumor with clear cell component in our population. PMID:25097537

  2. A multiplexed fragment analysis-based assay for detection of JAK2 exon 12 mutations.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Larissa V; Weigelin, Helmut C; Elenitoba-Johnson, Kojo S J; Betz, Bryan L

    2013-09-01

    Mutations within exon 12 of the JAK2 gene occur in most cases of JAK2 V617F-mutation negative polycythemia vera. Several methods have been developed to identify exon 12 mutations, with both Sanger sequencing and high resolution melting (HRM) being widely used. However, mutations can occur at allelic levels lower than 15%, which may hamper detection by these methods. We developed a novel fragment analysis-based assay capable of detecting nearly all JAK2 exon 12 mutations associated with polycythemia vera down to a sensitivity of 2% mutant allele. Test results were reviewed from a set of 20 reference cases and 1731 consecutive specimens that were referred to our laboratory for testing. Assay performance was compared to sequencing and HRM across a series of 27 specimens with JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Positive cases consisted of 22 with deletion mutations, four with duplications, and one with K539L. Nine cases had mutation levels between 6% and 15% that may not be reliably detected by sequencing or HRM. All cases were easily interpreted in the fragment analysis assay. Sequencing, HRM, and fragment analysis each represent viable platforms for detection of JAK2 exon 12 mutations. Our method performed favorably by providing a simple, robust, and highly sensitive solution for JAK2 exon 12 mutation testing.

  3. An integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of PIK3CA, PTEN and AKT mutations in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Davies, Michael; Carey, Mark; Hu, Zhi; Guan, Yinghui; Sahin, Aysegul; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Nolden, Laura K.; Horlings, Hugo; Berns, Katrien; Hung, Mien-Chie; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Bernards, Rene; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

    2008-05-06

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway aberrations are common in cancer. By applying mass spectroscopy-based sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays to 547 human breast cancers and 41 cell lines, we determined the subtype specificity and signaling effects of PIK3CA, AKT and PTEN mutations, and the effects of PIK3CA mutations on responsiveness to PI3K inhibition in-vitro and on outcome after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations were more common in hormone receptor positive (33.8%) and HER2-positive (24.6%) than in basal-like tumors (8.3%). AKT1 (1.4%) and PTEN (2.3%) mutations were restricted to hormone receptor-positive cancers with PTEN protein levels also being significantly lower in hormone receptor-positive cancers. Unlike AKT1 mutations, PIK3CA (39%) and PTEN (20%) mutations were more common in cell lines than tumors, suggesting a selection for these but not AKT1 mutations during adaptation to culture. PIK3CA mutations did not have a significant impact on outcome in 166 hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations, in comparison with PTEN loss and AKT1 mutations, were associated with significantly less and indeed inconsistent activation of AKT and of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling in tumors and cell lines, and PTEN loss and PIK3CA mutation were frequently concordant, suggesting different contributions to pathophysiology. PTEN loss but not PIK3CA mutations rendered cells sensitive to growth inhibition by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Thus, PI3K pathway aberrations likely play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of different breast cancer subtypes. The specific aberration may have implications for the selection of PI3K-targeted therapies in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  4. Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo

    MedlinePlus

    ... Questionnaire Home Diseases and Conditions Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo (BPPV) Condition Family HealthMenWomen Share Benign Paroxysmal Positional ...

  5. ESR1 mutations in circulating plasma tumor DNA from metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Chu, David; Paoletti, Costanza; Gersch, Christina; VanDenBerg, Dustin A.; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Cochran, Rory L.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Toro, Patricia Valda; Cidado, Justin; Croessmann, Sarah; Erlanger, Bracha; Cravero, Karen; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Button, Berry; Parsons, Heather; Dalton, W. Brian; Gillani, Riaz; Medford, Arielle; Aung, Kimberly; Tokudome, Nahomi; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Schott, Anne; Robinson, Dan; Jacks, Karen S.; Lauring, Josh; Hurley, Paula; Hayes, Daniel F.; Rae, James; Park, Ben Ho

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Mutations in the estrogen receptor-alpha (ER) gene, ESR1, have been identified in breast cancer metastases after progression on endocrine therapies. Due to limitations of metastatic biopsies, the reported frequency of ESR1 mutations may be underestimated. Here, we show a high frequency of ESR1 mutations using circulating plasma tumor DNA (ptDNA) from metastatic breast cancer patients. Experimental Design We retrospectively obtained plasma samples from eight patients with known ESR1 mutations and three patients with wild type ESR1 identified by next generation sequencing (NGS) of biopsied metastatic tissues. Three common ESR1 mutations were queried for using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). In a prospective cohort, metastatic tissue and plasma were collected contemporaneously from eight ER-positive and four ER-negative patients. Tissue biopsies were sequenced by NGS and ptDNA ESR1 mutations were analyzed by ddPCR. Results In the retrospective cohort, all corresponding mutations were detected in ptDNA, with two patients harboring additional ESR1 mutations not present in their metastatic tissues. In the prospective cohort, three ER-positive patients did not have adequate tissue for NGS, and no ESR1 mutations were identified in tissue biopsies from the other nine patients. In contrast, ddPCR detected seven ptDNA ESR1 mutations in six of twelve patients (50%). Conclusions We show that ESR1 mutations can occur at a high frequency and suggest that blood can be used to identify additional mutations not found by sequencing of a single metastatic lesion. PMID:26261103

  6. Predominance of precore mutations and clinical significance of basal core promoter mutations in chronic hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Juniastuti; Utsumi, Takako; Aksono, Eduardus Bimo; Yano, Yoshihiko; Soetjipto; Hayashi, Yoshitake; Hotta, Hak; Rantam, Fedik Abdul; Kusumobroto, Hernomo Ontoseno; Lusida, Maria Inge

    2013-07-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide, with a particularly high prevalence in the Asian-Pacific region. During chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mutations commonly occur in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) regions of HBV, affecting HBeAg expression, particularly following HBeAg serocon-version. Mutations in the B- and T-cell epitopes of the HBV core have also been observed during disease progression. The clinical significance of HBV genome variability has been demonstrated, however the results are a subject of controversy. Considering the characteristics of the virus associated with geographical location, the profiles of BCP, PC and core mutations and their clinical implications in patients with chronic HBV infection in Surabaya, Indonesia, were investigated. The BCP, PC and core mutations and HBV genotypes were detected by direct sequencing. The HBeAg/anti-HBe status and HBV DNA levels were also assessed. This study enrolled 10 patients with chronic HBV infection (UC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital and Indonesian Red Cross, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, 10 patients with chronic hepatitis B and liver cirrhosis (LC) and 4 patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital. The PC mutation A1896 was predominant in all the groups (60-100%), together with the PC variant T1858, which was associated with HBV genotype B. The number of detected core mutations (Thr/Ser130) was higher in HCC patients (50%). However, the BCP mutations T1762/A1764 were predominant in LC patients (50-60%). The LC and HCC patients carried HBV isolates with additional mutations, at least at BCP or PC, mainly following HBeAg seroconversion. In the majority of anti-HBe-positive samples, the BCP T1762/A1764 mutations were associated with a high viral load, regardless of the PC 1896 status. In conclusion, the PC mutations were found to be predominant in all the groups. However, the

  7. Predominance of precore mutations and clinical significance of basal core promoter mutations in chronic hepatitis B virus infection in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    JUNIASTUTI; UTSUMI, TAKAKO; AKSONO, EDUARDUS BIMO; YANO, YOSHIHIKO; SOETJIPTO; HAYASHI, YOSHITAKE; HOTTA, HAK; RANTAM, FEDIK ABDUL; KUSUMOBROTO, HERNOMO ONTOSENO; LUSIDA, MARIA INGE

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major health problem worldwide, with a particularly high prevalence in the Asian-Pacific region. During chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, mutations commonly occur in the basal core promoter (BCP) and precore (PC) regions of HBV, affecting HBeAg expression, particularly following HBeAg serocon-version. Mutations in the B- and T-cell epitopes of the HBV core have also been observed during disease progression. The clinical significance of HBV genome variability has been demonstrated, however the results are a subject of controversy. Considering the characteristics of the virus associated with geographical location, the profiles of BCP, PC and core mutations and their clinical implications in patients with chronic HBV infection in Surabaya, Indonesia, were investigated. The BCP, PC and core mutations and HBV genotypes were detected by direct sequencing. The HBeAg/anti-HBe status and HBV DNA levels were also assessed. This study enrolled 10 patients with chronic HBV infection (UC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital and Indonesian Red Cross, Surabaya, East Java, Indonesia, 10 patients with chronic hepatitis B and liver cirrhosis (LC) and 4 patients with chronic hepatitis B and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from Dr Soetomo General Hospital. The PC mutation A1896 was predominant in all the groups (60–100%), together with the PC variant T1858, which was associated with HBV genotype B. The number of detected core mutations (Thr/Ser130) was higher in HCC patients (50%). However, the BCP mutations T1762/A1764 were predominant in LC patients (50–60%). The LC and HCC patients carried HBV isolates with additional mutations, at least at BCP or PC, mainly following HBeAg seroconversion. In the majority of anti-HBe-positive samples, the BCP T1762/A1764 mutations were associated with a high viral load, regardless of the PC 1896 status. In conclusion, the PC mutations were found to be predominant in all the groups. However

  8. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  9. Positive position control of robotic manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Gumusel, L.

    1989-01-01

    The present, simple and accurate position-control algorithm, which is applicable to fast-moving and lightly damped robot arms, is based on the positive position feedback (PPF) strategy and relies solely on position sensors to monitor joint angles of robotic arms to furnish stable position control. The optimized tuned filters, in the form of a set of difference equations, manipulate position signals for robotic system performance. Attention is given to comparisons between this PPF-algorithm controller's experimentally ascertained performance characteristics and those of a conventional proportional controller.

  10. First description of a sporadic breast cancer in a woman with BRCA1 germline mutation

    PubMed Central

    Curtit, Elsa; Benhamo, Vanessa; Gruel, Nadège; Popova, Tatiana; Manie, Elodie; Cottu, Paul; Mariani, Odette; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Pivot, Xavier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Vincent-Salomon, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a woman carrying a germline pathogenic BRCA1 mutation diagnosed with a breast cancer overexpressing HER2. Clinical presentation of the tumor, HER2-positivity, genomic profile and loss of the mutated BRCA1 allele in tumor evidence that BRCA1 is not inactivated in this breast cancer. It represents the first biological demonstration for the existence of a sporadic HER2-positive breast cancer independent from BRCA loss of function in a woman carrier of a deleterious BRCA1 mutation. In a context where targeted therapies based on BRCA loss of function in the tumor are developed, such case could have direct implications. PMID:26426992

  11. Positive regulation of the Escherichia coli glycine cleavage enzyme system.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, R L; Steiert, P S; Stauffer, G V

    1993-01-01

    A new mutation in Escherichia coli, designated gcvA1, that results in noninducible expression of both gcv and a gcvT-lacZ gene fusion was isolated. A plasmid carrying the wild-type gcvA gene complemented the mutation and restored glycine-inducible gcv and gcvT-lacZ gene expression. These results suggest that gcvA encodes a positive-acting regulatory protein that acts in trans to increase expression of gcv. PMID:8423160

  12. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 siblings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances.

  13. Myotonia and the muscle chloride channel: dominant mutations show variable penetrance and founder effect.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Pegoraro, E; Hobson, G; Marks, H G; Turel, A; Flagler, D; Cadaldini, M; Angelini, C; Hoffman, E P

    1996-10-01

    The delayed relaxation or sustained contraction of skeletal muscle-myotonia-is frequently seen in myotonic dystrophy and sodium channelopathies (hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, paramyotonia congenita). Many cases of congenital myotonia without other clinical symptoms have been associated with mutations in the muscle chloride channel gene. Most cases reported to date show a recessive inheritance pattern, with loss of function of the corresponding protein. Six families have been reported with dominantly inherited myotonia and mutations of the chloride channel gene. Here we report clinical and molecular data on 38 family members from four new families with dominantly inherited myotonia congenita. Three families show a previously characterized G230E mutation, and we show that these three share a common affected ancestor despite living in different regions of the United States (linkage disequilibrium). One Italian family is shown to have a novel dominant mutation-I290M. This is the sixth mutation identified in Thomsen's myotonia. Genotype/phenotype correlations in these four families showed that both of the dominant mutations resulted in a mild clinical picture in 90% of the patients, and no symptoms in 10% of mutation-positive patients. The EMG was the clinical feature that most closely correlated with mutation data; however, 3 of 16 (19%) mutation-positive patients tested negative by electromyography at least once, and 1 (6%) tested negative despite multiple tests. Only about half (55%) of the mutation-positive patients tested positive for percussion myotonia. Most of the clinically symptomatic individuals stated that cold temperatures and stress substantially worsened their myotonia. Our data show that dominantly inherited Thomsen's myotonia is most often a very mild disorder that shows considerable clinical heterogeneity.

  14. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 silbings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances. PMID:26722549

  15. The correlation of sodium iodide symporter and BRAF(V600E) mutation in classical variant papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yazgan, Aylin; Yıldırım, Nilüfer; Gözalan, Ayşegül; Gümüştaş, Sinem; Kılıçarslan, Aydan; Balci, Serdar; Aydın, Cevdet; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir; Güler, Gülnur

    2016-06-01

    BRAF(V600E) mutation was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 96 consecutive cases with classical variant papillary thyroid cancer, and immunohistochemical staining of Na+/I- symporter (NIS) protein was evaluated. Localization (intracellular or membranous), density, and the intensity of cytoplasmic staining were characterized semiquantitatively. Extrathyroidal invasion, surgical margin positivity, and lymph node metastasis were compared with BRAF(V600E) mutation and NIS expression. Eighty-eight patients who had at least 24-month follow-up were also included in survival analysis. BRAF(V600E) mutation was determined in 78.1% (75/96) and functional NIS activity in 74% (71/96) of the cases. There were statistically significant differences in mean ages between BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive (48.6) and BRAF(V600E) mutation-negative cases (37.3; Levene test, P=.419; Student t test, P=.001). The surgical margin positivity (46.7%) and extrathyroidal extension percentage (54.7%) in the BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive group were higher than the negative (28.6% and 33.3%, respectively) group, without statistical significance (P=.138 and P=.084, respectively). Functional NIS activity was higher in BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive cases (78.1%) than mutation-negative ones (57.1%; P=.047). The possibility of moderate and intense cytoplasmic staining in BRAF(V600E) mutation-positive cases (72%) was 6.3 times higher than the possibility of weak staining (28%) in the mutation-positive cases (95% confidence interval, 2.2-18.8; P=.001). Functional NIS expression is higher in patients with classical variant papillary thyroid cancer with BRAF(V600E) mutation. However, the clinical features were not found to be associated with NIS expression. There may be different mechanisms determining the outcome of therapy.

  16. Germline mutations in FH confer predisposition to malignant pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas.

    PubMed

    Castro-Vega, Luis Jaime; Buffet, Alexandre; De Cubas, Aguirre A; Cascón, Alberto; Menara, Mélanie; Khalifa, Emmanuel; Amar, Laurence; Azriel, Sharona; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Chabre, Olivier; Currás-Freixes, Maria; Franco-Vidal, Valérie; Guillaud-Bataille, Marine; Simian, Christophe; Morin, Aurélie; Letón, Rocío; Gómez-Graña, Alvaro; Pollard, Patrick J; Rustin, Pierre; Robledo, Mercedes; Favier, Judith; Gimenez-Roqueplo, Anne-Paule

    2014-05-01

    Malignant pheochromocytoma (PCC) and paraganglioma (PGL) are mostly caused by germline mutations of SDHB, encoding a subunit of succinate dehydrogenase. Using whole-exome sequencing, we recently identified a mutation in the FH gene encoding fumarate hydratase, in a PCC with an 'SDH-like' molecular phenotype. Here, we investigated the role of FH in PCC/PGL predisposition, by screening for germline FH mutations in a large international cohort of patients. We screened 598 patients with PCC/PGL without mutations in known PCC/PGL susceptibility genes. We searched for FH germline mutations and large deletions, by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification methods. Global alterations in DNA methylation and protein succination were assessed by immunohistochemical staining for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC) and S-(2-succinyl) cysteine (2SC), respectively. We identified five pathogenic germline FH mutations (four missense and one splice mutation) in five patients. Somatic inactivation of the second allele, resulting in a loss of fumarate hydratase activity, was demonstrated in tumors with FH mutations. Low tumor levels of 5-hmC, resembling those in SDHB-deficient tumors, and positive 2SC staining were detected in tumors with FH mutations. Clinically, metastatic phenotype (P = 0.007) and multiple tumors (P = 0.02) were significantly more frequent in patients with FH mutations than those without such mutations. This study reveals a new role for FH in susceptibility to malignant and/or multiple PCC/PGL. Remarkably, FH-deficient PCC/PGLs display the same pattern of epigenetic deregulation as SDHB-mutated malignant PCC/PGL. Therefore, we propose that mutation screening for FH should be included in PCC/PGL genetic testing, at least for tumors with malignant behavior.

  17. Influence of Chemotherapy on EGFR Mutation Status Among Patients With Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hua; Wang, Zhijie; Chen, Keneng; Zhao, Jun; Lee, J. Jack; Wang, Shuhang; Zhou, Qinghua; Zhuo, Minglei; Mao, Li; An, Tongtong; Duan, Jianchun; Yang, Lu; Wu, Meina; Liang, Zhen; Wang, Yuyan; Kang, Xiaozheng; Wang, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose EGFR mutation is a predictor of epidermal growth factor receptor–tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment response in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, it remains unclear whether chemotherapy affects EGFR mutation status in NSCLC. We investigated the influence of chemotherapy on EGFR mutations in plasma and tumor tissues from patients with NSCLC. Patients and Methods Samples were derived from three cohorts: one, 264 patients with advanced NSCLC who received first-line chemotherapy with matched pre- and postchemotherapy blood samples; two, 63 patients with stages IIb to IIIb disease with pre– and post–neoadjuvant chemotherapy tumor tissues; and three, 79 patients with advanced NSCLC who underwent palliative surgery. EGFR mutation status was determined and analyzed to reveal potential impact of chemotherapy. Results In the first cohort, EGFR mutations were detected in 34.5% of the prechemotherapy plasma samples (91 of 264) but in only 23.1% of the postchemotherapy plasma samples (61 of 264). The decrease in EGFR mutation rate was statistically significant (P < .001). Patients whose EGFR mutations switched from positive to negative after chemotherapy had a better partial response (PR) than patients with a reverse change (P = .037). A similar decrease in EGFR mutation rate was observed in tissues after neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the second cohort (34.9% [22 of 63] v 19.0% [12 of 63]; P = .013). In the third cohort, 38.0% of the tumors (30 of 79) showed an intratumor heterogeneity of EGFR mutation, whereas 62.0% (49 of 79) were homogeneous, either with EGFR mutation or no mutation. Conclusion Our results suggest that chemotherapy may reduce EGFR mutation frequency in patients with NSCLC, likely the result of a preferential response of subclones with EGFR mutations in tumors with heterogeneous tumor cell populations. PMID:22826274

  18. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models.

    PubMed

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn Cj

    2016-09-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic mutation can take appropriate action to prevent cancer or have cancer diagnosed as early as possible for better treatment options. The recent discovery that BRCA pathogenic mutation status can inform treatment decisions in patients with ovarian cancer has led to an increased demand for BRCA testing, with testing taking place earlier in the patient care pathway. New approaches to genetic counselling may be required to meet this greater demand for BRCA testing. This review discusses the need for best practices for genetic counselling and BRCA testing; it examines the challenges facing current practice and looks at adapted models of genetic counselling.

  19. Effect of Single-Site Mutations on HP Lattice Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wuest, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P

    2014-01-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground-states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  20. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models

    PubMed Central

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn CJ

    2016-01-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic mutation can take appropriate action to prevent cancer or have cancer diagnosed as early as possible for better treatment options. The recent discovery that BRCA pathogenic mutation status can inform treatment decisions in patients with ovarian cancer has led to an increased demand for BRCA testing, with testing taking place earlier in the patient care pathway. New approaches to genetic counselling may be required to meet this greater demand for BRCA testing. This review discusses the need for best practices for genetic counselling and BRCA testing; it examines the challenges facing current practice and looks at adapted models of genetic counselling. PMID:27514840

  1. Driven by Mutations: The Predictive Value of Mutation Subtype in EGFR-Mutated Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily; Feld, Emily; Horn, Leora

    2016-12-23

    EGFR-mutated NSCLC is a genetically heterogeneous disease that includes more than 200 distinct mutations. The implications of mutational subtype for both prognostic and predictive value are being increasingly understood. Although the most common EGFR mutations-exon 19 deletions or L858R mutations-predict sensitivity to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), it is now being recognized that outcomes may be improved in patients with exon 19 deletions. Additionally, 10% of patients will have an uncommon EGFR mutation, and response to EGFR TKI therapy is highly variable depending on the mutation. Given the growing recognition of the genetic and clinical variation seen in this disease, the development of comprehensive bioinformatics-driven tools to both analyze response in uncommon mutation subtypes and inform clinical decision making will be increasingly important. Clinical trials of novel EGFR TKIs should prospectively account for the presence of uncommon mutation subtypes in study design.

  2. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness.

  3. Structural Consequences of Calmodulin EF Hand Mutations.

    PubMed

    Piazza, Michael; Taiakina, Valentina; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Guillemette, J Guy

    2017-02-21

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding protein that serves as a control element for many enzymes. It consists of two globular domains, each containing two EF hand pairs capable of binding Ca(2+), joined by a flexible central linker region. CaM is able to bind and activate its target proteins in the Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-deplete forms. To study the Ca(2+)-dependent/independent properties of binding and activation of target proteins by CaM, CaM constructs with Ca(2+)-binding disrupting mutations of Asp to Ala at position one of each EF hand have been used. These CaM mutant proteins are deficient in binding Ca(2+) in either the N-lobe EF hands (CaM12), C-lobe EF hands (CaM34), or all four EF hands (CaM1234). To investigate potential structural changes these mutations may cause, we performed detailed NMR studies of CaM12, CaM34, and CaM1234 including determining the solution structure of CaM1234. We then investigated if these CaM mutants affected the interaction of CaM with a target protein known to interact with apoCaM by determining the solution structure of CaM34 bound to the iNOS CaM binding domain peptide. The structures provide direct structural evidence of changes that are present in these Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants and show these mutations increase the hydrophobic exposed surface and decrease the electronegative surface potential throughout each lobe of CaM. These Ca(2+)-deficient CaM mutants may not be a true representation of apoCaM and may not allow for native-like interactions of apoCaM with its target proteins.

  4. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  5. Clinical features reflect exon sites of EGFR mutations in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Na, Im Il; Rho, Jin Kyung; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Cheol Hyeon; Koh, Jae Soo; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yang, Sung Hyun; Lee, Jae Cheol

    2007-06-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the clinical significance according to the subtypes of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations and presence of KRAS mutations in operable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We sequenced exons 18-21 of the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain and examined mutations in codons 12 and 13 of KRAS in tissues of patients with NSCLC who had undergone surgical resection. EGFR mutations were more frequent in never-smokers than smokers (33% vs. 14%, respectively; p=0.009) and in females than in males (31% vs. 16%, respectively; p=0.036). Mutations in exon 18-19 and 20-21 were found in 10 and 22 patients, respectively. Never-smokers and broncho-alveolar cell carcinoma features were positively associated with a mutation in exon 18-19 (p=0.027 and 0.016, respectively). The five-year survival rate in patients with a mutation in exons 18-19 (100%) was higher than that in patients without such mutation (47%; p=0.021). KRAS mutations were found in 16 patients (12%) and were not related to the overall survival (p=0.742). Patients with an EGFR mutation in exons 18-19 had better survival than patients without such mutation. Subtypes of EGFR mutations may be prognostic factors in patients undergoing curative resection.

  6. CCN1 mutation is associated with atrial septal defect.

    PubMed

    Perrot, Andreas; Schmitt, Katharina R; Roth, Eva-Maria G; Stiller, Brigitte; Posch, Maximilian G; Browne, Edmund N L; Timmann, Christian; Horstmann, Rolf D; Berger, Felix; Özcelik, Cemil

    2015-02-01

    The genetic basis of congenital heart disease remains unknown in most of the cases. Recently, a novel mouse model shed new light on the role of CCN1/CYR61, a matricellular regulatory factor, in cardiac morphogenesis. In a candidate gene approach, we analyzed a cohort of 143 patients with atrial septal defects (ASD) by sequencing the coding exons of CCN1. In addition to three frequent polymorphisms, we identified an extremely rare novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.139C > T; p.R47W) in one patient with severe ASD. The mutation leads to an exchange of residues with quite different properties in a highly conserved position of the N-terminal insulin-like growth factor binding protein module. Further bioinformatic analysis, exclusion of known ASD disease genes as well as the exclusion of the mutation in a very high number of ethnically matched controls (more than 1,000 individuals) and in public genetic databases, indicates that the p.R47W variant is a probable disease-associated mutation. The report about ASD in mice in heterozygous Ccn 1 +/- animals strongly supports this notion. Our study is the first to suggest a relationship between a probable CCN1 mutation and ASD. Our purpose here was to draw attention to CCN1, a gene that we believe may be important for genetic analysis in patients with congenital heart disease.

  7. The Y-chromosome point mutation rate in humans.

    PubMed

    Helgason, Agnar; Einarsson, Axel W; Guðmundsdóttir, Valdís B; Sigurðsson, Ásgeir; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen D; Jagadeesan, Anuradha; Ebenesersdóttir, S Sunna; Kong, Augustine; Stefánsson, Kári

    2015-05-01

    Mutations are the fundamental source of biological variation, and their rate is a crucial parameter for evolutionary and medical studies. Here we used whole-genome sequence data from 753 Icelandic males, grouped into 274 patrilines, to estimate the point mutation rate for 21.3 Mb of male-specific Y chromosome (MSY) sequence, on the basis of 1,365 meioses (47,123 years). The combined mutation rate for 15.2 Mb of X-degenerate (XDG), X-transposed (XTR) and ampliconic excluding palindromes (rAMP) sequence was 8.71 × 10(-10) mutations per position per year (PPPY). We observed a lower rate (P = 0.04) of 7.37 × 10(-10) PPPY for 6.1 Mb of sequence from palindromes (PAL), which was not statistically different from the rate of 7.2 × 10(-10) PPPY for paternally transmitted autosomes. We postulate that the difference between PAL and the other MSY regions may provide an indication of the rate at which nascent autosomal and PAL de novo mutations are repaired as a result of gene conversion.

  8. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  9. The impact of germline mutations on targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Simon A; French, Tim; Hollingsworth, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapies provide clinical benefit and improved therapeutic index. They have a growing prominence in patient management and focus in drug development. Their development is fuelled by our deepening knowledge of complex disease phenotypes and the need for improvement in new therapeutic efficacy. Extrapolation of the biological discovery through to new therapy targeting the causal biological variants to drive clinical gain is challenging. Here, we review the impact of germline mutations on targeted therapies. Historically, germline changes have contributed most to our understanding of disease mechanisms, drug metabolism and exposure, the latter of which has enabled safer positioning of therapies, such as clopidogrel and irinotecan. Similarly, prescreening for germline variants can avoid potentially fatal hypersensitivity reactions with abacavir. However, germline mutations continue to emerge as a central player in targeting therapeutics; ivacaftor drives partial restoration of mucus secretion in cystic fibrosis patients harbouring specific mutations, and treatment with olaparib exploits germline mutations in BRCA genes to drive synthetic lethality as an anti-cancer mechanism. Central is definition of the causal link, association or contribution to the biological variance - and that we believe it is drugable for therapeutic gain. The demand for better therapies to treat modern diseases provides the appetite for continued investigation of the biological variance associated with germline mutations, inevitably leading to increased impact on the development of targeted therapeutics.

  10. Whole-genome reconstruction and mutational signatures in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is the second highest cause of global cancer mortality. To explore the complete repertoire of somatic alterations in gastric cancer, we combined massively parallel short read and DNA paired-end tag sequencing to present the first whole-genome analysis of two gastric adenocarcinomas, one with chromosomal instability and the other with microsatellite instability. Results Integrative analysis and de novo assemblies revealed the architecture of a wild-type KRAS amplification, a common driver event in gastric cancer. We discovered three distinct mutational signatures in gastric cancer - against a genome-wide backdrop of oxidative and microsatellite instability-related mutational signatures, we identified the first exome-specific mutational signature. Further characterization of the impact of these signatures by combining sequencing data from 40 complete gastric cancer exomes and targeted screening of an additional 94 independent gastric tumors uncovered ACVR2A, RPL22 and LMAN1 as recurrently mutated genes in microsatellite instability-positive gastric cancer and PAPPA as a recurrently mutated gene in TP53 wild-type gastric cancer. Conclusions These results highlight how whole-genome cancer sequencing can uncover information relevant to tissue-specific carcinogenesis that would otherwise be missed from exome-sequencing data. PMID:23237666

  11. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  12. Rapid generation of hypomorphic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Laura L.; Chung, Joyce J.; Jankirama, Preetam; Keefer, Kathryn M.; Kolotilin, Igor; Pavlovic-Djuranovic, Slavica; Chalker, Douglas L.; Grbic, Vojislava; Green, Rachel; Menassa, Rima; True, Heather L.; Skeath, James B.; Djuranovic, Sergej

    2017-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations are a valuable tool for both genetic analysis of gene function and for synthetic biology applications. However, current methods to generate hypomorphic mutations are limited to a specific organism, change gene expression unpredictably, or depend on changes in spatial-temporal expression of the targeted gene. Here we present a simple and predictable method to generate hypomorphic mutations in model organisms by targeting translation elongation. Adding consecutive adenosine nucleotides, so-called polyA tracks, to the gene coding sequence of interest will decrease translation elongation efficiency, and in all tested cell cultures and model organisms, this decreases mRNA stability and protein expression. We show that protein expression is adjustable independent of promoter strength and can be further modulated by changing sequence features of the polyA tracks. These characteristics make this method highly predictable and tractable for generation of programmable allelic series with a range of expression levels. PMID:28106166

  13. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. Objective: To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA. Materials and methods:    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. Results: We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. Conclusion: BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org. PMID:27547378

  14. Coupled mutation finder: A new entropy-based method quantifying phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of significant compensatory mutation signals in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is often complicated by noise. A challenging problem in bioinformatics is remains the separation of significant signals between two or more non-conserved residue sites from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. Determination of these non-conserved residue sites is as important as the recognition of strictly conserved positions for understanding of the structural basis of protein functions and identification of functionally important residue regions. In this study, we developed a new method, the Coupled Mutation Finder (CMF) quantifying the phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations. Results To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we analyzed essential sites of two human proteins: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and glucokinase (GCK). Our results suggest that the CMF is able to separate significant compensatory mutation signals from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. The vast majority of compensatory mutation sites found by the CMF are related to essential sites of both proteins and they are likely to affect protein stability or functionality. Conclusions The CMF is a new method, which includes an MSA-specific statistical model based on multiple testing procedures that quantify the error made in terms of the false discovery rate and a novel entropy-based metric to upscale BLOSUM62 dissimilar compensatory mutations. Therefore, it is a helpful tool to predict and investigate compensatory mutation sites of structural or functional importance in proteins. We suggest that the CMF could be used as a novel automated function prediction tool that is required for a better understanding of the structural basis of proteins. The CMF server is freely accessible at http://cmf.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de. PMID:22963049

  15. Mutation analysis of the ferritin L-chain gene in age-related cataract

    PubMed Central

    Assia, Nurit; Goldenberg-Cohen, Nitza; Rechavi, Gideon; Amariglio, Ninette

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate whether acquired somatic mutations in the iron response element of the ferritin L-chain gene account for the age-related cataract. Methods The 15 most prevalent point mutations causing hereditary hyperferritinemia cataract syndrome (HHCS) were screened in patients with age-related cataract using MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry. DNA samples were obtained from the lens capsules of patients following cataract surgery, and subjected to PCR amplification. Products were analyzed by a Sequenom® mass spectrometer, and classified as a mutation or wild type according to molecular weight. For a positive control, L-ferritin G32T mutation detected by direct sequencing in 3 members of an Israeli family known to be affected by HHCS was used. Results DNA samples were isolated from the lens capsules of 90 patients, mean age 73.86, and screened for L-ferritin mutations. While the G32T mutation was detected in all 3 positive control cases, all other patients were negative for the 15 mutations. Conclusions Somatic mutations in the iron response elements (IRE) of the L-ferritin gene are infrequent in the age-related cataract. The role of L-ferritin genetic variations in the pathogenesis of age-related cataract is yet to be explored. PMID:21139976

  16. Correlation between connexin 32 gene mutations and clinical phenotype in X-linked dominant Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Ionasescu, V.; Ionasescu, R.; Searby, C.

    1996-06-14

    We studied the relationship between the genotype and clinical phenotype in 27 families with dominant X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMTX1) neuropathy. Twenty-two families showed mutations in the coding region of the connexin32 (cx32) gene. The mutations include four nonsense mutations, eight missense mutations, two medium size deletions, and one insertion. Most missense mutations showed a mild clinical phenotype (five out of eight), whereas all nonsense mutations, the larger of the two deletions, and the insertion that produced frameshifts showed severe phenotypes. Five CMTX1 families with mild clinical phenotype showed no point mutations of the cx32 gene coding region. Three of these families showed positive genetic linkage with the markers of the Xq13.1 region. The genetic linkage of the remaining two families could not be evaluated because of their small size. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. Adiposity is associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Marian, Catalin; Nie, Jing; Brasky, Theodore M; Goerlitz, David S; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Berry, Deborah L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the p53 gene are among the most frequent genetic events in human cancer and may be triggered by environmental and occupational exposures. We examined the association of clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors and breast cancer risk factors according to the prevalence and type of p53 mutations. Using tumor blocks from incident cases from a case-control study in western New York, we screened for p53 mutations in exons 2-11 using the Affymetrix p53 Gene Chip array and analyzed case-case comparisons using logistic regression. The p53 mutation frequency among cases was 28.1 %; 95 % were point mutations (13 % of which were silent) and the remainder were single base pair deletions. Sixty seven percent of all point mutations were transitions; 24 % of them are G:C>A:T at CpG sites. Positive p53 mutation status was associated with poorer differentiation (OR, 95 % CI 2.29, 1.21-4.32), higher nuclear grade (OR, 95 % CI 1.99, 1.22-3.25), and increased Ki-67 status (OR, 95 % CI 1.81, 1.10-2.98). Cases with P53 mutations were more likely to have a combined ER-positive and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 1.65, 1.01-2.71), and a combined ER-negative and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 2.18, 1.47-3.23). Body mass index >30 kg/m(2), waist circumference >79 cm, and waist-to-hip ratio >0.86 were also associated with p53 status; obese breast cancer cases are more likely to have p53 mutations (OR, 95 % CI 1.78, 1.19-2.68). We confirmed that p53 mutations are associated with less favorable tumor characteristics and identified an association of p53 mutation status and adiposity.

  18. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Caribbean Hispanic families with Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Pérez-Mayoral, Julyann; Suleiman-Suleiman, Wasilah; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria del Mar; Bertrán, Carlos; Casellas, Nicolás; Rodríguez, Natalia; Pardo, Sherly; Rivera, Keyla; Mosquera, Rafael; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2015-01-01

    Lynch Syndrome (LS) is an inherited form of colorectal cancer caused by germline mutations in the Mismatch Repair (MMR) genes. It accounts for approximately 5% of all colorectal cancers. The prevalence of Lynch Syndrome among US Hispanics is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the germline mutations of Lynch Syndrome in Caribbean Hispanics from Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. A total of 89 subjects were recruited through the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry and were classified according to Amsterdam and Bethesda clinical guidelines. For those tumors with lack of expression of MMR protein, gene sequencing was ordered. A total of 35 individuals with deficient MMR system were identified: 22 had MMR mutations and 13 had tumors with absent MMR protein expression. Our results show that the mutation spectrum of Caribbean Hispanic LS patients was composed mostly of MSH2 (66.7 %) mutations, followed by MLH1 (25.0 %). One mutation was identified in MSH6 (8.3 %). A previously unidentified mutation in MLH1 gene c.2044_2045del was found in one Caribbean Hispanic family. MMR mutation-positive individuals were found to be more likely to have a prominent family history of CRC and tumors located at the proximal colon. Compared to MSH2 mutation carriers, MLH1 mutation-positive individuals were more likely to have a strong family history of CRC and LS associated cancers. Furthermore, insurance coverage for genetic testing was found to be limited in the study population with 65.1% of the individuals recruited were denied coverage. This report presents the first description of the mutation spectrum and clinicopathologic characteristics of LS Caribbean Hispanics patients. PMID:25782445

  19. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Caribbean Hispanic families with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Pérez-Mayoral, Julyann; Suleiman-Suleiman, Wasilah; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria del Mar; Bertrán, Carlos; Casellas, Nicolás; Rodríguez, Natalia; Pardo, Sherly; Rivera, Keyla; Mosquera, Rafael; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2015-09-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC) caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. It accounts for approximately 5% of all CRCs. The prevalence of LS among US Hispanics is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the germline mutations of LS in Caribbean Hispanics from Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. A total of 89 subjects were recruited through the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry and were classified according to Amsterdam and Bethesda clinical guidelines. For those tumors with lack of expression of MMR protein, gene sequencing was ordered. A total of 35 individuals with deficient MMR system were identified: 22 had MMR mutations and 13 had tumors with absent MMR protein expression. Our results show that the mutation spectrum of Caribbean Hispanic LS patients was composed mostly of MSH2 (66.7%) mutations, followed by MLH1 (25.0%). One mutation was identified in MSH6 (8.3%). A previously unidentified mutation in MLH1 gene c.2044_2045del was found in one Caribbean Hispanic family. MMR mutation-positive individuals were found to be more likely to have a prominent family history of CRC and tumors located at the proximal colon. Compared to MSH2 mutation carriers, MLH1 mutation-positive individuals were more likely to have a strong family history of CRC and LS associated cancers. Furthermore, insurance coverage for genetic testing was found to be limited in the study population with 65.1% of the individuals recruited were denied coverage. This report presents the first description of the mutation spectrum and clinicopathologic characteristics of LS Caribbean Hispanics patients.

  20. Different mutation profiles associated to P53 accumulation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    López, Ignacio; P Oliveira, Ligia; Tucci, Paula; Alvarez-Valín, Fernando; A Coudry, Renata; Marín, Mónica

    2012-05-10

    The tumor suppressor TP53 gene is one of the most frequently mutated in different types of human cancer. Particularly in colorectal cancer (CRC), it is believed that TP53 mutations play a role in the adenoma-carcinoma transition of tumors during pathological process. In order to analyze TP53 expressed alleles in CRC, we examined TP53 mRNA in tumor samples from 101 patients with sporadic CRC. Samples were divided in two groups defined according to whether they exhibit positive or negative P53 protein expression as detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The presence of TP53 mutation was a common event in tumors with an overall frequency of 54.5%. By direct sequencing, we report 42 different TP53 sequence changes in 55 CRC patients, being two of them validated polymorphisms. TP53 mutations were more frequent in positive than in negative P53 detection group (p<0.0001), being the precise figures 79.6% and 30.8%, respectively. In addition, the mutation profiles were also different between the two groups of samples; while most of the mutations detected in P53 positive group were missense (38 out of 39), changes in P53 negative detection group include 7 insertions/deletions, 6 missense, 2 nonsense and 1 silent mutation. As previously observed, most mutations were concentrated in regions encoding P53 DNA binding domain (DBD). Codons 175, 248 and 273 together account for 36.7% of point mutations, in agreement with previous observations provided that these codons are considered mutation hotspots. Interestingly, we detected two new deletions and two new insertions. In addition, in three samples we detected two deletions and one insertion that could be explained as putative splicing variants or splicing errors.

  1. KIT and PDGFRA mutations and PDGFRA immunostaining in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Antonella; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonello, Lisa; Tondat, Fabrizio; Chiusa, Luigi; Lista, Patrizia; Pich, Achille

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association of PDGFRA and KIT mutations as well as PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Tumor DNA from 40 GISTs was sequenced for the presence of mutations in KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Tissue sections were stained with polyclonal anti-PDGFRA antibody. KIT mutations occurred in 26 cases. There were 13 deletions, 6 substitutions, 3 deletion-substitutions, 3 duplications and 1 insertion. Tumors with KIT deletions/insertion were large with a high mitotic index (MI), and were associated with a high rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs, distant metastasis, relapse and a short disease-free survival (DFS). PDGFRA mutations occurred in 6 gastric GISTs. There were 4 deletions and 2 substitutions. Tumors with PDGFRA mutations were small, with a low MI and Ki67 score, and were associated with a very low rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs and distant metastasis. PDGFRA immunopositivity was found in 23 cases: a peculiar 'dotlike' staining was found in 5 out of 6 PDGFRA mutated cases. Patients with positive PDGFRA immunostaining had a longer DFS than those with negative staining. Our data confirm that the type of KIT mutation is associated with various clinicopathologic features of GISTs, and indicate that PDGFRA mutations are associated with rather indolent tumors. PDGFRA immunopositivity reflects PDGFRA mutational status and is associated with a favorable outcome.

  2. Esophageal melanomas harbor frequent NRAS mutations unlike melanomas of other mucosal sites.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shigeki; Nakanishi, Yukihiro; Ogawa, Reiko; Kouda, Satoko; Kanai, Yae

    2009-05-01

    Mucosal melanomas have genetic alterations distinct from those in cutaneous melanomas. For example, NRAS- and BRAF-activating mutations occur frequently in cutaneous melanomas, but not in mucosal melanomas. We examined 16 esophageal melanomas for genetic alterations in NRAS, BRAF, and KIT to determine whether they exhibit genetic features common to melanomas arising from other mucosal sites. A sequencing analysis identified NRAS mutations in six cases; notably, four of these mutations were located in exon 1, an uncommon mutation site in cutaneous and other mucosal melanomas. BRAF and KIT mutations were found in one case each. Immunohistochemistry showed KIT expression in four cases, including the tumor with a KIT mutation and two other intramucosal tumors. The low frequency of BRAF mutations and the presence of a KIT mutation-positive case are findings similar to those of mucosal melanomas of other sites, but the prevalence of NRAS mutations was even higher than that of cutaneous melanomas. The present study implies that esophageal melanomas have genetic alterations unique from those observed in other mucosal melanomas.

  3. Characterization of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Mutations in Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma Families

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-01-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15–40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and β-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6±11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4±14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein–protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506337

  4. APP717, APP693, and PRIP gene mutations are rare in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Anderson, Leojean; O'dahl, Sheldon; Wisjman, Ellen M.; Sadovnick, Adele D.; Ball, Melvyn J.; Larson, Eric B.; Kukull, Walter A.; Martin, George M.; Roses, Allen D.; Bird, Thomas D.

    1991-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene codes for the precursor to the β-protein found in the amyloid deposits of Alzheimer disease (AD). Recently Goate et al. identified in codon 717 of this gene a missense mutation which segregates with AD in a familial AD (FAD) kindred. The same mutation was also found in affected subjects from a second FAD family but not in other FAD families or in normal controls. The following work was undertaken to determine the frequency of the codon 717 mutation in FAD and nonfamilial AD cases and in normal controls. We tested 76 FAD families, 127 “sporadic” AD subjects, 16 Down syndrome cases, and 256 normal controls for this mutation, and none were positive. We also tested for the APP codon 693 mutation associated with hereditary cerebral hemorrhage with amyloidosis–Dutch type, for PRIP gene missense mutations at codons 102, 117, and 200, and for the PRIP insertion mutations which are associated with Creutzfeld-Jakob disease and Gerstmann-Straussler Scheinker syndrome. No examples of these mutations were found in our population. Thus these APP and PRIP mutations are rare in both FAD and nonfamilial AD. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:1679288

  5. Detecting gene mutations in Japanese Alzheimer's patients by semiconductor sequencing.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Ryoichi; Miyamoto, Ryosuke; Morino, Hiroyuki; Izumi, Yuishin; Kuramochi, Masahito; Kurashige, Takashi; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Mizuno, Noriyoshi; Kurihara, Hidemi; Kawakami, Hideshi

    2014-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. To date, several genes have been identified as the cause of AD, including PSEN1, PSEN2, and APP. The association between APOE and late-onset AD has also been reported. We here used a bench top next-generation sequencer, which uses an integrated semiconductor device, detects hydrogen ions, and operates at a high-speed using nonoptical technology. We examined 45 Japanese AD patients with positive family histories, and 29 sporadic patients with early onset (<60-year-old). Causative mutations were detected in 5 patients in the familial group (11%). Three patients had a known heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN1 gene (p.H163R). Two patients from 1 family had a novel heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN1 gene (p.F386L). In the early onset group, 1 patient carrying homozygous APOEε4 had a novel heterozygous missense mutation in the PSEN2 gene (p.T421M). Approximately 43% patients were APOEε4 positive in our study. This new sequencing technology is useful for detecting genetic variations in familial AD.

  6. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  7. Positive clinical neuroscience: explorations in positive neurology.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Narinder; Cole, Jonathan; Manly, Tom; Viskontas, Indre; Ninteman, Aafke; Hasher, Lynn; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2013-08-01

    Disorders of the brain and its sensory organs have traditionally been associated with deficits in movement, perception, cognition, emotion, and behavior. It is increasingly evident, however, that positive phenomena may also occur in such conditions, with implications for the individual, science, medicine, and for society. This article provides a selective review of such positive phenomena--enhanced function after brain lesions, better-than-normal performance in people with sensory loss, creativity associated with neurological disease, and enhanced performance associated with aging. We propose that, akin to the well-established field of positive psychology and the emerging field of positive clinical psychology, the nascent fields of positive neurology and positive neuropsychology offer new avenues to understand brain-behavior relationships, with both theoretical and therapeutic implications.

  8. Clustering of Caucasian Leber hereditary optic neuropathy patients containing the 11778 or 14484 mutations on an mtDNA lineage

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.D.; Sun, F.; Wallace, D.C.

    1997-02-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a type of blindness caused by mtDNA mutations. Three LHON mtDNA mutations at nucleotide positions 3460, 11778, and 14484 are specific for LHON and account for 90% of worldwide cases and are thus designated as {open_quotes}primary{close_quotes} LHON mutations. Fifteen other {open_quotes}secondary{close_quotes} LHON mtDNA mutations have been identified, but their pathogenicity is unclear. mtDNA haplotype and phylogenetic analysis of the primary LHON mutations in North American Caucasian patients and controls has shown that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, which are distributed throughout the European-derived (Caucasian) mtDNA phylogeny, patients containing the 14484 mutation tended to be associated with European mtDNA haplotype J. To investigate this apparent clustering, we performed {chi}{sup 2}-based statistical analyses to compare the distribution of LHON patients on the Caucasian phylogenetic tree. Our results indicate that, unlike the 3460 and 11778 mutations, the 14484 mutation was not distributed on the phylogeny in proportion to the frequencies of the major Caucasian mtDNA haplogroups found in North America. The 14484 mutation was next shown to occur on the haplogroup J background more frequently that expected, consistent with the observation that {approximately}75% of worldwide 14484-positive LHON patients occur in association with haplogroup J. The 11778 mutation also exhibited a moderate clustering on haplogroup J. These observations were supported by statistical analysis using all available mutation frequencies reported in the literature. This paper thus illustrates the potential importance of genetic background in certain mtDNA-based diseases, speculates on a pathogenic role for a subset of LHON secondary mutations and their interaction with primary mutations, and provides support for a polygenic model for LHON expression in some cases. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Rapid Bioinformatic Identification of Thermostabilizing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, David B.; Karpowich, Nathan K.; Song, Jin Mei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo stability is a valuable protein characteristic but is laborious to improve experimentally. In addition to biopharmaceutical and industrial applications, stable protein is important for biochemical and structural studies. Taking advantage of the large number of available genomic sequences and growth temperature data, we present two bioinformatic methods to identify a limited set of amino acids or positions that likely underlie thermostability. Because these methods allow thousands of homologs to be examined in silico, they have the advantage of providing both speed and statistical power. Using these methods, we introduced, via mutation, amino acids from thermoadapted homologs into an exemplar mesophilic membrane protein, and demonstrated significantly increased thermostability while preserving protein activity. PMID:26445442

  10. Biallelic truncating SCN9A mutation identified in four families with congenital insensitivity to pain from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Sawal, H A; Harripaul, R; Mikhailov, A; Dad, R; Ayub, M; Jawad Hassan, M; Vincent, J B

    2016-12-01

    (a) Homozygosity-mapping-by-descent of four Bhakkar congenital indifference/insensitivity to pain (CIP) families. (b) Identification of mutation Met1190* in SCN9A. (c) SCN9A/NaV1.7 2D structure (as predicted by CCTOP and SMART) and approximate position of known nonsense (*) and missense (M) mutations ( www.hgmd.cf.ac.uk), as well as the Bhakkar mutation (this study) in red.

  11. A comparison of somatic mutational spectra in healthy study populations from Russia, Sweden and USA

    SciTech Connect

    Noori, P; Hou, S; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Lambert, B

    2004-10-27

    Comparison of mutation spectra at the hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene of peripheral blood T lymphocytes may provide insight into the aetiology of somatic mutation contributing to carcinogenesis and other diseases. To increase knowledge of mutation spectra in healthy people, we have analyzed HPRT mutant T-cells of 50 healthy Russians originally recruited as controls for a study of Chernobyl clean-up workers (Jones et al. Radiation Res. 158, 2002, 424). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions and DNA sequencing identified 161 independent mutations among 176 thioguanine resistant mutants. Forty (40) mutations affected splicing mechanisms and 27 deletions or insertions of 1 to 60 nucleotides were identified. Ninety four (94) single base substitutions were identified, including 62 different mutations at 55 different nucleotide positions, of which 19 had not previously been reported in human T-cells. Comparison of this base substitution spectrum with mutation spectra in a USA (Burkhart-Schultz et al. Carcinogenesis 17, 1996, 1871) and two Swedish populations (Podlutsky et al, Carcinogenesis 19, 1998, 557, Podlutsky et al. Mutation Res. 431, 1999, 325) revealed similarity in the type, frequency and distribution of mutations in the four spectra, consistent with aetiologies inherent in human metabolism. There were 15-19 identical mutations in the three pair-wise comparisons of Russian with USA and Swedish spectra. Intriguingly, there were 21 mutations unique to the Russian spectrum, and comparison by the Monte Carlo method of Adams and Skopek (J. Mol. Biol. 194, 1987, 391) indicated that the Russian spectrum was different from both Swedish spectra (P=0.007, 0.002) but not different from the USA spectrum (P=0.07), when Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was made (p < 0.008 required for significance). Age and smoking did not account for these differences. Other factors causing mutational differences need to be explored.

  12. HER2 somatic mutations are associated with poor survival in HER2-negative breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tonghui; Xu, Ye; Sheng, Shuyan; Yuan, Hua; Ouyang, Tao; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Tianfeng; Fan, Zhaoqing; Fan, Tie; Lin, Benyao; Xie, Yuntao

    2017-02-06

    It is well documented that HER2 overexpression/amplification is associated with the poor survival in breast cancer patients. However, it is largely unknown whether HER2 somatic mutations are associated with the survival in HER2-negative breast cancer patients. Here, we identified HER2 somatic mutations in tumors from 1,348 unselected breast cancer patients by sequencing the entire HER2 coding region. All these mutations were tested for in corresponding blood samples to determine whether they were somatic or germline mutations. We further investigated the associations between the HER2 somatic mutations and recurrence-free survival (RFS) and distant recurrence-free survival (DRFS) in this cohort of patients. We found that 27 of 1,348 (2.0%) of these patients carried a HER2 somatic mutation. In vitro experiments demonstrated that some of novel mutations and those with unknown functions increased HER2 activity. HER2 status was available for 1,306 patients, and the HER2 somatic mutation rates in HER2-positive (n=353) and HER2-negative breast cancers (n=953) were 1.4% and 2.3%, respectively. Among the HER2-negative patients, those with a HER2 somatic mutation had a significantly worse recurrence-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR] =2.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.25-5.72, P=0.002) and distant recurrence-free survival (unadjusted HR=2.50; 95% CI: 1.10-5.68, P=0.004) than those with wild-type HER2. Taken together, our findings suggested that HER2 somatic mutations occur at a higher frequency in HER2-negative breast cancer, and HER2-negative breast cancer patients with these mutations have poor survival. Therefore, HER2-negative patients with a HER2 somatic mutation are potentially good candidates for HER2-targeted therapy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Novel FAM134B mutations and their clinicopathological significance in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Islam, Farhadul; Gopalan, Vinod; Wahab, Riajul; Lee, Katherine Ting-Wei; Haque, Md Hakimul; Mamoori, Afraa; Lu, Cu-Tai; Smith, Robert A; Lam, Alfred K-Y

    2017-03-01

    FAM134B is a putative tumour suppressor gene and no mutations in FAM134B have been reported in colorectal cancer (CRC) to date. This study aims to identify FAM134B mutation sites and the clinicopathological significance of the gene in patients with CRC. Eighty-eight colorectal cancers were studied for FAM134B mutations by Sanger sequencing. The mutations in these cancers were then tested for correlations with the clinical and pathological parameters of the studied cancers. In addition, mRNA and protein expression of FAM134B in colorectal cancers was examined by polymerase chain reaction, Western blots, and immunofluorescence analysis. FAM134B mutation was noted in 46.5% (41/88) of patients with CRC. Thirty-one novel potentially pathogenic mutations were noted in coding and intronic regions of FAM134B in CRC, the majority of which were single-nucleotide substitutions. Of the 31 mutations, eight novel frameshift mutations showed potential to cause non-sense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in computational analysis. In addition, FAM134B mutations were associated with various clinical and pathological variables, including sex of the patients, presence of metachronous cancer, size, T staging, presence of distant metastases, and positivity of microsatellite instability (MSI) in the cancer (p < 0.05). FAM134B mRNA and protein expression was decreased in FAM134B mutated cancers. To conclude, FAM134B mutation is common in colorectal cancer. The association of the mutation of this gene with adverse clinical and pathological parameters is congruent with the tumour suppressive properties of the gene.

  14. DUOX2 Mutations Are Frequently Associated With Congenital Hypothyroidism in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Ryul; Park, Jong-Ho; Park, June-Hee; Park, Hyung-Doo; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2016-01-01

    Background Most cases with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) are usually sporadic, while about 20% of the cases are caused by genetic defects. Little information is available regarding the mutation incidence and genetic heterogeneity of CH in Koreans. We aimed to determine the mutation incidence of CH in newborn screenings (NBS) and to evaluate the frequency and spectrum of mutations underlying CH. Methods A total of 112 newborns with thyroid dysfunction were enrolled from 256,624 consecutive NBS. Furthermore, 58 outpatients with primary CH were added from an endocrine clinic. All coding exons of TSHR, PAX8, TPO, DUOX2, DUOXA2, and SCL5A5 were sequenced. Results The mutation incidence of CH was estimated to be 1 in 6,580 newborns. A total of 36 different mutations were identified in 53 cases. The overall mutation positive rate was 31%. The DUOX2 mutations were the most prevalent in both newborns and outpatients. Seven different recurrent mutations [p.G488R (n=13), p.A649E (n=3), p.R885Q (n=3), p.I1080T (n=2), and p.A1206T (n=2) in DUOX2; p.Y138X (n=9) in DUOXA2; and p.R450H (n=5) in TSHR) were identified as the mutations underlying CH. Conclusions The mutation incidence of CH was considerably higher than expected in the Korean newborn population. This study revealed seven different recurrent mutations underlying CH. We conclude that DUOX2 mutations are a frequent cause of CH in the Korean population. PMID:26709262

  15. Systematic mutation of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Rennell, D; Bouvier, S E; Hardy, L W; Poteete, A R

    1991-11-05

    Amber mutations were introduced into every codon (except the initiating AUG) of the bacteriophage T4 lysozyme gene. The amber alleles were introduced into a bacteriophage P22 hybrid, called P22 e416, in which the normal P22 lysozyme gene is replaced by its T4 homologue, and which consequently depends upon T4 lysozyme for its ability to form a plaque. The resulting amber mutants were tested for plaque formation on amber suppressor strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Experiments with other hybrid phages engineered to produce different amounts of wild-type T4 lysozyme have shown that, to score as deleterious, a mutation must reduce lysozyme activity to less than 3% of that produced by wild-type P22 e416. Plating the collection of amber mutants covering 163 of the 164 codons of T4 lysozyme, on 13 suppressor strains that each insert a different amino acid substitutions at every position in the protein (except the first). Of the resulting 2015 single amino acid substitutions in T4 lysozyme, 328 were found to be sufficiently deleterious to inhibit plaque formation. More than half (55%) of the positions in the protein tolerated all substitutions examined. Among (N-terminal) amber fragments, only those of 161 or more residues are active. The effects of many of the deleterious substitutions are interpretable in light of the known structure of T4 lysozyme. Residues in the molecule that are refractory to replacements generally have solvent-inaccessible side-chains; the catalytic Glu11 and Asp20 residues are notable exceptions. Especially sensitive sites include residues involved in buried salt bridges near the catalytic site (Asp10, Arg145 and Arg148) and a few others that may have critical structural roles (Gly30, Trp138 and Tyr161).

  16. Mutational analysis using oligonucleotide microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Hacia, J.; Collins, F.

    1999-01-01

    The development of inexpensive high throughput methods to identify individual DNA sequence differences is important to the future growth of medical genetics. This has become increasingly apparent as epidemiologists, pathologists, and clinical geneticists focus more attention on the molecular basis of complex multifactorial diseases. Such undertakings will rely upon genetic maps based upon newly discovered, common, single nucleotide polymorphisms. Furthermore, candidate gene approaches used in identifying disease associated genes necessitate screening large sequence blocks for changes tracking with the disease state. Even after such genes are isolated, large scale mutational analyses will often be needed for risk assessment studies to define the likely medical consequences of carrying a mutated gene.
This review concentrates on the use of oligonucleotide arrays for hybridisation based comparative sequence analysis. Technological advances within the past decade have made it possible to apply this technology to many different aspects of medical genetics. These applications range from the detection and scoring of single nucleotide polymorphisms to mutational analysis of large genes. Although we discuss published scientific reports, unpublished work from the private sector12 could also significantly affect the future of this technology.


Keywords: mutational analysis; oligonucleotide microarrays; DNA chips PMID:10528850

  17. Sporadic medulloblastomas contain PTCH mutations.

    PubMed

    Raffel, C; Jenkins, R B; Frederick, L; Hebrink, D; Alderete, B; Fults, D W; James, C D

    1997-03-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), or Gorlin's syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder that predisposes to developmental defects and various forms of cancer. PTCH was recently proposed as a candidate gene for NBCCS due to its frequent mutation in basal cell carcinomas, the cancer most often associated with this syndrome. Another NBCCS-associated cancer is medulloblastoma, a common central nervous system tumor in children. Most medulloblastomas, however, occur without indication of an inherited predisposition. We have examined 24 sporadic medulloblastomas for loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at loci flanking as well as within PTCH. In cases with LOH, single-strand conformational polymorphism and sequencing analysis were performed to determine the status of the remaining PTCH allele. Microsatellite analysis indicated LOH of PTCH in 5 of 24 tumors, and in three of these cases a mutation of the remaining allele was identified. Two of the mutations were duplication insertions, and the third consisted of a single base deletion. It is interesting that all three mutations occur in exon 17 of the PTCH gene. These data suggest that inactivation of PTCH function is involved in the development of at least a subset of sporadic medulloblastomas.

  18. New mutation to Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolff, G; Deuschl, G; Wienker, T F; Hummel, K; Bender, K; Lücking, C H; Schumacher, M; Hammer, J; Oepen, G

    1989-01-01

    We report a large family with an isolated case of Huntington's disease (HD), which is probably the result of a new mutation. The patient developed clinical signs typical of HD at the age of 36. The clinical course of the patient's disease is documented by several clinical admissions over a period of 14 years at present. The family history is strikingly negative with the parents having been clearly unaffected into their 80s and with 13 older and two younger, living, healthy sibs. Extensive testing of polymorphic markers (blood groups, red cell and serum proteins, HLA antigens) showed no indication of non-paternity, but rather gave strong support to the hypothesis that the proband is a full sib. In addition, DNA typing for several RFLPs known to be closely linked to the HD gene locus indicated that several clearly unaffected sibs share one or the other or both of the patient's haplotypes. This is further evidence in favour of the hypothesis of a new mutation at the HD locus. The posterior probability of a new mutation to HD in the patient exceeds 99%, even if an a priori probability of non-paternity of 10% and a mutation rate of HD of 10(-7) is assumed.

  19. Isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations in gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Waitkus, Matthew S.; Diplas, Bill H.; Yan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, extraordinary progress has been made in elucidating the underlying genetic causes of gliomas. In 2008, our understanding of glioma genetics was revolutionized when mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) were identified in the vast majority of progressive gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs). IDH enzymes normally catalyze the decarboxylation of isocitrate to generate α-ketoglutarate (αKG), but recurrent mutations at Arg132 of IDH1 and Arg172 of IDH2 confer a neomorphic enzyme activity that catalyzes reduction of αKG into the putative oncometabolite D-2-hydroxyglutate (D2HG). D2HG inhibits αKG-dependent dioxygenases and is thought to create a cellular state permissive to malignant transformation by altering cellular epigenetics and blocking normal differentiation processes. Herein, we discuss the relevant literature on mechanistic studies of IDH1/2 mutations in gliomas, and we review the potential impact of IDH1/2 mutations on molecular classification and glioma therapy. PMID:26188014

  20. Recovery position - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... CPR, the victim should be placed in the recovery position. The recovery position helps keep the victim's airway open. To put the victim in the recovery position grab the victim's leg and shoulder and ...

  1. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  2. Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

    2012-01-01

    Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

  3. Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Ernst, Randal M.; Gillham, Jane; Reivich, Karen; Linkins, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Positive education is defined as education for both traditional skills and for happiness. The high prevalence worldwide of depression among young people, the small rise in life satisfaction, and the synergy between learning and positive emotion all argue that the skills for happiness should be taught in school. There is substantial evidence from…

  4. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  5. Detection of EGFR and KRAS Mutation by Pyrosequencing Analysis in Cytologic Samples of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Lee, So-Young; Park, Hyung-Kyu; Oh, Seo-Young; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Kye-Young; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2016-08-01

    EGFR and KRAS mutations are two of the most common mutations that are present in lung cancer. Screening and detecting these mutations are of issue these days, and many different methods and tissue samples are currently used to effectively detect these two mutations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the testing for EGFR and KRAS mutations by pyrosequencing method, and compared the yield of cytology versus histology specimens in a consecutive series of patients with lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed EGFR and KRAS mutation results of 399 (patients with EGFR mutation test) and 323 patients (patients with KRAS mutation test) diagnosed with lung cancer in Konkuk University Medical Center from 2008 to 2014. Among them, 60 patients had received both EGFR and KRAS mutation studies. We compared the detection rate of EGFR and KRAS tests in cytology, biopsy, and resection specimens. EGFR and KRAS mutations were detected in 29.8% and 8.7% of total patients, and the positive mutation results of EGFR and KRAS were mutually exclusive. The detection rate of EGFR mutation in cytology was higher than non-cytology (biopsy or resection) materials (cytology: 48.5%, non-cytology: 26.1%), and the detection rate of KRAS mutation in cytology specimens was comparable to non-cytology specimens (cytology: 8.3%, non-cytology: 8.7%). We suggest that cytology specimens are good alternatives that can readily substitute tissue samples for testing both EGFR and KRAS mutations. Moreover, pyrosequencing method is highly sensitive in detecting EGFR and KRAS mutations in lung cancer patients.

  6. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  7. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  8. DHPLC Screening of ATM Gene in Italian Patients Affected by Ataxia-Telangiectasia: Fourteen Novel ATM Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Magliozzi, Monia; Piane, Maria; Torrente, Isabella; Sinibaldi, Lorenzo; Rizzo, Giovanni; Savio, Camilla; Lulli, Patrizia; De Luca, Alessandro; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Chessa, Luciana

    2006-01-01

    The gene for ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T:MIM:#208900), ATM, spans about 150~kb of genomic DNA and is composed of 62 coding exons. ATM mutations are found along the entire coding sequence of the gene, without evidence of mutational hot spots. Using DNA as the starting material, we used denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) technique to search for ATM gene mutations. Initially, DHPLC was validated in a retrospective study of 16 positive control samples that included 19 known mutations; 100% of mutations were detected. Subsequently, DHPLC was used to screen for mutations a cohort of 22 patients with the classical form of A-T. A total of 27 different mutations were identified on 38 of the 44 alleles, corresponding to a 86% detection rate. Fourteen of the mutations were novel. In addition, 15 different variants and polymorphisms of unknown functional significance were found. The high incidence of new and individual A-T mutations in our cohort of patients demonstrates marked mutational heterogeneity of A-T in Italy and corroborate the efficiency of DHPLC as a method for the mutation screening of A-T patients. PMID:17124347

  9. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1): a protein truncation assay yielding identification of mutations in 73% of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Park, V M; Pivnick, E K

    1998-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is caused by mutations in a tumour suppressor gene located on chromosome 17 (17q11.2). Disease causing mutations are dispersed throughout the gene, which spans 350 kilobases and includes 59 exons. A common consequence of NF1 mutations is introduction of a premature stop codon, and the majority of mutant genes encode truncated forms of neurofibromin. We used a protein truncation assay to screen for mutations in 15 NF1 patients and obtained positive results in 11 of them (73%). Sequencing of cDNA and genomic DNA yielded identification of 10 different mutations, including four splicing errors, three small deletions, two nonsense mutations, and one small insertion. Nine mutations were predicted to cause premature termination of translation, while one mutation caused in frame deletion as a result ofexon skipping. In one other case involving abnormal splicing, five different aberrantly spliced transcripts were detected. One germline nonsense mutation (R1306X, 3916C>T) corresponded to the same base change that occurs by mRNA editing in normal subjects. The second nonsense mutation (R2496X) was the sole germline mutation that has been previously described. The subjects studied represented typically affected NF1 patients and no correlations between genotype and phenotype were apparent. A high incidence of ocular hypertelorism was observed. Images PMID:9783703

  10. The prevalence of mutations in the major hydrophilic region of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus varies with subgenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Harrison, T J; He, X; Chen, Q Y; Li, G J; Liu, M H; Li, H; Yang, J Y; Fang, Z L

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBV) may result in vaccine escape, failure of immunotherapy and antiviral resistance. These mutants may be transmitted and constitute a public health threat. We aimed to determine the prevalence of MHR mutations of HBV in areas of high endemicity in Guangxi, China. HBV surface gene was analysed from 278 HBsAg-positive asymptomatic individuals recruited from Guangxi using cluster sampling. Three genotypes, B, C and I, were identified. The overall prevalence of MHR mutations is 17·6%. The prevalence of MHR mutations in genotype B (15·1%) is not significantly different from that in genotype C (16·4%). However, the prevalence in subgenotype C5 (31·1%) is significantly higher than in subgenotype C2 (13·0%) (χ 2 = 6·997, P < 0·05). The prevalence of escape mutations and overlapping polymerase substitutions in subgenotype C5 is significantly higher than in subgenotypes B2 and C2. In total, 7·9% of MHR mutants are escape mutations and 72·1% of MHR mutations produced amino-acid changes in the overlapping polymerase, including resistance mutations to entecavir. Our results suggest that the prevalence of MHR mutations varies with subgenotype. The prevalence of escape mutations and polymerase mutations may be associated with subgenotype.

  11. Characterization of six novel mutations in CYBA: the gene causing autosomal recessive chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Teimourian, Shahram; Zomorodian, Elham; Badalzadeh, Mohsen; Pouya, Alireza; Kannengiesser, Caroline; Mansouri, Davood; Cheraghi, Taher; Parvaneh, Nima

    2008-06-01

    One of the rarest forms of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is caused by mutations in CYBA, which encodes the p22-phox subunit of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase, leading to defective intracellular killing. This study investigated eight patients (six males and two females) from seven consanguineous, unrelated families with clinical CGD, positive family history and p22-phox deficiency. Mutation analysis of CYBA showed six different novel mutations: deletion of exons 3, 4 and 5; a missense mutation in exon 6 (c.373G>A); a splice site mutation in intron 5 (c.369+1G>A); a frameshift in exon 6 (c.385delGAGC); a frameshift in exon 3 (c.174delG); and a frameshift in exon 4 (c.223delC).

  12. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, J W; Steenvoorden, A C; Lyons, J; Anger, B; Böhlke, J U; Bos, J L; Seliger, H; Bartram, C R

    1987-01-01

    We report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization we additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case. Images PMID:3122217

  13. RAS gene mutations in acute and chronic myelocytic leukemias, chronic myeloproliferative disorders, and myelodysplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Janssen, J.W.G.; Steenvoorden, A.C.M.; Lyons, J.; Anger, B.; Boehlke, J.U.; Bos, J.L.; Seliger, H.; Bartram, C.R.

    1987-12-01

    The authors report on investigations aimed at detecting mutated RAS genes in a variety of preleukemic disorders and leukemias of myeloid origin. DNA transfection analyses (tumorigenicity assay) and hybridization to mutation-specific oligonucleotide probes established NRAS mutations in codon 12 or 61 of 4/9 acute myelocytic leukemias (AML) and three AML lines. Leukemic cells of another AML patient showed HRAS gene activation. By using a rapid and sensitive dot-blot screening procedure based on the combination of in vitro amplification of RAS-specific sequences and oligonucleotide hybridization they additionally screened 15 myelodysplastic syndromes, 26 Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelocytic leukemias in chronic or acute phase, and 19 other chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A mutation within NRAS codon 12 could thus be demonstrated in a patient with idiopathic myelofibrosis and in another with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia. Moreover, mutated NRAS sequences were detected in lymphocytes, in granulocytes, as well as in monocytes/macrophages of the latter case.

  14. Targeting EGFR T790M mutation in NSCLC: From biology to evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Passaro, Antonio; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Pochesci, Alessia; Vacirca, Davide; Spitaleri, Gianluca; Catania, Chiara Matilde; Rappa, Alessandra; Barberis, Massimo; de Marinis, Filippo

    2017-03-01

    The identification of EGFR mutations and their respectively tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), changed dramatically treatment and survival of patients with EGFR-positive lung cancer. Nowadays, different EGFR TKIs as afatinib, erlotinib and gefitinib are approved worldwide for the treatment of NSCLC harbouring EGFR mutations, in particular exon 19 deletions or exon 21 (Leu858Arg) substitution EGFR mutations. In first-line setting, when comparing with platinum-based chemotherapy, these target drugs improves progression-free survival, response rate and quality of life. Unfortunately, the development of different mechanism of resistance, limits the long term efficacy of these agents. The most clear mechanism of resistance is the development of EGFR Thr790Met mutation. Against this new target, different third-generation EGFR-mutant-selective TKIs, such as osimertinib, rociletinib and olmutinib, showed a great activity. In this review, we summarize the scientific evidences about biology, evaluation and treatment on NSCLC with EGFR T790M mutation.

  15. Molecular definition of an allelic series of mutations disrupting the mouse Lmx1a (dreher) gene.

    PubMed

    Chizhikov, Victor; Steshina, Ekaterina; Roberts, Richard; Ilkin, Yesim; Washburn, Linda; Millen, Kathleen J

    2006-10-01

    Mice homozygous for the dreher (dr) mutation are characterized by pigmentation and skeletal abnormalities and striking behavioral phenotypes, including ataxia, vestibular deficits, and hyperactivity. The ataxia is associated with a cerebellar malformation that is remarkably similar to human Dandy-Walker malformation. Previously, positional cloning identified mutations in LIM homeobox transcription factor 1 alpha gene (Lmx1a) in three dr alleles. Two of these alleles, however, are extinct and unavailable for further analysis. In this article we report a new spontaneous dr allele and describe the Lmx1a mutations in this and six additional dr alleles. Strikingly, deletion null, missense, and frameshift mutations in these alleles all cause similar cerebellar malformations, suggesting that all dr mutations analyzed to date are null alleles.

  16. Mutational analysis of glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene in Hirayama Disease

    PubMed Central

    Blumen, Sergiu C.; Drory, Vivian E.; Sadeh, Menachem; El-Ad, Baruch; Soimu, Uri; Groozman, Galina B.; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Goldfarb, Lev G.

    2009-01-01

    Sporadic juvenile muscular atrophy of the distal upper extremity or Hirayama's Disease (HD) and autosomal dominant motor distal neuronopathy/axonopathy (CMT2D/dSMA-V), produced by glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS) gene mutations, share some clinical features including: young age of onset, predilection for the distal upper extremity, asymmetry, sparing of proximal muscles and unusual cold sensitivity. However, incomplete penetrance of GARS gene mutations may account for apparently non-familial cases. In order to inquire whether GARS gene mutations are associated with HD we studied seven patients fulfilling the clinical and electrodiagnostic criteria for HD. All patients underwent MRI of cervical spine that excluded compressive myelopathy in neutral position and intramedullary pathology. Each patient was tested for the presence of mutations in GARS by sequencing all coding exons amplified from genomic DNA. No pathogenic mutations were found, excluding the role of GARS gene as a possible factor in the etiology of HD in this cohort. PMID:19412816

  17. Mutations in TrkA Causing Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis (CIPA) Induce Misfolding, Aggregation, and Mutation-dependent Neurodegeneration by Dysfunction of the Autophagic Flux.

    PubMed

    Franco, María Luisa; Melero, Cristina; Sarasola, Esther; Acebo, Paloma; Luque, Alfonso; Calatayud-Baselga, Isabel; García-Barcina, María; Vilar, Marçal

    2016-10-07

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by insensitivity to noxious stimuli and variable intellectual disability (ID) due to mutations in the NTRK1 gene encoding the NGF receptor TrkA. To get an insight in the effect of NTRK1 mutations in the cognitive phenotype we biochemically characterized three TrkA mutations identified in children diagnosed of CIPA with variable ID. These mutations are located in different domains of the protein; L213P in the extracellular domain, Δ736 in the kinase domain, and C300stop in the extracellular domain, a new mutation causing CIPA diagnosed in a Spanish teenager. We found that TrkA mutations induce misfolding, retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and aggregation in a mutation-dependent manner. The distinct mutations are degraded with a different kinetics by different ER quality control mechanisms; although C300stop is rapidly disposed by autophagy, Δ736 degradation is sensitive to the proteasome and to autophagy inhibitors, and L213P is a long-lived protein refractory to degradation. In addition L213P enhances the formation of autophagic vesicles triggering an increase in the autophagic flux with deleterious consequences. Mouse cortical neurons expressing L213P showed the accumulation of LC3-GFP positive puncta and dystrophic neurites. Our data suggest that TrkA misfolding and aggregation induced by some CIPA mutations disrupt the autophagy homeostasis causing neurodegeneration. We propose that distinct disease-causing mutations of TrkA generate different levels of cell toxicity, which may provide an explanation of the variable intellectual disability observed in CIPA patients.

  18. Mutation analysis in Turkish phenylketonuria patients.

    PubMed Central

    Ozgüç, M; Ozalp, I; Coşkun, T; Yilmaz, E; Erdem, H; Ayter, S

    1993-01-01

    Forty-four classical PKU patients have been screened for various mutations. The newly identified IVS 10 splicing mutation was found in 32% of the mutant alleles and comprises 74.5% of the mutations that could be typed: 261arg-gln (6.8%), 158arg-gly (2.3%), 252arg-trp (1.1%), 280glu-lys (-), and 272gly-stop (-) were the other mutations that were screened. Images PMID:8445616

  19. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Comparison of Three Diagnostic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Sevin, Margaux; Ramla, Selim; Truffot, Aurélie; Verrier, Tiffany; Bouchot, Dominique; Courtois, Martine; Bas, Mathilde; Benali, Sonia; Bailly, François; Favre, Bernardine; Guy, Julien; Martin, Laurent; Maynadié, Marc; Carillo, Serge; Girodon, François

    2015-01-01

    Calreticulin (CALR) mutations have recently been reported in 70–84% of JAK2V617F-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), and this detection has become necessary to improve the diagnosis of MPN. In a large single-centre cohort of 298 patients suffering from Essential Thrombocythemia (ET), the JAK2V617F, CALR and MPL mutations were noted in 179 (60%), 56 (18.5%) and 13 (4.5%) respectively. For the detection of the CALR mutations, three methods were compared in parallel: high-resolution melting-curve analysis (HRM), product-sizing analysis and Sanger sequencing. The sensitivity for the HRM, product-sizing analysis and Sanger sequencing was 96.4%, 98.2% and 89.3% respectively, whereas the specificity was 96.3%, 100% and 100%. In our cohort, the product-sizing analysis was the most sensitive method and was the easiest to interpret, while the HRM was sometimes difficult to interpret. In contrast, when large series of samples were tested, HRM provided results more quickly than did the other methods, which required more time. Finally, the sequencing method, which is the reference method, had the lowest sensitivity but can be used to describe the type of mutation precisely. Altogether, our results suggest that in routine laboratory practice, product-sizing analysis is globally similar to HRM for the detection of CALR mutations, and that both may be used as first-line screening tests. If the results are positive, Sanger sequencing can be used to confirm the mutation and to determine its type. Product-sizing analysis provides sensitive and specific results, moreover, with the quantitative measurement of CALR, which might be useful to monitor specific treatments. PMID:26501981

  20. A proven de novo germline mutation in HNPCC.

    PubMed

    Kraus, C; Kastl, S; Günther, K; Klessinger, S; Hohenberger, W; Ballhausen, W G

    1999-12-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) is a heterogeneous group of tumour predisposition syndromes caused by germline mutations in at least four different mismatch repair genes. HNPCC patients are prone to the development of carcinomas of the intestinal tract and other specific sites. Identification of presumptive HNPCC patients is primarily based on a positive family history of colorectal cancer in at least two generations. In the course of mutation screening of the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in patients manifesting a carcinoma of the HNPCC tumour spectrum before the age of 45 years, we identified a germline MSH2 344delA frameshift mutation in a male proband. This index patient, at the age of 25 years, initially developed a large rectal adenoma that was removed by polypectomy. Ten years later he was operated on for an invasive right sided colon carcinoma in the caecum (International Union Against Cancer (UICC) stage III). The mother and father, aged 61 and 66 years, respectively, were healthy and had no family history of colorectal cancer. Subsequent molecular analyses excluded the germinal MSH2 344delA alteration identified in their son and at the same time paternity was confirmed with a set of informative polymorphic markers. Thus, the genetic alteration identified in our patient definitely represented a de novo germline mutation in one of the major HNPCC genes. This case report of a patient with colorectal cancer at a relatively young age with no family history is intended to encourage mutation screening of the MSH2 and MLH1 genes in similar cases to find out whether this group of patients contains an increased proportion of de novo mutations in mismatch repair genes.

  1. Molecular characterization of novel progranulin (GRN) mutations in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Odity; Wang, Jun; Gitcho, Michael; Chakraverty, Sumi; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Shears, Shantia; Kauwe, John S K; Norton, Joanne; Levitch, Denise; Bigio, Eileen H; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; White, Charles L; Morris, John C; Cairns, Nigel J; Goate, Alison

    2008-04-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a clinical term encompassing dementia characterized by the presence of two major phenotypes: 1) behavioral and personality disorder, and 2) language disorder, which includes primary progressive aphasia and semantic dementia. Recently, the gene for familial frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with ubiquitin-positive, tau-negative inclusions (FTLD-U) linked to chromosome 17 was cloned. In the present study, 62 unrelated patients from the Washington University Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the Midwest Consortium for FTD with clinically diagnosed FTD and/or neuropathologically characterized cases of FTLD-U with or without motor neuron disease (MND) were screened for mutations in the progranulin gene (GRN; also PGRN). We discovered two pathogenic mutations in four families: 1) a single-base substitution within the 3' splice acceptor site of intron 6/exon 7 (g.5913A>G [IVS6-2A>G]) causing skipping of exon 7 and premature termination of the coding sequence (PTC); and 2) a missense mutation in exon 1 (g.4068C>A) introducing a charged amino acid in the hydrophobic core of the signal peptide at residue 9 (p.A9D). Functional analysis in mutation carriers for the splice acceptor site mutation revealed a 50% decrease in GRN mRNA and protein levels, supporting haploinsufficiency. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the total GRN mRNA between cases and controls carrying the p.A9D mutation. Further, subcellular fractionation and confocal microscopy indicate that although the mutant protein is expressed, it is not secreted, and appears to be trapped within an intracellular compartment, possibly resulting in a functional haploinsufficiency.

  2. Mutational Profile of Metastatic Breast Cancers: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pedrero, Marion; Campone, Mario; Soria, Jean-Charles; Massard, Christophe; Lévy, Christelle; Arnedos, Monica; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Garrabey, Julie; Boursin, Yannick; Deloger, Marc; Commo, Frédéric; Scott, Véronique; Kamal, Maud; Diéras, Véronique; Gonçalves, Anthony; Romieu, Gilles; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Mouret Reynier, Marie-Ange; Théry, Jean-Christophe; Le Du, Fanny; Guiu, Séverine; Dalenc, Florence; Bonnefoi, Hervé; Jimenez, Marta; Le Tourneau, Christophe; André, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Background Major advances have been achieved in the characterization of early breast cancer (eBC) genomic profiles. Metastatic breast cancer (mBC) is associated with poor outcomes, yet limited information is available on the genomic profile of this disease. This study aims to decipher mutational profiles of mBC using next-generation sequencing. Methods and Findings Whole-exome sequencing was performed on 216 tumor–blood pairs from mBC patients who underwent a biopsy in the context of the SAFIR01, SAFIR02, SHIVA, or Molecular Screening for Cancer Treatment Optimization (MOSCATO) prospective trials. Mutational profiles from 772 primary breast tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used as a reference for comparing primary and mBC mutational profiles. Twelve genes (TP53, PIK3CA, GATA3, ESR1, MAP3K1, CDH1, AKT1, MAP2K4, RB1, PTEN, CBFB, and CDKN2A) were identified as significantly mutated in mBC (false discovery rate [FDR] < 0.1). Eight genes (ESR1, FSIP2, FRAS1, OSBPL3, EDC4, PALB2, IGFN1, and AGRN) were more frequently mutated in mBC as compared to eBC (FDR < 0.01). ESR1 was identified both as a driver and as a metastatic gene (n = 22, odds ratio = 29, 95% CI [9–155], p = 1.2e-12) and also presented with focal amplification (n = 9) for a total of 31 mBCs with either ESR1 mutation or amplification, including 27 hormone receptor positive (HR+) and HER2 negative (HER2−) mBCs (19%). HR+/HER2− mBC presented a high prevalence of mutations on genes located on the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway (TSC1 and TSC2) as compared to HR+/HER2− eBC (respectively 6% and 0.7%, p = 0.0004). Other actionable genes were more frequently mutated in HR+ mBC, including ERBB4 (n = 8), NOTCH3 (n = 7), and ALK (n = 7). Analysis of mutational signatures revealed a significant increase in APOBEC-mediated mutagenesis in HR+/HER2− metastatic tumors as compared to primary TCGA samples (p < 2e-16). The main limitations of this study include the absence of bone

  3. Targeted ultradeep next-generation sequencing as a method for KIT D816V mutation analysis in mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Thomas; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Vestergaard, Hanne; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Møller, Michael Boe

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is becoming increasingly used for diagnostic mutation analysis in myeloid neoplasms and may also represent a feasible technique in mastocytosis. However, detection of the KIT D816V mutation requires a highly sensitive method in most patients due to the typically low mutation levels. In this study, we established an NGS-based KIT mutation analysis and analyzed the sensitivity of D816V detection using the Ion Torrent platform. Eighty-two individual NGS analyses were included in the study. All samples were also analyzed using highly sensitive KIT D816V mutation-specific qPCR. Measurements of the background level in D816V-negative samples supported a cutoff for positivity of 0.2% in three different NGS panels. Clinical samples from patients with SM that tested positive using qPCR with a D816V allele burden >0.2% also tested positive using NGS. Samples that tested positive using qPCR with an allele burden <0.2% tested negative using NGS. We thereby demonstrate that caution should be taken when using the potentially very sensitive NGS technique for KIT D816V mutation analysis in mastocytosis, as many patients with SM have D816V mutation levels below the detection limit of NGS. A dedicated and highly sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis therefore remains important in mastocytosis diagnostics.

  4. Effects of TP53 and PIK3CA mutations in early breast cancer: a matter of co-mutation and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kotoula, Vassiliki; Karavasilis, Vasilios; Zagouri, Flora; Kouvatseas, George; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Gogas, Helen; Lakis, Sotiris; Pentheroudakis, George; Bobos, Mattheos; Papadopoulou, Kyriaki; Tsolaki, Eleftheria; Pectasides, Dimitrios; Lazaridis, Georgios; Koutras, Angelos; Aravantinos, Gerasimos; Christodoulou, Christos; Papakostas, Pavlos; Markopoulos, Christos; Zografos, George; Papandreou, Christos; Fountzilas, George

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the outcome of breast cancer (BC) patients treated with adjuvant chemotherapy is affected by co-mutated TP53 and PIK3CA according to stromal tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). Paraffin tumors of all clinical subtypes from 1661 patients with operable breast cancer who were treated within 4 adjuvant trials with anthracycline-taxanes chemotherapy were informative for TP53 and PIK3CA mutation status (semiconductor sequencing genotyping) and for stromal TILs density. Disease-free survival (DFS) was examined. TP53 mutations were associated with higher (p < 0.001) and PIK3CA with lower (p = 0.004) TILs in an ER /PgR-specific manner (p < 0.001). Mutations did not affect the favorable DFS of patients with lymphocyte-predominant (LP) BC. Within non-LPBC, PIK3CA-only mutations conferred best, while TP53-PIK3CA co-mutations (6 % of all tumors) conferred worst DFS (HR 0.59; 95 % CI 0.44-0.79; p = 0.001 for PIK3CA-only). TP53-only mutations were unfavorable in patients with lower TILs, while patients with lower TILs performed worse if their tumors carried TP53-only mutations (interaction p = 0.046). Multivariate analysis revealed favorable PIK3CA-only mutations in non-LPBC (HR 0.64; 95 % CI 0.47-0.88; p = 0.007), and unfavorable TP53 mutations in ER/PgRpos/HER2neg (HR 1.55; 95 % CI 1.07-2.24; p = 0.021). Mutations did not interact with TILs in non-LP triple-negative and HER2-positive patients. TP53 and PIK3CA mutations appear to have diverse effects on the outcome of early BC patients, according to whether these genes are co-mutated or not, and for TP53 according to TILs density and ER/PgR-status. These findings need to be considered when evaluating the effect of these two most frequently mutated genes in the context of large clinical trials.

  5. Plastome Mutations and Recombination Events in Barley Chloroplast Mutator Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Landau, Alejandra; Lencina, Franco; Pacheco, María G; Prina, Alberto R

    2016-05-01

    The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions. The detected polymorphisms can be accounted for by at least 61 independent mutational events. The vast majority of the polymorphisms originated in substitutions and small indels (insertions/deletions) in microsatellites. The rpl23 and the rps16 genes were the most polymorphic. Interestingly, the variation observed in the rpl23 gene consisted of several combinations of 5 different one nucleotide polymorphisms. Besides, 4 large indels that have direct repeats at both ends were also observed, which appear to be originated from recombinational events. The cpm mutation spectrum suggests that the CPM gene product is probably involved in plastome mismatch repair. The numerous subtle molecular changes that were localized in a wide range of plastome sites show the cpm as a valuable source of plastome variability for plant research and/or plant breeding. Moreover, the cpm mutant appears to be an interesting experimental material for investigating the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the stability of plant organelle DNA.

  6. WRN Mutation Update: Mutation Spectrum, Patient Registries, and Translational Prospects.

    PubMed

    Yokote, Koutaro; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Lee, Lin; Eirich, Katharina; Takemoto, Minoru; Watanabe, Aki; Koizumi, Naoko; Lessel, Davor; Mori, Takayasu; Hisama, Fuki M; Ladd, Paula D; Angle, Brad; Baris, Hagit; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Ozturk, Sukru; Chateau, Antoinette; Deguchi, Kentaro; Easwar, T K M; Federico, Antonio; Fox, Amy; Grebe, Theresa A; Hay, Beverly; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Seiter, Karen; Streeten, Elizabeth; Piña-Aguilar, Raul E; Poke, Gemma; Poot, Martin; Posmyk, Renata; Martin, George M; Kubisch, Christian; Schindler, Detlev; Oshima, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of adult onset phenotypes consistent with an acceleration of intrinsic biological aging. It is caused by pathogenic variants in the WRN gene, which encodes a multifunctional nuclear protein with exonuclease and helicase activities. WRN protein is thought to be involved in optimization of various aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA repair, recombination, replication, and transcription. In this update, we summarize a total of 83 different WRN mutations, including eight previously unpublished mutations identified by the International Registry of Werner Syndrome (Seattle, WA) and the Japanese Werner Consortium (Chiba, Japan), as well as 75 mutations already reported in the literature. The Seattle International Registry recruits patients from all over the world to investigate genetic causes of a wide variety of progeroid syndromes in order to contribute to the knowledge of basic mechanisms of human aging. Given the unusually high prevalence of WS patients and heterozygous carriers in Japan, the major goal of the Japanese Consortium is to develop effective therapies and to establish management guidelines for WS patients in Japan and elsewhere. This review will also discuss potential translational approaches to this disorder, including those currently under investigation.

  7. WRN Mutation Update: Mutation Spectrum, Patient Registries, and Translational Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Koutaro; Chanprasert, Sirisak; Lee, Lin; Eirich, Katharina; Takemoto, Minoru; Watanabe, Aki; Koizumi, Naoko; Lessel, Davor; Mori, Takayasu; Hisama, Fuki M.; Ladd, Paula D.; Angle, Brad; Baris, Hagit; Cefle, Kivanc; Palanduz, Sukru; Ozturk, Sukru; Chateau, Antoinette; Deguchi, Kentaro; Easwar, T.K.M; Federico, Antonio; Fox, Amy; Grebe, Theresa A.; Hay, Beverly; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Seiter, Karen; Streeten, Elizabeth; Piña-Aguilar, Raul E.; Poke, Gemma; Poot, Martin; Posmyk, Renata; Martin, George M.; Kubisch, Christian; Schindler, Detlev; Oshima, Junko

    2017-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a constellation of adult onset phenotypes consistent with an acceleration of intrinsic biological aging. It is caused by pathogenic variants in the WRN gene, which encodes a multifunctional nuclear protein with exonuclease and helicase activities. WRN protein is thought to be involved in optimization of various aspects of DNA metabolism, including DNA repair, recombination, replication, and transcription. In this update, we summarize a total of 83 different WRN mutations, including eight previously unpublished mutations identified by the International Registry of Werner Syndrome (Seattle, WA) and the Japanese Werner Consortium (Chiba, Japan), as well as 75 mutations already reported in the literature. The Seattle International Registry recruits patients from all over the world to investigate genetic causes of a wide variety of progeroid syndromes in order to contribute to the knowledge of basic mechanisms of human aging. Given the unusually high prevalence of WS patients and heterozygous carriers in Japan, the major goal of the Japanese Consortium is to develop effective therapies and to establish management guidelines for WS patients in Japan and elsewhere. This review will also discuss potential translational approaches to this disorder, including those currently under investigation. PMID:27667302

  8. Mucinous breast carcinomas lack PIK3CA and AKT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kehr, Elizabeth L; Jorns, Julie M; Ang, Daphne; Warrick, Andrea; Neff, Tanaya; Degnin, Michelle; Lewis, Rebecca; Beadling, Carol; Corless, Christopher L; Troxell, Megan L

    2012-12-01

    Activating point mutations in the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase catalytic subunit (PIK3CA) are among the most common molecular defects in invasive breast cancer. Point mutations in the downstream kinase AKT1 are seen in a minority of carcinomas. These mutations are found preferentially in estrogen receptor-positive and Her2-positive breast carcinomas; however, special morphologic types of breast cancer have not been well studied. Twenty-nine cases of pure invasive mucinous carcinoma and 9 cases of ductal carcinoma with mucinous differentiation were screened for a panel of point mutations (>321 mutations in 30 genes) using a multiplex polymerase chain reaction panel with mass spectroscopy readout. In addition, associated ductal carcinoma in situ, hyperplasia, or columnar cell lesions were separately tested where available (25 lesions). In 3 invasive cases and 15 ductal carcinoma in situ/proliferative lesions, PIK3CA hotspot mutations were, instead, tested by direct sequencing. No point mutations were identified in invasive mucinous breast carcinoma. This contrasts with the 35% frequency of PIK3CA mutations in a comparative group of invasive ductal carcinomas of no special type. Interestingly, PIK3CA hotspot point mutations were identified in associated ductal carcinoma in situ (3/14) and hyperplasia (atypical ductal hyperplasia [2/3], usual ductal hyperplasia [2/3], columnar cell change [1/5]), suggesting that PIK3CA mutations may play a role in breast epithelial proliferation. This series represents the largest study, to date, of PIK3CA genotyping in mucinous carcinoma and supports the unique pathogenetics of invasive mucinous breast carcinoma.

  9. Mutations in the p53 and Ki-ras genes, microsatellite instability and site of tumor origin in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Teresa; Curia, Maria Cristina; Aceto, Gitana; Verginelli, Fabio; Cascinu, Stefano; Cama, Alessandro; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Teti, Diana; Battista, Pasquale

    2005-09-01

    Using PCR-SSCP screening and direct sequencing we analyzed a series of 28 colorectal carcinomas for mutations in p53 (exons 5-8) and Ki-ras (codons 12, 13 and 61), and for micro-satellite instability (MSI) at BAT25 and BAT26, supplementing data with the analysis of the IARC colorectal cancer p53 mutation database. Mutations were correlated with the site of tumor origin (proximal or distal to the splenic flexure). We identified 19 mutations in p53, 9 in Ki-ras, and 4 MSI-positive cases in a total of 20 tumors. Only 6/20 cases (30%) carried mutations in both p53 and Ki-ras. Mutations in p53 were detected at similar frequencies in proximal and distal tumors, while IARC data pointed to a strong association of p53 mutations with distal cancers. Ki-ras mutations were more frequent in proximal tumors, and MSI occurred at similar frequencies in proximal and distal tumors and was associated with mutations in p53 or Ki-ras. The p53 mutations detected in the series analyzed, as well as those retrieved from the IARC database, were predominantly transitions, with no preferential sequence localization or nucleotide position. Ki-ras mutations were predominantly transversions in position 2 at codon 12. MSI-H occurred at similar frequencies in proximal and distal tumors and was associated with either p53 or Ki-ras mutations. Overall these data suggest that distinct mutagenic factors target p53 and Ki-ras in colorectal epithelium irrespective of MSI-H status.

  10. Prevalence and Functional Consequence of TP53 Mutations in Pediatric Adrenocortical Carcinoma: A Children's Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Wasserman, Jonathan D.; Novokmet, Ana; Eichler-Jonsson, Claudia; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Zambetti, Gerard P.; Malkin, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare pediatric malignancy. It occurs in excess among individuals with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, which results primarily from germline mutations in the TP53 gene. Prior series exploring frequencies of germline TP53 mutation among children with ACC have been small, geographically limited, or subject to referral bias. The functional consequence of mutations has not been related to phenotype. We provide a genotype-phenotype analysis of TP53 mutations in pediatric ACC and propose a model for tissue-specific effects based on adrenocortical ontogeny. Patients and Methods Eighty-eight consecutive, unrelated children with ACC, unselected for family history, underwent germline TP53 sequencing. Rate and distribution of mutations were identified. Functional analysis was performed for novel TP53 variants. Correlation with the International Agency for Research on Cancer p53 database further delineated mutational distribution, association with family history, and risk for multiple primary malignancies (MPMs). Results Germline mutations were present in 50% of children. These mutations did not correspond to the conventional hotspot mutations. There was a wide range of mutant protein function. Patients bearing alleles encoding protein with higher functionality were less likely to have a strong family cancer history, whereas those with greater loss of function had MPMs and/or positive family history. In patients with MPMs, ACC was the most frequent initial malignancy. Finally, we demonstrated age-dependent rates of TP53 mutation positivity. Conclusion TP53 mutations are prevalent in children with ACC but decline with age. Mutations result in a broad spectrum of functional loss. Effect of individual mutations may predict carrier and familial disease penetrance with potentially broad implications for clinical surveillance and counseling. PMID:25584008

  11. rpoB Mutations in Multidrug-Resistant Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Isolated in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, G.; Meloni, M.; Iona, E.; Orrù, G.; Thoresen, O. F.; Ricci, M. L.; Oggioni, M. R.; Fattorini, L.; Orefici, G.

    1999-01-01

    Mutations of rpoB associated with rifampin resistance were studied in 37 multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated in Italy. At least one mutated codon was found in each MDR strain. It was always a single-base substitution leading to an amino acid change. Nine different rpoB alleles, three of which had not been reported before, were found. The relative frequencies of specific mutations in this sample were different from those previously reported from different geographical areas, since 22 strains (59.5%) carried the mutated codon TTG in position 531 (Ser→Leu) and 11 (29.7%) had GAC in position 526 (His→Asp). PMID:10074552

  12. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  13. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  14. The p53 transcriptional pathway is preserved in ATMmutated and NOTCH1mutated chronic lymphocytic leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Agnoletto, Chiara; Voltan, Rebecca; Vozzi, Diego; Piscianz, Elisa; Segat, Ludovica; Dal Monego, Simeone; Cuneo, Antonio; Secchiero, Paola; Zauli, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    By using next generation sequencing, we have analyzed 108 B chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients. Among genes involved in the TP53 pathway, we found frequent mutations in ATM (n=18), TP53 (n=10) and NOTCH1 (n=10) genes, rare mutations of NOTCH2 (n=2) and CDKN1A/p21 (n=1) and no mutations in BAX, MDM2, TNFRSF10A and TNFRSF10B genes. The in vitro treatment of primary B-CLL cells with the activator of p53 Nutlin-3 induced the transcription of p53 target genes, without significant differences between the B-CLL without mutations and those harboring either ATM or NOTCH1 mutations. On the other hand, the subgroup of TP53mutated B-CLL exhibited a significantly lower induction of the p53 target genes in response to Nutlin-3 as compared to the other B-CLL samples. However, among the TP53mutated B-CLL, those showing mutations in the high hot spot region of the DNA binding domain [273-280 aa] maintained a significantly higher p53-dependent transcriptional activity as compared to the other TP53mutated B-CLL samples. Since the ability to elicit a p53-dependent transcriptional activity in vitro has a positive prognostic significance, our data suggest that ATMmutated, NOTCH1mutated and surprisingly, also a subset of TP53mutated B-CLL patients might benefit from therapeutic combinations including small molecule activator of the p53 pathway. PMID:25587027

  15. Natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations in HIV-1 protease with potential antiretroviral resistance: a bioinformatic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The correlations of genotypic and phenotypic tests with treatment, clinical history and the significance of mutations in viruses of HIV-infected patients are used to establish resistance mutations to protease inhibitors (PIs). Emerging mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease confer resistance to PIs by inducing structural changes at the ligand interaction site. The aim of this study was to establish an in silico structural relationship between natural HIV-1 polymorphisms and unusual HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to PIs. Results Protease sequences isolated from 151 Mexican HIV-1 patients that were naïve to, or subjected to antiretroviral therapy, were examined. We identified 41 unrelated resistance mutations with a prevalence greater than 1%. Among these mutations, nine exhibited positive selection, three were natural polymorphisms (L63S/V/H) in a codon associated with drug resistance, and six were unusual mutations (L5F, D29V, L63R/G, P79L and T91V). The D29V mutation, with a prevalence of 1.32% in the studied population, was only found in patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Using in silico modelling, we observed that D29V formed unstable protease complexes when were docked with lopinavir, saquinavir, darunavir, tipranavir, indinavir and atazanavir. Conclusions The structural correlation of natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations with drug resistance is useful for the identification of HIV-1 variants with potential resistance to PIs. The D29V mutation likely confers a selection advantage in viruses; however, in silico, presence of this mutation results in unstable enzyme/PI complexes, that possibly induce resistance to PIs. PMID:24629078

  16. Predictive and Prognostic Analysis of PIK3CA Mutation in Stage III Colon Cancer Intergroup Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoyun; Imamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Mai; McCleary, Nadine J.; Ng, Kimmie; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al B.; Mowat, Rex B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphonate 3-kinase [PI3K], catalytic subunit alpha gene) activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway and contribute to pathogenesis of various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Methods We examined associations of PIK3CA oncogene mutation with relapse, survival, and treatment efficacy in 627 stage III colon carcinoma case subjects within a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (5-fluorouracil and leucovorin [FU/LV] vs irinotecan [CPT11], fluorouracil and leucovorin [IFL]; Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 [Alliance]). We detected PIK3CA mutation in exons 9 and 20 by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess prognostic and predictive role of PIK3CA mutation, adjusting for clinical features and status of routine standard molecular pathology features, including KRAS and BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability (mismatch repair deficiency). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Compared with PIK3CA wild-type cases, overall status of PIK3CA mutation positivity or the presence of PIK3CA mutation in either exon 9 or 20 alone was not statistically significantly associated with recurrence-free, disease-free, or overall survival (log-rank P > .70; P > .40 in multivariable regression models). There was no statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA and KRAS (or BRAF) mutation status in survival analysis (P interaction > .18). PIK3CA mutation status did not appear to predict better or worse response to IFL therapy compared with FU/LV therapy (P interaction > .16). Conclusions Overall tumor PIK3CA mutation status is not associated with stage III colon cancer prognosis. PIK3CA mutation does not appear to serve as a predictive tumor molecular biomarker for response to irinotecan-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24231454

  17. Mutations in btk in patients with presumed X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    PubMed Central

    Conley, M E; Mathias, D; Treadaway, J; Minegishi, Y; Rohrer, J

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, two groups showed that X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) was due to mutations in a tyrosine kinase now called Btk. Most laboratories have been able to detect mutations in Btk in 80%-90% of males with presumed XLA. The remaining patients may have mutations in Btk that are difficult to identify, or they may have defects that are phenotypically similar to XLA but genotypically different. We analyzed 101 families in which affected males were diagnosed as having XLA. Mutations in Btk were identified in 38 of 40 families with more than one affected family member and in 56 of 61 families with sporadic disease. Excluding the patients in whom the marked decrease in B cell numbers characteristic of XLA could not be confirmed by immunofluorescence studies, mutations in Btk were identified in 43 of 46 patients with presumed sporadic XLA. Two of the three remaining patients had defects in other genes required for normal B cell development, and the third patient was unlikely to have XLA, on the basis of results of extensive Btk analysis. Our techniques were unable to identify a mutation in Btk in one male with both a family history and laboratory findings suggestive of XLA. DNA samples from 41 of 49 of the mothers of males with sporadic disease and proven mutations in Btk were positive for the mutation found in their son. In the other 8 families, the mutation appeared to arise in the maternal germ line. In 20 families, haplotype analysis showed that the new mutation originated in the maternal grandfather or great-grandfather. These studies indicate that 90%-95% of males with presumed XLA have mutations in Btk. The other patients are likely to have defects in other genes. PMID:9545398

  18. HER2 mutations in Chinese patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhengbo; Yu, Xinmin; Shi, Zhiyong; Zhao, Jun; Zhang, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Background ERBB2 (HER2) is a driver gene identified in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The prevalence, clinicopathology, genetic variability and treatment of HER2-positive NSCLC in Chinese population are unclear. Patients and Methods Eight hundred and fifty-nine patients with pathologically confirmed NSCLC were screened for HER2 mutations using Sanger sequencing. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed in positive cases. HER2 amplification was detected with FISH. Overall survival (OS) was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier methods and compared with log-rank tests. Results Twenty-one cases carrying HER2 mutations were identified with a prevalence of 2.4%. HER2 mutations were more frequently encountered in females, non-smokers and adenocarcinoma. NGS was performed in 19 out of 21 patients, The results showed 16 cases with additional genetic aberrations, most commonly associated with TP53 (n = 6), followed by EGFR (n = 3), NF1 (n = 3), KRAS (n = 2) and other mutations. One patient harbored HER2 amplification. Four patients with stage IV received afatinib treatment, and three showed stable disease with a median progression-free survival of 4 months and one patient was diagnosed with progressive disease. Conclusion HER2 mutations represent a distinct subset of NSCLC. NGS showed that HER2 mutations commonly co-existed with other driver genes. Afatinib treatment displayed moderate efficacy in patients with HER2 mutations. PMID:27825109

  19. The carcinogenic role of oncogenic HPV and p53 gene mutation in cervical adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Andersson, S; Hellström, A-C; Ren, Zhi-Ping; Wilander, E

    2006-01-01

    Thirty tumors were collected from our archive of cervical adenocarcinomas. They were examined with respect to the content of oncogenic HPV and presence of mutations in the p53 gene exons 5 through 8. Furthermore, available clinical information on the cases was reviewed. For the detection of p53 gene and presence of oncogenic HPV, PCR followed by direct sequence analysis of the amplified DNA was employed. Seventeen tumors were identified as HPV-positive, comprising both HPV types 18 and 16. Six cases showed a p53 gene mutation, of which five were of the missence and one of the silent type. No statistical correlation between the occurrence of oncogenic HPV and presence of p53 gene mutation (p = 0.67) was recorded. Among the tumors with p53 gene mutation, three were HPV-positive and three were HPV-negative. The determination of p53 gene mutations was not related to clinical findings such as the stage of the tumor or presence of metastases of the lymph nodes. However, p53 gene mutations were somewhat more prevalent in low differentiated tumors (p < 0.02). The results indicate that oncogenic HPV and p53 gene mutations have independent carcinogenic roles in cervical adenocarcinomas.

  20. Computational DNA hole spectroscopy: A new tool to predict mutation hotspots, critical base pairs, and disease 'driver' mutations.

    PubMed

    Villagrán, Martha Y Suárez; Miller, John H

    2015-08-27

    We report on a new technique, computational DNA hole spectroscopy, which creates spectra of electron hole probabilities vs. nucleotide position. A hole is a site of positive charge created when an electron is removed. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of mitochondrial DNA reveal a correlation between L-strand hole spectrum peaks and spikes in the human mutation spectrum. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with disease-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential disease 'driver' mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could ultimately prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions of the vast non-protein-coding genome. An observed asymmetry in correlations, between the spectrum of human mtDNA variations and the L- and H-strand hole spectra, is attributed to asymmetric DNA replication processes that occur for the leading and lagging strands.

  1. Computational DNA hole spectroscopy: A new tool to predict mutation hotspots, critical base pairs, and disease ‘driver’ mutations

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Martha Y.; Villagrán; Miller, John H.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a new technique, computational DNA hole spectroscopy, which creates spectra of electron hole probabilities vs. nucleotide position. A hole is a site of positive charge created when an electron is removed. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of mitochondrial DNA reveal a correlation between L-strand hole spectrum peaks and spikes in the human mutation spectrum. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with disease-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential disease ‘driver’ mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could ultimately prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions of the vast non-protein-coding genome. An observed asymmetry in correlations, between the spectrum of human mtDNA variations and the L- and H-strand hole spectra, is attributed to asymmetric DNA replication processes that occur for the leading and lagging strands. PMID:26310834

  2. MIMEAnTo: profiling functional RNA in mutational interference mapping experiments.

    PubMed

    Smith, Maureen R; Smyth, Redmond P; Marquet, Roland; von Kleist, Max

    2016-11-01

    The mutational interference mapping experiment (MIME) is a powerful method that, coupled to a bioinformatics analysis pipeline, allows the identification of domains and structures in RNA that are important for its function. In MIME, target RNAs are randomly mutated, selected by function, physically separated and sequenced using next-generation sequencing (NGS). Quantitative effects of each mutation at each position in the RNA can be recovered with statistical certainty using the herein developed user-friendly, cross-platform software MIMEAnTo (MIME Analysis Tool).

  3. Sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of blood as a diagnostic test in mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Thomas; Vestergaard, Hanne; Bindslev-Jensen, Carsten; Møller, Michael Boe; Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd

    2014-05-01

    The recent progress in sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis suggests that mutation analysis of peripheral blood (PB) represents a promising diagnostic test in mastocytosis. However, there is a need for systematic assessment of the analytical sensitivity and specificity of the approach in order to establish its value in clinical use. We therefore evaluated sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis of PB as a diagnostic test in an entire case-series of adults with mastocytosis. We demonstrate for the first time that by using a sufficiently sensitive KIT D816V mutation analysis, it is possible to detect the mutation in PB in nearly all adult mastocytosis patients. The mutation was detected in PB in 78 of 83 systemic mastocytosis (94%) and 3 of 4 cutaneous mastocytosis patients (75%). The test was 100% specific as determined by analysis of clinically relevant control patients who all tested negative. Mutation analysis of PB was significantly more sensitive than serum tryptase >20 ng/mL. Of 27 patients with low tryptase, 26 tested mutation positive (96%). The test is furthermore readily available and we consider the results to serve as a foundation of experimental evidence to support the inclusion of the test in diagnostic algorithms and clinical practice in mastocytosis.

  4. Somatic MED12 mutations are associated with poor prognosis markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ruppert, Amy S.; Senter, Leigha; Hoag, Kevin W.; Dufva, Olli; Kontro, Mika; Rassenti, Laura; Hertlein, Erin; Kipps, Thomas J.; Porkka, Kimmo; Byrd, John C.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Vahteristo, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults. We performed systematic database search and identified highly specific MED12 mutations in CLL patients. To study this further, we collected three independent sample series comprising over 700 CLL samples and screened MED12 exons 1 and 2 by direct sequencing. Mutations were identified at significant frequency in all three series with a combined mutation frequency of 5.2% (37/709). Positive mutation status was found to be associated with unmutated IGHV and ZAP70 expression, which are well-known poor prognosis markers in CLL. Our results recognize CLL as the first extrauterine cancer type where 5′ terminus of MED12 is mutated at significant frequency. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations lead to dissociation of Cyclin C-CDK8/19 from the core Mediator and to the loss of Mediator-associated CDK kinase activity. Additional studies on the role of MED12 mutation status as a putative prognostic factor as well as mutations' exact tumorigenic mechanism in CLL are warranted. PMID:25595892

  5. Somatic MED12 mutations are associated with poor prognosis markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kämpjärvi, Kati; Järvinen, Tiina M; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ruppert, Amy S; Senter, Leigha; Hoag, Kevin W; Dufva, Olli; Kontro, Mika; Rassenti, Laura; Hertlein, Erin; Kipps, Thomas J; Porkka, Kimmo; Byrd, John C; de la Chapelle, Albert; Vahteristo, Pia

    2015-01-30

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults. We performed systematic database search and identified highly specific MED12 mutations in CLL patients. To study this further, we collected three independent sample series comprising over 700 CLL samples and screened MED12 exons 1 and 2 by direct sequencing. Mutations were identified at significant frequency in all three series with a combined mutation frequency of 5.2% (37/709). Positive mutation status was found to be associated with unmutated IGHV and ZAP70 expression, which are well-known poor prognosis markers in CLL. Our results recognize CLL as the first extrauterine cancer type where 5'terminus of MED12 is mutated at significant frequency. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations lead to dissociation of Cyclin C-CDK8/19 from the core Mediator and to the loss of Mediator-associated CDK kinase activity. Additional studies on the role of MED12 mutation status as a putative prognostic factor as well as mutations' exact tumorigenic mechanism in CLL are warranted.

  6. Mutations in LZTR1 add to the complex heterogeneity of schwannomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Miriam J.; Isidor, Bertand; Beetz, Christian; Williams, Simon G.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Richer, Wilfrid; O'Sullivan, James; Anderson, Beverly; Daly, Sarah B.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Fryer, Alan; Rustad, Cecilie F.; Mills, Samantha J.; Samii, Amir; du Plessis, Daniel; Halliday, Dorothy; Barbarot, Sebastien; Bourdeaut, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to determine the proportion of individuals in our schwannomatosis cohort whose disease is associated with an LZTR1 mutation. Methods: We used exome sequencing, Sanger sequencing, and copy number analysis to screen 65 unrelated individuals with schwannomatosis who were negative for a germline NF2 or SMARCB1 mutation. We also screened samples from 39 patients with a unilateral vestibular schwannoma (UVS), plus at least one other schwannoma, but who did not have an identifiable germline or mosaic NF2 mutation. Results: We identified germline LZTR1 mutations in 6 of 16 patients (37.5%) with schwannomatosis who had at least one affected relative, 11 of 49 (22%) sporadic patients, and 2 of 39 patients with UVS in our cohort. Three germline mutation–positive patients in total had developed a UVS. Mosaicism was excluded in 3 patients without germline mutation in NF2, SMARCB1, or LZTR1 by mutation screening in 2 tumors from each. Conclusions: Our data confirm the relationship between mutations in LZTR1 and schwannomatosis. They indicate that germline mutations in LZTR1 confer an increased risk of vestibular schwannoma, providing further overlap with NF2, and that further causative genes for schwannomatosis remain to be identified. PMID:25480913

  7. Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene mutations in Canadian subjects with abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Hegele, R A

    2000-03-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an extremely rare autosomal recessive disorder, which is characterized by defective assembly and secretion of plasma apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins. ABL results from mutations in the gene encoding the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). We sequenced the MTP gene in six Canadian subjects with ABL, of whom four were found to be simple homozygotes and two were found to be compound heterozygotes for MTP gene mutations. Of the 8 MTP gene mutations identified, 6 had not been previously reported, including two new nonsense mutations (K448X and K842X), two new missense mutations (S590I and G746E), one new frameshift mutation (1820del1) and one new splice donor site mutation (G1770A). Despite appropriate treatment with high doses of fat-soluble vitamins in all subjects, there was a wide variation in the progression and severity of the clinical phenotypes. For example, the presence of severe retinopathy and neuropathy did not correlate with the type and position of the mutation, but rather with the age at diagnosis and onset of treatment with fat-soluble vitamins. These findings suggest that genetic and non-genetic factors can modulate the clinical impact of mutant MTP in ABL patients.

  8. Novel mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein gene causing abetalipoproteinemia.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, K; Ishibashi, S; Osuga, J; Tozawa, R; Harada, K; Yahagi, N; Shionoiri, F; Iizuka, Y; Tamura, Y; Nagai, R; Illingworth, D R; Gotoda, T; Yamada, N

    2000-08-01

    Abetalipoproteinemia (ABL) is an inherited disease characterized by the virtual absence of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins from plasma. Only limited numbers of families have been screened for mutations in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) gene. To clarify the genetic basis of clinical diversity of ABL, mutations of the MTP gene have been screened in 4 unrelated patients with ABL. Three novel mutations have been identified: a frameshift mutation caused by a single adenine deletion at position 1389 of the cDNA, and a missense mutation, Asn780Tyr, each in homozygous forms; and a splice site mutation, 2218-2A-->G, in a compound heterozygous form. The frameshift and splice site mutations are predicted to encode truncated forms of MTP. When transiently expressed in Cos-1 cells, the Asn780Tyr mutant MTP bound protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) but displayed negligible MTP activity. It is of interest that the patient having the Asn780Tyr mutation, a 27-year-old male, has none of the manifestations characteristic of classic ABL even though his plasma apoB and vitamin E were virtually undetectable. These results indicated that defects of the MTP gene are the proximal cause of ABL.

  9. Characterization of aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) mutations in familial isolated pituitary adenoma families.

    PubMed

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-08-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15-40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and beta-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6+/-11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4+/-14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein-protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants.

  10. Identification of mutations from phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis in mouse chromosome 7.

    PubMed

    Culiat, Cymbeline T; Klebig, Mitchell L; Liu, Zhaowei; Monroe, Heidi; Stanford, Beverly; Desai, Jayashree; Tandan, Samvit; Hughes, Lori; Kerley, Marilyn K; Carpenter, Donald A; Johnson, Dabney K; Rinchik, Eugene M; Li, Qingbo

    2005-08-01

    We have used the new high-throughput mutation-scanning technique temperature-gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE) for the identification of point mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) in the mouse genome. TGCE detects the presence of heteroduplex molecules formed between a wild-type gene segment and the corresponding homologous segment containing an induced mutation or a naturally occurring single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Partially denatured heteroduplex molecules are resolved from homoduplexes by virtue of their differential mobilities during capillary electrophoresis conducted in a finely controlled temperature gradient. Simultaneous heteroduplex analysis of 96 amplicons ranging from 150 to 600 bp in size is achieved in approximately 45 min without the need for predetermining the melting profile of each fragment. Initially, we exploited known mouse mutations to develop TGCE protocols for analyzing unpurified PCR samples amplified from crude tail-DNA preparations. TGCE was then applied to the rapid identification of three new ENU-induced mutations recovered from regional mutagenesis screens of a segment of mouse Chromosome 7. Enzyme assays and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) methods validated these new mutations. Our data demonstrate that rapid mutation scanning with TGCE, followed by sequence verification only of detected positives, is an efficient approach to the identification of point mutations in the mouse genome.

  11. Is mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(UCN)) T7501C mutation associated with cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Huang, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are increasingly recognized as an important cause of cardiovascular diseases, point mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes being the largest group among them. Most recently, mutation at position 7501 in mt-tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene has been reported to be associated with human cardiovascular diseases including cardiomyopathy, sudden cardiac death (SCD) and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). However, its direct pathogenic role remained poorly understood. In this study, we performed an extensive web-based search for the published resources concerning this association. Through the application of bioinformatics tool, we observed that this mutation altered the mt-tRNA(Ser(UCN)) secondary structure, in addition, evolutionary conservation analysis of this mutation indicated that this mutation is highly conserved between different species. Notably, the T7501C mutation belonging to human mitochondrial haplogroup U8a1a1, a rare subgroup of U8, was present only in European population and was absent in Han Chinese population. Taken together, our result indicated that the T7501C mutation may occur infrequently and was probably pathogenic in cardiovascular disease development.

  12. Cancer Driver Log (CanDL): Catalog of Potentially Actionable Cancer Mutations.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko; Zhu, Eliot; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Datta, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have enabled characterization of genomic alterations across multiple tumor types. Efforts have focused on identifying driver mutations because they represent potential targets for therapy. However, because of the presence of driver and passenger mutations, it is often challenging to assign the clinical relevance of specific mutations observed in patients. Currently, there are multiple databases and tools that provide in silico assessment for potential drivers; however, there is no comprehensive resource for mutations with functional characterization. Therefore, we created an expert-curated database of potentially actionable driver mutations for molecular pathologists to facilitate annotation of cancer genomic testing. We reviewed scientific literature to identify variants that have been functionally characterized in vitro or in vivo as driver mutations. We obtained the chromosome location and all possible nucleotide positions for each amino acid change and uploaded them to the Cancer Driver Log (CanDL) database with associated literature reference indicating functional driver evidence. In addition to a simple interface, the database allows users to download all or selected genes as a comma-separated values file for incorporation into their own analysis pipeline. Furthermore, the database includes a mechanism for third-party contributions to support updates for novel driver mutations. Overall, this freely available database will facilitate rapid annotation of cancer genomic testing in molecular pathology laboratories for mutations.

  13. Kin-Driver: a database of driver mutations in protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Franco L; Tornador, Cristian; Nabau-Moretó, Nuria; Molina-Vila, Miguel A; Marino-Buslje, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutations in protein kinases (PKs) are frequent driver events in many human tumors, while germ-line mutations are associated with hereditary diseases. Here we present Kin-driver, the first database that compiles driver mutations in PKs with experimental evidence demonstrating their functional role. Kin-driver is a manual expert-curated database that pays special attention to activating mutations (AMs) and can serve as a validation set to develop new generation tools focused on the prediction of gain-of-function driver mutations. It also offers an easy and intuitive environment to facilitate the visualization and analysis of mutations in PKs. Because all mutations are mapped onto a multiple sequence alignment, analogue positions between kinases can be identified and tentative new mutations can be proposed for studying by transferring annotation. Finally, our database can also be of use to clinical and translational laboratories, helping them to identify uncommon AMs that can correlate with response to new antitumor drugs. The website was developed using PHP and JavaScript, which are supported by all major browsers; the database was built using MySQL server. Kin-driver is available at: http://kin-driver.leloir.org.ar/

  14. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  15. LRRK2 mutations and Parkinson's disease in Sardinia--A Mediterranean genetic isolate.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Giovanni; van Doeselaar, Marina; Deriu, Marcello; Melis, Maurizio; Molari, Andrea; Di Fonzo, Alessio; Oostra, Ben A; Bonifati, Vincenzo

    2007-02-01

    The Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) Gly2019Ser mutation is frequent among Parkinson's disease (PD) patients from the Arab, Jewish, and Iberian populations, while another mutation, Arg1441Gly, is common in the Basque population. We studied the prevalence of these mutations in Sardinia, a Mediterranean genetic isolate with peculiar structure and similarities with the Basque population. Among 98 Sardinian PD probands we detected one heterozygous Gly2019Ser carrier. This mutation was also found in one of 55 Sardinian controls, an 85-year-old man, later shown to have a positive family history of parkinsonism. No carriers of Arg1441Gly, Arg1441Cys, or Arg1441His mutations were found among cases and controls. Our results suggest that the "Basque"LRRK2 mutation is absent or very rare in Sardinia. The Gly2019Ser mutation is present but its frequency is lower than that in Iberian, Arab, or Jewish populations. The identification of an 85-year-old, healthy Gly2019Ser carrier supports the concept that this mutation displays incomplete penetrance.

  16. A new case of Pfeiffer syndrome with mutation in FGFR2.

    PubMed

    Addor, M C; Gudinchet, F; Laurini, R N; Pescia, G; Schorderet, D F

    1997-01-01

    We report on a sporadic case of Pfeiffer syndrome in a male newborn with complex craniosynostosis, broad thumbs and great toes and early demise. SSCP and direct sequencing revealed a missense mutation at position 1037 of the exon B (or IIIc) of the FGFR2 gene (codon 342) resulting in a cysteine to serine modification (TGC-TCC). Genotype-phenotype correlations between the FGFRs mutations and the different craniosynostotic syndromes are discussed.

  17. PIK3CA mutation detection in metastatic biliary cancer using cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shibing; Lee, Sujin; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Mao, Mao; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh

    2015-01-01

    PIK3CA mutation is considered a good candidate for targeted therapies in cancers, especially biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) from serum by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) as an alternative source for PIK3CA mutation analysis. To identify matching archival tumour specimens from serum samples of advanced BTC patients, mutation detection using ddPCR with Bio-Rad's PrimePCR mutation and wild type assays were performed for PIK3CA p.E542K, p.E545K, and p.H1047R. Thirty-eight patients with metastatic BTC were enrolled. Only one (BTC 29T) sample (n = 38) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K and another (BTC 27T) for p.H1047R mutation; none was positive for PIK3CA p.E545K. Matched serum sample (BTC 29P) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K with 28 mutant copies detected, corresponding to 48 copies/ml of serum and an allelic prevalence of 0.3%. Another matched serum sample (BTC 27P) was positive for PIK3CA p.H1047R with 10 mutant copies detected, i.e. 18 copies/ml and an allelic frequency of 0.2%. High correlation was noted in the PIK3CA mutation status between tumour gDNA and serum cfDNA. Low-level PIK3CA mutations were detectable in the serum indicating the utility of cfDNA as a DNA source to detect cancer-derived mutations in metastatic biliary cancers. PMID:26498688

  18. Mutational analysis of muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit assembly

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The structural elements required for normal maturation and assembly of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit were investigated by expression of mutated subunits in transfected fibroblasts. Normally, the wild-type alpha subunit acquires high affinity alpha bungarotoxin binding in a time-dependent manner; however, mutation of the 128 and/or 142 cysteines to either serine or alanine, as well as deletion of the entire 14 amino acids in this region abolished all detectable high affinity binding. Nonglycosylated subunits that had a serine to glycine mutation in the consensus sequence also did not efficiently attain high affinity binding to toxin. In contrast, mutation of the proline at position 136 to glycine or alanine, or a double mutation of the cysteines at position 192 and 193 to serines had no effect on the acquisition of high affinity toxin binding. These data suggest that a disulfide bridge between cysteines 128 and 142 and oligosaccharide addition at asparagine 141 are required for the normal maturation of alpha subunit as assayed by high affinity toxin binding. The unassembled wild-type alpha subunit expressed in fibroblasts is normally degraded with a t1/2 of 2 h; upon assembly with the delta subunit, the degradation rate slows significantly (t1/2 greater than 13 h). All mutated alpha subunits retained the capacity to assemble with a delta subunit coexpressed in fibroblasts; however, mutated alpha subunits that were not glycosylated or did not acquire high affinity toxin binding were rapidly degraded (t1/2 = 20 min to 2 h) regardless of whether or not they assembled with the delta subunit. Assembly and rapid degradation of nonglycosylated acetylcholine receptor (AChR) subunits and subunit complexes were also observed in tunicamycin- treated BC3H-1 cells, a mouse musclelike cell line that normally expresses functional AChR. Hence, rapid degradation may be one form of regulation assuring that only correctly processed and assembled subunits

  19. Nutlin‐3a selects for cells harbouring TP 53 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hollstein, Monica; Arlt, Volker M.; Phillips, David H.

    2016-01-01

    TP53 mutations occur in half of all human tumours. Mutagen‐induced or spontaneous TP53 mutagenesis can be studied in vitro using the human TP53 knock‐in (Hupki) mouse embryo fibroblast (HUF) immortalisation assay (HIMA). TP53 mutations arise in up to 30% of mutagen‐treated, immortalised HUFs; however, mutants are not identified until TP53 sequence analysis following immortalisation (2–5 months) and much effort is expended maintaining TP53‐WT cultures. In order to improve the selectivity of the HIMA for HUFs harbouring TP53 mutations, we explored the use of Nutlin‐3a, an MDM2 inhibitor that leads to stabilisation and activation of wild‐type (WT) p53. First, we treated previously established immortal HUF lines carrying WT or mutated TP53 with Nutlin‐3a to examine the effect on cell growth and p53 activation. Nutlin‐3a induced the p53 pathway in TP53‐WT HUFs and inhibited cell growth, whereas most TP53‐mutated HUFs were resistant to Nutlin‐3a. We then assessed whether Nutlin‐3a treatment could discriminate between TP53‐WT and TP53‐mutated cells during the HIMA (n = 72 cultures). As immortal clones emerged from senescent cultures, each was treated with 10 µM Nutlin‐3a for 5 days and observed for sensitivity or resistance. TP53 was subsequently sequenced from all immortalised clones. We found that all Nutlin‐3a‐resistant clones harboured TP53 mutations, which were diverse in position and functional impact, while all but one of the Nutlin‐3a‐sensitive clones were TP53‐WT. These data suggest that including a Nutlin‐3a counter‐screen significantly improves the specificity and efficiency of the HIMA, whereby TP53‐mutated clones are selected prior to sequencing and TP53‐WT clones can be discarded. PMID:27813088

  20. Rare beneficial mutations can halt Muller's ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Daniel; Goyal, Sidhartha; Jerison, Elizabeth; Neher, Richard; Shraiman, Boris; Desai, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In viral, bacterial, and other asexual populations, the vast majority of non-neutral mutations are deleterious. This motivates the application of models without beneficial mutations. Here we show that the presence of surprisingly few compensatory mutations halts fitness decay in these models. Production of deleterious mutations is balanced by purifying selection, stabilizing the fitness distribution. However, stochastic vanishing of fitness classes can lead to slow fitness decay (i.e. Muller's ratchet). For weakly deleterious mutations, production overwhelms purification, rapidly decreasing population fitness. We show that when beneficial mutations are introduced, a stable steady state emerges in the form of a dynamic mutation-selection balance. We argue this state is generic for all mutation rates and population sizes, and is reached as an end state as genomes become saturated by either beneficial or deleterious mutations. Assuming all mutations have the same magnitude selective effect, we calculate the fraction of beneficial mutations necessary to maintain the dynamic balance. This may explain the unexpected maintenance of asexual genomes, as in mitochondria, in the presence of selection. This will affect in the statistics of genetic diversity in these populations.

  1. Identification of CANT1 Mutations in Desbuquois Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Céline; Oulès, Bénédicte; Bertoli, Marta; Chami, Mounia; Fradin, Mélanie; Alanay, Yasemin; Al-Gazali, Lihadh I.; Ausems, Margreet G.E.M.; Bitoun, Pierre; Cavalcanti, Denise P.; Krebs, Alexander; Le Merrer, Martine; Mortier, Geert; Shafeghati, Yousef; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Robertson, Stephen P.; Le Goff, Carine; Muda, Andrea Onetti; Paterlini-Bréchot, Patrizia; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2009-01-01

    Desbuquois dysplasia is a severe condition characterized by short stature, joint laxity, scoliosis, and advanced carpal ossification with a delta phalanx. Studying nine Desbuquois families, we identified seven distinct mutations in the Calcium-Activated Nucleotidase 1 gene (CANT1), which encodes a soluble UDP-preferring nucleotidase belonging to the apyrase family. Among the seven mutations, four were nonsense mutations (Del 5′ UTR and exon 1, p.P245RfsX3, p.S303AfsX20, and p.W125X), and three were missense mutations (p.R300C, p.R300H, and p.P299L) responsible for the change of conserved amino acids located in the seventh nucleotidase conserved region (NRC). The arginine substitution at position 300 was identified in five out of nine families. The specific function of CANT1 is as yet unknown, but its substrates are involved in several major signaling functions, including Ca2+ release, through activation of pyrimidinergic signaling. Importantly, using RT-PCR analysis, we observed a specific expression in chondrocytes. We also found electron-dense material within distended rough endoplasmic reticulum in the fibroblasts of Desbuquois patients. Our findings demonstrate the specific involvement of a nucleotidase in the endochondral ossification process. PMID:19853239

  2. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed Central

    Wildin, R. S.; Antush, M. J.; Bennett, R. L.; Schoof, J. M.; Scott, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. We have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was documented in two additional cases. Carrier detection was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7913579

  3. Progranulin gene mutation with an unusual clinical and neuropathologic presentation.

    PubMed

    Wider, Christian; Uitti, Ryan J; Wszolek, Zbigniew K; Fang, John Y; Josephs, Keith A; Baker, Matthew C; Rademakers, Rosa; Hutton, Michael L; Dickson, Dennis W

    2008-06-15

    Progranulin gene (PGRN) mutations cause frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). Patients usually present with a frontotemporal dementia syndrome and have prominent atrophy and neuronal loss in frontal and temporal cortices and the striatum, with neuronal intranuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions. Clinical, neuropathological, and genetic studies are reported on an individual with PGRN mutation and her family members. We describe a patient with a PGRN c.26C>A mutation who presented with progressive stuttering dysarthria, oculomotor abnormalities, choreic buccolingual movements, and mild parkinsonism. Two other family members were affected, one with a behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia syndrome, the other with a diagnosis of probable Alzheimer's disease. At autopsy there was no neuronal loss in the cortex or medial temporal lobe structures, but there was striatal gliosis. Immunohistochemistry for ubiquitin and TDP-43 revealed neuronal cytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions as well as neurites. This study further expands the clinical and pathological spectrum of PGRN mutations, and suggests the diagnosis could be missed in some individuals with atypical presentations.

  4. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents. PMID:25045626

  5. [Analysis of Flt-3 expression and Flt-3/ITD mutation in acute myeloid leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Lun; Wang, Tong; Xu, Feng; Gang, Yan; Wang, Jie

    2006-06-01

    This study was aimed to explore the relationship between Flt-3 expression, Flt-3/ITD mutation in acute leukemia (AL) cell line and pathogenesis of AL, especially AML. The Flt-3 expression and Flt-3/ITD mutation were detected by RT-PCR and sequencing method in 82 leukemia cell lines including 20 AML, 57 ALL and 5 CML cell lines. The results indicated that positive results of Flt-3 expression were obtained in 48 out of 77 AL cell line, the positive rate was 62%; 12 cell lines were positive in 20 AML cell lines, the positive rate was 60%; 33 cell lines was positive in 57 ALL cell lines, the positive rate was 58%; 3 cell lines were positive in 5 CML cell lines, the positive rate was 60%. There was abnormal gene product in 1 AMOL cell line out of 12 AML cell lines with Flt-3 positive expression (positive rate 8.3%). DNA sequencing of abnormal gene product showed two coding duplication sequence with 29 bp long. The positive rate of Flt-3 expression in undifferentiated cell line was prominently higher than that in mature B cell ALL (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the Flt-3 expression is different in various leukemia cells. Flt-3/ITD duplication was found in one AML cell line. The detection of Flt-3 gene and Flt-3/ITD mutation may contribute to the diagnosis of ALL, especially to AML.

  6. Janus kinase 2 mutations in cases with BCR-ABL-negative chronic myeloproliferative disorders from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ismail; Yokuş, Osman; Gedik, Habip

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the frequency of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutations in cases with chronic myeloproliferative disorders (CMDs), and the relationship between the presence of JAK2 mutation and leukocytosis and splenomegaly, retrospectively. Materials and Methods: Patients, who were diagnosed with BCR-ABL-negative CMDs according to diagnosis criteria of the World Health Organization and followed up at the hematology clinic between 2013 and 2015, were investigated in terms of the frequency of JAK2 mutation in cases with CMDs, and the relationship between the presence of JAK2 mutation and leukocytosis and splenomegaly, retrospectively. Results: In total, 100 patients, who were diagnosed with BCR-ABL-negative CMDs, were evaluated retrospectively. The mean age of the patients with JAK2 positivity was significantly higher compared to patients with negative. JAK2-positivity rates in the age groups were significantly different. Gender, diagnosis, splenomegaly, and leukocytosis were not statistically different for JAK2 positivity between the groups. Conclusion: JAK2 V617F mutation is more commonly seen in older age as a risk for complications related to CDMS. Splenomegaly and leukocytosis are not associated with JAK2 V617F mutation. PMID:28182037

  7. Novel inherited mutations and variable expressivity of BRCA1 alleles, including the founder mutation 185delAG in Ashkenazi Jewish families.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, L S; Szabo, C I; Ostermeyer, E A; Dowd, P; Butler, L; Park, T; Lee, M K; Goode, E L; Rowell, S E; King, M C

    1995-01-01

    Thirty-seven families with four or more cases of breast cancer or breast and ovarian cancer were analyzed for mutations in BRCA1. Twelve different germ-line mutations, four novel and eight previously observed, were detected in 16 families. Five families of Ashkenazi Jewish descent carried the 185delAG mutation and shared the same haplotype at eight polymorphic markers spanning approximately 850 kb at BRCA1. Expressivity of 185delAG in these families varied, from early-onset breast cancer without ovarian cancer. Mutation 4184delTCAA occurred independently in two families. In one family, penetrance was complete, with females developing early-onset breast cancer or ovarian cancer and the male carrier developing prostatic cancer, whereas, in the other family, penetrance was incomplete and only breast cancer occurred, diagnosed at ages 38-81 years. Two novel nonsense mutations led to the loss of mutant BRCA1 transcript in families with 10 and 6 cases of early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer. A 665-nt segment of the BRCA1 3'-UTR and 1.3 kb of genomic sequence including the putative promoter region were invariant by single-strand conformation analysis in 13 families without coding-sequence mutations. Overall in our series, BRCA1 mutations have been detected in 26 families: 16 with positive BRCA1 lod scores, 7 with negative lod scores (reflecting multiple sporadic breast cancers), and 3 not tested for linkage. Three other families have positive lod scores for linkage to BRCA2, but 13 families without detected BRCA1 mutations have negative lod scores for both BRCA1 and BRCA2. Images Figure 5 PMID:8533757

  8. Novel inherited mutations and variable expressivity of BRCA1 alleles, including the founder mutation 185delAG in Ashkenazi Jewish families

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, L.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Ostermeyer, E.A.

    1995-12-01

    Thirty-seven families with four or more cases of breast cancer or breast and ovarian cancer were analyzed for mutations in BRCA1. Twelve different germ-line mutations, four novel and eight previously observed, were detected in 16 families. Five families of Ashkenazi Jewish descent carried the 185delAG mutation and shared the same haplotype at eight polymorphic markers spanning {approximately}850 kb at BRCA1. Expressivity of 185delAG in these families varied, from early-onset bilateral breast cancer and ovarian cancer to late-onset breast cancer without ovarian cancer. Mutation 4184delTCAA occurred independently in two families. In one family, penetrance was complete, with females developing early-onset breast cancer or ovarian cancer and the male carrier developing prostatic cancer, whereas, in the other family, penetrance was incomplete and only breast cancer occurred, diagnosed at ages 38-81 years. Two novel nonsense mutations led to the loss of mutant BRCA1 transcript in families with 10 and 6 cases of early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer. A 665-nt segment of the BRCA1 3{prime}-UTR and 1.3 kb of genomic sequence including the putative promoter region were invariant by single-strand conformation analysis in 13 families without coding-sequence mutations. Overall in our series, BRCA1 mutations have been detected in 26 families: 16 with positive BRCA1 lod scores, 7 with negative lod scores (reflecting multiple sporadic breast cancers), and 3 not tested for linkage. Three other families have positive lod scores for linkage to BRCA2, but 13 families without detected BRCA1 mutations have negative lod scores for both BRCA1 and BRCA2. 57 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Variable phenotypes in a family with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy harboring a 3291T > C mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sunami, Yoko; Sugaya, Keizo; Chihara, Norio; Goto, Yu-ichi; Matsubara, Shiro

    2011-10-01

    We present a Japanese family suffering from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy associated with a T-to-C transition at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide position 3291. Clinical manifestations of the patients include cerebellar ataxia with myopathy, recurrent headache, and myoclonus and epilepsy. The phenotypic variation among the affected members of a single family and the mutational analysis showing maternal inheritance in a heteroplasmic fashion are consistent with well-recognized phenomena associated with many pathogenic point mutations of mtDNA tRNA genes. The 3291 mutation is a rare mtDNA mutation whose clinical presentation had only been reported in three sporadic cases. This is the first report of a family segregating the 3291 mutation with multigenerational matrilinear recurrence of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the pathogenicity of the 3291T > C mutation in mtDNA and its characteristic clinical heterogeneity.

  10. Prevalence of an inherited cancer predisposition syndrome associated with the germ line TP53 R337H mutation in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Legal, Edith Falcon-de; Ascurra, Marta; Custódio, Gislaine; Ayala, Horacio Legal; Monteiro, Magna; Vega, Celeste; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Vega, Sonia; Sade, Elis R; Coelho, Izabel M M; Ribeiro, Enilze M S F; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Figueiredo, Bonald C

    2015-04-01

    The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer, and the germline TP53 R337H mutation is the most common mutation reported to date. However, this mutation is associated with a lower cumulative lifetime cancer risk than other mutations in the p53 DNA-binding domain. A detailed statistical analysis of 171,500 DNA tests in Brazilian neonates found that 0.27% of the general population is positive for this mutation, and some of the estimated 200,000 Brazilian R337H carriers in southern and southeastern Brazil have already developed cancer. The present study was designed to estimate R337H prevalence in neighboring Paraguay. To address this question, 10,000 dried blood samples stored in Guthrie cards since 2008 were randomly selected from the Paraguayan municipalities located at the border with Brazil. These samples were tested for R337H mutation using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. This germline mutation was detected in five samples (5/10,000), indicating that the total number of R337H carriers in Paraguay may be as high as 3500. Previous studies have shown that other countries (i.e., Portugal, Spain, and Germany) presented one family with this mutation, leading us to conclude that, besides Brazil and Paraguay, other countries may have multiple families carrying this mutation, which is an inherited syndrome that is difficult to control.

  11. A comparison of ARMS and mutation specific IHC for common activating EGFR mutations analysis in small biopsy and cytology specimens of advanced non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Yueyue; Xu, Yinhong; Zhang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    We have compared mutation analysis by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant-specific antibodies for their ability to detect two common activating EGFR mutations in a cohort of 115 advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including cytology material, core biopsy, and bronchoscopic biopsies. Assessment of EGFR mutation status was performed by using antibodies and ARMS assay specific to the two major forms of mutant EGFR, exon 19 deletion E746-A750 (c.2235_2249del15 or c.2236_2250del15, p. Glu746_Ala750 del) and exon 21 L858R point mutation (c.2573T>G, p.Leu858Arg). In this study the optimal buffer for antigen retrieval was sodium citrate (pH 6.0). Q score was used to evaluate the specific mutant EGFR proteins expression. Validation using clinical material showed deletions in exon 19 were detected in 19.1% and L858R mutation in 20% of all cases by ARMS assay. A cutoff value of score 1 was used as positive by IHC. No wild type cases were immuno-reactive. The antibodies performed well in cytology, core biopsies and bronchoscopic biopsies. There were only one false positive case using L858R IHC (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.5%, positive predictive value 96%, negative predictive value 100%). All 23 E746-A750 exon 19 deletions identified by mutation analysis were positive by IHC. The sensitivity of exon 19 IHC for E746-A750 was 100%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 100%. The result of the IHC stains was finely correlated with mutations status determined by ARMS assay. Although inferior to molecular genetic analysis of the EGFR gene, IHC is highly specific and sensitive for the targeted EGFR mutations. The antibodies are likely to be of clinical value in cases especially where limited tumor material is available, or in situations where molecular genetic analysis is not readily available.

  12. Positive battery plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowlette, John R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    The power characteristics of a lead acid battery are improved by incorporating a dispersion of 1 to 10% by weight of a thermodynamically stable conductivity additive, such as conductive tin oxide coated glass fibers (34) of filamentary glass wool (42) in the positive active layer (32) carried on the grid (30) of the positive plate (16). Positive plate potential must be kept high enough to prevent reduction of the tin oxide to tin by utilizing an oversized, precharged positive paste.

  13. Positive Deviance: Learning from Positive Anomalies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMahieu, Paul G.; Nordstrum, Lee E.; Gale, Dick

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This paper is one of seven in this volume, each elaborating different approaches to quality improvement in education. The purpose of this paper is to delineate a methodology called positive deviance. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents the origins, theoretical foundations, core principles and a case study demonstrating an…

  14. Epigenomic annotation of noncoding mutations identifies mutated pathways in primary liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lowdon, Rebecca F.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence that noncoding mutation can result in cancer driver events is mounting. However, it is more difficult to assign molecular biological consequences to noncoding mutations than to coding mutations, and a typical cancer genome contains many more noncoding mutations than protein-coding mutations. Accordingly, parsing functional noncoding mutation signal from noise remains an important challenge. Here we use an empirical approach to identify putatively functional noncoding somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from liver cancer genomes. Annotation of candidate variants by publicly available epigenome datasets finds that 40.5% of SNVs fall in regulatory elements. When assigned to specific regulatory elements, we find that the distribution of regulatory element mutation mirrors that of nonsynonymous coding mutation, where few regulatory elements are recurrently mutated in a patient population but many are singly mutated. We find potential gain-of-binding site events among candidate SNVs, suggesting a mechanism of action for these variants. When aggregating noncoding somatic mutation in promoters, we find that genes in the ERBB signaling and MAPK signaling pathways are significantly enriched for promoter mutations. Altogether, our results suggest that functional somatic SNVs in cancer are sporadic, but occasionally occur in regulatory elements and may affect phenotype by creating binding sites for transcriptional regulators. Accordingly, we propose that noncoding mutation should be formally accounted for when determining gene- and pathway-mutation burden in cancer. PMID:28333948

  15. Comparison of uncommon EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations with single mutation.

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Song, Zhigang; Jiao, Shunchang

    2015-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation is sensitive to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). But little is known about the response to EGFR TKIs and the prognostic role of compound mutations. This study compared the uncommon EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations with single mutation to characterize EGFR compound mutations and investigated their response to EGFR TKI treatment. We retrospectively screened 799 non-small-cell lung cancer patients from August 1, 2009 to June 1, 2012 by EGFR mutation testing. EGFR mutations were detected in 443 patients, with 22 (4.97%) compound mutations. Subsequently, six patients with EGFR exon 21 L858R compound mutations and 18 paired patients with single L858R mutation were well characterized. Finally, we also analyzed the EGFR TKI treatment response and patients' outcomes of compound or single L858R mutations. There was no differential treatment effect on the disease control rate and objective response rate between the L858R compound mutations and single mutation groups. No significant difference in overall survival or progression-free survival of these two groups was found by log-rank test. In conclusion, we demonstrated that no significant difference was detected in the response to EGFR TKIs and patients' outcomes in the compound and single mutation groups.

  16. The Positivity Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Alessandri, Guido; Eisenberg, Nancy; Kupfer, A.; Steca, Patrizia; Caprara, Maria Giovanna; Yamaguchi, Susumu; Fukuzawa, Ai; Abela, John

    2012-01-01

    Five studies document the validity of a new 8-item scale designed to measure "positivity," defined as the tendency to view life and experiences with a positive outlook. In the first study (N = 372), the psychometric properties of Positivity Scale (P Scale) were examined in accordance with classical test theory using a large number of…

  17. The Global Positioning System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-01

    Global Positioning System ( GPS ) and current program status are provided. The importance of...the NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (NAVSTAR GPS or GPS ) will have on future weapons employment. The study will: examine why we need a high...Washington, D.C., 24 January, 1984. Malone, Daniel K. GPS /NAVSTAR. Military Review, March 1986. Nepean, Phillip The NAVSTAR Global Positioning System

  18. Two de novo mutations in the AR gene cause the complete androgen insensitivity syndrome in a pair of monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Mongan, Nigel P; Jääskeläinen, Jarmo; Green, Katherine; Schwabe, John W; Shimura, Naoto; Dattani, Mehul; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2002-03-01

    The androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) is the most common cause of male undermasculinization and is typically caused by mutations in the AR gene. Affected individuals may exhibit either complete external feminization (complete AIS) or a partial phenotype (partial AIS). Here we describe monozygotic twins diagnosed with complete AIS who each possess two substitutions (C-->G at position 2930 and T-->C at position 2955, both in exon 7), leading to Phe(856)Leu and Ser(865)Pro mutations, respectively. Neither parent was found to be a carrier for these mutations, indicating that the double mutation arose de novo. Both mutations were recreated by site-directed mutagenesis and compared functionally with the wild-type receptor. The Phe(856)Leu mutation did not affect androgen binding when expressed in COS-1 cells, nor did this mutation decrease androgen-dependent trans-activation in transfected HeLa cells. However, the Ser(865)Pro mutation completely ablated androgen binding and trans-activation. In this study we demonstrate that the replacement of serine by proline at position 865 is sufficient in itself to cause complete AIS in these twins. Analyses of nuclear receptor structures suggest that this mutation is likely to perturb the conformation of helix 10/11, which plays a role in ligand binding, dimerization, and receptor activation. To our knowledge this is the first confirmed instance of AIS (complete or partial) due to an AR mutation occurring in twins. Furthermore, the phenotype was associated with two mutations that were both novel in nature.

  19. Identification of five novel FBN1 mutations by non-radioactive single-strand conformation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W.; Qian, C.; Comeau, K.; Francke, U.

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS), one of the most common genetic disorders of connective tissue, is characterized by variable manifestations in skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular systems. Mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 (FBN1) have been shown to cause MFS. To examine the relationship between FBN1 gene mutations, fibrillin protein function and MFS phenotypes, we screened for alternations in the fibrillin coding sequence in fibroblast derived cDNA from MFS patients. To date, abnormally migrating bands in more than 20 unrelated MFS patients have been identified by using non-radioactive single-strand conformation analysis and silver staining. Five altered bands have been directly sequenced. Two missense mutations and three splice site mutations have been identified. Both missense mutations substitute another amino acid for a cysteine residue (C1402W and C1672R) in EGF-like motifs of the fibrillin polypeptide chain. The two splice site mutations are at nucleotide positions 6994+1 (G{yields}A), and 7205-2 (A{yields}G) and result in in-frame skipping of exon 56 and 58, respectively. Skipping of exon 56 occurs in 50%