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Sample records for pms2 mutation positive

  1. PMS2 mutations in childhood cancer.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Michel; Hayward, Bruce E; Charlton, Ruth; Taylor, Graham R; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan; Cole, Trevor R; Maher, Eamonn R; McKeown, Carole M E; Mann, Jill R; Yates, John R; Baralle, Diana; Rankin, Julia; Bonthron, David T; Sheridan, Eamonn

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, the PMS2 DNA mismatch repair gene has only rarely been implicated as a cancer susceptibility locus. New studies have shown, however, that earlier analyses of this gene have had technical limitations and also that the genetic behavior of mutant PMS2 alleles is unusual, in that, unlike MLH1 or MSH2 mutations, PMS2 mutations show low heterozygote penetrance. As a result, a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition has not been a feature reported in families with PMS2 mutations. Such families have instead been ascertained through childhood-onset cancers in homozygotes or through apparently sporadic colorectal cancer in heterozygotes. We present further information on the phenotype associated with homozygous PMS2 deficiency in 13 patients from six families of Pakistani origin living in the United Kingdom. This syndrome is characterized by café-au-lait skin pigmentation and a characteristic tumor spectrum, including leukemias, lymphomas, cerebral malignancies (such as supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumors, astrocytomas, and glioblastomas), and colorectal neoplasia with an onset in early adult life. We present evidence for a founder effect in five families, all of which carried the same R802-->X mutation (i.e., arginine-802 to stop) in PMS2. This cancer syndrome can be mistaken for neurofibromatosis type 1, with important management implications including the risk of the disorder occurring in siblings and the likelihood of tumor development in affected individuals.

  2. Secondary mutation in a coding mononucleotide tract in MSH6 causes loss of immunoexpression of MSH6 in colorectal carcinomas with MLH1/PMS2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shia, Jinru; Zhang, Liying; Shike, Moshe; Guo, Min; Stadler, Zsofia; Xiong, Xiaoling; Tang, Laura H; Vakiani, Efsevia; Katabi, Nora; Wang, Hangjun; Bacares, Ruben; Ruggeri, Jeanine; Boland, C Richard; Ladanyi, Marc; Klimstra, David S

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemical staining for DNA mismatch repair proteins may be affected by various biological and technical factors. Staining variations that could potentially lead to erroneous interpretations have been recognized. A recently recognized staining variation is the significant reduction of staining for MSH6 in some colorectal carcinomas. The frequency and specific characteristics of this aberrant MSH6 staining pattern, however, have not been well analyzed. In this study of 420 colorectal carcinoma samples obtained from patients fulfilling the Revised Bethesda Guidelines, we detected 9 tumors (2%) showing extremely limited staining for MSH6 with positive staining present in <5% of the tumor cells. Our analyses showed that these tumors belonged to two distinct categories: (1) MLH1 and/or PMS2 protein-deficient carcinomas (n=5, including 1 with a pathogenic mutation in PMS2); and (2) MLH1, PMS2 and MSH2 normal but with chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy before surgery (n=4). To test our hypothesis that somatic mutation in the coding region microsatellite of the MSH6 gene might be a potential underlying mechanism for such limited MSH6 staining, we evaluated frameshift mutation in a (C)8 tract in exon 5 of the MSH6 gene in seven tumors that had sufficient DNA for analysis, and detected mutation in four; all four tumors belonged to the MLH1/PMS2-deficient group. In conclusion, our data outline the main scenarios where significant reduction of MSH6 staining is more likely to occur in colorectal carcinoma, and suggest that somatic mutations of the coding region microsatellites of the MSH6 gene is an underlying mechanism for this staining phenomenon in MLH1/PMS2-deficient carcinomas. PMID:22918162

  3. Café-au-lait macules and pediatric malignancy caused by biallelic mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) gene PMS2.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Carl-Christian; Holter, Spring; Pollett, Aaron; Clendenning, Mark; Chou, Shirley; Senter, Leigha; Ramphal, Raveena; Gallinger, Steven; Boycott, Kym

    2008-06-01

    A 14-year-old male presented with a T4 sigmoid adenocarcinoma, <10 colonic adenomas and multiple café-au-lait macules. Family history was not suggestive of a dominant hereditary form of colorectal cancer. Evaluation of the tumor revealed abnormal immunohistochemical staining of the PMS2 protein and high frequency microsatellite instability. Germline analysis identified biallelic PMS2 missense mutations. A new cancer syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in the mismatch repair genes, including PMS2, is now emerging and is characterized by café-au-lait macules, colonic polyps and a distinctive tumor spectrum.

  4. Homozygous PMS2 germline mutations in two families with early-onset haematological malignancy, brain tumours, HNPCC-associated tumours, and signs of neurofibromatosis type 1.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Stefan; Kinzel, Miriam; Walldorf, Constanze; Gottschling, Sven; Bier, Andrea; Tinschert, Sigrid; von Stackelberg, Arend; Henn, Wolfram; Görgens, Heike; Boue, Stephanie; Kölble, Konrad; Büttner, Reinhard; Schackert, Hans K

    2008-01-01

    Heterozygous germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, PMS2, MSH2, and MSH6 cause Lynch syndrome. New studies have indicated that biallelic mutations lead to a distinctive syndrome, childhood cancer syndrome (CCS), with haematological malignancies and tumours of brain and bowel early in childhood, often associated with signs of neurofibromatosis type 1. We provide further evidence for CCS reporting on six children from two consanguineous families carrying homozygous PMS2 germline mutations. In family 1, all four children had the homozygous p.I590Xfs mutation. Two had a glioblastoma at the age of 6 years and one of them had three additional Lynch-syndrome associated tumours at 15. Another sibling suffered from a glioblastoma at age 9, and the fourth sibling had infantile myofibromatosis at 1. In family 2, two of four siblings were homozygous for the p.G271V mutation. One had two colorectal cancers diagnosed at ages 13 and 14, the other had a Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and a colorectal cancer at ages 10 and 11, respectively. All children with malignancies had multiple café-au-lait spots. After reviewing published cases of biallelic MMR gene mutations, we provide a concise description of CCS, revealing similarities in age distribution with carriers of heterozygous MMR gene mutations.

  5. Isolated Loss of PMS2 Immunohistochemical Expression is Frequently Caused by Heterogenous MLH1 Promoter Hypermethylation in Lynch Syndrome Screening for Endometrial Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Naoki; Sugawara, Tae; Takahashi, Kazue; Kito, Masahiko; Makino, Kenichi; Sato, Toshiharu; Shimizu, Dai; Shirasawa, Hiromistu; Miura, Hiroshi; Sato, Wataru; Kumazawa, Yukiyo; Sato, Akira; Kumagai, Jin; Terada, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder mainly caused by a germline mutation in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2) and is associated with increased risk for various cancers, particularly colorectal cancer and endometrial cancer (EC). Women with LS account for 2% to 6% of EC patients; it is clinically important to identify LS in such individuals for predicting and/or preventing additional LS-associated cancers. PMS2 germline mutation (PMS2-LS) is the rarest contribution to LS etiology among the 4 LS-associated MMR germline mutations, and its detection is complicated. Therefore, prudent screening for PMS2-LS is important as it leads to an efficient LS identification strategy. Immunohistochemistry is recommended as a screening method for LS in EC. Isolated loss of PMS2 (IL-PMS2) expression is caused not only by PMS2-LS but also by MLH1 germline mutation or MLH1 promoter hypermethylation (MLH-PHM). This study aimed to determine the association between MLH1-PHM and IL-PMS2 to avoid inappropriate genetic analysis. We performed MLH1 methylation analysis and MLH1/PMS2 germline mutation testing on the IL-PMS2 cases. By performing MMR-immunohistochemistry on 360 unselected ECs, we could select 8 (2.2%) cases as IL-PMS2. Heterogenous MLH1 staining and MLH1-PHM were detected in 4 of 8 (50%) IL-PMS2 tumors. Of the 5 IL-PMS2 patients who underwent genetic analysis, 1 had PMS2 germline mutation with normal MLH1 expression (without MLH1-PHM), and no MLH1 germline mutation was detected. We suggest that MLH1 promoter methylation analysis for IL-PMS2 EC should be performed to exclude sporadic cases before further PMS2 genetic testing. PMID:26848797

  6. Relationship between MLH-1, MSH-2, PMS-2,MSH-6 expression and clinicopathological features in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Birgül; Argon, Asuman; Yıldırım, Mehmet; Vardar, Enver

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancers are the third most common in both sexes and they are the second most common cause of cancer-related death. 12-15% of colorectal cancers develop through microsatellite instability (the hereditary mutation in at least one of DNA mismatch repair genes) pathway and they are 2-5% hereditary. In this study, we investigated the correlation between the clinicopathological features themselves and also the correlation between them and the immunohistochemical MLH-1, MSH-2, PMS-2, MSH-6 expressions in a total of 186 resection materials with colorectal adenocarcinoma between 2008 and 2012. All the cases were retrospectively evaluated in terms of age, sex, localization, size, accompanying polyp, multiple tumor, arising from polyp, differentiation, mucinous differentiation, pathological tumor stage, lymphovascular and perineural invasion, lymphocyte amount in the tumor microenvironment, surgical border and lymph node metastasis. We prepared multiple tissue blocks which had 4-millimeter tumor. Immunohistochemically, MLH-1, MSH-2, PMS-2, MSH-6 primary antibodies were studied. Statistically, “Kruskal-Wallis” ve “Pearson’s chi-squared” tests were used. We found a positive correlation between loss of MLH-1 and PMS-2 expressions and the right-colon location, poor and mucinous differentiation and dense lymphocytic infiltration. In addition, loss of MSH-2 and MSH-6 expressions was correlated with the right-colon location, poor and mucinous differentiation. We found a meaningful relationship between immunohistochemical markers and clinicopathological features usually observed in tumors with microsatellite instability. This finding may arouse suspicion for MSI. However, the findings in our study must be supported with studies conducted in large series including molecular methods. PMID:26097592

  7. Deficient Pms2, ERCC1, Ku86, CcOI in field defects during progression to colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy; Loustaunau, Cristy; Facista, Alexander; Ramsey, Lois; Hassounah, Nadia; Taylor, Hilary; Krouse, Robert; Payne, Claire M; Tsikitis, V Liana; Goldschmid, Steve; Banerjee, Bhaskar; Perini, Rafael F; Bernstein, Carol

    2010-01-01

    In carcinogenesis, the "field defect" is recognized clinically because of the high propensity of survivors of certain cancers to develop other malignancies of the same tissue type, often in a nearby location. Such field defects have been indicated in colon cancer. The molecular abnormalities that are responsible for a field defect in the colon should be detectable at high frequency in the histologically normal tissue surrounding a colonic adenocarcinoma or surrounding an adenoma with advanced neoplasia (well on the way to a colon cancer), but at low frequency in the colonic mucosa from patients without colonic neoplasia. Using immunohistochemistry, entire crypts within 10 cm on each side of colonic adenocarcinomas or advanced colonic neoplasias were found to be frequently reduced or absent in expression for two DNA repair proteins, Pms2 and/or ERCC1. Pms2 is a dual role protein, active in DNA mismatch repair as well as needed in apoptosis of cells with excess DNA damage. ERCC1 is active in DNA nucleotide excision repair. The reduced or absent expression of both ERCC1 and Pms2 would create cells with both increased ability to survive (apoptosis resistance) and increased level of mutability. The reduced or absent expression of both ERCC1 and Pms2 is likely an early step in progression to colon cancer. DNA repair gene Ku86 (active in DNA non-homologous end joining) and Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunit I (involved in apoptosis) had each been reported to be decreased in expression in mucosal areas close to colon cancers. However, immunohistochemical evaluation of their levels of expression showed only low to modest frequencies of crypts to be deficient in their expression in a field defect surrounding colon cancer or surrounding advanced colonic neoplasia. We show, here, our method of evaluation of crypts for expression of ERCC1, Pms2, Ku86 and CcOI. We show that frequency of entire crypts deficient for Pms2 and ERCC1 is often as great as 70% to 95% in 20 cm long areas

  8. [Afatinib as first-line therapy in mutation-positive EGFR. Results by type of mutation].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Óscar Juan

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has laid the foundations for personalized medicine in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In phase III trials, the first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib and erlotinib, demonstrated greater efficacy compared with chemotherapy in patients with EGFR mutations, achieving progression-free survival of 8-13.5 months. Afatinib, a second-generation irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor, is the first TKI that has shown a benefit in overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC when used as first-line treatment. Exon 19 deletion (Del19) and the single-point substitution mutation (L858R) in exon 21, called activating mutations due to their ability to confer sensitivity to TKI, represent approximately 90% of the EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Distinct sensitivity to TKI has been observed depending on the type of mutation, with greater progression-free survival in patients with the Del19 mutation. The analysis of OS in the LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6 trials showed a statistically significant increase in survival in afatinib-treated patients with the Del 19 mutation, but no significant increase in that of patients with the L858R mutation. Direct comparison of afatinib and gefitinib as first-line therapy (LUX-Lung 7 trial) showed a statistically-significant increase in progression-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.95; p=0.0165) with afatinib. In the analysis by type of mutation, this benefit was observed for both the Del19 and the L858R mutations. PMID:27426243

  9. [Afatinib as first-line therapy in mutation-positive EGFR. Results by type of mutation].

    PubMed

    Vidal, Óscar Juan

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of endothelial growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has laid the foundations for personalized medicine in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In phase III trials, the first-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), gefitinib and erlotinib, demonstrated greater efficacy compared with chemotherapy in patients with EGFR mutations, achieving progression-free survival of 8-13.5 months. Afatinib, a second-generation irreversible pan-ErbB inhibitor, is the first TKI that has shown a benefit in overall survival (OS) compared with chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC when used as first-line treatment. Exon 19 deletion (Del19) and the single-point substitution mutation (L858R) in exon 21, called activating mutations due to their ability to confer sensitivity to TKI, represent approximately 90% of the EGFR mutations in NSCLC. Distinct sensitivity to TKI has been observed depending on the type of mutation, with greater progression-free survival in patients with the Del19 mutation. The analysis of OS in the LUX-Lung 3 and LUX-Lung 6 trials showed a statistically significant increase in survival in afatinib-treated patients with the Del 19 mutation, but no significant increase in that of patients with the L858R mutation. Direct comparison of afatinib and gefitinib as first-line therapy (LUX-Lung 7 trial) showed a statistically-significant increase in progression-free survival (hazard ratio: 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.57-0.95; p=0.0165) with afatinib. In the analysis by type of mutation, this benefit was observed for both the Del19 and the L858R mutations.

  10. Tumor Mismatch Repair Immunohistochemistry and DNA MLH1 Methylation Testing of Patients With Endometrial Cancer Diagnosed at Age Younger Than 60 Years Optimizes Triage for Population-Level Germline Mismatch Repair Gene Mutation Testing

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Daniel D.; Tan, Yen Y.; Walsh, Michael D.; Clendenning, Mark; Metcalf, Alexander M.; Ferguson, Kaltin; Arnold, Sven T.; Thompson, Bryony A.; Lose, Felicity A.; Parsons, Michael T.; Walters, Rhiannon J.; Pearson, Sally-Ann; Cummings, Margaret; Oehler, Martin K.; Blomfield, Penelope B.; Quinn, Michael A.; Kirk, Judy A.; Stewart, Colin J.; Obermair, Andreas; Young, Joanne P.; Webb, Penelope M.; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Clinicopathologic data from a population-based endometrial cancer cohort, unselected for age or family history, were analyzed to determine the optimal scheme for identification of patients with germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. Patients and Methods Endometrial cancers from 702 patients recruited into the Australian National Endometrial Cancer Study (ANECS) were tested for MMR protein expression using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and for MLH1 gene promoter methylation in MLH1-deficient cases. MMR mutation testing was performed on germline DNA of patients with MMR-protein deficient tumors. Prediction of germline mutation status was compared for combinations of tumor characteristics, age at diagnosis, and various clinical criteria (Amsterdam, Bethesda, Society of Gynecologic Oncology, ANECS). Results Tumor MMR-protein deficiency was detected in 170 (24%) of 702 cases. Germline testing of 158 MMR-deficient cases identified 22 truncating mutations (3% of all cases) and four unclassified variants. Tumor MLH1 methylation was detected in 99 (89%) of 111 cases demonstrating MLH1/PMS2 IHC loss; all were germline MLH1 mutation negative. A combination of MMR IHC plus MLH1 methylation testing in women younger than 60 years of age at diagnosis provided the highest positive predictive value for the identification of mutation carriers at 46% versus ≤ 41% for any other criteria considered. Conclusion Population-level identification of patients with MMR mutation-positive endometrial cancer is optimized by stepwise testing for tumor MMR IHC loss in patients younger than 60 years, tumor MLH1 methylation in individuals with MLH1 IHC loss, and germline mutations in patients exhibiting loss of MSH6, MSH2, or PMS2 or loss of MLH1/PMS2 with absence of MLH1 methylation. PMID:24323032

  11. Deoxyinosine triphosphate induces MLH1/PMS2- and p53-dependent cell growth arrest and DNA instability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Yoneshima, Yasuto; Abolhassani, Nona; Iyama, Teruaki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoko; Mori, Masahiko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Noda, Tetsuo; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyinosine (dI) occurs in DNA either by oxidative deamination of a previously incorporated deoxyadenosine residue or by misincorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) from the nucleotide pool during replication. To exclude dITP from the pool, mammals possess specific hydrolysing enzymes, such as inosine triphosphatase (ITPA). Previous studies have shown that deficiency in ITPA results in cell growth suppression and DNA instability. To explore the mechanisms of these phenotypes, we analysed ITPA-deficient human and mouse cells. We found that both growth suppression and accumulation of single-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of ITPA-deficient cells depended on MLH1/PMS2. The cell growth suppression of ITPA-deficient cells also depended on p53, but not on MPG, ENDOV or MSH2. ITPA deficiency significantly increased the levels of p53 protein and p21 mRNA/protein, a well-known target of p53, in an MLH1-dependent manner. Furthermore, MLH1 may also contribute to cell growth arrest by increasing the basal level of p53 activity. PMID:27618981

  12. Deoxyinosine triphosphate induces MLH1/PMS2- and p53-dependent cell growth arrest and DNA instability in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoneshima, Yasuto; Abolhassani, Nona; Iyama, Teruaki; Sakumi, Kunihiko; Shiomi, Naoko; Mori, Masahiko; Shiomi, Tadahiro; Noda, Tetsuo; Tsuchimoto, Daisuke; Nakabeppu, Yusaku

    2016-01-01

    Deoxyinosine (dI) occurs in DNA either by oxidative deamination of a previously incorporated deoxyadenosine residue or by misincorporation of deoxyinosine triphosphate (dITP) from the nucleotide pool during replication. To exclude dITP from the pool, mammals possess specific hydrolysing enzymes, such as inosine triphosphatase (ITPA). Previous studies have shown that deficiency in ITPA results in cell growth suppression and DNA instability. To explore the mechanisms of these phenotypes, we analysed ITPA-deficient human and mouse cells. We found that both growth suppression and accumulation of single-strand breaks in nuclear DNA of ITPA-deficient cells depended on MLH1/PMS2. The cell growth suppression of ITPA-deficient cells also depended on p53, but not on MPG, ENDOV or MSH2. ITPA deficiency significantly increased the levels of p53 protein and p21 mRNA/protein, a well-known target of p53, in an MLH1-dependent manner. Furthermore, MLH1 may also contribute to cell growth arrest by increasing the basal level of p53 activity. PMID:27618981

  13. Mutational analysis of a histone deacetylase in Drosophila melanogaster: missense mutations suppress gene silencing associated with position effect variegation.

    PubMed Central

    Mottus, R; Sobel, R E; Grigliatti, T A

    2000-01-01

    For many years it has been noted that there is a correlation between acetylation of histones and an increase in transcriptional activity. One prediction, based on this correlation, is that hypomorphic or null mutations in histone deacetylase genes should lead to increased levels of histone acetylation and result in increased levels of transcription. It was therefore surprising when it was reported, in both yeast and fruit flies, that mutations that reduced or eliminated a histone deacetylase resulted in transcriptional silencing of genes subject to telomeric and heterochromatic position effect variegation (PEV). Here we report the first mutational analysis of a histone deacetylase in a multicellular eukaryote by examining six new mutations in HDAC1 of Drosophila melanogaster. We observed a suite of phenotypes accompanying the mutations consistent with the notion that HDAC1 acts as a global transcriptional regulator. However, in contrast to recent findings, here we report that specific missense mutations in the structural gene of HDAC1 suppress the silencing of genes subject to PEV. We propose that the missense mutations reported here are acting as antimorphic mutations that "poison" the deacetylase complex and propose a model that accounts for the various phenotypes associated with lesions in the deacetylase locus. PMID:10655219

  14. People with "MECP2" Mutation-Positive Rett Disorder Who Converse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, A. M.; Archer, H. L.; Evans, J. C.; Prescott, R. J.; Gibbon, F.

    2006-01-01

    Background: People with useful speech after regression constitute a distinct group of those with mutation-positive Rett disorder, 6% (20/331) reported among mutation-positive people in the British Survey. We aimed to determine the physical, mental and genetic characteristics of this group and to gain insight into their experience of Rett syndrome.…

  15. Positive mutations and mutation-dependent Verhulst factor in Penna ageing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss de Oliveira, S.; Stauffer, D.; de Oliveira, P. M. C.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    2004-02-01

    We modify twice the Penna model for biological ageing. First, we introduce back (good) mutations and a memory for them into the model. It allows us to observe an improvement of the species fitness over long-time scales as well as punctuated equilibrium. Second, we adopt a food/space competition factor that depends on the number of accumulated mutations in the individuals genomes, and get rid of the fixed limiting number of allowed mutations. Besides reproducing the main results of the standard model, we also observe a mortality maximum for the oldest old.

  16. Hyperactive Arg39Lys mutated mnemiopsin: implication of positively charged residue in chromophore binding cavity.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Sajedi, Reza H; Hosseinkhani, Saman; Taghdir, Majid

    2015-04-01

    Mnemiopsin, a Ca(2+)-regulated photoprotein isolated from Mnemiopsis leidyi, belongs to the family of ctenophore photoproteins. These proteins emit blue light from a chromophore, which is tightly but non-covalently bound in their central hydrophobic core that contains 21 conserved residues. In an effort to investigate the role of Arg39 (the sole charged residue in coelenterazine binding cavity of ctenophore photoproteins) in bioluminescence properties of these photoproteins, three mutated forms of mnemiopsin 1 (R39E, R39K and R39M) were constructed and characterized. The results indicate that while the luminescence activity of R39K mutated mnemiopsin has increased about nine fold compared to the wild type, R39M and R39E mutated mnemiopsins have entirely lost their activities. The most distinguished properties of R39K mutated photoprotein are its high activity, slow rate of luminescence decay and broad pH profile compared to the wild type. The complete loss of bioluminescence activity in mutated photoproteins with negatively charged and aliphatic residues (R39E and R39M, respectively) shows that the presence of a positively charged residue at this position is necessary. The results of spectroscopic studies, including CD, intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence measurements and acrylamide quenching studies show that, while the substitutions lead to structural rigidity in R39E and R39M mutated mnemiopsins, structural flexibility is obvious in R39K mutated mnemiopsin. The presence of a more localized positive charge on ε-amino group of Lys compared to guanidinium group of Arg residue in close proximity to the choromophre might affect its fixation in the binding cavity and result in increased bioluminescence activity in this mutated photoprotein. It appears that the polarity and flexibility of positively charged residue at this position finely tunes the luminescence properties of ctenophore photoproteins. PMID:25635518

  17. Functional analysis of 'a' determinant mutations associated with occult HBV in HIV-positive South Africans.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eleanor A; Boyce, Ceejay L; Gededzha, Maemu P; Selabe, Selokela G; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T

    2016-07-01

    Occult hepatitis B is defined by the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation during immune suppression, and virus transmission. Viral mutations contribute significantly to the occult HBV phenotype. Mutations in the 'a' determinant of HBsAg are of particular interest, as these mutations are associated with immune escape, vaccine escape and diagnostic failure. We examined the effects of selected occult HBV-associated mutations identified in a population of HIV-positive South Africans on HBsAg production in vitro. Mutations were inserted into two different chronic HBV backbones and transfected into a hepatocyte-derived cell line. HBsAg levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while the detectability of mutant HBsAg was determined using an HA-tagged HBsAg expression system. Of the seven mutations analysed, four (S132P, C138Y, N146D and C147Y) resulted in decreased HBsAg expression in one viral background but not in the second viral background. One mutation (N146D) led to a decrease in HBsAg detected as compared to HA-tag, indicating that this mutation compromises the ability of the ELISA to detect HBsAg. The contribution of occult-associated mutations to the HBsAg-negative phenotype of occult HBV cannot be determined adequately by testing the effect of the mutation in a single viral background, and rigorous analysis of these mutations is required.

  18. Functional analysis of 'a' determinant mutations associated with occult HBV in HIV-positive South Africans.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eleanor A; Boyce, Ceejay L; Gededzha, Maemu P; Selabe, Selokela G; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T

    2016-07-01

    Occult hepatitis B is defined by the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation during immune suppression, and virus transmission. Viral mutations contribute significantly to the occult HBV phenotype. Mutations in the 'a' determinant of HBsAg are of particular interest, as these mutations are associated with immune escape, vaccine escape and diagnostic failure. We examined the effects of selected occult HBV-associated mutations identified in a population of HIV-positive South Africans on HBsAg production in vitro. Mutations were inserted into two different chronic HBV backbones and transfected into a hepatocyte-derived cell line. HBsAg levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while the detectability of mutant HBsAg was determined using an HA-tagged HBsAg expression system. Of the seven mutations analysed, four (S132P, C138Y, N146D and C147Y) resulted in decreased HBsAg expression in one viral background but not in the second viral background. One mutation (N146D) led to a decrease in HBsAg detected as compared to HA-tag, indicating that this mutation compromises the ability of the ELISA to detect HBsAg. The contribution of occult-associated mutations to the HBsAg-negative phenotype of occult HBV cannot be determined adequately by testing the effect of the mutation in a single viral background, and rigorous analysis of these mutations is required. PMID:27031988

  19. Altered Chromosomal Positioning, Compaction, and Gene Expression with a Lamin A/C Gene Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Abuisneineh, Fida; Fahrenbach, John P.; Zhang, Yuan; MacLeod, Heather; Dellefave, Lisa; Pytel, Peter; Selig, Sara; Labno, Christine M.; Reddy, Karen; Singh, Harinder; McNally, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Background Lamins A and C, encoded by the LMNA gene, are filamentous proteins that form the core scaffold of the nuclear lamina. Dominant LMNA gene mutations cause multiple human diseases including cardiac and skeletal myopathies. The nuclear lamina is thought to regulate gene expression by its direct interaction with chromatin. LMNA gene mutations may mediate disease by disrupting normal gene expression. Methods/Findings To investigate the hypothesis that mutant lamin A/C changes the lamina's ability to interact with chromatin, we studied gene misexpression resulting from the cardiomyopathic LMNA E161K mutation and correlated this with changes in chromosome positioning. We identified clusters of misexpressed genes and examined the nuclear positioning of two such genomic clusters, each harboring genes relevant to striated muscle disease including LMO7 and MBNL2. Both gene clusters were found to be more centrally positioned in LMNA-mutant nuclei. Additionally, these loci were less compacted. In LMNA mutant heart and fibroblasts, we found that chromosome 13 had a disproportionately high fraction of misexpressed genes. Using three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization we found that the entire territory of chromosome 13 was displaced towards the center of the nucleus in LMNA mutant fibroblasts. Additional cardiomyopathic LMNA gene mutations were also shown to have abnormal positioning of chromosome 13, although in the opposite direction. Conclusions These data support a model in which LMNA mutations perturb the intranuclear positioning and compaction of chromosomal domains and provide a mechanism by which gene expression may be altered. PMID:21179469

  20. Mutations associated with occult hepatitis B in HIV-positive South Africans.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eleanor A; Gededzha, Maemu P; Rentz, Michael; Rakgole, Nare J; Selabe, Selokela G; Seleise, Tebogo A; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T

    2015-03-01

    Occult hepatitis B is characterized by the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) but the presence of HBV DNA. Because diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) typically includes HBsAg detection, occult HBV remains largely undiagnosed. Occult HBV is associated with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation to chronic HBV during immune suppression, and transmission during blood transfusion and liver transplant. The mechanisms leading to occult HBV infection are unclear, although viral mutations are likely a significant factor. In this study, sera from 394 HIV-positive South Africans were tested for HBV DNA and HBsAg. For patients with detectable HBV DNA, the overlapping surface and polymerase open reading frames (ORFs) were sequenced. Occult-associated mutations-those mutations found exclusively in individuals with occult HBV infection but not in individuals with chronic HBV infection from the same cohort or GenBank references-were identified. Ninety patients (22.8%) had detectable HBV DNA. Of these, 37 had detectable HBsAg, while 53 lacked detectable surface antigen. The surface and polymerase ORFs were cloned successfully for 19 patients with chronic HBV and 30 patients with occult HBV. In total, 235 occult-associated mutations were identified. Ten occult-associated mutations were identified in more than one patient. Additionally, 15 amino acid positions had two distinct occult-associated mutations at the same residue. Occult-associated mutations were common and present in all regions of the surface and polymerase ORFs. Further study is underway to determine the effects of these mutations on viral replication and surface antigen expression in vitro.

  1. Mutational hotspots in the TP53 gene and, possibly, other tumor suppressors evolve by positive selection

    PubMed Central

    Glazko, Galina V; Babenko, Vladimir N; Koonin, Eugene V; Rogozin, Igor B

    2006-01-01

    Background The mutation spectra of the TP53 gene and other tumor suppressors contain multiple hotspots, i.e., sites of non-random, frequent mutation in tumors and/or the germline. The origin of the hotspots remains unclear, the general view being that they represent highly mutable nucleotide contexts which likely reflect effects of different endogenous and exogenous factors shaping the mutation process in specific tissues. The origin of hotspots is of major importance because it has been suggested that mutable contexts could be used to infer mechanisms of mutagenesis contributing to tumorigenesis. Results Here we apply three independent tests, accounting for non-uniform base compositions in synonymous and non-synonymous sites, to test whether the hotspots emerge via selection or due to mutational bias. All three tests consistently indicate that the hotspots in the TP53 gene evolve, primarily, via positive selection. The results were robust to the elimination of the highly mutable CpG dinucleotides. By contrast, only one, the least conservative test reveals the signature of positive selection in BRCA1, BRCA2, and p16. Elucidation of the origin of the hotspots in these genes requires more data on somatic mutations in tumors. Conclusion The results of this analysis seem to indicate that positive selection for gain-of-function in tumor suppressor genes is an important aspect of tumorigenesis, blurring the distinction between tumor suppressors and oncogenes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Sandor Pongor, Christopher Lee and Mikhail Blagosklonny. PMID:16542006

  2. Mutations Associated With Occult Hepatitis B in HIV-Positive South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Eleanor A.; Gededzha, Maemu P.; Rentz, Michael; Rakgole, Nare J.; Selabe, Selokela G.; Seleise, Tebogo A.; Mphahlele, M. Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B is characterized by the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) but the presence of HBV DNA. Because diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) typically includes HBsAg detection, occult HBV remains largely undiagnosed. Occult HBV is associated with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation to chronic HBV during immune suppression, and transmission during blood transfusion and liver transplant. The mechanisms leading to occult HBV infection are unclear, although viral mutations are likely a significant factor. In this study, sera from 394 HIV-positive South Africans were tested for HBV DNA and HBsAg. For patients with detectable HBV DNA, the overlapping surface and polymerase open reading frames (ORFs) were sequenced. Occult-associated mutations—those mutations found exclusively in individuals with occult HBV infection but not in individuals with chronic HBV infection from the same cohort or GenBank references—were identified. Ninety patients (22.8%) had detectable HBV DNA. Of these, 37 had detectable HBsAg, while 53 lacked detectable surface antigen. The surface and polymerase ORFs were cloned successfully for 19 patients with chronic HBV and 30 patients with occult HBV. In total, 235 occult-associated mutations were identified. Ten occult-associated mutations were identified in more than one patient. Additionally, 15 amino acid positions had two distinct occult-associated mutations at the same residue. Occult-associated mutations were common and present in all regions of the surface and polymerase ORFs. Further study is underway to determine the effects of these mutations on viral replication and surface antigen expression in vitro. PMID:25164924

  3. EGFR Mutation Positive Stage IV Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Treatment Beyond Progression

    PubMed Central

    Van Assche, Katrijn; Ferdinande, Liesbeth; Lievens, Yolande; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Surmont, Veerle

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of death from cancer for both men and women. Chemotherapy is the mainstay of treatment in advanced disease, but is only marginally effective. In about 30% of patients with advanced NSCLC in East Asia and in 10–15% in Western countries, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations are found. In this population, first-line treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib, gefitinib, or afatinib is recommended. The treatment beyond progression is less well-defined. In this paper, we present three patients, EGFR mutation positive, with local progression after an initial treatment with TKI. These patients were treated with local radiotherapy. TKI was temporarily stopped and restarted after radiotherapy. We give an overview of the literature and discuss the different treatment options in case of progression after TKI: TKI continuation with or without chemotherapy, TKI continuation with local therapy, alternative dosing or switch to next-generation TKI or combination therapy. There are different options for treatment beyond progression in EGFR mutation positive metastatic NSCLC, but the optimal strategy is still to be defined. Further research on this topic is ongoing. PMID:25538894

  4. Evolution of prodromal clinical markers of Parkinson disease in a glucocerebrosidase mutation positive cohort

    PubMed Central

    Beavan, Michelle; McNeill, Alisdair; Proukakis, Christos; Hughes, Derralynn A; Mehta, Atul; Schapira, Anthony H V

    2015-01-01

    Importance Numerically, the most important genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson disease (PD) is the presence of a glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) mutation. Objective The purpose of this study was the longitudinal clinical evaluation of a GBA mutation positive cohort and the evolution of the prodromal features of PD. Design Individuals were participants in a study of the aetiology and prodrome of PD and have been re-evaluated in this 2 year follow-up report. Setting Clinic-based. Participants Type 1 GD patients and heterozygous GBA mutation positive carriers were recruited in 2010 from the Lysosomal Storage Disorder Unit at the Royal Free Hospital, London. Thirty previously diagnosed Type 1 GD patients, twenty-eight heterozygous GBA mutation carriers and twenty-six genetically unrelated controls were included. For both GD and carrier subjects, exclusion criteria included a diagnosis of PD or dementia and for controls, any existing neurological disease. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) Assessment was performed for clinical markers including hyposmia, rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), depression, autonomic dysfunction, cognitive function and parkinsonian motor signs (UPDRS part III). Results Over 2 years, depression scores were significantly worse in heterozygotes (P = ·01), RBD scores were significantly worse in GD patients (P < ·001) and heterozygotes (P < ·001), and UPDRS III scores were significantly worse in GD patients (P < ·001) and heterozygotes (P < ·001). In controls, there was a small but significant deterioration in the UPDRS II score (P = ·006). At 2 years, olfactory and cognitive assessment scores were lower in GD patients and heterozygotes compared to controls, but did not differ significantly from baseline. When the results from GD patients and heterozygotes were combined, there was a significant deterioration from baseline in RBD, BDI, UPDRS II and III scores (in all, P < ·01), and at 2 years, significant

  5. [Founder mutation in Lynch syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cajal, Andrea R; Piñero, Tamara A; Verzura, Alicia; Santino, Juan Pablo; Solano, Angela R; Kalfayan, Pablo G; Ferro, Alejandra; Vaccaro, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most frequent syndrome in hereditary colorectal cancer, a family-specific deleterious mutations in genes encoding DNA reparation proteins: MLH1 (mutL homolog 1), MSH2, MSH6 (mutS homolog 2 y 6, respectively), PMS2 (PMS1 homolog 2, mismatch repair system component) y MUTYH (mutY DNA glycosylase). The c.2252_2253delAA, p.Lys751Serfs*3 mutation in MLH1 gene segregates with a haplotype reported in the northern region of Italy and whose origin was attributed to a founder effect. This mutation co-segregates with typical characteristics of Lynch syndrome, including early age at onset and multiple primary tumors in the same individual, a high frequency of pancreatic cancer, high microsatellite instability and lack of PMS2 expression. This report describes a mutation in an Argentinian patient with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of uterus. Her first-degree relatives had a history of colon cancer diagnosed before 50 years, fulfilling the Amsterdam Criteria I and Lynch syndrome II. The high pathogenicity associated to this mutation makes necessary the study of all members from families with hereditary cancer, allowing pre-symptomatic genetic diagnosis, early assessment and the instauration of preventive treatments.

  6. The tRNA-Tyr gene family of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: agents of phenotypic variation and position effects on mutation frequency.

    PubMed Central

    Ito-Harashima, Sayoko; Hartzog, Phillip E; Sinha, Himanshu; McCusker, John H

    2002-01-01

    Extensive phenotypic diversity or variation exists in clonal populations of microorganisms and is thought to play a role in adaptation to novel environments. This phenotypic variation or instability, which occurs by multiple mechanisms, may be a form of cellular differentiation and a stochastic means for modulating gene expression. This work dissects a case of phenotypic variation in a clinically derived Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain involving a cox15 ochre mutation, which acts as a reporter. The ochre mutation reverts to sense at a low frequency while tRNA-Tyr ochre suppressors (SUP-o) arise at a very high frequency to produce this phenotypic variation. The SUP-o mutations are highly pleiotropic. In addition, although all SUP-o mutations within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family suppress the ochre mutation reporter, there are considerable phenotypic differences among the different SUP-o mutants. Finally, and of particular interest, there is a strong position effect on mutation frequency within the eight-member tRNA-Tyr gene family, with one locus, SUP6, mutating at a much higher than average frequency and two other loci, SUP2 and SUP8, mutating at much lower than average frequencies. Mechanisms for the position effect on mutation frequency are evaluated. PMID:12196388

  7. Development of positive control materials for DNA-based detection of cystic fibrosis: Cloning and sequencing of 31 mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Iovannisci, D.; Brown, C.; Winn-Deen, E.

    1994-09-01

    The cloning and sequencing of the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF) now provides the opportunity for earlier detection and carrier screening through DNA-based detection schemes. To date, over 300 mutations have been reported to the CF Consortium; however, only 30 mutations have been observed frequently enough world-wide to warrant routine screening. Many of these mutations are not available as cloned material or as established tissue culture cell lines to aid in the development of DNA-based detection assays. We have therefore cloned the 30 most frequently reported mutations, plus the mutation R347H due to its association with male infertility (31 mutations, total). Two approaches were employed: direct PCR amplification, where mutations were available from patient sources, and site-directed PCR mutagenesis of normal genomic DNA to generate the remaining mutations. After amplification, products were cloned into a sequencing vector, bacterial transformants were screened by a novel method (PCR/oligonucleotide litigation assay/sequence-coded separation), and plamid DNA sequences determined by automated fluorescent methods on the Applied Biosystems 373A. Mixing of the clones allows the construction of artificial genotypes useful as positive control material for assay validation. A second round of mutagenesis, resulting in the construction of plasmids bearing multiple mutations, will be evaluated for their utility as reagent control materials in kit development.

  8. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Luis J; Fox, Emily M; Balko, Justin M; Garrett, Joan T; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-12-01

    Estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER(+) tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER(+) breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER(+) LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYN(D189Y) has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYN(D189Y) exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYN(WT). Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYN(D189Y) overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER(+) xenografts but not LYN(D189Y)-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER(+) breast cancers.

  9. Mito-nuclear co-evolution: the positive and negative sides of functional ancient mutations

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Liron; Blumberg, Amit; Barshad, Gilad; Mishmar, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Most cell functions are carried out by interacting factors, thus underlying the functional importance of genetic interactions between genes, termed epistasis. Epistasis could be under strong selective pressures especially in conditions where the mutation rate of one of the interacting partners notably differs from the other. Accordingly, the order of magnitude higher mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutation rate as compared to the nuclear DNA (nDNA) of all tested animals, should influence systems involving mitochondrial-nuclear (mito-nuclear) interactions. Such is the case of the energy producing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and mitochondrial translational machineries which are comprised of factors encoded by both the mtDNA and the nDNA. Additionally, the mitochondrial RNA transcription and mtDNA replication systems are operated by nDNA-encoded proteins that bind mtDNA regulatory elements. As these systems are central to cell life there is strong selection toward mito-nuclear co-evolution to maintain their function. However, it is unclear whether (A) mito-nuclear co-evolution befalls only to retain mitochondrial functions during evolution or, also, (B) serves as an adaptive tool to adjust for the evolving energetic demands as species’ complexity increases. As the first step to answer these questions we discuss evidence of both negative and adaptive (positive) selection acting on the mtDNA and nDNA-encoded genes and the effect of both types of selection on mito-nuclear interacting factors. Emphasis is given to the crucial role of recurrent ancient (nodal) mutations in such selective events. We apply this point-of-view to the three available types of mito-nuclear co-evolution: protein–protein (within the OXPHOS system), protein-RNA (mainly within the mitochondrial ribosome), and protein-DNA (at the mitochondrial replication and transcription machineries). PMID:25566330

  10. Secretion-Positive LGI1 Mutations Linked to Lateral Temporal Epilepsy Impair Binding to ADAM22 and ADAM23 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dazzo, Emanuela; Belluzzi, Elisa; Malacrida, Sandro; Vitiello, Libero; Greggio, Elisa; Tosatto, Silvio C. E.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADTLE) is a focal epilepsy syndrome caused by mutations in the LGI1 gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Most ADLTE-causing mutations inhibit LGI1 protein secretion, and only a few secretion-positive missense mutations have been reported. Here we describe the effects of four disease-causing nonsynonymous LGI1 mutations, T380A, R407C, S473L, and R474Q, on protein secretion and extracellular interactions. Expression of LGI1 mutant proteins in cultured cells shows that these mutations do not inhibit protein secretion. This finding likely results from the lack of effects of these mutations on LGI1 protein folding, as suggested by 3D protein modelling. In addition, immunofluorescence and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that all four mutations significantly impair interaction of LGI1 with the ADAM22 and ADAM23 receptors on the cell surface. These results support the existence of a second mechanism, alternative to inhibition of protein secretion, by which ADLTE-causing LGI1 mutations exert their loss-of-function effect extracellularly, and suggest that interactions of LGI1 with both ADAM22 and ADAM23 play an important role in the molecular mechanisms leading to ADLTE. PMID:27760137

  11. Importance of carbohydrate positioning in the recognition of mutated CPY for ER-associated degradation.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Zlatka; Wolf, Dieter H

    2005-04-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), N-linked glycans (N-glycans) function as signals to recruit the lectin chaperones involved in protein folding, quality control and ER-associated degradation. We undertook a systematic study of the four N-glycans of mutated carboxypeptidase yscY (CPY*) to determine whether there are positional differences between the glycans in ER-associated degradation. We constructed hypoglycosylated CPY* variants containing one, two or three N-glycans in various combinations and studied their degradation kinetics. We found that the four carbohydrate chains on CPY* are not equal in their signaling function: presence of the Asn368-linked glycan is necessary and sufficient for efficient degradation of CPY*. We also analysed the involvement of the ER lectins Htm1p and Cne1p (yeast calnexin) in the glycan-based recognition process with respect to number and position of N-glycans. We observed that Htm1p function depends on the presence of N-glycans in general but that there is no positional preference for a particular glycan. Cne1p, however, is selective with respect to substrate, and participates in the quality control only of some underglycosylated variants. For cases in which both lectins are involved, Cne1p and Htm1p play competing roles in targeting the substrate for degradation: loss of Cne1p accelerates degradation, whereas loss of Htm1p stabilizes the substrate. PMID:15769847

  12. Mismatch repair hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6 and hPMS2 mRNA expression profiles in precancerous and cancerous urothelium.

    PubMed

    Vageli, Dimitra P; Giannopoulos, Stavros; Doukas, Sotirios G; Kalaitzis, Christos; Giannakopoulos, Stilianos; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Koukoulis, George K; Touloupidis, Stavros

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6 and hPMS2 reflect dysfunction of the DNA repair system that may allow the malignant transformation of tissue cells. The aim of the present study was to address the mRNA expression profiles of the mismatch DNA repair system in cancerous and precancerous urothelium. This is the first study to quantify MMR mRNA expression by applying quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and translate the results to mRNA phenotypic profiles (r, reduced; R, regular or elevated) in bladder tumors [24 urothelial cell carcinomas (UCCs) and 1 papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP)] paired with their adjacent normal tissues (ANTs). Genetic instability analysis was applied at polymorphic sites distal or close to the hMSH2 and hMLH1 locus. Presenting our data, reduced hMSH2, hMSH6 and hPMS2 mRNA expression profiles were observed in cancerous and precancerous urothelia. Significantly, the ANTs of UCCs revealed the highest percentages of reduced hMSH2 (r(2)), hMSH6 (r(6)) and hPMS2 (p(2)) mRNA phenotypes relative to their tumors (P<0.03). In particular, combined r(2)r(6) (P<0.02) presented a greater difference between ANTs of low-grade UCCs vs. their tumors compared with ANTs of high-grade UCCs (P= 0.000). Reduced hMLH1 (r(1)) phenotype was not expressed in precancerous or cancerous urothelia. The hMSH6 mRNA was the most changed in UCCs (47.8%), while hMSH2, hMLH1 and hPMS2 showed overexpression (47.8, 35 and 30%, respectively) that was associated with gender and histological tumor grading or staging. Genetic instability was rare in polymorphic regions distal to hMLH1. Our data reveal a previously unrecognized hMSH2 and hMSH6 mRNA combined phenotype (r(2)r(6)) correlated with a precancerous urothelium and show that hMLH1 is transcriptionally activated in precancerous or cancerous urothelium. In the present study, it is demonstrated that reduction of hMSH6 mRNA is a frequent event in bladder

  13. Positive selection during the evolution of the blood coagulation factors in the context of their disease-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M; Orengo, Christine A; Studer, Romain A; Perkins, Stephen J

    2014-11-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII-FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy.

  14. Positive Selection during the Evolution of the Blood Coagulation Factors in the Context of Their Disease-Causing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rallapalli, Pavithra M.; Orengo, Christine A.; Studer, Romain A.; Perkins, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood coagulation occurs through a cascade of enzymes and cofactors that produces a fibrin clot, while otherwise maintaining hemostasis. The 11 human coagulation factors (FG, FII–FXIII) have been identified across all vertebrates, suggesting that they emerged with the first vertebrates around 500 Ma. Human FVIII, FIX, and FXI are associated with thousands of disease-causing mutations. Here, we evaluated the strength of selective pressures on the 14 genes coding for the 11 factors during vertebrate evolution, and compared these with human mutations in FVIII, FIX, and FXI. Positive selection was identified for fibrinogen (FG), FIII, FVIII, FIX, and FX in the mammalian Primates and Laurasiatheria and the Sauropsida (reptiles and birds). This showed that the coagulation system in vertebrates was under strong selective pressures, perhaps to adapt against blood-invading pathogens. The comparison of these results with disease-causing mutations reported in FVIII, FIX, and FXI showed that the number of disease-causing mutations, and the probability of positive selection were inversely related to each other. It was concluded that when a site was under positive selection, it was less likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations. In contrast, sites under negative selection were more likely to be associated with disease-causing mutations and be destabilizing. A residue-by-residue comparison of the FVIII, FIX, and FXI sequence alignments confirmed this. This improved understanding of evolutionary changes in FVIII, FIX, and FXI provided greater insight into disease-causing mutations, and better assessments of the codon sites that may be mutated in applications of gene therapy. PMID:25158795

  15. Positional cloning of Kreisler, a mutation that causes deafness and segmentation abnormalities in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, S.P.; Barsh, G.S.

    1994-09-01

    The identification and analysis of mouse deafness mutations is of great interest to human geneticists, not only because deafness is a common problem in clinical genetics, but also because the molecular mechanisms leading to deafness can underly fundamental aspects of mammalian development. Approximately 10 to 20 genes when mutated can lead to deafness in mice or in humans, but none have yet been identified at the molecular level. In mice homozygous for the kreisler (kr) mutation, abnormal development of the hindbrain and otic vesicle leads to neurosensory deafness and loss of vestibular function. Using the techniques of positional cloning combined with ENU mutagenesis, we have now cloned the kr gene and find that it predicts a transcription factor whose absence leads to defects in Hox gene expression and hindbrain segmentation. We used a backcross between different strains of laboratory mice to sublocalize kr on the meiotic map close to the Src gene on mouse chromosome 2. A probe from the Src gene detected high molecular weight restriction fragments of altered size in kr/kr DNA, suggesting that kr was due to a chromosomal rearrangement. Based on the meiotic map location of kr{sup ENU}, a new kr allele that we generated by ENU mutagenesis, cDNAs were selected from 8.5 day mouse embryos using genomic clones that spanned the distal inversion breakpoint. One cDNA that predicted a basic domain leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor was found to be expressed in the caudal hindbrain, and was confirmed to encode the kr gene by analysis of the kr{sup ENU} allele, in which a Ser was substituted for an Asn residue conserved in the DNA binding domain of all known bZip family members. kr is not expressed in the otic vesicle, suggesting that abnormal otic development is a consequence of defects in hindbrain segmentation. kr is the first mammalian deafness gene to be isolated, and should provide insights into embryologic mechanisms that underly hindbrain and otic development.

  16. Positional cloning of a gene responsible for the cts mutation of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Kidokoro, Kurako; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Mita, Kazuei; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko

    2012-07-01

    The larval head cuticle and anal plates of the silkworm mutant cheek and tail spot (cts) have chocolate-colored spots, unlike the entirely white appearance of the wild-type (WT) strain. We report the identification and characterization of the gene responsible for the cts mutation. Positional cloning revealed a cts candidate on chromosome 16, designated BmMFS, based on the high similarity of the deduced amino acid sequence between the candidate gene from the WT strain and the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) protein. BmMFS likely encodes a membrane protein with 11 putative transmembrane domains, while the putative structure deduced from the cts-type allele possesses only 10-pass transmembrane domains owing to a deletion in its coding region. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that BmMFS mRNA was strongly expressed in the integument of the head and tail, where the cts phenotype is observed; expression markedly increased at the molting and newly ecdysed stages. These results indicate that the novel BmMFS gene is cts and the membrane structure of its protein accounts for the cts phenotype. These expression profiles and the cts phenotype are quite similar to those of melanin-related genes, such as Bmyellow-e and Bm-iAANAT, suggesting that BmMFS is involved in the melanin synthesis pathway.

  17. Alternative mutations of a positively selected residue elicit gain or loss of functionalities in enzyme evolution.

    PubMed

    Norrgård, Malena A; Ivarsson, Ylva; Tars, Kaspars; Mannervik, Bengt

    2006-03-28

    All molecular species in an organism are connected physically and functionally to other molecules. In evolving systems, it is not obvious to what extent functional properties of a protein can change to selective advantage and leave intact favorable traits previously acquired. This uncertainty has particular significance in the evolution of novel pathways for detoxication, because an organism challenged with new xenobiotics in the environment may still require biotransformation of previously encountered toxins. Positive selection has been proposed as an evolutionary mechanism for facile adaptive responses of proteins to changing conditions. Here, we show, by saturation mutagenesis, that mutations of a hypervariable residue in human glutathione transferase M2-2 can differentially change the enzyme's substrate-activity profile with alternative substrates and, furthermore, enable or disable dissimilar chemical reactions. Crystal structures demonstrate that activity with epoxides is enabled through removal of steric hindrance from a methyl group, whereas activities with an orthoquinone and a nitroso donor are maintained in the variant enzymes. Given the diversity of cellular activities in which a single protein can be engaged, the selective transmutation of functional properties has general significance in molecular evolution. PMID:16549767

  18. A single positively selected West Nile viral mutation confers increased virogenesis in American crows

    PubMed Central

    Brault, Aaron C; Huang, Claire Y-H; Langevin, Stanley A; Kinney, Richard M; Bowen, Richard A; Ramey, Wanichaya N; Panella, Nicholas A; Holmes, Edward C; Powers, Ann M; Miller, Barry R

    2008-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), first recognized in North America in 1999, has been responsible for the largest arboviral epiornitic and epidemic of human encephalitis in recorded history. Despite the well-described epidemiological patterns of WNV in North America, the basis for the emergence of WNV-associated avian pathology, particularly in the American crow (AMCR) sentinel species, and the large scale of the North American epidemic and epiornitic is uncertain. We report here that the introduction of a T249P amino acid substitution in the NS3 helicase (found in North American WNV) in a low-virulence strain was sufficient to generate a phenotype highly virulent to AMCRs. Furthermore, comparative sequence analyses of full-length WNV genomes demonstrated that the same site (NS3-249) was subject to adaptive evolution. These phenotypic and evolutionary results provide compelling evidence for the positive selection of a mutation encoding increased viremia potential and virulence in the AMCR sentinel bird species. PMID:17694056

  19. Mutations in the Drosophila melanogaster gene encoding S-adenosylmethionine suppress position-effect variegation

    SciTech Connect

    Larsson, J.; Rasmuson-Lestander, A.; Zhang, Jingpu

    1996-06-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, the study of trans-acting modifier mutations of position-effect variegation and Polycomb group (Pc-G) genes have been useful tools to investigate genes involved in chromatin structure. We have cloned a modifier gene, Suppressor of zeste 5 (Su(z)5), which encodes S-adenosylmethionine synthetase, and we present here molecular results and data concerning its expression in mutants and genetic interactions. The mutant alleles Su(z)5, l(2)R23 and l(2)M6 show suppression of w{sup m4} and also of two white mutants induced by roo element insertions in the regulatory region i.e., w{sup is} (in combination with z{sup 1}) and w{sup sp1}. Two of the Su(z)5 alleles, as well as a deletion of the gene, also act as enhancers of Polycomb by increasing the size of sex combes on midleg. The results suggest that Su(z)5 is connected with regulation of chromatin structure. The enzyme S-adenosylmethionine synthetase is involved in the synthesis of S-adenosylmethionine, a methyl group donor and also, after decarboxylation, a propylamino group donor in the biosynthesis of polyamines. Our results from HPLC analysis show that in ovaries from heterozygous Su(z)5 mutants the content of spermine is significantly reduced. Results presented here suggest that polyamines are an important molecule class in the regulation of chromatin structure. 50 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Pooled analysis of clinical outcome for EGFR TKI-treated patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Paz-Ares, Luis; Soulières, Denis; Moecks, Joachim; Bara, Ilze; Mok, Tony; Klughammer, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    Patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) appear to gain particular benefit from treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (TKI) if their disease tests positive for EGFR activating mutations. Recently, several large, controlled, phase III studies have been published in NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumours. Given the increased patient dataset now available, a comprehensive literature search for EGFR TKIs or chemotherapy in EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC was undertaken to update the results of a previously published pooled analysis. Pooling eligible progression-free survival (PFS) data from 27 erlotinib studies (n = 731), 54 gefitinib studies (n = 1802) and 20 chemotherapy studies (n = 984) provided median PFS values for each treatment. The pooled median PFS was: 12.4 months (95% accuracy intervals [AI] 11.6-13.4) for erlotinib-treated patients; 9.4 months (95% AI 9.0-9.8) for gefitinib-treated patients; and 5.6 months (95% AI 5.3-6.0) for chemotherapy. Both erlotinib and gefitinib resulted in significantly longer PFS than chemotherapy (permutation testing; P = 0.000 and P = 0.000, respectively). Data on more recent TKIs (afatinib, dacomitinib and icotinib) were insufficient at this time-point to carry out a pooled PFS analysis on these compounds. The results of this updated pooled analysis suggest a substantial clear PFS benefit of treating patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC with erlotinib or gefitinib compared with chemotherapy.

  1. EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancers are sensitive to intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) complete treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongjuan; Zhan, Cheng; Ke, Ji; Xue, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Aiqun; Xu, Kaifeng; Shen, Zhirong; Yu, Lei; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the global leading cause of cancer-related deaths. A significant portion of lung cancer patients harbor kinase domain mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). While EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) effectively shrink tumors harboring mutant EGFR, clinical efficacy is limited by the development of TKI resistance. Effective alternatives are desperately needed in clinic for treating EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer. In our clinic in treating M1a lung cancer patients through intrapleural perfusion with hyperthermic chemotherapy (IPHC) followed by cycles of systemic chemotherapy (we termed this procedure IPHC complete treatment, IPHC-CT), we found dramatic tumor shrinkage in mutant EGFR-positive patients. We further confirmed the sensitivity of EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer cell lines derived from patients to HC (hyperthermic chemotherapy) treatment. We found that hyperthermia promoted accumulation of cisplatin in lung cancer cells. Hyperthermia and cisplatin synergistically downregulated the EGFR protein level, leading to quenching of signal from EGFR and induction of apoptosis. Our work therefore showed IPHC-CT is an effective treatment for EGFR kinase domain mutation positive lung cancer patients. PMID:26654941

  2. Mutational landscape of MCPyV-positive and MCPyV-negative Merkel cell carcinomas with implications for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Markarov, Vladimir; Blom, Astrid; Riaz, Nadeem; Doumani, Ryan; Stafstrom, Krista; Moshiri, Ata; Yelistratova, Lola; Levinsohn, Jonathan; Chan, Timothy A; Nghiem, Paul; Lifton, Richard P; Choi, Jaehyuk

    2016-01-19

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but highly aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, associated with the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in 80% of cases. To define the genetic basis of MCCs, we performed exome sequencing of 49 MCCs. We show that MCPyV-negative MCCs have a high mutation burden (median of 1121 somatic single nucleotide variants (SSNVs) per-exome with frequent mutations in RB1 and TP53 and additional damaging mutations in genes in the chromatin modification (ASXL1, MLL2, and MLL3), JNK (MAP3K1 and TRAF7), and DNA-damage pathways (ATM, MSH2, and BRCA1). In contrast, MCPyV-positive MCCs harbor few SSNVs (median of 12.5 SSNVs/tumor) with none in the genes listed above. In both subgroups, there are rare cancer-promoting mutations predicted to activate the PI3K pathway (HRAS, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, and TSC1) and to inactivate the Notch pathway (Notch1 and Notch2). TP53 mutations appear to be clinically relevant in virus-negative MCCs as 37% of these tumors harbor potentially targetable gain-of-function mutations in TP53 at p.R248 and p.P278. Moreover, TP53 mutational status predicts death in early stage MCC (5-year survival in TP53 mutant vs wild-type stage I and II MCCs is 20% vs. 92%, respectively; P = 0.0036). Lastly, we identified the tumor neoantigens in MCPyV-negative and MCPyV-positive MCCs. We found that virus-negative MCCs harbor more tumor neoantigens than melanomas or non-small cell lung cancers (median of 173, 65, and 111 neoantigens/sample, respectively), two cancers for which immune checkpoint blockade can produce durable clinical responses. Collectively, these data support the use of immunotherapies for virus-negative MCCs. PMID:26655088

  3. Mutational landscape of MCPyV-positive and MCPyV-negative Merkel cell carcinomas with implications for immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Gerald; Walradt, Trent; Markarov, Vladimir; Blom, Astrid; Riaz, Nadeem; Doumani, Ryan; Stafstrom, Krista; Moshiri, Ata; Yelistratova, Lola; Levinsohn, Jonathan; Chan, Timothy A.; Nghiem, Paul; Lifton, Richard P.; Choi, Jaehyuk

    2016-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but highly aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma, associated with the Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in 80% of cases. To define the genetic basis of MCCs, we performed exome sequencing of 49 MCCs. We show that MCPyV-negative MCCs have a high mutation burden (median of 1121 somatic single nucleotide variants (SSNVs) per-exome with frequent mutations in RB1 and TP53 and additional damaging mutations in genes in the chromatin modification (ASXL1, MLL2, and MLL3), JNK (MAP3K1 and TRAF7), and DNA-damage pathways (ATM, MSH2, and BRCA1). In contrast, MCPyV-positive MCCs harbor few SSNVs (median of 12.5 SSNVs/tumor) with none in the genes listed above. In both subgroups, there are rare cancer-promoting mutations predicted to activate the PI3K pathway (HRAS, KRAS, PIK3CA, PTEN, and TSC1) and to inactivate the Notch pathway (Notch1 and Notch2). TP53 mutations appear to be clinically relevant in virus-negative MCCs as 37% of these tumors harbor potentially targetable gain-of-function mutations in TP53 at p.R248 and p.P278. Moreover, TP53 mutational status predicts death in early stage MCC (5-year survival in TP53 mutant vs wild-type stage I and II MCCs is 20% vs. 92%, respectively; P = 0.0036). Lastly, we identified the tumor neoantigens in MCPyV-negative and MCPyV-positive MCCs. We found that virus-negative MCCs harbor more tumor neoantigens than melanomas or non-small cell lung cancers (median of 173, 65, and 111 neoantigens/sample, respectively), two cancers for which immune checkpoint blockade can produce durable clinical responses. Collectively, these data support the use of immunotherapies for virus-negative MCCs. PMID:26655088

  4. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer in the Real-World Setting in Central Europe: The INSIGHT Study.

    PubMed

    Ramlau, Rodryg; Cufer, Tanja; Berzinec, Peter; Dziadziuszko, Rafal; Olszewski, Włodzimierz; Popper, Helmut; Bajcic, Paolo; Dušek, Ladislav; Zbozinkova, Zuzana; Pirker, Robert

    2015-09-01

    The ImplementatioN of perSonalized medicine In NSCLC in Central Europe: EGFR testing, Histopathology, and clinical feaTures (INSIGHT) observational study assessed both implementation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing and treatment of patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a real-world setting in Central Europe. A total of 1785 patients from 14 cancer centers of six Central European countries were enrolled. EGFR mutations were detected in tumors of 13.8% of the patients. More than 70% of patients with advanced EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC received EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy. The INSIGHT study demonstrated the establishment of EGFR mutation testing, a mutation rate consistent with other Caucasian patients populations, and adherence to current guidelines regarding treatment of patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors in Central Europe.

  5. Emergence of constitutively active estrogen receptor-α mutations in pretreated advanced estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Ferrer-Lozano, Jaime; Perez-Fidalgo, Jose A.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Gómez, Henry; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Giltnane, Jennifer; Balko, Justin M.; Cronin, Maureen T; Jarosz, Mirna; Sun, James; Hawryluk, Matthew; Lipson, Doron; Otto, Geoff; Ross, Jeffrey S; Dvir, Addie; Soussan-Gutman, Lior; Wolf, Ido; Rubinek, Tamar; Gilmore, Lauren; Schnitt, Stuart; Come, Steven E.; Pusztai, Lajos; Stephens, Philip; Brown, Myles; Miller, Vincent A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We undertook this study to determine the prevalence of estrogen receptor (ER) α (ESR1) mutations throughout the natural history of hormone dependent breast cancer and to delineate the functional roles of the most commonly detected alterations. Experimental Design We studied a total of 249 tumor specimens from 208 patients. The specimens include 134 ER positive (ER+/HER2–) and, as controls, 115 ER negative (ER−) tumors. The ER+ samples consist of 58 primary breast cancers and 76 metastatic samples. All tumors were sequenced to high unique coverage using next generation sequencing targeting the coding sequence of the estrogen receptor and an additional 182 cancer-related genes. Results Recurring somatic mutations in codons 537 and 538 within the ligand-binding domain of ER were detected in ER+ metastatic disease. Overall, the frequency of these mutations was 12% (9/76, 95% CI 6%-21%) in metastatic tumors and in a subgroup of patients who received an average of 7 lines of treatment the frequency was 20% (5/25, 95% CI 7%-41%). These mutations were not detected in primary or treatment naïve ER+ cancer or in any stage of ER− disease. Functional studies in cell line models demonstrate that these mutations render estrogen receptor constitutive activity and confer partial resistance to currently available endocrine treatments. Conclusions In this study we show evidence for the temporal selection of functional ESR1 mutations as potential drivers of endocrine resistance during the progression of ER positive breast cancer. PMID:24398047

  6. Mismatch repair hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6 and hPMS2 mRNA expression profiles in precancerous and cancerous urothelium

    PubMed Central

    VAGELI, DIMITRA P.; GIANNOPOULOS, STAVROS; DOUKAS, SOTIRIOS G.; KALAITZIS, CHRISTOS; GIANNAKOPOULOS, STILIANOS; GIATROMANOLAKI, ALEXANDRA; KOUKOULIS, GEORGE K.; TOULOUPIDIS, STAVROS

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) genes hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6 and hPMS2 reflect dysfunction of the DNA repair system that may allow the malignant transformation of tissue cells. The aim of the present study was to address the mRNA expression profiles of the mismatch DNA repair system in cancerous and precancerous urothelium. This is the first study to quantify MMR mRNA expression by applying quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and translate the results to mRNA phenotypic profiles (r, reduced; R, regular or elevated) in bladder tumors [24 urothelial cell carcinomas (UCCs) and 1 papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP)] paired with their adjacent normal tissues (ANTs). Genetic instability analysis was applied at polymorphic sites distal or close to the hMSH2 and hMLH1 locus. Presenting our data, reduced hMSH2, hMSH6 and hPMS2 mRNA expression profiles were observed in cancerous and precancerous urothelia. Significantly, the ANTs of UCCs revealed the highest percentages of reduced hMSH2 (r2), hMSH6 (r6) and hPMS2 (p2) mRNA phenotypes relative to their tumors (P<0.03). In particular, combined r2r6 (P<0.02) presented a greater difference between ANTs of low-grade UCCs vs. their tumors compared with ANTs of high-grade UCCs (P= 0.000). Reduced hMLH1 (r1) phenotype was not expressed in precancerous or cancerous urothelia. The hMSH6 mRNA was the most changed in UCCs (47.8%), while hMSH2, hMLH1 and hPMS2 showed overexpression (47.8, 35 and 30%, respectively) that was associated with gender and histological tumor grading or staging. Genetic instability was rare in polymorphic regions distal to hMLH1. Our data reveal a previously unrecognized hMSH2 and hMSH6 mRNA combined phenotype (r2r6) correlated with a precancerous urothelium and show that hMLH1 is transcriptionally activated in precancerous or cancerous urothelium. In the present study, it is demonstrated that reduction of hMSH6 mRNA is a frequent event in bladder tumorigenesis and

  7. Evidence of positive selection for a glycogen synthase (GYS1) mutation in domestic horse populations.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Annette M; Schaefer, Robert; Petersen, Jessica L; Morrell, Peter L; Slamka, Megan A; Mickelson, James R; Valberg, Stephanie J; McCue, Molly E

    2014-01-01

    A dominantly inherited gain-of-function mutation in the glycogen synthase (GYS1) gene, resulting in excess skeletal muscle glycogen, has been identified in more than 30 horse breeds. This mutation is associated with the disease Equine Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy Type 1, yet persists at high frequency in some breeds. Under historical conditions of daily work and limited feed, excess muscle glycogen may have been advantageous, driving the increase in frequency of this allele. Fine-scale DNA sequencing in 80 horses and genotype assays in 279 horses revealed a paucity of haplotypes carrying the mutant allele when compared with the wild-type allele. Additionally, we found increased linkage disequilibrium, measured by relative extended haplotype homozygosity, in haplotypes carrying the mutation compared with haplotypes carrying the wild-type allele. Coalescent simulations of Belgian horse populations demonstrated that the high frequency and extended haplotype associated with the GYS1 mutation were unlikely to have arisen under neutrality or due to population demography. In contrast, in Quarter Horses, elevated relative extended haplotype homozygosity was associated with multiple haplotypes and may be the result of recent population expansion or a popular sire effect. These data suggest that the GYS1 mutation underwent historical selection in the Belgian, but not in the Quarter Horse.

  8. Mutation of the phospholipase C-gamma1-binding site of LAT affects both positive and negative thymocyte selection.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Connie L; Lee, Jan; Steiner, Kevin L; Gurson, Jordan M; Depersis, Corinne L; El-Khoury, Dalal; Fuller, Claudette L; Shores, Elizabeth W; Love, Paul E; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2005-04-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a scaffolding adaptor protein that is critical for T cell development and function. A mutation of LAT (Y136F) that disrupts phospholipase C-gamma1 activation and subsequent calcium influx causes a partial block in T cell development and leads to a severe lymphoproliferative disease in homozygous knock-in mice. One possible contribution to the fatal disease of LAT Y136F knock-in mice could be from autoreactive T cells generated in these mice because of altered thymocyte selection. To examine the impact of the LAT Y136F mutation on thymocyte positive and negative selection, we bred this mutation onto the HY T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, recombination activating gene-2 knockout background. Female mice with this genotype showed a severe defect in positive selection, whereas male mice exhibited a phenotype resembling positive selection (i.e., development and survival of CD8(hi) HY TCR-specific T cells) instead of negative selection. These results support the hypothesis that in non-TCR transgenic, LAT Y136F knock-in mice, altered thymocyte selection leads to the survival and proliferation of autoreactive T cells that would otherwise be negatively selected in the thymus.

  9. [Efficacy of first-line afatinib versus chemotherapy in EGFR mutation positive pulmonary adenocarcinoma].

    PubMed

    Sárosi, Veronika; Balikó, Zoltán

    2014-12-01

    Therapy of patients with advanced NSCLC has lately changed due to the algorithm based on the presence or absence of oncogenic mutations. There is an agreement nowadays that in the presence of activating EGFR mutations, the administration of EGFR TKI (gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib) is the most efficacious initial treatment. Unlike the first-generation TKIs, afatinib is a new, irreversible ErbB blocker, selectively and effectively blocking signals from the ErbB family receptors. Afatinib's marketing authorization is based on a large, randomized, phase III clinical trial, LUX-Lung 3, where patients in the control arm were treated with the best available chemotherapy (pemetrexed/cisplatin combination). Primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Patients with common EGFR mutations showed a PFS of 13.6 months when treated with afatinib, while treatment in the control arm resulted in a PFS of 6.9 months. Overall survival (OS) was 31.6 and 28.2 months, respectively. LUX-Lung 3 has been followed by the LUX-Lung 6 trial, comparing afatinib treatment to traditional chemotherapy (gemcitabine/cisplatin) in Asian patients with NSCLC harboring EGFR mutations. This clinical trial has also proved benefit of afatinib: PFS was 11.0 months in the afatinib arm and 5.6 months in the control arm by independent reviewer, while OS was 23.6 months and 23.5 months, respectively. Similarity of the OS values in both trials is explained by the cross-over treatment. When further analyzing OS data, a statistically significant difference between the afatinib and the control arm was seen in the EGFR exon 19 del subgroup (LUX-Lung 3: 33.3 vs. 21.1 months, LUX-Lung 6: 31.4 vs. 18.4 months, respectively). PMID:25517450

  10. Positive selection for new disease mutations in the human germline: evidence from the heritable cancer syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2012-01-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B (MEN2B) is a highly aggressive thyroid cancer syndrome. Since almost all sporadic cases are caused by the same nucleotide substitution in the RET proto-oncogene, the calculated disease incidence is 100-200 times greater than would be expected based on the genome average mutation frequency. In order to determine whether this increased incidence is due to an elevated mutation rate at this position (true mutation hot spot) or a selective advantage conferred on mutated spermatogonial stem cells, we studied the spatial distribution of the mutation in 14 human testes. In donors aged 36-68, mutations were clustered with small regions of each testis having mutation frequencies several orders of magnitude greater than the rest of the testis. In donors aged 19-23 mutations were almost non-existent, demonstrating that clusters in middle-aged donors grew during adulthood. Computational analysis showed that germline selection is the only plausible explanation. Testes of men aged 75-80 were heterogeneous with some like middle-aged and others like younger testes. Incorporating data on age-dependent death of spermatogonial stem cells explains the results from all age groups. Germline selection also explains MEN2B's male mutation bias and paternal age effect. Our discovery focuses attention on MEN2B as a model for understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of germline selection. Since RET function in mouse spermatogonial stem cells has been extensively studied, we are able to suggest that the MEN2B mutation provides a selective advantage by altering the PI3K/AKT and SFK signaling pathways. Mutations that are preferred in the germline but reduce the fitness of offspring increase the population's mutational load. Our approach is useful for studying other disease mutations with similar characteristics and could uncover additional germline selection pathways or identify true mutation hot spots. PMID:22359510

  11. Rapid identification of compound mutations in patients with Ph-positive leukemias by long-range next generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, R.; Zopf, A.; Preuner, S.; Pröll, J.; Niklas, N.; Foskett, P.; Valent, P.; Lion, T.; Gabriel, C.

    2016-01-01

    An emerging problem in patients with Ph-positive leukemias is the occurrence of cells with multiple mutations in the BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) associated with high resistance to different tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Rapid and sensitive detection of leukemic subclones carrying such changes, referred to as compound mutations, is therefore of increasing clinical relevance. However, current diagnostic methods including next generation sequencing (NGS) of short fragments do not optimally meet these requirements. We have therefore established a long-range (LR) NGS approach permitting massively parallel sequencing of the entire TKD length of 933bp in a single read using 454 sequencing with the GS FLX+ instrument (454 Life Sciences). By testing a series of individual and consecutive specimens derived from six patients with chronic myeloid leukemia, we demonstrate that long-range NGS analysis permits sensitive identification of mutations and their assignment to the same or to separate subclones. This approach also facilitates readily interpretable documentation of insertions and deletions in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD. The long-range NGS findings were reevaluated by an independent technical approach in select cases. PCR amplicons of the BCR-ABL1 TKD derived from individual specimens were subcloned into pGEM®-T plasmids, and >100 individual clones were subjected to analysis by Sanger sequencing. The NGS results were confirmed, thus documenting the reliability of the new technology. Long-range NGS analysis therefore provides an economic approach to the identification of compound mutations and other genetic alterations in the entire BCR-ABL1 TKD, and represents an important advancement of the diagnostic armamentarium for rapid assessment of impending resistant disease. PMID:24365090

  12. Extensive tissue-related and allele-related mtDNA heteroplasmy suggests positive selection for somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingkun; Schröder, Roland; Ni, Shengyu; Madea, Burkhard; Stoneking, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Heteroplasmy in human mtDNA may play a role in cancer, other diseases, and aging, but patterns of heteroplasmy variation across different tissues have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we analyzed complete mtDNA genome sequences at ∼3,500× average coverage from each of 12 tissues obtained at autopsy from each of 152 individuals. We identified 4,577 heteroplasmies (with an alternative allele frequency of at least 0.5%) at 393 positions across the mtDNA genome. Surprisingly, different nucleotide positions (nps) exhibit high frequencies of heteroplasmy in different tissues, and, moreover, heteroplasmy is strongly dependent on the specific consensus allele at an np. All of these tissue-related and allele-related heteroplasmies show a significant age-related accumulation, suggesting positive selection for specific alleles at specific positions in specific tissues. We also find a highly significant excess of liver-specific heteroplasmies involving nonsynonymous changes, most of which are predicted to have an impact on protein function. This apparent positive selection for reduced mitochondrial function in the liver may reflect selection to decrease damaging byproducts of liver mitochondrial metabolism (i.e., “survival of the slowest”). Overall, our results provide compelling evidence for positive selection acting on some somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:25675502

  13. First-line gefitinib in Caucasian EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC patients: a phase-IV, open-label, single-arm study

    PubMed Central

    Douillard, J-Y; Ostoros, G; Cobo, M; Ciuleanu, T; McCormack, R; Webster, A; Milenkova, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: Phase-IV, open-label, single-arm study (NCT01203917) to assess efficacy and safety/tolerability of first-line gefitinib in Caucasian patients with stage IIIA/B/IV, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Treatment: gefitinib 250 mg day−1 until progression. Primary endpoint: objective response rate (ORR). Secondary endpoints: disease control rate (DCR), progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and safety/tolerability. Pre-planned exploratory objective: EGFR mutation analysis in matched tumour and plasma samples. Results: Of 1060 screened patients with NSCLC (859 known mutation status; 118 positive, mutation frequency 14%), 106 with EGFR sensitising mutations were enrolled (female 70.8% adenocarcinoma 97.2% never-smoker 64.2%). At data cutoff: ORR 69.8% (95% confidence interval (CI) 60.5–77.7), DCR 90.6% (95% CI 83.5–94.8), median PFS 9.7 months (95% CI 8.5–11.0), median OS 19.2 months (95% CI 17.0–NC; 27% maturity). Most common adverse events (AEs; any grade): rash (44.9%), diarrhoea (30.8%); CTC (Common Toxicity Criteria) grade 3/4 AEs: 15% SAEs: 19%. Baseline plasma 1 samples were available in 803 patients (784 known mutation status; 82 positive; mutation frequency 10%). Plasma 1 EGFR mutation test sensitivity: 65.7% (95% CI 55.8–74.7). Conclusion: First-line gefitinib was effective and well tolerated in Caucasian patients with EGFR mutation-positive NSCLC. Plasma samples could be considered for mutation analysis if tumour tissue is unavailable. PMID:24263064

  14. High frequency of mutations in exon 10 of the porphobilinogen deaminase gene in patients with a CRIM-positive subtype of acute intermittent porphyria

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.F.; Rooij, F. de; Voortman, G.; Velde, K.T.; Nordmann, Y.; Grandchamp, B.

    1992-09-01

    Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by a partial deficiency of porphobilinogen (PBG) deaminase. Different subtypes of the disease have been defined, and more than 10 different mutations have been described. The authors focused their study on exon 10, since they previously found that three different mutations were located in this exon and that two of them seemed to be relatively common. They used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) after in vitro amplification to detect all possible mutations in exon 10 in 41 unrelated AIP patients. In about one-fourth of these patients they could distinguish three abnormal migration patterns, indicating the presence of various mutations. Additional sequencing demonstrated the presence of three different single-base substitutions. Two of these mutations had already been described. A third one consisted of a C-to-T transition located at position 499 of the PBG deaminase mRNA and resulted in an Arg-to-Trp substitution. All three mutations were found in patients with crossreacting immunological material (CRIM)-positive forms of AlP. The high frequency of these mutations make DGGE analysis of exon 10 a useful approach allowing the direct detection of the DNA abnormality in most of the families with the CRIM-positive subtype of AlP. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  15. slan-defined subsets of CD16-positive monocytes: impact of granulomatous inflammation and M-CSF receptor mutation.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Thomas P; Zawada, Adam M; Frankenberger, Marion; Skokann, Kerstin; Satzl, Anna A; Gesierich, Wolfgang; Schuberth, Madeleine; Levin, Johannes; Danek, Adrian; Rotter, Björn; Heine, Gunnar H; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems

    2015-12-10

    Human monocytes are subdivided into classical, intermediate, and nonclassical subsets, but there is no unequivocal strategy to dissect the latter 2 cell types. We show herein that the cell surface marker 6-sulfo LacNAc (slan) can define slan-positive CD14(+)CD16(++) nonclassical monocytes and slan-negative CD14(++)CD16(+) intermediate monocytes. Gene expression profiling confirms that slan-negative intermediate monocytes show highest expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II genes, whereas a differential ubiquitin signature is a novel feature of the slan approach. In unsupervised hierarchical clustering, the slan-positive nonclassical monocytes cluster with monocytes and are clearly distinct from CD1c(+) dendritic cells. In clinical studies, we show a selective increase of the slan-negative intermediate monocytes to >100 cells per microliter in patients with sarcoidosis and a fivefold depletion of the slan-positive monocytes in patients with hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids (HDLS), which is caused by macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) receptor mutations. These data demonstrate that the slan-based definition of CD16-positive monocyte subsets is informative in molecular studies and in clinical settings. PMID:26443621

  16. A novel acquired ALK F1245C mutation confers resistance to crizotinib in ALK-positive NSCLC but is sensitive to ceritinib.

    PubMed

    Kodityal, Sandeep; Elvin, Julia A; Squillace, Rachel; Agarwal, Nikita; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Klempner, Samuel J; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2016-02-01

    The emergence of acquired anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) resistant mutations is a common molecular mechanism underpinning disease progression during crizotinib treatment of ALK-positive (ALK+) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Identifying acquired resistance mutations in ALK is paramount for tailoring future therapy with second generation ALK inhibitors and beyond. Comprehensive genomic profiling using hybrid-capture next generation sequencing has been successful in identifying acquired ALK resistance mutations. Here we described the emergence of an ALK F1245C mutation in an advanced ALK+ NSCLC patient (EML4-ALK variant 3a/b) who developed slow disease progression after a durable response to crizotinib. The patient was eventually switched to ceritinib with on-going clinical response. This is the first patient report that ALK F1245C is an acquired resistance mutation to crizotinib that can be overcome by ceritinib. PMID:26775591

  17. Positional cloning of the PIS mutation in goats and its impact on understanding mammalian sex-differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    In goats, the PIS (polled intersex syndrome) mutation is responsible for both the absence of horns in males and females and sex-reversal affecting exclusively XX individuals. The mode of inheritance is dominant for the polled trait and recessive for sex-reversal. In XX PIS-/- mutants, the expression of testis-specific genes is observed very precociously during gonad development. Nevertheless, a delay of 4–5 days is observed in comparison with normal testis differentiation in XY males. By positional cloning, we demonstrate that the PIS mutation is an 11.7-kb regulatory-deletion affecting the expression of two genes, PISRT1 and FOXL2 which could act synergistically to promote ovarian differentiation. The transcriptional extinction of these two genes leads, very early, to testis-formation in XX homozygous PIS-/- mutants. According to their expression profiles and bibliographic data, we propose that FOXL2 may be an ovary-differentiating gene, and the non-coding RNA PISRT1, an anti-testis factor repressing SOX9, a key regulator of testis differentiation. Under this hypothesis, SRY, the testis-determining factor would inhibit these two genes in the gonads of XY males, to ensure testis differentiation. PMID:15601595

  18. A potential CF mutation at position -741 upstream from the CFTR gene induces altered interaction with transactivating factors

    SciTech Connect

    Bienvenu, T.; Kaplan, J.C.; Beldjord, C. |

    1994-09-01

    More than 400 sequence alterations have been identified in the whole coding sequence of the CFTR gene corresponding to the 27 exons and their exon-intron boundaries. However, in some CF chromosomes, no mutation is detected in the coding region. We explored the promoter and the sequence up to -1000 from the cap site of the CFTR gene in 33 CF chromosomes belonging to this group, using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. During this study three novel sequence variations located in the 5{prime} upstream region of the gene have been identified. One of these (T to G substitution at position -741 from the cap site) is located at a potential AP-1 binding site. We investigated the ability of this region to bind nuclear factors in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We found (i) that the normal sequence between -740/-745, considered as a binding site for Fos/Jun heterodimers, does not bind the AP-1 transcription factor, (ii) that the T to G -741 mutated sequence exhibits an abnormal binding pattern, suggesting the possible deleterious effect of still unknown negative transacting factors.

  19. From Whole Gene Deletion to Point Mutations of EP300-Positive Rubinstein-Taybi Patients: New Insights into the Mutational Spectrum and Peculiar Clinical Hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Negri, Gloria; Magini, Pamela; Milani, Donatella; Colapietro, Patrizia; Rusconi, Daniela; Scarano, Emanuela; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Priolo, Manuela; Crippa, Milena; Mazzanti, Laura; Wischmeijer, Anita; Tamburrino, Federica; Pippucci, Tommaso; Finelli, Palma; Larizza, Lidia; Gervasini, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth deficiency, skeletal abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and intellectual disability. Causative mutations in CREBBP and EP300 genes have been identified in ∼55% and ∼8% of affected individuals. To date, only 28 EP300 alterations in 29 RSTS clinically described patients have been reported. EP300 analysis of 22 CREBBP-negative RSTS patients from our cohort led us to identify six novel mutations: a 376-kb deletion depleting EP300 gene; an exons 17-19 deletion (c.(3141+1_3142-1)_(3590+1_3591-1)del/p.(Ile1047Serfs*30)); two stop mutations, (c.3829A>T/p.(Lys1277*) and c.4585C>T/p.(Arg1529*)); a splicing mutation (c.1878-12A>G/p.(Ala627Glnfs*11)), and a duplication (c.4640dupA/p.(Asn1547Lysfs*3)). All EP300-mutated individuals show a mild RSTS phenotype and peculiar findings including maternal gestosis, skin manifestation, especially nevi or keloids, back malformations, and a behavior predisposing to anxiety. Furthermore, the patient carrying the complete EP300 deletion does not show a markedly severe clinical picture, even if a more composite phenotype was noticed. By characterizing six novel EP300-mutated patients, this study provides further insights into the EP300-specific clinical presentation and expands the mutational repertoire including the first case of a whole gene deletion. These new data will enhance EP300-mutated cases identification highlighting distinctive features and will improve the clinical practice allowing a better genotype-phenotype correlation.

  20. Phosphatidyl-inositol-3-kinase alpha catalytic subunit mutation and response to neoadjuvant endocrine therapy for estrogen receptor positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Matthew J; Lin, Li; Crowder, Robert; Tao, Yu; Hoog, Jeremy; Snider, Jacqueline; Davies, Sherri; DeSchryver, Katherine; Evans, Dean B; Steinseifer, Jutta; Bandaru, Raj; Liu, WeiHua; Gardner, Humphrey; Semiglazov, Vladimir; Watson, Mark; Hunt, Kelly; Olson, John; Baselga, José

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutations in the alpha catalytic subunit of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PIK3CA) occur in ~30% of ER positive breast cancers. We therefore sought to determine the impact of PIK3CA mutation on response to neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Methods Exon 9 (helical domain - HD) and Exon 20 (kinase domain- KD) mutations in PIK3CA were determined samples from four neoadjuvant endocrine therapy trials. Interactions with clinical, pathological and biomarker response parameters were examined. Results A weak negative interaction between PIK3CA mutation status and clinical response to neoadjuvant endocrine treatment was detected (N=235 P=<0.05), but not with treatment-induced changes in Ki67-based proliferation index (N=418). Despite these findings, PIK3CA KD mutation was a favorable prognostic factor for relapse-free survival (RFS log rank P=0.02) in the P024 trial (N=153). The favorable prognostic effect was maintained in a multivariable analysis (N=125) that included the preoperative prognostic index (PEPI), an approach to predicting RFS based on post neoadjuvant endocrine therapy pathological stage, ER and Ki67 levels (HR for no PIK3CA KD mutation, 14, CI 1.9–105 P=0.01). Conclusion PIK3CA mutation status did not strongly interact with neoadjuvant endocrine therapy responsiveness in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer. Nonetheless, as with other recent studies, a favorable interaction between PIK3CA kinase domain mutation and prognosis was detected. The mechanism for the favorable prognostic impact of PIK3CA mutation status therefore remains unexplained. PMID:19844788

  1. Positive Selection in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Targets a Natural Mutation Associated with Primary Ovarian Insufficiency in Human

    PubMed Central

    Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  2. Positive selection in bone morphogenetic protein 15 targets a natural mutation associated with primary ovarian insufficiency in human.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Rossetti, Raffaella; Meslin, Camille; Monestier, Olivier; Di Pasquale, Elisa; Pascal, Géraldine; Persani, Luca; Fabre, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP15) is a TGFβ-like oocyte-derived growth factor involved in ovarian folliculogenesis as a critical regulator of many granulosa cell processes. Alterations of the BMP15 gene have been found associated with different ovarian phenotypic effects depending on the species, from sterility to increased prolificacy in sheep, slight subfertility in mouse or associated with primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) in women. To investigate the evolving role of BMP15, a phylogenetic analysis of this particular TGFβ family member was performed. A maximum likelihood phylogenetic tree of several TGFβ/BMP family members expressed by the ovary showed that BMP15 has a very strong divergence and a rapid evolution compared to others. Moreover, among 24 mammalian species, we detected signals of positive selection in the hominidae clade corresponding to F146, L189 and Y235 residues in human BMP15. The biological importance of these residues was tested functionally after site directed-mutagenesis in a COV434 cells luciferase assay. By replacing the positively selected amino acid either by alanine or the most represented residue in other studied species, only L189A, Y235A and Y235C mutants showed a significant increase of BMP15 signaling when compared to wild type. Additionally, the Y235C mutant was more potent than wild type in inhibiting progesterone secretion of ovine granulosa cells in primary culture. Interestingly, the Y235C mutation was previously identified in association with POI in women. In conclusion, this study evidences that the BMP15 gene has evolved faster than other members of the TGFß family and was submitted to a positive selection pressure in the hominidae clade. Some residues under positive selection are of great importance for the normal function of the protein and thus for female fertility. Y235 represents a critical residue in the determination of BMP15 biological activity, thus indirectly confirming its role in the onset of POI in

  3. Pulmonary Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Virus Mutation Positive Mucinous Adenocarcinoma Arising in a Congenital Pulmonary Airway Malformation, Mixed Type 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gopal; Coffey, Amy; Neely, Robert; Lambert, Daniel; Sonett, Joshua; Borczuk, Alain C; Gorenstein, Lyall

    2016-10-01

    Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) is a developmental abnormality of the lung, which results from an abnormality of branching during fetal development of the lung. We report the case of an 18 year-old woman who developed Kirsten rat sarcoma virus (KRAS) mutation positive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lung (AC) in association with mixed CPAM type 1 and 2. This case is unique as KRAS mutation positive AC is present in a setting of both CPAM 1 and 2 in the same lesion. PMID:27645976

  4. Heterogeneity and clinical significance of ESR1 mutations in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer patients receiving fulvestrant.

    PubMed

    Spoerke, Jill M; Gendreau, Steven; Walter, Kimberly; Qiu, Jiaheng; Wilson, Timothy R; Savage, Heidi; Aimi, Junko; Derynck, Mika K; Chen, Meng; Chan, Iris T; Amler, Lukas C; Hampton, Garret M; Johnston, Stephen; Krop, Ian; Schmid, Peter; Lackner, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ESR1 have been associated with resistance to aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in patients with ER+ metastatic breast cancer. Little is known of the impact of these mutations in patients receiving selective oestrogen receptor degrader (SERD) therapy. In this study, hotspot mutations in ESR1 and PIK3CA from ctDNA were assayed in clinical trial samples from ER+ metastatic breast cancer patients randomized either to the SERD fulvestrant or fulvestrant plus a pan-PI3K inhibitor. ESR1 mutations are present in 37% of baseline samples and are enriched in patients with luminal A and PIK3CA-mutated tumours. ESR1 mutations are often polyclonal and longitudinal analysis shows distinct clones exhibiting divergent behaviour over time. ESR1 mutation allele frequency does not show a consistent pattern of increases during fulvestrant treatment, and progression-free survival is not different in patients with ESR1 mutations compared with wild-type patients. ESR1 mutations are not associated with clinical resistance to fulvestrant in this study. PMID:27174596

  5. Heterogeneity and clinical significance of ESR1 mutations in ER-positive metastatic breast cancer patients receiving fulvestrant

    PubMed Central

    Spoerke, Jill M.; Gendreau, Steven; Walter, Kimberly; Qiu, Jiaheng; Wilson, Timothy R.; Savage, Heidi; Aimi, Junko; Derynck, Mika K.; Chen, Meng; Chan, Iris T.; Amler, Lukas C.; Hampton, Garret M.; Johnston, Stephen; Krop, Ian; Schmid, Peter; Lackner, Mark R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ESR1 have been associated with resistance to aromatase inhibitor (AI) therapy in patients with ER+ metastatic breast cancer. Little is known of the impact of these mutations in patients receiving selective oestrogen receptor degrader (SERD) therapy. In this study, hotspot mutations in ESR1 and PIK3CA from ctDNA were assayed in clinical trial samples from ER+ metastatic breast cancer patients randomized either to the SERD fulvestrant or fulvestrant plus a pan-PI3K inhibitor. ESR1 mutations are present in 37% of baseline samples and are enriched in patients with luminal A and PIK3CA-mutated tumours. ESR1 mutations are often polyclonal and longitudinal analysis shows distinct clones exhibiting divergent behaviour over time. ESR1 mutation allele frequency does not show a consistent pattern of increases during fulvestrant treatment, and progression-free survival is not different in patients with ESR1 mutations compared with wild-type patients. ESR1 mutations are not associated with clinical resistance to fulvestrant in this study. PMID:27174596

  6. Mutation-Positive and Mutation-Negative Patients with Cowden and Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba Syndromes Associated with Distinct 10q Haplotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pezzolesi, Marcus G.; Li, Yan; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Lei; Eng, Charis

    2006-01-01

    Phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) encodes a tumor-suppressor phosphatase frequently mutated in both sporadic and heritable forms of human cancer. Germline mutations are associated with a number of heritable cancer syndromes that are jointly referred to as the “PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome” (PHTS) and include Cowden syndrome, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba syndrome, Proteus syndrome, and Proteus-like syndrome. Germline PTEN mutations have been identified in a significant proportion of patients with PHTS; however, there are still many individuals with classic diagnostic features for whom mutations have yet to be identified. To address this, we took a haplotype-based approach and investigated the association of specific genomic regions of the PTEN locus with PHTS. We found this locus to be characterized by three distinct haplotype blocks 33 kb, 65 kb, and 43 kb in length. Comparisons of the haplotype distributions for all three blocks differed significantly among patients with PHTS and controls (P=.0098, P<.0001, and P<.0001 for blocks 1, 2, and 3, respectively). “Rare” haplotype blocks and extended haplotypes account for two-to-threefold more PHTS chromosomes than control chromosomes. PTEN mutation–negative patients are strongly associated with a haplotype block spanning a region upstream of PTEN and the gene’s first intron (P=.0027). Furthermore, allelic combinations contribute to the phenotypic complexity of this syndrome. Taken together, these data suggest that specific haplotypes and rare alleles underlie the disease etiology in these sample populations; constitute low-penetrance, modifying loci; and, specifically in the case of patients with PHTS for whom traditional mutations have yet to be identified, may harbor pathogenic variant(s) that have escaped detection by standard PTEN mutation–scanning methodologies. PMID:17033968

  7. A multi-case report of the pathways to and through genetic testing and cancer risk management for BRCA mutation-positive women aged 18–25

    PubMed Central

    Werner-Lin, Allison

    2012-01-01

    Much of the extant literature addressing the psychosocial aspects of BRCA1/2 mutation testing and risk management aggregates mutation carriers of all ages in study recruitment, data analysis, and interpretation. This analytic strategy does not adequately address the needs of the youngest genetic testing consumers, i.e., women aged 18–25. Despite low absolute cancer risk estimates before age 30, BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women aged 18–25 feel vulnerable to a cancer diagnosis but find themselves in a management quandary because the clinical utility of screening and prevention options are not yet well defined for such young carriers. We present three cases, selected from a larger study of 32 BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women who completed or considered genetic testing before age 25, to demonstrate the unique developmental, relational and temporal influences, as well as the challenges, experienced by very young BRCA mutation-positive women as they complete genetic testing and initiate cancer risk management. The first case describes the maturation of a young woman whose family participated in a national cancer registry. The second addresses the experiences and expectations of a young woman who completed genetic testing after learning that her unaffected father was a mutation carrier. The third case highlights the experiences of a young woman parentally bereaved in childhood, who presented for genetic counseling and testing due to intense family pressure. Together, these cases suggest that BRCA1/2-positive women aged 18–25 are challenged to reconcile their burgeoning independence from their families with risk-related support needs. Loved ones acting in ways meant to care for these young women may inadvertently apply pressure, convoluting family support dynamics and autonomous decision-making. Ongoing support from competent healthcare professionals will enable these young women to remain informed and receive objective counsel about their risk-management decisions

  8. Molecular characterization of a novel HEXA mutation at the +3 position of intron 8 in a Tay-Sachs disease patient

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, M.; Triggs-Raine, B.; Natowicz, M.

    1994-09-01

    Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder resulting from mutations in the HEXA gene that cause a deficiency in the activity of that enzyme {beta}-hexosaminidase A (Hex A). This deficiency leads to the build-up of G{sub M2} ganglioside, resulting in neurodegeneration and death. Biochemical analysis of a non-Jewish patient with a late-infantile form of Tay-Sachs disease revealed a substantial level of Hex A activity (38.4%) when 4-MUG was used as the substrate. However, when a substrate (4-MUGS) specific for the {alpha}-subunit of Hex A ({alpha}{beta}) was used, almost no activity was detected in the HEXA gene of the patient using SSCP analysis followed by sequencing. The first mutation, a G533A substitution in exon 5, is previously described and associated with the B1 form of Tay-Sachs disease. The second mutation is a novel a-to-g base change at the +3 position of intron 8. This was confirmed using the AIRS method, whereby a MaeIII site was created in the presence of the mutation. Normal and patient mRNA was reverse transcribed and exons 7 to 9 were PCR-amplified from the cDNA. An abnormally sized amplification product detected only in the patient cDNA was sequenced; exon 8 had been deleted and exons 7 and 9 were spliced together. A substantial level of normally-sized PCR product was also detected in the patient`s cDNA. Experiments are in progress to determine if this is produced from the allele harboring the G533A mutation. Given that previous mutations of this type have been associated with 97-100% abnormal splicing, this mutation is likely to be the cause, together with the G533A mutation, of Tay-Sachs disease in this patient.

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor mutation and treatment outcome of mediastinoscopic N2 positive non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee Kyung; Choi, Yoon-La; Han, Joung Ho; Ahn, Yong Chan; Kim, Kwhanmien; Kim, Jhingook; Shim, Young Mog; Um, Sang-Won; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung; Sun, Jong-Mu; Ahn, Jin Seok; Park, Keunchil; Ahn, Myung-Ju

    2013-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a strong predictive factor for a favorable response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, however, its prognostic role in locally advanced stage is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the association of EGFR mutational status and clinical outcome after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by surgical resection in mediastinoscopically proven N2(+) NSCLC patients. We retrospectively identified 168 patients diagnosed between 1998 and 2006. EGFR mutational status was identified in 107 patients. Response and survival after neoadjuvant CRT followed by surgery were compared according to EGFR mutational status. 83 patients (77.6%) were found to have wild type EGFR, while exon 19 deletions or L858R missense mutations in the EGFR gene were detected in 19 patients. There was no significant difference in overall survival; however, the 5-year PFS rate in EGFR mutant patients (8.4%) were significantly lower than in the EGFR wild-type patients (33.6%; p=0.005). In multivariate analysis, EGFR mutation was a significant prognostic factor for a higher risk of distant recurrence/progression than the EGFR wild type (HR=7.183, p=0.005). In locally advanced mediastinoscopic N2-positive NSCLC, EGFR mutation was associated with more frequent distant relapses and worse 5-year PFS rate after neoadjuvant CRT followed by surgery, which might suggest that systemic control might be important in patients with the EGFR mutation. Therefore, the role of TKI for adjuvant EGFR TKI to decrease disease recurrence in distant sites should be further investigated. PMID:23261144

  10. Benign and Deleterious Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Mutations Identified by Sequencing in Positive Cystic Fibrosis Newborn Screen Children from California

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Danieli B.; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Azen, Colleen; Young, Suzanne; Raraigh, Karen S.; Keens, Thomas G.; Kharrazi, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Background Of the 2007 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) mutations, 202 have been assigned disease liability. California’s racially diverse population, along with CFTR sequencing as part of newborn screening model, provides the opportunity to examine the phenotypes of children with uncategorized mutations to help inform disease liability and penetrance. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on children screened from 2007 to 2011 and followed for two to six years. Newborns that screened positive were divided into three genotype groups: those with two CF-causing mutations (CF-C); those with one mutation of varying clinic consequence (VCC); and those with one mutation of unknown disease liability (Unknown). Sweat chloride tests, pancreatic sufficiency status, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization were compared. Results Children with two CF-causing mutations had a classical CF phenotype, while 5% of VCC (4/78) and 11% of Unknown (27/244) met diagnostic criteria of CF. Children carrying Unknown mutations 2215insG with D836Y, and T1036N had early and classical CF phenotype, while others carrying 1525-42G>A, L320V, L967S, R170H, and 296+28A>G had a benign clinical presentation, suggesting that these are non-CF causing. Conclusions While most infants with VCC and Unknown CFTR mutations do not meet diagnostic criteria for CF, a small proportion do. These findings highlight the range of genotypes and phenotypes in the first few years of life following CF newborn screening when CFTR sequencing is performed. PMID:27214204

  11. Association of high CD4-positive T cell infiltration with mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Surmann, Eva-Maria; Voigt, Anita Y; Michel, Sara; Bauer, Kathrin; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Ferrone, Soldano; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2015-03-01

    Besides being expressed on professional antigen-presenting cells, HLA class II antigens are expressed on various tumors of non-lymphoid origin, including a subset of colorectal cancers (CRC). Information about the regulation of HLA class II antigen expression is important for a better understanding of their role in the interactions between tumor and immune cells. Whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in tumors reflects the selective immune destruction of HLA class II antigen-expressing tumor cells is unknown. To address this question, we tested whether lack of HLA class II antigen expression in CRC was associated with immune cell infiltration. We selected microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) CRC, because they show pronounced tumor antigen-specific immune responses and, in a subset of tumors, lack of HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations inactivating HLA class II-regulatory genes. We examined HLA class II antigen expression, mutations in regulatory genes, and CD4-positive T cell infiltration in 69 MSI-H CRC lesions. Mutations in RFX5, CIITA, and RFXAP were found in 13 (28.9%), 3 (6.7%), and 1 (2.2%) out of 45 HLA class II antigen-negative tumors. CD4-positive tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte counts were significantly higher in HLA class II antigen-negative tumors harboring mutations in HLA class II-regulatory genes (107.4 T cells per 0.25 mm(2)) compared to tumors without mutations (55.5 T cells per 0.25 mm(2), p = 0.008). Our results suggest that the outgrowth of tumor cells lacking HLA class II antigen expression due to mutations of regulatory genes is favored in an environment of dense CD4-positive T cell infiltration.

  12. Clinical significance of monitoring ESR1 mutations in circulating cell-free DNA in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Inao, Toko; Sueta, Aiko; Fujiwara, Saori; Omoto, Yoko; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    Background The measurement of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) may transform the management of breast cancer patients. We aimed to investigate the clinical significance of sequential measurements of ESR1 mutations in primary breast cancer (PBC) and metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients. Results ESR1 mutations ratio in the PBC groups was used as the minimum cutoff for determining increases in cfDNA ESR1 mutation ratio. An increase in cfDNA ESR1 mutations was found in 13 samples of cfDNA from 12 (28.6%) out of 42 MBC patients. A total of 10 (83.3%) out of 12 MBC patients with increase cfDNA ESR1 mutations showed a poor response to treatment. In survival analysis, increase cfDNA ESR1 mutations may predict a shorter duration of post-endocrine-therapy effectiveness (P = 0.0033). Methods A total of 119 patients (253 plasma samples) with breast carcinoma were enrolled in this study. Cases were selected if archival plasma samples were available from PBC before and after treatment and from MBC gathered more than twice at the time of progression. cfDNA was isolated from the 77 PBC patients (154 plasma samples) and from the 42 MBC patients (99 plasma samples). To investigate any changes in each cfDNA ESR1 mutation before and after treatment, we analyzed the difference with cfDNA ESR1 mutations ratio in the first blood sample using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR). Conclusions We demonstrate that ddPCR monitoring of the recurrent ESR1 mutation in cfDNA of MBC patients is a feasible and useful method of providing relevant predictive information. PMID:27102299

  13. Dabrafenib for Treating Unresectable, Advanced or Metastatic BRAF V600 Mutation-Positive Melanoma: An Evidence Review Group Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fleeman, Nigel; Bagust, Adrian; Beale, Sophie; Boland, Angela; Dickson, Rumona; Dwan, Kerry; Richardson, Marty; Dundar, Yenal; Davis, Helen; Banks, Lindsay

    2015-09-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) invited GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of dabrafenib, to submit evidence for the clinical and cost effectiveness of dabrafenib for the treatment of unresectable, advanced or metastatic BRAF V600 mutation-positive melanoma in accordance with the Institute's Single Technology Appraisal (STA) process. The Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group (LRiG) at the University of Liverpool was commissioned to act as the Evidence Review Group (ERG). This article summarizes the ERG's review of the evidence submitted by the company and provides a summary of the Appraisal Committee's (AC) final decision in October 2014. The clinical evidence for dabrafenib was derived from an ongoing phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international, multicentre clinical trial (BREAK-3) involving 230 patients randomized 2:1 to receive either dabrafenib or dacarbazine. A significant improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) but not overall survival (OS) was reported in the dabrafenib arm compared with dacarbazine. Vemurafenib is considered a more appropriate comparator than is dacarbazine. The clinical evidence for vemurafenib was derived from a completed phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, international, multicentre clinical trial (BRIM-3) involving 675 patients randomized 1:1 to receive either vemurafenib or dacarbazine. A significant improvement in median PFS and OS was reported in the vemurafenib arm compared with dacarbazine. As there is no direct evidence comparing dabrafenib versus vemurafenib, the company presented an indirect treatment comparison (ITC) that demonstrated no statistical differences between dabrafenib and vemurafenib for PFS or OS. The ERG expressed concerns with the ITC, mainly in relation to the validity of the assumptions underpinning the methodology; the ERG concluded this resulted in findings that are unlikely to be robust or reliable. Dabrafenib and

  14. Mutation from arginine to lysine at the position 189 of hemagglutinin contributes to the antigenic drift in H3N2 swine influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianqiang; Xu, Yifei; Harris, Jillian; Sun, Hailiang; Bowman, Andrew S; Cunningham, Fred; Cardona, Carol; Yoon, Kyoungjin J; Slemons, Richard D; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2013-11-01

    Two distinct antigenic clusters were previously identified among the H3N2 swine influenza A viruses (IAVs) and were designated H3N2SIV-alpha and H3N2SIV-beta (Feng et al., 2013. Journal of Virology 87 (13), 7655-7667). A consistent mutation was observed at the position 189 of hemagglutinin (R189K) between H3N2SIV-alpha and H3N2SIV-beta fair isolates. To evaluate the contribution of R189K mutation to the antigenic drift from H3N2SIV-alpha to H3N2SIV-beta, four reassortant viruses with 189R or 189K were generated. The antigenic cartography demonstrated that the R189K mutation in the hemagglutinin of H3N2 IAV contributed to the antigenic drift, separating these viruses into H3N2SIV-alpha to H3N2SIV-beta. This R189K mutation was also found to contribute to the cross-reaction with several ferret sera raised against historical human IAVs with hemagglutinin carrying 189K. This study suggests that the R189K mutation plays a vital role in the antigenicity of swine and human H3N2 IAVs and identification of this antigenic determinant will help us rapidly identify antigenic variants in influenza surveillance.

  15. Analysis of P gene mutations in patients with type II (tyrosinase-positive) oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.T.; Nicholls, R.D.; Schnur, R. ||

    1994-09-01

    OCA2 is an autosomal recessive disorder in which the biosynthesis of melanin pigment is greatly reduced in the skin, hair, and eyes. Recently, we showed that OCA2 results from mutations of the P gene, in chromosome segment 15q11-q13. In addition to OCA2, mutations of P account for OCA associated with the Prader-Willi syndrome and some cases of {open_quotes}autosomal recessive ocular albinism{close_quotes} (AROA). We have now studied 38 unrelated patients with various forms of OCA2 or AROA from a variety of different ethnic groups. None of these patients had detectable abnormalities of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene. Among 8 African-American patients with OCA2 we observed apparent locus homogeneity. We detected abnormalities of the P gene in all 8 patients, including 12 different mutations and deletions, most of which are unique to this group and none of which is predominant. In contrast, OCA2 in other populations appears to be genetically heterogeneous. Among 21 Caucasian patients we detected abnormalities of the P gene in only 8, comprising 9 different point mutations and deletions, some of which also occurred among the African-American patients. Among 3 Middle-Eastern, 3 Indo-Pakistani, and 3 Asian patients we detected mutations of the P gene in only one from each group. In a large Indo-Pakistani kindred with OCA2 we have excluded both the TYR and P genes on the basis of genetic linkage. The prevalence of mutations of the P gene thus appears to be much higher among African-Americans with OCA2 than among patients from other ethnic groups. The incidence of OCA2 in some parts of equatorial Africa is extremely high, as frequent as 1 per 1100, and the disease has been linked to P in South African Bantu. The eventual characterization of P gene mutations in Africans will be informative with regard to the origins of P gene mutations in African-American patients.

  16. Mutation analysis of 13 driver genes of colorectal cancer-related pathways in Taiwanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yuli Christine; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Liu, Ta-Chih; Lin, Chien-Yu; Yang, Shu-Fen; Ho, Cheng-Mao; Chen, William Tzu-Liang; Chang, Ya-Sian

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the driver gene mutations associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in the Taiwanese population. METHODS: In this study, 103 patients with CRC were evaluated. The samples consisted of 66 men and 37 women with a median age of 59 years and an age range of 26-86 years. We used high-resolution melting analysis (HRM) and direct DNA sequencing to characterize the mutations in 13 driver genes of CRC-related pathways. The HRM assays were conducted using the LightCycler® 480 Instrument provided with the software LightCycler® 480 Gene Scanning Software Version 1.5. We also compared the clinicopathological data of CRC patients with the driver gene mutation status. RESULTS: Of the 103 patients evaluated, 73.79% had mutations in one of the 13 driver genes. We discovered 18 novel mutations in APC, MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, SMAD4 and TP53 that have not been previously reported. Additionally, we found 16 de novo mutations in APC, BMPR1A, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH and PMS2 in cancerous tissues previously reported in the dbSNP database; however, these mutations could not be detected in peripheral blood cells. The APC mutation correlates with lymph node metastasis (34.69% vs 12.96%, P = 0.009) and cancer stage (34.78% vs 14.04%, P = 0.013). No association was observed between other driver gene mutations and clinicopathological features. Furthermore, having two or more driver gene mutations correlates with the degree of lymph node metastasis (42.86% vs 24.07%, P = 0.043). CONCLUSION: Our findings confirm the importance of 13 CRC-related pathway driver genes in the development of CRC in Taiwanese patients. PMID:26900293

  17. EBV-negative monomorphic B-cell post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are pathologically distinct from EBV-positive cases and frequently contain TP53 mutations.

    PubMed

    Courville, Elizabeth L; Yohe, Sophia; Chou, David; Nardi, Valentina; Lazaryan, Aleksandr; Thakral, Beenu; Nelson, Andrew C; Ferry, Judith A; Sohani, Aliyah R

    2016-10-01

    Monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder commonly resembles diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or Burkitt lymphoma, and most are Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) positive. We retrospectively identified 32 cases of monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder from two institutions and evaluated EBV in situ hybridization; TP53 mutation status; p53, CD30, myc, and BCL2 expression by immunohistochemistry; proliferation index by Ki67; and germinal center vs non-germinal center immunophenotype by Hans criteria. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder arose after hematopoietic stem cell transplant in five and solid organ transplant in 27 patients, a median of 4 and 96 months after transplant, respectively (overall median latency 71 months, range 2-295). The most common morphology was diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (28 cases), with three cases of Burkitt lymphoma, and one case of plasmablastic lymphoma. Ten cases (31%) were EBV negative. Of those with the morphology of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the EBV-negative cases were more frequently TP53-mutated (P<0.001), p53 positive by immunohistochemistry (P<0.001), CD30 negative (P<0.01), and of germinal center immunophenotype (P=0.01) compared with EBV-positive cases. No statistically significant difference in overall survival was identified based on EBV, TP53 mutation status, germinal center vs non-germinal center immunophenotype, or other immunohistochemical parameters evaluated. Patients who died of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder were older with a longer latency from time of transplant to diagnosis (P<0.05). Our study demonstrates that diffuse large B-cell lymphoma-related immunohistochemical prognostic markers have limited relevance in the post-transplant setting and underscores differences between EBV-positive and EBV-negative post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder in terms of immunophenotype and TP53 mutation frequency, supporting an alternative pathogenesis for EBV-negative post

  18. Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism in Southern African blacks: P gene-associated haplotypes suggest a major mutation in the 5{prime} region of the gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, M.; Stevens, G.; Beukering, J. van

    1994-09-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) occurs with a prevalence of 1 in 3900 among Southern African (SA) blacks. The major contributors to morbidity and mortality are skin cancer and decreased visual acuity. Two distinct phenotypes occur, namely individuals with ephelides (darkly pigmented patches) and those without. There is complete concordance with regard to ephelus status among siblings. The disorder is linked to markers on chromosome 15q11.2-q12, and no obligatory cross-overs were observed with polymophic markers at the human homolog, P, of the mouse pink eyed dilute gene, p. Contrary to what has been shown for Caucasoid ty-pos OCA, this condition shows locus homogeneity among SA blacks. The P gene is an excellent candidate for ty-pos OCA and mutations in this gene will confirm its role in causing the common form of albinism in SA. Numerous P gene mutations have been described in other populations. In an attempt to detect mutations, the P gene cDNA was used to search for structural rearrangements or polymorphisms. Six polymorphisms (plR10/Scal, 912/Xbal, 912/HincII, 912/TaqI, 1412/TaqI [two systems] and 1412/HindIII) were detected with subclones of the P cDNA and haplotypes were determined in each family. None were clearly associated with an albinism-related rearrangement. However, strong linkage disequilibrium was observed with alleles at loci toward the 5{prime} region of the gene ({triangle}=0.65, 0.57 and 0.80 for the three polymorphisms detected with the 912 subclone), suggesting a major ty-pos OCA mutation in this region. Haplotype analysis provides evidence for a major mutation associated with the same haplotype in individuals with ephelides (8/12 OCA chromosomes) and those without ephelides (24:30). The presence of other ty-pos OCA associated haplotypes indicates several other less common mutations.

  19. Mutation of the phospholipase C-γ1–binding site of LAT affects both positive and negative thymocyte selection

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Lee, Jan; Steiner, Kevin L.; Gurson, Jordan M.; DePersis, Corinne L.; El-Khoury, Dalal; Fuller, Claudette L.; Shores, Elizabeth W.; Love, Paul E.; Samelson, Lawrence E.

    2005-01-01

    Linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a scaffolding adaptor protein that is critical for T cell development and function. A mutation of LAT (Y136F) that disrupts phospholipase C-γ1 activation and subsequent calcium influx causes a partial block in T cell development and leads to a severe lymphoproliferative disease in homozygous knock-in mice. One possible contribution to the fatal disease of LAT Y136F knock-in mice could be from autoreactive T cells generated in these mice because of altered thymocyte selection. To examine the impact of the LAT Y136F mutation on thymocyte positive and negative selection, we bred this mutation onto the HY T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, recombination activating gene-2 knockout background. Female mice with this genotype showed a severe defect in positive selection, whereas male mice exhibited a phenotype resembling positive selection (i.e., development and survival of CD8hi HY TCR-specific T cells) instead of negative selection. These results support the hypothesis that in non-TCR transgenic, LAT Y136F knock-in mice, altered thymocyte selection leads to the survival and proliferation of autoreactive T cells that would otherwise be negatively selected in the thymus. PMID:15795236

  20. Functional RNAi screen targeting cytokine and growth factor receptors reveals oncorequisite role for interleukin-2 gamma receptor in JAK3 mutation-positive leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anupriya; MacKenzie, Ryan J.; Eide, Christopher A.; Davare, Monika A.; Watanabe-Smith, Kevin; Tognon, Cristina E.; Mongoue-Tchokote, Solange; Park, Byung; Braziel, Rita M.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    To understand the role for cytokine and growth factor receptor-mediated signaling in leukemia pathogenesis we designed a functional RNAi screen targeting 188 cytokine and growth factor receptors that we found highly expressed in primary leukemia specimens. Using this screen we identified interleukin-2 gamma receptor (IL2Rγ) as a critical growth determinant for the JAK3A572V mutation-positive AML cell line. We observed that knockdown of IL2Rγ abrogates phosphorylation of JAK3 and downstream signaling molecules, JAK1, STAT5, MAPK and pS6 ribosomal protein. Overexpression of IL2Rγ in murine cells increased the transforming potential of activating JAK3 mutations, whereas absence of IL2Rγ completely abrogated the clonogenic potential of JAK3A572V as well as the transforming potential of additional JAK3 activating mutations such as JAK3M511I. In addition, mutation at the IL2Rγ interaction site in the FERM domain of JAK3 (Y100C) completely abrogated JAK3-mediated leukemic transformation. Mechanistically, we found IL2Rγ contributes to constitutive JAK3 mutant signaling by increasing JAK3 expression and phosphorylation. Conversely, we found that mutant but not wild type JAK3 increased the expression of IL2Rγ, indicating IL2Rγ and JAK3 contribute to constitutive JAK/STAT signaling through their reciprocal regulation. Overall we demonstrate a novel role for IL2Rγ in potentiating oncogenesis in the setting of JAK3-mutation positive leukemia. Additionally, our study highlights an RNAi-based functional assay that can be used to facilitate the identification of non-kinase cytokine and growth factor receptor targets for inhibiting leukemic cell growth. PMID:25109334

  1. Capsule loss or death: the position of mutations among capsule genes sways the destiny of Streptococcus suis.

    PubMed

    Lakkitjaroen, Nattakan; Takamatsu, Daisuke; Okura, Masatoshi; Sato, Masumi; Osaki, Makoto; Sekizaki, Tsutomu

    2014-05-01

    Streptococcus suis, an emerging zoonotic pathogen, is responsible for various diseases in swine and humans. Most S. suis strains from clinical cases possess a group of capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps) genes and phenotypically express capsular polysaccharides (CPs). Although CPs are considered to be an important virulence factor, our previous study showed that many S. suis isolates from porcine endocarditis lost their CPs, and some of these unencapsulated isolates had large insertions or deletions in the cps gene clusters. We further investigated 25 endocarditis isolates with no obvious genetic alterations to elucidate the unencapsulation mechanisms and found that a single-nucleotide substitution and frameshift mutation in two glycosyltransferase genes (cps2E and cps2F) were the main causes of the capsule loss. Moreover, mutations in the genes involved in side-chain formation (cps2J and cps2N), polymerase (cps2I), and flippase (cps2O) appeared to be lethal; however, these lethal effects were relieved by mutations in the cps2EF region. As unencapsulation and even the death of individual cells have recently been suggested to be beneficial to the pathogenesis of infections, the results of the present study provide a further insight into understanding the biological significance of cps mutations during the course of S. suis infections.

  2. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    PubMed

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource. PMID:26763160

  3. The albinism of the feral Asinara white donkeys (Equus asinus) is determined by a missense mutation in a highly conserved position of the tyrosinase (TYR) gene deduced protein.

    PubMed

    Utzeri, V J; Bertolini, F; Ribani, A; Schiavo, G; Dall'Olio, S; Fontanesi, L

    2016-02-01

    A feral donkey population (Equus asinus), living in the Asinara National Park (an island north-west of Sardinia, Italy), includes a unique white albino donkey subpopulation or colour morph that is a major attraction of this park. Disrupting mutations in the tyrosinase (TYR) gene are known to cause recessive albinisms in humans (oculocutaneous albinism Type 1; OCA1) and other species. In this study, we analysed the donkey TYR gene as a strong candidate to identify the causative mutation of the albinism of these donkeys. The TYR gene was sequenced from 13 donkeys (seven Asinara white albino and six coloured animals). Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. A missense mutation (c.604C>G; p.His202Asp) in a highly conserved amino acid position (even across kingdoms), which disrupts the first copper-binding site (CuA) of functional protein, was identified in the homozygous condition (G/G or D/D) in all Asinara white albino donkeys and in the albino son of a trio (the grey parents had genotype C/G or H/D), supporting the recessive mode of inheritance of this mutation. Genotyping 82 donkeys confirmed that Asinara albino donkeys had genotype G/G whereas all other coloured donkeys had genotype C/C or C/G. Across-population association between the c.604C>G genotypes and the albino coat colour was highly significant (P = 6.17E-18). The identification of the causative mutation of the albinism in the Asinara white donkeys might open new perspectives to study the dynamics of this putative deleterious allele in a feral population and to manage this interesting animal genetic resource.

  4. Mutational studies reveal a complex set of positive and negative control elements within the chicken vitellogenin II promoter.

    PubMed

    Seal, S N; Davis, D L; Burch, J B

    1991-05-01

    The endogenous chicken vitellogenin II (VTGII) gene is transcribed exclusively in hepatocytes in response to estrogen. We previously identified two estrogen response elements (EREs) upstream of this gene. We now present an analysis of the VTGII promoter activated by these EREs in response to estrogen. Chimeric VTGII-CAT genes were cotransfected into LMH chicken hepatoma cells along with an estrogen receptor expression vector, and transient CAT expression was assayed after culturing the cells in the absence or presence of estrogen. An analysis of constructs bearing deletions downstream of the more proximal ERE indicated that promoter elements relevant to transcription in LMH cells extend to between -113 and -96. The relative importance of sequences within the VTGII promoter was examined by using 10 contiguous linker scanner mutations spanning the region from -117 to -24. Although most of these mutations compromised VTGII promoter function, one dramatically increased expression in LMH cells and also rendered the VTGII promoter capable of being activated by cis-linked EREs in fibroblasts cotransfected with an estrogen receptor expression vector. Gel retardation and DNase I footprinting assays revealed four factor-binding sites within this promoter. We demonstrate that three of these sites bind C/EBP, SP1, and USF (or related factors), respectively; the fourth site binds a factor that we denote TF-V beta. The biological relevance of these findings is suggested by the fact that three of these binding sites map to sites previously shown to be occupied in vivo in response to estrogen. PMID:2017174

  5. Molecular dissection of a viral quasispecies under mutagenic treatment: positive correlation between fitness loss and mutational load.

    PubMed

    Arias, Armando; Isabel de Ávila, Ana; Sanz-Ramos, Marta; Agudo, Rubén; Escarmís, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban

    2013-04-01

    Low fidelity replication and the absence of error-repair activities in RNA viruses result in complex and adaptable ensembles of related genomes in the viral population, termed quasispecies, with important implications for natural infections. Theoretical predictions suggested that elevated replication error rates in RNA viruses might be near to a maximum compatible with viral viability. This fact encouraged the use of mutagenic nucleosides as a new antiviral strategy to induce viral extinction through increased replication error rates. Despite extensive evidence of lethal mutagenesis of RNA viruses by different mutagenic compounds, a detailed picture of the infectivity of individual genomes and its relationship with the mutations accumulated is lacking. Here, we report a molecular analysis of a foot-and-mouth disease virus population previously subjected to heavy mutagenesis to determine whether a correlation between increased mutagenesis and decreased fitness existed. Plaque-purified viruses isolated from a ribavirin-treated quasispecies presented decreases of up to 200-fold in infectivity relative to clones in the reference population, associated with an overall eightfold increase in the mutation frequency. This observation suggests that individual infectious genomes of a quasispecies subjected to increased mutagenesis lose infectivity by their continuous mutagenic 'poisoning'. These results support the lethal defection model of virus extinction and the practical use of chemical mutagens as antiviral treatment. Even when extinction is not achieved, mutagenesis can decrease the infectivity of surviving virus, and facilitate their clearance by host immune responses or complementing antiviral approaches.

  6. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options

    PubMed Central

    Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M.; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L.; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A.; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I.; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P.; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C.; Moorman, Anthony V.; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S.; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; von der Weid, Nicolas; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O.; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    TCF3-HLF-fusion positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Employing an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression, and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. Recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 were identified in constellation with TCF3-HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin towards a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics, but sensitivity towards glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  7. Genomics and drug profiling of fatal TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies recurrent mutation patterns and therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ute; Forster, Michael; Rinaldi, Anna; Risch, Thomas; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Bornhauser, Beat; Gombert, Michael; Kratsch, Christina; Stütz, Adrian M; Sultan, Marc; Tchinda, Joelle; Worth, Catherine L; Amstislavskiy, Vyacheslav; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Baruchel, André; Bartram, Thies; Basso, Giuseppe; Canpolat, Cengiz; Cario, Gunnar; Cavé, Hélène; Dakaj, Dardane; Delorenzi, Mauro; Dobay, Maria Pamela; Eckert, Cornelia; Ellinghaus, Eva; Eugster, Sabrina; Frismantas, Viktoras; Ginzel, Sebastian; Haas, Oskar A; Heidenreich, Olaf; Hemmrich-Stanisak, Georg; Hezaveh, Kebria; Höll, Jessica I; Hornhardt, Sabine; Husemann, Peter; Kachroo, Priyadarshini; Kratz, Christian P; Kronnie, Geertruy Te; Marovca, Blerim; Niggli, Felix; McHardy, Alice C; Moorman, Anthony V; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Petersen, Britt S; Raeder, Benjamin; Ralser, Meryem; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schäfer, Daniel; Schrappe, Martin; Schreiber, Stefan; Schütte, Moritz; Stade, Björn; Thiele, Ralf; Weid, Nicolas von der; Vora, Ajay; Zaliova, Marketa; Zhang, Langhui; Zichner, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Borkhardt, Arndt; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Franke, Andre; Korbel, Jan O; Stanulla, Martin; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2015-09-01

    TCF3-HLF-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is currently incurable. Using an integrated approach, we uncovered distinct mutation, gene expression and drug response profiles in TCF3-HLF-positive and treatment-responsive TCF3-PBX1-positive ALL. We identified recurrent intragenic deletions of PAX5 or VPREB1 in constellation with the fusion of TCF3 and HLF. Moreover somatic mutations in the non-translocated allele of TCF3 and a reduction of PAX5 gene dosage in TCF3-HLF ALL suggest cooperation within a restricted genetic context. The enrichment for stem cell and myeloid features in the TCF3-HLF signature may reflect reprogramming by TCF3-HLF of a lymphoid-committed cell of origin toward a hybrid, drug-resistant hematopoietic state. Drug response profiling of matched patient-derived xenografts revealed a distinct profile for TCF3-HLF ALL with resistance to conventional chemotherapeutics but sensitivity to glucocorticoids, anthracyclines and agents in clinical development. Striking on-target sensitivity was achieved with the BCL2-specific inhibitor venetoclax (ABT-199). This integrated approach thus provides alternative treatment options for this deadly disease. PMID:26214592

  8. Positional cloning of the nude locus: Genetic, physical, and transcription maps of the region and mutations in the mouse and rat

    SciTech Connect

    Segre, J.A.; Lander, E.S. |; Taylor, B.A.

    1995-08-10

    Mutations in the nude locus in mice and rats produce the pleiotropic phenotype of hairlessness and athymia, resulting in severely compromised immune system. To identify the causative gene, we utilized modern tools and techniques of positional cloning. Specifically, spanning the region in which the nude locus resides, we constructed a genetic map of polymorphic markers, a physical map of yeast artificial chromosomes and bacteriophage P1 clones, and a transcription map of genes obtained by direct cDNA selection and exon trapping. We identified seven novel transcripts with similarity to genes from Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, rat or human and three previously identified mouse genes. Based on our transcription mapping results, we present a novel approach to estimate that the nude locus resides in a region approximately threefold enriched for genes. We confirm a recently published report that the nude phenotype is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a novel winged helix or fork head domain transcription factor, whn. We report as well as the mutations in the rat rnu allele and the complete coding sequence of the rat whn mRNA. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Characteristics and overall survival of EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer treated with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors: a retrospective analysis for 1660 Japanese patients

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Akira; Yoshida, Kazushi; Morita, Satoshi; Imamura, Fumio; Seto, Takashi; Okamoto, Isamu; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Muto, Satoshi; Fukuoka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Background The Japan Guidelines of Lung Cancer Therapy recommend epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors as a first-line therapy for advanced/recurrent non-small cell lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation. Although survival periods in recent reports of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment have been getting longer, the reasons why are unclear. We investigated the survival, prognostic factors and real-world treatment of non-small cell lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation in clinical practice. Methods Non-small cell lung cancer patients (n = 1660) who started first-line treatment from January 2008 to December 2012 were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed with epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive advanced/recurrent non-small cell lung cancer by histology or cytology samples. The primary objective was to estimate overall survival. The secondary objectives were to determine prognostic factors, real-world treatment patterns and efficacy of gefitinib treatment. We calculated the treatment exposure rate for each treatment category using the following formula: exposure rate = person-years for the treatment category/total person-years × 100. Results The median overall survival was 30.8 months. Sex, age, histology, epidermal growth factor receptor mutation type, clinical stage and performance status affected overall survival. The exposure rates for all epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, gefitinib and platinum-doublet chemotherapy were 62.1, 46.4 and 8.5% respectively. Overall 56.1% of patients were administered gefitinib as first-line therapy, and 39.0% were treated with ≥2 epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor regimens. The median progression-free survival in the first-line gefitinib group was 11.4 months. Factors affecting prognosis were sex, histology, clinical stage and performance status. Conclusion

  10. LRP4 third β-propeller domain mutations cause novel congenital myasthenia by compromising agrin-mediated MuSK signaling in a position-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Bisei; Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Nakata, Tomohiko; Milone, Margherita; Asai, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kenyu; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ito, Yasutomo; Engel, Andrew G; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-04-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders in which the safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. Using Sanger and exome sequencing in a CMS patient, we identified two heteroallelic mutations, p.Glu1233Lys and p.Arg1277His, in LRP4 coding for the postsynaptic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4. LRP4, expressed on the surface of the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, is a receptor for neurally secreted agrin, and LRP4 bound by agrin activates MuSK. Activated MuSK in concert with Dok-7 stimulates rapsyn to concentrate and anchor AChR on the postsynaptic membrane and interacts with other proteins implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. LRP4 also functions as an inhibitor of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The identified mutations in LRP4 are located at the edge of its 3rd beta-propeller domain and decrease binding affinity of LRP4 for both MuSK and agrin. Mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain were previously reported to impair Wnt signaling and cause bone diseases including Cenani-Lenz syndactyly syndrome and sclerosteosis-2. By analyzing naturally occurring and artificially introduced mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain, we show that the edge of the domain regulates the MuSK signaling whereas its central cavity governs Wnt signaling. We conclude that LRP4 is a new CMS disease gene and that the 3rd beta propeller domain of LRP4 mediates the two signaling pathways in a position-specific manner.

  11. LRP4 third β-propeller domain mutations cause novel congenital myasthenia by compromising agrin-mediated MuSK signaling in a position-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawara, Bisei; Cabrera-Serrano, Macarena; Nakata, Tomohiko; Milone, Margherita; Asai, Nobuyuki; Ito, Kenyu; Ito, Mikako; Masuda, Akio; Ito, Yasutomo; Engel, Andrew G.; Ohno, Kinji

    2014-01-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMS) are heterogeneous disorders in which the safety margin of neuromuscular transmission is compromised by one or more specific mechanisms. Using Sanger and exome sequencing in a CMS patient, we identified two heteroallelic mutations, p.Glu1233Lys and p.Arg1277His, in LRP4 coding for the postsynaptic low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4. LRP4, expressed on the surface of the postsynaptic membrane of the neuromuscular junction, is a receptor for neurally secreted agrin, and LRP4 bound by agrin activates MuSK. Activated MuSK in concert with Dok-7 stimulates rapsyn to concentrate and anchor AChR on the postsynaptic membrane and interacts with other proteins implicated in the assembly and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. LRP4 also functions as an inhibitor of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. The identified mutations in LRP4 are located at the edge of its 3rd beta-propeller domain and decrease binding affinity of LRP4 for both MuSK and agrin. Mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain were previously reported to impair Wnt signaling and cause bone diseases including Cenani–Lenz syndactyly syndrome and sclerosteosis-2. By analyzing naturally occurring and artificially introduced mutations in the LRP4 3rd beta-propeller domain, we show that the edge of the domain regulates the MuSK signaling whereas its central cavity governs Wnt signaling. We conclude that LRP4 is a new CMS disease gene and that the 3rd beta propeller domain of LRP4 mediates the two signaling pathways in a position-specific manner. PMID:24234652

  12. Positional adaptability in the design of mutation-resistant nonnucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a supramolecular perspective.

    PubMed

    Bruccoleri, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance is a key cause of failed treatment of HIV infection. The efficacy of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase-inhibiting (NNRTI) drugs is impaired by the rapid emergence of drug-resistant mutations. The literature supports the idea that purposefully designed flexible NNRTIs at an active site may help overcome drug resistance. It is proposed here that the usual "lock and key" model, with respect to NNRTI drug design, be expanded to consider creating "master keys" that would automatically adjust conformations to fit all of the "locks" mutations may make. The present work introduces the novel perspective of designing and creating supramolecular assemblies as potential NNRTIs (instead of the relatively more rigid single-molecule inhibitors). Specifically, flexible self-assembling quinhydrone supramolecular dimers formed from quinonoid monomers (designed to be highly flexible NNRTIs themselves) will be offered as a working example of this new perspective in NNRTI drug design. Quinonoid compounds have demonstrated binding interactions at various sites of the HIV-1 RT enzyme, including the elusive ribonuclease H area. Quinhydrone self-organized dimers have at some point in their molecular architecture a noncovalently interacting donor-acceptor ring pair complex. This complex is at the heart of the increased torsional, rotational, and translational motion this species will experience at a particular active site. Flexible supramolecular assemblies, together with their flexible monomer components, may offer a critical advantage in retaining potency against a wide range of drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs. This new supramolecular perspective may also have broader implications in the general field of antimicrobial drug design. PMID:22938539

  13. Erlotinib plus bevacizumab as an effective treatment for leptomeningeal metastases from EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Yoshihiko; Kawamura, Kodai; Shingu, Naoki; Ichikado, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    Leptomeningeal metastasis is a severe complication of non-small cell lung cancer. Its prognosis is very poor and conventional treatments have limited efficacy. However, epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors have exhibited high response rates in EGFR mutation-positive lung cancer patients with central nervous system metastases. It has been postulated that this could be due to the penetration of agents into the central nervous system and a high cerebrospinal fluid concentration is a key consideration in measuring treatment effect. Bevacizumab has also been used as an effective therapeutic agent in patients with central nervous system metastases. However, the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor doublet therapy for leptomeningeal metastases and the cerebrospinal fluid penetration of epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitors have yet to be determined. Moreover, the safety of this doublet regimen in patients with a poor general condition is not known. Herein, we report on a case treated with erlotinib plus bevacizumab for leptomeningeal metastases from EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer. The patient's performance status significantly improved and the cerebrospinal fluid penetration rate of erlotinib plus bevacizumab was equal to or greater than the past reports of erlotinib alone. PMID:27565925

  14. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism gene shows locus homogeneity on chromosome 15q11-q13 and evidence of multiple mutations in southern African negroids

    SciTech Connect

    Kedda, M.A.; Stevens, G.; Manga, P.; Viljoen, C.; Jenkins, T.; Ramsay, M. Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg )

    1994-06-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin pigmentary system. South African ty-pos OCA individuals occur with two distinct phenotypes, with or without darkly pigmented patches (ephelides, or dendritic freckles) on exposed areas of the skin. These phenotypes are concordant within families, suggesting that there may be more than one mutation at the ty-pos OCA locus. Linkage studies carried out in 41 families have shown linkage between markers in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on chromosome 15q11-q13 and ty-pos OCA. Analysis showed no obligatory crossovers between the alleles at the D15S12 locus and ty-pos OCA, suggesting that the D15S12 locus is very close to or part of the disease locus, which is postulated to be the human homologue, P, of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene, p. Unlike caucasoid [open quotes]ty-pos OCA[close quotes] individuals, negroid ty-pos OCA individuals do not show any evidence of locus heterogeneity. Studies of allelic association between the polymorphic alleles detected at the D15S12 locus and ephelus status suggest that there was a single major mutation giving rise to ty-pos OCA without ephelides. There may, however, be two major mutations causing ty-pos OCA with ephelides, one associated with D15S12 allele 1 and the other associated with D15S12 allele 2. The two loci, GABRA5 and D15S24, flanking D15S12, are both hypervariable, and many different haplotypes were observed with the alleles at the three loci on both ty-pos OCA-associated chromosomes and [open quotes]normal[close quotes] chromosomes. No haplotype showed statistically significant association with ty-pos OCA, and thus none could be used to predict the origins of the ty-pos OCA mutations. On the basis of the D15S12 results, there is evidence for multiple ty-pos OCA mutations in southern African negroids. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  15. Effect of administration of caffeine or green tea on the mutation profile in the p53 gene in early mutant p53-positive patches of epidermal cells induced by chronic UVB-irradiation of hairless SKH-1 mice.

    PubMed

    Kramata, Pavel; Lu, Yao-Ping; Lou, You-Rong; Cohen, Julie L; Olcha, Meir; Liu, Sandy; Conney, Allan H

    2005-11-01

    Irradiation of SKH-1 mice with UVB light for 20 weeks resulted in a large number of patches of epidermal cells, which was visualized with an antibody that recognizes mutated p53 protein. Oral treatment of mice with caffeine (0.4 mg/ml) or green tea (6 mg tea solids/ml) as the drinking fluid during UVB irradiation decreased the number of patches by approximately 40%. Sequencing analysis of the p53 gene (exons 3 to 9) detected 88, 82 or 39 point mutations in 67, 70 or 29 patches from water, caffeine or tea treated mice, respectively. A major hotspot at codon 270 (Arg-->Cys) accounted for 47.7% (water), 70.7% (caffeine) or 46.2% (tea) of all mutations. Patches from caffeine treated mice had fewer types of mutations than patches from mice treated with water or tea. Administration of caffeine or tea during 20 weeks of UVB irradiation eliminated mutations at codons 149 (Pro-->Ser) and 210 (Arg-->Cys) but increased the frequency of mutations at codon 238 (Ser-->Phe). Topical applications of caffeine (1.2 mg in 100 microl acetone) once a day, five times a week for 6 weeks after stopping UVB decreased the number of patches by 63% when compared with mice treated with acetone. DNA sequencing analysis detected 63 and 68 mutations in 48 and 57 patches from acetone or caffeine treated mice, respectively. Although no differences in the frequency, position or types of mutations were observed, the caffeine group harbored less homozygous mutations (12.3% of the total) than the acetone group (31.3% of the total, P = 0.029). In summary, oral treatment of mice with caffeine or green tea during chronic UVB irradiation changed the mutation profile of the p53 gene in early mutant p53 positive epidermal patches, and topical applications of caffeine after discontinuation of chronic UVB irradiation specifically eliminated patches harboring homozygous p53 mutations.

  16. Population genetic and phylogenetic evidence for positive selection on regulatory mutations at the factor VII locus in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Matthew W; Rockman, Matthew V; Soranzo, Nicole; Goldstein, David B; Wray, Gregory A

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of cis-regulatory polymorphisms in humans suggests that many may have been important in human evolution, but evidence for their role is relatively rare. Four common polymorphisms in the 5' promoter region of factor VII (F7), a coagulation factor, have been shown to affect its transcription and protein abundance both in vitro and in vivo. Three of these polymorphisms have low-frequency alleles that decrease expression of F7 and may provide protection against myocardial infarction (heart attacks). The fourth polymorphism has a minor allele that increases the level of transcription. To look for evidence of natural selection on the cis-regulatory variants flanking F7, we genotyped three of the polymorphisms in six Old World populations for which we also have data from a group of putatively neutral SNPs. Our population genetic analysis shows evidence for selection within humans; surprisingly, the strongest evidence is due to a large increase in frequency of the high-expression variant in Singaporean Chinese. Further characterization of a Japanese population shows that at least part of the increase in frequency of the high-expression allele is found in other East Asian populations. In addition, to examine interspecific patterns of selection we sequenced the homologous 5' noncoding region in chimpanzees, bonobos, a gorilla, an orangutan, and a baboon. Analysis of these data reveals an excess of fixed differences within transcription factor binding sites along the human lineage. Our results thus further support the hypothesis that regulatory mutations have been important in human evolution. PMID:15238535

  17. The tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism gene shows locus homogeneity on chromosome 15q11-q13 and evidence of multiple mutations in southern African negroids.

    PubMed Central

    Kedda, M. A.; Stevens, G.; Manga, P.; Viljoen, C.; Jenkins, T.; Ramsay, M.

    1994-01-01

    Tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism (ty-pos OCA) is an autosomal recessive disorder of the melanin pigmentary system. South African ty-pos OCA individuals occur with two distinct phenotypes, with or without darkly pigmented patches (ephelides, or dendritic freckles) on exposed areas of the skin. These phenotypes are concordant within families, suggesting that there may be more than one mutation at the ty-pos OCA locus. Linkage studies carried out in 41 families have shown linkage between markers in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on chromosome 15q11-q13 and ty-pos OCA. Analysis showed no obligatory crossovers between the alleles at the D15S12 locus and ty-pos OCA, suggesting that the D15S12 locus is very close to or part of the disease locus, which is postulated to be the human homologue, P, of the mouse pink-eyed dilution gene, p. Unlike caucasoid "ty-pos OCA" individuals, negroid ty-pos OCA individuals do not show any evidence of locus heterogeneity. Studies of allelic association between the polymorphic alleles detected at the D15S12 locus and ephelus status suggest that there was a single major mutation giving rise to ty-pos OCA without ephelides. There may, however, be two major mutations causing ty-pos OCA with ephelides, one associated with D15S12 allele 1 and the other associated with D15S12 allele 2. The two loci, GABRA5 and D15S24, flanking D15S12, are both hypervariable, and many different haplotypes were observed with the alleles at the three loci on both ty-pos OCA-associated chromosomes and "normal" chromosomes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8198130

  18. A positively selected mutation in the WNV 2K peptide confers resistance to superinfection exclusion in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Corey L.; Smith, Darci R.; Sanchez-Vargas, Irma; Zhang, Bo; Shi, Pei-Yong; Ebel, Gregory D.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular epidemiologic studies of North American (NA) West Nile virus (WNV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) have documented the displacement of the introduced NY99 genotype with WN02. In addition, these studies have shown that particular substitutions are under positive selection. One occurs in the C-terminus of the NS4A coding sequence and results in a valine to methionine substitution at position nine of the 2K peptide. 2K-V9M confers the ability to overcome superinfection exclusion in vitro. We hypothesized that WNV strains bearing 2K-V9M have higher fitness than wildtype in Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes. Although infection rates and viral titers were not significantly different, virus dissemination rates were significantly higher with WNV 2K-V9M. As a super-infecting virus, WNV 2K-V9M was more successful than wildtype, however, in a mixed infection, 2K-V9M was not. These data support observations that 2K-V9M confers a context-specific selective advantage in mosquitoes and provides an in vivo mechanism for its positive selection. PMID:25104615

  19. The structural gene for a phosphorus-repressible phosphate permease in Neurospora crassa can complement a mutation in positive regulatory gene nuc-1.

    PubMed

    Mann, B J; Akins, R A; Lambowitz, A M; Metzenberg, R L

    1988-03-01

    van+, a gene encoding a phosphorus-repressible phosphate permease, was isolated by its ability to complement nuc-1, a positive regulatory locus that normally regulates van+ expression. This was unexpected because the nuc-1 host already contained a resident van+ gene. Plasmids carrying van+ complemented a nuc-2 mutation as well. Probing of RNA from untransformed wild-type (nuc-1+) and constitutive (nuc-1c) strains by van+ probes indicated that levels of the van+ transcript were subject to control by nuc-1+. Probing of the same RNAs with a cosmid clone, containing approximately 15 kilobases of upstream and downstream DNA, revealed no other detectable phosphorus-regulated transcripts within this 40-kilobase region of the chromosome.

  20. Successful treatment with afatinib after grade 3 hepatotoxicity induced by both gefitinib and erlotinib in EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zenke, Yoshitaka; Umemura, Shigeki; Sugiyama, Eri; Kirita, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Shingo; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Niho, Seiji; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi

    2016-09-01

    Hepatotoxicity is a major cause of the withdrawal of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs) when treating EGFR mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We report a case in which gefitinib- and elrotinib-induced severe hepatotoxicity arose in a patient with the uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase isoform 1A1 (UGT1A1) and cytochrome p450 3A5 (CYP3A5) poor metabolizer phenotypes. Afatinib is not significantly metabolized by cytochrome p450-mediated pathways. We describe successful management of the patient's tumor by switching to afatinib. Evaluation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in metabolic enzymes might be useful to predict severe hepatotoxicity induced by EGFR-TKIs. PMID:27565905

  1. The structural gene for a phosphorus-repressible phosphate permease in Neurospora crassa can complement a mutation in positive regulatory gene nuc-1.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, B J; Akins, R A; Lambowitz, A M; Metzenberg, R L

    1988-01-01

    van+, a gene encoding a phosphorus-repressible phosphate permease, was isolated by its ability to complement nuc-1, a positive regulatory locus that normally regulates van+ expression. This was unexpected because the nuc-1 host already contained a resident van+ gene. Plasmids carrying van+ complemented a nuc-2 mutation as well. Probing of RNA from untransformed wild-type (nuc-1+) and constitutive (nuc-1c) strains by van+ probes indicated that levels of the van+ transcript were subject to control by nuc-1+. Probing of the same RNAs with a cosmid clone, containing approximately 15 kilobases of upstream and downstream DNA, revealed no other detectable phosphorus-regulated transcripts within this 40-kilobase region of the chromosome. Images PMID:2966896

  2. 'Cancer doesn't have an age': genetic testing and cancer risk management in BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women aged 18-24.

    PubMed

    Werner-Lin, Allison; Hoskins, Lindsey M; Doyle, Maya H; Greene, Mark H

    2012-11-01

    Increasingly, 18-24-year-old women from hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (HBOC) families are pursuing genetic testing, despite their low absolute risks of breast and ovarian cancer and the fact that evidence-based management options used with older high-risk women are not generally available. Difficult clinical decisions in older carriers take on substantially more complexity and value-laden import in very young carriers. As a result, many of the latter receive highly personal and emotionally charged cancer risk information in a life context where management strategies are not well defined. We analyzed 32 in-depth interviews with BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women aged 18-24 using techniques of grounded theory and interpretive description. Participants described feeling vulnerable to a cancer diagnosis but in a quandary regarding their care because evidence-based approaches to management have not been developed and clinical trials have not been undertaken. Our participants demonstrated a wide range of genetic and health literacy. Inconsistent recommendations, surveillance fatigue, and the unpredictability of their having health insurance coverage for surgical risk-reducing procedures led several to contemplate risk-reducing mastectomy before age 25. Parents remained a primary source of emotional and financial support, slowing age-appropriate independence and complicating patient privacy. Our findings suggest that, for 18-24-year-olds, readiness to autonomously elect genetic testing, to fully understand and act on genetic information, and to confidently make decisions with life-long implications are all evolving processes. We comment on the tensions between informed consent, privacy, and the unique developmental needs of BRCA1/2 mutation-positive women just emerging into their adult years. PMID:22547552

  3. Mutation tryptophan to leucine at position 222 of haemagglutinin could facilitate H3N2 influenza A virus infection in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guohua; Li, Shoujun; Blackmon, Sherry; Ye, Jianqiang; Bradley, Konrad C.; Cooley, Jim; Smith, Dave; Hanson, Larry; Cardona, Carol; Steinhauer, David A.; Webby, Richard; Liao, Ming

    2013-01-01

    An avian-like H3N2 influenza A virus (IAV) has recently caused sporadic canine influenza outbreaks in China and Korea, but the molecular mechanisms involved in the interspecies transmission of H3N2 IAV from avian to canine species are not well understood. Sequence analysis showed that residue 222 in haemagglutinin (HA) is predominantly tryptophan (W) in the closely related avian H3N2 IAV, but was leucine (L) in canine H3N2 IAV. In this study, reassortant viruses rH3N2-222L (canine-like) and rH3N2-222W (avian-like) with HA mutation L222W were generated using reverse genetics to evaluate the significance of the L222W mutation on receptor binding and host tropism of H3N2 IAV. Compared with rH3N2-222W, rH3N2-222L grew more rapidly in MDCK cells and had significantly higher infectivity in primary canine tracheal epithelial cells. Tissue-binding assays demonstrated that rH3N2-222L had a preference for canine tracheal tissues rather avian tracheal tissues, whereas rH3N2-222W favoured slightly avian rather canine tracheal tissues. Glycan microarray analysis suggested both rH3N2-222L and rH3N2-222W bound preferentially to α2,3-linked sialic acids. However, the rH3N2-222W had more than twofold less binding affinity than rH3N2-222L to a set of glycans with Neu5Aca2–3Galb1–4(Fuca-)-like or Neu5Aca2–3Galb1–3(Fuca-)-like structures. These data suggest the W to L mutation at position 222 of the HA could facilitate infection of H3N2 IAV in dogs, possibly by increasing the binding affinities of the HA to specific receptors with Neu5Aca2–3Galb1–4(Fuca-) or Neu5Aca2–3Galb1–3(Fuca-)-like structures that are present in dogs. PMID:23994833

  4. Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors as initial therapy for non-small cell lung cancer: focus on epidermal growth factor receptor mutation testing and mutation-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Roengvoraphoj, Monic; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Dragnev, Konstantin H; Rigas, James R

    2013-12-01

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway has been implicated in tumorigenesis in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the most common type of lung cancer. As a result, EGFR has become a key focus for the development of personalized therapy, with several molecular biomarkers having been investigated as potential predictors of response with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in NSCLC (e.g., EGFR expression, EGFR gene copy gain, and EGFR mutations). Of these, activating mutations in EGFR have thus far given the most consistent results based on the available evidence from preclinical studies and clinical trials. In an attempt to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment with EGFR TKIs, EGFR mutation testing is being increasingly utilized in clinical practice. Currently in the United States, no EGFR TKI or accompanying mutational test is approved for the identification and first-line treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC. However, the first-generation EGFR TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, as well as investigational ErbB family TKIs and EGFR mutation testing methods are being evaluated in this setting. This review will discuss EGFR mutation testing as a biomarker of response to EGFR TKIs and the evolution of EGFR mutational analysis in NSCLC. Completed and ongoing clinical trials evaluating currently available or investigational EGFR TKIs as first-line therapy in molecularly and clinically selected patients with NSCLC, with a focus on trials in patients whose tumors have EGFR mutations, will also be reviewed.

  5. Successful pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy for epidermal growth factor receptor mutation-positive adenosquamous cell carcinoma of the lung: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WATANABE, HIROKO; TAMURA, TOMOHIRO; KAGOHASHI, KATSUNORI; KAWAGUCHI, MIO; KURISHIMA, KOICHI; SATOH, HIROAKI

    2016-01-01

    Pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy has shown promise in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, although adenosquamous cell lung cancer (ASCLC) is a type of NSCLC, the availability of studies investigating its response to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy is limited. A 66-year-old woman was referred to Mito Medical Center, University of Tsukuba with hemoptysis and a chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a large cavitary mass in the lower lobe of the left lung. The patient underwent left lower lobectomy and mediastinal lymph node dissection. The tumor was staged as pT2bN2M0. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 19 deletion was identified in the adenocarcinomatous as well as the squamous cell carcinomatous components. Despite gefitinib therapy for pulmonary metastases, the patient developed cavitary metastases in both lungs. Therefore, treatment with pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was initiated. A chest CT scan revealed significant regression of the metastatic lesions in both lungs, with thinning of the walls. The patient remains well and recurrence-free 19 months after the initiation of pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy. Therefore, the clinical response of EGFR mutation-positive ASCLC to pemetrexed-containing chemotherapy was promising, suggesting pemetrexed to be one of the key drugs for this subset of ASCLC patients. PMID:27073680

  6. BRCA Mutation Frequency and Patterns of Treatment Response in BRCA Mutation–Positive Women With Ovarian Cancer: A Report From the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study Group

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Kathryn; Fereday, Sian; Meldrum, Cliff; deFazio, Anna; Emmanuel, Catherine; George, Joshy; Dobrovic, Alexander; Birrer, Michael J.; Webb, Penelope M.; Stewart, Colin; Friedlander, Michael; Fox, Stephen; Bowtell, David; Mitchell, Gillian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germ-line mutations in women with ovarian cancer is unclear; reports vary from 3% to 27%. The impact of germ-line mutation on response requires further investigation to understand its impact on treatment planning and clinical trial design. Patients and Methods Women with nonmucinous ovarian carcinoma (n = 1,001) enrolled onto a population-based, case-control study were screened for point mutations and large deletions in both genes. Survival outcomes and responses to multiple lines of chemotherapy were assessed. Results Germ-line mutations were found in 14.1% of patients overall, including 16.6% of serous cancer patients (high-grade serous, 22.6%); 44% had no reported family history of breast or ovarian cancer. Patients carrying germ-line mutations had improved rates of progression-free and overall survival. In the relapse setting, patients carrying mutations more frequently responded to both platin- and nonplatin-based regimens than mutation-negative patients, even in patients with early relapse after primary treatment. Mutation-negative patients who responded to multiple cycles of platin-based treatment were more likely to carry somatic BRCA1/2 mutations. Conclusion BRCA mutation status has a major influence on survival in ovarian cancer patients and should be an additional stratification factor in clinical trials. Treatment outcomes in BRCA1/2 carriers challenge conventional definitions of platin resistance, and mutation status may be able to contribute to decision making and systemic therapy selection in the relapse setting. Our data, together with the advent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor trials, supports the recommendation that germ-line BRCA1/2 testing should be offered to all women diagnosed with nonmucinous, ovarian carcinoma, regardless of family history. PMID:22711857

  7. Influence of mutations at the proximal histidine position on the Fe-O2 bond in hemoglobin from density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todde, Guido; Hovmöller, Sven; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2016-03-01

    Four mutated hemoglobin (Hb) variants and wild type hemoglobin as a reference have been investigated using density functional theory methods focusing on oxygen binding. Dispersion-corrected B3LYP functional is used and found to provide reliable oxygen binding energies. It also correctly reproduces the spin distribution of both bound and free heme groups as well as provides correct geometries at their close vicinity. Mutations in hemoglobin are not only an intrigued biological problem and it is also highly important to understand their effects from a clinical point of view. This study clearly shows how even small structural differences close to the heme group can have a significant effect in reducing the oxygen binding of mutated hemoglobins and consequently affecting the health condition of the patient suffering from the mutations. All of the studied mutated Hb variants did exhibit much weaker binding of molecular oxygen compared to the wild type of hemoglobin.

  8. PIK3CA genotype and a PIK3CA mutation-related gene signature and response to everolimus and letrozole in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Loi, Sherene; Michiels, Stefan; Baselga, Jose; Bartlett, John M S; Singhal, Sandeep K; Sabine, Vicky S; Sims, Andrew H; Sahmoud, Tarek; Dixon, J Michael; Piccart, Martine J; Sotiriou, Christos

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase (PI3K) pathway is commonly activated in breast cancer and aberrations such as PI3K mutations are common. Recent exciting clinical trial results in advanced estrogen receptor-positive (ER) breast cancer support mTOR activation is a major means of estrogen-independent tumor growth. Hence the means to identify a responsive breast cancer population that would most benefit from these compounds in the adjuvant or earlier stage setting is of high interest. Here we study PIK3CA genotype as well as a previously reported PI3K/mTOR-pathway gene signature (PIK3CA-GS) and their ability to estimate the level of PI3K pathway activation in two clinical trials of newly diagnosed ER-positive breast cancer patients- a total of 81 patients- one of which was randomized between letrozole and placebo vs letrozole and everolimus. The main objectives were to correlate the baseline PIK3CA genotype and GS with the relative change from baseline to day 15 in Ki67 (which has been shown to be prognostic in breast cancer) and phosphorylated S6 (S240) immunohistochemistry (a substrate of mTOR). In the randomized dataset, the PIK3CA-GS could identify those patients with the largest relative decreases in Ki67 to letrozole/everolimus (R = -0.43, p = 0.008) compared with letrozole/placebo (R = 0.07, p = 0.58; interaction test p = 0.02). In a second dataset of pre-surgical everolimus alone, the PIK3CA-GS was not significantly correlated with relative change in Ki67 (R = -0.11, p = 0.37) but with relative change in phosphorlyated S6 (S240) (R = -0.46, p = 0.028). PIK3CA genotype was not significantly associated with any endpoint in either datasets. Our results suggest that the PIK3CA-GS has potential to identify those ER-positive BCs who may benefit from the addition of everolimus to letrozole. Further evaluation of the PIK3CA-GS as a predictive biomarker is warranted as it may facilitate better selection of responsive patient populations for mTOR inhibition in

  9. Review: Clinical aspects of hereditary DNA Mismatch repair gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Sijmons, Rolf H; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2016-02-01

    Inherited mutations of the DNA Mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 can result in two hereditary tumor syndromes: the adult-onset autosomal dominant Lynch syndrome, previously referred to as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) and the childhood-onset autosomal recessive Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome. Both conditions are important to recognize clinically as their identification has direct consequences for clinical management and allows targeted preventive actions in mutation carriers. Lynch syndrome is one of the more common adult-onset hereditary tumor syndromes, with thousands of patients reported to date. Its tumor spectrum is well established and includes colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and a range of other cancer types. However, surveillance for cancers other than colorectal cancer is still of uncertain value. Prophylactic surgery, especially for the uterus and its adnexa is an option in female mutation carriers. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer with aspirin is actively being investigated in this syndrome and shows promising results. In contrast, the Constitutional Mismatch Repair Deficiency syndrome is rare, features a wide spectrum of childhood onset cancers, many of which are brain tumors with high mortality rates. Future studies are very much needed to improve the care for patients with this severe disorder. PMID:26746812

  10. Yeast mutator phenotype enforced by Arabidopsis PMS1 expression.

    PubMed

    Galles, Celina; Spampinato, Claudia P

    2013-03-01

    The DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system is a major DNA repair pathway whose function is critical for the correction of DNA biosynthetic errors. MMR is initiated by the binding of MutS proteins to mismatches and unpaired nucleotides followed by the recruitment of MutL proteins. The major MutL activity in eukaryotes is performed by MutLα, the heterocomplex of MLH1-PMS1 in yeast and plants and MLH1-PMS2 in humans. We here report the effect the expression of Arabidopsis PMS1 protein exerts on Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic stability. A strain carrying specific microsatellite instability reporter systems was chosen for the study. The plant protein failed to complement the hypermutator phenotype of a pms1 deficient strain but increased approximately 14-fold and 2,000-fold the mutation rates of his7-2 and lys2::InsE-A 14 loci of MMR proficient strains when compared to wild-type strains, respectively. Overexpressing AtMLH1 in the AtPMS1-overproducing strain generated an increase in mutation rate comparable to that of AtPMS1 expression alone. Deletion of the C-terminal residues implicated in protein-protein interaction and including the putative endonuclease sequence of AtPMS1 completely eliminated the mutator phenotype. Taken together, these results indicate that the plant proteins affect yeast genomic stability, very possibly altering protein-protein interactions that are necessary to complete repair.

  11. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors for epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutation-positive non-small cell lung cancers: an update for recent advances in therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chung, Clement

    2016-06-01

    The presence of activating gene mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor of non-small cell lung cancer patients is predictive (improved progression-free survival and improved response rate) when treated with small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib. The two most common mutations that account for greater than 85% of all EGFR gene mutations are in-frame deletions in exon 19 (LREA deletions) and substitution in exon 21 (L858R). Exon 18 mutations occur much less frequently at about 4% of all EGFR gene mutations. Together, exon 19 deletion and exon 21 L858R gene substitution are present in about 10% of Caucasian patients and 20-40% of Asian patients with non-small cell lung cancer. T790M gene mutation at exon 20 is associated with acquired resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Early studies showed that activating EGFR gene mutations are most common in patients with adenocarcinoma histology, women, never smokers and those of Asian ethnicity. A recent multi-center phase III trial suggested that frontline epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy with afatinib is associated with improved progression-free survival compared to chemotherapy regardless of race. Moreover, guidelines now suggest EGFR gene mutation testing should be conducted in all patients with lung adenocarcinoma or mixed lung cancers with an adenocarcinoma component, regardless of characteristics such as smoking status, gender or race. The success of targeted therapies in non-small cell lung cancer patients has changed the treatment paradigm in metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, despite a durable response of greater than a year, resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors inevitably occurs. This mini-review describes the clinically relevant EGFR gene mutations and the efficacy/toxicity of small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase

  12. Relationship between PTEN, DNA mismatch repair, and tumor histotype in endometrial carcinoma: retained positive expression of PTEN preferentially identifies sporadic non-endometrioid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Djordjevic, Bojana; Barkoh, Bedia A; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Broaddus, Russell R

    2013-10-01

    Loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) expression and microsatellite instability are two of the more common molecular alterations in endometrial carcinoma. From the published literature, it is controversial as to whether there is a relationship between these different molecular mechanisms. Therefore, a cohort of 187 pure endometrioid and non-endometrioid endometrial carcinomas, carefully characterized as to clinical and pathological features, was examined for PTEN sequence abnormalities and the immunohistochemical expression of PTEN and the DNA mismatch repair proteins MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. MLH1 methylation analysis was performed when tumors had loss of MLH1 protein. Mismatch repair protein loss was more frequent in endometrioid carcinomas compared with non-endometrioid carcinomas, a difference primarily attributable to the presence of MLH1 methylation in a greater proportion of endometrioid tumors. Among the non-endometrioid group, mixed endometrioid/non-endometrioid carcinomas were the histotype that most commonly had loss of a mismatch repair protein. In endometrioid tumors, the frequency of PTEN loss measured by immunohistochemistry and mutation did not differ significantly between the mismatch repair protein intact or mismatch repair protein loss groups, suggesting that PTEN loss is independent of mismatch protein repair status in this group. However, in non-endometrioid carcinomas, both intact positive PTEN immunohistochemical expression and PTEN wild type were highly associated with retained positive expression of mismatch repair proteins in the tumor. Relevant to screening endometrial cancers for Lynch Syndrome, an initial PTEN immunohistochemistry determination may be able to replace the use of four mismatch repair immunohistochemical markers in 63% of patients with non-endometrioid endometrial carcinoma. Therefore, PTEN immunohistochemistry, in combination with tumor histotype, is a useful adjunct in the clinical evaluation of endometrial

  13. Primary erythromelalgia in a 12-year-old boy: positive response to sodium channel blockers despite negative SCN9A mutations.

    PubMed

    Jakob, A; Creutzfeldt, R; Staszewski, O; Winterpacht, A; Berner, R; Hufnagel, M

    2012-09-01

    Erythromelalgia is a rare disorder characterized by recurrent pain attacks, swelling and redness in the distal extremities. The primary forms of the disorder are caused by mutations in voltage-gated sodium channels. Treatment is difficult and controlled therapeutic studies offer little to no guidance. We report on a 12-year-old boy and his first occurrence of primary erythromelalgia. Genetic findings for mutations in the SCN9A gene, which encodes for the α-subunit of sodium channel NaV1.7, were negative. Although initial treatment with sodium nitroprusside was ineffective, subsequent medication with lidocaine and mexiletine, in combination with gabapentin, was successful. Despite negative findings for mutations in the sodium channels, the use of sodium channel blockers should be considered in these patients. PMID:22170168

  14. Impact of JAK2V617F Mutation Burden on Disease Phenotype in Chinese Patients with JAK2V617F-positive Polycythemia Vera (PV) and Essential thrombocythemia (ET).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shixiang; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Yang; Feng, Yufeng; Sheng, Wenhong; Cen, Jiannong; Wu, Depei; Han, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and half of essential thrombocythemia (ET) possess an activating JAK2V617F mutation. The objective of this study was to better define the effect of JAK2V617F mutant allele burden on clinical phenotypes in Chinese patients, especially thrombosis. By real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), the JAK2V617F mutation burden was detected in 170 JAK2V617F-positive patients, including 54 PV and 116 ET. The results showed that JAK2V617F allele burden was higher in PV than in ET (P< 0.001). Higher percentage of patients had JAK2V617F allele burden over 20% in PV than in ET (68.5% VS 26.7%) (P< 0.001). In PV patients, higher JAK2V617F allele burden was observed in female (P< 0.05) and leukocytosis patients (WBC above 10 × 10(9)/L) (P< 0.001). Meanwhile, ET patients showed increased JAK2V617F allele burden in the group with higher hemoglobin (HGB above 150 g/L) (P< 0.05), leukocytosis (WBC above 10 × 10(9)/L) (P< 0.001), splenomegaly (P< 0.05) and thrombosis (P< 0.05). In conclusion, the JAK2V617F mutation allele burden is higher in Chinese patients with PV than ET. In PV patients, JAK2V617F mutation burden had influence on WBC counts. And the clinical characteristics of ET patients, such as WBC counts, hemoglobin level, splenomegaly and thrombosis, were influenced by JAK2V617F mutation burden. Male, high hemoglobin (HGB above 150 g/L), and increased JAK2V617F mutation burden (JAK2V617F allele burden ≥ 16.5%) were risks of thrombosis (P< 0.05) for ET patients by Logistic Regression.

  15. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Ortiz, Jose Miguel; Ayala-Madrigal, María de la Luz; Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Centeno-Flores, Manuel; Maciel-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Franco-Topete, Ramón Antonio; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Hotchkiss, Erin; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucia; Rhees, Jennifer; Boland, Clement Richard; Gutiérrez-Angulo, Melva

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS) is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC) and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC), and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del) and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs) in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  16. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Ortiz, Jose Miguel; Ayala-Madrigal, María de la Luz; Corona-Rivera, Jorge Román; Maciel-Gutiérrez, Víctor; Franco-Topete, Ramón Antonio; Armendáriz-Borunda, Juan; Pérez-Carbonell, Lucia; Rhees, Jennifer; Gutiérrez-Angulo, Melva

    2016-01-01

    Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS) is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC) and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC), and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del) and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A) in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs) in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel. PMID:27247567

  17. Exome Sequencing Identifies Biallelic MSH3 Germline Mutations as a Recessive Subtype of Colorectal Adenomatous Polyposis.

    PubMed

    Adam, Ronja; Spier, Isabel; Zhao, Bixiao; Kloth, Michael; Marquez, Jonathan; Hinrichsen, Inga; Kirfel, Jutta; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Uhlhaas, Siegfried; Stienen, Dietlinde; Friedrichs, Nicolaus; Altmüller, Janine; Laner, Andreas; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Peters, Sophia; Kayser, Katrin; Thiele, Holger; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Marra, Giancarlo; Kristiansen, Glen; Nöthen, Markus M; Büttner, Reinhard; Möslein, Gabriela; Betz, Regina C; Brieger, Angela; Lifton, Richard P; Aretz, Stefan

    2016-08-01

    In ∼30% of families affected by colorectal adenomatous polyposis, no germline mutations have been identified in the previously implicated genes APC, MUTYH, POLE, POLD1, and NTHL1, although a hereditary etiology is likely. To uncover further genes with high-penetrance causative mutations, we performed exome sequencing of leukocyte DNA from 102 unrelated individuals with unexplained adenomatous polyposis. We identified two unrelated individuals with differing compound-heterozygous loss-of-function (LoF) germline mutations in the mismatch-repair gene MSH3. The impact of the MSH3 mutations (c.1148delA, c.2319-1G>A, c.2760delC, and c.3001-2A>C) was indicated at the RNA and protein levels. Analysis of the diseased individuals' tumor tissue demonstrated high microsatellite instability of di- and tetranucleotides (EMAST), and immunohistochemical staining illustrated a complete loss of nuclear MSH3 in normal and tumor tissue, confirming the LoF effect and causal relevance of the mutations. The pedigrees, genotypes, and frequency of MSH3 mutations in the general population are consistent with an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance. Both index persons have an affected sibling carrying the same mutations. The tumor spectrum in these four persons comprised colorectal and duodenal adenomas, colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, and an early-onset astrocytoma. Additionally, we detected one unrelated individual with biallelic PMS2 germline mutations, representing constitutional mismatch-repair deficiency. Potentially causative variants in 14 more candidate genes identified in 26 other individuals require further workup. In the present study, we identified biallelic germline MSH3 mutations in individuals with a suspected hereditary tumor syndrome. Our data suggest that MSH3 mutations represent an additional recessive subtype of colorectal adenomatous polyposis. PMID:27476653

  18. Risk of colorectal cancer for people with a mutation in both a MUTYH and a DNA mismatch repair gene.

    PubMed

    Win, Aung Ko; Reece, Jeanette C; Buchanan, Daniel D; Clendenning, Mark; Young, Joanne P; Cleary, Sean P; Kim, Hyeja; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dowty, James G; MacInnis, Robert J; Tucker, Katherine M; Winship, Ingrid M; Macrae, Finlay A; Burnett, Terrilea; Le Marchand, Loïc; Casey, Graham; Haile, Robert W; Newcomb, Polly A; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Gallinger, Steven; Jenkins, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    The base excision repair protein, MUTYH, functionally interacts with the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. As genetic testing moves from testing one gene at a time, to gene panel and whole exome next generation sequencing approaches, understandin g the risk associated with co-existence of germline mutations in these genes will be important for clinical interpretation and management. From the Colon Cancer Family Registry, we identified 10 carriers who had both a MUTYH mutation (6 with c.1187G>A p.(Gly396Asp), 3 with c.821G>A p.(Arg274Gln), and 1 with c.536A>G p.(Tyr179Cys)) and a MMR gene mutation (3 in MLH1, 6 in MSH2, and 1 in PMS2), 375 carriers of a single (monoallelic) MUTYH mutation alone, and 469 carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Of the 10 carriers of both gene mutations, 8 were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Using a weighted cohort analysis, we estimated that risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of both a MUTYH and a MMR gene mutation was substantially higher than that for carriers of a MUTYH mutation alone [hazard ratio (HR) 21.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 9.19-50.1; p < 0.001], but not different from that for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone (HR 1.94, 95% CI 0.63-5.99; p = 0.25). Within the limited power of this study, there was no evidence that a monoallelic MUTYH gene mutation confers additional risk of colorectal cancer for carriers of a MMR gene mutation alone. Our finding suggests MUTYH mutation testing in MMR gene mutation carriers is not clinically informative.

  19. Do mutator mutations fuel tumorigenesis?

    PubMed

    Fox, Edward J; Prindle, Marc J; Loeb, Lawrence A

    2013-12-01

    The mutator phenotype hypothesis proposes that the mutation rate of normal cells is insufficient to account for the large number of mutations found in human cancers. Consequently, human tumors exhibit an elevated mutation rate that increases the likelihood of a tumor acquiring advantageous mutations. The hypothesis predicts that tumors are composed of cells harboring hundreds of thousands of mutations, as opposed to a small number of specific driver mutations, and that malignant cells within a tumor therefore constitute a highly heterogeneous population. As a result, drugs targeting specific mutated driver genes or even pathways of mutated driver genes will have only limited anticancer potential. In addition, because the tumor is composed of such a diverse cell population, tumor cells harboring drug-resistant mutations will exist prior to the administration of any chemotherapeutic agent. We present recent evidence in support of the mutator phenotype hypothesis, major arguments against this concept, and discuss the clinical consequences of tumor evolution fueled by an elevated mutation rate. We also consider the therapeutic possibility of altering the rate of mutation accumulation. Most significantly, we contend that there is a need to fundamentally reconsider current approaches to personalized cancer therapy. We propose that targeting cellular pathways that alter the rate of mutation accumulation in tumors will ultimately prove more effective than attempting to identify and target mutant driver genes or driver pathways.

  20. An in vivo mutation from leucine to tryptophan at position 210 in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase contributes to high-level resistance to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine.

    PubMed Central

    Hooker, D J; Tachedjian, G; Solomon, A E; Gurusinghe, A D; Land, S; Birch, C; Anderson, J L; Roy, B M; Arnold, E; Deacon, N J

    1996-01-01

    Sequencing of the reverse transcriptase (RT) region of 26 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates from eight patients treated with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) revealed a mutation at codon 210 from TTG (leucine) to TGG (tryptophan) exclusively in association with resistance to AZT. The mutation Trp-210 was observed in 15 of the 20 isolates phenotypically resistant to AZT, being more commonly observed than resistance-associated mutations at codons 67, 70, and 219. Trp-210 was never observed before the emergence of resistance-associated mutations Leu-41 and Tyr-215, and in a sequential series of five isolates from one patient the order of emergence of mutations was found to be Tyr-215, Leu-41, and then Trp-210. Trp-210 was also found in association with the Leu-41, Asn-67, Arg-70, and Tyr-215 resistance genotype. To define the role of Trp-210 in AZT resistance, molecular HIV-1 clones were constructed with various combinations of RT mutations at codons 41, 67, 70, 210, and 215 and tested for susceptibility to AZT. In clones with polymerase genes derived either from HXB2-D or clinical isolates, Trp-210 alone did not increase AZT resistance, whereas in conjunction with Leu-41 and Tyr-215, Trp-210 contributed to high-level resistance (50% inhibitory concentration of >1 microM). In HXB2-D, Trp-210 with Tyr-215 generated a virus with resistance comparable to one with Leu-41, Tyr-215, and Trp-210. Inserting Trp-210 into the genetic context of mutations at codons 41, 67, 70, and 215 further enhanced resistance from a 50% inhibitory concentration of 1.44 microM to 8.41 microM. Molecular modeling of the tertiary structure of HIV-1 RT revealed that the distance between the side chains of Trp-210 (in helix alphaF) and Tyr-215 (in strand beta11a) approximated 4 A (1 A = 0.1 nm), sufficiently close to result in significant energetic interaction between these two aromatic side chains. In conclusion, Trp-210 contributes significantly to phenotypic AZT resistance of

  1. Breast and ovarian cancer screening of non-carriers from BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families: 2-year follow-up of cohorts from France and Quebec.

    PubMed

    Dorval, Michel; Noguès, Catherine; Berthet, Pascaline; Chiquette, Jocelyne; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Lasset, Christine; Picard, Claude; Plante, Marie; Simard, Jacques; Julian-Reynier, Claire

    2011-05-01

    We described and compared breast and ovarian screening practices in the 2-year period following test result disclosure in female non-carriers from BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families living in two countries, France and Quebec, Canada, which provide universal health care. Four hundred and two (France n=293; Quebec n=109) unaffected female non-carriers from BRCA-proven mutation families provided information about the uptake of mammography, clinical breast examination, breast self-examination, and ovarian ultrasounds using self-administered questionnaires. The frequency of screening practices between study cohorts were compared using logistic regression. Annual mammography was conducted in 23 and 43% of French and Quebecer women participants <50 years of age, respectively (adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=2.72; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.08-6.81). In women ≥ 50 years of age, mammography was conducted in 49 and 65% of French and Quebecer participants (aOR=1.77; 95% CI, 0.07-4.51). Overall, 33% of French women and 39% of Quebecer women underwent at least one ovarian ultrasound during the 2-year period following BRCA1/2 test result with no significant difference between cohorts of women < 50 years of age. Among older women, Quebecers reported more frequently than French women that they had undergone ultrasound once (aOR=3.00; 95% CI, 1.02-8.83). The frequency of cancer screening practices for female non-carriers from BRCA1/2 mutation-positive families in both France and Quebec exceeded those recommended for similarly aged women in the general population. Our findings highlight the need for clearcut recommendations on the follow-up of women from BRCA1/2 families who are not themselves carriers of a BRCA1/2 mutation.

  2. A single mutation in MCCC1 or MCCC2 as a potential cause of positive screening for 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Morscher, Raphael J; Grünert, Sarah Catharina; Bürer, Céline; Burda, Patricie; Suormala, Terttu; Fowler, Brian; Baumgartner, Matthias R

    2012-04-01

    Isolated 3-Methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (MCC deficiency) is an organic aciduria presenting with a highly variable phenotype and has been part of newborn screening programs in various countries, in particular in the US. Here we present enzymatic and genetic characterisation of 22 individuals with increased 3-hydroxyisovalerylcarnitine and/or 3-methylcrotonylglycine suggesting MCC deficiency, but only partially reduced 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase activity. Among these, 21 carried a single mutant allele in either MCCC1 (n=20) or MCCC2 (n=1). Our results suggest that heterozygosity for such a single deleterious mutation may lead to misdiagnosis of MCC deficiency.

  3. Familial T‐cell non‐Hodgkin lymphoma caused by biallelic MSH2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Richard H; Homfray, Tessa; Huxter, Nicola L; Mitton, Sally G; Nash, Ruth; Potter, Mike N; Lancaster, Donna; Rahman, Nazneen

    2007-01-01

    Familial non‐Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is rare and in most cases, no underlying cause is identifiable. We report homozygous truncating mutations in the mismatch repair gene MSH2 (226C→T; Q76X) in three siblings who each developed T‐cell NHL in early childhood. All three children had hyperpigmented and hypopigmented skin lesions. Constitutional biallelic MSH2 mutations have previously been reported in five individuals, all of whom developed malignancy in childhood. Familial lymphoma has not been reported in this context or in association with biallelic mutations in the other mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH6 or PMS2. In addition, hypopigmented skin lesions have not previously been reported in biallelic MSH2 carriers. Our findings therefore expand the spectrum of phenotypes associated with biallelic MSH2 mutations and identify a new cause of familial lymphoma. Moreover, the diagnosis has important management implications as it allows the avoidance of chemotherapeutic agents likely to be ineffective and mutagenic in the proband, and the provision of cascade genetic testing and tumour screening for relatives. PMID:17601929

  4. Prevalence of HIV-1 Subtypes and Drug Resistance-Associated Mutations in HIV-1-Positive Treatment-Naive Pregnant Women in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo (Kento-Mwana Project).

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, Bianca; Saladini, Francesco; Sticchi, Laura; Mayinda Mboungou, Franc A; Barresi, Renata; Caligiuri, Patrizia; Calzi, Anna; Zazzi, Maurizio; Icardi, Giancarlo; Viscoli, Claudio; Bisio, Francesca

    2015-08-01

    The Kento-Mwana project was carried out in Pointe Noire, Republic of the Congo, to prevent mother-to-child HIV-1 transmission. To determine the prevalence of different subtypes and transmitted drug resistance-associated mutations, 95 plasma samples were collected at baseline from HIV-1-positive naive pregnant women enrolled in the project during the years 2005-2008. Full protease and partial reverse transcriptase sequencing was performed and 68/95 (71.6%) samples were successfully sequenced. Major mutations to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors were detected in 4/68 (5.9%), 3/68 (4.4%), and 2/68 (2.9%) samples, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of HIV-1 isolates showed a high prevalence of unique recombinant forms (24/68, 35%), followed by CRF45_cpx (7/68, 10.3%) and subsubtype A3 and subtype G (6/68 each, 8.8%). Although the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance mutations appears to be currently limited, baseline HIV-1 genotyping is highly advisable in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy scale-up in resource-limited settings to optimize treatment and prevent perinatal transmission. PMID:25970260

  5. Substitution of arginine for glycine at position 154 of the {alpha}1 chain of type I collagen in a variant of osteogenesis imperfecta: Comparison to previous cases with the same mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, J.; Tromp, G.; Kuivaniemi, H.; Prockop, D.J.; Castells, S.

    1996-01-11

    A substitution of arginine for glycine at amino acid position 154 of the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain was found in a father and his three children. The phenotype of the patients includes manifestations of types I and III/IV osteogenesis imperfecta, but appears to be milder than that of the previously described two unrelated patients that had the identical mutation in the {alpha}1(I) collagen chain. The variability in the phenotype raises the possibility of epistatic loci or environmental effects on expression of the disorder. 35 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Germline Mutations in Predisposition Genes in Pediatric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonson, Michael N.; Gruber, Tanja A.; Easton, John; Hedges, Dale; Ma, Xiaotu; Zhou, Xin; Yergeau, Donald A.; Wilkinson, Mark R.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Chen, Xiang; McGee, Rose B.; Hines-Dowell, Stacy; Nuccio, Regina; Quinn, Emily; Shurtleff, Sheila A.; Rusch, Michael; Patel, Aman; Becksfort, Jared B.; Wang, Shuoguo; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Gajjar, Amar; Ellison, David W.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Downing, James R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prevalence and spectrum of predisposing mutations among children and adolescents with cancer are largely unknown. Knowledge of such mutations may improve the understanding of tumorigenesis, direct patient care, and enable genetic counseling of patients and families. METHODS In 1120 patients younger than 20 years of age, we sequenced the whole genomes (in 595 patients), whole exomes (in 456), or both (in 69). We analyzed the DNA sequences of 565 genes, including 60 that have been associated with autosomal dominant cancer-predisposition syndromes, for the presence of germline mutations. The pathogenicity of the mutations was determined by a panel of medical experts with the use of cancer-specific and locus-specific genetic databases, the medical literature, computational predictions, and second hits identified in the tumor genome. The same approach was used to analyze data from 966 persons who did not have known cancer in the 1000 Genomes Project, and a similar approach was used to analyze data from an autism study (from 515 persons with autism and 208 persons without autism). RESULTS Mutations that were deemed to be pathogenic or probably pathogenic were identified in 95 patients with cancer (8.5%), as compared with 1.1% of the persons in the 1000 Genomes Project and 0.6% of the participants in the autism study. The most commonly mutated genes in the affected patients were TP53 (in 50 patients), APC (in 6), BRCA2 (in 6), NF1 (in 4), PMS2 (in 4), RB1 (in 3), and RUNX1 (in 3). A total of 18 additional patients had protein-truncating mutations in tumor-suppressor genes. Of the 58 patients with a predisposing mutation and available information on family history, 23 (40%) had a family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Germline mutations in cancer-predisposing genes were identified in 8.5% of the children and adolescents with cancer. Family history did not predict the presence of an underlying predisposition syndrome in most patients. (Funded by the American

  7. A mutational mimic analysis of histone H3 post-translational modifications: specific sites influence the conformational state of H3/H4, causing either positive or negative supercoiling of DNA.

    PubMed

    White, Rachel H; Keberlein, Melissa; Jackson, Vaughn

    2012-10-16

    Histone H3 has specific sites of post-translational modifications that serve as epigenetic signals to cellular machinery to direct various processes. Mutational mimics of these modifications (glutamine for acetylation, methionine and leucine for methylation, and glutamic acid for phosphorylation) were constructed at the relevant sites of the major histone variant, H3.2, and their effects on the conformational equilibrium of the H3/H4 tetramer at physiological ionic strength were determined when bound to or free of DNA. The deposition vehicle used for this analysis was NAP1, nucleosome assembly protein 1. Acetylation mimics in the N-terminus preferentially stabilized the left-handed conformer (DNA negatively supercoiled), and mutations within the globular region preferred the right-handed conformer (DNA positively supercoiled). The methylation mimics in the N-terminus tended to maintain characteristics similar to those of wild-type H3/H4; i.e., the conformational equilibrium maintains similar levels of both left- and right-handed conformers. Phosphorylation mimics facilitated a mixed effect, i.e., when at serines, the left-handed conformer, and at threonines, a mixture of both conformers. When double mutations were present, the conformational equilibrium was shifted dramatically, either leftward or rightward depending on the specific sites. In contrast, these mutations tended not to affect the direction and extent of supercoiling for variants H3.1 and H3.3. Variant H3.3 promoted only the left-handed conformer, and H3.1 tended to maintain both conformers. Additional experiments indicate the importance of a propagation mechanism for ensuring the formation of a particular superhelical state over an extended region of the DNA. The potential relevance of these results to the maintenance of epigenetic information on a gene is discussed.

  8. A mutational mimic analysis of histone H3 post-translational modifications: specific sites influence the conformational state of H3/H4, causing either positive or negative supercoiling of DNA.

    PubMed

    White, Rachel H; Keberlein, Melissa; Jackson, Vaughn

    2012-10-16

    Histone H3 has specific sites of post-translational modifications that serve as epigenetic signals to cellular machinery to direct various processes. Mutational mimics of these modifications (glutamine for acetylation, methionine and leucine for methylation, and glutamic acid for phosphorylation) were constructed at the relevant sites of the major histone variant, H3.2, and their effects on the conformational equilibrium of the H3/H4 tetramer at physiological ionic strength were determined when bound to or free of DNA. The deposition vehicle used for this analysis was NAP1, nucleosome assembly protein 1. Acetylation mimics in the N-terminus preferentially stabilized the left-handed conformer (DNA negatively supercoiled), and mutations within the globular region preferred the right-handed conformer (DNA positively supercoiled). The methylation mimics in the N-terminus tended to maintain characteristics similar to those of wild-type H3/H4; i.e., the conformational equilibrium maintains similar levels of both left- and right-handed conformers. Phosphorylation mimics facilitated a mixed effect, i.e., when at serines, the left-handed conformer, and at threonines, a mixture of both conformers. When double mutations were present, the conformational equilibrium was shifted dramatically, either leftward or rightward depending on the specific sites. In contrast, these mutations tended not to affect the direction and extent of supercoiling for variants H3.1 and H3.3. Variant H3.3 promoted only the left-handed conformer, and H3.1 tended to maintain both conformers. Additional experiments indicate the importance of a propagation mechanism for ensuring the formation of a particular superhelical state over an extended region of the DNA. The potential relevance of these results to the maintenance of epigenetic information on a gene is discussed. PMID:23003102

  9. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes.

  10. Genome Destabilizing Mutator Alleles Drive Specific Mutational Trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, Peter C.; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J. M.; Hieter, Philip

    2014-01-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13–Stn1–Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes. PMID:24336748

  11. Majority of hMLH1 mutations responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer cluster at the exonic region 15-16

    SciTech Connect

    Wijnen, J.; Khan, P.M.; Klift, H. van der

    1996-02-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a common autosomal dominant cancer susceptibility condition. Inherited mutations in at least four DNA mismatch repair genes, hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2, are known to cause HNPCC. In this study we used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to screen for hMLH1 mutations in 34 unrelated HNPCC families (30 Dutch, 3 Italian, and 1 Danish). Ten novel pathogenic germ-line mutations (seven affecting splice sites, two frameshifts, and one in-frame deletion of a single amino acid) have been identified in 12 (35%) of these families. In a previous study, hMSH2 mutations were found in 21% of the same families. While the spectrum of mutations at the hMSH2 gene among HNPCC patients appears heterogeneous, a cluster of hMLH1 mutations has been found in the region encompassing exons 15 and 16, which accounts for 50% of all the independent hMLH1 mutations described to date and for >20% of the unrelated HNPCC kindreds here analyzed. This unexpected finding has a great practical value in the clinical scenario of genetic services. 34 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Majority of hMLH1 mutations responsible for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer cluster at the exonic region 15-16.

    PubMed Central

    Wijnen, J.; Khan, P. M.; Vasen, H.; Menko, F.; van der Klift, H.; van den Broek, M.; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, I.; Nagengast, F.; Meijers-Heijboer, E. J.; Lindhout, D.; Griffioen, G.; Cats, A.; Kleibeuker, J.; Varesco, L.; Bertario, L.; Bisgaard, M. L.; Mohr, J.; Kolodner, R.; Fodde, R.

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a common autosomal dominant cancer susceptibility condition. Inherited mutations in at least four DNA mismatch repair genes, hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, and hPMS2, are known to cause HNPCC. In this study we used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to screen for hMLH1 mutations in 34 unrelated HNPCC families (30 Dutch, 3 Italian, and 1 Danish). Ten novel pathogenic germ-line mutations (seven affecting splice sites, two frameshifts, and one in-frame deletion of a single amino acid) have been identified in 12 (35%) of these families. In a previous study, hMSH2 mutations were found in 21% of the same families. While the spectrum of mutations at the hMSH2 gene among HNPCC patients appears heterogeneous, a cluster of hMLH1 mutations has been found in the region encompassing exons 15 and 16, which accounts for 50% of all the independent hMLH1 mutations described to date and for > 20% of the unrelated HNPCC kindreds here analyzed. This unexpected finding has a great practical value in the clinical scenario of genetic services. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 PMID:8571956

  13. Prenatal monitoring in a family at high risk for ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency: A new mutation of an A-to-C transversion in position +4 of intron 1 of the OTC gene that is likely to abolish enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hoshide, Ryuuji; Matsuura, Toshinobu; Endo, Fumio

    1996-08-23

    DNA analysis of a male propositus with ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency documented an A-to-C substitution in position +4 of intron 1. No other abnormalities were observed in the OTC gene, or at 563 bp upstream of the 5{prime} site, which included a promoter region, or at 383 bp downstream of the termination codon, which included a polyadenylation signal sequence. This mutation produces an RsaI site in the sequence, which was used for prenatal monitoring in the fourth and fifth pregnancies. DNA from amniotic cells in the former case were positive for RsaI digestion and the SRY gene (sex determinant region Y), indicating hemizygosity for the mutant allele. OTC activity was not measureable, and mRNA of the OTC gene was not detected by Northern blotting in the affected fetal liver. RT-PCR (reverse transcription-PCR) demonstrated only the wild-type allele. Thus, the mutation interferes with RNA processing, and an extremely low amount of normally spliced mRNA for the OTC gene seems to have caused the disease in our patient. The fetus of the fifth pregnancy was a normal male, as confirmed postnatally. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Spectroscopic characterization of mutations at the Phe41 position in the distal haem pocket of horseradish peroxidase C: structural and functional consequences.

    PubMed

    Heering, Hendrik A; Smith, Andrew T; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2002-05-01

    Three mutants of horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRPC) have been constructed in which the conserved distal aromatic residue Phe(41) has been substituted by Trp, Val or Ala and the properties of the mutant proteins have been compared with that of the wild-type. The ferric and ferrous states have been studied by resonance Raman, electronic absorption and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopies, together with their respective fluoride and CO complexes as probes for the integrity of the distal haem-pocket hydrogen-bonding network. The catalytic properties of the mutants, most notably the HRPC-mutant Phe(41)-->Trp (F41W) variant, were also affected. Structural modelling suggests that the bulky indole group of the F41W mutant blocks the distal cavity, inhibiting the binding of fluoride and CO to the haem iron, severely impairing the reaction of the enzyme with H(2)O(2) to form Compound I. Substitution with the smaller side-chain residues Val or Ala resulted in a 2-fold increase in the affinity of the mutants for the aromatic donor benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) compared with the wild-type, whereas the sterically hindered F41W mutant was not able to bind BHA at all. All the mutations studied increased the amount of a ferric six-coordinate aquo-high-spin species. On the other hand, the similarity in the Fe-Im stretching frequencies of the mutants and wild-type protein suggests that the distal haem-pocket mutations do not cause any substantive changes on the proximal side of the haem. Spectra of the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Ala-CO and the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Val-CO complexes strongly suggested a weakening of the interaction between CO and Arg(38) due to a secondary rearrangement of the haem relative to helix B. The effects observed for these HRP mutants were somewhat different from those noted recently for the analogous Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) mutants, particularly the Trp mutant. These differences can be reconciled in part as being due to the smaller size of the

  15. Spectroscopic characterization of mutations at the Phe41 position in the distal haem pocket of horseradish peroxidase C: structural and functional consequences.

    PubMed Central

    Heering, Hendrik A; Smith, Andrew T; Smulevich, Giulietta

    2002-01-01

    Three mutants of horseradish peroxidase isoenzyme C (HRPC) have been constructed in which the conserved distal aromatic residue Phe(41) has been substituted by Trp, Val or Ala and the properties of the mutant proteins have been compared with that of the wild-type. The ferric and ferrous states have been studied by resonance Raman, electronic absorption and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopies, together with their respective fluoride and CO complexes as probes for the integrity of the distal haem-pocket hydrogen-bonding network. The catalytic properties of the mutants, most notably the HRPC-mutant Phe(41)-->Trp (F41W) variant, were also affected. Structural modelling suggests that the bulky indole group of the F41W mutant blocks the distal cavity, inhibiting the binding of fluoride and CO to the haem iron, severely impairing the reaction of the enzyme with H(2)O(2) to form Compound I. Substitution with the smaller side-chain residues Val or Ala resulted in a 2-fold increase in the affinity of the mutants for the aromatic donor benzhydroxamic acid (BHA) compared with the wild-type, whereas the sterically hindered F41W mutant was not able to bind BHA at all. All the mutations studied increased the amount of a ferric six-coordinate aquo-high-spin species. On the other hand, the similarity in the Fe-Im stretching frequencies of the mutants and wild-type protein suggests that the distal haem-pocket mutations do not cause any substantive changes on the proximal side of the haem. Spectra of the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Ala-CO and the HRPC mutant Phe(41)-->Val-CO complexes strongly suggested a weakening of the interaction between CO and Arg(38) due to a secondary rearrangement of the haem relative to helix B. The effects observed for these HRP mutants were somewhat different from those noted recently for the analogous Coprinus cinereus peroxidase (CIP) mutants, particularly the Trp mutant. These differences can be reconciled in part as being due to the smaller size of the

  16. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis. PMID:26898890

  17. Positive Control Mutations in the MyoD Basic Region Fail to Show Cooperative DNA Binding and Transcriptional Activation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengal, Eyal; Flores, Osvaldo; Rangarajan, Pundi N.; Chen, Amy; Weintraub, Harold; Verma, Inder M.

    1994-06-01

    An in vitro transcription system from HeLa cells has been established in which MyoD and E47 proteins activate transcription both as homodimers and heterodimers. However, heterodimers activate transcription more efficiently than homodimers, and function synergistically from multiple binding sites. Positive control mutants in the basic region of MyoD that have previously been shown to be defective in initiating the myogenic program, can bind DNA but have lost their ability to function as transcriptional activators in vitro. Additionally, positive control mutants, unlike wild-type MyoD, fail to bind cooperatively to DNA. We propose that binding of MyoD complexes to high affinity MyoD binding sites induces conformational changes that facilitate cooperative binding to multiple sites and promote transcriptional activation.

  18. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010-2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%-2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%-10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB.

  19. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010–2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%–2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%–3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%–7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%–10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  20. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010-2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%-2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%-10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  1. Myopathy-causing Q147P TPM2 mutation shifts tropomyosin strands further towards the open position and increases the proportion of strong-binding cross-bridges during the ATPase cycle.

    PubMed

    Karpicheva, Olga E; Simonyan, Armen O; Kuleva, Nadezhda V; Redwood, Charles S; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2016-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction in congenital myopathies remain unclear. The present study examines the effect of a myopathy-causing mutation Q147P in β-tropomyosin on the position of tropomyosin on troponin-free filaments and on the actin–myosin interaction at different stages of the ATP hydrolysis cycle using the technique of polarized fluorimetry. Wild-type and Q147P recombinant tropomyosins, actin, and myosin subfragment-1 were modified by 5-IAF, 1,5-IAEDANS or FITC-phalloidin, and 1,5-IAEDANS, respectively, and incorporated into single ghost muscle fibers, containing predominantly actin filaments which were free of troponin and tropomyosin. Despite its reduced affinity for actin in co-sedimentation assay, the Q147P mutant incorporates into the muscle fiber. However, compared to wild-type tropomyosin, it locates closer to the center of the actin filament. The mutant tropomyosin increases the proportion of the strong-binding myosin heads and disrupts the co-operation of actin and myosin heads during the ATPase cycle. These changes are likely to underlie the contractile abnormalities caused by this mutation.

  2. Myopathy-causing Q147P TPM2 mutation shifts tropomyosin strands further towards the open position and increases the proportion of strong-binding cross-bridges during the ATPase cycle.

    PubMed

    Karpicheva, Olga E; Simonyan, Armen O; Kuleva, Nadezhda V; Redwood, Charles S; Borovikov, Yurii S

    2016-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction in congenital myopathies remain unclear. The present study examines the effect of a myopathy-causing mutation Q147P in β-tropomyosin on the position of tropomyosin on troponin-free filaments and on the actin–myosin interaction at different stages of the ATP hydrolysis cycle using the technique of polarized fluorimetry. Wild-type and Q147P recombinant tropomyosins, actin, and myosin subfragment-1 were modified by 5-IAF, 1,5-IAEDANS or FITC-phalloidin, and 1,5-IAEDANS, respectively, and incorporated into single ghost muscle fibers, containing predominantly actin filaments which were free of troponin and tropomyosin. Despite its reduced affinity for actin in co-sedimentation assay, the Q147P mutant incorporates into the muscle fiber. However, compared to wild-type tropomyosin, it locates closer to the center of the actin filament. The mutant tropomyosin increases the proportion of the strong-binding myosin heads and disrupts the co-operation of actin and myosin heads during the ATPase cycle. These changes are likely to underlie the contractile abnormalities caused by this mutation. PMID:26708479

  3. KRAS mutation-positive bronchial surface epithelium (BSE)-type lung adenocarcinoma with strong expression of TTF-1: a case providing a further insight as for the role of TTF-1 in the oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Takanashi, Yusuke; Tajima, Shogo; Hayakawa, Takamitsu; Neyatani, Hiroshi; Funai, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Bronchial surface epithelium (BSE)-type lung adenocarcinoma is a subtype of non-terminal respiratory unit (TRU)-type lung adenocarcinoma originating in the bronchial surface epithelium. However, there are few known cases of BSE-type adenocarcinoma with marked expression of thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1). This paper describes a very rare case of KRAS mutation-positive BSE-type adenocarcinoma that exhibited strong expression of TTF-1 that was putatively involved in oncogenesis. An 84-year-old woman, a never smoker, was referred to our hospital because of an abnormal chest radiograph. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed a solid mass lesion, 15 mm × 10 mm, with a relatively smooth margin in the left upper lobe. The patient underwent partial resection of the left upper lobe for strongly suspected lung cancer with a clinical stage of cT1aN0M0. Histopathological findings showed continuous migration of papillary, hyperplastic, atypical columnar tumor cells originating from normal bronchial surface epithelium, leading to a diagnosis of BSE-type adenocarcinoma. TTF-1 was strongly expressed in almost 100% of the tumor cells, which tested positive for the KRAS mutation. TTF-1 has recently attracted attention as an oncogene, and it is purportedly involved in the carcinogenesis and survival of lung adenocarcinoma cells. There is typically an inverse correlation between the respective expressions of KRAS and TTF-1, but in the present study, they appeared simultaneously and were both putatively involved as oncogenic driver alterations. This case is important in that it sheds some light on the largely unknown pathogenic mechanism of BSE-type adenocarcinoma.

  4. Pre-clinical evidence of PIM kinase inhibitor activity in BCR-ABL1 unmutated and mutated Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Curi, Dany A.; Beauchamp, Elspeth M.; Blyth, Gavin T.; Arslan, Ahmet Dirim; Donato, Nicholas J.; Giles, Francis J.; Altman, Jessica K.; Platanias, Leonidas C.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of targeting the PIM kinase pathway in Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) leukemias. We provide evidence that inhibition of PIM, with the pan-PIM inhibitor SGI-1776, results in suppression of classic PIM effectors and also elements of the mTOR pathway, suggesting interplay between PIM and mTOR signals. Our data demonstrate that PIM inhibition enhances the effects of imatinib mesylate on Ph+ leukemia cells. We also found that PIM inhibition results in suppression of leukemic cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis of Ph+ leukemia cells, including those resistant to imatinib mesylate. Importantly, inhibition of PIM results in enhanced suppression of primary leukemic progenitors from patients with CML. Altogether these findings suggest that pharmacological PIM targeting may provide a unique therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ph+ leukemias. PMID:26375673

  5. The contribution of deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and the mismatch repair genes to ovarian cancer in the population.

    PubMed

    Song, Honglin; Cicek, Mine S; Dicks, Ed; Harrington, Patricia; Ramus, Susan J; Cunningham, Julie M; Fridley, Brooke L; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Alsop, Jennifer; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Gayther, Simon A; Goode, Ellen L; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of deleterious mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in the population. The coding sequence and splice site boundaries of all six genes were amplified in germline DNA from 2240 invasive EOC cases and 1535 controls. Barcoded fragment libraries were sequenced using the Illumina GAII or HiSeq and sequence data for each subject de-multiplexed prior to interpretation. GATK and Annovar were used for variant detection and annotation. After quality control 2222 cases (99.2%) and 1528 controls (99.5%) were included in the final analysis. We identified 193 EOC cases (8.7%) carrying a deleterious mutation in at least one gene compared with 10 controls (0.65%). Mutations were most frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with 84 EOC cases (3.8%) carrying a BRCA1 mutation and 94 EOC cases (4.2%) carrying a BRCA2 mutation. The combined BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence was 11% in high-grade serous disease. Seventeen EOC cases carried a mutation in a mismatch repair gene, including 10 MSH6 mutation carriers (0.45%) and 4 MSH2 mutation carriers (0.18%). At least 1 in 10 women with high-grade serous EOC has a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The development of next generation sequencing technologies enables rapid mutation screening for multiple susceptibility genes at once, suggesting that routine clinical testing of all incidence cases should be considered.

  6. The contribution of deleterious germline mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2 and the mismatch repair genes to ovarian cancer in the population

    PubMed Central

    Song, Honglin; Cicek, Mine S.; Dicks, Ed; Harrington, Patricia; Ramus, Susan J.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Alsop, Jennifer; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Gayther, Simon A.; Goode, Ellen L.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of deleterious mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2 to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in the population. The coding sequence and splice site boundaries of all six genes were amplified in germline DNA from 2240 invasive EOC cases and 1535 controls. Barcoded fragment libraries were sequenced using the Illumina GAII or HiSeq and sequence data for each subject de-multiplexed prior to interpretation. GATK and Annovar were used for variant detection and annotation. After quality control 2222 cases (99.2%) and 1528 controls (99.5%) were included in the final analysis. We identified 193 EOC cases (8.7%) carrying a deleterious mutation in at least one gene compared with 10 controls (0.65%). Mutations were most frequent in BRCA1 and BRCA2, with 84 EOC cases (3.8%) carrying a BRCA1 mutation and 94 EOC cases (4.2%) carrying a BRCA2 mutation. The combined BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation prevalence was 11% in high-grade serous disease. Seventeen EOC cases carried a mutation in a mismatch repair gene, including 10 MSH6 mutation carriers (0.45%) and 4 MSH2 mutation carriers (0.18%). At least 1 in 10 women with high-grade serous EOC has a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation. The development of next generation sequencing technologies enables rapid mutation screening for multiple susceptibility genes at once, suggesting that routine clinical testing of all incidence cases should be considered. PMID:24728189

  7. Mutation rate evolution in replicator dynamics.

    PubMed

    Allen, Benjamin; Rosenbloom, Daniel I Scholes

    2012-11-01

    The mutation rate of an organism is itself evolvable. In stable environments, if faithful replication is costless, theory predicts that mutation rates will evolve to zero. However, positive mutation rates can evolve in novel or fluctuating environments, as analytical and empirical studies have shown. Previous work on this question has focused on environments that fluctuate independently of the evolving population. Here we consider fluctuations that arise from frequency-dependent selection in the evolving population itself. We investigate how the dynamics of competing traits can induce selective pressure on the rates of mutation between these traits. To address this question, we introduce a theoretical framework combining replicator dynamics and adaptive dynamics. We suppose that changes in mutation rates are rare, compared to changes in the traits under direct selection, so that the expected evolutionary trajectories of mutation rates can be obtained from analysis of pairwise competition between strains of different rates. Depending on the nature of frequency-dependent trait dynamics, we demonstrate three possible outcomes of this competition. First, if trait frequencies are at a mutation-selection equilibrium, lower mutation rates can displace higher ones. Second, if trait dynamics converge to a heteroclinic cycle-arising, for example, from "rock-paper-scissors" interactions-mutator strains succeed against non-mutators. Third, in cases where selection alone maintains all traits at positive frequencies, zero and nonzero mutation rates can coexist indefinitely. Our second result suggests that relatively high mutation rates may be observed for traits subject to cyclical frequency-dependent dynamics.

  8. Efficacy of the dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 in combination with nilotinib against BCR-ABL-positive leukemia cells involves the ABL kinase domain mutation

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Seiichi; Tauchi, Tetsuzo; Tanaka, Yuko; Kitahara, Toshihiko; Kimura, Shinya; Maekawa, Taira; Ohyashiki, Kazuma

    2014-01-01

    Imatinib, an ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), has shown clinical efficacy against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a substantial number of patients develop resistance to imatinib treatment due to the emergence of clones carrying mutations in the protein BCR-ABL. The phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates various processes, including cell proliferation, cell survival, and antiapoptosis activity. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor, using BCR-ABL-positive cell lines. Treatment with NVP-BEZ235 for 48 h inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis. The phosphorylation of the AKT kinase, eukaryotic initiation factor 4-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), and p70 S6 kinase were decreased after NVP-BEZ235 treatment. The combination of NVP-BEZ235 with a BCR-ABL kinase inhibitor, imatinib, or nilotinib, induced a more pronounced colony growth inhibition, whereas the combination of NVP-BEZ235 and nilotinib was more effective in inducing apoptosis and reducing the phosphorylation of AKT, 4E-BP1, and S6 kinase. NVP-BEZ235 in combination with nilotinib also inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft model and inhibited the growth of primary T315I mutant cells and ponatinib-resistant cells. Taken together, these results suggest that administration of the dual PI3K and mTOR inhibitor NVP-BEZ235 may be an effective strategy against BCR-ABL mutant cells and may enhance the cytotoxic effects of nilotinib in ABL TKI-resistant BCR-ABL mutant cells. PMID:24100660

  9. The Contribution of Whole Gene Deletions and Large Rearrangements to the Mutation Spectrum in Inherited Tumor Predisposing Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Miriam J; Urquhart, Jill E; Harkness, Elaine F; Miles, Emma K; Bowers, Naomi L; Byers, Helen J; Bulman, Michael; Gokhale, Carolyn; Wallace, Andrew J; Newman, William G; Evans, D Gareth

    2016-03-01

    Heterozygous whole gene deletions (WGDs), and intragenic microdeletions, account for a significant proportion of mutations underlying cancer predisposition syndromes. We analyzed the frequency and genotype-phenotype correlations of microdeletions in 12 genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, MSH2, MLH1, MSH6, PMS2, NF1, NF2, APC, PTCH1, and VHL) representing seven tumor predisposition syndromes in 5,897 individuals (2,611 families) from our center. Overall, microdeletions accounted for 14% of identified mutations. As expected, smaller deletions or duplications were more common (12%) than WGDs (2.2%). Where a WGD was identified in the germline in NF2, the mechanism of somatic second hit was not deletion, as previously described for NF1. For neurofibromatosis type 1 and 2, we compared the mechanism of germline deletion. Unlike NF1, where three specific deletion sizes account for most germline WGDs, NF2 deletion breakpoints were different across seven samples tested. One of these deletions was 3.93 Mb and conferred a severe phenotype, thus refining the region for a potential NF2 modifier gene to a 2.04-Mb region on chromosome 22. The milder phenotype of NF2 WGDs may be due to the apparent absence of chromosome 22 loss as the second hit. These observations of WGD phenotypes will be helpful for interpreting incidental findings from microarray analysis and next-generation sequencing. PMID:26615784

  10. Selection of a Mutant of Escherichia coli Which Has High Mutation Rates

    PubMed Central

    Helling, Robert B.

    1968-01-01

    A mutation which causes high mutation rates in all other loci tested was induced with nitrosoguanidine and was selected through the ability of the progeny of such mutant cells to mutate to streptomycin resistance at a higher rate than the wild-type cells. This mutation (mut-2) and the Treffers' mutation (mutT1) mapped at approximately the same position to the right of leu. Specificity studies showed that the two mutations differ in rates of mutation produced. PMID:4879569

  11. Spectrum of mutations and genotype-phenotype analysis in Noonan syndrome patients with RIT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Yaoita, Masako; Niihori, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Seiji; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Hayashi, Shion; Watanabe, Atsushi; Yokozawa, Masato; Suzumura, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Akihiko; Nakano, Yusuke; Hokosaki, Tatsunori; Ohmori, Ayumi; Sawada, Hirofumi; Migita, Ohsuke; Mima, Aya; Lapunzina, Pablo; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Ogata, Tsutomu; Kawame, Hiroshi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Inoue, Shin-Ichi; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kure, Shigeo; Aoki, Yoko

    2016-02-01

    RASopathies are autosomal dominant disorders caused by mutations in more than 10 known genes that regulate the RAS/MAPK pathway. Noonan syndrome (NS) is a RASopathy characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, musculoskeletal abnormalities, and congenital heart defects. We have recently identified mutations in RIT1 in patients with NS. To delineate the clinical manifestations in RIT1 mutation-positive patients, we further performed a RIT1 analysis in RASopathy patients and identified 7 RIT1 mutations, including two novel mutations, p.A77S and p.A77T, in 14 of 186 patients. Perinatal abnormalities, including nuchal translucency, fetal hydrops, pleural effusion, or chylothorax and congenital heart defects, are observed in all RIT1 mutation-positive patients. Luciferase assays in NIH 3T3 cells demonstrated that the newly identified RIT1 mutants, including p.A77S and p.A77T, and the previously identified p.F82V, p.T83P, p.Y89H, and p.M90I, enhanced Elk1 transactivation. Genotype-phenotype correlation analyses of previously reported NS patients harboring RIT1, PTPN11, SOS1, RAF1, and KRAS revealed that hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (56 %) was more frequent in patients harboring a RIT1 mutation than in patients harboring PTPN11 (9 %) and SOS1 mutations (10 %). The rates of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were similar between patients harboring RIT1 mutations and patients harboring RAF1 mutations (75 %). Short stature (52 %) was less prevalent in patients harboring RIT1 mutations than in patients harboring PTPN11 (71 %) and RAF1 (83 %) mutations. These results delineate the clinical manifestations of RIT1 mutation-positive NS patients: high frequencies of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, atrial septal defects, and pulmonary stenosis; and lower frequencies of ptosis and short stature. PMID:26714497

  12. Distinct clinical characteristics of myeloproliferative neoplasms with calreticulin mutations

    PubMed Central

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Krahling, Tunde; Balassa, Katalin; Halm, Gabriella; Bors, Andras; Koszarska, Magdalena; Batai, Arpad; Dolgos, Janos; Csomor, Judit; Egyed, Miklos; Sipos, Andrea; Remenyi, Peter; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamas

    2014-01-01

    Somatic insertions/deletions in the calreticulin gene have recently been discovered to be causative alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms. A combination of qualitative and quantitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction, fragment-sizing, high resolution melting and Sanger-sequencing was applied for the detection of three driver mutations (in Janus kinase 2, calreticulin and myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene genes) in 289 cases of essential thrombocythemia and 99 cases of primary myelofibrosis. In essential thrombocythemia, 154 (53%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 96 (33%) calreticulin, 9 (3%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 30 triple-negative (11%) cases were identified, while in primary myelofibrosis 56 (57%) Janus kinase 2 V617F, 25 (25%) calreticulin, 7 (7%) myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogene gene mutation-positive and 11 (11%) triple-negative cases were identified. Patients positive for the calreticulin mutation were younger and had higher platelet counts compared to Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive counterparts. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with essential thrombocythemia showed a lower risk of developing venous thrombosis, but no difference in overall survival. Calreticulin mutation-positive patients with primary myelofibrosis had a better overall survival compared to that of the Janus kinase 2 mutation-positive (P=0.04) or triple-negative cases (P=0.01). Type 2 calreticulin mutation occurred more frequently in essential thrombocythemia than in primary myelofibrosis (P=0.049). In essential thrombocythemia, the calreticulin mutational load was higher than the Janus kinase 2 mutational load (P<0.001), and increased gradually in advanced stages. Calreticulin mutational load influenced blood counts even at the time point of diagnosis in essential thrombocythemia. We confirm that calreticulin mutation is associated with distinct clinical characteristics and explored relationships between mutation

  13. Why Are Phenotypic Mutation Rates Much Higher Than Genotypic Mutation Rates?

    PubMed Central

    Bürger, Reinhard; Willensdorfer, Martin; Nowak, Martin A.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of genotypic mutation rates has been investigated in numerous theoretical and experimental studies. Mutations, however, occur not only when copying DNA, but also when building the phenotype, especially when translating and transcribing DNA to RNA and protein. Here we study the effect of such phenotypic mutations. We find a maximum phenotypic mutation rate, umax, that is compatible with maintaining a certain function of the organism. This may be called a phenotypic error threshold. In particular, we find a minimum phenotypic mutation rate, umin, with the property that there is (nearly) no selection pressure to reduce the rate of phenotypic mutations below this value. If there is a cost for lowering the phenotypic mutation rate, then umin is close to the optimum phenotypic mutation rate that maximizes the fitness of the organism. In our model, there is selective pressure to decrease the rate of genotypic mutations to zero, but to decrease the rate of phenotypic mutations only to a positive value. Despite its simplicity, our model can explain part of the huge difference between genotypic and phenotypic mutation rates that is observed in nature. The relevant data are summarized. PMID:16143614

  14. Novel PORCN mutations in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Froyen, G; Govaerts, K; Van Esch, H; Verbeeck, J; Tuomi, M-L; Heikkilä, H; Torniainen, S; Devriendt, K; Fryns, J-P; Marynen, P; Järvelä, I; Ala-Mello, S

    2009-12-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), Goltz or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an X-linked dominant multisystem disorder characterized primarily by involvement of the skin, skeletal system and eyes. We screened for mutations in the PORCN gene in eight patients of Belgian and Finnish origin with firm clinical suspicion of FDH. First, we performed quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis to define the copy number at this locus. Next, we sequenced the coding regions and flanking intronic sequences of the PORCN gene. Three de novo mutations were identified in our patients with FDH: a 150-kb deletion removing six genes including PORCN, as defined by qPCR and X-array-CGH, and two heterozygous missense mutations; c.992T>G (p.L331R) in exon 11 and c.1094G>A (p.R365Q) in exon 13 of the gene. Both point mutations changed highly conserved amino acids and were not found in 300 control X chromosomes. The three patients in whom mutations were identified all present with characteristic dermal findings together with limb manifestations, which were not seen in our mutation-negative patients. The clinical characteristics of our patients with PORCN mutations were compared with the previously reported mutation-positive cases. In this report, we summarize the literature on PORCN mutations and associated phenotypes.

  15. Calreticulin Exon 9 Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Kyung

    2015-01-01

    Background Calreticulin (CALR) mutations were recently discovered in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We studied the frequency and type of CALR mutations and their hematological characteristics. Methods A total of 168 MPN patients (36 polycythemia vera [PV], 114 essential thrombocythemia [ET], and 18 primary myelofibrosis [PMF] cases) were included in the study. CALR mutation was analyzed by the direct sequencing method. Results CALR mutations were detected in 21.9% of ET and 16.7% of PMF patients, which accounted for 58.5% and 33.3% of ET and PMF patients without Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) or myeloproliferative leukemia virus oncogenes (MPL) mutations, respectively. A total of five types of mutation were detected, among which, L367fs*46 (53.6%) and K385fs*47 (35.7%) were found to be the most common. ET patients with CALR mutation had lower leukocyte counts and ages compared with JAK2-mutated ET patients. Conclusion Genotyping for CALR could be a useful diagnostic tool for JAK2-or MPL-negative ET or PMF patients. CALR mutation may be a distinct disease group, with different hematological characteristics than that of JAK2-positive patients. PMID:25553276

  16. Gene mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Amin, Nisar A; Malek, Sami N

    2016-04-01

    The recent discovery of genes mutated in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has stimulated new research into the role of these genes in CLL pathogenesis. CLL cases carry approximately 5-20 mutated genes per exome, a lower number than detected in many human tumors. Of the recurrently mutated genes in CLL, all are mutated in 10% or less of patients when assayed in unselected CLL cohorts at diagnosis. Mutations in TP53 are of major clinical relevance, are often associated with del17p and gain in frequency over time. TP53 mutated and associated del17p states substantially lower response rates, remission duration, and survival in CLL. Mutations in NOTCH1 and SF3B1 are recurrent, often associated with progressive CLL that is also IgVH unmutated and ZAP70-positive and are under investigation as targets for novel therapies and as factors influencing CLL outcome. There are an estimated 20-50 additional mutated genes with frequencies of 1%-5% in CLL; more work is needed to identify these and to study their significance. Finally, of the major biological aberration categories influencing CLL as a disease, gene mutations will need to be placed into context with regard to their ultimate role and importance. Such calibrated appreciation necessitates studies incorporating multiple CLL driver aberrations into biological and clinical analyses. PMID:27040699

  17. Evidence for presence of mismatch repair gene expression positive Lynch syndrome cases in India.

    PubMed

    Bashyam, Murali D; Kotapalli, Viswakalyan; Raman, Ratheesh; Chaudhary, Ajay K; Yadav, Brijesh K; Gowrishankar, Swarnalata; Uppin, Shantveer G; Kongara, Ravikanth; Sastry, Regulagadda A; Vamsy, Mohana; Patnaik, Sujit; Rao, Satish; Dsouza, Shoba; Desai, Devendra; Tester, Ashavaid

    2015-12-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common form of familial CRC predisposition that causes tumor onset at a young age, is characterized by the presence of microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumors due to germline inactivation of mismatch repair (MMR) system. Two MMR genes namely MLH1 and MSH2 account for majority of LS cases while MSH6 and PMS2 may account for a minor proportion. In order to identify MMR genes causing LS in India, we analyzed MSI and determined expression status of the four MMR genes in forty eight suspected LS patient colorectal tumor samples. Though a majority exhibited MSI, only 58% exhibited loss of MMR expression, a significantly low proportion compared to reports from other populations. PCR-DNA sequencing and MLPA-based mutation and exonic deletion/duplication screening respectively, revealed genetic lesions in samples with and without MMR gene expression. Interestingly, tumor samples with and without MMR expression exhibited significant differences with respect to histological (mucin content) and molecular (instability exhibited by mononucleotide microsatellites) features. The study has revealed for the first time a significant proportion of LS tumors not exhibiting loss of MMR expression.

  18. MutationAligner: a resource of recurrent mutation hotspots in protein domains in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Nicholas Paul; Reznik, Ed; Gao, Jianjiong; Sumer, Selcuk Onur; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris; Miller, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The MutationAligner web resource, available at http://www.mutationaligner.org, enables discovery and exploration of somatic mutation hotspots identified in protein domains in currently (mid-2015) more than 5000 cancer patient samples across 22 different tumor types. Using multiple sequence alignments of protein domains in the human genome, we extend the principle of recurrence analysis by aggregating mutations in homologous positions across sets of paralogous genes. Protein domain analysis enhances the statistical power to detect cancer-relevant mutations and links mutations to the specific biological functions encoded in domains. We illustrate how the MutationAligner database and interactive web tool can be used to explore, visualize and analyze mutation hotspots in protein domains across genes and tumor types. We believe that MutationAligner will be an important resource for the cancer research community by providing detailed clues for the functional importance of particular mutations, as well as for the design of functional genomics experiments and for decision support in precision medicine. MutationAligner is slated to be periodically updated to incorporate additional analyses and new data from cancer genomics projects. PMID:26590264

  19. Mutational landscape of yeast mutator strains.

    PubMed

    Serero, Alexandre; Jubin, Claire; Loeillet, Sophie; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Nicolas, Alain G

    2014-02-01

    The acquisition of mutations is relevant to every aspect of genetics, including cancer and evolution of species on Darwinian selection. Genome variations arise from rare stochastic imperfections of cellular metabolism and deficiencies in maintenance genes. Here, we established the genome-wide spectrum of mutations that accumulate in a WT and in nine Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutator strains deficient for distinct genome maintenance processes: pol32Δ and rad27Δ (replication), msh2Δ (mismatch repair), tsa1Δ (oxidative stress), mre11Δ (recombination), mec1Δ tel1Δ (DNA damage/S-phase checkpoints), pif1Δ (maintenance of mitochondrial genome and telomere length), cac1Δ cac3Δ (nucleosome deposition), and clb5Δ (cell cycle progression). This study reveals the diversity, complexity, and ultimate unique nature of each mutational spectrum, composed of punctual mutations, chromosomal structural variations, and/or aneuploidies. The mutations produced in clb5Δ/CCNB1, mec1Δ/ATR, tel1Δ/ATM, and rad27Δ/FEN1 strains extensively reshape the genome, following a trajectory dependent on previous events. It comprises the transmission of unstable genomes that lead to colony mosaicisms. This comprehensive analytical approach of mutator defects provides a model to understand how genome variations might accumulate during clonal evolution of somatic cell populations, including tumor cells.

  20. Reverse mutations in fragile X syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, W.T.; Nolin, S.; Houck, G.E.

    1994-09-01

    The fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited form of mental retardation. Yet new mutations have not been described and no affected child has been born to a carrier mother having less than 60 FMR-1 CGG triplet repeats. Reverse mutations also appear to be very rare. We have previously identified the daughter of a premutation mother (95 CGGs) who inherited a normal repeat size of 35 as a reverse mutation. In the process of carrier testing by PCR, we have now identified two additional females with reverse mutations. All three of these reverse mutation women were previously tested by linkage as part of known fragile X families (subsequently confirmed by direct analysis), and assigned a > 99% risk as a carrier. In the second family, the mother carries a premutation allele of 95 repeats and the daughter inherited a 43 repeat allele. Prior to direct DNA testing, she had a positive prenatal diagnosis by linkage (> 99% risk) and cytogenetics with 3/450 cells apparently positive. Subsequent retesting of the products of conception by PCR now reveals a 43 repeat allele from her carrier mother with an 82 repeat allele. Testing with close CA markers (FRAXAC1 and DXS548) confirmed that these women inherited the same chromosome and their full mutation brothers. Further analysis is pending. These examples of reverse mutations are the only ones we have identified in our study of offspring of more than 200 carriers (400+ meioses) examined to date. Therefore, we conclude the frequency of fragile X back mutations is likely to be less than 1%. Retesting of linkage positive carriers is recommended to detect reverse mutations and assure accurate genetic counseling.

  1. Mutation accumulation and fitness in mutator subpopulations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Maharjan, Ram P; Liu, Bin; Li, Yang; Reeves, Peter R; Wang, Lei; Ferenci, Thomas

    2013-02-23

    Bacterial populations in clinical and laboratory settings contain a significant proportion of mutants with elevated mutation rates (mutators). Mutators have a particular advantage when multiple beneficial mutations are needed for fitness, as in antibiotic resistance. Nevertheless, high mutation rates potentially lead to increasing numbers of deleterious mutations and subsequently to the decreased fitness of mutators. To test how fitness changed with mutation accumulation, genome sequencing and fitness assays of nine Escherichia coli mutY mutators were undertaken in an evolving chemostat population at three time points. Unexpectedly, the fitness in members of the mutator subpopulation became constant despite a growing number of mutations over time. To test if the accumulated mutations affected fitness, we replaced each of the known beneficial mutations with wild-type alleles in a mutator isolate. We found that the other 25 accumulated mutations were not deleterious. Our results suggest that isolates with deleterious mutations are eliminated by competition in a continuous culture, leaving mutators with mostly neutral mutations. Interestingly, the mutator-non-mutator balance in the population reversed after the fitness plateau of mutators was reached, suggesting that the mutator-non-mutator ratio in populations has more to do with competition between members of the population than the accumulation of deleterious mutations.

  2. Recurrent Somatic Mutations in Regulatory Regions of Human Cancer Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Melton, Collin; Reuter, Jason A.; Spacek, Damek V.; Snyder, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of gene expression in cancer can promote survival and proliferation of cancer cells. Here we integrate TCGA whole genome sequencing data of 436 patients from eight cancer subtypes with ENCODE and other regulatory annotations to identify point mutations in regulatory regions. We find evidence for positive selection of mutations in transcription factor binding sites, consistent with these sites regulating important cancer cell functions. Using a novel method that adjusts for sample- and genomic locus-specific mutation rate, we identify recurrently mutated sites across cancer patients. Mutated regulatory sites include known sites in the TERT promoter and many novel sites, including a subset in proximity to cancer genes. In reporter assays, two novel sites display decreased enhancer activity upon mutation. These data demonstrate that many regulatory regions contain mutations under selective pressure and suggest a larger role for regulatory mutations in cancer than previously appreciated. PMID:26053494

  3. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  4. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J.; Phillips, James G.; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H. Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84–4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25–11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  5. BRCC3 mutations in myeloid neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dayong; Nagata, Yasunobu; Grossmann, Vera; Radivoyevitch, Tomas; Okuno, Yusuke; Nagae, Genta; Hosono, Naoko; Schnittger, Susanne; Sanada, Masashi; Przychodzen, Bartlomiej; Kon, Ayana; Polprasert, Chantana; Shen, Wenyi; Clemente, Michael J; Phillips, James G; Alpermann, Tamara; Yoshida, Kenichi; Nadarajah, Niroshan; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Oakley, Kevin; Nguyen, Nhu; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koeffler, H Phillip; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Dugas, Martin; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Miyano, Satoru; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten; Du, Yang; Ogawa, Seishi; Makishima, Hideki

    2015-08-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies have provided insights into the molecular heterogeneity of various myeloid neoplasms, revealing previously unknown somatic genetic events. In our cohort of 1444 cases analyzed by next generation sequencing, somatic mutations in the gene BRCA1-BRCA2-containing complex 3 (BRCC3) were identified in 28 cases (1.9%). BRCC3 is a member of the JAMM/MPN+ family of zinc metalloproteases capable of cleaving Lys-63 linked polyubiquitin chains, and is implicated in DNA repair. The mutations were located throughout its coding region. The average variant allelic frequency of BRCC3 mutations was 30.1%, and by a serial sample analysis at two different time points a BRCC3 mutation was already identified in the initial stage of a myelodysplastic syndrome. BRCC3 mutations commonly occurred in nonsense (n=12), frameshift (n=4), and splice site (n=5) configurations. Due to the marginal male dominance (odds ratio; 2.00, 0.84-4.73) of BRCC3 mutations, the majority of mutations (n=23; 82%) were hemizygous. Phenotypically, BRCC3 mutations were frequently observed in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms and associated with -Y abnormality (odds ratio; 3.70, 1.25-11.0). Clinically, BRCC3 mutations were also related to higher age (P=0.01), although prognosis was not affected. Knockdown of Brcc3 gene expression in murine bone marrow lineage negative, Sca1 positive, c-kit positive cells resulted in 2-fold more colony formation and modest differentiation defect. Thus, BRCC3 likely plays a role as tumor-associated gene in myelodysplastic syndromes and myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms. PMID:26001790

  6. Clinical features and mismatch repair gene mutation screening in Chinese patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan-Run; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Zhen-Jun; Wan, Yuan-Lian; Huang, Yan-Ting

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominantly-inherited cancer-susceptibility syndrome that confers an increased risk for colorectal cancer and a variety of other tumors at a young age. It has been associated with germline mutations in five mismatch repair (MMR) genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hPMS1, hPMS2, and hMSH6/GTBP). The great majority of germline mutations were found in hMSH2 and hMLH1. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical features of Chinese HNPCC patients and to screen hMSH2 and hMLH1 gene mutations. METHODS: Twenty-eight independent Chinese families were collected, of which 15 met Amsterdam criteria I and 13 met the Japanese clinical diagnosis criteria. The data were recorded including sex, site of colorectal cancer (CRC), age of diagnosis, history of synchronous and/or metachronous CRC, instance of extracolonic cancers, and histopathology of tumors. Peripheral blood samples were collected from all pedigrees after formal written consents were signed. PCR and denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) were used to screen the coding regions of hMSH2 and hMLH1 genes. The samples showing abnormal DHPLC profiles were sequenced by a 377 DNA sequencer. RESULTS: One hundred and seventy malignant neoplasms were found in one hundred and twenty-six patients (multiple cancer in twenty-three), including one hundred and twenty-seven CRCs, fifteen gastric, seven endometrial, and five esophageal cancers. Seventy-seven point eight percent of the patients had CRCs, sharing the features of early occurrence (average age of onset, 45.9 years) and of the right-sided predominance reported in the literature. In Chinese HNPCC patients, gastric cancer occurred more frequently, accounting for 11.9% of all cancers patients and ranking second in the spectrum of HNPCC predisposing cancers. Synchronous CRCs occurred less frequently, only accounting for 3.1% of the total CRCs. Twenty percent of the colorectal patients had

  7. RFLP analysis for APP 717 mutations associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeldenrust, S R; Murrell, J; Farlow, M; Ghetti, B; Roses, A D; Benson, M D

    1993-06-01

    Familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) has been shown to be associated with three distinct point mutations within the same codon of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene. The mutation identified in the Indiana kindred is a G-->T transversion at the first position of the codon for amino acid 717, resulting in a substitution of phenylalanine for valine in the APP protein. Screening of persons at risk for the APP Phe-717 mutation using a variation of the polymerase chain reaction identified nine positives among 34 tested. In addition, DNA from 145 FAD subjects were tested for the three known APP 717 mutations.

  8. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve.

  9. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Murray, Anne; Hanks, Sandra; Douglas, Jenny; Armstrong, Ruth; Banka, Siddharth; Bird, Lynne M; Clericuzio, Carol L; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Cushing, Tom; Flinter, Frances; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Joss, Shelagh; Kinning, Esther; Lynch, Sally Ann; Magee, Alex; McConnell, Vivienne; Medeira, Ana; Ozono, Keiichi; Patton, Michael; Rankin, Julia; Shears, Debbie; Simon, Marleen; Splitt, Miranda; Strenger, Volker; Stuurman, Kyra; Taylor, Clare; Titheradge, Hannah; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Temple, I Karen; Cole, Trevor; Seal, Sheila; Rahman, Nazneen

    2013-12-01

    Weaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with EZH2 mutations. The mutations were primarily missense mutations occurring throughout the gene, with some clustering in the SET domain (12/48). Truncating mutations were uncommon (4/48) and only identified in the final exon, after the SET domain. Through analyses of clinical data and facial photographs of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals, we have shown that the facial features can be subtle and the clinical diagnosis of Weaver syndrome is thus challenging, especially in older individuals. However, tall stature is very common, reported in >90% of affected individuals. Intellectual disability is also common, present in ~80%, but is highly variable and frequently mild. Additional clinical features which may help in stratifying individuals to EZH2 mutation testing include camptodactyly, soft, doughy skin, umbilical hernia, and a low, hoarse cry. Considerable phenotypic overlap between Sotos and Weaver syndromes is also evident. The identification of an EZH2 mutation can therefore provide an objective means of confirming a subtle presentation of Weaver syndrome and/or distinguishing Weaver and Sotos syndromes. As mutation testing becomes increasingly accessible and larger numbers of EZH2 mutation-positive individuals are identified, knowledge of the clinical spectrum and prognostic implications of EZH2 mutations should improve. PMID:24214728

  10. A germ-line-selective advantage rather than an increased mutation rate can explain some unexpectedly common human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Choi, Soo-Kyung; Yoon, Song-Ro; Calabrese, Peter; Arnheim, Norman

    2008-07-22

    Two nucleotide substitutions in the human FGFR2 gene (C755G or C758G) are responsible for virtually all sporadic cases of Apert syndrome. This condition is 100-1,000 times more common than genomic mutation frequency data predict. Here, we report on the C758G de novo Apert syndrome mutation. Using data on older donors, we show that spontaneous mutations are not uniformly distributed throughout normal testes. Instead, we find foci where C758G mutation frequencies are 3-4 orders of magnitude greater than the remaining tissue. We conclude this nucleotide site is not a mutation hot spot even after accounting for possible Luria-Delbruck "mutation jackpots." An alternative explanation for such foci involving positive selection acting on adult self-renewing Ap spermatogonia experiencing the rare mutation could not be rejected. Further, the two youngest individuals studied (19 and 23 years old) had lower mutation frequencies and smaller foci at both mutation sites compared with the older individuals. This implies that the mutation frequency of foci increases as adults age, and thus selection could explain the paternal age effect for Apert syndrome and other genetic conditions. Our results, now including the analysis of two mutations in the same set of testes, suggest that positive selection can increase the relative frequency of premeiotic germ cells carrying such mutations, although individuals who inherit them have reduced fitness. In addition, we compared the anatomical distribution of C758G mutation foci with both new and old data on the C755G mutation in the same testis and found their positions were not correlated with one another. PMID:18632557

  11. Predicting Resistance Mutations Using Protein Design Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, K.; Georgiev, I; Donald, B; Anderson, A

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance resulting from mutations to the target is an unfortunate common phenomenon that limits the lifetime of many of the most successful drugs. In contrast to the investigation of mutations after clinical exposure, it would be powerful to be able to incorporate strategies early in the development process to predict and overcome the effects of possible resistance mutations. Here we present a unique prospective application of an ensemble-based protein design algorithm, K*, to predict potential resistance mutations in dihydrofolate reductase from Staphylococcus aureus using positive design to maintain catalytic function and negative design to interfere with binding of a lead inhibitor. Enzyme inhibition assays show that three of the four highly-ranked predicted mutants are active yet display lower affinity (18-, 9-, and 13-fold) for the inhibitor. A crystal structure of the top-ranked mutant enzyme validates the predicted conformations of the mutated residues and the structural basis of the loss of potency. The use of protein design algorithms to predict resistance mutations could be incorporated in a lead design strategy against any target that is susceptible to mutational resistance.

  12. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  13. A mutational analysis of the Abetaz/Aalphad major histocompatibility complex class II molecule that restricts autoreactive T cells in (NZBxNZW)F1 mice. The critical influence of alanine at position 69 in the Aalphad chain.

    PubMed

    Sai, T; Mine, M; Fukuoka, M; Koarada, S; Kimoto, M

    1999-03-01

    Autoimmune symptoms of (NZBxNZW)F1 (H-2d/z) mice are reported to be critically related to the heterozygosity at the H-2 complex of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We previously showed that several Abetaz/Aalphad MHC class II molecule-restricted autoreactive T-cell clones from B/WF1 mice were pathogenic upon transfer to preautoimmune B/WF1 mice. In this study, to identify the crucial amino acid residues in Abetaz/Aalphad molecules for T-cell activation, we generated a panel of transfectant cell lines. These transfectant cell lines express the Abetaz/Aalphad MHC molecules with a mutation at each residue alpha11, alpha28, alpha57, alpha69, alpha70, alpha76 of Aalphad chain and beta86 of Abetaz chain. Replacing alpha69 alanine with threonine, valine or serine completely eliminated the ability to stimulate autoreactive T-cell clones without affecting the ability to present foreign antigen keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH) or L-plastin peptide to specific T-cell clones. Replacing beta86 valine with aspartic acid resulted in a decrease in the stimulation for antigen-reactive as well as autoreactive T-cell clones. Substitutions at other residues had minimal or no effect on the stimulation of either auto- or antigen-reactive T-cell clones. These results suggest that alanine at residue 69 of the Aalphad chain is critical for the activation of autoreactive Abetaz/Aalphad-restricted T-cell clones. Possible explanations for this are discussed. PMID:10233712

  14. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  15. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations by Ethnicity and Mutation Location in BRCA Mutation Carriers.

    PubMed

    Bayraktar, Soley; Jackson, Michelle; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M; Liu, Diane; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Brandt, Amanda; Woodson, Ashley; Litton, Jennifer; Lu, Karen H; Valero, Vicente; Arun, Banu K

    2015-01-01

    The genotype-phenotype correlations of the specific BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in multi-ethnic populations in USA have not yet been fully investigated. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of ethnicity at specific mutation locations and breast/ovarian cancer phenotypes. Our cohort included 445 women with different ethnic backgrounds who underwent BRCA genetic testing between 1997 and 2010. Known clinical and pathologic characteristics were compared with Chi-Square Analysis or Fisher's Exact test as appropriate. The three most common mutation locations in BRCA1 (exons 2, 11, and 20) and BRCA2 (exons 10, 11, and 25) genes were chosen. Prevalence of BRCA1 exon 2 mutations were significantly higher in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) women compared to Caucasians (41% versus 15%; p = 0.001). Similarly, AJ women with breast cancer were more likely to have BRCA1 exon 2 mutation (47% positivity in AJ women versus 0-12.5% positivity in other ethnicities; p = 0.004). Women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation had the highest probability of having combined breast and ovarian cancers compared to women carrying other exon mutations (p = 0.05). The median age at initial cancer diagnosis, phenotypic features of breast cancer tumors, and overall survival did not vary significantly by ethnicity or mutation location. Our data suggest that ethnicity does not affect age of onset, overall survival or confer different risks of breast and ovarian cancer development in BRCA carriers. These results also suggest that women carrying the exon 20 BRCA1 mutation may warrant mutation-specific counseling and be more aggressively managed for risk reduction.

  16. Complementation analysis of eleven tryptophanase mutations in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    White, M K; Yudkin, M D

    1979-10-01

    Nine independent mutants deficient in tryptophanase activity were isolated. Each mutation was transferred to a specialized transducing phage that carries the tryptophanase region of the Escherichia coli chromosome. The nine phages thus produced, and a tenth carrying a previously characterized tryptophanase mutation, were used to lysogenize a bacterial strain harbouring a mutation in the tryptophanase structural gene and also a suppressor of polarity. In no case was complementation observed; we conclude that there is no closely linked positive regulatory gene for tryptophanase.

  17. Mutation rates as adaptations.

    PubMed

    Maley, C

    1997-06-01

    In order to better understand life, it is helpful to look beyond the envelop of life as we know it. A simple model of coevolution was implemented with the addition of a gene for the mutation rate of the individual. This allowed the mutation rate itself to evolve in a lineage. The model shows that when the individuals interact in a sort of zero-sum game, the lineages maintain relatively high mutation rates. However, when individuals engage in interactions that have greater consequences for one individual in the interaction than the other, lineages tend to evolve relatively low mutation rates. This model suggests that one possible cause for differential mutation rates across genes may be the coevolutionary pressure of the various forms of interactions with other genes. PMID:9219670

  18. Mutation and premating isolation.

    PubMed

    Woodruff, R C; Thompson, J N

    2002-11-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  19. Multiplex detection of mutations.

    PubMed

    Perlin, David S; Balashov, Sergey; Park, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of mutations at the genetic level is an integral part of modern molecular diagnostics. These mutations can range from dominant single nucleotide polymorphisms within specific loci to codominant heterozygotic insertions and they present considerable challenges to investigators in developing rapid nucleic acid-based amplification assays that can distinguish wild-type from mutant alleles. The recent improvements of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using self-reporting fluorescence probes have given researchers a powerful tool in developing assays for mutation detection that can be multiplexed for high-throughput screening of multiple mutations and cost effectiveness. Here we describe an application of a multiplexed real-time PCR assay using Molecular Beacon probes for the detection of mutations in codon 54 of the CYP51A gene in Aspergillus fumigatus conferring triazole resistance.

  20. Mutation and premating isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, R. C.; Thompson, J. N. Jr

    2002-01-01

    While premating isolation might be traceable to different genetic mechanisms in different species, evidence supports the idea that as few as one or two genes may often be sufficient to initiate isolation. Thus, new mutation can theoretically play a key role in the process. But it has long been thought that a new isolation mutation would fail, because there would be no other individuals for the isolation-mutation-carrier to mate with. We now realize that premeiotic mutations are very common and will yield a cluster of progeny carrying the same new mutant allele. In this paper, we discuss the evidence for genetically simple premating isolation barriers and the role that clusters of an isolation mutation may play in initiating allopatric, and even sympatric, species divisions.

  1. HRM confirmation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae in clinical specimens by G→A (position 857) mutation detection in the 16S rRNA gene before sequencing and after porA confirmation.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Volker; Mayall, Barrie C; Wang, Jenny

    2012-05-01

    A total of 2273 specimens submitted to the Austin Hospital Pathology Service for Neisseria gonorrhoeae screening between September 1, 2009 and May 11, 2011 were used in this study. Specimens were simultaneously screened and confirmed with a previously published real time PCR assay for the opa gene (extra primers were included to increase sensitivity) and the porA gene respectively. The opa gene screen and initial porA gene confirmation yielded an N. gonorrhoeae positivity rate of 0.88% (20/2273) and 0.49% (11/2191) for specimens and patients respectively. A 16S rDNA High Resolution Melt confirmatory PCR was developed subsequently; this reduced the N. gonorrhoeae positivity rate to 0.35% (8/2273) and 0.27% (6/2191) for specimens and patients respectively (not altered by 16S sequencing). The higher rate of secondary confirmation (16S HRM) in patients compared with samples was due to the detection of species other than N. gonorrhoeae detected by the initial screening and confirmation test. This underlines the importance of performing the secondary confirmatory test that has been developed in this study.

  2. Application of Markov chain to the pattern of mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantika, Sandy; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-01

    This research explains how Markov chain used to model the pattern of deoxyribonucleic acid mutations in mitochondrial (mitochondrial DNA). First, sign test was used to see a pattern of nucleotide bases that will appear at one position after the position of mutated nucleotide base. Results obtained from the sign test showed that for most cases, there exist a pattern of mutation except in the mutation cases of adenine to cytosine, adenine to thymine, and cytosine to guanine. Markov chain analysis results on data of mutations that occur in mitochondrial DNA indicate that one and two positions after the position of mutated nucleotide bases tend to be occupied by particular nucleotide bases. From this analysis, it can be said that the adenine, cytosine, guanine and thymine will mutate if the nucelotide base at one and/or two positions after them is cytosine.

  3. Pan-Cancer Analysis of Mutation Hotspots in Protein Domains.

    PubMed

    Miller, Martin L; Reznik, Ed; Gauthier, Nicholas P; Aksoy, Bülent Arman; Korkut, Anil; Gao, Jianjiong; Ciriello, Giovanni; Schultz, Nikolaus; Sander, Chris

    2015-09-23

    In cancer genomics, recurrence of mutations in independent tumor samples is a strong indicator of functional impact. However, rare functional mutations can escape detection by recurrence analysis owing to lack of statistical power. We enhance statistical power by extending the notion of recurrence of mutations from single genes to gene families that share homologous protein domains. Domain mutation analysis also sharpens the functional interpretation of the impact of mutations, as domains more succinctly embody function than entire genes. By mapping mutations in 22 different tumor types to equivalent positions in multiple sequence alignments of domains, we confirm well-known functional mutation hotspots, identify uncharacterized rare variants in one gene that are equivalent to well-characterized mutations in another gene, detect previously unknown mutation hotspots, and provide hypotheses about molecular mechanisms and downstream effects of domain mutations. With the rapid expansion of cancer genomics projects, protein domain hotspot analysis will likely provide many more leads linking mutations in proteins to the cancer phenotype. PMID:27135912

  4. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) mutations database: review of the "old" and update of the new mutations.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Angelo; Moradkhani, Kamran; Hwang, Ming Jing; Zuppi, Cecilia; Giardina, Bruno; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2012-03-15

    In the present paper we have updated the G6PD mutations database, including all the last discovered G6PD genetic variants. We underline that the last database has been published by Vulliamy et al. [1] who analytically reported 140 G6PD mutations: along with Vulliamy's database, there are two main sites, such as http://202.120.189.88/mutdb/ and www.LOVD.nl/MR, where almost all G6PD mutations can be found. Compared to the previous mutation reports, in our paper we have included for each mutation some additional information, such as: the secondary structure and the enzyme 3D position involving by mutation, the creation or abolition of a restriction site (with the enzyme involved) and the conservation score associated with each amino acid position. The mutations reported in the present tab have been divided according to the gene's region involved (coding and non-coding) and mutations affecting the coding region in: single, multiple (at least with two bases involved) and deletion. We underline that for the listed mutations, reported in italic, literature doesn't provide all the biochemical or bio-molecular information or the research data. Finally, for the "old" mutations, we tried to verify features previously reported and, when subsequently modified, we updated the specific information using the latest literature data. PMID:22293322

  5. Calreticulin mutation burden--is it a stable clone in patients with essential thrombocythemia and myelofibrosis?

    PubMed

    Shuly, Yulia; Nagar, Meital; Ben-Asaf, Lior; Kneller, Abraham; Steinberg, David M; Amariglio, Ninette; Salomon, Ophira

    2015-12-01

    Calreticulin mutation represents the second most frequent mutation after JAK2 V617F in myeloproliferative disorder and is considered to be a driving mutation. Herein the mutation burden was evaluated in patients with essential thrombocythemia or myelofibrosis and found to increase by 5.7% over time unrelated to the time elapsed from the initial to the final positive test. The longer the course of the disease when first tested (range 0-30 years, mean 7.9 years) the lower mutation burden was observed. The mutated clone was larger in type II in comparison with type I mutation when first tested but the difference in mutation burden from the final to the first positive test was significantly higher in those with type I. Similarly, the difference in mutation burden was higher in patients with essential thrombocythemia reaching almost 8% in comparison to 1.3% in post-essential thrombocythemia myelofibrosis. Thus a repeat calreticulin quantitative test is not warranted.

  6. RELN Mutations in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lammert, Dawn B.; Howell, Brian W.

    2016-01-01

    RELN encodes a large, secreted glycoprotein integral to proper neuronal positioning during development and regulation of synaptic function postnatally. Rare, homozygous, null mutations lead to lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH), accompanied by developmental delay and epilepsy. Until recently, little was known about the frequency or consequences of heterozygous mutations. Several lines of evidence from multiple studies now implicate heterozygous mutations in RELN in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). RELN maps to the AUTS1 locus on 7q22, and at this time over 40 distinct mutations have been identified that would alter the protein sequence, four of which are de novo. The RELN mutations that are most clearly consequential are those that are predicted to inactivate the signaling function of the encoded protein and those that fall in a highly conserved RXR motif found at the core of the 16 Reelin subrepeats. Despite the growing evidence of RELN dysfunction in ASD, it appears that these mutations in isolation are insufficient and that secondary genetic or environmental factors are likely required for a diagnosis. PMID:27064498

  7. Nursing Positions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Nursing Positions KidsHealth > For Parents > Nursing Positions Print A ... and actually needs to feed. Getting Comfortable With Breastfeeding Nursing can be one of the most challenging ...

  8. Positive Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Positive psychology is a deliberate correction to the focus of psychology on problems. Positive psychology does not deny the difficulties that people may experience but does suggest that sole attention to disorder leads to an incomplete view of the human condition. Positive psychologists concern themselves with four major topics: (1) positive…

  9. Mutations in man

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections that cover some of the following topics: DNA repair, gene or point mutations, aspects of nondisjunction, origin and significance of chromosomal alterations, structure and organization of the human genome, and mutagenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  10. Transcriptomic Characterization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma with CTNNB1 Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chengzhi; Xu, Naiqing; Huang, Huanwei; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Aiqun; Han, Ze-Guang; Zhou, Weiping; Chen, Liang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the sixth most common solid tumor worldwide and the third leading cause of cancer-related death. HCC is a particularly serious threat to the Chinese population. Although many molecular alterations are known to be involved in the tumorigenesis of hepatocytes, no systemic survey has examined the somatic mutations in HCC samples from Chinese patients. Our goal was to elucidate somatic mutations in Chinese HCC patients and investigate the possible molecular mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis. Experimental Design A total of 110 hepatitis B virus (HBV)-positive HCC samples and 46 HBV-negative HCC samples were genotyped for hot-spot mutations in the CSF1R, CTNNB1, KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, ERBB2, MET, PIK3CA, JAK1, and SMO genes. The transcriptomes of the CTNNB1 mutation-positive HCC samples from the HBV-positive patients (CB+ HCC) were compared to adjacent non-cancerous livers, and significantly altered genes were functionally validated in vitro. Results CTNNB1 mutations accounted for the majority of the mutations detected in our study. A slightly higher mutation rate was found in the HBV-positive patients than in their negative counterparts. A distinct pattern of CTNNB1 mutation was detected in these two populations, and drastic changes at the transcriptomic level were detected in the CB+ tumors compared to adjacent non-cancerous livers. Potential tumor suppressors (FoxA3 and Onecut1) and oncogenes (MAFG and SSX1) were functionally validated. Conclusions Our work is the first systemic characterization of oncogenic mutations in HCC samples from Chinese patients. Targeting the Wnt-β-catenin pathway may represent a valid treatment option for Chinese HCC patients. Our work also suggests that targeting ONECUT1, FOXA3, SSX1, and MAFG may be a valid treatment option for CTNNB1 mutation positive HCC patients. PMID:24798046

  11. Positional plagiocephaly

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Carl

    2011-01-01

    Cranial asymmetry occurring as a result of forces that deform skull shape in the supine position is known as deformational plagiocephaly. The risk of plagiocephaly may be modified by positioning the baby on alternate days with the head to the right or the left side, and by increasing time spent in the prone position during awake periods. When deformational plagiocephaly is already present, physiotherapy (including positioning equivalent to the preventive positioning, and exercises as needed for torticollis and positional preference) has been shown to be superior to counselling about preventive positioning only. Helmet therapy (moulding therapy) to reduce skull asymmetry has some drawbacks: it is expensive, significantly inconvenient due to the long hours of use per day and associated with skin complications. There is evidence that helmet therapy may increase the initial rate of improvement of asymmetry, but there is no evidence that it improves the final outcome for patients with moderate or severe plagiocephaly. PMID:23024590

  12. Two novel mutations involved in hereditary tyrosinemia type I

    SciTech Connect

    St-Louis, M.; Poudrier, J.; Phaneuf, D.

    1994-09-01

    The deficiency of fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase, the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolic pathway is the cause of hereditary tyrosinemia type I (HT1), an autosomal recessive disease. The disease has been reported worldwide. The incidence is much higher in two clusters: the Saguenay- Lac St-Jean region (Quebec, Canada) and in Scandinavia. Seven mutations have been reported in the last two years. Here we describe two new missense mutations identified by direct sequencing of PCR products in two HT1 patients, a Norwegian (patient No. 1) and a French-Canadian (patient No. 2). The first mutation consists of a G to A transition at position 337 of the FAH gene which predicts a change from glycine to serine (G337S). The second mutation is an A to G transition at position 381 which predicts a change from arginine to glycine (R381G). Patient No. 1 seems heterozygous for the G337S mutation and for a splice mutation (IVS12+5G{r_arrow}A) which was previously described. Patient No. 2 was also found heterozygous for the R381G mutation and for a rare nonsense mutation (E357X) already reported. In vitro transcription and translation were performed on mutant cDNA to demonstrate the responsibility of these two mutations in causing the decreased amount of FAH detected by Western blot analysis.

  13. Comparing Mutational Variabilities

    PubMed Central

    Houle, D.; Morikawa, B.; Lynch, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have reviewed the available data on V(M), the amount of genetic variation in phenotypic traits produced each generation by mutation. We use these data to make several qualitative tests of the mutation-selection balance hypothesis for the maintenance of genetic variance (MSB). To compare V(M) values, we use three dimensionless quantities: mutational heritability, V(M)/V(E); the mutational coefficient of variation, CV(M); and the ratio of the standing genetic variance to V(M), V(G)/V(M). Since genetic coefficients of variation for life history traits are larger than those for morphological traits, we predict that under MSB, life history traits should also have larger CV(M). This is confirmed; life history traits have a median CV(M) value more than six times higher than that for morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) approximates the persistence time of mutations under MSB in an infinite population. In order for MSB to hold, V(G)/V(M) must be small, substantially less than 1000, and life history traits should have smaller values than morphological traits. V(G)/V(M) averages about 50 generations for life history traits and 100 generations for morphological traits. These observations are all consistent with the predictions of a mutation-selection balance model. PMID:8807316

  14. MoKCa database—mutations of kinases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Christopher J.; Gao, Qiong; Mitsopoulous, Costas; Zvelebil, Marketa; Pearl, Laurence H.; Pearl, Frances M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Members of the protein kinase family are amongst the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer, and both mutated and activated protein kinases have proved to be tractable targets for the development of new anticancer therapies The MoKCa database (Mutations of Kinases in Cancer, http://strubiol.icr.ac.uk/extra/mokca) has been developed to structurally and functionally annotate, and where possible predict, the phenotypic consequences of mutations in protein kinases implicated in cancer. Somatic mutation data from tumours and tumour cell lines have been mapped onto the crystal structures of the affected protein domains. Positions of the mutated amino-acids are highlighted on a sequence-based domain pictogram, as well as a 3D-image of the protein structure, and in a molecular graphics package, integrated for interactive viewing. The data associated with each mutation is presented in the Web interface, along with expert annotation of the detailed molecular functional implications of the mutation. Proteins are linked to functional annotation resources and are annotated with structural and functional features such as domains and phosphorylation sites. MoKCa aims to provide assessments available from multiple sources and algorithms for each potential cancer-associated mutation, and present these together in a consistent and coherent fashion to facilitate authoritative annotation by cancer biologists and structural biologists, directly involved in the generation and analysis of new mutational data. PMID:18986996

  15. HIGH COLORECTAL AND LOW ENDOMETRIAL CANCER RISK IN EPCAM DELETION-POSITIVE LYNCH SYNDROME: A COHORT STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kempers, Marlies JE; Kuiper, Roland P; Ockeloen, Charlotte W; Chappuis, Pierre O; Hutter, Pierre; Rahner, Nils; Schackert, Hans K; Steinke, Verena; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Büttner, Reinhard; Verwiel, Eugene TP; van Krieken, J. Han; Nagtegaal, Iris D; Goossens, Monique; van der Post, Rachel S.; Niessen, Renée C; Sijmons, Rolf H; Kluijt, Irma; Hogervorst, Frans BL; Leter, Edward M; Gille, Johan JP; Aalfs, Cora M; Redeker, Egbert JW; Hes, Frederik J; Tops, Carli MJ; van Nesselrooij, Bernadette PM; van Gijn, Marielle E; García, Encarna B Gómez; Eccles, Diana M; Bunyan, David J; Syngal, Sapna; Stoffel, Elena M; Culver, Julie O; Palomares, Melanie R; Graham, Tracy; Velsher, Lea; Papp, Janos; Oláh, Edith; Chan, Tsun L; Leung, Suet Y; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Kiemeney, Lambertus ALM; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn JL

    2013-01-01

    Summary BACKGROUND Lynch syndrome is caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes (MSH2, MLH1, MSH6 or PMS2), which lead to a high risk of predominantly colorectal and endometrial cancer. Recently, we found that also constitutional 3′ end deletions of EPCAM can cause Lynch syndrome through epigenetic silencing of MSH2 in EPCAM expressing tissues. This results in a tissue specific MSH2-deficiency, which may evoke a different cancer risk and spectrum. To optimize the care for EPCAM deletion carriers we studied their cancer risk and spectrum. METHODS Clinical data of 194 carriers from 41 EPCAM families were systematically collected and compared to those of 431 carriers from 91 families with mutations in MLH1, MSH2, or MSH6. FINDINGS EPCAM deletion carriers exhibited a 75% [95%CI 65–85%] cumulative risk of colorectal cancer before the age of 70 years, with a mean age at diagnosis of 43 years, which is comparable to that of carriers of a combined EPCAM-MSH2 deletion (69% [95%CI 47-91%], p=0·8609) or of a mutation in MSH2 (77% [95%CI 64-90%], p=0·5892) or MLH1 (79% [95%CI 68-90%], p=0·5492) and higher than that of MSH6 mutation carriers (50% [95%CI 38-62%], p<0·0001). In contrast, women with EPCAM deletions (n=87) exhibited a 12% [95%CI 0-27%] cumulative risk of endometrial cancer, which is significantly lower than in carriers of a combined EPCAM-MSH2 deletion (55% [95%CI 20-90%], p<0·0001) or of a mutation in MSH2 (51% [95%CI 33-69%], p=0·0006) or MSH6 (34% [95%CI 20-48%], p=0·0309) and lower than in MLH1 (33% [95%CI 15-51%] p=0·1193) mutation carriers. This risk seems to be restricted to large deletions that extend close to the MSH2 gene promoter. Overall, a relatively high incidence of duodenal (n=3) and pancreatic (n=4) cancers was observed. INTERPRETATION EPCAM deletion carriers do have a high risk of colorectal cancer. Only those with deletions extending close to the MSH2 promoter have an increased risk of endometrial cancer. These results

  16. Satellite positioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, Oscar L.; Watkins, Michael M.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in satellite positioning techniques and their applications are reviewed on the basis of the theoretical and practical work published by U.S. researchers in 1987-1990. Current techniques are classified into two main categories: satellite laser tracking and radio tracking. Particular attention is given to the Geoscience Laser Ranging System, the Lunar Laser Ranging concept; GPS ephemerides determination, fiducial networks, and reference frame; static GPS positioning; and kinematic GPS positioning.

  17. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII's natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins.

  18. Systematic Mapping of Protein Mutational Space by Prolonged Drift Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Seemingly Neutral Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rockah-Shmuel, Liat; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic mappings of the effects of protein mutations are becoming increasingly popular. Unexpectedly, these experiments often find that proteins are tolerant to most amino acid substitutions, including substitutions in positions that are highly conserved in nature. To obtain a more realistic distribution of the effects of protein mutations, we applied a laboratory drift comprising 17 rounds of random mutagenesis and selection of M.HaeIII, a DNA methyltransferase. During this drift, multiple mutations gradually accumulated. Deep sequencing of the drifted gene ensembles allowed determination of the relative effects of all possible single nucleotide mutations. Despite being averaged across many different genetic backgrounds, about 67% of all nonsynonymous, missense mutations were evidently deleterious, and an additional 16% were likely to be deleterious. In the early generations, the frequency of most deleterious mutations remained high. However, by the 17th generation, their frequency was consistently reduced, and those remaining were accepted alongside compensatory mutations. The tolerance to mutations measured in this laboratory drift correlated with sequence exchanges seen in M.HaeIII’s natural orthologs. The biophysical constraints dictating purging in nature and in this laboratory drift also seemed to overlap. Our experiment therefore provides an improved method for measuring the effects of protein mutations that more closely replicates the natural evolutionary forces, and thereby a more realistic view of the mutational space of proteins. PMID:26274323

  19. Novel CDKN2A mutations in Austrian melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller-Muehlbacher, Sebastian; Marko, Martha; Müller, Christoph; Wendt, Judith; Pehamberger, Hubert; Okamoto, Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    CDKN2A is the most prominent familial melanoma gene, with mutations occurring in up to 40% of the families. Numerous mutations in the gene are known, several of them representing regional founder mutations. We sought to determine, for the first time, germline mutations in CDKN2A in Austria to identify novel mutations. In total, 700 individuals (136 patients with a positive family history and 164 with at least two primary melanomas as the high-risk groups; 200 with single primary melanomas; and 200 healthy individuals as the control groups) were Sanger sequenced for CDKN2A exon 1α, 1β, and 2. The 136 patients with affected relatives were also sequenced for CDK4 exon 2. We found the disease-associated mutations p.R24P (8×), p.N71T (1×), p.G101W (1×), and p.V126D (1×) in the group with affected relatives and p.R24P (2×) in the group with several primary melanomas. Furthermore, we discovered four mutations of unknown significance, two of which were novel: p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively. Computational effect prediction suggested p.A34V as conferring a high risk for melanoma, whereas c.151-4 G>C, although being predicted as a splice site mutation by MutationTaster, could not functionally be confirmed to alter splicing. Moreover, computational effect prediction confirmed accumulation of high-penetrance mutations in high-risk groups, whereas mutations of unknown significance were distributed across all groups. p.R24P is the most common high-risk mutation in Austria. In addition, we discovered two new mutations in Austrian melanoma patients, p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively.

  20. Novel CDKN2A mutations in Austrian melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller-Muehlbacher, Sebastian; Marko, Martha; Müller, Christoph; Wendt, Judith; Pehamberger, Hubert; Okamoto, Ichiro

    2015-10-01

    CDKN2A is the most prominent familial melanoma gene, with mutations occurring in up to 40% of the families. Numerous mutations in the gene are known, several of them representing regional founder mutations. We sought to determine, for the first time, germline mutations in CDKN2A in Austria to identify novel mutations. In total, 700 individuals (136 patients with a positive family history and 164 with at least two primary melanomas as the high-risk groups; 200 with single primary melanomas; and 200 healthy individuals as the control groups) were Sanger sequenced for CDKN2A exon 1α, 1β, and 2. The 136 patients with affected relatives were also sequenced for CDK4 exon 2. We found the disease-associated mutations p.R24P (8×), p.N71T (1×), p.G101W (1×), and p.V126D (1×) in the group with affected relatives and p.R24P (2×) in the group with several primary melanomas. Furthermore, we discovered four mutations of unknown significance, two of which were novel: p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively. Computational effect prediction suggested p.A34V as conferring a high risk for melanoma, whereas c.151-4 G>C, although being predicted as a splice site mutation by MutationTaster, could not functionally be confirmed to alter splicing. Moreover, computational effect prediction confirmed accumulation of high-penetrance mutations in high-risk groups, whereas mutations of unknown significance were distributed across all groups. p.R24P is the most common high-risk mutation in Austria. In addition, we discovered two new mutations in Austrian melanoma patients, p.A34V and c.151-4 G>C, respectively. PMID:26225579

  1. Positive Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  2. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    PubMed

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  3. Positioning Agility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oza, Nilay; Abrahamsson, Pekka; Conboy, Kieran

    Agile methods are increasingly adopted by European companies. Academics too are conducting numerous studies on different tenets of agile methods. Companies often feel proud in marketing themselves as ‘agile’. However, the true notion of ‘being agile’ seems to have been overlooked due to lack of positioning of oneself for agility. This raises a call for more research and interactions between academia and the industry. The proposed workshop refers to this call. It will be highly relevant to participants, interested in positioning their company’s agility from organizational, group or project perspectives. The positioning of agility will help companies to better align their agile practices with stakeholder values. Results of the workshop will be shared across participants and they will also have opportunity to continue their work on agile positioning in their companies. At broader level, the work done in this workshop will contribute towards developing Agile Positioning System.

  4. Mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ćwikła, Jarosław; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kwiatek, Paweł; Szperl, Małgorzata; Michalski, Wojciech; Wyrwicz, Lucjan; Kuśmierczyk, Mariusz; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Maciejczyk, Anna; Roszczynko, Marta; Pęczkowska, Mariola

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Paragangliomas (PGLs) related to hereditary syndromes are rare mediastinal tumors. Paragangliomas are caused by mutations in genes encoding subunits of succinate dehydrogenase enzyme (SDH). Aim To evaluate clinical, anatomical and functional characteristics of mediastinal paragangliomas related to SDHx gene mutations. Material and methods Retrospective analysis of 75 patients with confirmed SDHx gene mutations (24 patients with SDHB, 5 SDHC, 46 with SDHD mutations) was performed. Patients underwent evaluation using computed tomography (CT), somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) (99mTc-[HYNIC,Tyr3]-octreotide), 123I mIBG scintigraphy and urinary excretion of total methoxycatecholamines. Results Out of 75 patients, 16 (21%) patients (1 SDHB, 15 SDHD mutations) had 17 PGLs localized in the mediastinum. Fourteen PGLs were localized in the middle mediastinum (intrapericardial) and 3 PGLs in the posterior mediastinum. The median diameter of paragangliomas measured on the axial slice was 24.3 mm (interquartile range (IQR): 14.7–36.6), and the median volume was 2.78 ml (IQR: 0.87–16.16). Twelve out of 16 patients (75%) underwent SRS, and 11 of them (92.3%) had pathological uptake of the radiotracer. Eleven (68.75%) out of 16 patients underwent 123 I mIBG, with only 3 positive results. Symptoms of catecholamine excretion were observed in 3 patients with PGLs localized in the posterior mediastinum. All PGLs were benign except in 1 patient with the SDHB mutation and PGL detected in the posterior mediastinum, who had a metastatic disease. Conclusions Most mediastinal paragangliomas were related to SDHD gene mutations. They were asymptomatic, localized in the medial mediastinum, intrapericardially. PMID:27785149

  5. Mutations in Lettuce Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Mou, Beiquan

    2011-01-01

    Lettuce is a major vegetable in western countries. Mutations generated genetic variations and played an important role in the domestication of the crop. Many traits derived from natural and induced mutations, such as dwarfing, early flowering, male sterility, and chlorophyll deficiency, are useful in physiological and genetic studies. Mutants were also used to develop new lettuce products including miniature and herbicide-tolerant cultivars. Mutant analysis was critical in lettuce genomic studies including identification and cloning of disease-resistance genes. Mutagenesis combined with genomic technology may provide powerful tools for the discovery of novel gene alleles. In addition to radiation and chemical mutagens, unconventional approaches such as tissue or protoplast culture, transposable elements, and space flights have been utilized to generate mutants in lettuce. Since mutation breeding is considered nontransgenic, it is more acceptable to consumers and will be explored more in the future for lettuce improvement. PMID:22287955

  6. EGFR Mutation Testing Practices within the Asia Pacific Region

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Keith M.; Utomo, Ahmad; Rajadurai, Pathmanathan; Tran, Van Khanh; Du, Xiang; Chou, Teh-Ying; Enriquez, Ma. Luisa D.; Lee, Geon Kook; Iqbal, Jabed; Shuangshoti, Shanop; Chung, Jin-Haeng; Hagiwara, Koichi; Liang, Zhiyong; Normanno, Nicola; Park, Keunchil; Toyooka, Shinichi; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Waring, Paul; Zhang, Li; McCormack, Rose; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Itoh, Yohji; Sugeno, Masatoshi; Mok, Tony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors in EGFR mutation-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients necessitates accurate, timely testing. Although EGFR mutation testing has been adopted by many laboratories in Asia, data are lacking on the proportion of NSCLC patients tested in each country, and the most commonly used testing methods. Methods: A retrospective survey of records from NSCLC patients tested for EGFR mutations during 2011 was conducted in 11 Asian Pacific countries at 40 sites that routinely performed EGFR mutation testing during that period. Patient records were used to complete an online questionnaire at each site. Results: Of the 22,193 NSCLC patient records surveyed, 31.8% (95% confidence interval: 31.2%–32.5%) were tested for EGFR mutations. The rate of EGFR mutation positivity was 39.6% among the 10,687 cases tested. The majority of samples were biopsy and/or cytology samples (71.4%). DNA sequencing was the most commonly used testing method accounting for 40% and 32.5% of tissue and cytology samples, respectively. A pathology report was available only to 60.0% of the sites, and 47.5% were not members of a Quality Assurance Scheme. Conclusions: In 2011, EGFR mutation testing practices varied widely across Asia. These data provide a reference platform from which to improve the molecular diagnosis of NSCLC, and EGFR mutation testing in particular, in Asia. PMID:25376513

  7. Somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations do not increase neuronal vulnerability to MPTP in young POLG mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Clark, Joanne; Zheng, Kangni; Kujoth, Gregory C; Prolla, Tomas A; Simon, David K

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are hypothesized to play a pathogenic role in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). In support of this, high levels of somatic mtDNA mutations in “POLG mutator” mice carrying a proofreading-deficient form of mtDNA polymerase ã (Polg(D257A)) lead to a premature aging phenotype. However, the relevance of this finding to the normal aging process has been questioned as the number of mutations is greater even in young POLG mutator mice, which shows no overt phenotype, than levels achieved during normal aging in mice. Vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) increases with age, and we hypothesized that this may result in part from the accumulation with age of somatic mtDNA mutations. If correct, then levels of mutations in young (2–3 month old) POLG mutator mice should be sufficient to increase vulnerability to MPTP. In contrast, we find that susceptibility to MPTP in both heterozygous and homozygous POLG mutator mice at this young age is not different from that of wild type littermate controls as measured by levels of tyrosine hydroxylase positive (TH+) striatal terminals, striatal dopamine and its metabolites, a marker of oxidative damage, or stereological counts of TH+ and total substantia nigra neurons. These unexpected results do not support the hypothesis that somatic mtDNA mutations contribute to the age-related vulnerability of dopaminergic neurons to MPTP. It remains possible that somatic mtDNA mutations influence vulnerability to other stressors, or require additional time for the deleterious consequences to manifest. Furthermore, the impact of the higher levels of mutations present at older ages in these mice was not assessed in our study, although a prior study also failed to detect an increase in vulnerability to MPTP in older mice. With these caveats, the current data do not provide evidence for a role of somatic mt

  8. Positive Proof.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auty, Geoffrey

    1988-01-01

    Presents experiments which show that in electrostatics there are logical reasons for describing charged materials as positive or negative. Indicates that static and current electricity are not separate areas of physics. Diagrams of experiments and circuits are included. (RT)

  9. Reducing mutation load through sexual selection on males.

    PubMed

    McGuigan, Katrina; Petfield, Donna; Blows, Mark W

    2011-10-01

    Mutation load is a key parameter in evolutionary theories, but relatively little empirical information exists on the mutation load of populations, or the elimination of this load through selection. We manipulated the opportunity for sexual selection within a mutation accumulation divergence experiment to determine how sexual selection on males affected the accumulation of mutations contributing to sexual and nonsexual fitness. Sexual selection prevented the accumulation of mutations affecting male mating success, the target trait, as well as reducing mutation load on productivity, a nonsexual fitness component. Mutational correlations between mating success and productivity (estimated in the absence of sexual selection) were positive. Sexual selection significantly reduced these fitness component correlations. Male mating success significantly diverged between sexual selection treatments, consistent with the fixation of genetic differences. However, the rank of the treatments was not consistent across assays, indicating that the mutational effects on mating success were conditional on biotic and abiotic context. Our experiment suggests that greater insight into the genetic targets of natural and sexual selection can be gained by focusing on mutational rather than standing genetic variation, and on the behavior of trait variances rather than means.

  10. Mutation of glutamine to arginine at position 548 of IE2 86 in human cytomegalovirus leads to decreased expression of IE2 40, IE2 60, UL83, and UL84 and increased transcription of US8-9 and US29-32.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, Sarah W; Clark, Charles L; Burgdorf, James R; Spector, Deborah H

    2011-11-01

    The IE2 86 protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is essential for productive infection. The mutation of glutamine to arginine at position 548 of IE2 86 causes the virus to grow both slowly and to very low titers, making it difficult to study this mutant via infection. In this study, Q548R IE2 86 HCMV was produced on the complementing cell line 86F/40HA, which allowed faster and higher-titer production of mutant virus. The main defects observed in this mutant were greatly decreased expression of IE2 40, IE2 60, UL83, and UL84. Genome replication and the induction of cell cycle arrest were found to proceed at or near wild-type levels, and there was no defect in transitioning to early or late protein expression. Q548R IE2 86 was still able to interact with UL84. Furthermore, Q548R IE2 40 maintained the ability to enhance UL84 expression in a cotransfection assay. Microarray analysis of Q548R IE2 HCMV revealed that the US8, US9, and US29-32 transcripts were all significantly upregulated. These results further confirm the importance of IE2 in UL83 and UL84 expression as well as pointing to several previously unknown regions of the HCMV genome that may be regulated by IE2.

  11. Cancer Missense Mutations Alter Binding Properties of Proteins and Their Interaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Tyagi, Manoj; Teng, Shaolei; Shoemaker, Benjamin A.; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Alexov, Emil; Wuchty, Stefan; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown that missense mutations might play an important role in carcinogenesis. However, the extent to which cancer mutations might affect biomolecular interactions remains unclear. Here, we map glioblastoma missense mutations on the human protein interactome, model the structures of affected protein complexes and decipher the effect of mutations on protein-protein, protein-nucleic acid and protein-ion binding interfaces. Although some missense mutations over-stabilize protein complexes, we found that the overall effect of mutations is destabilizing, mostly affecting the electrostatic component of binding energy. We also showed that mutations on interfaces resulted in more drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties than mutations occurring outside the interfaces. Analysis of glioblastoma mutations on interfaces allowed us to stratify cancer-related interactions, identify potential driver genes, and propose two dozen additional cancer biomarkers, including those specific to functions of the nervous system. Such an analysis also offered insight into the molecular mechanism of the phenotypic outcomes of mutations, including effects on complex stability, activity, binding and turnover rate. As a result of mutated protein and gene network analysis, we observed that interactions of proteins with mutations mapped on interfaces had higher bottleneck properties compared to interactions with mutations elsewhere on the protein or unaffected interactions. Such observations suggest that genes with mutations directly affecting protein binding properties are preferably located in central network positions and may influence critical nodes and edges in signal transduction networks. PMID:23799087

  12. Position indicator

    DOEpatents

    Tanner, David E.

    1981-01-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described in which a position indicator is provided for detecting and indicating the position of a movable element inside a pressure vessel. The movable element may be a valve element or similar device which moves about an axis. Light from a light source is transmitted from a source outside the pressure vessel to a first region inside the pressure vessel in alignment with the axis of the movable element. The light is redirected by a reflector prism to a second region displaced radially from the first region. The reflector prism moves in response to movement of the movable element about its axis such that the second region moves arcuately with respect to the first region. Sensors are arrayed in an arc corresponding to the arc of movement of the second region and signals are transmitted from the sensors to the exterior of the reactor vessel to provide indication of the position of the movable element.

  13. Large-scale mapping of mutations affecting zebrafish development

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Robert; Rauch, Gerd-Jörg; Geiger-Rudolph, Silke; Albrecht, Andrea; van Bebber, Frauke; Berger, Andrea; Busch-Nentwich, Elisabeth; Dahm, Ralf; Dekens, Marcus PS; Dooley, Christopher; Elli, Alexandra F; Gehring, Ines; Geiger, Horst; Geisler, Maria; Glaser, Stefanie; Holley, Scott; Huber, Matthias; Kerr, Andy; Kirn, Anette; Knirsch, Martina; Konantz, Martina; Küchler, Axel M; Maderspacher, Florian; Neuhauss, Stephan C; Nicolson, Teresa; Ober, Elke A; Praeg, Elke; Ray, Russell; Rentzsch, Brit; Rick, Jens M; Rief, Eva; Schauerte, Heike E; Schepp, Carsten P; Schönberger, Ulrike; Schonthaler, Helia B; Seiler, Christoph; Sidi, Samuel; Söllner, Christian; Wehner, Anja; Weiler, Christian; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2007-01-01

    Background Large-scale mutagenesis screens in the zebrafish employing the mutagen ENU have isolated several hundred mutant loci that represent putative developmental control genes. In order to realize the potential of such screens, systematic genetic mapping of the mutations is necessary. Here we report on a large-scale effort to map the mutations generated in mutagenesis screening at the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology by genome scanning with microsatellite markers. Results We have selected a set of microsatellite markers and developed methods and scoring criteria suitable for efficient, high-throughput genome scanning. We have used these methods to successfully obtain a rough map position for 319 mutant loci from the Tübingen I mutagenesis screen and subsequent screening of the mutant collection. For 277 of these the corresponding gene is not yet identified. Mapping was successful for 80 % of the tested loci. By comparing 21 mutation and gene positions of cloned mutations we have validated the correctness of our linkage group assignments and estimated the standard error of our map positions to be approximately 6 cM. Conclusion By obtaining rough map positions for over 300 zebrafish loci with developmental phenotypes, we have generated a dataset that will be useful not only for cloning of the affected genes, but also to suggest allelism of mutations with similar phenotypes that will be identified in future screens. Furthermore this work validates the usefulness of our methodology for rapid, systematic and inexpensive microsatellite mapping of zebrafish mutations. PMID:17212827

  14. Positive psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Seligman, Martin E P; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C

    2006-11-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported them to be "life-changing." Delivered on the Web, positive psychology exercises relieved depressive symptoms for at least 6 months compared with placebo interventions, the effects of which lasted less than a week. In severe depression, the effects of these Web exercises were particularly striking. This address reports two preliminary studies: In the first, PPT delivered to groups significantly decreased levels of mild-to-moderate depression through 1-year follow-up. In the second, PPT delivered to individuals produced higher remission rates than did treatment as usual and treatment as usual plus medication among outpatients with major depressive disorder. Together, these studies suggest that treatments for depression may usefully be supplemented by exercises that explicitly increase positive emotion, engagement, and meaning. ((c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:17115810

  15. Positively Adolescent!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, Sue

    2000-01-01

    Believes that music teachers should reassess their views toward adolescent behavior in the music classroom by learning to see their behavior in a positive light. Describes teaching strategies that build on four adolescent behaviors: (1) desire for peer acceptance; (2) abundant energy; (3) love of fun; and (4) limited time-managing skills. (CMK)

  16. Mutation directional selection sheds light on prion pathogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Liang; Ji, Hong-Fang

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} Most pathogenic mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. {yields} Mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interactions between PrP and facilitating factors. {yields} The findings also have significant implications for exploring potential regions involved in the conformational transition from PrP{sup C} to PrP{sup Sc}. -- Abstract: As mutations in the PRNP gene account for human hereditary prion diseases (PrDs), it is crucial to elucidating how these mutations affect the central pathogenic conformational transition of normal cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) to abnormal scrapie isoform (PrP{sup Sc}). Many studies proposed that these pathogenic mutations may make PrP more susceptible to conformational change through altering its structure stability. By evaluating the most recent observations regarding pathogenic mutations, it was found that the pathogenic mutations do not exert a uniform effect on the thermodynamic stability of the human PrP's structure. Through analyzing the reported PrDs-related mutations, we found that 25 out of 27 mutations possess strong directional selection, i.e., enhancing hydrophobicity or decreasing negative and increasing positive charge. Based on the triggering role reported by previous studies of facilitating factors in PrP{sup C} conversion, e.g., lipid and polyanion, we proposed that the mutation-induced changes may strengthen the interaction between PrP and facilitating factors, which will accelerate PrP conversion and cause PrDs.

  17. Characterization of breast cancers with PI3K mutations in an academic practice setting using SNaPshot profiling.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Vandana G; Cooper Lloyd, M; Ballinger, Tarah; Sanders, Melinda E; Du, Liping; Lai, Darson; Su, Zengliu; Mayer, Ingrid; Levy, Mia; LaFrance, Delecia R; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Shyr, Yu; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Pao, William; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the PIK3CA gene are common in breast cancer and represent a clinically useful therapeutic target. Several larger, population-based studies have shown a positive prognostic significance associated with these mutations. This study aims to further identify characteristics of patients harboring PIK3CA mutations while evaluating the clinical impact of genomic testing for these mutations. Tumors from 312 patients at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center were analyzed for PIK3CA mutations using a multiplex screening assay (SNaPshot). Mutation rates, receptor status, histopathologic characteristics, and time to recurrence were assessed. The number of patients participating in clinical trials, specifically trials relating to the PIK3CA mutation, was examined. Statistically significant differences between wild-type and mutated tumors were determined using the Wilcoxon, Pearson, and Fischer exact tests. The PIK3CA mutation was found in 25 % of tumors tested. Patients with PIK3CA mutations were significantly more likely to express hormone receptors, be of lower combined histological grade, and have a reduced time to recurrence. Patients found to have a PIK3CA mutation were significantly more likely to enter a PIK3CA-specific clinical trial. In addition to confirming previously established positive prognostic characteristics of tumors harboring PIK3CA mutations, this study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of mutation profiling in a clinical setting. PIK3CA mutation testing impacted treatment and resulted in more patients entering mutation-specific clinical trials. PMID:24722917

  18. Characterization of breast cancers with PI3K mutations in an academic practice setting using SNaPshot profiling.

    PubMed

    Abramson, Vandana G; Cooper Lloyd, M; Ballinger, Tarah; Sanders, Melinda E; Du, Liping; Lai, Darson; Su, Zengliu; Mayer, Ingrid; Levy, Mia; LaFrance, Delecia R; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L; Shyr, Yu; Dahlman, Kimberly B; Pao, William; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-06-01

    Mutations in the PIK3CA gene are common in breast cancer and represent a clinically useful therapeutic target. Several larger, population-based studies have shown a positive prognostic significance associated with these mutations. This study aims to further identify characteristics of patients harboring PIK3CA mutations while evaluating the clinical impact of genomic testing for these mutations. Tumors from 312 patients at Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center were analyzed for PIK3CA mutations using a multiplex screening assay (SNaPshot). Mutation rates, receptor status, histopathologic characteristics, and time to recurrence were assessed. The number of patients participating in clinical trials, specifically trials relating to the PIK3CA mutation, was examined. Statistically significant differences between wild-type and mutated tumors were determined using the Wilcoxon, Pearson, and Fischer exact tests. The PIK3CA mutation was found in 25 % of tumors tested. Patients with PIK3CA mutations were significantly more likely to express hormone receptors, be of lower combined histological grade, and have a reduced time to recurrence. Patients found to have a PIK3CA mutation were significantly more likely to enter a PIK3CA-specific clinical trial. In addition to confirming previously established positive prognostic characteristics of tumors harboring PIK3CA mutations, this study demonstrates the feasibility and utility of mutation profiling in a clinical setting. PIK3CA mutation testing impacted treatment and resulted in more patients entering mutation-specific clinical trials.

  19. BRCA1/2 germline mutations and their clinical importance in Turkish breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cecener, Gulsah; Egeli, Unal; Tunca, Berrin; Erturk, Elif; Ak, Secil; Gokgoz, Sehsuvar; Tasdelen, Ismet; Tezcan, Gulcin; Demirdogen, Elif; Bayram, Nuran; Avci, Nilufer; Evrensel, Turkkan

    2014-10-01

    BRCA1/BRCA2 genes were screened in 117 patients with breast cancer by sequencing. Fourteen percent of patients tested positive for BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations. Four frame shift mutations, four pathogenic missense mutations, and 25 different sequence variations were detected. BRCA mutation positivity was significantly associated with Ki67 (p = .001). BRCA protein expressions were decreased in the patients harboring important mutations and polymorphisms (BRCA1;P508 stop, V1740G, Q1182R, Q1756P and BRCA2;V2466A) related with disease. Our findings contribute significantly to the types of germline BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations and their biological effects in Turkish women. These data could help guide the management of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-carrying patients when considering breast-conserving therapy.

  20. Position sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, Siegfried (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A radiant energy angle sensor is provided wherein the sensitive portion thereof comprises a pair of linear array detectors with each detector mounted normal to the other to provide X and Y channels and a pair of slits spaced from the pair of linear arrays with each of the slits positioned normal to its associated linear array. There is also provided electrical circuit means connected to the pair of linear array detectors and to separate X and Y axes outputs.

  1. Positive Psychologists on Positive Constructs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyubomirsky, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Comments on the original article by McNulty and Fincham (see record 2011-15476-001). In their article, the authors offered compelling evidence that constructs such as forgiveness and optimism can have both beneficial and adverse consequences, depending on the context. Their caution about labeling particular psychological processes as "positive" is…

  2. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats. PMID:20484848

  3. Genetic analyses of fancy rat-derived mutations.

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Takashi; Yokoe, Mayuko; Yagasaki, Kayoko; Kawaguchi, Tatsuya; Kumafuji, Kenta; Serikawa, Tadao

    2010-01-01

    To collect rat mutations and increase the value of the rat model system, we introduced fancy-derived mutations to the laboratory and carried out genetic analyses. Six fancy rats were shipped from a fancy rat colony in the USA and used as founders. After initial crosses with a laboratory strain, TM/Kyo or PVG/Seac, inbreeding started and 6 partially inbred lines, including 2 sublines, were produced as Kyoto Fancy Rat Stock (KFRS) strains. During inbreeding, we isolated 9 mutations: 5 coat colors, American mink (am), Black eye (Be), grey (g), Pearl (Pel), siamese (sia); 1 coat pattern, head spot (hs); 2 coat textures, Rex (Re), satin (sat); and an ear pinnae malformation, dumbo (dmbo). Genetic analyses mapped 7 mutations to particular regions of the rat chromosomes (Chr): am to Chr 1, sia to Chr 1, sat to Chr 3, Re to Chr 7, g to Chr 8, dmbo to Chr 14, and hs to Chr 15. Candidate gene analysis revealed that a missense mutation in the tyrosinase gene, Ser79Pro, was responsible for sia. From mutant phenotypes and mapping positions, it is likely that all mutations isolated in this study were unique to the fancy rat. These findings suggest that fancy rat colonies are a good source for collecting rat mutations. The fancy-derived mutations, made available to biomedical research in the current study, will increase the scientific value of laboratory rats.

  4. Sex and deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Isabel; Campos, Paulo R A

    2008-05-01

    The evolutionary advantage of sexual reproduction has been considered as one of the most pressing questions in evolutionary biology. While a pluralistic view of the evolution of sex and recombination has been suggested by some, here we take a simpler view and try to quantify the conditions under which sex can evolve given a set of minimal assumptions. Since real populations are finite and also subject to recurrent deleterious mutations, this minimal model should apply generally to all populations. We show that the maximum advantage of recombination occurs for an intermediate value of the deleterious effect of mutations. Furthermore we show that the conditions under which the biggest advantage of sex is achieved are those that produce the fastest fitness decline in the corresponding asexual population and are therefore the conditions for which Muller's ratchet has the strongest effect. We also show that the selective advantage of a modifier of the recombination rate depends on its strength. The quantification of the range of selective effects that favors recombination then leads us to suggest that, if in stressful environments the effect of deleterious mutations is enhanced, a connection between sex and stress could be expected, as it is found in several species.

  5. Mutator and MULE Transposons.

    PubMed

    Lisch, Damon

    2015-04-01

    The Mutator system of transposable elements (TEs) is a highly mutagenic family of transposons in maize. Because they transpose at high rates and target genic regions, these transposons can rapidly generate large numbers of new mutants, which has made the Mutator system a favored tool for both forward and reverse mutagenesis in maize. Low copy number versions of this system have also proved to be excellent models for understanding the regulation and behavior of Class II transposons in plants. Notably, the availability of a naturally occurring locus that can heritably silence autonomous Mutator elements has provided insights into the means by which otherwise active transposons are recognized and silenced. This chapter will provide a review of the biology, regulation, evolution and uses of this remarkable transposon system, with an emphasis on recent developments in our understanding of the ways in which this TE system is recognized and epigenetically silenced as well as recent evidence that Mu-like elements (MULEs) have had a significant impact on the evolution of plant genomes.

  6. OXPHOS mutations and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Werner J H; Distelmaier, Felix; Smeitink, Jan AM; Willems, Peter HGM

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) sustains organelle function and plays a central role in cellular energy metabolism. The OXPHOS system consists of 5 multisubunit complexes (CI–CV) that are built up of 92 different structural proteins encoded by the nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Biogenesis of a functional OXPHOS system further requires the assistance of nDNA-encoded OXPHOS assembly factors, of which 35 are currently identified. In humans, mutations in both structural and assembly genes and in genes involved in mtDNA maintenance, replication, transcription, and translation induce ‘primary' OXPHOS disorders that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Leigh syndrome (LS), which is probably the most classical OXPHOS disease during early childhood. Here, we present the current insights regarding function, biogenesis, regulation, and supramolecular architecture of the OXPHOS system, as well as its genetic origin. Next, we provide an inventory of OXPHOS structural and assembly genes which, when mutated, induce human neurodegenerative disorders. Finally, we discuss the consequences of mutations in OXPHOS structural and assembly genes at the single cell level and how this information has advanced our understanding of the role of OXPHOS dysfunction in neurodegeneration. PMID:23149385

  7. Spectrum of CHD7 Mutations in 110 Individuals with CHARGE Syndrome and Genotype-Phenotype Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Lalani, Seema R.; Safiullah, Arsalan M.; Fernbach, Susan D.; Harutyunyan, Karine G.; Thaller, Christina; Peterson, Leif E.; McPherson, John D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; White, Lisa D.; Hefner, Margaret; Davenport, Sandra L. H.; Graham, John M.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Glass, Nancy L.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Craigen, William J.; Neish, Steven R.; Lin, Angela E.; Belmont, John W.

    2006-01-01

    CHARGE syndrome is a well-established multiple-malformation syndrome with distinctive consensus diagnostic criteria. Characteristic associated anomalies include ocular coloboma, choanal atresia, cranial nerve defects, distinctive external and inner ear abnormalities, hearing loss, cardiovascular malformations, urogenital anomalies, and growth retardation. Recently, mutations of the chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein gene CHD7 were reported to be a major cause of CHARGE syndrome. We sequenced the CHD7 gene in 110 individuals who had received the clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome, and we detected mutations in 64 (58%). Mutations were distributed throughout the coding exons and conserved splice sites of CHD7. Of the 64 mutations, 47 (73%) predicted premature truncation of the protein. These included nonsense and frameshift mutations, which most likely lead to haploinsufficiency. Phenotypically, the mutation-positive group was more likely to exhibit cardiovascular malformations (54 of 59 in the mutation-positive group vs. 30 of 42 in the mutation-negative group; P=.014), coloboma of the eye (55 of 62 in the mutation-positive group vs. 30 of 43 in the mutation-negative group; P=.022), and facial asymmetry, often caused by seventh cranial nerve abnormalities (36 of 56 in the mutation-positive group vs. 13 of 39 in the mutation-negative group; P=.004). Mouse embryo whole-mount and section in situ hybridization showed the expression of Chd7 in the outflow tract of the heart, optic vesicle, facio-acoustic preganglion complex, brain, olfactory pit, and mandibular component of the first branchial arch. Microarray gene-expression analysis showed a signature pattern of gene-expression differences that distinguished the individuals with CHARGE syndrome with CHD7 mutation from the controls. We conclude that cardiovascular malformations, coloboma, and facial asymmetry are common findings in CHARGE syndrome caused by CHD7 mutation. PMID:16400610

  8. Novel insight into mutational landscape of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gaykalova, Daria A; Mambo, Elizabeth; Choudhary, Ashish; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Hadd, Andrew; Latham, Gary; Danilova, Ludmila V; Bishop, Justin; Li, Ryan J; Westra, William H; Hennessey, Patrick; Koch, Wayne M; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A; Sun, Wenyue

    2014-01-01

    Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46%) studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection.

  9. Novel Insight into Mutational Landscape of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaykalova, Daria A.; Mambo, Elizabeth; Choudhary, Ashish; Houghton, Jeffery; Buddavarapu, Kalyan; Sanford, Tiffany; Darden, Will; Adai, Alex; Hadd, Andrew; Latham, Gary; Danilova, Ludmila V.; Bishop, Justin; Li, Ryan J.; Westra, William H.; Hennessey, Patrick; Koch, Wayne M.; Ochs, Michael F.; Califano, Joseph A.; Sun, Wenyue

    2014-01-01

    Development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is characterized by accumulation of mutations in several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. We have formerly described the mutation pattern of HNSCC and described NOTCH signaling pathway alterations. Given the complexity of the HNSCC, here we extend the previous study to understand the overall HNSCC mutation context and to discover additional genetic alterations. We performed high depth targeted exon sequencing of 51 highly actionable cancer-related genes with a high frequency of mutation across many cancer types, including head and neck. DNA from primary tumor tissues and matched normal tissues was analyzed for 37 HNSCC patients. We identified 26 non-synonymous or stop-gained mutations targeting 11 of 51 selected genes. These genes were mutated in 17 out of 37 (46%) studied HNSCC patients. Smokers harbored 3.2-fold more mutations than non-smokers. Importantly, TP53 was mutated in 30%, NOTCH1 in 8% and FGFR3 in 5% of HNSCC. HPV negative patients harbored 4-fold more TP53 mutations than HPV positive patients. These data confirm prior reports of the HNSCC mutational profile. Additionally, we detected mutations in two new genes, CEBPA and FES, which have not been previously reported in HNSCC. These data extend the spectrum of HNSCC mutations and define novel mutation targets in HNSCC carcinogenesis, especially for smokers and HNSCC without HPV infection. PMID:24667986

  10. Hypothesis: Obesity Is Associated with a Lower Mutation Threshold in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bordonaro, Michael; Lazarova, Darina

    2015-01-01

    Neoplastic progression requires accumulation of several mutations (mutation threshold). We hypothesize that obesity raises the risk of microsatellite stable (MSS) colon cancer (CC) at least in part by decreasing the mutation threshold. Thus, we posit that obese patients require fewer mutations, particularly driver mutations, compared to their normal BMI counterparts. Further, we suggest that the reduced number of required mutations in obese patients could be due to several factors, including the high levels of cytokines that accompany obesity. Cytokine-activated ERK, AKT, and JAK/STAT signaling could synergize with CC-initiating mutations to promote intestinal neoplastic development. Therefore, driver mutations that induce these specific pathways may not be “required” for neoplastic development in obesity; alteration in cell signaling consequent to obesity can substitute for some driver mutations in neoplastic progression. This hypothesis is supported by preliminary analyses of data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Thus, we observed that, compared to normal weight patients, cancer genomes of obese MSS CC patients exhibit fewer somatic mutations, and correspondingly lower numbers of mutations in driver genes (P = 0.026).The most striking observation was the lower number of KRAS mutations detected in patients with high body-mass index (BMI). These intriguing observations require further validation with increased number of patients, taking into account all possible confounding factors. If the hypothesis is confirmed, future studies should also address several possible explanations for the observed lower mutation threshold in obese MSS CC patients. PMID:26284133

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA mutations in Chinese patients: 16 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Weimin; Wang, Yun; Meng, Yan; Su, Liang; Shi, Huiping; Huang, Shangzhi

    2010-08-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA; Morquio A syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficiency of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS) and transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. This is the first systematic mutation screen in Chinese MPS IVA patients. Mutation detections in 24 unrelated Chinese MPS IVA patients were performed by PCR and direct sequencing of exons or the mRNA of GALNS. A total of 42 mutant alleles were identified, belonging to 27 different mutations. Out of the 27 mutations, 16 were novel, including 2 splicing mutations (c.567-1G>T and c.634-1G>A), 2 nonsense mutations (p.W325X and p.Q422X) and 12 missense mutations (p.T88I, p.H142R, p.P163H, p.G168L, p.H236D, p.N289S, p.T312A, p.G316V, p.A324E, p.L366P, p.Q422K and p.F452L). p.G340D was found to be a common mutation in the Chinese MPS IVA patients, accounting for 16.7% of the total number of mutant alleles. The results show that the mutations in Chinese MPS IVA patients are also family specific but have a different mutation spectrum as compared to those of other populations.

  12. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Lavi, Noa

    2014-01-01

    With the discovery of the JAK2V617F mutation in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative (Ph−) myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) in 2005, major advances have been made in the diagnosis of MPNs, in understanding of their pathogenesis involving the JAK/STAT pathway, and finally in the development of novel therapies targeting this pathway. Nevertheless, it remains unknown which mutations exist in approximately one-third of patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). At the end of 2013, two studies identified recurrent mutations in the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) using whole-exome sequencing. These mutations were revealed in the majority of ET and PMF patients with non-mutated JAK2 or MPL but not in polycythemia vera patients. Somatic 52-bp deletions (type 1 mutations) and recurrent 5-bp insertions (type 2 mutations) in exon 9 of the CALR gene (the last exon encoding the C-terminal amino acids of the protein calreticulin) were detected and found always to generate frameshift mutations. All detected mutant calreticulin proteins shared a novel amino acid sequence at the C-terminal. Mutations in CALR are acquired early in the clonal history of the disease, and they cause activation of JAK/STAT signaling. The CALR mutations are the second most frequent mutations in Ph− MPN patients after the JAK2V617F mutation, and their detection has significantly improved the diagnostic approach for ET and PMF. The characteristics of the CALR mutations as well as their diagnostic, clinical, and pathogenesis implications are discussed in this review. PMID:25386351

  13. Escherichia coli frameshift mutation rate depends on the chromosomal context but not on the GATC content near the mutation site.

    PubMed

    Martina, Mariana A; Correa, Elisa M E; Argaraña, Carlos E; Barra, José L

    2012-01-01

    Different studies have suggested that mutation rate varies at different positions in the genome. In this work we analyzed if the chromosomal context and/or the presence of GATC sites can affect the frameshift mutation rate in the Escherichia coli genome. We show that in a mismatch repair deficient background, a condition where the mutation rate reflects the fidelity of the DNA polymerization process, the frameshift mutation rate could vary up to four times among different chromosomal contexts. Furthermore, the mismatch repair efficiency could vary up to eight times when compared at different chromosomal locations, indicating that detection and/or repair of frameshift events also depends on the chromosomal context. Also, GATC sequences have been proved to be essential for the correct functioning of the E. coli mismatch repair system. Using bacteriophage heteroduplexes molecules it has been shown that GATC influence the mismatch repair efficiency in a distance- and number-dependent manner, being almost nonfunctional when GATC sequences are located at 1 kb or more from the mutation site. Interestingly, we found that in E. coli genomic DNA the mismatch repair system can efficiently function even if the nearest GATC sequence is located more than 2 kb away from the mutation site. The results presented in this work show that even though frameshift mutations can be efficiently generated and/or repaired anywhere in the genome, these processes can be modulated by the chromosomal context that surrounds the mutation site.

  14. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, M.A.; Alter, P.

    1983-07-07

    An apparatus is provided for precisely adjusting the position of an article relative to a beam emerging from a neutron source disposed in a housing. The apparatus includes a support pivotably mounted on a movable base plate and freely suspended therefrom. The support is gravity biased toward the housing and carries an article holder movable in a first direction longitudinally of the axis of said beam and normally urged into engagement against said housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the suspended holder in two mutually perpendicular directions, respectively, normal to the axis of the beam.

  15. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  16. Positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, Max A.; Alter, Paul

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus for precisely positioning materials test specimens within the optimum neutron flux path emerging from a neutron source located in a housing. The test specimens are retained in a holder mounted on the free end of a support pivotably mounted and suspended from a movable base plate. The support is gravity biased to urge the holder in a direction longitudinally of the flux path against the housing. Means are provided for moving the base plate in two directions to effect movement of the holder in two mutually perpendicular directions normal to the axis of the flux path.

  17. POSITIONING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wall, R.R.; Peterson, D.L.

    1959-09-15

    A positioner is described for a vertical reactor-control rod. The positioner comprises four grooved friction rotatable members that engage the control rod on all sides and shift it longitudinally. The four friction members are drivingly interconnected for conjoint rotation and comprise two pairs of coaxial members. The members of each pair are urged toward one another by hydraulic or pneumatic pressure and thus grip the control rod so as to hold it in any position or adjust it. Release of the by-draulic or pneumatic pressure permits springs between the friction members of each pair to force them apart, whereby the control rod moves quickly by gravity into the reactor.

  18. High specificity but low sensitivity of mutation-specific antibodies against EGFR mutations in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bondgaard, Anna-Louise; Høgdall, Estrid; Mellemgaard, Anders; Skov, Birgit G

    2014-12-01

    Determination of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations has a pivotal impact on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A standardized test has not yet been approved. So far, Sanger DNA sequencing has been widely used. Its rather low sensitivity has led to the development of more sensitive methods including real-time PCR (RT-PCR). Immunohistochemistry with mutation-specific antibodies might be a promising detection method. We evaluated 210 samples with NSCLC from an unselected Caucasian population. Extracted DNA was analyzed for EGFR mutations by RT-PCR (Therascreen EGFR PCR kit, Qiagen, UK; reference method). For immunohistochemistry, antibodies against exon19 deletions (clone 6B6), exon21 mutations (clone 43B2) from Cell Signaling Technology (Boston, USA) and EGFR variantIII (clone 218C9) from Dako (Copenhagen, DK) were applied. Protein expression was evaluated, and staining score (multipum of intensity (graded 0-3) and percentages (0-100%) of stained tumor cells) was calculated. Positivity was defined as staining score >0. Specificity of exon19 antibody was 98.8% (95% confidence interval=95.9-99.9%) and of exon21 antibody 97.8% (95% confidence interval=94.4-99.4%). Sensitivity of exon19 antibody was 63.2% (95% confidence interval=38.4-83.7%) and of exon21 antibody was 80.0% (95% confidence interval=44.4-97.5%). Seven exon19 and four exon21 mutations were false negatives (immunohistochemistry negative, RT-PCR positive). Two exon19 and three exon21 mutations were false positive (immunohistochemistry positive, RT-PCR negative). One false positive exon21 mutation had staining score 300. The EGFR variantIII antibody showed no correlation to EGFR mutation status determined by RT-PCR or to EGFR immunohistochemistry. High specificity of the mutation-specific antibodies was demonstrated. However, sensitivity was low, especially for exon19 deletions, and thus these antibodies cannot yet be used as screening method for EGFR mutations in NSCLC

  19. EG-08IDH MUTATIONS IN GLIOMAS ASSOCIATED WITH ENCHONDROMATOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, M. Kelly; Joseph, Loren; Venneti, Sriram; Daher, Ahmad; Pytel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The enchondromatoses, Ollier's disease and Maffucci syndrome, are non-heritable developmental disorders characterized by multiple enchondromas (Olllier's) in association with hemangiomas (Maffucci). Glial neoplasms are reported in both disorders but a pathogenic mechanism underlying this association has not been identified. We report a case of anaplastic astrocytoma in a 23 year old man with Maffucci syndrome whose tumor carried a substitution mutation of arginine for cysteine at position 132 (R132C) of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) protein. This mutation, commonly found in Maffucci-associated enchondromas and hemangiomas, was not detected on routine immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of the astrocytoma using the R132H mutation-specific antibody, commonly applied in clinical laboratories. The R132C mutation was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and subsequently confirmed using a SNaPshot assay. Because somatic mosaic IDH mutations are associated with enchondromas and hemangiomas in Maffucci syndrome, we looked for the R132C mutation in a hemangioma, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and histologically normal brain surrounding the tumor from this patient. The mutation was present in the hemangioma, absent in PBMNC, and present in 2% of alleles in ‘normal’ brain. The low level in surrounding brain tissue is consistent with tumor cell infiltration, not mosaicism, as a S173T p53 mutation in the tumor showed similar results. Using IHC, we further demonstrated that the mutant IDH1 protein in this glioma functions as an oncometabolite. Two repressive histone trimethylation marks were strongly positive in the tumor, supporting a role for 2-hydroxyglutarate in the inhibition of histone demethylation. Together, these data demonstrate that an IDH1 mutation common in enchodromatoses underlies the association of glial tumors reported in both Ollier's disease and Maffucci syndrome.

  20. Role of TP53 mutations in vulvar carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Choschzick, Matthias; Hantaredja, Widianto; Tennstedt, Pierre; Gieseking, Frederike; Wölber, Linn; Simon, Ronald

    2011-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-independent development of vulvar carcinomas is common and the disruption of the TP53 pathway seems to play a key role in these tumors. Overexpression of TP53 in precursor lesions (differentiated VIN) and associated invasive carcinomas is regarded as an important diagnostic feature of this subtype of vulvar cancer. To determine the relationship of TP53 mutation status with clinicopathologic parameters, HPV status, and patient outcome, 18 squamous cell carcinomas of the vulva with TP53 overexpression along with 21 immunohistochemically TP53-negative tumors were analyzed. TP53 mutations were found in 17 (43.6%) of vulvar cancers, 18 (46.2%) tumors were HPV associated, and 8 (20.5%) carcinomas showed no relation to HPV infection or TP53 mutations. The presence of TP53 mutations was significantly linked to TP53 overexpression (P=0.002) and negative HPV status (P=0.012). The specificity of TP53 protein overexpression for the occurrence of TP53 mutations was 68.2%, with a positive predictive value of 66.7%. The most frequent mutation types were C:G →T:A transitions (57.9%). This mutation pattern strongly indicates the important role of oxidative stress in vulvar carcinogenesis. There were no relationships between TP53 mutation status and tumor stage, grading, nodal status, depth of invasion, or patient prognosis. In summary, TP53 mutations play a crucial role in a substantial proportion of vulvar carcinomas and are probably associated to cellular oxidative stress in chronically degenerative diseases of the vulva, such as lichen sclerosus. These data support the potential utility of restoring TP53 function as a therapeutic alternative in vulvar cancer. Further studies are necessary to clarify the prognostic implications of TP53 mutations in vulvar carcinomas.

  1. Algorithms and semantic infrastructure for mutation impact extraction and grounding

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mutation impact extraction is a hitherto unaccomplished task in state of the art mutation extraction systems. Protein mutations and their impacts on protein properties are hidden in scientific literature, making them poorly accessible for protein engineers and inaccessible for phenotype-prediction systems that currently depend on manually curated genomic variation databases. Results We present the first rule-based approach for the extraction of mutation impacts on protein properties, categorizing their directionality as positive, negative or neutral. Furthermore protein and mutation mentions are grounded to their respective UniProtKB IDs and selected protein properties, namely protein functions to concepts found in the Gene Ontology. The extracted entities are populated to an OWL-DL Mutation Impact ontology facilitating complex querying for mutation impacts using SPARQL. We illustrate retrieval of proteins and mutant sequences for a given direction of impact on specific protein properties. Moreover we provide programmatic access to the data through semantic web services using the SADI (Semantic Automated Discovery and Integration) framework. Conclusion We address the problem of access to legacy mutation data in unstructured form through the creation of novel mutation impact extraction methods which are evaluated on a corpus of full-text articles on haloalkane dehalogenases, tagged by domain experts. Our approaches show state of the art levels of precision and recall for Mutation Grounding and respectable level of precision but lower recall for the task of Mutant-Impact relation extraction. The system is deployed using text mining and semantic web technologies with the goal of publishing to a broad spectrum of consumers. PMID:21143808

  2. Point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Urdaneta, L; Plowe, C; Goldman, I; Lal, A A

    1999-09-01

    The present study was designed to characterize mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) genes of Plasmodium falciparum in the Bolivar region of Venezuela, where high levels of clinical resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, Fansidar; F. Hoffman-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland) has been documented. We used a nested mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion methods to measure 1) the prevalence of DHFR mutations at 16, 50, 51, 59, 108, and 164 codon positions, and 2) the prevalence of mutations in the 436, 437, 581, and 613 codon sites in DHPS gene. In the case of the DHFR gene, of the 54 parasite isolates analyzed, we detected the presence of Asn-108 and Ile-51 in 96% of the isolates and Arg-50 mutation in 64% of the isolates. Each of these mutations has been associated with high level of resistance to pyrimethamine. Only 2 samples (4%) showed the wild type Ser-108 mutation and none showed Thr-108 and Val-16 mutations that are specific for resistance to cycloguanil. In the case of DHPS gene, we found a mutation at position 437 (Gly) in 100% of the isolates and Gly-581 in 96% of the isolates. The simultaneous presence of mutations Asn-108 and Ile-51 in the DHFR gene and Gly-437 and Gly-581 in the DHPS gene in 96% of the samples tested suggested that a cumulative effect of mutations could be the major mechanism conferring high SP resistance in this area. PMID:10497990

  3. Protein Domain-Level Landscape of Cancer-Type-Specific Somatic Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fan; Petsalaki, Evangelia; Rolland, Thomas; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Roth, Frederick P.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying driver mutations and their functional consequences is critical to our understanding of cancer. Towards this goal, and because domains are the functional units of a protein, we explored the protein domain-level landscape of cancer-type-specific somatic mutations. Specifically, we systematically examined tumor genomes from 21 cancer types to identify domains with high mutational density in specific tissues, the positions of mutational hotspots within these domains, and the functional and structural context where possible. While hotspots corresponding to specific gain-of-function mutations are expected for oncoproteins, we found that tumor suppressor proteins also exhibit strong biases toward being mutated in particular domains. Within domains, however, we observed the expected patterns of mutation, with recurrently mutated positions for oncogenes and evenly distributed mutations for tumor suppressors. For example, we identified both known and new endometrial cancer hotspots in the tyrosine kinase domain of the FGFR2 protein, one of which is also a hotspot in breast cancer, and found new two hotspots in the Immunoglobulin I-set domain in colon cancer. Thus, to prioritize cancer mutations for further functional studies aimed at more precise cancer treatments, we have systematically correlated mutations and cancer types at the protein domain level. PMID:25794154

  4. Filaggrin mutations and the skin.

    PubMed

    De, Dipankar; Handa, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    Filaggrin is very important in the terminal differentiation of the skin and the formation of cornified envelope in the stratum corneum. Several mutations in the filaggrin gene have been identified in the last decade, mostly from the European countries. Loss of function mutations in the filaggrin gene results in reduced production of filaggrin, depending on the type and site of mutation. Such mutations in the filaggrin gene have been shown to be the most significant genetic risk factor for development of atopic dermatitis and undoubtedly has a role in the pathogenesis of ichthyosis vulgaris. Though there is theoretical possibility of association with hand eczema and allergic contact dermatitis; in clinical studies, the strength of these associations was not significantly strong. In this review, we have discussed the structure and function of filaggrin, basic genetics, type of mutations in filaggrin gene, and association of such mutations with different dermatoses.

  5. Efficient Algorithms for Probing the RNA Mutation Landscape

    PubMed Central

    Waldispühl, Jérôme; Devadas, Srinivas; Berger, Bonnie; Clote, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The diversity and importance of the role played by RNAs in the regulation and development of the cell are now well-known and well-documented. This broad range of functions is achieved through specific structures that have been (presumably) optimized through evolution. State-of-the-art methods, such as McCaskill's algorithm, use a statistical mechanics framework based on the computation of the partition function over the canonical ensemble of all possible secondary structures on a given sequence. Although secondary structure predictions from thermodynamics-based algorithms are not as accurate as methods employing comparative genomics, the former methods are the only available tools to investigate novel RNAs, such as the many RNAs of unknown function recently reported by the ENCODE consortium. In this paper, we generalize the McCaskill partition function algorithm to sum over the grand canonical ensemble of all secondary structures of all mutants of the given sequence. Specifically, our new program, RNAmutants, simultaneously computes for each integer k the minimum free energy structure MFE(k) and the partition function Z(k) over all secondary structures of all k-point mutants, even allowing the user to specify certain positions required not to mutate and certain positions required to base-pair or remain unpaired. This technically important extension allows us to study the resilience of an RNA molecule to pointwise mutations. By computing the mutation profile of a sequence, a novel graphical representation of the mutational tendency of nucleotide positions, we analyze the deleterious nature of mutating specific nucleotide positions or groups of positions. We have successfully applied RNAmutants to investigate deleterious mutations (mutations that radically modify the secondary structure) in the Hepatitis C virus cis-acting replication element and to evaluate the evolutionary pressure applied on different regions of the HIV trans-activation response element. In

  6. The spectrum of mutations causing end-plate acetylcholinesterase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ohno, K; Engel, A G; Brengman, J M; Shen, X M; Heidenreich, F; Vincent, A; Milone, M; Tan, E; Demirci, M; Walsh, P; Nakano, S; Akiguchi, I

    2000-02-01

    The end-plate species of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an asymmetric enzyme consisting of a collagenic tail subunit composed of three collagenic strands (ColQ), each attached to a tetramer of the T isoform of the catalytic subunit (AChE(T)) via a proline-rich attachment domain. The principal function of the tail subunit is to anchor asymmetric AChE in the synaptic basal lamina. Human end-plate AChE deficiency was recently shown to be caused by mutations in COLQ. We here report nine novel COLQ mutations in 7 patients with end-plate AChE deficiency. We examine the effects of the mutations on the assembly of asymmetric AChE by coexpressing each genetically engineered COLQ mutant with ACHE(T) in COS cells. We classify the newly recognized and previously reported COLQ mutations into four classes according to their position in ColQ and their effect on AChE expression. We find that missense mutations in the proline-rich attachment domain abrogate attachment of catalytic subunits, that truncation mutations in the ColQ collagen domain prevent the assembly of asymmetric AChE, that hydrophobic missense residues in the C-terminal domain prevent triple helical assembly of the ColQ collagen domain, and that other mutations in the C-terminal region produce asymmetric species of AChE that are likely insertion incompetent. PMID:10665486

  7. Comparison of somatic mutation frequency among immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Motoyama, N; Miwa, T; Suzuki, Y; Okada, H; Azuma, T

    1994-02-01

    We analyzed the frequency of somatic mutation in immunoglobulin genes from hybridomas that secrete anti-(4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl (NP) monoclonal antibodies. A high frequency of mutation (3.3-4.4%) was observed in both the rearranged VH186.2 and V lambda 1 genes, indicating that somatic mutation occurs with similar frequency in these genes in spite of the absence of an intron enhancer in lambda 1 chain genes. In contrast to the high frequency in J-C introns, only two nucleotide substitutions occurred at positions -462 and -555 in the 5' noncoding region in one of the lambda 1-chain genes and in none of the other three so far studied. Since a similar low frequency of somatic mutation was observed in the 5' noncoding region of inactive lambda 2-chain genes rendered inactive because of incorrect rearrangement, this region may not be a target or alternatively, may be protected from the mutator system. We observed a low frequency of nucleotide substitution in unrearranged V lambda 1 genes (approximately 1/15 that of rearranged genes). Together with previous results (Azuma T., N. Motoyama, L. Fields, and D. Loh, 1993. Int. Immunol. 5:121), these findings suggest that the 5' noncoding region, which contains the promoter element, provides a signal for the somatic mutator system and that rearrangement, which brings the promoter into close proximity to the enhancer element, should increase mutation efficiency.

  8. Association of CFTR gene mutation with bronchial asthma

    PubMed Central

    Maurya, Nutan; Awasthi, Shally; Dixit, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Mutation on both the copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene results in cystic fibrosis (CF), which is a recessively transmitted genetic disorder. It is hypothesized that individuals heterozygous for CFTR gene mutation may develop obstructive pulmonary diseases like asthma. There is great heterogeneity in the phenotypic presentation and severity of CF lung disease. This could be due to genetic or environmental factors. Several modifier genes have been identified which may directly or indirectly interact with CFTR pathway and affect the severity of disease. This review article discusses the information related to the association of CFTR gene mutation with asthma. Association between CFTR gene mutation and asthma is still unclear. Report ranges from studies showing positive or protective association to those showing no association. Therefore, studies with sufficiently large sample size and detailed phenotype are required to define the potential contribution of CFTR in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:22664493

  9. Expression and mutations of p53 in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Kärjä, V J; Syrjänen, K J; Kurvinen, A K; Syrjänen, S M

    1997-05-01

    A series of 219 salivary gland tumours (103 carcinomas and 116 benign tumours) were analysed for p53 protein expression using immunohistochemistry, and for mutations in p53 gene using non-radioactive single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP). p53 expression was present in 36% (42/116) of the benign tumours and in 54% (56/103) of the carcinomas. The highest prevalence of p53 expression was found in adenoid cystic carcinomas (69%), followed by mucoepidermoid carcinomas (67%). Of the benign tumours, pleomorphic adenomas showed the highest prevalence of p53 positivity (41%). In malignant tumours, expression of p53 bore no correlation to local recurrence, metastatic disease or survival of the patients. Exons 5 through 9 were analysed and four mutations were found in 20 cases of p53-immunopositive tumours and two in 20 p53-negative tumours. Each of the exons 5, 6 and 8/9 had two mutations, whereas no mutations were detected in exon 7.

  10. Predominance of the recurrent mutation R635X in the LAMB3 gene in European patients with Herlitz junctional epidermolysis bullosa has implications for mutation detection strategy.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, L; Meneguzzi, G; McGrath, J A; Xu, Y; Blanchet-Bardon, C; Ortonne, J P; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J

    1997-08-01

    Junctional forms of epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) are characterized by tissue separation at the level of the lamina lucida. We have recently disclosed specific mutations in the LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 genes encoding the subunit polypeptides of the anchoring filament protein laminin 5 in 66 families with different variants of JEB. Examination of the JEB mutation database revealed recurrence of a particular C-->T substitution at nucleotide position 1903 (exon 14) of LAMB3, resulting in the mutation R635X. The inheritance of this nonsense mutation was noted on different genetic backgrounds, suggesting that R635X is a hotspot mutation. In this study, we have performed mutation evaluation in a European cohort of 14 families with the lethal, Herlitz type of JEB (H-JEB). The families were first screened for the presence of the R635X mutation by restriction enzyme digestion of the PCR product corresponding to exon 14. Four of the probands were found to be homozygous and six were heterozygous for R635X. The remaining alleles were subjected to mutation screening by PCR amplification of individual exons of LAMB3 and LAMC2, followed by heteroduplex analysis and nucleotide sequencing. In three families (six alleles), mutations in LAMC2 were disclosed. In the remaining eight alleles, additional pathogenetic LAMB3 mutations were found. None of the patients had LAMA3 mutation. Thus, LAMB3 mutations accounted for 22 of 28 JEB alleles (79%), and a total of 14 of 22 LAMB3 alleles (64%) harbored the R635X mutation, signifying its prevalence as a predominant genetic lesion underlying H-JEB in this European cohort of patients. This recurrent mutation will facilitate screening of additional JEB patients for the purpose of prenatal testing of fetuses at risk for recurrence. PMID:9242513

  11. Mutation screening of the RYR1 gene in malignant hyperthermia: Detection of a novel Tyr to ser mutation in a pedigree with associated centrl cores

    SciTech Connect

    Quane, K.A.; Keating, K.E.; Healy, J.M.S.

    1994-09-01

    The ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) has been shown to be mutated in a small number of malignant hyperthermia (MH) predigrees. Missense mutations in this gene have also been identified in two families with central core disease (CCD), a rare myopathy closely associated with MH. In an effort to identify other RYR1 mutations responsible for MH and CCD, we used a SSCP approach to screen the RYR1 gene for mutations in a family exhibiting susceptibility to MH (MHS) where some of the MHS individuals display core regions in their muscle. Sequence analysis of a unique aberrant SSCP has allowed us to identify a point mutation cosegregating with MHS in the described family. The mutation changes a conserved tyrosine residue at position 522 to a serine residue. This mutation is positioned relatively close to five of the six MHS/CCD mutations known to date and provides further evidence that MHS/CCD mutations may cluster in the amino terminal region of the RYR1 protein.

  12. Overexpression and mutations of p53 in metastatic malignant melanomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, A; Blaszyk, H; Cunningham, J S; McGovern, R M; Schroeder, J S; Helander, S D; Pittelkow, M R; Sommer, S S; Kovach, J S

    1996-07-29

    Alterations of the p53 tumor suppressor gene are the most frequent genetic abnormalities in human malignancies, but the role of p53 in the etiology of malignant melanomas is unclear. Fifty unselected malignant melanomas were analyzed for p53 overexpression by immunohistochemistry using 3 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Fifteen tumors (29.4%) showed positive staining with at least 2 different antibodies. In the first 20 consecutive tumors exons 5-9 and adjacent splice sites of the p53 gene were analyzed by genomic sequencing. There were 4 mutations in 20 metastatic melanomas. Three of 4 mutations were C:G-->T:A transitions. A search of our database of p53 mutations revealed that out of 8 p53 mutations reported by others, 4 are C:G-->T:A transitions at dipyrimidine sites, and one is a tandem CC-->TT mutation. This mutational pattern is comparable with the pattern of p53 mutations in squamous cell and basal cell carcinomas of the skin and is related to exposure to ultraviolet B (UV-B) wavelength radiation. Taken together with a predominance of UV-induced mutations in the CDKN2/ p16 gene demonstrated in melanoma cell lines, our data support a role of sunlight exposure in the etiology of malignant melanoma. The low frequency of p53 mutants in melanomas compared with other types of skin cancers suggests that although mutations in this gene are likely to be involved in the development of some malignant melanomas, they do not play as large a role as in squamous and basal cell carcinomas of the skin. PMID:8707401

  13. Investigation of CYP21A2 mutations in Turkish patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency and a novel founder mutation.

    PubMed

    Toraman, Bayram; Ökten, Ayşenur; Kalay, Ersan; Karagüzel, Gülay; Dinçer, Tuba; Açıkgöz, Emel Gül; Karagüzel, Ahmet

    2013-01-15

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessively inherited disorders characterized by impaired production of adrenal steroids. Approximately 95% of all CAH are caused by mutations of the CYP21A2 that encodes 21-hydroxylase. In this study, mutation analyses of CYP21A2 were performed in 48 CAH patients from 45 Turkish families with the clinical diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). While in 39 (86.7%) of 21OHD patients, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were identified in both alleles, in two 21OHD patients CYP21A2 mutations were identified only in one allele. In four patients, mutation was not detected at all. In total, seventeen known and one novel, disease causing CYP21A2 mutations were observed. Among identified mutations, previously described c.293-13C/A>G, large rearrangements and p.Q319X mutations were the most common mutations accounting for 33.3%, 14.4% and 12.2% of all evaluated chromosomes, respectively. In six families (13.3%) a novel founder mutation, c.2T>C (p.M1?), inactivating the translation initiation codon was found. This mutation is not present in pseudogene CYP21A1P and causes the classical form of the disease in six patients. In addition, depending on the nature of the rearrangements CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras were further classified as CH(c/d), and CH-1(c) was shown to be the most prominent chimera in our study group. In conclusion, with this study we identified a novel founder CYP21A2 mutation and suggest a further classification for CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeras depending on the combination of junction site position and whether it is occurred as a result of deletion or conversion. Absence of disease causing mutation of CYP21A2 in ten of screened ninety chromosomes suggests the contribution of regulatory elements in occurrences of CAH due to the 21OHD.

  14. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology.

  15. CCR4 frameshift mutation identifies a distinct group of adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Noriaki; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Kato, Takeharu; Sakata-Yanagimoto, Mamiko; Niino, Daisuke; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Moriuchi, Yukiyoshi; Miyahara, Masaharu; Kurita, Daisuke; Sasaki, Yuya; Shimono, Joji; Kawamoto, Keisuke; Utsunomiya, Atae; Imaizumi, Yoshitaka; Seto, Masao; Ohshima, Koichi

    2016-04-01

    Adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is an intractable T cell neoplasm caused by human T cell leukaemia virus type 1. Next-generation sequencing-based comprehensive mutation studies have revealed recurrent somatic CCR4 mutations in ATLL, although clinicopathological findings associated with CCR4 mutations remain to be delineated. In the current study, 184 cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma, including 113 cases of ATLL, were subjected to CCR4 mutation analysis. This sequence analysis identified mutations in 27% (30/113) of cases of ATLL and 9% (4/44) of cases of peripheral T cell lymphoma not otherwise specified. Identified mutations included nonsense (NS) and frameshift (FS) mutations. No significant differences in clinicopathological findings were observed between ATLL cases stratified by presence of CCR4 mutation. All ATLL cases with CCR4 mutations exhibited cell-surface CCR4 positivity. Semi-quantitative CCR4 protein analysis of immunohistochemical sections revealed higher CCR4 expression in cases with NS mutations of CCR4 than in cases with wild-type (WT) CCR4. Furthermore, among ATLL cases, FS mutation was significantly associated with a poor prognosis, compared with NS mutation and WT CCR4. These results suggest that CCR4 mutation is an important determinant of the clinical course in ATLL cases, and that NS and FS mutations of CCR4 behave differently with respect to ATLL pathophysiology. PMID:26847489

  16. Nucleotide 1376 G-->T mutation in G6PD-deficient Chinese in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ainoon, O; Joyce, J; Boo, N Y; Cheong, S K; Hamidah, N H

    1995-12-01

    G6PD deficiency is the most common human enzymopathy and affects 200 million people worldwide. To date more than 400 biochemical variants and at least 60 different point mutations in the G6PD locus have been discovered. In Malaysia the overall incidence of G6PD deficiency among males is 3.1%, being more prevalent among the Chinese and Malays and less common among the Indians. As part of our initial effort to characterise G6PD deficiency in the Malaysian population, we investigated 18 G6PD deficient Chinese male neonates for the G6PD mutation G-->T at nt 1376, a common mutation seen among the Chinese in Taiwan and mainland China. The mutation was detected by a PCR-based technique using primers that artificially create a site for restriction enzyme Xho I. We found 61% (11 out of 18) of the Chinese G6PD deficient male neonates positive for this mutation. Study of enzyme electrophoretic mobility in 7 of the cases positive for this mutation revealed three different patterns of mobility. 107% (5 out of 7), 103% (1 out of 7) and 100% (1 out of 7). This study shows that mutation G-->T at nt 1376 is a common allele causing G6PD deficiency in Malaysians of Chinese origin. The finding of different patterns of electrophoretic mobility among the 7 cases positive for 1376 G-->T mutation supports the notion that diverse biochemical variants may share the same mutation. PMID:8935127

  17. Whole‐exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene

    PubMed Central

    Stenman, Adam; Haglund, Felix; Clark, Victoria E.; Brown, Taylor C.; Baranoski, Jacob; Bilguvar, Kaya; Goh, Gerald; Welander, Jenny; Svahn, Fredrika; Rubinstein, Jill C.; Caramuta, Stefano; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat; Bäckdahl, Martin; Gimm, Oliver; Söderkvist, Peter; Prasad, Manju L.; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P.

    2015-01-01

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole‐exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis‐related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well‐established cancer gene lysine (K)‐specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome‐sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D‐mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26032282

  18. Whole-exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, C Christofer; Stenman, Adam; Haglund, Felix; Clark, Victoria E; Brown, Taylor C; Baranoski, Jacob; Bilguvar, Kaya; Goh, Gerald; Welander, Jenny; Svahn, Fredrika; Rubinstein, Jill C; Caramuta, Stefano; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat; Bäckdahl, Martin; Gimm, Oliver; Söderkvist, Peter; Prasad, Manju L; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P; Carling, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole-exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis-related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well-established cancer gene lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome-sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D-mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. PMID:26032282

  19. Ramifications of four concurrent thrombophilic mutations and one hypofibrinolytic mutation.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Goldenberg, Naila; Wang, Ping; Aregawi, Dawit

    2004-10-01

    A kindred was examined in which the 48-year-old white female proband with three deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary emboli events had four thrombophilic and one hypofibrinolytic mutations, and in which her 14-year-old asymptomatic daughter had four thrombophilic mutations. The proband was heterozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden, G20210A prothrombin, and platelet glycoprotein IIIa PL A1/A2 mutations, had high factor VIII (221%), and was homozygous for the 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene mutation, with high plasminogen activator inhibitor activity (23.7 U/mL). Her 14-year-old daughter was homozygous for the G1691A factor V Leiden and platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2/A2 mutations, compound heterozygous for the C677T and A1298C methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) mutations, and heterozygous for the G20210A prothrombin mutation, a combination with an estimated likelihood of 1.6 x 10(-7). In 247 white healthy controls, there was no V Leiden homozygosity and no V Leiden-prothrombin gene compound heterozygosity. Heterozygosity for the V Leiden and prothrombin gene mutations was 3.2% and 4.1%, respectively. Homozygosity for the platelet glycoprotein IIb-IIIa PL A2A2, PAI-1 gene 4G4G, and C677T MTHFR mutations was 3.2%, 22.7%, and 12%, respectively. The proband will receive anticoagulation therapy for life. Beyond aspirin, avoidance of exogenous estrogens, and enoxaparin prophylaxis during pregnancy, it is not known whether the proband's daughter should have lifelong anticoagulation therapy, or only after her first thrombotic event. PMID:15497023

  20. High Resolution Melting Analysis: A Rapid and Accurate Method to Detect CALR Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Melania; Torres, Laura; Santana-Lopez, Gonzalo; Rodriguez-Medina, Carlos; Perera, María; Bellosillo, Beatriz; de la Iglesia, Silvia; Molero, Teresa; Gomez-Casares, Maria Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent discovery of CALR mutations in essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) patients without JAK2/MPL mutations has emerged as a relevant finding for the molecular diagnosis of these myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). We tested the feasibility of high-resolution melting (HRM) as a screening method for rapid detection of CALR mutations. Methods CALR was studied in wild-type JAK2/MPL patients including 34 ET, 21 persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN and 98 suspected secondary thrombocytosis. CALR mutation analysis was performed through HRM and Sanger sequencing. We compared clinical features of CALR-mutated versus 45 JAK2/MPL-mutated subjects in ET. Results Nineteen samples showed distinct HRM patterns from wild-type. Of them, 18 were mutations and one a polymorphism as confirmed by direct sequencing. CALR mutations were present in 44% of ET (15/34), 14% of persistent thrombocytosis suggestive of MPN (3/21) and none of the secondary thrombocytosis (0/98). Of the 18 mutants, 9 were 52 bp deletions, 8 were 5 bp insertions and other was a complex mutation with insertion/deletion. No mutations were found after sequencing analysis of 45 samples displaying wild-type HRM curves. HRM technique was reproducible, no false positive or negative were detected and the limit of detection was of 3%. Conclusions This study establishes a sensitive, reliable and rapid HRM method to screen for the presence of CALR mutations. PMID:25068507

  1. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  2. Spontaneous mutations in Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from streptococcal toxic shock syndrome patients play roles in virulence.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Matsumura, Takayuki; Nihonmatsu, Hisako; Ohya, Hitomi; Okuno, Rumi; Mitsui, Chieko; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kameyama, Mitsuhiro; Sasaki, Mari; Shimada, Naomi; Ato, Manabu; Ohnishi, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes (group A Streptococcus; GAS) is a widespread human pathogen and causes streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS). STSS isolates have been previously shown to have high frequency mutations in the csrS/csrR (covS/covR) and/or rgg (ropB) genes, which are negative regulators of virulence. However, these mutations were found at somewhat low frequencies in emm1-genotyped isolates, the most prevalent STSS genotype. In this study, we sought to detect causal mutations of enhanced virulence in emm1 isolates lacking mutation(s) in the csrS/csrR and rgg genes. Three mutations associated with elevated virulence were found in the sic (a virulence gene) promoter, the csrR promoter, and the rocA gene (a csrR positive regulator). In vivo contribution of the sic promoter and rocA mutations to pathogenicity and lethality was confirmed in a GAS mouse model. Frequency of the sic promoter mutation was significantly higher in STSS emm1 isolates than in non-invasive STSS isolates; the rocA gene mutation frequency was not significantly different among STSS and non-STSS isolates. STSS emm1 isolates possessed a high frequency mutation in the sic promoter. Thus, this mutation may play a role in the dynamics of virulence and STSS pathogenesis. PMID:27349341

  3. Low frequency of recurrent BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Spain.

    PubMed

    Llort, Gemma; Muñoz, Carmen Yagüe; Tuser, Mercè Peris; Guillermo, Ignacio Blanco; Lluch, José Ramón Germà; Bale, Allen E; Franco, Mayra Alvarez

    2002-03-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations underlie a substantial proportion of all hereditary breast cancer. The mutational spectrum in these genes is very broad, with hundreds of different BRCA mutations reported worldwide. However, high frequency founder mutations make up a substantial fraction of all mutations in some ethnic groups. We directly sequenced BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 35 Spanish breast/ovarian cancer families and found 13 mutations of which 3 had been reported previously in Spain. The ten novel mutations are: IVS5+1 G>A, 1491delA, Leu1086Ter, and Gln895Ter in BRCA1; Glu49Ter, 5373delGTAT, 5947delCTCT, 6672delTA, 8281insA, and Pro3039Leu (which also involves a splice site) in BRCA2. Our data, in combination with previous reports, indicate that 14 mutations have been seen recurrently in Spanish families. Analyzing these 14 mutations in 42 previously untested breast/ovarian cancer families revealed only two families testing positive, one for BRCA1 185delAG and one for BRCA2 9254delATCAT. While several mutations have been found recurrently in Spain, none appear to be high frequency founder mutations based on studies of breast and ovarian cancer families.

  4. Independent orgins of cystic ribrosis mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T provide evidence of mutation recurrence in the CFTR gene

    SciTech Connect

    Morral, N.; Llevadot, R.; Casals, T.; Estivill, X.; Gasparini, P.; Macek, M. Jr.; Doerk, T.

    1994-11-01

    Microsatellite analysis of chromosomes carrying particular cystic fibrosis mutations has shown different haplotypes in four cases: R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T. To investigate the possibility of recurrence of these mutations, analysis of intra- and extragenic markers flanking these mutations has been performed. Recurrence is the most plausible explanation, as it becomes necessary to postulate either double recombinations or single recombinations in conjunction with slippage at one or more microsatellite loci, to explain the combination of mutations and microsatellites if the mutations arose only once. Also in support of recurrence, mutations R334W, R347P, R1162X, and 3849+10kbC{yields}T involve CpG dinucleotides, which are known to have an increased mutation rate. Although only 15.7% of point mutations in the coding sequence of CFTR have occurred at CpG dinucleotides, approximately half of these CpG sites have mutated at least once. Specific nucleotide positions of the coding region of CFTR, distinct from CpG sequences, also seem to have a higher mutation rate, and so it is possible that the mutations observed are recurrent. G{yields}A transitions are the most common change found in those positions involved in more than one mutational event in CFTR. 65 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  5. Parkinsonism Associated with Glucocerebrosidase Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sunwoo, Mun-Kyung; Kim, Seung-Min; Lee, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Background Gaucher's disease is an autosomal recessive, lysosomal storage disease caused by mutations of the β-glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA). There is increasing evidence that GBA mutations are a genetic risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We report herein a family of Koreans exhibiting parkinsonism-associated GBA mutations. Case Report A 44-year-old woman suffering from slowness and paresthesia of the left arm for the previous 1.5years, visited our hospital to manage known invasive ductal carcinoma. During a preoperative evaluation, she was diagnosed with Gaucher's disease and double mutations of S271G and R359X in GBA. Parkinsonian features including low amplitude postural tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia and shuffling gait were observed. Genetic analysis also revealed that her older sister, who had also been diagnosed with PD and had been taking dopaminergic drugs for 8-years, also possessed a heterozygote R359X mutation in GBA. 18F-fluoropropylcarbomethoxyiodophenylnortropane positron-emission tomography in these patients revealed decreased uptake of dopamine transporter in the posterior portion of the bilateral putamen. Conclusions This case study demonstrates Korean familial cases of PD with heterozygote mutation of GBA, further supporting the association between PD and GBA mutation. PMID:21779299

  6. Enhanced ratio of signals enables digital mutation scanning for rare allele detection.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rizaldos, Elena; Paweletz, Cloud; Song, Chen; Oxnard, Geoffrey R; Mamon, Harvey; Jänne, Pasi A; Makrigiorgos, G Mike

    2015-05-01

    The use of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for low-level DNA mutation detection in cancer, prenatal diagnosis, and infectious diseases is growing rapidly. However, although ddPCR has been implemented successfully for detection of rare mutations at pre-determined positions, no ddPCR adaptation for mutation scanning exists. Yet, frequently, clinically relevant mutations reside on multiple sequence positions in tumor suppressor genes or complex hotspot mutations in oncogenes. Here, we describe a combination of coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR (COLD-PCR) with ddPCR that enables digital mutation scanning within approximately 50-bp sections of a target amplicon. Two FAM/HEX-labeled hydrolysis probes matching the wild-type sequence are used during ddPCR. The ratio of FAM/HEX-positive droplets is constant when wild-type amplicons are amplified but deviates when mutations anywhere under the FAM or HEX probes are present. To enhance the change in FAM/HEX ratio, we employed COLD-PCR cycling conditions that enrich mutation-containing amplicons anywhere on the sequence. We validated COLD-ddPCR on multiple mutations in TP53 and in EGFR using serial mutation dilutions and cell-free circulating DNA samples, and demonstrate detection down to approximately 0.2% to 1.2% mutation abundance. COLD-ddPCR enables a simple, rapid, and robust two-fluorophore detection method for the identification of multiple mutations during ddPCR and potentially can identify unknown DNA variants present in the target sequence.

  7. Bladder Cancer and Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yangde

    2015-09-01

    The most common type of urinary bladder cancer is called as transitional cell carcinoma. The major risk factors for bladder cancer are environmental, tobacco smoking, exposure to toxic industrial chemicals and gases, bladder inflammation due to microbial and parasitic infections, as well as some adverse side-effects of medications. The genetic mutations in some chromosomal genes, such as FGFR3, RB1, HRAS, TP53, TSC1, and others, occur which form tumors in the urinary bladder. These genes play an important role in the regulation of cell division which prevents cells from dividing too quickly. The changes in the genes of human chromosome 9 are usually responsible for tumor in bladder cancer, but the genetic mutation of chromosome 22 can also result in bladder cancer. The identification of p53 gene mutation has been studied at NIH, Washington, DC, USA, in urine samples of bladder cancer patients. The invasive bladder cancers were determined for the presence of gene mutations on p53 suppressor gene. The 18 different bladder tumors were evaluated, and 11 (61 %) had genetic mutations of p53 gene. The bladder cancer studies have suggested that 70 % of bladder cancers involve a specific mutation in a particular gene, namely telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene. The TERT gene is involved in DNA protection, cellular aging processes, and cancer. The Urothelial carcinomas of the bladder have been described in Atlas of genetics and cytogenetics in oncology and hematology. HRAS is a proto-oncogene and has potential to cause cancer in several organs including the bladder. The TSC1 c. 1907 1908 del (E636fs) mutation in bladder cancer suggests that the location of the mutation is Exon 15 with frequency of TSC1 mutation of 11.7 %. The recent findings of BAP1 mutations have shown that it contributes to BRCA pathway alterations in bladder cancer. The discoveries of more gene mutations and new biomarkers and polymerase chain reaction bioassays for gene mutations in bladder

  8. CFTR mutation analysis and haplotype associations in CF patients☆

    PubMed Central

    Cordovado, S.K.; Hendrix, M.; Greene, C.N.; Mochal, S.; Earley, M.C.; Farrell, P.M.; Kharrazi, M.; Hannon, W.H.; Mueller, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    Most newborn screening (NBS) laboratories use second-tier molecular tests for cystic fibrosis (CF) using dried blood spots (DBS). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s NBS Quality Assurance Program offers proficiency testing (PT) in DBS for CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection. Extensive molecular characterization on 76 CF patients, family members or screen positive newborns was performed for quality assurance. The coding, regulatory regions and portions of all introns were sequenced and large insertions/deletions were characterized as well as two intronic di-nucleotide microsatellites. For CF patient samples, at least two mutations were identified/verified and four specimens contained three likely CF-associated mutations. Thirty-four sequence variations in 152 chromosomes were identified, five of which were not previously reported. Twenty-seven of these variants were used to predict haplotypes from the major haplotype block defined by HapMap data that spans the promoter through intron 19. Chromosomes containing the F508del (p.Phe508del), G542X (p.Gly542X) and N1303K (p.Asn1303Lys) mutations shared a common haplotype subgroup, consistent with a common ancient European founder. Understanding the haplotype background of CF-associated mutations in the U.S. population provides a framework for future phenotype/genotype studies and will assist in determining a likely cis/trans phase of the mutations without need for parent studies. PMID:22137130

  9. Diagnostic application of KRAS mutation testing in uterine microglandular proliferations.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei; Abi-Raad, Rita; Alomari, Ahmed K; Hui, Pei; Buza, Natalia

    2015-07-01

    Microglandular proliferations often pose a diagnostic challenge in small endocervical and endometrial biopsies. Microglandular hyperplasia (MGH) is one of the most common pseudoneoplastic glandular proliferations of uterine cervix, which can closely mimic endometrial adenocarcinomas (EAC) with a microglandular pattern (microglandular EAC). Although MGH is typically characterized by relatively uniform nuclei and rare to absent mitoses, atypical forms with architectural and/or cytologic deviation from the usual morphology have been previously described. Recently, a series of MGH with high mitotic activity has also been documented. Although careful morphological assessment and immunohistochemical workup can resolve the diagnostic dilemma in some cases, additional differential diagnostic tools are needed to separate both the common and atypical variants of MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern. Frequent KRAS mutation has been previously reported in endometrial complex mucinous lesions and endometrial mucinous carcinomas. However, the diagnostic utility of KRAS mutation analysis has not yet been explored in the context of cervical and endometrial microglandular lesions. Twelve mitotically active MGH cases and 15 cases of EAC with microglandular growth pattern were selected for the study. KRAS mutation analysis was performed in all cases by highly sensitive single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. Clinical history and follow-up data were retrieved from electronic medical records. KRAS mutation was absent in all MGH cases, whereas 9 (60%) of 15 microglandular EAC cases tested positive for KRAS mutation. Our data indicate that KRAS mutation analysis may offer additional discriminatory power in separating benign MGH from EAC with microglandular pattern.

  10. PDCD10 Gene Mutations in Multiple Cerebral Cavernous Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Cigoli, Maria Sole; Avemaria, Francesca; De Benedetti, Stefano; Gesu, Giovanni P.; Accorsi, Lucio Giordano; Parmigiani, Stefano; Corona, Maria Franca; Capra, Valeria; Mosca, Andrea; Giovannini, Simona; Notturno, Francesca; Ciccocioppo, Fausta; Volpi, Lilia; Estienne, Margherita; De Michele, Giuseppe; Antenora, Antonella; Bilo, Leda; Tavoni, Antonietta; Zamponi, Nelia; Alfei, Enrico; Baranello, Giovanni; Riva, Daria; Penco, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are vascular abnormalities that may cause seizures, intracerebral haemorrhages, and focal neurological deficits. Familial form shows an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable clinical expression. Three genes have been identified causing familial CCM: KRIT1/CCM1, MGC4607/CCM2, and PDCD10/CCM3. Aim of this study is to report additional PDCD10/CCM3 families poorly described so far which account for 10-15% of hereditary cerebral cavernous malformations. Our group investigated 87 consecutive Italian affected individuals (i.e. positive Magnetic Resonance Imaging) with multiple/familial CCM through direct sequencing and Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. We identified mutations in over 97.7% of cases, and PDCD10/CCM3 accounts for 13.1%. PDCD10/CCM3 molecular screening revealed four already known mutations and four novel ones. The mutated patients show an earlier onset of clinical manifestations as compared to CCM1/CCM2 mutated patients. The study of further families carrying mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 may help define a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype; an accurate clinical follow up of the subjects would help define more precisely whether mutations in PDCD10/CCM3 lead to a characteristic phenotype. PMID:25354366

  11. Mutational landscape and underlying mutational processes in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kasar, S; Brown, J R

    2016-07-01

    Sequencing studies have been instrumental in understanding the genetic basis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Our recent whole-genome sequencing study focusing on lower cytogenetic risk CLL demonstrated that CLL mutations can be attributed to 3 key mutational processes-2 types of activation induced-cytidine deaminase (AID) signatures and an aging signature-that operate at different times throughout CLL evolution. PMID:27652313

  12. Evaluation of EGFR mutation status in cytology specimens: an institutional experience.

    PubMed

    Aisner, D L; Deshpande, C; Baloch, Z; Watt, C D; Litzky, L A; Malhotra, B; Sepulveda, A R; Langer, C; Evans, T; Van Deerlin, V M

    2013-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status has been shown to predict response to anti-EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In patients with advanced-stage NSCLC, evaluation of mutational status is increasingly requested on biopsy or fine-needle aspiration specimens, which often have limited material. There are limited data on the suitability of cytology cell blocks (CB) for EGFR mutation testing. In this study, we report our institutional experience with cytology cell block material for EGFR mutation testing. We retrospectively reviewed EGFR mutation analyses performed on 234 surgical (SP) and cytology (CB) from October 2007 to May 2010. One hundred ninety-two SP specimens and 42 CB specimens were evaluated for EGFR mutation. CB specimens were evaluated for overall specimen size based on aggregate cellularity in comparison to small biopsy specimens, and percent tumor. Of the 192 SP and 42 CB specimens, 31 (16.1%) and 11 (26.2%) were positive for EGFR mutation, respectively; there does not appear to be an association between mutation detection rate and the source of the specimen (P = 0.124). Limited DNA was obtained from 70.0% (29/42), including 81.8% (9/11) of those which were mutation positive. Additionally, 45.4% (5/11) of mutation positive specimens had extremely low DNA yields. Although 16.6% (7/42) of CB specimens had <10% tumor, all 11 mutation positive CB cases had >10% tumor. These data indicate that CB specimens provide an alternative source for molecular evaluation of NSCLC, and that tumor percentage may be more important than specimen size and/or DNA yield in determining the suitability of these specimens for testing.

  13. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity.

    PubMed

    Saldaño, Tadeo E; Monzon, Alexander M; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  14. Evolutionary Conserved Positions Define Protein Conformational Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Saldaño, Tadeo E.; Monzon, Alexander M.; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Conformational diversity of the native state plays a central role in modulating protein function. The selection paradigm sustains that different ligands shift the conformational equilibrium through their binding to highest-affinity conformers. Intramolecular vibrational dynamics associated to each conformation should guarantee conformational transitions, which due to its importance, could possibly be associated with evolutionary conserved traits. Normal mode analysis, based on a coarse-grained model of the protein, can provide the required information to explore these features. Herein, we present a novel procedure to identify key positions sustaining the conformational diversity associated to ligand binding. The method is applied to an adequate refined dataset of 188 paired protein structures in their bound and unbound forms. Firstly, normal modes most involved in the conformational change are selected according to their corresponding overlap with structural distortions introduced by ligand binding. The subspace defined by these modes is used to analyze the effect of simulated point mutations on preserving the conformational diversity of the protein. We find a negative correlation between the effects of mutations on these normal mode subspaces associated to ligand-binding and position-specific evolutionary conservations obtained from multiple sequence-structure alignments. Positions whose mutations are found to alter the most these subspaces are defined as key positions, that is, dynamically important residues that mediate the ligand-binding conformational change. These positions are shown to be evolutionary conserved, mostly buried aliphatic residues localized in regular structural regions of the protein like β-sheets and α-helix. PMID:27008419

  15. Electron holes appear to trigger cancer-implicated mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, John; Villagran, Martha

    Malignant tumors are caused by mutations, which also affect their subsequent growth and evolution. We use a novel approach, computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)], to compute spectra of enhanced hole probability based on actual sequence data. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of reveal a correlation between hole spectrum peaks and spikes in human mutation frequencies. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with cancer-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential cancer `driver' mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could also prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions, and sites of driver mutations, in the vast non-protein-coding genome. Supported by the State of Texas through the Texas Ctr. for Superconductivity.

  16. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing

    PubMed Central

    Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K.; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y.; Mountain, Joanna L.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown. Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service® report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned. Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation-positive participants

  17. Dealing with the unexpected: consumer responses to direct-access BRCA mutation testing.

    PubMed

    Francke, Uta; Dijamco, Cheri; Kiefer, Amy K; Eriksson, Nicholas; Moiseff, Bianca; Tung, Joyce Y; Mountain, Joanna L

    2013-01-01

    Background. Inherited BRCA gene mutations convey a high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, but current guidelines limit BRCA mutation testing to women with early-onset cancer and relatives of mutation-positive cases. Benefits and risks of providing this information directly to consumers are unknown. Methods. To assess and quantify emotional and behavioral reactions of consumers to their 23andMe Personal Genome Service(®) report of three BRCA mutations that are common in Ashkenazi Jews, we invited all 136 BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation-positive individuals in the 23andMe customer database who had chosen to view their BRCA reports to participate in this IRB-approved study. We also invited 160 mutation-negative customers who were matched for age, sex and ancestry. Semi-structured phone interviews were completed for 32 mutation carriers, 16 women and 16 men, and 31 non-carriers. Questions addressed personal and family history of cancer, decision and timing of viewing the BRCA report, recollection of the result, emotional responses, perception of personal cancer risk, information sharing, and actions taken or planned. Results. Eleven women and 14 men had received the unexpected result that they are carriers of a BRCA1 185delAG or 5382insC, or BRCA2 6174delT mutation. None of them reported extreme anxiety and four experienced moderate anxiety that was transitory. Remarkably, five women and six men described their response as neutral. Most carrier women sought medical advice and four underwent risk-reducing procedures after confirmatory mutation testing. Male carriers realized that their test results implied genetic risk for female relatives, and several of them felt considerably burdened by this fact. Sharing mutation information with family members led to screening of at least 30 relatives and identification of 13 additional carriers. Non-carriers did not report inappropriate actions, such as foregoing cancer screening. All but one of the 32 mutation-positive participants

  18. Feline polycystic kidney disease mutation identified in PKD1.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Leslie A; Biller, David S; Erdman, Carolyn A; Lipinski, Monika J; Young, Amy E; Roe, Bruce A; Qin, Baifang; Grahn, Robert A

    2004-10-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a commonly inherited disorder in humans that causes the formation of fluid-filled renal cysts, often leading to renal failure. PKD1 mutations cause 85% of ADPKD. Feline PKD is autosomal dominant and has clinical presentations similar to humans. PKD affects approximately 38% of Persian cats worldwide, which is approximately 6% of cats, making it the most prominent inherited feline disease. Previous analyses have shown significant linkage between the PKD phenotype and microsatellite markers linked to the feline homolog for PKD1. In this report, the feline PKD1 gene was scanned for causative mutations and a C>A transversion was identified at c.10063 (human ref NM_000296) in exon 29, resulting in a stop mutation at position 3284, which suggests a loss of approximately 25% of the C-terminus of the protein. The same mutation has not been identified in humans, although similar regions of the protein are truncated. The C>A transversion has been identified in the heterozygous state in 48 affected cats examined, including 41 Persians, a Siamese, and several other breeds that have been known to outcross with Persians. In addition, the mutation is segregating concordantly in all available PKD families. No unaffected cats have been identified with the mutation. No homozygous cats have been identified, supporting the suggestion that the mutation is embryonic lethal. These data suggest that the stop mutation causes feline PKD, providing a test to identify cats that will develop PKD and demonstrating that the domestic cat is an ideal model for human PKD. PMID:15466259

  19. High prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in micropapillary urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Doreen; Taheri, Diana; Springer, Simeon; Cowan, Morgan; Guner, Gunes; Mendoza Rodriguez, Maria Angelica; Wang, Yuxuan; Kinde, Isaac; VandenBussche, Christopher J; Olson, Matthew T; Ricardo, Bernardo F P; Cunha, Isabela; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Ertoy, Dilek; Kinzler, Kenneth W; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Vogelstein, Bert; Netto, George J

    2016-10-01

    Somatic activating mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene are the most common genetic alterations in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder and upper urinary tract. Little is known, however, about TERT-mutation status in the relatively uncommon but clinically aggressive micropapillary (MPC) variant. We evaluated the presence of TERT promoter mutations in MPC of the bladder and upper urinary tract. A retrospective search of our archives for MPC and UC with micropapillary features (2005-2014) was performed. All slides were reviewed to confirm the histologic diagnosis. Thirty-three specimens from 31 patients had FFPE blocks available for DNA analysis and were included in the study. Intratumoral areas of non-micropapillary histology were also evaluated when present. Samples were analyzed with Safe-SeqS, a sequencing error reduction technology, and sequenced using the Illumina MiSeq platform. TERT promoter mutations were detected in all specimens with pure MPC (18 of 18) and UC with focal micropapillary features (15 of 15). Similar to conventional UC, the predominant mutations identified occurred at positions -124 (C228T) (85 %) and -146 (C250T) (12 %) bp upstream of the TERT ATG start site. In heterogeneous tumors with focal variant histology, intratumoral concordant mutations were found in variant (MPC and non-MPC) and corresponding conventional UC. We found TERT promoter mutations, commonly found in conventional UC, to be frequently present in MPC. Our finding of concordant intratumoral mutational alterations in cases with focal variant histology lends support to the common oncogenesis origin of UC and its variant histology. PMID:27520411

  20. Direct estimate of the rate of germline mutation in a bird

    PubMed Central

    Smeds, Linnéa; Qvarnström, Anna; Ellegren, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The fidelity of DNA replication together with repair mechanisms ensure that the genetic material is properly copied from one generation to another. However, on extremely rare occasions when damages to DNA or replication errors are not repaired, germline mutations can be transmitted to the next generation. Because of the rarity of these events, studying the rate at which new mutations arise across organisms has been a great challenge, especially in multicellular nonmodel organisms with large genomes. We sequenced the genomes of 11 birds from a three-generation pedigree of the collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis) and used highly stringent bioinformatic criteria for mutation detection and used several procedures to validate mutations, including following the stable inheritance of new mutations to subsequent generations. We identified 55 de novo mutations with a 10-fold enrichment of mutations at CpG sites and with only a modest male mutation bias. The estimated rate of mutation per site per generation was 4.6 × 10−9, which corresponds to 2.3 × 10−9 mutations per site per year. Compared to mammals, this is similar to mouse but about half of that reported for humans, which may be due to the higher frequency of male mutations in humans. We confirm that mutation rate scales positively with genome size and that there is a strong negative relationship between mutation rate and effective population size, in line with the drift-barrier hypothesis. Our study illustrates that it should be feasible to obtain direct estimates of the rate of mutation in essentially any organism from which family material can be obtained. PMID:27412854

  1. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease

    PubMed Central

    Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A.; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E.; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R. Curtis

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  2. Infantile onset spinocerebellar ataxia caused by compound heterozygosity for Twinkle mutations and modeling of Twinkle mutations causing recessive disease.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Sarah B; Gulsuner, Suleyman; Stapleton, Gail A; Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K; Mandell, Jessica B; Morales, Augusto; Klevit, Rachel E; King, Mary-Claire; Rogers, R Curtis

    2016-07-01

    Mutations in nuclear genes required for the replication and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA cause progressive multisystemic neuromuscular disorders with overlapping phenotypes. Biallelic mutations in C10orf2, encoding the Twinkle mitochondrial DNA helicase, lead to infantile-onset cerebellar ataxia (IOSCA), as well as milder and more severe phenotypes. We present a 13-year-old girl with ataxia, severe hearing loss, optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Whole-exome sequencing revealed that the patient is compound heterozygous for previously unreported variants in the C10orf2 gene: a paternally inherited frameshift variant (c.333delT; p.L112Sfs*3) and a maternally inherited missense variant (c.904C>T; p.R302W). The identification of novel C10orf2 mutations extends the spectrum of mutations in the Twinkle helicase causing recessive disease, in particular the intermediate IOSCA phenotype. Structural modeling suggests that the p.R302W mutation and many other recessively inherited Twinkle mutations impact the position or interactions of the linker region, which is critical for the oligomeric ring structure and activity of the helicase. This study emphasizes the utility of whole-exome sequencing for the genetic diagnosis of a complex multisystemic disorder. PMID:27551684

  3. Paired natural cysteine mutation mapping: aid to constraining models of protein tertiary structure.

    PubMed Central

    Kreisberg, R.; Buchner, V.; Arad, D.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the benefit of mapping paired cysteine mutation patterns as a guide to identifying the positions of protein disulfide bonds. This information can facilitate the computer modeling of protein tertiary structure. First, a simple, paired natural-cysteine-mutation map is presented that identifies the positions of putative disulfide bonds in protein families. The method is based on the observation that if, during the process of evolution, a disulfide-bonded cysteine residue is not conserved, then it is likely that its counterpart will also be mutated. For each target protein, protein databases were searched for the primary amino acid sequences of all known members of distinct protein families. Primary sequence alignment was carried out using PileUp algorithms in the GCG package. To search for correlated mutations, we listed only the positions where cysteine residues were highly conserved and emphasized the mutated residues. In proteins of known three-dimensional structure, a striking pattern of paired cysteine mutations correlated with the positions of known disulfide bridges. For proteins of unknown architecture, the mutation maps showed several positions where disulfide bridging might occur. PMID:8563638

  4. Immunostaining with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies: a reliable screening method for lung adenocarcinomas harboring EGFR mutation in biopsy and resection samples.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiangshan; Liu, Biao; Xu, Haodong; Yu, Bo; Shi, Shanshan; Zhang, Jin; Wang, Xuan; Wang, Jiandong; Lu, Zhenfeng; Ma, Henghui; Zhou, Xiaojun

    2013-08-01

    Mutation analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is essential in determining the therapeutic strategy for lung adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical (IHC) staining with EGFR mutation-specific antibodies of del E746-A750 in exon 19 and L858R in exon 21 has been evaluated in resection specimens in a few studies but rarely in biopsy samples. A total of 169 cases (78 biopsies and 91 resected specimens) of lung adenocarcinoma with EGFR mutation status predefined by direct DNA sequencing were histologically examined, and IHC was performed using EGFR mutation-specific antibodies of del E746-A750 and L858R. The cases with positive results by IHC but negative results by direct DNA sequencing were examined by amplified refractory mutation system. Our results showed that the frequency of EGFR mutations for both E746-A750 deletion and L858R mutation was 38.5% (65/169) by DNA sequencing or amplified refractory mutation system and 34.3% (58/169) by IHC in lung adenocarcinomas. Based on molecular test results, the overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of IHC using these 2 antibodies in all (biopsy/resection) cases were 87.7% (80%/94.3%), 99.0% (97.9%/100%), 98.3% (96%/100%), and 92.8% (88.7%/96.6%), respectively. Lung adenocarcinomas with a predominant acinar, papillary, lepidic, or solid growth pattern more often harbor EGFR mutation of del E746-A750 or L858R. In conclusion, the immunostaining with EGFR del E746-A750 and L858R mutation antibodies is a reliable screening method with high specificity and sensitivity for identifying the EGFR mutation in both resected and biopsied lung adenocarcinomas.

  5. Recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 2 vaccine candidates containing a 3′ genomic promoter mutation and L polymerase mutations are attenuated and protective in non-human primates

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Sheila M.; Skiadopoulos, Mario H.; Bradley, Konrad; Kim, Olivia S.; Bier, Stacia; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Surman, Sonja R.; Davis, Stephanie; St. Claire, Marisa; Elkins, Randy; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.; Schaap-Nutt, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we identified several attenuating mutations in the L polymerase protein of human parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV2) and genetically stabilized those mutations using reverse genetics (Nolan et al., 2005). Here we describe the discovery of an attenuating mutation at nucleotide 15 (15T→C) in the 3′ genomic promoter that was also present in the previously characterized mutants. We evaluated the properties of this promoter mutation alone and in various combinations with the L polymerase mutations. Amino acid substitutions at L protein positions 460 (460A or 460P) or 948 (948L), or deletion of amino acids 1724 and 1725 (Δ1724), each conferred a temperature sensitivity (ts) phenotype whereas the 15T→C mutation did not. The 460A and 948L mutations each contributed to restricted replication in the lower respiratory tract of African green monkeys, but the Δ1724 mutation increased attenuation only in certain combinations with other mutations. We constructed two highly attenuated viruses, rV94(15C)/460A/948L and rV94(15C)/948L/Δ1724, that were immunogenic and protective against challenge with wild-type HPIV2 in African green monkeys and, therefore, appear to be suitable for evaluation in humans. PMID:17658669

  6. PPARγ mutations, lipodystrophy and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Astapova, Olga; Leff, Todd

    2014-11-01

    The focus of this review is the lipodystrophy syndrome caused by mutation in the PPARγ nuclear receptor - partial familial lipodystrophy FPLD3. To provide a broader context for how these mutations act to generate the clinical features of partial lipodystrophy we will review the basic biology of PPARγ and also survey the set PPARγ genetic variants that do not cause lipodystrophy, but are nonetheless associated with clinically related syndromes, specifically type 2 diabetes.

  7. Spectrum of MLL2 (ALR) mutations in 110 cases of Kabuki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Mark C; Buckingham, Kati J; Ng, Sarah B; Ming, Jeffrey E; Beck, Anita E; McMillin, Margaret J; Gildersleeve, Heidi I; Bigham, Abigail W; Tabor, Holly K; Mefford, Heather C; Cook, Joseph; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Miyake, Noriko; Tonoki, Hidefumi; Naritomi, Kenji; Kaname, Tadashi; Nagai, Toshiro; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Kurosawa, Kenji; Hou, Jia-Woei; Ohta, Tohru; Liang, Deshung; Sudo, Akira; Morris, Colleen A; Banka, Siddharth; Black, Graeme C; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Nickerson, Deborah A; Zackai, Elaine H; Shaikh, Tamim H; Donnai, Dian; Niikawa, Norio; Shendure, Jay; Bamshad, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    Kabuki syndrome is a rare, multiple malformation disorder characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, cardiac anomalies, skeletal abnormalities, and mild to moderate intellectual disability. Simplex cases make up the vast majority of the reported cases with Kabuki syndrome, but parent-to-child transmission in more than a half-dozen instances indicates that it is an autosomal dominant disorder. We recently reported that Kabuki syndrome is caused by mutations in MLL2, a gene that encodes a Trithorax-group histone methyltransferase, a protein important in the epigenetic control of active chromatin states. Here, we report on the screening of 110 families with Kabuki syndrome. MLL2 mutations were found in 81/110 (74%) of families. In simplex cases for which DNA was available from both parents, 25 mutations were confirmed to be de novo, while a transmitted MLL2 mutation was found in two of three familial cases. The majority of variants found to cause Kabuki syndrome were novel nonsense or frameshift mutations that are predicted to result in haploinsufficiency. The clinical characteristics of MLL2 mutation-positive cases did not differ significantly from MLL2 mutation-negative cases with the exception that renal anomalies were more common in MLL2 mutation-positive cases. These results are important for understanding the phenotypic consequences of MLL2 mutations for individuals and their families as well as for providing a basis for the identification of additional genes for Kabuki syndrome.

  8. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications.

  9. PCR-sequencing is a complementary method to amplification refractory mutation system for EGFR gene mutation analysis in FFPE samples.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junchang; Wang, Chunhua; Yu, Xiaoli; Sheng, Danli; Zuo, Chen; Ren, Minpu; Wu, Yaqin; Shen, Jie; Jin, Mei; Xu, Songxiao

    2015-12-01

    Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) is the most popular technology for EGFR gene mutation analysis in China. Cutoff Ct or ΔCt values were used to differentiate low mutation abundance cases from no mutation cases. In this study, all of 359 NSCLC samples were tested by ARMS. Seventeen samples with larger Ct or ΔCt than cutoff values were retested by PCR-sequencing. TKI treatment responses were monitored on the cases with ARMS negative and PCR-sequencing positive results. One exon 18 G719X case, 67 exon 19 deletion cases, 2 exon 20 insertion cases, 1 exon 20 T790M case, 60 exon 21 L858R cases, 5 exon 21 L861Q cases and 201 wild type cases were identified by ARMS. Another 22 cases were evaluated as wild type but had later amplification fluorescent curves. Seventeen out of these 22 cases were retested by PCR-sequencing. It turns out that 3 out of 3 cases with exon 19 deletion later amplifications, 2 out of 2 cases with L858R later amplifications and 4 out of 12 cases with T790M later amplifications were identified as mutation positive. Two cases with exon 19 deletion and L858R respectively were treated by TKI and got responses. Our study indicated that PCR-sequencing might be a complementary way to confirm ARMS results with later amplifications. PMID:26477713

  10. Mutations in cardiovascular connexin genes.

    PubMed

    Molica, Filippo; Meens, Merlijn J P; Morel, Sandrine; Kwak, Brenda R

    2014-09-01

    Connexins (Cxs) form a family of transmembrane proteins comprising 21 members in humans. Cxs differ in their expression patterns, biophysical properties and ability to combine into homomeric or heteromeric gap junction channels between neighbouring cells. The permeation of ions and small metabolites through gap junction channels or hemichannels confers a crucial role to these proteins in intercellular communication and in maintaining tissue homeostasis. Among others, Cx37, Cx40, Cx43, Cx45 and Cx47 are found in heart, blood and lymphatic vessels. Mutations or polymorphisms in the genes coding for these Cxs have not only been implicated in cardiovascular pathologies but also in a variety of other disorders. While mutations in Cx43 are mostly linked to oculodentodigital dysplasia, Cx47 mutations are associated with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher-like disease and lymphoedema. Cx40 mutations are principally linked to atrial fibrillation. Mutations in Cx37 have not yet been described, but polymorphisms in the Cx37 gene have been implicated in the development of arterial disease. This review addresses current knowledge on gene mutations in cardiovascular Cxs systematically and links them to alterations in channel properties and disease.

  11. Lipoprotein lipase gene mutations and the genetic susceptibility of preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y J; Williamson, R A; Chen, K; Smith, J L; Murray, J C; Merrill, D C

    2001-11-01

    In the pathogenesis of preeclampsia, endothelial cell activation or dysfunction is a central theme, and marked dyslipidemia may contribute to endothelial cell dysfunction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between preeclampsia and mutations within the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene. DNA was extracted from whole blood or cheek swabs of 250 preeclamptic patients, 265 control subjects, and 106 offspring of preeclamptic patients (all white). Control subjects were women who had undergone >/=2 term pregnancies unaffected by preeclampsia. All samples were genotyped for 3 LPL polymorphisms with the use of polymerase chain reaction of known allelic variants. The 3 mutations studied were the following: (1) Asp9Asn substitution in exon 2, (2) T-to-G substitution at position -93 of the proximal promotor region (-93T/G), and (3) Asn291Ser substitution in exon 6. Results were analyzed with an chi(2) contingency table. The prevalences of the Asp9Asn mutation, -93T/G promotor mutation, and Asn291Ser mutation were not significantly different among the preeclamptic patients and control subjects (Asp9Asn: patients, 2.8%; control subjects, 4.0%; -93T/G: patients, 4.5%; control subjects, 5.5%; Asn291Ser: patients, 4.0%; control subject, 3.0%). In addition, there was no difference in the frequency of any of the mutations in the offspring of preeclamptic women compared with that observed in the control population. Between a small group of patients with nulliparous HELLP syndrome (a variant of severe preeclampsia: hemolysis, elevated liver enzyme, low platelets) patients (n=12) and control subjects, there was a significant difference in the prevalence of the Asn291Ser mutation (16.7% versus 3.0%, P=0.01). In this large white population, the Asp9Asn mutation, -93T/G promotor mutation, and Asn291Ser mutation were not associated with an increased risk for preeclampsia. In a small subgroup of patients, the Asn291Ser mutation was associated with an increased risk for

  12. A strain of Yersinia pestis with a mutator phenotype from the Republic of Georgia.

    PubMed

    Rajanna, Chythanya; Ouellette, Gary; Rashid, Mohammed; Zemla, Adam; Karavis, Mark; Zhou, Carol; Revazishvili, Tamara; Redmond, Brady; McNew, Lauren; Bakanidze, Lela; Imnadze, Paata; Rivers, Bryan; Skowronski, Evan W; O'Connell, Kevin P; Sulakvelidze, Alexander; Gibbons, Henry S

    2013-06-01

    We describe here a strain of Yersinia pestis, G1670A, which exhibits a baseline mutation rate elevated 250-fold over wild-type Y. pestis. The responsible mutation, a C to T substitution in the mutS gene, results in the transition of a highly conserved leucine at position 689 to arginine (mutS(L689R)). When the MutSL 689R protein of G1670A was expressed in a ΔmutS derivative of Y. pestis strain EV76, mutation rates observed were equivalent to those observed in G1670A, consistent with a causal association between the mutS mutation and the mutator phenotype. The observation of a mutator allele in Yersinia pestis has potential implications for the study of evolution of this and other especially dangerous pathogens.

  13. PoPMuSiC, rationally designing point mutations in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Kwasigroch, J M; Gilis, D; Dehouck, Y; Rooman, M

    2002-12-01

    PoPMuSiC is an efficient tool for rational computer-aided design of single-site mutations in proteins and peptides. Two types of queries can be submitted. The first option allows to estimate the changes in folding free energy for specific point mutations given by the user. In the second option, all possible point mutations in a given protein or protein region are performed and the most stabilizing or destabilizing mutations, or the neutral mutations with respect to thermodynamic stability, are selected. For each sequence position or secondary structure the deviation from the most stable sequence is moreover evaluated, which helps to identify the most suitable sites for the introduction of mutations.

  14. An enhanced MITOMAP with a global mtDNA mutational phylogeny

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Lott, Marie T.; Procaccio, Vincent; Poole, Jason C.; Brandon, Marty C.; Mishmar, Dan; Yi, Christina; Kreuziger, James; Baldi, Pierre; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    The MITOMAP () data system for the human mitochondrial genome has been greatly enhanced by the addition of a navigable mutational mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) phylogenetic tree of ∼3000 mtDNA coding region sequences plus expanded pathogenic mutation tables and a nuclear-mtDNA pseudogene (NUMT) data base. The phylogeny reconstructs the entire mutational history of the human mtDNA, thus defining the mtDNA haplogroups and differentiating ancient from recent mtDNA mutations. Pathogenic mutations are classified by both genotype and phenotype, and the NUMT sequences permits detection of spurious inclusion of pseudogene variants during mutation analysis. These additions position MITOMAP for the implementation of our automated mtDNA sequence analysis system, Mitomaster. PMID:17178747

  15. Mutational dynamics of short tandem repeats in human genome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borstnik, B.; Pumpernik, D.

    2004-01-01

    The evolutionary dynamics of short tandem repeats of nucleotide sequences of the human genome is studied. It is shown that a model due to which the evolutionary repeat dynamics consists of elongations and shortenings of the repeats, combined with point mutations, is degenerate in the sense that an ambiguity exists regarding the role of point mutations and slippage asymmetry. By introducing a measure of the correlations between the positions of the repeats along the DNA sequences we were able to remove the degeneracy and to show that the slippage events which are the main factor in repeat evolution exhibit more frequent shortenings than elongations.

  16. An integrative genomic and proteomic analysis of PIK3CA, PTEN and AKT mutations in breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Stemke-Hale, Katherine; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana Maria; Lluch, Ana; Neve, Richard M.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Davies, Michael; Carey, Mark; Hu, Zhi; Guan, Yinghui; Sahin, Aysegul; Symmans, W. Fraser; Pusztai, Lajos; Nolden, Laura K.; Horlings, Hugo; Berns, Katrien; Hung, Mien-Chie; van de Vijver, Marc J.; Valero, Vicente; Gray, Joe W.; Bernards, Rene; Mills, Gordon B.; Hennessy, Bryan T.

    2008-05-06

    Phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway aberrations are common in cancer. By applying mass spectroscopy-based sequencing and reverse phase protein arrays to 547 human breast cancers and 41 cell lines, we determined the subtype specificity and signaling effects of PIK3CA, AKT and PTEN mutations, and the effects of PIK3CA mutations on responsiveness to PI3K inhibition in-vitro and on outcome after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations were more common in hormone receptor positive (33.8%) and HER2-positive (24.6%) than in basal-like tumors (8.3%). AKT1 (1.4%) and PTEN (2.3%) mutations were restricted to hormone receptor-positive cancers with PTEN protein levels also being significantly lower in hormone receptor-positive cancers. Unlike AKT1 mutations, PIK3CA (39%) and PTEN (20%) mutations were more common in cell lines than tumors, suggesting a selection for these but not AKT1 mutations during adaptation to culture. PIK3CA mutations did not have a significant impact on outcome in 166 hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients after adjuvant tamoxifen. PIK3CA mutations, in comparison with PTEN loss and AKT1 mutations, were associated with significantly less and indeed inconsistent activation of AKT and of downstream PI3K/AKT signaling in tumors and cell lines, and PTEN loss and PIK3CA mutation were frequently concordant, suggesting different contributions to pathophysiology. PTEN loss but not PIK3CA mutations rendered cells sensitive to growth inhibition by the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. Thus, PI3K pathway aberrations likely play a distinct role in the pathogenesis of different breast cancer subtypes. The specific aberration may have implications for the selection of PI3K-targeted therapies in hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  17. Large-Effect Beneficial Synonymous Mutations Mediate Rapid and Parallel Adaptation in a Bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Agashe, Deepa; Sane, Mrudula; Phalnikar, Kruttika; Diwan, Gaurav D.; Habibullah, Alefiyah; Martinez-Gomez, Norma Cecilia; Sahasrabuddhe, Vinaya; Polachek, William; Wang, Jue; Chubiz, Lon M.; Marx, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to previous understanding, recent evidence indicates that synonymous codon changes may sometimes face strong selection. However, it remains difficult to generalize the nature, strength, and mechanism(s) of such selection. Previously, we showed that synonymous variants of a key enzyme-coding gene (fae) of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 decreased enzyme production and reduced fitness dramatically. We now show that during laboratory evolution, these variants rapidly regained fitness via parallel yet variant-specific, highly beneficial point mutations in the N-terminal region of fae. These mutations (including four synonymous mutations) had weak but consistently positive impacts on transcript levels, enzyme production, or enzyme activity. However, none of the proposed mechanisms (including internal ribosome pause sites or mRNA structure) predicted the fitness impact of evolved or additional, engineered point mutations. This study shows that synonymous mutations can be fixed through strong positive selection, but the mechanism for their benefit varies depending on the local sequence context. PMID:26908584

  18. Novel mutations in the IRF6 gene in Brazilian families with Van der Woude syndrome.

    PubMed

    Paranaíba, Lívia Máris Ribeiro; Martelli-Júnior, Hercílio; Oliveira Swerts, Mário Sergio; Line, Sergio R P; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2008-10-01

    Van der Woude Syndrome (VWS) is an autosomal craniofacial disorder characterized by lower lip pits and cleft lip and/or palate. Mutations in the interferon regulatory factor 6 (IRF6) gene have been identified in patients with VWS. To identify novel IRF6 mutations in patients affected by VWS, we screened 2 Brazilian families, sequencing the entire IRF6-coding region and flanking intronic boundaries. Two novel heterozygous mutations were identified: a frame shift mutation with deletion of G at the nucleotide position 520 in the exon 6 (520delG), and a missense single nucleotide substitution from T to A at nucleotide position 1135 in exon 8 (T1135A). By using restriction enzyme analysis, we were able to demonstrate the lack of similar mutations in unrelated healthy individuals and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate patients. Our results further confirmed that haploinsufficiency of the IRF6 gene results in VWS. PMID:18813858

  19. Extended RAS and BRAF Mutation Analysis Using Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kazuko; Tsurutani, Junji; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Yoneshige, Azusa; Ito, Akihiko; Togashi, Yosuke; De Velasco, Marco A; Terashima, Masato; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Tomida, Shuta; Tamura, Takao; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nishio, Kazuto

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF genes are related to resistance to anti-EGFR antibodies in colorectal cancer. We have established an extended RAS and BRAF mutation assay using a next-generation sequencer to analyze these mutations. Multiplexed deep sequencing was performed to detect somatic mutations within KRAS, NRAS, and BRAF, including minor mutated components. We first validated the technical performance of the multiplexed deep sequencing using 10 normal DNA and 20 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor samples. To demonstrate the potential clinical utility of our assay, we profiled 100 FFPE tumor samples and 15 plasma samples obtained from colorectal cancer patients. We used a variant calling approach based on a Poisson distribution. The distribution of the mutation-positive population was hypothesized to follow a Poisson distribution, and a mutation-positive status was defined as a value greater than the significance level of the error rate (α = 2 x 10(-5)). The cut-off value was determined to be the average error rate plus 7 standard deviations. Mutation analysis of 100 clinical FFPE tumor specimens was performed without any invalid cases. Mutations were detected at a frequency of 59% (59/100). KRAS mutation concordance between this assay and Scorpion-ARMS was 92% (92/100). DNA obtained from 15 plasma samples was also analyzed. KRAS and BRAF mutations were identified in both the plasma and tissue samples of 6 patients. The genetic screening assay using next-generation sequencer was validated for the detection of clinically relevant RAS and BRAF mutations using FFPE and liquid samples.

  20. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  1. Mutator Dynamics on a Smooth Evolutionary Landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kessler, David A.; Levine, Herbert

    1998-03-01

    We investigate a model of evolutionary dynamics on a smooth landscape which features a ``mutator'' allele which increases the mutation rate. We show that when the fitness is far from its equilibrium value the expected proportion of mutators approaches a value governed solely by the transition rates into and out of the mutator state, resulting in a much faster fitness increase than would be the case without the mutator allele. Near the fitness equilibrium, the mutators are severely suppressed, due to the detrimental effects of a large mutation rate near the fitness maximum. We discuss the results of a recent experiment on natural selection of E. coli in the light of our model.

  2. HFE mutations in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Willis, Gavin; Wimperis, Jennie Z; Smith, Katy; Fellows, Ian W; Jennings, Barbara A

    2003-01-01

    Most individuals diagnosed with hereditary hemochromatosis have mutations in both copies of the HFE gene, with such mutations being common in populations of north European origin. The number of individuals currently diagnosed and treated for hemochromatosis is small relative to the number carrying two HFE mutations. Studies searching for undiagnosed hemochromatosis cases among disease cohorts have generally failed to find the number of cases that would be expected if disease were the commonest outcome for individuals with two C282Y HFE mutations. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that individuals with two HFE mutations would be under-represented in an elderly population because many would have died from disease caused by hemochromatosis before they reached old age. This is a cross-sectional study of elderly patients referred for full blood counts at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. We screened blood samples from 1,000 elderly men (aged 85 and over) and women (aged 89 and over) for the C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations of the HFE gene. We also analyzed any recent laboratory data relevant to signs of hemochromatosis. None of the ten possible genotypes was significantly under- or over-represented compared to the expected frequency calculated from the Hardy-Weinberg equation. Four C282Y homozygotes were found. There were few significant differences in the laboratory findings between the genotypes. Our data suggest that most people with HFE mutations survive to old age and do not suffer from signs of iron overload and hemochromatosis. PMID:12972032

  3. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 siblings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances.

  4. [Applications of microchip electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis for screening FLT3-ITD gene mutation in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Leng, Xin; Li, Ling-Di; Li, Jin-Lan; Huang, Xiao-Jun; Ruan, Guo-Rui

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of microchip electrophoresis and capillary electrophoresis for screening FLT3-ITD gene mutation in acute myeloid leukemia. The FLT3-ITD mutation in the genomic DNA samples from 214 untreated AML patients were separately detected by PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis, then the DNA direct sequencing analysis was carried out. The results from PCR-microchip electrophoresis showed that there were 151 FLT3-ITD mutation negative, 58 FLT3-ITD mutation positive (58/214, 27.1%) and 5 FLT3-ITD mutation doubtful positive (5/214, 2.3%), while the outcomes from PCR-capillary electrophoresis displayed that there were 147 FLT3-ITD mutation negative and 67 FLT3-ITD mutation positive (67/214, 31.3%) without doubtful positive. In the 67 FLT3-ITD mutation positive samples detected by using PCR-capillary electrophoresis, 4 samples were detected as the negative while 5 samples were measured as the doubtful positive by using PCR-microchip electrophoresis. The followed sequencing analysis demonstrated that the above 9 samples were all FLT3-ITD mutation positive, indicating that PCR-capillary electrophoresis was more accurate and sensitive in screening the FLT3-ITD mutation, although statistic analysis showed that there were no significant differences in the detected results between PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis groups (Pearson Chi-squared Test, P > 0.05). It is concluded that both PCR-microchip electrophoresis and PCR-capillary electrophoresis were convenient and fast for screening FLT3-ITD mutation, but the accuracy of PCR-microchip electrophoresis awaits further improvement.

  5. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models

    PubMed Central

    Svetlichnyy, Dmitry; Imrichova, Hana; Fiers, Mark; Kalender Atak, Zeynep; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME). We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a “gain-of-target” for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. PMID:26562774

  6. Sequence and Structure Signatures of Cancer Mutation Hotspots in Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Anshuman; Yi, Lin; Gowthaman, Ragul; Torkamani, Ali; Schork, Nicholas J.; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinases are the most common protein domains implicated in cancer, where somatically acquired mutations are known to be functionally linked to a variety of cancers. Resequencing studies of protein kinase coding regions have emphasized the importance of sequence and structure determinants of cancer-causing kinase mutations in understanding of the mutation-dependent activation process. We have developed an integrated bioinformatics resource, which consolidated and mapped all currently available information on genetic modifications in protein kinase genes with sequence, structure and functional data. The integration of diverse data types provided a convenient framework for kinome-wide study of sequence-based and structure-based signatures of cancer mutations. The database-driven analysis has revealed a differential enrichment of SNPs categories in functional regions of the kinase domain, demonstrating that a significant number of cancer mutations could fall at structurally equivalent positions (mutational hotspots) within the catalytic core. We have also found that structurally conserved mutational hotspots can be shared by multiple kinase genes and are often enriched by cancer driver mutations with high oncogenic activity. Structural modeling and energetic analysis of the mutational hotspots have suggested a common molecular mechanism of kinase activation by cancer mutations, and have allowed to reconcile the experimental data. According to a proposed mechanism, structural effect of kinase mutations with a high oncogenic potential may manifest in a significant destabilization of the autoinhibited kinase form, which is likely to drive tumorigenesis at some level. Structure-based functional annotation and prediction of cancer mutation effects in protein kinases can facilitate an understanding of the mutation-dependent activation process and inform experimental studies exploring molecular pathology of tumorigenesis. PMID:19834613

  7. Positive maps, positive polynomials and entanglement witnesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowronek, Łukasz; Życzkowski, Karol

    2009-08-01

    We link the study of positive quantum maps, block positive operators and entanglement witnesses with problems related to multivariate polynomials. For instance, we show how indecomposable block positive operators relate to biquadratic forms that are not sums of squares. Although the general problem of describing the set of positive maps remains open, in some particular cases we solve the corresponding polynomial inequalities and obtain explicit conditions for positivity.

  8. Finding all BRCA pathogenic mutation carriers: best practice models.

    PubMed

    Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Jongmans, Marjolijn Cj

    2016-09-01

    Identifying germline BRCA pathogenic mutations in patients with ovarian or breast cancer is a crucial component in the medical management of affected patients. Furthermore, the relatives of affected patients can be offered genetic testing. Relatives who test positive for a germline BRCA pathogenic mutation can take appropriate action to prevent cancer or have cancer diagnosed as early as possible for better treatment options. The recent discovery that BRCA pathogenic mutation status can inform treatment decisions in patients with ovarian cancer has led to an increased demand for BRCA testing, with testing taking place earlier in the patient care pathway. New approaches to genetic counselling may be required to meet this greater demand for BRCA testing. This review discusses the need for best practices for genetic counselling and BRCA testing; it examines the challenges facing current practice and looks at adapted models of genetic counselling. PMID:27514840

  9. Exploring the link between glucocerebrosidase mutations and parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Westbroek, Wendy; Gustafson, Ann Marie; Sidransky, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Clinical, genetic and pathological studies all demonstrate that mutations in glucocerebrosidase (GBA), which encodes the lysosomal enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease (GD), are an important and common risk factor for Parkinson disease (PD) and related disorders. Some patients with GD and Gaucher carriers develop parkinsonism. Furthermore, subjects with PD have a greatly increased frequency of GBA mutations. GBA mutation carriers exhibit diverse parkinsonian phenotypes, and have glucocerebrosidase-positive Lewy bodies. Although the mechanism for this association is unknown, we present several theories, including enhanced protein aggregation, prion transmission, lipid accumulation, and impaired autophagy, mitophagy or trafficking. Each has inherent limitations, and an unknown “second hit” might be essential. Elucidating the basis for this link will have important consequences and should provide new insights into lysosomal pathways and potential treatment strategies. PMID:21723784

  10. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness.

  11. ALK positivity on pleuroscopic pleural biopsy in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Preyas J; Kate, Arvind H; Mehta, Deval; Dhabar, Boman N; Chhajed, Prashant N

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, and around 75% to 80% of lung cancers are detected in advanced stage. Multiple genetic mutations are identified and reported in adenocarcinoma of the lung. Various pulmonary samples can be tested for molecular mutations in lung cancer. However, feasibility of molecular profiling of pleuroscopic pleural biopsies in lung adenocarcinoma is not reported. We describe a case of advanced adenocarcinoma of lung with positive anaplastic lymphoma tyrosine kinase mutation on pleuroscopic pleural biopsy and improved with oral crizotinib. The current case highlights the feasibility of pleuroscopy.-guided pleural biopsies in molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:27461706

  12. Novel Calmodulin (CALM2) Mutations Associated with Congenital Arrhythmia Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Naomasa; Yagihara, Nobue; Crotti, Lia; Johnson, Christopher N.; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Roh, Michelle S.; Shigemizu, Daichi; Lichtner, Peter; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aiba, Takeshi; Homfray, Tessa; Behr, Elijah R.; Klug, Didier; Denjoy, Isabelle; Mastantuono, Elisa; Theisen, Daniel; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Satake, Wataru; Toda, Tatsushi; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Tsuji, Yukiomi; Tsuchiya, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Endo, Naoto; Kimura, Akinori; Ozaki, Kouichi; Motomura, Hideki; Suda, Kenji; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Schwartz, Peter J.; Meitinger, Thomas; Kääb, Stefan; Guicheney, Pascale; Shimizu, Wataru; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Chazin, Walter J.; George, Alfred L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic predisposition to life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias such as in congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) represent treatable causes of sudden cardiac death in young adults and children. Recently, mutations in calmodulin (CALM1, CALM2) have been associated with severe forms of LQTS and CPVT, with life-threatening arrhythmias occurring very early in life. Additional mutation-positive cases are needed to discern genotype-phenotype correlations associated with calmodulin mutations. Methods and Results We employed conventional and next-generation sequencing approaches including exome analysis in genotype-negative LQTS probands. We identified five novel de novo missense mutations in CALM2 in three subjects with LQTS (p.N98S, p.N98I, p.D134H) and two subjects with clinical features of both LQTS and CPVT (p.D132E, p.Q136P). Age of onset of major symptoms (syncope or cardiac arrest) ranged from 1–9 years. Three of five probands had cardiac arrest and one of these subjects did not survive. Although all probands had LQTS, two subjects also exhibited electrocardiographic features consistent with CPVT. The clinical severity among subjects in this series was generally less than that originally reported for CALM1 and CALM2 associated with recurrent cardiac arrest during infancy. Four of five probands responded to β-blocker therapy whereas one subject with mutation p.Q136P died suddenly during exertion despite this treatment. Mutations affect conserved residues located within calcium binding loops III (p.N98S, p.N98I) or IV (p.D132E, p.D134H, p.Q136P) and caused reduced calcium binding affinity. Conclusions CALM2 mutations can be associated with LQTS and with overlapping features of LQTS and CPVT. PMID:24917665

  13. Human anion exchanger1 mutations and distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Yenchitsomanus, Pa-thai

    2003-09-01

    The human anion exchanger 1 (AE1 or SLC4A1) gene encodes anion exchanger 1 (or band 3) protein in erythrocytes and in alpha-intercalated cells of the kidney. Thus, AE1 mutations show pleiotrophic effects resulting in two distinct and seemingly unrelated defects, an erythrocyte abnormality and distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Southeast Asian ovalocytosis (SAO), a well-known red blood cell (RBC) defect, which is widespread in Southeast Asian regions, is caused by AE1 mutation due to a deletion of 27 base pairs in codons 400-408 (delta400-408) leading to an in-frame 9 amino-acid loss in the protein. Co-existence of SAO and dRTA is usually not seen in the same individual. However, the two conditions can co-exist as the result of compound heterozygosities between delta400-408 and other mutations. The reported genotypes include delta400-408/G701D, delta400-408/R602H, delta400-408/deltaV850, and delta400-408/A858D. The presence of dRTA, with or without RBC abnormalities, may occur from homozygous or compound heterozygous conditions of recessive AE1 mutations (eg G701D/G701D, V488M/V488M, deltaV850/deltaV850, deltaV850/A858D, G701D/S773P) or heterozygous dominant AE1 mutations (eg R598H, R589C, R589S, S613F, R901X). Codon 589 of this gene seems to be a 'mutational hot-spot' since repeated mutations at this codon occurring in different ethnic groups and at least two de novo (R589H and R589C) mutations have been observed. Therefore, AE1 mutations can result in both recessive and dominant dRTA, possibly depending on the position of the amino acid change in the protein. As several mutant AE1 proteins still maintain a significant anion transport function but are defective in targeting to the cell surface, impaired intracellular trafficking of the mutant AE1 is an important molecular mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of dRTA associated with AE1 mutations. PMID:15115146

  14. Detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in formalin fixed paraffin embedded biopsies in Malaysian non-small cell lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are reportedly associated with various responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving the anti-EGFR agents. Detection of the mutation therefore plays an important role in therapeutic decision making. The aim of this study was to detect EGFR mutations in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) samples using both Scorpion ARMS and high resolution melt (HRM) assay, and to compare the sensitivity of these methods. Results All of the mutations were found in adenocarcinoma, except one that was in squamous cell carcinoma. The mutation rate was 45.7% (221/484). Complex mutations were also observed, wherein 8 tumours carried 2 mutations and 1 tumour carried 3 mutations. Conclusions Both methods detected EGFR mutations in FFPE samples. HRM assays gave more EGFR positive results compared to Scorpion ARMS. PMID:23590575

  15. Absence of heartbeat in the Xenopus tropicalis mutation muzak is caused by a nonsense mutation in cardiac myosin myh6

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Daya, Anita; Sater, Amy K.; Wells, Dan E.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Zimmerman, Lyle B.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanisms coupling heart function and cardiac morphogenesis can be accessed in lower vertebrate embryos that can survive to swimming tadpole stages on diffused oxygen. Forward genetic screens in Xenopus tropicalis have identified more than 80 mutations affecting diverse developmental processes, including cardiac morphogenesis and function. In the first positional cloning of a mutation in X. tropicalis, we show that non-contractile hearts in muzak (muz) embryos are caused by a premature stop codon in the cardiac myosin heavy chain gene myh6. The mutation deletes the coiled-coil domain responsible for polymerization into thick filaments, severely disrupting the cardiomyocyte cytoskeleton. Despite the lack of contractile activity and absence of a major structural protein, early stages of cardiac morphogenesis including looping and chamber formation are grossly normal. Muz hearts subsequently develop dilated chambers with compressed endocardium and fail to form identifiable cardiac valves and trabeculae. PMID:19769958

  16. A Cryptochrome 2 mutation yields advanced sleep phase in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Arisa; Shi, Guangsen; Jones, Christopher R; Lipzen, Anna; Pennacchio, Len A; Xu, Ying; Hallows, William C; McMahon, Thomas; Yamazaki, Maya; Ptáček, Louis J; Fu, Ying-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Familial Advanced Sleep Phase (FASP) is a heritable human sleep phenotype characterized by very early sleep and wake times. We identified a missense mutation in the human Cryptochrome 2 (CRY2) gene that co-segregates with FASP in one family. The mutation leads to replacement of an alanine residue at position 260 with a threonine (A260T). In mice, the CRY2 mutation causes a shortened circadian period and reduced phase-shift to early-night light pulse associated with phase-advanced behavioral rhythms in the light-dark cycle. The A260T mutation is located in the phosphate loop of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) binding domain of CRY2. The mutation alters the conformation of CRY2, increasing its accessibility and affinity for FBXL3 (an E3 ubiquitin ligase), thus promoting its degradation. These results demonstrate that CRY2 stability controlled by FBXL3 plays a key role in the regulation of human sleep wake behavior. PMID:27529127

  17. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  18. Gene mutations in Cushing's disease

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qi; Ge, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's disease (CD) is a severe (and potentially fatal) disease caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting adenomas of the pituitary gland (often termed pituitary adenomas). The majority of ACTH-secreting corticotroph tumors are sporadic and CD rarely appears as a familial disorder, thus, the genetic mechanisms underlying CD are poorly understood. Studies have reported that various mutated genes are associated with CD, such as those in menin 1, aryl hydrocarbon receptor-interacting protein and the nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1. Recently it was identified that ubiquitin-specific protease 8 mutations contribute to CD, which was significant towards elucidating the genetic mechanisms of CD. The present study reviews the associated gene mutations in CD patients. PMID:27588171

  19. Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA): A software tool for analyzing mutations associated with antiviral resistance

    PubMed Central

    Salvatierra, Karina; Florez, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is considered a major public health problem, with 200 million people infected worldwide. The treatment for HCV chronic infection with pegylated interferon alpha plus ribavirin inhibitors is unspecific; consequently, the treatment is effective in only 50% of patients infected. This has prompted the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAA) that target virus proteins. These DAA have demonstrated a potent effect in vitro and in vivo; however, virus mutations associated with the development of resistance have been described. Objective: To design and develop an online information system for detecting mutations in amino acids known to be implicated in resistance to DAA. Materials and methods:    We have used computer applications, technological tools, standard languages, infrastructure systems and algorithms, to analyze positions associated with resistance to DAA for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes of HCV. Results: We have designed and developed an online information system named Biomedical Mutation Analysis (BMA), which allows users to calculate changes in nucleotide and amino acid sequences for each selected sequence from conventional Sanger and cloning sequencing using a graphical interface. Conclusion: BMA quickly, easily and effectively analyzes mutations, including complete documentation and examples. Furthermore, the development of different visualization techniques allows proper interpretation and understanding of the results. The data obtained using BMA will be useful for the assessment and surveillance of HCV resistance to new antivirals, and for the treatment regimens by selecting those DAA to which the virus is not resistant, avoiding unnecessary treatment failures. The software is available at: http://bma.itiud.org. PMID:27547378

  20. A novel mutation of the HNF1B gene associated with hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease and neonatal renal failure: a case report and mutation update.

    PubMed

    Alvelos, Maria Inês; Rodrigues, Magda; Lobo, Luísa; Medeira, Ana; Sousa, Ana Berta; Simão, Carla; Lemos, Manuel Carlos

    2015-02-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 beta (HNF1B) plays an important role in embryonic development, namely in the kidney, pancreas, liver, genital tract, and gut. Heterozygous germline mutations of HNF1B are associated with the renal cysts and diabetes syndrome (RCAD). Affected individuals may present a variety of renal developmental abnormalities and/or maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). A Portuguese 19-month-old male infant was evaluated due to hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease and renal dysfunction diagnosed in the neonatal period that progressed to stage 5 chronic renal disease during the first year of life. His mother was diagnosed with a solitary hypoplastic microcystic left kidney at age 20, with stage 2 chronic renal disease established at age 35, and presented bicornuate uterus, pancreatic atrophy, and gestational diabetes. DNA sequence analysis of HNF1B revealed a novel germline frameshift insertion (c.110_111insC or c.110dupC) in both the child and the mother. A review of the literature revealed a total of 106 different HNF1B mutations, in 236 mutation-positive families, comprising gross deletions (34%), missense mutations (31%), frameshift deletions or insertions (15%), nonsense mutations (11%), and splice-site mutations (8%). The study of this family with an unusual presentation of hypoplastic glomerulocystic kidney disease with neonatal renal dysfunction identified a previously unreported mutation of the HNF1B gene, thereby expanding the spectrum of known mutations associated with renal developmental disorders. PMID:25700310

  1. Coupled mutation finder: A new entropy-based method quantifying phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of significant compensatory mutation signals in multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) is often complicated by noise. A challenging problem in bioinformatics is remains the separation of significant signals between two or more non-conserved residue sites from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. Determination of these non-conserved residue sites is as important as the recognition of strictly conserved positions for understanding of the structural basis of protein functions and identification of functionally important residue regions. In this study, we developed a new method, the Coupled Mutation Finder (CMF) quantifying the phylogenetic noise for the detection of compensatory mutations. Results To demonstrate the effectiveness of this method, we analyzed essential sites of two human proteins: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and glucokinase (GCK). Our results suggest that the CMF is able to separate significant compensatory mutation signals from the phylogenetic noise and unrelated pair signals. The vast majority of compensatory mutation sites found by the CMF are related to essential sites of both proteins and they are likely to affect protein stability or functionality. Conclusions The CMF is a new method, which includes an MSA-specific statistical model based on multiple testing procedures that quantify the error made in terms of the false discovery rate and a novel entropy-based metric to upscale BLOSUM62 dissimilar compensatory mutations. Therefore, it is a helpful tool to predict and investigate compensatory mutation sites of structural or functional importance in proteins. We suggest that the CMF could be used as a novel automated function prediction tool that is required for a better understanding of the structural basis of proteins. The CMF server is freely accessible at http://cmf.bioinf.med.uni-goettingen.de. PMID:22963049

  2. Neuropathy- and Myopathy-Associated Mutations in Human Small Heat Shock Proteins: Characteristics and Evolutionary History of the Mutation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Benndorf, Rainer; Martin, Jody L.; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Wertheim, Joel O.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in four of the ten human small heat shock proteins (sHSP) are associated with various forms of motor neuropathies and myopathies. In HspB1, HspB3, and HspB8 all known mutations cause motor neuropathies, whereas in HspB5 they cause myopathies. Several features are common to the majority of these mutations: (i) they are missense mutations, (ii) most associated disease phenotypes exhibit a dominant inheritance pattern and late disease onset, (iii) in the primary protein sequences, the sites of most mutations are located in the conserved α-crystallin domain and the variable C-terminal extensions, and (iv) most human mutation sites are highly conserved among the vertebrate orthologs and have been historically exposed to significant purifying selection. In contrast, a minor fraction of these mutations deviate from these rules: they are (i) frame shifting, nonsense, or elongation mutations, (ii) associated with recessive or early onset disease phenotypes, (iii) positioned in the N-terminal domain of the proteins, and (iv) less conserved among the vertebrates and were historically not subject to a strong selective pressure. In several vertebrate sHSPs (including primate sHSPs), homologous sites differ from the human sequence and occasionally even encode the same amino acid residues that cause the disease in humans. Apparently, a number of these mutations sites are not crucial for the protein function in single species or entire taxa, and single species even seem to have adopted mechanisms that compensate for potentially adverse effects of 'mutant-like' sHSPs. The disease-associated dominant sHSP missense mutations have a number of cellular consequences that are consistent with gain-of-function mechanisms of genetic dominance: dominant-negative effects, the formation of cytotoxic amyloid protein oligomers and precipitates, disruption of cytoskeletal networks, and increased downstream enzymatic activities. Future therapeutic concepts should aim for reducing these

  3. FRAXE mutation analysis in three Spanish families

    SciTech Connect

    Carbonell, P.; Lopez, I.; Gabarron, J.

    1996-08-09

    Very little is known about the phenotype of FRAXE-positive individuals and the relation between the genotype/phenotype and genotype/cytogenetic expression. We describe three families with normal and mildly affected individuals and a severely retarded male expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus or presenting different expansions at the CGG FRAXE triplet. In addition, we analyze the FRAXE mutation in sperm DNA from a retarded male carrier with a handicapped daughter expressing fragility at the FRAXE locus. Mental status in FRAXE individuals is highly variable and, although mild mental retardation is observed in most cases, several carrier males are apparently normal. It seems that methylation is not as strictly associated with size of CGG triplets in the FRAXE locus as in FRAXA, and it is possible that normal carrier individuals with fully methylated increments in lymphocytes have a certain proportion of unmethylated alleles in the critical (i.e., neural) tissues. FRAXE mutation is apparently similar to FRAXA in that males with somatic large methylated increments are carriers of small unmethylated ones in germinal cells. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Phenotypic clustering in MPZ mutations.

    PubMed

    Shy, Michael E; Jáni, Agnes; Krajewski, Karen; Grandis, Marina; Lewis, Richard A; Li, Jun; Shy, Rosemary R; Balsamo, Janne; Lilien, Jack; Garbern, James Y; Kamholz, John

    2004-02-01

    Myelin protein zero (MPZ) is a member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily with single extracellular, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. Homotypic interactions between extracellular domains of MPZ adhere adjacent myelin wraps to each other. MPZ is also necessary for myelin compaction since mice which lack MPZ develop severe dysmyelinating neuropathies in which compaction is dramatically disrupted. MPZ mutations in humans cause the inherited demyelinating neuropathy CMT1B. Some mutations cause the severe neuropathies of infancy designated as Dejerine-Sottas disease, while others cause a 'classical' Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease Type 1B (CMT1B) phenotype with normal early milestones but development of disability during the first two decades of life. Still other mutations cause a neuropathy that presents in adults, with normal nerve conduction velocities, designated as a 'CMT2' form of CMT1B. To correlate the phenotype of patients with MPZ mutations with their genotype, we identified and evaluated 13 patients from 12 different families with eight different MPZ mutations. In addition, we re-analysed the clinical data from 64 cases of CMT1B from the literature. Contrary to our expectations, we found that most patients presented with either an early onset neuropathy with signs and symptoms prior to the onset of walking or a late onset neuropathy with signs and symptoms at around age 40 years. Only occasional patients presented with a 'classical' CMT phenotype. Correlation of specific MPZ mutations with their phenotypes demonstrated that addition of either a charged amino acid or altering a cysteine residue in the extracellular domain caused a severe early onset neuropathy. Severe neuropathy was also caused by truncation of the cytoplasmic domain or alteration of an evolutionarily conserved amino acid. Taken together, these data suggest that early onset neuropathy is caused by MPZ mutations that significantly disrupt the tertiary structure of MPZ and thus

  5. Adiposity is associated with p53 gene mutations in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochs-Balcom, Heather M; Marian, Catalin; Nie, Jing; Brasky, Theodore M; Goerlitz, David S; Trevisan, Maurizio; Edge, Stephen B; Winston, Janet; Berry, Deborah L; Kallakury, Bhaskar V; Freudenheim, Jo L; Shields, Peter G

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the p53 gene are among the most frequent genetic events in human cancer and may be triggered by environmental and occupational exposures. We examined the association of clinical and pathological characteristics of breast tumors and breast cancer risk factors according to the prevalence and type of p53 mutations. Using tumor blocks from incident cases from a case-control study in western New York, we screened for p53 mutations in exons 2-11 using the Affymetrix p53 Gene Chip array and analyzed case-case comparisons using logistic regression. The p53 mutation frequency among cases was 28.1 %; 95 % were point mutations (13 % of which were silent) and the remainder were single base pair deletions. Sixty seven percent of all point mutations were transitions; 24 % of them are G:C>A:T at CpG sites. Positive p53 mutation status was associated with poorer differentiation (OR, 95 % CI 2.29, 1.21-4.32), higher nuclear grade (OR, 95 % CI 1.99, 1.22-3.25), and increased Ki-67 status (OR, 95 % CI 1.81, 1.10-2.98). Cases with P53 mutations were more likely to have a combined ER-positive and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 1.65, 1.01-2.71), and a combined ER-negative and PR-negative status (OR, 95 % CI 2.18, 1.47-3.23). Body mass index >30 kg/m(2), waist circumference >79 cm, and waist-to-hip ratio >0.86 were also associated with p53 status; obese breast cancer cases are more likely to have p53 mutations (OR, 95 % CI 1.78, 1.19-2.68). We confirmed that p53 mutations are associated with less favorable tumor characteristics and identified an association of p53 mutation status and adiposity.

  6. Clinical characterization and mutation spectrum in Caribbean Hispanic families with Lynch syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Correa, Marcia; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Pérez-Mayoral, Julyann; Suleiman-Suleiman, Wasilah; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria del Mar; Bertrán, Carlos; Casellas, Nicolás; Rodríguez, Natalia; Pardo, Sherly; Rivera, Keyla; Mosquera, Rafael; Rodriguez-Quilichini, Segundo

    2015-09-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is an inherited form of colorectal cancer (CRC) caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes. It accounts for approximately 5% of all CRCs. The prevalence of LS among US Hispanics is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the germline mutations of LS in Caribbean Hispanics from Puerto Rico and Dominican Republic. A total of 89 subjects were recruited through the Puerto Rico Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry and were classified according to Amsterdam and Bethesda clinical guidelines. For those tumors with lack of expression of MMR protein, gene sequencing was ordered. A total of 35 individuals with deficient MMR system were identified: 22 had MMR mutations and 13 had tumors with absent MMR protein expression. Our results show that the mutation spectrum of Caribbean Hispanic LS patients was composed mostly of MSH2 (66.7%) mutations, followed by MLH1 (25.0%). One mutation was identified in MSH6 (8.3%). A previously unidentified mutation in MLH1 gene c.2044_2045del was found in one Caribbean Hispanic family. MMR mutation-positive individuals were found to be more likely to have a prominent family history of CRC and tumors located at the proximal colon. Compared to MSH2 mutation carriers, MLH1 mutation-positive individuals were more likely to have a strong family history of CRC and LS associated cancers. Furthermore, insurance coverage for genetic testing was found to be limited in the study population with 65.1% of the individuals recruited were denied coverage. This report presents the first description of the mutation spectrum and clinicopathologic characteristics of LS Caribbean Hispanics patients.

  7. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  8. [Analysis of PTPN11 mutation in children leukemia and its clinical significance].

    PubMed

    Yang, San-Zhen; Chen, Bing-Qiang; Lu, Su-Ying; Zhang, Bi-Hong; Xue, Hong-Man; Chen, Chun

    2012-02-01

    This study was aimed to explore the frequency of PTPN11 mutation in children with leukemia and its clinical significance. Genomic DNAs were extracted from peripheral leukocytes of 131 patients with leukemia, including 101 cases of ALL, 26 cases of AML, 3 cases of CML and 1 case of juvenil myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). The sequences of PTPN11 exons 3, 8, 13 were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the clinical characteristics of positive patients were analyzed. The results indicated that the PTPN11 mutation was found in 10 cases (9.9%) from newly diagnosed 101 cases of ALL. Grouping the newly diagnosed ALL children by various clinical features, it was found that the PTPN11 mutation did not show associations with sex, age, white blood cell (WBC) count, prednisone test sensitivity, clinical risk and disease recurrences at the first visit (P > 0.05). PTPN11 mutations were found in 2 cases out of 26 AML patients, including one AML-M(2) and one AML-M(4). No PTPN11 mutation in 3 CML patients was found. Exon 13 mutation of PTPN11 gene was found in 1 case of JMML. It is concluded that the E76 of exon 3 is the hot spot of PTPN11 mutation in children leukemia. The novel G503E (1508G > A) mutation is detected in one JMML patient. The PTPN11 mutation does not associate with the sex, age, WBC count, prednisone sensitive test and early recurrence.

  9. The Distinctive Mutational Spectra of Polyomavirus-Negative Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegen, Monique Elise; Robinson, Dan R.; Wu, Yi-Mi; Dhanasekaran, Saravana Mohan; Palanisamy, Nallasivam; Siddiqui, Javed; Cao, Xuhong; Su, Fengyun; Wang, Rui; Xiao, Hong; Kunju, Lakshmi P.; Mehra, Rohit; Tomlins, Scott A.; Fullen, Douglas Randall; Bichakjian, Christopher Keram; Johnson, Timothy M.; Dlugosz, Andrzej Antoni; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but highly aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine tumor. Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) may contribute to tumorigenesis in a subset of tumors via inhibition of tumor suppressors such as retinoblastoma (RB1) by mutated viral T-antigens, but the molecular pathogenesis of MCPyV-negative MCC is largely unexplored. Through our MI-ONCOSEQ precision oncology study we performed integrative sequencing on two cases of MCPyV-negative MCC, as well as a validation cohort of 14 additional MCC cases (n=16). In addition to previously identified mutations in TP53, RB1, and PIK3CA, we discovered activating mutations of oncogenes including HRAS and loss-of-function mutations in PRUNE2 and NOTCH family genes in MCPyV-negative MCC. MCPyV-negative tumors also displayed high overall mutation burden (10.09 +/− 2.32 mutations per Mb) and were characterized by a prominent UV-signature pattern with C > T transitions comprising 85% of mutations. In contrast, mutation burden was low in MCPyV-positive tumors (0.40 +/− 0.09 mutations per Mb) and lacked a UV signature. These findings suggest a potential ontologic dichotomy in MCC, characterized by either viral-dependent or UV-dependent tumorigenic pathways. PMID:26238782

  10. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A.; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  11. Characterization of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Interacting Protein (AIP) Mutations in Familial Isolated Pituitary Adenoma Families

    PubMed Central

    Igreja, Susana; Chahal, Harvinder S; King, Peter; Bolger, Graeme B; Srirangalingam, Umasuthan; Guasti, Leonardo; Chapple, J Paul; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Gueorguiev, Maria; Guegan, Katie; Stals, Karen; Khoo, Bernard; Kumar, Ajith V; Ellard, Sian; Grossman, Ashley B; Korbonits, Márta

    2010-01-01

    Familial isolated pituitary adenoma (FIPA) is an autosomal dominant condition with variable genetic background and incomplete penetrance. Germline mutations of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting protein (AIP) gene have been reported in 15–40% of FIPA patients. Limited data are available on the functional consequences of the mutations or regarding the regulation of the AIP gene. We describe a large cohort of FIPA families and characterize missense and silent mutations using minigene constructs, luciferase and β-galactosidase assays, as well as in silico predictions. Patients with AIP mutations had a lower mean age at diagnosis (23.6±11.2 years) than AIP mutation-negative patients (40.4±14.5 years). A promoter mutation showed reduced in vitro activity corresponding to lower mRNA expression in patient samples. Stimulation of the protein kinase A-pathway positively regulates the AIP promoter. Silent mutations led to abnormal splicing resulting in truncated protein or reduced AIP expression. A two-hybrid assay of protein–protein interaction of all missense variants showed variable disruption of AIP-phosphodiesterase-4A5 binding. In summary, exonic, promoter, splice-site, and large deletion mutations in AIP are implicated in 31% of families in our FIPA cohort. Functional characterization of AIP changes is important to identify the functional impact of gene sequence variants. Hum Mutat 31:1–11, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. PMID:20506337

  12. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study.

    PubMed

    Lorentzen, Jon A; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  13. Association of mutations in the mitochondrial genome with the subclinical carotid atherosclerosis in women.

    PubMed

    Sazonova, Margarita A; Chicheva, Mariya M; Zhelankin, Andrey V; Sobenin, Igor A; Bobryshev, Yuri V; Orekhov, Alexander N

    2015-08-01

    The importance of the study of an association of mitochondrial DNA mutations with asymptomatic atherosclerosis in women is undeniable. In the present study, a series of PCR with primers for mutation region and further amplificate pyrosequencing were carried out to identify point substitutions or microdeletions of the mitochondrial genome. The results obtained were processed using the original method of estimating the level of heteroplasmy. Five mutations in the mitochondrial genome, namely C3256T, G14709A, G12315A, G13513A and G14846A, in which the heteroplasmy level was associated with the degree of preclinical atherosclerosis in women, were identified. The data obtained in the study showed that C3256T, G14709A and G12315A mutations have a positive correlation with atherosclerosis while G13513A and G14846A mutations have a negative correlation with atherosclerotic lesions. Total mutational load of the mitochondrial genome for C3256T, G14709A, G12315A, G13513A and G14846A mutations explains 68% of the variability of thickness of the carotid intima-medial layer, while the complex of traditional risk factors for cardiovascular diseases explains only 8% of the IMT variability. Data on the correlation between heteroplasmy levels of C3256T, G14709A, G12315A, G13513A and G14846A mutations prompt a suggestion that these mutations may be present on the same haplotypes of mitochondrial genome, associated with atherosclerosis. PMID:25910413

  14. A high incidence of BRCA1 mutations in 20 breast-ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed Central

    Serova, O.; Montagna, M.; Torchard, D.; Narod, S. A.; Tonin, P.; Sylla, B.; Lynch, H. T.; Feunteun, J.; Lenoir, G. M.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 breast-ovarian cancer families, the majority of which show positive evidence of linkage to chromosome 17q12 for germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 mutations cosegregating with breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility were identified in 16 families, including 1 family with a case of male breast cancer. Nine of these mutations have not been reported previously. The majority of mutations were found to generate a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated BRCA1 protein of 2%-88% of the expected normal length. Two mutations altered the RING finger domain. Sequencing of genomic DNA led to the identification of a mutation in the coding region of BRCA1 in 12 families, and cDNA analysis revealed an abnormal or missing BRCA1 transcript in 4 of the 8 remaining families. A total of eight mutations were associated with a reduced quantity of BRCA1 transcript. We were unable to detect BRCA1 mutations in 4 of the 20 families, but only 1 of these was clearly linked to BRCA1. It is expected that the majority of clear examples of the breast-ovarian syndrome will be associated with germ-line mutations in the coding region of BRCA1. Images Figure 1 PMID:8554067

  15. A novel homozygous mutation in HSF4 causing autosomal recessive congenital cataract.

    PubMed

    Behnam, Mahdiyeh; Imagawa, Eri; Chaleshtori, Ahmad Reza Salehi; Ronasian, Firooze; Salehi, Mansoor; Miyake, Noriko; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2016-02-01

    Cataract is defined as opacity in the crystalline lens and congenital cataract occurs during the first year of life. Until now, mutations of more than 50 genes in congenital cataract have been reported with various modes of inheritance. Among them, HSF4 mutations have been reported in autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and age-related forms of cataract. The inheritance patterns of these mutations depend on their mutational positions in HSF4: autosomal dominant or recessive mutations are respectively found either in a DNA-binding domain or in (or downstream of) hydrophobic repeats. Here we report a novel homozygous HSF4 mutation (c.521T>C, p.Leu174Pro) in two affected sibs of an Iranian consanguineous family using whole exome sequencing. The mutation is predicted as highly pathogenic by in silico analysis (SIFT, Polyphen2 and MutationTaster) and is not found in any of control databases. This mutation is located in a hydrophobic repeat of the HSF4 protein, which is consistent with the mode of inheritance as an autosomal recessive trait. PMID:26490182

  16. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  17. Late-onset Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 4F caused by periaxin gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Shoko; Hashiguchi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Akiko; Maeda, Kengo; Suzuki, Takashi; Haruki, Hiroyo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Okamoto, Yuji; Takashima, Hiroshi

    2012-11-01

    We identified the main features of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease, type 4F, caused by a periaxin gene (PRX) mutation in Japanese patients. Periaxin is known as one of the key myelination molecules, forming tight junction between myelin loop and axon. We collected 427 DNA samples from individuals with CMT or CMT-related neuropathy, negative for PMP22 duplication. We investigated PRX mutations using a purpose-built resequencing array screen during the period 2006-2012. We detected two types of PRX mutations in three patients; one patient showed a novel homozygous p.D651N mutation and the other two showed homozygous p.R1070X mutation. All PRX mutations reported so far have been of nonsense or frameshift type. In this study, we found homozygous missense mutation p.D651N. Aspartate 651 is located in a repeat domain; its position might indicate an important function. PRX mutations usually lead to early-onset, autosomal-recessive demyelinating CMT neuropathy 4F (CMT4F) or Dejerine-Sottas disease; their clinical phenotypes are severe. In our three patients, the onset of the disease was at the age of 27 years or later, and their clinical phenotypes were milder compared with those reported in previous studies. We showed a variation of clinical phenotypes for CMT4F caused by a novel, nonsense PRX mutation. PMID:22847150

  18. KIT and PDGFRA mutations and PDGFRA immunostaining in gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Barreca, Antonella; Fornari, Alessandro; Bonello, Lisa; Tondat, Fabrizio; Chiusa, Luigi; Lista, Patrizia; Pich, Achille

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the association of PDGFRA and KIT mutations as well as PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression with clinicopathologic features and prognosis in a series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Tumor DNA from 40 GISTs was sequenced for the presence of mutations in KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and in PDGFRA exons 12 and 18. Tissue sections were stained with polyclonal anti-PDGFRA antibody. KIT mutations occurred in 26 cases. There were 13 deletions, 6 substitutions, 3 deletion-substitutions, 3 duplications and 1 insertion. Tumors with KIT deletions/insertion were large with a high mitotic index (MI), and were associated with a high rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs, distant metastasis, relapse and a short disease-free survival (DFS). PDGFRA mutations occurred in 6 gastric GISTs. There were 4 deletions and 2 substitutions. Tumors with PDGFRA mutations were small, with a low MI and Ki67 score, and were associated with a very low rate of symptoms at diagnosis, invasion into adjacent organs and distant metastasis. PDGFRA immunopositivity was found in 23 cases: a peculiar 'dotlike' staining was found in 5 out of 6 PDGFRA mutated cases. Patients with positive PDGFRA immunostaining had a longer DFS than those with negative staining. Our data confirm that the type of KIT mutation is associated with various clinicopathologic features of GISTs, and indicate that PDGFRA mutations are associated with rather indolent tumors. PDGFRA immunopositivity reflects PDGFRA mutational status and is associated with a favorable outcome. PMID:21461555

  19. A high incidence of BRCA1 mutations in 20 breast-ovarian cancer families

    SciTech Connect

    Serova, O.; Montagna, M.; Sylla, B.

    1996-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 breast-ovarian cancer families, the majority of which show positive evidence of linkage to chromosome 17q12, for germ-line mutations in the BRCA1 gene. BRCA1 mutations cosegregating with breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility were identified in 16 families, including 1 family with a case of male breast cancer. Nine of these mutations have not been reported previously. The majority of mutations were found to generate a premature stop codon leading to the formation of a truncated BRCA1 protein of 2%-88% of the expected normal length. Two mutations altered the RING finger domain. Sequencing of genomic DNA led to the identification of a mutation in the coding region of BRCA1 in 12 families, and cDNA analysis revealed an abnormal or missing BRCA1 transcript in 4 of the 8 remaining families. A total of eight mutations were associated with a reduced quantity of BRCA1 transcript. We were unable to detect BRCA1 mutations in 4 of the 20 families, but only 1 of these was clearly linked to BRCA1. It is expected that the majority of clear examples of the breast-ovarian cancer syndrome will be associated with germ-line mutations in the coding region of BRCA1. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Systematic analysis of mutation distribution in three dimensional protein structures identifies cancer driver genes.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Akihiro; Okada, Yukinori; Boroevich, Keith A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Taniguchi, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Hidewaki

    2016-01-01

    Protein tertiary structure determines molecular function, interaction, and stability of the protein, therefore distribution of mutation in the tertiary structure can facilitate the identification of new driver genes in cancer. To analyze mutation distribution in protein tertiary structures, we applied a novel three dimensional permutation test to the mutation positions. We analyzed somatic mutation datasets of 21 types of cancers obtained from exome sequencing conducted by the TCGA project. Of the 3,622 genes that had ≥3 mutations in the regions with tertiary structure data, 106 genes showed significant skew in mutation distribution. Known tumor suppressors and oncogenes were significantly enriched in these identified cancer gene sets. Physical distances between mutations in known oncogenes were significantly smaller than those of tumor suppressors. Twenty-three genes were detected in multiple cancers. Candidate genes with significant skew of the 3D mutation distribution included kinases (MAPK1, EPHA5, ERBB3, and ERBB4), an apoptosis related gene (APP), an RNA splicing factor (SF1), a miRNA processing factor (DICER1), an E3 ubiquitin ligase (CUL1) and transcription factors (KLF5 and EEF1B2). Our study suggests that systematic analysis of mutation distribution in the tertiary protein structure can help identify cancer driver genes. PMID:27225414

  1. A missense mutation in the 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase FVT1 as candidate causal mutation for bovine spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Stefan; Medugorac, Ivica; Röther, Susanne; Strässer, Katja; Förster, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The bovine form of the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) shows striking similarity to the human form of the disease. It has, however, been mapped to a genomic region not harboring the bovine orthologue of the SMN gene, mutation of which causes human SMA. After refinement of the mapping results we analyzed positional and functional candidate genes. One of three candidate genes, FVT1, encoding 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase, which catalyzes a crucial step in the glycosphingolipid metabolism, showed a G-to-A missense mutation that changes Ala-175 to Thr. The identified mutation is limited to SMA-affected animals and carriers and always appears in context of the founder haplotype. The Ala variant found in healthy animals showed the expected 3-ketodihydrosphingosine reductase activity in an in vitro enzyme assay. Importantly, the Thr variant found in SMA animals showed no detectable activity. Surprisingly, in an in vivo assay the mutated gene complements the growth defect of a homologous yeast knockout strain as well as the healthy variant. This finding explains the viability of affected newborn calves and the later neuron-specific onset of the disease, which might be due to the high sensitivity of these neurons to changes in housekeeping functions. Taken together, the described mutation in FVT1 is a strong candidate for causality of SMA in cattle. This result provides an animal model for understanding the underlying mechanisms of the development of SMA and will allow efficient selection against the disease in cattle. PMID:17420465

  2. Holes influence the mutation spectrum of human mitochondrial DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagran, Martha; Miller, John

    Mutations drive evolution and disease, showing highly non-random patterns of variant frequency vs. nucleotide position. We use computational DNA hole spectroscopy [M.Y. Suarez-Villagran & J.H. Miller, Sci. Rep. 5, 13571 (2015)] to reveal sites of enhanced hole probability in selected regions of human mitochondrial DNA. A hole is a mobile site of positive charge created when an electron is removed, for example by radiation or contact with a mutagenic agent. The hole spectra are quantum mechanically computed using a two-stranded tight binding model of DNA. We observe significant correlation between spectra of hole probabilities and of genetic variation frequencies from the MITOMAP database. These results suggest that hole-enhanced mutation mechanisms exert a substantial, perhaps dominant, influence on mutation patterns in DNA. One example is where a trapped hole induces a hydrogen bond shift, known as tautomerization, which then triggers a base-pair mismatch during replication. Our results deepen overall understanding of sequence specific mutation rates, encompassing both hotspots and cold spots, which drive molecular evolution.

  3. The Relationship of the Factor V Leiden Mutation and Pregnancy Outcomes for Mother and Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Dizon-Townson, Donna; Miller, Connie; Sibai, Baha; Spong, Catherine Y.; Thom, Elizabeth; Wendel, George; Wenstrom, Katharine; Samuels, Philip; Cotroneo, Margaret A.; Moawad, Atef; Sorokin, Yoram; Meis, Paul; Miodovnik, Menachem; O’Sullivan, Mary J.; Conway, Deborah; Wapner, Ronald J.; Gabbe, Steven G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We sought to estimate the frequency of pregnancy-related thromboembolic events among carriers of the factor V Leiden (FVL) mutation without a personal history of thromboembolism, and to evaluate the impact of maternal and fetal FVL mutation carriage or other thrombophilias on the risk of adverse outcomes. Methods Women with a singleton pregnancy and no history of thromboembolism were recruited at 13 clinical centers before 14 weeks of gestation from April 2000 to August 2001. Each was tested for the FVL mutation, as was the resultant conceptus after delivery or after miscarriage, when available. The incidence of thromboembolism (primary outcome), and of other adverse outcomes, was compared between FVL mutation carriers and noncarriers. We also compared adverse outcomes in a secondary nested carrier-control analysis of FVL mutation and other coagulation abnormalities. In this secondary analysis, we defined carriers as women having one or more of the following traits: carrier for FVL mutation, protein C deficiency, protein S deficiency, antithrombin III deficiency, activated protein C resistance, or lupus anticoagulant-positive, heterozygous for prothrombin G20210A or homozygous for the 5,10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase mutations. Carriers of the FVL mutation alone (with or without activated protein C resistance) were compared with those having one or more other coagulation abnormalities and with controls with no coagulation abnormality. Results One hundred thirty-four FVL mutation carriers were identified among 4,885 gravidas (2.7%), with both FVL mutation status and pregnancy outcomes available. No thromboembolic events occurred among the FVL mutation carriers (0%, 95% confidence interval 0–2.7%). Three pulmonary emboli and one deep venous thrombosis occurred (0.08%, 95% confidence interval 0.02–0.21%), all occurring in FVL mutation noncarriers. In the nested carrier-control analysis (n = 339), no differences in adverse pregnancy outcomes were

  4. A comparison of methods for EGFR mutation testing in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Elizabeth C; Owens, Martina M; Adebiyi, Idowu; Bedenham, Tina; Butler, Rachel; Callaway, Jonathan; Cranston, Treena; Crosby, Charlene; Cree, Ian A; Dutton, Laura; Faulkes, Catherine; Faulkner, Claire; Howard, Emma; Knight, Julia; Huang, Yuanxue; Lavender, Louise; Lazarou, Lazarus P; Liu, Hongxiang; Mair, Debbie; Milano, Antonio; Sandell, Stacey; Skinner, Alison; Wallace, Andrew; Williams, Maggie; Spivey, Vicky; Goodall, John; Frampton, Jonathan; Ellard, Sian

    2013-12-01

    EGFR mutation testing of tumor samples is routinely performed to predict sensitivity to treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors for patients with non-small cell lung cancer. At least 9 different methodologies are employed in UK laboratories, and the aim of this study was to compare the sensitivity of different methods for the detection of EGFR mutations. Participating laboratories were sent coded samples with varying mutation loads (from 0% to 15%) to be tested for the p.Leu858Arg (p.L858R) missense mutation and c.2235_2249del exon 19 deletion. The p.L858R mutation and deletions within exon 19 of the EGFR gene account for ∼90% of mutation-positive cases. The 11 laboratories used their standard testing method(s) and submitted 15 sets of results for the p.L858R samples and 10 for the exon 19 deletion. The p.Leu858Arg (p.L858R) mutation was detected at levels between 1% and 7.5% by Sanger sequencing, pyrosequencing, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), amplification refractory mutation system, and capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation analysis. The c.2235_2249del mutation was detected at 1% to 5% by fragment size analysis, Sanger sequencing or real-time PCR. A mutation was detected in 24/25 (96%) of the samples tested which contained 5% mutated DNA. The 1% sensitivity claimed for commercial real-time PCR-targeted EGFR tests was achieved and our results show greater sensitivity for the Sanger sequencing and pyrosequencing screening methods compared to the 10% to 20% detection levels cited on clinical diagnostic reports. We conclude that multiple methodologies are suitable for the detection of acquired EGFR mutations.

  5. DUOX2 Mutations Are Frequently Associated With Congenital Hypothyroidism in the Korean Population

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Hyun-Kyung; Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Kyoung-Ryul; Park, Jong-Ho; Park, June-Hee; Park, Hyung-Doo; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2016-01-01

    Background Most cases with congenital hypothyroidism (CH) are usually sporadic, while about 20% of the cases are caused by genetic defects. Little information is available regarding the mutation incidence and genetic heterogeneity of CH in Koreans. We aimed to determine the mutation incidence of CH in newborn screenings (NBS) and to evaluate the frequency and spectrum of mutations underlying CH. Methods A total of 112 newborns with thyroid dysfunction were enrolled from 256,624 consecutive NBS. Furthermore, 58 outpatients with primary CH were added from an endocrine clinic. All coding exons of TSHR, PAX8, TPO, DUOX2, DUOXA2, and SCL5A5 were sequenced. Results The mutation incidence of CH was estimated to be 1 in 6,580 newborns. A total of 36 different mutations were identified in 53 cases. The overall mutation positive rate was 31%. The DUOX2 mutations were the most prevalent in both newborns and outpatients. Seven different recurrent mutations [p.G488R (n=13), p.A649E (n=3), p.R885Q (n=3), p.I1080T (n=2), and p.A1206T (n=2) in DUOX2; p.Y138X (n=9) in DUOXA2; and p.R450H (n=5) in TSHR) were identified as the mutations underlying CH. Conclusions The mutation incidence of CH was considerably higher than expected in the Korean newborn population. This study revealed seven different recurrent mutations underlying CH. We conclude that DUOX2 mutations are a frequent cause of CH in the Korean population. PMID:26709262

  6. A comparison of somatic mutational spectra in healthy study populations from Russia, Sweden and USA

    SciTech Connect

    Noori, P; Hou, S; Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Lambert, B

    2004-10-27

    Comparison of mutation spectra at the hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene of peripheral blood T lymphocytes may provide insight into the aetiology of somatic mutation contributing to carcinogenesis and other diseases. To increase knowledge of mutation spectra in healthy people, we have analyzed HPRT mutant T-cells of 50 healthy Russians originally recruited as controls for a study of Chernobyl clean-up workers (Jones et al. Radiation Res. 158, 2002, 424). Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reactions and DNA sequencing identified 161 independent mutations among 176 thioguanine resistant mutants. Forty (40) mutations affected splicing mechanisms and 27 deletions or insertions of 1 to 60 nucleotides were identified. Ninety four (94) single base substitutions were identified, including 62 different mutations at 55 different nucleotide positions, of which 19 had not previously been reported in human T-cells. Comparison of this base substitution spectrum with mutation spectra in a USA (Burkhart-Schultz et al. Carcinogenesis 17, 1996, 1871) and two Swedish populations (Podlutsky et al, Carcinogenesis 19, 1998, 557, Podlutsky et al. Mutation Res. 431, 1999, 325) revealed similarity in the type, frequency and distribution of mutations in the four spectra, consistent with aetiologies inherent in human metabolism. There were 15-19 identical mutations in the three pair-wise comparisons of Russian with USA and Swedish spectra. Intriguingly, there were 21 mutations unique to the Russian spectrum, and comparison by the Monte Carlo method of Adams and Skopek (J. Mol. Biol. 194, 1987, 391) indicated that the Russian spectrum was different from both Swedish spectra (P=0.007, 0.002) but not different from the USA spectrum (P=0.07), when Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was made (p < 0.008 required for significance). Age and smoking did not account for these differences. Other factors causing mutational differences need to be explored.

  7. High prevalence of BRAF gene mutation in papillary thyroid carcinomas and thyroid tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiulong; Quiros, Roderick M; Gattuso, Paolo; Ain, Kenneth B; Prinz, Richard A

    2003-08-01

    The RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK-MAP kinase pathway mediates the cellular response to extracellular signals that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Mutation of the RAS proto-oncogene occurs in various thyroid neoplasms such as papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs), follicular thyroid adenomas and carcinomas. A second genetic alteration frequently involved in PTC is RET/PTC rearrangements. Recent studies have shown that BRAF, which is a downstream signaling molecule of RET and RAS, is frequently mutated in melanomas. This study tests whether BRAF is also mutated in thyroid tumors and cell lines. We analyzed BRAF gene mutation at codon 599 in thyroid tumors using mutant-allele-specific PCR and in 10 thyroid tumor cell lines by DNA sequencing of the PCR-amplified exon 15. We found that BRAF was mutated in 8 of 10 thyroid tumor cell lines, including 2 of 2 papillary carcinoma cell lines, 4 of 5 anaplastic carcinoma cell lines, 1 of 2 follicular carcinoma cell lines, and 1 follicular adenoma cell line. BRAF mutation at codon 599 was detected in 21 of 56 PTC (38%) but not in 18 follicular adenomas and 6 goiters. BRAF mutation occurred in PTC at a significantly higher frequency in male patients than in female patients. To test whether BRAF mutation may cooperate with RET/PTC rearrangements in the oncogenesis of PTC, we tested whether BRAF-mutated PTCs were also positive for RET/PTC rearrangements. Immunohistochemical staining was conducted to evaluate RET/PTC rearrangements by using two different anti-RET antibodies. Surprisingly, we found that a large number of BRAF-mutated PTCs (8 of 21) also expressed RET, indicating that the RET proto-oncogene is rearranged in these BRAF-mutated PTCs. These observations suggest that mutated BRAF gene may cooperate with RET/PTC to induce the oncogenesis of PTC.

  8. Rapid Bioinformatic Identification of Thermostabilizing Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, David B.; Karpowich, Nathan K.; Song, Jin Mei; Wang, Da-Neng

    2015-01-01

    Ex vivo stability is a valuable protein characteristic but is laborious to improve experimentally. In addition to biopharmaceutical and industrial applications, stable protein is important for biochemical and structural studies. Taking advantage of the large number of available genomic sequences and growth temperature data, we present two bioinformatic methods to identify a limited set of amino acids or positions that likely underlie thermostability. Because these methods allow thousands of homologs to be examined in silico, they have the advantage of providing both speed and statistical power. Using these methods, we introduced, via mutation, amino acids from thermoadapted homologs into an exemplar mesophilic membrane protein, and demonstrated significantly increased thermostability while preserving protein activity. PMID:26445442

  9. Powerful mutators lurking in the genome

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Vincent; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre; Wain-Hobson, Simon

    2008-01-01

    The human genome encodes numerous enzymes capable of deaminating polynucleotides. While they are capable of exquisite specificity, occasionally they result in hypermutation where up to 90 per cent of cytidine or adenosine residues may be edited. As such, they constitute a formidable anti-viral barrier, for no virus can survive such a high mutation rate. As the APOBEC3 group of cytidine deaminases edit single-stranded viral DNA, the crucial question is can they hyperedit chromosomal DNA? Everything points to a positive answer. Nonetheless, hypermutants per se have not yet been described, probably being countered by highly efficient mismatch repair. For the APOBEC3 genes, not only is their physiological function unknown, but also their role in the induction of cancer remains to be determined. Yet given the pace of research, all this is certain to change in the next few years. PMID:19042181

  10. An N-terminal glycine to cysteine mutation in the collagen COL1A1 gene produces moderately severe osteogenesis imperfecta

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, W.; Scott, L.; Cohn, D.

    1994-09-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is usually due to mutations in the type I procollagen genes COL1A1 and COL1A2. Point mutations close to the N-terminus are generally milder than those near the C-terminus of the molecule (the gradient hypothesis of collagen mutations). We describe a patient with moderately severe OI due to a mutation in the N-terminal portion of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Electrophoretic analysis of collagen isolated from fibroblast cultures suggested the abnormal presence of a cysteine in the N-terminal portion of the {alpha}1(I) chain. Five overlapping DNA fragments amplified from fibroblast RNA were screened for mutations using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and heteroduplex analyses. Direct DNA sequence analysis of the single positive fragment demonstrated a G to T transversion, corresponding to a glycine to cysteine substitution at position 226 of the triple helical domain of the {alpha}1(I) chain. The mutation was confirmed by restriction enzyme analysis of amplified genomic DNA. The mutation was not present in fibroblasts from either phenotypically normal parent. Combining this mutation with other reported mutations, glycine to cysteine substitutions at positions 205, 211, 223, and 226 produce a moderately severe phenotype whereas flanking mutations at positions 175 and 382 produce a mild phenotype. This data supports a regional rather than a gradient model of the relationship between the nature and location of type I collagen mutations and OI phenotype.

  11. Functional characterization of the RYR1 mutation p.Arg4737Trp associated with susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Johannsen, Stephan; Treves, Susan; Müller, Clemens R; Mögele, Susanne; Schneiderbanger, Daniel; Roewer, Norbert; Schuster, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Aside from the in vitro contracture test, genetic screening for causative RYR1 mutations is the established procedure to diagnose susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH). However, currently only 34 out of more than 300 known RYR1 mutations have been confirmed to be causative for MH by experimental studies addressing their functional impact on intracellular calcium homeostasis. The RYR1 mutation p.Arg4737Trp has been recently detected in a German MH family. To evaluate the effects of that mutation on intracellular calcium handling, the response after stimulation with the RYR1 agonist 4-chloro-m-cresol was investigated in immortalized B lymphocytes containing the p.Arg4737Trp mutation and compared to the response of wild type RYR1 from unaffected family members and unrelated controls. Intracellular resting calcium was slightly but significantly elevated in mutation positive cells. Calcium release following stimulation with 4-chloro-m-cresol was significantly increased in B lymphocytes carrying the p.Arg4737Trp mutation compared to mutation negative controls. Hence, the functional properties of the RYR1 mutation p.Arg4737Trp are consistent with susceptibility to MH. Together with previously published data, the mutation has now been reported in three independent MH positive families. PMID:26631338

  12. Association between BRAF and RAS mutations, and RET rearrangements and the clinical features of papillary thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Jie; Liu, Zeming; Zeng, Wen; Maimaiti, Yusufu; Guo, Yawen; Nie, Xiu; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Xiangwang; Shi, Lan; Liu, Chunping; Huang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the significance of BRAF V600E and Ras mutations, and RET rearrangements in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in the South central region of China. Methods: We included patients from Union hospital’s pathology archive diagnosed with PTC and meeting the criteria for BRAF mutation, RAS mutation, and RET rearrangement testing. Medical records were analyzed for BRAF and RAS mutation status, RET rearrangements (positive or negative), and a list of standardized clinicopathologic features. Results: Positive BRAF mutation was found to be significantly associated with age and extrathyroidal extension (P=0.011 and P=0.013, respectively). However, there was no significant association between BRAF mutation and sex, tumor size, histological subtype, multifocality, or accompanying nodular goiter and Hashimoto’s. On the other hand, none of these characteristics of PTC were been found to be associated with RAS mutation. Additionally, the frequency of RET rearrangements was higher in patients ≤45 years old than that in patients >45 years old. Conclusions: We demonstrated that the BRAF V600E mutation slightly correlated with the clinicopathological characteristics of PTC in the Han population. Furthermore, neither RAS mutation nor RET rearrangements were found to be associated with the clinicopathological characteristics of PTCs. Our work provides useful information on somatic mutations to predict the risk of PTC in different ethnic groups. PMID:26823860

  13. Detection of EGFR and KRAS Mutation by Pyrosequencing Analysis in Cytologic Samples of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    EGFR and KRAS mutations are two of the most common mutations that are present in lung cancer. Screening and detecting these mutations are of issue these days, and many different methods and tissue samples are currently used to effectively detect these two mutations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the testing for EGFR and KRAS mutations by pyrosequencing method, and compared the yield of cytology versus histology specimens in a consecutive series of patients with lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed EGFR and KRAS mutation results of 399 (patients with EGFR mutation test) and 323 patients (patients with KRAS mutation test) diagnosed with lung cancer in Konkuk University Medical Center from 2008 to 2014. Among them, 60 patients had received both EGFR and KRAS mutation studies. We compared the detection rate of EGFR and KRAS tests in cytology, biopsy, and resection specimens. EGFR and KRAS mutations were detected in 29.8% and 8.7% of total patients, and the positive mutation results of EGFR and KRAS were mutually exclusive. The detection rate of EGFR mutation in cytology was higher than non-cytology (biopsy or resection) materials (cytology: 48.5%, non-cytology: 26.1%), and the detection rate of KRAS mutation in cytology specimens was comparable to non-cytology specimens (cytology: 8.3%, non-cytology: 8.7%). We suggest that cytology specimens are good alternatives that can readily substitute tissue samples for testing both EGFR and KRAS mutations. Moreover, pyrosequencing method is highly sensitive in detecting EGFR and KRAS mutations in lung cancer patients. PMID:27478332

  14. Detection of EGFR and KRAS Mutation by Pyrosequencing Analysis in Cytologic Samples of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Eun; Lee, So-Young; Park, Hyung-Kyu; Oh, Seo-Young; Kim, Hee-Joung; Lee, Kye-Young; Kim, Wan-Seop

    2016-08-01

    EGFR and KRAS mutations are two of the most common mutations that are present in lung cancer. Screening and detecting these mutations are of issue these days, and many different methods and tissue samples are currently used to effectively detect these two mutations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the testing for EGFR and KRAS mutations by pyrosequencing method, and compared the yield of cytology versus histology specimens in a consecutive series of patients with lung cancer. We retrospectively reviewed EGFR and KRAS mutation results of 399 (patients with EGFR mutation test) and 323 patients (patients with KRAS mutation test) diagnosed with lung cancer in Konkuk University Medical Center from 2008 to 2014. Among them, 60 patients had received both EGFR and KRAS mutation studies. We compared the detection rate of EGFR and KRAS tests in cytology, biopsy, and resection specimens. EGFR and KRAS mutations were detected in 29.8% and 8.7% of total patients, and the positive mutation results of EGFR and KRAS were mutually exclusive. The detection rate of EGFR mutation in cytology was higher than non-cytology (biopsy or resection) materials (cytology: 48.5%, non-cytology: 26.1%), and the detection rate of KRAS mutation in cytology specimens was comparable to non-cytology specimens (cytology: 8.3%, non-cytology: 8.7%). We suggest that cytology specimens are good alternatives that can readily substitute tissue samples for testing both EGFR and KRAS mutations. Moreover, pyrosequencing method is highly sensitive in detecting EGFR and KRAS mutations in lung cancer patients.

  15. p53 mutations and overexpression in locally advanced breast cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Faille, A.; De Cremoux, P.; Extra, J. M.; Linares, G.; Espie, M.; Bourstyn, E.; De Rocquancourt, A.; Giacchetti, S.; Marty, M.; Calvo, F.

    1994-01-01

    Alterations in the p53 gene were analysed in 39 patients with locally advanced breast cancers (LABCs) (stage III-IV) with inflammatory signs in most cases (UICC stage T4d = 32 patients) by molecular and immunohistochemical (IHC) approaches. All patients were included in the same therapy protocol. Using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a single-strand conformational polymorphism migration technique (SSCP), the presence of mutations in exons 2-11, covering the entire coding sequence of the p53 gene, was evaluated. Using the mouse specific anti-human p53 monoclonal antibody (PAb 1801), we also looked for overexpression of the p53 protein in tissue sections. In 16 cases shifted bands were reproducibly identified by PCR-SSCP, and all but one (localised to exon 10) were in exons 5-8, the usual mutational hotspots. Fifteen of these 16 samples were sequenced and 14 of the suspected mutations (36%) were confirmed. Most of them (12) were single nucleotide substitutions, and transitions were more frequent (eight cases) than transversions (four cases). Fourteen of the tumour samples were positively stained with the monoclonal antibody PAb 1801, 11 with nuclear staining only, two with mixed cytoplasmic and nuclear staining and one with cytoplasmic staining only. Staining patterns were very heterogeneous in terms of the percentage of positive cells (10-75%) and their distribution in the tissue section (isolated foci or dispersed cells). In 11 of the 14 mutated cases a positive immunostaining was observed. The presence of a p53 mutation was significantly associated with larger tumour diameter (chi 2 = 7.490, P = 0.0062) and the presence of clinical metastases (stage IV) (chi 2 = 10.113, P = 0.0015). A non-statistically significant trend of association was observed between p53 mutation, negative oestrogen receptors and lower response rate to therapy. Our results in this group of patients and the heterogeneity of the staining of tumour cells in tissue sections suggest that p53

  16. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrova, Y.E. |; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-10-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of {gamma}-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure {sup 137}Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed.

  17. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C.; Aparicio, Samuel A.J.R.; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bignell, Graham R.; Bolli, Niccolo; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P.; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R.; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A.; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T.W.; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R.; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A.; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L.; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N.; Span, Paul N.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N.J.; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M.; van ’t Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R.; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P. Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M.; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M.; Campbell, Peter J.; Stratton, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations. However, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here, we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, kataegis, is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer with potential implications for understanding of cancer etiology, prevention and therapy. PMID:23945592

  18. Signatures of mutational processes in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Wedge, David C; Aparicio, Samuel A J R; Behjati, Sam; Biankin, Andrew V; Bignell, Graham R; Bolli, Niccolò; Borg, Ake; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Boyault, Sandrine; Burkhardt, Birgit; Butler, Adam P; Caldas, Carlos; Davies, Helen R; Desmedt, Christine; Eils, Roland; Eyfjörd, Jórunn Erla; Foekens, John A; Greaves, Mel; Hosoda, Fumie; Hutter, Barbara; Ilicic, Tomislav; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Imielinski, Marcin; Imielinsk, Marcin; Jäger, Natalie; Jones, David T W; Jones, David; Knappskog, Stian; Kool, Marcel; Lakhani, Sunil R; López-Otín, Carlos; Martin, Sancha; Munshi, Nikhil C; Nakamura, Hiromi; Northcott, Paul A; Pajic, Marina; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Paradiso, Angelo; Pearson, John V; Puente, Xose S; Raine, Keiran; Ramakrishna, Manasa; Richardson, Andrea L; Richter, Julia; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schlesner, Matthias; Schumacher, Ton N; Span, Paul N; Teague, Jon W; Totoki, Yasushi; Tutt, Andrew N J; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; van Buuren, Marit M; van 't Veer, Laura; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Waddell, Nicola; Yates, Lucy R; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Futreal, P Andrew; McDermott, Ultan; Lichter, Peter; Meyerson, Matthew; Grimmond, Sean M; Siebert, Reiner; Campo, Elías; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Pfister, Stefan M; Campbell, Peter J; Stratton, Michael R

    2013-08-22

    All cancers are caused by somatic mutations; however, understanding of the biological processes generating these mutations is limited. The catalogue of somatic mutations from a cancer genome bears the signatures of the mutational processes that have been operative. Here we analysed 4,938,362 mutations from 7,042 cancers and extracted more than 20 distinct mutational signatures. Some are present in many cancer types, notably a signature attributed to the APOBEC family of cytidine deaminases, whereas others are confined to a single cancer class. Certain signatures are associated with age of the patient at cancer diagnosis, known mutagenic exposures or defects in DNA maintenance, but many are of cryptic origin. In addition to these genome-wide mutational signatures, hypermutation localized to small genomic regions, 'kataegis', is found in many cancer types. The results reveal the diversity of mutational processes underlying the development of cancer, with potential implications for understanding of cancer aetiology, prevention and therapy.

  19. The prevalence of mutations in the major hydrophilic region of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus varies with subgenotype.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Harrison, T J; He, X; Chen, Q Y; Li, G J; Liu, M H; Li, H; Yang, J Y; Fang, Z L

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in the major hydrophilic region (MHR) of the surface antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBV) may result in vaccine escape, failure of immunotherapy and antiviral resistance. These mutants may be transmitted and constitute a public health threat. We aimed to determine the prevalence of MHR mutations of HBV in areas of high endemicity in Guangxi, China. HBV surface gene was analysed from 278 HBsAg-positive asymptomatic individuals recruited from Guangxi using cluster sampling. Three genotypes, B, C and I, were identified. The overall prevalence of MHR mutations is 17·6%. The prevalence of MHR mutations in genotype B (15·1%) is not significantly different from that in genotype C (16·4%). However, the prevalence in subgenotype C5 (31·1%) is significantly higher than in subgenotype C2 (13·0%) (χ 2 = 6·997, P < 0·05). The prevalence of escape mutations and overlapping polymerase substitutions in subgenotype C5 is significantly higher than in subgenotypes B2 and C2. In total, 7·9% of MHR mutants are escape mutations and 72·1% of MHR mutations produced amino-acid changes in the overlapping polymerase, including resistance mutations to entecavir. Our results suggest that the prevalence of MHR mutations varies with subgenotype. The prevalence of escape mutations and polymerase mutations may be associated with subgenotype.

  20. HFE gene mutation and transferrin saturation in very low birthweight infants

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R.; Witt, H.; Buhrer, C.; Monch, E.; Kottgen, E.

    1999-01-01

    AIM—To determine if there is an association between high transferrin saturation and the C282Y HFE gene mutation in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants.
METHODS—One hundred and forty three VLBW infants receiving recombinant erythropoietin and 3 to 9 mg/kg/day of enteral iron were studied. Genomic DNA was extracted from filter paper cards. The C282Y mutation was determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis.
RESULTS—Six infants were heterozygous for the mutation; none was homozygous. Ten infants had a transferrin saturation above 80% at least once. No infant was positive for both transferrin saturation above 80% and the mutation.
CONCLUSIONS—The data strongly suggest that there is no association between high transferrin saturation and the HFE gene mutation in VLBW infants during the first weeks of life.

 PMID:10448186

  1. Microsatellites in the Eukaryotic DNA Mismatch Repair Genes as Modulators of Evolutionary Mutation Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Dong Kyung; Metzgar, David; Wills, Christopher; Boland, C. Richard

    2003-01-01

    All "minor" components of the human DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system-MSH3, MSH6, PMS2, and the recently discovered MLH3-contain mononucleotide microsatellites in their coding sequences. This intriguing finding contrasts with the situation found in the major components of the DNA MMR system-MSH2 and MLH1-and, in fact, most human genes. Although eukaryotic genomes are rich in microsatellites, non-triplet microsatellites are rare in coding regions. The recurring presence of exonal mononucleotide repeat sequences within a single family of human genes would therefore be considered exceptional.

  2. MECHANISMS OF STATIONARY PHASE MUTATION: A Decade of Adaptive Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Foster, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    A decade of research on adaptive mutation has revealed a plethora of mutagenic mechanisms that may be important in evolution. The DNA synthesis associated with recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation in cells that are not proliferating. The movement of insertion elements can be responsive to environmental conditions. Insertion elements not only activate and inactivate genes, they also provide sequence homology that allows large-scale genomic rearrangements. Some conjugative plasmids can recombine with their host’s chromosome, and may acquire chromosomal genes that could then spread through the population and even to other species. Finally, a subpopulation of transient hypermutators could be a source of multiple variant alleles, providing a mechanism for rapid evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10690404

  3. Calreticulin Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Comparison of Three Diagnostic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji-Hye; Sevin, Margaux; Ramla, Selim; Truffot, Aurélie; Verrier, Tiffany; Bouchot, Dominique; Courtois, Martine; Bas, Mathilde; Benali, Sonia; Bailly, François; Favre, Bernardine; Guy, Julien; Martin, Laurent; Maynadié, Marc; Carillo, Serge; Girodon, François

    2015-01-01

    Calreticulin (CALR) mutations have recently been reported in 70–84% of JAK2V617F-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), and this detection has become necessary to improve the diagnosis of MPN. In a large single-centre cohort of 298 patients suffering from Essential Thrombocythemia (ET), the JAK2V617F, CALR and MPL mutations were noted in 179 (60%), 56 (18.5%) and 13 (4.5%) respectively. For the detection of the CALR mutations, three methods were compared in parallel: high-resolution melting-curve analysis (HRM), product-sizing analysis and Sanger sequencing. The sensitivity for the HRM, product-sizing analysis and Sanger sequencing was 96.4%, 98.2% and 89.3% respectively, whereas the specificity was 96.3%, 100% and 100%. In our cohort, the product-sizing analysis was the most sensitive method and was the easiest to interpret, while the HRM was sometimes difficult to interpret. In contrast, when large series of samples were tested, HRM provided results more quickly than did the other methods, which required more time. Finally, the sequencing method, which is the reference method, had the lowest sensitivity but can be used to describe the type of mutation precisely. Altogether, our results suggest that in routine laboratory practice, product-sizing analysis is globally similar to HRM for the detection of CALR mutations, and that both may be used as first-line screening tests. If the results are positive, Sanger sequencing can be used to confirm the mutation and to determine its type. Product-sizing analysis provides sensitive and specific results, moreover, with the quantitative measurement of CALR, which might be useful to monitor specific treatments. PMID:26501981

  4. Mechanisms of ultraviolet-induced mutation. Mutational spectra in the Escherichia coli lacI gene for a wild-type and an excision-repair-deficient strain.

    PubMed

    Schaaper, R M; Dunn, R L; Glickman, B W

    1987-11-20

    -pairing properties are partially retained in cyclobutane dimers. While the frameshift mutations in the Uvr+ strain were distributed over many different sites, more than half in the UvrB- strain were concentrated at a single site. Ultraviolet light-induced deletions as well as frameshift hotspot mutations (+/- TGGC at positions 620 to 632) are considered to be examples of untargeted or semitargeted mutagenesis. Hotspot mutations in the Uvr+ strain showed an increased contribution by (-)TGGC relative to (+)TGGC, indicating that ultraviolet light may specifically promote the loss of the four bases.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  5. F8 gene mutation profile in Indian hemophilia A patients: Identification of 23 novel mutations and factor VIII inhibitor risk association.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Patricia; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2016-04-01

    'FVIII inhibitors', especially in severe hemophilia A (HA) patients, is a serious adverse effect that complicates their clinical management. Many genetic and non-genetic risk factors have been proposed for FVIII inhibitor development, diverse in different population groups. This is the first study in Indian hemophiliacs that analyzes inhibitor risk in relation to the complete F8 mutation profile, in a case-control study that included 145 Indian severe HA patients, i.e. 69 inhibitor positive (with 18 inhibitor concordant/discordant family members), and 58 inhibitor negative patients, after informed consent. While 53.54% (68/127) index cases were positive for intron 22 or intron 1 inversions, 55 causative F8 mutations were detected in the 59 inversion negative patients, of which 23 were novel mutations (in 24 patients) and 32 were reported earlier (in 35 patients). A higher incidence of mutations, in the C1 and C2 domains in inhibitor positive patients, and in the A1 domain in inhibitor negative patients was observed, though not significantly different. The study suggests that large F8 rearrangements (significantly higher in the inhibitor positive patients) pose the highest risk, while missense mutations (significantly higher in the inhibitor negative patients) pose the lowest risk of inhibitor development in Indian hemophilia A patients.

  6. Tracking Down Mutations Cell by Cell.

    PubMed

    Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-03-16

    Using somatic cell nuclear transfer, Hazen et al. (2016) examined clonally expanded single neurons for mutations and found ∼100 mutations from a variety of classes. Post-mitotic mutations in individual neurons represent an exploratory direction for finding fundamental origins of neurodegeneration. PMID:26985720

  7. Mutation analysis in patients with Wilson disease: identification of 4 novel mutations. Mutation in brief no. 250. Online.

    PubMed

    Haas, R; Gutierrez-Rivero, B; Knoche, J; Böker, K; Manns, M P; Schmidt, H H

    1999-01-01

    In order to obtain novel mutations in the recently discovered Wilson disease gene, we screened 5 unrelated German individuals for mutations in the 21 exons and their flanking intronic sequences. We detected 9 mutations affecting the Wilson disease gene. Four of those, designated 802-808delTGTAAGT, 2008-2013delTATATG, Cys985Thr, and Ile1148Thr have not yet been reported. One patient had a homozygous mutation whereas the remaining four subjects were compound heterozygous. Therefore these data confirm, that mutations causing Wilson disease are frequently found in affected subjects and they are very heterogenous. PMID:10447265

  8. Plastome Mutations and Recombination Events in Barley Chloroplast Mutator Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Landau, Alejandra; Lencina, Franco; Pacheco, María G; Prina, Alberto R

    2016-05-01

    The barley chloroplast mutator (cpm) is an allele of a nuclear gene that when homozygous induces several types of cytoplasmically inherited chlorophyll deficiencies. In this work, a plastome Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING) strategy based on mismatch digestion was used on families that carried the cpm genotype through many generations. Extensive scanning of 33 plastome genes and a few intergenic regions was conducted. Numerous polymorphisms were detected on both genic and intergenic regions. The detected polymorphisms can be accounted for by at least 61 independent mutational events. The vast majority of the polymorphisms originated in substitutions and small indels (insertions/deletions) in microsatellites. The rpl23 and the rps16 genes were the most polymorphic. Interestingly, the variation observed in the rpl23 gene consisted of several combinations of 5 different one nucleotide polymorphisms. Besides, 4 large indels that have direct repeats at both ends were also observed, which appear to be originated from recombinational events. The cpm mutation spectrum suggests that the CPM gene product is probably involved in plastome mismatch repair. The numerous subtle molecular changes that were localized in a wide range of plastome sites show the cpm as a valuable source of plastome variability for plant research and/or plant breeding. Moreover, the cpm mutant appears to be an interesting experimental material for investigating the mechanisms responsible for maintaining the stability of plant organelle DNA.

  9. BRAF V600E mutation detection by immunohistochemistry in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Affolter, Kajsa; Samowitz, Wade; Tripp, Sheryl; Bronner, Mary P

    2013-08-01

    The serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf (BRAF) is an oncogene mutated in various neoplasms, including 5-15% of colorectal carcinomas. The T1799A point mutation, responsible for a large majority of these alterations, results in an amino acid substitution (V600E) causing the constitutive activation of a protein kinase cascade. BRAF V600E in MLH1 deficient tumors implicates somatic tumor-only methylation of the MLH1 promoter region instead of a germline MLH1 mutation. BRAF V600E also predicts poor prognosis in microsatellite stable colorectal cancers and may be a marker of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy in metastatic disease. Currently, only molecular methods are available for assessing BRAF mutational status. An immunohistochemical approach is evaluated here. Colon cancers from 2008 to 2012 tested by pyrosequencing for BRAF V600E mutation were selected. A total of 31 tumors with (n = 14) and without (n = 17) the BRAF V600E mutation were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using a commercially available antibody specific to the V600E-mutated protein. All 14 colorectal carcinomas with the BRAF V600E mutation demonstrated cytoplasmic positivity in tumor cells with the anti-BRAF antibody. In a minority of cases, staining intensity for the mutated tumor samples was weak (n = 2) or heterogeneous (n = 4); however, the majority of cases showed diffuse, strong cytoplasmic positivity (8 of 14 cases). None of the 17 BRAF wild-type colorectal cancers showed immunoreactivity to the antibody. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the immunohistochemical BRAF V600E assay was 100%. Detection of the BRAF V600E mutation in colorectal cancer by immunohistochemistry is a viable alternative to molecular methods.

  10. Glioma Groups Based on 1p/19q, IDH, and TERT Promoter Mutations in Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E.; Lachance, Daniel H.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Walsh, Kyle M.; Decker, Paul A.; Sicotte, Hugues; Pekmezci, Melike; Rice, Terri; Kosel, Matt L.; Smirnov, Ivan V.; Sarkar, Gobinda; Caron, Alissa A.; Kollmeyer, Thomas M.; Praska, Corinne E.; Chada, Anisha R.; Halder, Chandralekha; Hansen, Helen M.; McCoy, Lucie S.; Bracci, Paige M.; Marshall, Roxanne; Zheng, Shichun; Reis, Gerald F.; Pico, Alexander R.; O’Neill, Brian P.; Buckner, Jan C.; Giannini, Caterina; Huse, Jason T.; Perry, Arie; Tihan, Tarik; Berger, Mitchell S.; Chang, Susan M.; Prados, Michael D.; Wiemels, Joseph; Wiencke, John K.; Wrensch, Margaret R.; Jenkins, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The prediction of clinical behavior, response to therapy, and outcome of infiltrative glioma is challenging. On the basis of previous studies of tumor biology, we defined five glioma molecular groups with the use of three alterations: mutations in the TERT promoter, mutations in IDH, and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion). We tested the hypothesis that within groups based on these features, tumors would have similar clinical variables, acquired somatic alterations, and germline variants. METHODS We scored tumors as negative or positive for each of these markers in 1087 gliomas and compared acquired alterations and patient characteristics among the five primary molecular groups. Using 11,590 controls, we assessed associations between these groups and known glioma germline variants. RESULTS Among 615 grade II or III gliomas, 29% had all three alterations (i.e., were triplepositive), 5% had TERT and IDH mutations, 45% had only IDH mutations, 7% were triple-negative, and 10% had only TERT mutations; 5% had other combinations. Among 472 grade IV gliomas, less than 1% were triple-positive, 2% had TERT and IDH mutations, 7% had only IDH mutations, 17% were triple-negative, and 74% had only TERT mutations. The mean age at diagnosis was lowest (37 years) among patients who had gliomas with only IDH mutations and was highest (59 years) among patients who had gliomas with only TERT mutations. The molecular groups were independently associated with overall survival among patients with grade II or III gliomas but not among patients with grade IV gliomas. The molecular groups were associated with specific germline variants. CONCLUSIONS Gliomas were classified into five principal groups on the basis of three tumor markers. The groups had different ages at onset, overall survival, and associations with germline variants, which implies that they are characterized by distinct mechanisms of pathogenesis. PMID:26061753

  11. JAWS coordinates chondrogenesis and synovial joint positioning.

    PubMed

    Sohaskey, Michael L; Yu, Jane; Diaz, Michael A; Plaas, Anna H; Harland, Richard M

    2008-07-01

    Properly positioned synovial joints are crucial to coordinated skeletal movement. Despite their importance for skeletal development and function, the molecular mechanisms that underlie joint positioning are not well understood. We show that mice carrying an insertional mutation in a previously uncharacterized gene, which we have named Jaws (joints abnormal with splitting), die perinatally with striking skeletal defects, including ectopic interphalangeal joints. These ectopic joints develop along the longitudinal axis and persist at birth, suggesting that JAWS is uniquely required for the orientation and consequent positioning of interphalangeal joints within the endochondral skeleton. Jaws mutant mice also exhibit severe chondrodysplasia characterized by delayed and disorganized maturation of growth plate chondrocytes, together with impaired chondroitin sulfation and abnormal metabolism of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan aggrecan. Our findings identify JAWS as a key regulator of chondrogenesis and synovial joint positioning required for the restriction of joint formation to discrete stereotyped locations in the embryonic skeleton.

  12. Isolation of a mutation resulting in constitutive synthesis of L-fucose catabolic enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartkus, J M; Mortlock, R P

    1986-01-01

    A ribitol-positive transductant of Escherichia coli K-12, JM2112, was used to facilitate the isolation and identification of mutations affecting the L-fucose catabolic pathway. Analysis of L-fucose-negative mutants of JM2112 enabled us to confirm that L-fucose-1-phosphate is the apparent inducer of the fucose catabolic enzymes. Plating of an L-fuculokinase-negative mutant of JM2112 on D-arabinose yielded an isolate containing a second fucose mutation which resulted in the constitutive synthesis of L-fucose permease, isomerase, and kinase. This constitutive mutation differs from the constitutive mutation described by Chen et al. (J. Bacteriol. 159:725-729, 1984) in that it is tightly linked to the fucose genes and appears to be located in the gene believed to code for the positive activator of the L-fucose genes. PMID:3005235

  13. Positional Plagiocephaly (Flattened Head)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Simple practices like changing a baby's sleep position, holding your baby, and providing lots of "tummy time" ... devices to keep your baby in one position. Alternate positions in the crib. Consider how you lay ...

  14. Benign positional vertigo - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Vertigo - positional - aftercare; Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo - aftercare; BPPV - aftercare; Dizziness - positional vertigo ... Your health care provider may have treated your vertigo with the Epley maneuver . These are head movements ...

  15. Novel katG mutations causing isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Jessica N; Paul, Lynthia V; Rodwell, Timothy C; Victor, Thomas C; Amallraja, Anu M; Elghraoui, Afif; Goodmanson, Amy P; Ramirez-Busby, Sarah M; Chawla, Ashu; Zadorozhny, Victoria; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Sirgel, Frederick A; Catanzaro, Donald; Rodrigues, Camilla; Gler, Maria Tarcela; Crudu, Valeru; Catanzaro, Antonino; Valafar, Faramarz

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery and confirmation of 23 novel mutations with previously undocumented role in isoniazid (INH) drug resistance, in catalase-peroxidase (katG) gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates. With these mutations, a synonymous mutation in fabG1g609a, and two canonical mutations, we were able to explain 98% of the phenotypic resistance observed in 366 clinical Mtb isolates collected from four high tuberculosis (TB)-burden countries: India, Moldova, Philippines, and South Africa. We conducted overlapping targeted and whole-genome sequencing for variant discovery in all clinical isolates with a variety of INH-resistant phenotypes. Our analysis showed that just two canonical mutations (katG 315AGC-ACC and inhA promoter-15C-T) identified 89.5% of resistance phenotypes in our collection. Inclusion of the 23 novel mutations reported here, and the previously documented point mutation in fabG1, increased the sensitivity of these mutations as markers of INH resistance to 98%. Only six (2%) of the 332 resistant isolates in our collection did not harbor one or more of these mutations. The third most prevalent substitution, at inhA promoter position -8, present in 39 resistant isolates, was of no diagnostic significance since it always co-occurred with katG 315. 79% of our isolates harboring novel mutations belong to genetic group 1 indicating a higher tendency for this group to go down an uncommon evolutionary path and evade molecular diagnostics. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of INH resistance in Mtb isolates that lack the canonical mutations and could improve the sensitivity of next generation molecular diagnostics. PMID:26251830

  16. Detection of inherited mutations for breast and ovarian cancer using genomic capture and massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Casadei, Silvia; Thornton, Anne M.; Stray, Sunday M.; Pennil, Christopher; Nord, Alex S.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; King, Mary-Claire

    2010-01-01

    Inherited loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and multiple other genes predispose to high risks of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated inherited mutations in these genes are collectively quite common, but individually rare or even private. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has become an integral part of clinical practice, but testing is generally limited to these two genes and to women with severe family histories of breast or ovarian cancer. To determine whether massively parallel, “next-generation” sequencing would enable accurate, thorough, and cost-effective identification of inherited mutations for breast and ovarian cancer, we developed a genomic assay to capture, sequence, and detect all mutations in 21 genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, with inherited mutations that predispose to breast or ovarian cancer. Constitutional genomic DNA from subjects with known inherited mutations, ranging in size from 1 to >100,000 bp, was hybridized to custom oligonucleotides and then sequenced using a genome analyzer. Analysis was carried out blind to the mutation in each sample. Average coverage was >1200 reads per base pair. After filtering sequences for quality and number of reads, all single-nucleotide substitutions, small insertion and deletion mutations, and large genomic duplications and deletions were detected. There were zero false-positive calls of nonsense mutations, frameshift mutations, or genomic rearrangements for any gene in any of the test samples. This approach enables widespread genetic testing and personalized risk assessment for breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:20616022

  17. Natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations in HIV-1 protease with potential antiretroviral resistance: a bioinformatic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The correlations of genotypic and phenotypic tests with treatment, clinical history and the significance of mutations in viruses of HIV-infected patients are used to establish resistance mutations to protease inhibitors (PIs). Emerging mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease confer resistance to PIs by inducing structural changes at the ligand interaction site. The aim of this study was to establish an in silico structural relationship between natural HIV-1 polymorphisms and unusual HIV-1 mutations that confer resistance to PIs. Results Protease sequences isolated from 151 Mexican HIV-1 patients that were naïve to, or subjected to antiretroviral therapy, were examined. We identified 41 unrelated resistance mutations with a prevalence greater than 1%. Among these mutations, nine exhibited positive selection, three were natural polymorphisms (L63S/V/H) in a codon associated with drug resistance, and six were unusual mutations (L5F, D29V, L63R/G, P79L and T91V). The D29V mutation, with a prevalence of 1.32% in the studied population, was only found in patients treated with antiretroviral drugs. Using in silico modelling, we observed that D29V formed unstable protease complexes when were docked with lopinavir, saquinavir, darunavir, tipranavir, indinavir and atazanavir. Conclusions The structural correlation of natural polymorphisms and unusual mutations with drug resistance is useful for the identification of HIV-1 variants with potential resistance to PIs. The D29V mutation likely confers a selection advantage in viruses; however, in silico, presence of this mutation results in unstable enzyme/PI complexes, that possibly induce resistance to PIs. PMID:24629078

  18. Predictive and Prognostic Analysis of PIK3CA Mutation in Stage III Colon Cancer Intergroup Trial

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiaoyun; Imamura, Yu; Yamauchi, Mai; McCleary, Nadine J.; Ng, Kimmie; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B.; Mayer, Robert J.; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Benson, Al B.; Mowat, Rex B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Goldberg, Richard M.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A.; Fuchs, Charles S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Somatic mutations in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphonate 3-kinase [PI3K], catalytic subunit alpha gene) activate the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway and contribute to pathogenesis of various malignancies, including colorectal cancer. Methods We examined associations of PIK3CA oncogene mutation with relapse, survival, and treatment efficacy in 627 stage III colon carcinoma case subjects within a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (5-fluorouracil and leucovorin [FU/LV] vs irinotecan [CPT11], fluorouracil and leucovorin [IFL]; Cancer and Leukemia Group B 89803 [Alliance]). We detected PIK3CA mutation in exons 9 and 20 by polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess prognostic and predictive role of PIK3CA mutation, adjusting for clinical features and status of routine standard molecular pathology features, including KRAS and BRAF mutations and microsatellite instability (mismatch repair deficiency). All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Compared with PIK3CA wild-type cases, overall status of PIK3CA mutation positivity or the presence of PIK3CA mutation in either exon 9 or 20 alone was not statistically significantly associated with recurrence-free, disease-free, or overall survival (log-rank P > .70; P > .40 in multivariable regression models). There was no statistically significant interaction between PIK3CA and KRAS (or BRAF) mutation status in survival analysis (P interaction > .18). PIK3CA mutation status did not appear to predict better or worse response to IFL therapy compared with FU/LV therapy (P interaction > .16). Conclusions Overall tumor PIK3CA mutation status is not associated with stage III colon cancer prognosis. PIK3CA mutation does not appear to serve as a predictive tumor molecular biomarker for response to irinotecan-based adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:24231454

  19. Immunohistochemistry is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of NRASQ61R mutation in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Massi, Daniela; Simi, Lisa; Sensi, Elisa; Baroni, Gianna; Xue, Gongda; Scatena, Cristian; Caldarella, Adele; Pinzani, Pamela; Fontanini, Gabriella; Carobbio, Alessandra; Urso, Carmelo; Mandalà, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Testing for NRAS is now integral part in the assessment of metastatic melanoma patients because there is evidence that NRAS-mutated patients may be sensitive to MEK inhibitors, and RAS mutation is a common mechanism of acquired resistance during treatment with BRAF inhibitors. This study evaluated the sensitivity and specificity of immunohistochemical analysis using an N-Ras (Q61R) antibody to detect the presence of the NRASQ61R mutation in melanoma patients. A total of 98 primary cutaneous melanomas that have undergone examination of NRAS mutation were retrieved from a multicentric database. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded melanoma tissues were analyzed for BRAF and NRAS mutations by independent, blinded observers using both conventional DNA molecular techniques and immunohistochemistry with the novel anti-human N-Ras (Q61R) monoclonal antibody (clone SP174). The antibody showed a sensitivity of 100% (14/14) and a specificity of 100% (83/83) for detecting the presence of an NRASQ61R mutation. Of the NRAS-mutated cases, none of the non-Q61R cases stained positive with the antibody (0/7). There were three cases with discordant NRAS mutational results. Additional molecular analysis confirmed the immunohistochemically obtained NRAS result in all cases, suggesting that a multiple analytical approach can be required to reach the correct sample classification. The reported immunohistochemical method is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method for detecting NRASQ61R mutation in melanoma patients, and represents a valuable supplement to traditional mutation testing. If validated in further studies, genetic testing would only be required for immunohistochemistry-negative patients to detect non-Q61R mutations.

  20. Conserved and variable correlated mutations in the plant MADS protein network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant MADS domain proteins are involved in a variety of developmental processes for which their ability to form various interactions is a key requisite. However, not much is known about the structure of these proteins or their complexes, whereas such knowledge would be valuable for a better understanding of their function. Here, we analyze those proteins and the complexes they form using a correlated mutation approach in combination with available structural, bioinformatics and experimental data. Results Correlated mutations are affected by several types of noise, which is difficult to disentangle from the real signal. In our analysis of the MADS domain proteins, we apply for the first time a correlated mutation analysis to a family of interacting proteins. This provides a unique way to investigate the amount of signal that is present in correlated mutations because it allows direct comparison of mutations in various family members and assessing their conservation. We show that correlated mutations in general are conserved within the various family members, and if not, the variability at the respective positions is less in the proteins in which the correlated mutation does not occur. Also, intermolecular correlated mutation signals for interacting pairs of proteins display clear overlap with other bioinformatics data, which is not the case for non-interacting protein pairs, an observation which validates the intermolecular correlated mutations. Having validated the correlated mutation results, we apply them to infer the structural organization of the MADS domain proteins. Conclusion Our analysis enables understanding of the structural organization of the MADS domain proteins, including support for predicted helices based on correlated mutation patterns, and evidence for a specific interaction site in those proteins. PMID:20979667

  1. Precise Classification of Cervical Carcinomas Combined with Somatic Mutation Profiling Contributes to Predicting Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Spaans, Vivian M.; Trietsch, Marjolijn D.; Peters, Alexander A. W.; Osse, Michelle; ter Haar, Natalja; Fleuren, Gert J.; Jordanova, Ekaterina S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and adenosquamous carcinoma (ASC) are the most common histological subtypes of cervical cancer. Differences in the somatic mutation profiles of these subtypes have been suggested. We investigated the prevalence of somatic hot-spot mutations in three well-defined cohorts of SCC, AC, and ASC and determined the additional value of mutation profiling in predicting disease outcome relative to well-established prognostic parameters. Materials and Methods Clinicopathological data were collected for 301 cervical tumors classified as SCC (n=166), AC (n=55), or ASC (n=80). Mass spectrometry was used to analyze 171 somatic hot-spot mutations in 13 relevant genes. Results In 103 (34%) tumors, 123 mutations were detected (36% in SCC, 38% in AC, and 28% in ASC), mostly in PIK3CA (20%) and KRAS (7%). PIK3CA mutations occurred more frequently in SCC than AC (25% vs. 11%, P=0.025), whereas KRAS mutations occurred more frequently in AC than SCC (24% vs. 3%, P<0.001) and ASC (24% vs. 3%, P<0.001). A positive mutation status correlated with worse disease-free survival (HR 1.57, P=0.043). In multivariate analysis, tumor diameter, parametrial infiltration, and lymph node metastasis, but not the presence of a somatic mutation, were independent predictors of survival. Conclusion Potentially targetable somatic mutations occurred in 34% of cervical tumors with different distributions among histological subtypes. Precise classification of cervical carcinomas in combination with mutation profiling is valuable for predicting disease outcome and may guide the development and selection of tumor-specific treatment approaches. PMID:26197069

  2. Novel katG mutations causing isoniazid resistance in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jessica N; Paul, Lynthia V; Rodwell, Timothy C; Victor, Thomas C; Amallraja, Anu M; Elghraoui, Afif; Goodmanson, Amy P; Ramirez-Busby, Sarah M; Chawla, Ashu; Zadorozhny, Victoria; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Sirgel, Frederick A; Catanzaro, Donald; Rodrigues, Camilla; Gler, Maria Tarcela; Crudu, Valeru; Catanzaro, Antonino; Valafar, Faramarz

    2015-07-01

    We report the discovery and confirmation of 23 novel mutations with previously undocumented role in isoniazid (INH) drug resistance, in catalase-peroxidase (katG) gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) isolates. With these mutations, a synonymous mutation in fabG1 (g609a), and two canonical mutations, we were able to explain 98% of the phenotypic resistance observed in 366 clinical Mtb isolates collected from four high tuberculosis (TB)-burden countries: India, Moldova, Philippines, and South Africa. We conducted overlapping targeted and whole-genome sequencing for variant discovery in all clinical isolates with a variety of INH-resistant phenotypes. Our analysis showed that just two canonical mutations (katG 315AGC-ACC and inhA promoter-15C-T) identified 89.5% of resistance phenotypes in our collection. Inclusion of the 23 novel mutations reported here, and the previously documented point mutation in fabG1, increased the sensitivity of these mutations as markers of INH resistance to 98%. Only six (2%) of the 332 resistant isolates in our collection did not harbor one or more of these mutations. The third most prevalent substitution, at inhA promoter position -8, present in 39 resistant isolates, was of no diagnostic significance since it always co-occurred with katG 315. 79% of our isolates harboring novel mutations belong to genetic group 1 indicating a higher tendency for this group to go down an uncommon evolutionary path and evade molecular diagnostics. The results of this study contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of INH resistance in Mtb isolates that lack the canonical mutations and could improve the sensitivity of next generation molecular diagnostics.

  3. A Dominant Mutation in Hexokinase 1 (HK1) Causes Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Lori S.; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Bowne, Sara J.; Lang, Steven; Blanton, Susan H.; Cadena, Elizabeth; Avery, Cheryl E.; Lewis, Richard A.; Webb-Jones, Kaylie; Wheaton, Dianna H.; Birch, David G.; Coussa, Razck; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Chakarova, Christina; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Garcia, Charles A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Wilson, Richard K.; Weinstock, George M.; Daiger, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To identify the cause of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in UTAD003, a large, six-generation Louisiana family with autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (adRP). Methods. A series of strategies, including candidate gene screening, linkage exclusion, genome-wide linkage mapping, and whole-exome next-generation sequencing, was used to identify a mutation in a novel disease gene on chromosome 10q22.1. Probands from an additional 404 retinal degeneration families were subsequently screened for mutations in this gene. Results. Exome sequencing in UTAD003 led to identification of a single, novel coding variant (c.2539G>A, p.Glu847Lys) in hexokinase 1 (HK1) present in all affected individuals and absent from normal controls. One affected family member carries two copies of the mutation and has an unusually severe form of disease, consistent with homozygosity for this mutation. Screening of additional adRP probands identified four other families (American, Canadian, and Sicilian) with the same mutation and a similar range of phenotypes. The families share a rare 450-kilobase haplotype containing the mutation, suggesting a founder mutation among otherwise unrelated families. Conclusions. We identified an HK1 mutation in five adRP families. Hexokinase 1 catalyzes phosphorylation of glucose to glucose-6-phosphate. HK1 is expressed in retina, with two abundant isoforms expressed at similar levels. The Glu847Lys mutation is located at a highly conserved position in the protein, outside the catalytic domains. We hypothesize that the effect of this mutation is limited to the retina, as no systemic abnormalities in glycolysis were detected. Prevalence of the HK1 mutation in our cohort of RP families is 1%. PMID:25190649

  4. Positive Education: Positive Psychology and Classroom Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Ernst, Randal M.; Gillham, Jane; Reivich, Karen; Linkins, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Positive education is defined as education for both traditional skills and for happiness. The high prevalence worldwide of depression among young people, the small rise in life satisfaction, and the synergy between learning and positive emotion all argue that the skills for happiness should be taught in school. There is substantial evidence from…

  5. Want Positive Behavior? Use Positive Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Chip; Freeman-Loftis, Babs

    2012-01-01

    Positive adult language is the professional use of words and tone of voice to enable students to learn in an engaged, active way. This includes learning social skills. To guide children toward choosing and maintaining positive behaviors, adults need to carefully choose the words and tone of voice used when speaking to them. Learning to use…

  6. A novel mutation in FHL1 in a family with X-linked scapuloperoneal myopathy: phenotypic spectrum and structural study of FHL1 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong-Hui; Raskind, Wendy H.; Parson, William W.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Vu, Tiffany; Zheng, YunLin; Matsushita, Mark; Wolff, John; Lipe, Hillary; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    An X-linked myopathy was recently associated with mutations in the four-and-a-half-LIM domains 1 (FHL1) gene. We identified a family with late onset, slowly progressive weakness of scapuloperoneal muscles in three brothers and their mother. A novel missense mutation in the LIM2 domain of FHL1 (W122C) co-segregated with disease in the family. The phenotype was less severe than that in other reported families. Muscle biopsy revealed myopathic changes with FHL1 inclusions that were ubiquitin- and desmin-positive. This mutation provides additional evidence for X-linked myopathy caused by a narrow spectrum of mutations in FHL1, mostly in the LIM2 domain. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the newly identified mutation and five previously published missense mutations in the LIM2 domain revealed no major distortions of the protein structure or disruption of zinc binding. There were, however, increases in the nonpolar, solvent-accessible surface area in one or both of two clusters of residues, suggesting that the mutant proteins have a variably increased propensity to aggregate. Review of the literature shows a wide range of phenotypes associated with mutations in FHL1. However, recognizing the typical scapuloperoneal phenotype and X-linked inheritance pattern will help clinicians arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:20633900

  7. Interplay of mutation and disassortativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sanjiv K.; Jalan, Sarika

    2015-08-01

    Despite disassortativity being commonly observed in many biological networks, our current understanding of its evolutionary origin is inadequate. Motivated by the occurrence of mutations during an evolutionary time span that results in changes in the behavior of interactions, we demonstrate that if we maximize the stability of the underlying system, the genetic algorithm leads to the evolution of a disassortative structure. The mutation probability governs the degree of saturation of the disassortativity coefficient, and this reveals the origin of the wide range of disassortativity values found in real systems. We analytically verify these results for star networks, and by considering various values for the antisymmetric couplings, we find a regime in which scale-free networks are more stable than the corresponding random networks.

  8. Mutations in the 1A domain of keratin 9 in patients with epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Rothnagel, J A; Wojcik, S; Liefer, K M; Dominey, A M; Huber, M; Hohl, D; Roop, D R

    1995-03-01

    Epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma is an autosomal dominant skin disorder characterized by hyperkeratosis of the palms and soles. Ultrastructurally the disease exhibits abnormal keratin filament networks and tonofilament clumping like that found in the keratin disorders of epidermolysis bullosa simplex and epidermolytic hyperkeratosis. The disease has been mapped to chromosome 17q11-q23 in the region of the type 1 keratin gene locus and more recently mutations have been found in the palmoplantar specific keratin, keratin 9. We have analyzed six unrelated incidences of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma for mutations in their keratin 9 genes. In two of these, we have identified mutations that alter critical residues within the highly conserved helix initiation motif at the beginning of the rod domain of keratin 9. In a three-generation Middle Eastern kindred we found a C to T transition at codon 162 that results in an arginine to tryptophan substitution at position 10 of the 1A alpha-helical domain, thus confirming this codon as a hot spot for mutation in keratin 9. The other mutation found involves a T to C transition at codon 167 that results in the expression of a serine residue in place of the normal leucine at position 15 of the 1A segment and is the first documentation of this mutation in this gene. The identification of these substitutions extends the current catalog of disease causing mutations in keratin 9.

  9. Spectrum of mutations in mut methylmalonic acidemia and identification of a common Hispanic mutation and haplotype.

    PubMed

    Worgan, Lisa C; Niles, Kirsten; Tirone, Jamie C; Hofmann, Adam; Verner, Andrei; Sammak, Alya'a; Kucic, Terrence; Lepage, Pierre; Rosenblatt, David S

    2006-01-01

    Cobalamin nonresponsive methylmalonic acidemia (MMA, mut complementation class) results from mutations in the nuclear gene MUT, which codes for the mitochondrial enzyme methylmalonyl CoA mutase (MCM). To better elucidate the spectrum of mutations that cause MMA, the MUT gene was sequenced in 160 patients with mut MMA. Sequence analysis identified mutations in 96% of disease alleles. Mutations were found in all coding exons, but predominantly in exons 2, 3, 6, and 11. A total of 116 different mutations, 68 of which were novel, were identified. Of the 116 different mutations, 53% were missense mutations, 22% were deletions, duplications or insertions, 16% were nonsense mutations, and 9% were splice-site mutations. Sixty-one of the mutations have only been identified in one family. A novel mutation in exon 2, c.322C>T (p.R108C), was identified in 16 of 27 Hispanic patients. SNP genotyping data demonstrated that Hispanic patients with this mutation share a common haplotype. Three other mutations were seen exclusively in Hispanic patients: c.280G>A (p.G94R), c.1022dupA, and c.970G>A (p.A324T). Seven mutations were seen almost exclusively in black patients, including the previously reported c.2150G>T (p.G717V) mutation, which was identified in 12 of 29 black patients. Two mutations were seen only in Asian patients. Some frequently identified mutations were not population-specific and were identified in patients of various ethnic backgrounds. Some of these mutations were found in mutation clusters in exons 2, 3, 6, and 11, suggesting a recurrent mutation.

  10. Tailoring the metabolism against mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Motter, Adilson E.; Almaas, Eivind; Barabasi, Albert Laszlo

    2008-03-01

    In the post-genomic era, organisms can be modelled at the whole-cell level in silico via steady state methods to describe their metabolic capabilities. We use two such methods, Flux Balance Analysis and Minimization of Metabolic Adjustment to explore the behavior of cells (of E. coli and S. cerevisiae) after severe mutations. We propose experimentally feasible ways of modifying the underlying biochemical reaction network of a mutant cell such that cell functionality, in particular growth rate, is significantly improved.

  11. [Pathologic manifestations of hormonal receptor mutations].

    PubMed

    Milgrom, E

    2000-01-01

    Mutations of receptor genes are involved in various aspects of thyroid and gonadal pathology. Activating mutations of TSH and LH receptors are associated with hyperthyroidism and premature puberty. These mutations are dominant and lead to the synthesis of a constitutive receptor, i.e. a receptor active even in the absence of hormone. Inactivating mutations of TSH, gonadotropin and GnRH receptors are recessive. They determine either a hypothyroidism or a hypogonadism. In the case of alterations of gonadotropin receptors the hypogonadism is hypergonadotrophic. It is hypogonadotrophic in the case of mutations of the GnRH receptor. PMID:10989556

  12. Somatic mutation, genomic variation, and neurological disease.

    PubMed

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A

    2013-07-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one's parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease-even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example-resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development.

  13. Somatic Mutation, Genomic Variation, and Neurological Disease

    PubMed Central

    Poduri, Annapurna; Evrony, Gilad D.; Cai, Xuyu; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations causing human disease are conventionally thought to be inherited through the germ line from one’s parents and present in all somatic (body) cells, except for most cancer mutations, which arise somatically. Increasingly, somatic mutations are being identified in diseases other than cancer, including neurodevelopmental diseases. Somatic mutations can arise during the course of prenatal brain development and cause neurological disease—even when present at low levels of mosaicism, for example—resulting in brain malformations associated with epilepsy and intellectual disability. Novel, highly sensitive technologies will allow more accurate evaluation of somatic mutations in neurodevelopmental disorders and during normal brain development. PMID:23828942

  14. Constant denaturant gel electrophoresis as a rapid screening technique for p53 mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Børresen, A L; Hovig, E; Smith-Sørensen, B; Malkin, D; Lystad, S; Andersen, T I; Nesland, J M; Isselbacher, K J; Friend, S H

    1991-01-01

    At present, mutation of the p53 gene appears to be the most common genetic alteration found in human cancers. These mutations can occur within many different regions of the gene. We have developed a modification of denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis termed "constant denaturant gel electrophoresis" (CDGE), which provides a rapid and sensitive method to screen the four conserved regions within the p53 gene where the majority of p53 mutations have been reported. The sensitivity of CDGE was first tested with known p53 mutations in all four conserved regions. The CDGE technique was then used to screen 32 breast carcinomas that had been analyzed by immunohistochemical methods for altered p53 protein levels and whose DNA had already been shown to have loss of heterozygosity for a chromosome 17p marker. By immunostaining techniques, only 6 of the 32 tumors had elevated p53 expression. However, CDGE detected p53 mutations in 11 of the 32 tumors. DNA sequence analysis was performed to determine the nucleotide positions of these mutations in all 11 samples. Loss of heterozygosity for the pYNZ22 or p144D6 markers did not associate with either the loss of heterozygosity at the p53 locus or the mutations detected by CDGE. We conclude that CDGE is a rapid and effective technique to screen for p53 mutations. Images PMID:1924299

  15. Is mitochondrial tRNA(Ser(UCN)) T7501C mutation associated with cardiovascular disease?

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Huang, Jinyu

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA mutations are increasingly recognized as an important cause of cardiovascular diseases, point mutations in mitochondrial tRNA genes being the largest group among them. Most recently, mutation at position 7501 in mt-tRNA(Ser(UCN)) gene has been reported to be associated with human cardiovascular diseases including cardiomyopathy, sudden cardiac death (SCD) and Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). However, its direct pathogenic role remained poorly understood. In this study, we performed an extensive web-based search for the published resources concerning this association. Through the application of bioinformatics tool, we observed that this mutation altered the mt-tRNA(Ser(UCN)) secondary structure, in addition, evolutionary conservation analysis of this mutation indicated that this mutation is highly conserved between different species. Notably, the T7501C mutation belonging to human mitochondrial haplogroup U8a1a1, a rare subgroup of U8, was present only in European population and was absent in Han Chinese population. Taken together, our result indicated that the T7501C mutation may occur infrequently and was probably pathogenic in cardiovascular disease development.

  16. Cancer Driver Log (CanDL): Catalog of Potentially Actionable Cancer Mutations.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Miya, Jharna; Kautto, Esko; Zhu, Eliot; Samorodnitsky, Eric; Datta, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Massively parallel sequencing technologies have enabled characterization of genomic alterations across multiple tumor types. Efforts have focused on identifying driver mutations because they represent potential targets for therapy. However, because of the presence of driver and passenger mutations, it is often challenging to assign the clinical relevance of specific mutations observed in patients. Currently, there are multiple databases and tools that provide in silico assessment for potential drivers; however, there is no comprehensive resource for mutations with functional characterization. Therefore, we created an expert-curated database of potentially actionable driver mutations for molecular pathologists to facilitate annotation of cancer genomic testing. We reviewed scientific literature to identify variants that have been functionally characterized in vitro or in vivo as driver mutations. We obtained the chromosome location and all possible nucleotide positions for each amino acid change and uploaded them to the Cancer Driver Log (CanDL) database with associated literature reference indicating functional driver evidence. In addition to a simple interface, the database allows users to download all or selected genes as a comma-separated values file for incorporation into their own analysis pipeline. Furthermore, the database includes a mechanism for third-party contributions to support updates for novel driver mutations. Overall, this freely available database will facilitate rapid annotation of cancer genomic testing in molecular pathology laboratories for mutations.

  17. Mutations in histone modulators are associated with prolonged survival during azacitidine therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tobiasson, Magnus; McLornan, Donal P.; Karimi, Mohsen; Dimitriou, Marios; Jansson, Monika; Azenkoud, Asmaa Ben; Jädersten, Martin; Lindberg, Greger; Abdulkadir, Hani; Kulasekararaj, Austin; Ungerstedt, Johanna; Lennartsson, Andreas; Ekwall, Karl; Mufti, Ghulam J.; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Early therapeutic decision-making is crucial in patients with higher-risk MDS. We evaluated the impact of clinical parameters and mutational profiles in 134 consecutive patients treated with azacitidine using a combined cohort from Karolinska University Hospital (n=89) and from King's College Hospital, London (n=45). While neither clinical parameters nor mutations had a significant impact on response rate, both karyotype and mutational profile were strongly associated with survival from the start of treatment. IPSS high-risk cytogenetics negatively impacted overall survival (median 20 vs 10 months; p<0.001), whereas mutations in histone modulators (ASXL1, EZH2) were associated with prolonged survival (22 vs 12 months, p=0.01). This positive association was present in both cohorts and remained highly significant in the multivariate cox model. Importantly, patients with mutations in histone modulators lacking high-risk cytogenetics showed a survival of 29 months compared to only 10 months in patients with the opposite pattern. While TP53 was negatively associated with survival, neither RUNX1-mutations nor the number of mutations appeared to influence survival in this cohort. We propose a model combining histone modulator mutational screening with cytogenetics in the clinical decision-making process for higher-risk MDS patients eligible for treatment with azacitidine. PMID:26959885

  18. Novel tools for extraction and validation of disease-related mutations applied to Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Remko; van den Bergh, Tom; Joosten, Henk-Jan; Lekanne dit Deprez, Ronald H; Mannens, Marcel Mam; Schaap, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    Genetic disorders are often caused by nonsynonymous nucleotide changes in one or more genes associated with the disease. Specific amino acid changes, however, can lead to large variability of phenotypic expression. For many genetic disorders this results in an increasing amount of publications describing phenotype-associated mutations in disorder-related genes. Keeping up with this stream of publications is essential for molecular diagnostics and translational research purposes but often impossible due to time constraints: there are simply too many articles to read. To help solve this problem, we have created Mutator, an automated method to extract mutations from full-text articles. Extracted mutations are crossreferenced to sequence data and a scoring method is applied to distinguish false-positives. To analyze stored and new mutation data for their (potential) effect we have developed Validator, a Web-based tool specifically designed for DNA diagnostics. Fabry disease, a monogenetic gene disorder of the GLA gene, was used as a test case. A structure-based sequence alignment of the alpha-amylase superfamily was used to validate results. We have compared our data with existing Fabry mutation data sets obtained from the HGMD and Swiss-Prot databases. Compared to these data sets, Mutator extracted 30% additional mutations from the literature.

  19. Somatic MED12 mutations are associated with poor prognosis markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ruppert, Amy S.; Senter, Leigha; Hoag, Kevin W.; Dufva, Olli; Kontro, Mika; Rassenti, Laura; Hertlein, Erin; Kipps, Thomas J.; Porkka, Kimmo; Byrd, John C.; de la Chapelle, Albert; Vahteristo, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in adults. We performed systematic database search and identified highly specific MED12 mutations in CLL patients. To study this further, we collected three independent sample series comprising over 700 CLL samples and screened MED12 exons 1 and 2 by direct sequencing. Mutations were identified at significant frequency in all three series with a combined mutation frequency of 5.2% (37/709). Positive mutation status was found to be associated with unmutated IGHV and ZAP70 expression, which are well-known poor prognosis markers in CLL. Our results recognize CLL as the first extrauterine cancer type where 5′ terminus of MED12 is mutated at significant frequency. Functional analyses have shown that these mutations lead to dissociation of Cyclin C-CDK8/19 from the core Mediator and to the loss of Mediator-associated CDK kinase activity. Additional studies on the role of MED12 mutation status as a putative prognostic factor as well as mutations' exact tumorigenic mechanism in CLL are warranted. PMID:25595892

  20. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution.

  1. Optimized Multiplex Detection of 7 KRAS Mutations by Taqman Allele-Specific qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Orue, Andrea; Rieber, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples is essential to manage patients with colorectal or lung cancer, since these mutations preclude treatment with monoclonal anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. We report an inexpensive, rapid multiplex allele-specific qPCR method detecting the 7 most clinically relevant KRAS somatic mutations with concomitant amplification of non-mutated KRAS in tumor cells and tissues from CRC patients. Positive samples evidenced in the multiplex assay were further subjected to individual allele-specific analysis, to define the specific mutation. Reference human cancer DNA harbouring either G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, G12V and G13D confirmed assay specificity with ≤1% sensitivity of mutant alleles. KRAS multiplex mutation analysis usefulness was also demonstrated with formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) from CRC biopsies. Conclusion. Co-amplification of non-mutated DNA avoided false negatives from degraded samples. Moreover, this cost effective assay is compatible with mutation detection by DNA sequencing in FFPE tissues, but with a greater sensitivity when mutant DNA concentrations are limiting. PMID:27632281

  2. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution. PMID:27444875

  3. Computational DNA hole spectroscopy: A new tool to predict mutation hotspots, critical base pairs, and disease ‘driver’ mutations

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, Martha Y.; Villagrán; Miller, John H.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a new technique, computational DNA hole spectroscopy, which creates spectra of electron hole probabilities vs. nucleotide position. A hole is a site of positive charge created when an electron is removed. Peaks in the hole spectrum depict sites where holes tend to localize and potentially trigger a base pair mismatch during replication. Our studies of mitochondrial DNA reveal a correlation between L-strand hole spectrum peaks and spikes in the human mutation spectrum. Importantly, we also find that hole peak positions that do not coincide with large variant frequencies often coincide with disease-implicated mutations and/or (for coding DNA) encoded conserved amino acids. This enables combining hole spectra with variant data to identify critical base pairs and potential disease ‘driver’ mutations. Such integration of DNA hole and variance spectra could ultimately prove invaluable for pinpointing critical regions of the vast non-protein-coding genome. An observed asymmetry in correlations, between the spectrum of human mtDNA variations and the L- and H-strand hole spectra, is attributed to asymmetric DNA replication processes that occur for the leading and lagging strands. PMID:26310834

  4. A novel mutation of a leucine residue in coil 1A of keratin 9 in epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma.

    PubMed

    Endo, H; Hatamochi, A; Shinkai, H

    1997-07-01

    Keratin 9 mutation was examined in a Japanese kindred of epidermolytic palmoplantar keratoderma (EPPK), which is a dominantly inherited autosomal disorder of keratinization characterized by diffuse thickening of the palms and soles and by epidermolytic hyperkeratosis histologically. We report herein a novel mutation, a C --> G transversion at nucleotide position 541 that converts a leucine residue (CTC) to a valine (GTC) at codon 159. As in all other reported cases of keratin 9 mutation in EPPK, this mutation lies within the highly conserved coil 1A of the rod domain, which is considered to play a role in the correct alignment of the coiled-coil molecules.

  5. A primary cardiac leiomyosarcoma with mutation at H-ras codon 12.

    PubMed

    Parissis, J; Arvanitis, D; Sourvinos, G; Spandidos, D

    1997-01-01

    The presence of activating ras mutations in a cardiac leiomyosarcoma which occurred in the right atrium of the heart of a female patient was examined. The tumor had the appearance of leiomyosarcoma in rutine histopathological examination and the definite diagnosis was confirmed by a positive immunohistochemical reaction to smooth muscle actin. Molecular analysis by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique showed a point mutation of H-ras gene at codon 12. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report describing ras gene mutation in a cardiac leiomyosarcoma implying a role for the ras oncogenes in the development of this tumor.

  6. LHON: Mitochondrial Mutations and More.

    PubMed

    Kirches, E

    2011-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is a mitochondrial disorder leading to severe visual impairment or even blindness by death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The primary cause of the disease is usually a mutation of the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) causing a single amino acid exchange in one of the mtDNA-encoded subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the first complex of the electron transport chain. It was thus obvious to accuse neuronal energy depletion as the most probable mediator of neuronal death. The group of Valerio Carelli and other authors have nicely shown that energy depletion shapes the cell fate in a LHON cybrid cell model. However, the cybrids used were osteosarcoma cells, which do not fully model neuronal energy metabolism. Although complex I mutations may cause oxidative stress, a potential pathogenetic role of the latter was less taken into focus. The hypothesis of bioenergetic failure does not provide a simple explanation for the relatively late disease onset and for the incomplete penetrance, which differs remarkably between genders. It is assumed that other genetic and environmental factors are needed in addition to the 'primary LHON mutations' to elicit RGC death. Relevant nuclear modifier genes have not been identified so far. The review discusses the unresolved problems of a pathogenetic hypothesis based on ATP decline and/or ROS-induced apoptosis in RGCs.

  7. Analysis of hemochromatosis gene mutations in 52 consecutive patients with polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; de Matteis, Giovanna; Federici, Francesca; Solero, Pietro; Veneri, Dino

    2004-01-01

    A literature review reports increased erythrocyte indices [hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), MCH concentration] in subjects with hereditary hemochromatosis (HH). We, therefore, screened 52 consecutive patients with polycythemia vera for 12 HH gene mutations, comparing iron status and red cell parameters between patients positive or negative for HH gene mutations. Our results support the evidence that there is no association between these two conditions.

  8. Spontaneous recurrent mutations and a complex rearrangement in the MECP2 gene in the light of current models of mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Tihomir; Todorova, Albena; Motoescu, Cristina; Dimova, Petia; Iancu, Daniela; Craiu, Dana; Stoian, Daniela; Barbarii, Ligia; Bojinova, Veneta; Mitev, Vanyo

    2012-06-01

    Mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene are associated with Rett syndrome (RTT). The MECP2 gene has some unique characteristics: (1) it is mainly affected by de novo mutations, due to recurrent independent mutational events in a defined "hot spot" regions or positions; (2) complex mutational events along a single allele are frequently found in this gene; (3) most mutations arise on paternal X chromosome. The recurrent point mutations involve mainly CpG dinucleotides, where C>T transitions are explained by methylation-mediated deamination. The complex mutational events might be explained by the genomic architecture of the region involving the MECP2 gene. The finding that most spontaneous mutations arise on paternal X-chromosome supports the higher contribution of replication-mediated mechanism of mutagenesis. We present 9 types of mutations in the MECP2 gene, detected in a group of 22 Bulgarian and 6 Romanian classical RTT patients. Thirteen patients were clarified on molecular level (46.4%). The point mutations in our sample account for 61.5%. One intraexonic deletion was detected in the present study (7.7%). One novel insertion c.321_322insGAAG, p.(Lys107_Leu108insGluAlafs2*) was found (7.7%). Large deletions and complex mutations account for 23%. A novel complex mutational event c.[584_624del41insTT; 638delTinsCA] was detected in a Romanian patient. We discuss different types of the MECP2 mutations detected in our sample in the light of the possible mechanisms of mutagenesis. Complex gene rearrangements involving a combination of deletions and insertions have always been most difficult to detect, to specify precisely and hence to explain in terms of their underlying mutational mechanisms.

  9. Germline and Somatic Mutations in Homologous Recombination Genes Predict Platinum Response and Survival in Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Peritoneal Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, Kathryn P.; Walsh, Tom; Harrell, Maria I.; Lee, Ming K.; Pennil, Christopher C.; Rendi, Mara H.; Thornton, Anne; Norquist, Barbara M.; Casadei, Silvia; Nord, Alexander S.; Agnew, Kathy J.; Pritchard, Colin C.; Scroggins, Sheena; Garcia, Rochelle L.; King, Mary-Claire; Swisher, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Hallmarks of germline BRCA1/2-associated ovarian carcinomas include chemosensitivity and improved survival. The therapeutic impact of somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair genes is uncertain. Experimental Design Using targeted capture and massively parallel genomic sequencing, we assessed 390 ovarian carcinomas for germline and somatic loss-of-function mutations in 30 genes, including BRCA1, BRCA2, and 11 other genes in the HR pathway. Results 31% of ovarian carcinomas had a deleterious germline (24%) and/or somatic (9%) mutation in one or more of the 13 HR genes: BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, BARD1, BRIP1, CHEK1, CHEK2, FAM175A, MRE11A, NBN, PALB2, RAD51C, and RAD51D. Non-serous ovarian carcinomas had similar rates of HR mutations to serous carcinomas (28% vs. 31%, p=0.6), including clear cell, endometrioid, and carcinosarcoma. The presence of germline and somatic HR mutations was highly predictive of primary platinum sensitivity (p=0.0002) and improved overall survival (p=0.0006), with median overall survival 66 months in germline HR mutation carriers, 59 months in cases with a somatic HR mutation, and 41 months for cases without an HR mutation. Conclusions Germline or somatic mutations in HR genes are present in almost one-third of ovarian carcinomas, including both serous and non-serous histologies. Somatic BRCA1/2 mutations and mutations in other HR genes have a similar positive impact on overall survival and platinum responsiveness as germline BRCA1/2 mutations. The similar rate of HR mutations in non-serous carcinomas supports their inclusion in PARP inhibitor clinical trials. PMID:24240112

  10. Spontaneously Arising mutL Mutators in Evolving Escherichia coli Populations Are the Result of Changes in Repeat Length

    PubMed Central

    Shaver, Aaron C.; Sniegowski, Paul D.

    2003-01-01

    Over the course of thousands of generations of growth in a glucose-limited environment, 3 of 12 experimental populations of Escherichia coli spontaneously and independently evolved greatly increased mutation rates. In two of the populations, the mutations responsible for this increased mutation rate lie in the same region of the mismatch repair gene mutL. In this region, a 6-bp repeat is present in three copies in the gene of the wild-type ancestor of the experimental populations but is present in four copies in one of the experimental populations and two copies in the other. These in-frame mutations either add or delete the amino acid sequence LA in the MutL protein. We determined that the replacement of the wild-type sequence with either of these mutations was sufficient to increase the mutation rate of the wild-type strain to a level comparable to that of the mutator strains. Complementation of strains bearing the mutator mutations with wild-type copies of either mutL or the mismatch repair gene uvrD rescued the wild-type mutation rate. The position of the mutator mutations—in the region of MutL known as the ATP lid—suggests a possible deficiency in MutL's ATPase activity as the cause of the mutator phenotype. The similarity of the two mutator mutations (despite the independent evolutionary histories of the populations that gave rise to them) leads to a discussion of the potential adaptive role of DNA repeats. PMID:14526019

  11. The evolution of low mutation rates in experimental mutator populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Michael J; Hsieh, Yu-Ying; Yu, Yen-Hsin; Chang, Shang-Lin; Leu, Jun-Yi

    2012-07-10

    Mutation is the source of both beneficial adaptive variation and deleterious genetic load, fueling the opposing selective forces than shape mutation rate evolution. This dichotomy is well illustrated by the evolution of the mutator phenotype, a genome-wide 10- to 100-fold increase in mutation rate. This phenotype has often been observed in clonally expanding populations exposed to novel or frequently changing conditions. Although studies of both experimental and natural populations have shed light on the evolutionary forces that lead to the spread of the mutator allele through a population, significant gaps in our understanding of mutator evolution remain. Here we use an experimental evolution approach to investigate the conditions required for the evolution of a reduction in mutation rate and the mechanisms by which populations tolerate the accumulation of deleterious mutations. We find that after ∼6,700 generations, four out of eight experimental mutator lines had evolved a decreased mutation rate. We provide evidence that the accumulation of deleterious mutations leads to selection for reduced mutation rate clones in populations of mutators. Finally, we test the long-term consequences of the mutator phenotype, finding that mutator lines follow different evolutionary trajectories, some of which lead to drug resistance.

  12. Myopathies associated with β-tropomyosin mutations.

    PubMed

    Tajsharghi, H; Ohlsson, M; Palm, L; Oldfors, A

    2012-11-01

    Mutations in TPM2, encoding β-tropomyosin, have recently been found to cause a range of muscle disorders. We review the clinical and morphological expression of the previously reported mutations illustrating the heterogeneity of β-tropomyosin-associated diseases and describe an additional case with a novel mutation. The manifestations of mutations in TPM2 include non-specific congenital myopathy with type 1 fibre predominance, nemaline myopathy, cap disease and distal arthrogryposis. In addition, Escobar syndrome with nemaline myopathy is a manifestation of homozygous truncating β-tropomyosin mutation. Cap disease appears to be the most common morphological manifestation. A coarse intermyofibrillar network and jagged Z lines are additional frequent changes. The dominant β-tropomyosin mutations manifest either as congenital myopathy or distal arthrogryposis. The various congenital myopathies are usually associated with moderate muscle weakness and no congenital joint contractures. The distal arthrogryposis syndromes associated with TPM2 mutations include the less severe forms, with congenital contractures mainly of the hands and feet and mild or no muscle weakness. The dominant TPM2 mutations include amino acid deletions/insertions and missense mutations. There is no clear relation between the type of mutations or the localisation of the mutated residue in the β-tropomyosin molecule and the clinical and morphological phenotype. PMID:22749895

  13. Mechanisms of Mutation in Nondividing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Patricia L.; Rosche, William A.

    2010-01-01

    When populations of cells are subjected to nonlethal selection, mutations arise in the absence of cell division, a phenomenon that has been called “adaptive mutation.” In a strain of Escherichia coli that cannot metabolize lactose (Lac−) but that reverts to lactose utilization (Lac+) when lactose is its sole energy and carbon source, the mutational process consists of two components. (1) A highly efficient, recombination-dependent mechanism giving rise to mutations on the F′ episome that carries the Lac− allele; and (2) a less efficient, unknown mechanism giving rise to mutations elsewhere in the genome. Both selected and nonselected mutations arise in the Lac− population, but nonselected mutations are enriched in Lac+ mutants, suggesting that some Lac+ cells have passed though a transient period of increased mutation. These results have several evolutionary implications. (1) DNA synthesis initiated by recombination could be an important source of spontaneous mutation, particularly in cells that are not undergoing genomic replication. (2) The highly active mutational mechanism on the episome could be important in the horizontal transfer of variant alleles among species that carry and exchange conjugal plasmids. (3) A subpopulation of cells in a state of transient mutation could be a source of multiple variant alleles and could provide a mechanism for rapid adaptive evolution under adverse conditions. PMID:10415479

  14. KRAS mutation testing in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Perincheri, Sudhir; Hui, Pei

    2015-03-01

    Activating mutation of KRAS plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of common human malignancies and molecular testing of KRAS mutation has emerged as an essential biomarker in the current practice of clinical oncology. The presence of KRAS mutation is generally associated with clinical aggressiveness of the cancer and reduced survival of the patient. Therapeutically, KRAS mutation testing has maximum utility in stratifying metastatic colorectal carcinoma and lung cancer patients for treatment with targeted therapy. Diagnostically, KRAS mutation testing is useful in the workup of pancreaticobiliary and thyroid cancers, particularly using cytological specimens. In the era of precision medicine, the role of KRAS mutation testing is poised to expand, likely in a setting of combinatorial therapeutic strategy and requiring additional mutation testing of its upstream and/or downstream effectors.

  15. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  16. Heterogeneous AVPR2 gene mutations in congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus

    SciTech Connect

    Wildin, R.S.; Antush, M.J.; Bennett, R.L.; Schoof, J.M.; Scott, C.R. )

    1994-08-01

    Mutations in the AVPR2 gene encoding the receptor for arginine vasopressin in the kidney (V2 ADHR) have been reported in patients with congenital nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, a predominantly X-linked disorder of water homeostasis. The authors have used restriction-enzyme analysis and direct DNA sequencing of genomic PCR product to evaluate the AVPR2 gene in 11 unrelated affected males. Each patient has a different DNA sequence variation, and only one matches a previously reported mutation. Cosegregation of the variations with nephrogenic diabetes insipidus was demonstrated for two families, and a de novo mutation was accomplished in one family. All the variations predict frameshifts, truncations, or nonconservative amino acid substitutions in evolutionarily conserved positions in the V2 ADHR and related receptors. Of interest, a 28-bp deletion is found in one patient, while another, unrelated patient has a tandem duplication of the same 28-bp segment, suggesting that both resulted from the same unusual unequal crossing-over mechanism facilitated by 9-mer direct sequence repeats. Since the V2 ADHR is a member of the seven-transmembrane-domain, G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily, the loss-of-function mutations from this study and others provide important clues to the structure-function relationship of this and related receptors. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Energy landscapes reveal the myopathic effects of tropomyosin mutations.

    PubMed

    Orzechowski, Marek; Fischer, Stefan; Moore, Jeffrey R; Lehman, William; Farman, Gerrie P

    2014-12-15

    Striated muscle contraction is regulated by an interaction network connecting the effects of troponin, Ca(2+), and myosin-heads to the azimuthal positioning of tropomyosin along thin filaments. Many missense mutations, located at the actin-tropomyosin interface, however, reset the regulatory switching mechanism either by weakening or strengthening residue-specific interactions, leading to hyper- or hypo-contractile pathologies. Here, we compute energy landscapes for the actin-tropomyosin interface and quantify contributions of single amino acid residues to actin-tropomyosin binding. The method is a useful tool to assess effects of actin and tropomyosin mutations, potentially relating initial stages of myopathy to alterations in thin filament stability and regulation. Landscapes for mutant filaments linked to hyper-contractility provide a simple picture that describes a decrease in actin-tropomyosin interaction energy. Destabilizing the blocked (relaxed)-state parallels previously noted enhanced Ca(2+)-sensitivity conferred by these mutants. Energy landscapes also identify post-translational modifications that can rescue regulatory imbalances. For example, cardiomyopathy-associated E62Q tropomyosin mutation weakens actin-tropomyosin interaction, but phosphorylation of neighboring S61 rescues the binding-deficit, results confirmed experimentally by in vitro motility assays. Unlike results on hyper-contractility-related mutants, landscapes for tropomyosin mutants tied to hypo-contractility do not present a straightforward picture. These mutations may affect other components of the regulatory network, e.g., troponin-tropomyosin signaling.

  18. Novel inherited mutations and variable expressivity of BRCA1 alleles, including the founder mutation 185delAG in Ashkenazi Jewish families

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, L.S.; Szabo, C.I.; Ostermeyer, E.A.

    1995-12-01

    Thirty-seven families with four or more cases of breast cancer or breast and ovarian cancer were analyzed for mutations in BRCA1. Twelve different germ-line mutations, four novel and eight previously observed, were detected in 16 families. Five families of Ashkenazi Jewish descent carried the 185delAG mutation and shared the same haplotype at eight polymorphic markers spanning {approximately}850 kb at BRCA1. Expressivity of 185delAG in these families varied, from early-onset bilateral breast cancer and ovarian cancer to late-onset breast cancer without ovarian cancer. Mutation 4184delTCAA occurred independently in two families. In one family, penetrance was complete, with females developing early-onset breast cancer or ovarian cancer and the male carrier developing prostatic cancer, whereas, in the other family, penetrance was incomplete and only breast cancer occurred, diagnosed at ages 38-81 years. Two novel nonsense mutations led to the loss of mutant BRCA1 transcript in families with 10 and 6 cases of early-onset breast cancer and ovarian cancer. A 665-nt segment of the BRCA1 3{prime}-UTR and 1.3 kb of genomic sequence including the putative promoter region were invariant by single-strand conformation analysis in 13 families without coding-sequence mutations. Overall in our series, BRCA1 mutations have been detected in 26 families: 16 with positive BRCA1 lod scores, 7 with negative lod scores (reflecting multiple sporadic breast cancers), and 3 not tested for linkage. Three other families have positive lod scores for linkage to BRCA2, but 13 families without detected BRCA1 mutations have negative lod scores for both BRCA1 and BRCA2. 57 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Variable phenotypes in a family with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy harboring a 3291T > C mutation in mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Sunami, Yoko; Sugaya, Keizo; Chihara, Norio; Goto, Yu-ichi; Matsubara, Shiro

    2011-10-01

    We present a Japanese family suffering from mitochondrial encephalomyopathy associated with a T-to-C transition at mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) nucleotide position 3291. Clinical manifestations of the patients include cerebellar ataxia with myopathy, recurrent headache, and myoclonus and epilepsy. The phenotypic variation among the affected members of a single family and the mutational analysis showing maternal inheritance in a heteroplasmic fashion are consistent with well-recognized phenomena associated with many pathogenic point mutations of mtDNA tRNA genes. The 3291 mutation is a rare mtDNA mutation whose clinical presentation had only been reported in three sporadic cases. This is the first report of a family segregating the 3291 mutation with multigenerational matrilinear recurrence of mitochondrial encephalopathy. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the pathogenicity of the 3291T > C mutation in mtDNA and its characteristic clinical heterogeneity.

  20. [Positive Activities Campaign.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This packet contains four pamphlets that are part of a campaign to encourage adults to provide and promote positive activities for youth and to serve as role models for young people. "Positive Activities: A Campaign for Youth" includes information on what positive activities are, how to get involved in helping to provide positive activities for…

  1. On Positive Functions with Positive Derivatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2002-01-01

    Three proofs are given for the fact that the derivative of an everywhere-positive non-constant real polynomial function must change sign. This self-contained note could find classroom use in courses on calculus or abstract algebra.

  2. Prevalence of an inherited cancer predisposition syndrome associated with the germ line TP53 R337H mutation in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Legal, Edith Falcon-de; Ascurra, Marta; Custódio, Gislaine; Ayala, Horacio Legal; Monteiro, Magna; Vega, Celeste; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Vega, Sonia; Sade, Elis R; Coelho, Izabel M M; Ribeiro, Enilze M S F; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Figueiredo, Bonald C

    2015-04-01

    The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer, and the germline TP53 R337H mutation is the most common mutation reported to date. However, this mutation is associated with a lower cumulative lifetime cancer risk than other mutations in the p53 DNA-binding domain. A detailed statistical analysis of 171,500 DNA tests in Brazilian neonates found that 0.27% of the general population is positive for this mutation, and some of the estimated 200,000 Brazilian R337H carriers in southern and southeastern Brazil have already developed cancer. The present study was designed to estimate R337H prevalence in neighboring Paraguay. To address this question, 10,000 dried blood samples stored in Guthrie cards since 2008 were randomly selected from the Paraguayan municipalities located at the border with Brazil. These samples were tested for R337H mutation using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. This germline mutation was detected in five samples (5/10,000), indicating that the total number of R337H carriers in Paraguay may be as high as 3500. Previous studies have shown that other countries (i.e., Portugal, Spain, and Germany) presented one family with this mutation, leading us to conclude that, besides Brazil and Paraguay, other countries may have multiple families carrying this mutation, which is an inherited syndrome that is difficult to control.

  3. Prevalence of an inherited cancer predisposition syndrome associated with the germ line TP53 R337H mutation in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Legal, Edith Falcon-de; Ascurra, Marta; Custódio, Gislaine; Ayala, Horacio Legal; Monteiro, Magna; Vega, Celeste; Fernández-Nestosa, María José; Vega, Sonia; Sade, Elis R; Coelho, Izabel M M; Ribeiro, Enilze M S F; Cavalli, Iglenir J; Figueiredo, Bonald C

    2015-04-01

    The tumor suppressor gene TP53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer, and the germline TP53 R337H mutation is the most common mutation reported to date. However, this mutation is associated with a lower cumulative lifetime cancer risk than other mutations in the p53 DNA-binding domain. A detailed statistical analysis of 171,500 DNA tests in Brazilian neonates found that 0.27% of the general population is positive for this mutation, and some of the estimated 200,000 Brazilian R337H carriers in southern and southeastern Brazil have already developed cancer. The present study was designed to estimate R337H prevalence in neighboring Paraguay. To address this question, 10,000 dried blood samples stored in Guthrie cards since 2008 were randomly selected from the Paraguayan municipalities located at the border with Brazil. These samples were tested for R337H mutation using the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. This germline mutation was detected in five samples (5/10,000), indicating that the total number of R337H carriers in Paraguay may be as high as 3500. Previous studies have shown that other countries (i.e., Portugal, Spain, and Germany) presented one family with this mutation, leading us to conclude that, besides Brazil and Paraguay, other countries may have multiple families carrying this mutation, which is an inherited syndrome that is difficult to control. PMID:25736369

  4. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  5. Sample positioning in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridharan, Govind (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Repulsion forces arising from laser beams are provided to produce mild positioning forces on a sample in microgravity vacuum environments. The system of the preferred embodiment positions samples using a plurality of pulsed lasers providing opposing repulsion forces. The lasers are positioned around the periphery of a confinement area and expanded to create a confinement zone. The grouped laser configuration, in coordination with position sensing devices, creates a feedback servo whereby stable position control of a sample within microgravity environment can be achieved.

  6. A comparison of ARMS and mutation specific IHC for common activating EGFR mutations analysis in small biopsy and cytology specimens of advanced non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Yueyue; Xu, Yinhong; Zhang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    We have compared mutation analysis by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant-specific antibodies for their ability to detect two common activating EGFR mutations in a cohort of 115 advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including cytology material, core biopsy, and bronchoscopic biopsies. Assessment of EGFR mutation status was performed by using antibodies and ARMS assay specific to the two major forms of mutant EGFR, exon 19 deletion E746-A750 (c.2235_2249del15 or c.2236_2250del15, p. Glu746_Ala750 del) and exon 21 L858R point mutation (c.2573T>G, p.Leu858Arg). In this study the optimal buffer for antigen retrieval was sodium citrate (pH 6.0). Q score was used to evaluate the specific mutant EGFR proteins expression. Validation using clinical material showed deletions in exon 19 were detected in 19.1% and L858R mutation in 20% of all cases by ARMS assay. A cutoff value of score 1 was used as positive by IHC. No wild type cases were immuno-reactive. The antibodies performed well in cytology, core biopsies and bronchoscopic biopsies. There were only one false positive case using L858R IHC (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.5%, positive predictive value 96%, negative predictive value 100%). All 23 E746-A750 exon 19 deletions identified by mutation analysis were positive by IHC. The sensitivity of exon 19 IHC for E746-A750 was 100%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 100%. The result of the IHC stains was finely correlated with mutations status determined by ARMS assay. Although inferior to molecular genetic analysis of the EGFR gene, IHC is highly specific and sensitive for the targeted EGFR mutations. The antibodies are likely to be of clinical value in cases especially where limited tumor material is available, or in situations where molecular genetic analysis is not readily available.

  7. Positional cloning reaches maturity.

    PubMed

    Nelson, D L

    1995-06-01

    The identification of genes involved in human genetic disease is no longer the province of those who would make a career of 'not finding' a gene. Developments from the human genome initiative have vastly facilitated the process of localizing genetic intervals segregating mutations, as well as that of obtaining the physical regents necessary for characterizing the region. In a few years' time, efforts aimed at the assignment of genes to the physical map, coupled with increasing quantities of sequence data from both cDNA and genomic sources, will provide numerous candidate genes for analysis, with consequences for the approaches used to define the gene and mutations(s) involved in the disease of interest. PMID:7549422

  8. Clinical investigation of EGFR mutation detection by pyrosequencing in lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    KIM, HEE JOUNG; OH, SEO YOUNG; KIM, WAN SEOP; KIM, SUN JONG; YOO, GWANG HA; KIM, WON DONG; LEE, KYE YOUNG

    2013-01-01

    Direct sequencing is the standard method for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in lung cancer, however, its relatively low sensitivity limits its clinical use. Pyrosequencing is a bioluminometric, real-time non-electrophoretic DNA sequencing technique with a number of advantages compared with direct sequencing, including higher sensitivity, speed, automation and cost-effectiveness. Clinical specimens from 202 lung cancer patients were analyzed for EGFR mutations in exons 18, 19, 20 and 21 using the pyrosequencing method following genomic DNA extraction from paraffin-embedded tissue specimens. All clinical data and tumor specimens were obtained from the Konkuk University Hospital (Korea) between July 2006 and December 2008. The results and clinical responses to EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) were compared. Overall, EGFR mutation-positive rate was 26.7% (54/202). Activating EGFR mutations were observed more frequently in female (52.1 vs. 13.0%), non-smoking (47.8 vs. 15.8%) and adenocarcinoma (35.2 vs. 5.2%) patients. However, significant numbers of EGFR mutation-positive patients were identified as male, former or current smokers and non-adenocarcinoma patients. The combinations of favorable clinicopathological factors, including female, non-smoking and adenocarcinoma, were not identified to significantly increase the positive EGFR mutation rate (female, 52.1%; female and non-smoker, 52.6%; female, non-smoker and adenocarcinoma, 51.9%). The present findings indicate that EGFR mutation analysis is a highly useful method for the prediction of response to EGFR-TKI and the use of favorable clinicopathological factors to perform this analysis is not suitable. Exon 19 deletion was the most common mutation (63.6%) and exon 21 L858R substitution was measured at 32.7%. The exon 20 T790M mutation was identified in 1 patient prior to EGFR-TKI treatment. EGFR mutation status is associated with response to EGFR-TKI and the overall

  9. Guanine Holes Are Prominent Targets for Mutation in Cancer and Inherited Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bacolla, Albino; Temiz, Nuri A.; Yi, Ming; Ivanic, Joseph; Cer, Regina Z.; Donohue, Duncan E.; Ball, Edward V.; Mudunuri, Uma S.; Wang, Guliang; Jain, Aklank; Volfovsky, Natalia; Luke, Brian T.; Stephens, Robert M.; Cooper, David N.; Collins, Jack R.; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2013-01-01

    Single base substitutions constitute the most frequent type of human gene mutation and are a leading cause of cancer and inherited disease. These alterations occur non-randomly in DNA, being strongly influenced by the local nucleotide sequence context. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such sequence context-dependent mutagenesis are not fully understood. Using bioinformatics, computational and molecular modeling analyses, we have determined the frequencies of mutation at G•C bp in the context of all 64 5′-NGNN-3′ motifs that contain the mutation at the second position. Twenty-four datasets were employed, comprising >530,000 somatic single base substitutions from 21 cancer genomes, >77,000 germline single-base substitutions causing or associated with human inherited disease and 16.7 million benign germline single-nucleotide variants. In several cancer types, the number of mutated motifs correlated both with the free energies of base stacking and the energies required for abstracting an electron from the target guanines (ionization potentials). Similar correlations were also evident for the pathological missense and nonsense germline mutations, but only when the target guanines were located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Likewise, pathogenic splicing mutations predominantly affected positions in which a purine was located on the non-transcribed DNA strand. Novel candidate driver mutations and tissue-specific mutational patterns were also identified in the cancer datasets. We conclude that electron transfer reactions within the DNA molecule contribute to sequence context-dependent mutagenesis, involving both somatic driver and passenger mutations in cancer, as well as germline alterations causing or associated with inherited disease. PMID:24086153

  10. Performance of computational tools in evaluating the functional impact of laboratory-induced amino acid mutations.

    PubMed

    Gray, Vanessa E; Kukurba, Kimberly R; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-08-15

    Site-directed mutagenesis is frequently used by scientists to investigate the functional impact of amino acid mutations in the laboratory. Over 10,000 such laboratory-induced mutations have been reported in the UniProt database along with the outcomes of functional assays. Here, we explore the performance of state-of-the-art computational tools (Condel, PolyPhen-2 and SIFT) in correctly annotating the function-altering potential of 10,913 laboratory-induced mutations from 2372 proteins. We find that computational tools are very successful in diagnosing laboratory-induced mutations that elicit significant functional change in the laboratory (up to 92% accuracy). But, these tools consistently fail in correctly annotating laboratory-induced mutations that show no functional impact in the laboratory assays. Therefore, the overall accuracy of computational tools for laboratory-induced mutations is much lower than that observed for the naturally occurring human variants. We tested and rejected the possibilities that the preponderance of changes to alanine and the presence of multiple base-pair mutations in the laboratory were the reasons for the observed discordance between the performance of computational tools for natural and laboratory mutations. Instead, we discover that the laboratory-induced mutations occur predominately at the highly conserved positions in proteins, where the computational tools have the lowest accuracy of correct prediction for variants that do not impact function (neutral). Therefore, the comparisons of experimental-profiling results with those from computational predictions need to be sensitive to the evolutionary conservation of the positions harboring the amino acid change. PMID:22685075

  11. TERT promoter hot spot mutations are frequent in Indian cervical and oral squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Vinothkumar, Vilvanathan; Arunkumar, Ganesan; Revathidevi, Sundaramoorthy; Arun, Kanagaraj; Manikandan, Mayakannan; Rao, Arunagiri Kuha Deva Magendhra; Rajkumar, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam; Ajay, Chandrasekar; Rajaraman, Ramamurthy; Ramani, Rajendren; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Munirajan, Arasambattu Kannan

    2016-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix and oral cavity are most common cancers in India. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) overexpression is one of the hallmarks for cancer, and activation through promoter mutation C228T and C250T has been reported in variety of tumors and often shown to be associated with aggressive tumors. In the present study, we analyzed these two hot spot mutations in 181 primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity by direct DNA sequencing and correlated with patient's clinicopathological characteristics. We found relatively high frequency of TERT hot spot mutations in both cervical [21.4 % (30/140)] and oral [31.7 % (13/41)] squamous cell carcinomas. In cervical cancer, TERT promoter mutations were more prevalent (25 %) in human papilloma virus (HPV)-negative cases compared to HPV-positive cases (20.6 %), and both TERT promoter mutation and HPV infection were more commonly observed in advanced stage tumors (77 %). Similarly, the poor and moderately differentiated tumors of the uterine cervix had both the TERT hot spot mutations and HPV (16 and 18) at higher frequency (95.7 %). Interestingly, we observed eight homozygous mutations (six 228TT and two 250TT) only in cervical tumors, and all of them were found to be positive for high-risk HPV. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study from India reporting high prevalence of TERT promoter mutations in primary tumors of the uterine cervix and oral cavity. Our results suggest that TERT reactivation through promoter mutation either alone or in association with the HPV oncogenes (E6 and E7) could play an important role in the carcinogenesis of cervical and oral cancers. PMID:26700669

  12. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  13. Structure-Based Analysis Reveals Cancer Missense Mutations Target Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Engin, H. Billur; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Carter, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that cancer mutations selectively target protein-protein interactions. We hypothesized that mutations affecting distinct protein interactions involving established cancer genes could contribute to tumor heterogeneity, and that novel mechanistic insights might be gained into tumorigenesis by investigating protein interactions under positive selection in cancer. To identify protein interactions under positive selection in cancer, we mapped over 1.2 million nonsynonymous somatic cancer mutations onto 4,896 experimentally determined protein structures and analyzed their spatial distribution. In total, 20% of mutations on the surface of known cancer genes perturbed protein-protein interactions (PPIs), and this enrichment for PPI interfaces was observed for both tumor suppressors (Odds Ratio 1.28, P-value < 10−4) and oncogenes (Odds Ratio 1.17, P-value < 10−3). To study this further, we constructed a bipartite network representing structurally resolved PPIs from all available human complexes in the Protein Data Bank (2,864 proteins, 3,072 PPIs). Analysis of frequently mutated cancer genes within this network revealed that tumor-suppressors, but not oncogenes, are significantly enriched with functional mutations in homo-oligomerization regions (Odds Ratio 3.68, P-Value < 10−8). We present two important examples, TP53 and beta-2-microglobulin, for which the patterns of somatic mutations at interfaces provide insights into specifically perturbed biological circuits. In patients with TP53 mutations, patient survival correlated with the specific interactions that were perturbed. Moreover, we investigated mutations at the interface of protein-nucleotide interactions and observed an unexpected number of missense mutations but not silent mutations occurring within DNA and RNA binding sites. Finally, we provide a resource of 3,072 PPI interfaces ranked according to their mutation rates. Analysis of this list highlights 282 novel candidate cancer

  14. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  15. Prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in unselected breast cancer patients from medellín, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Approximately 5% of all breast cancers can be attributed to a mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. The genetic component of breast cancer in Colombia has been, for the most part, studied on cases from the Bogota region. Five different founder mutations were in two studies of breast cancer patients in the Bogota region. It is important that the frequency of mutations be established among unselected cases of breast cancer of other regions of Colombia in order to estimate the genetic burden of this cancer in Colombia and to plan genetic services. The aim of this study was to establish the mutation frequencies of the BRCA genes in breast cancer patients unselected for family history or age, from Medellin, Colombia. Methods We enrolled 280 unselected women with breast cancer from a large public hospital in Medellin, Colombia. A detailed family history from each patient and a blood sample was obtained and processed for DNA analysis. Mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 were sought using a combination of techniques including a panel of recurrent Hispanic BRCA mutations which consists of fifty BRCA1 mutations and forty-six BRCA2 mutations, including the five recurrent Colombian BRCA mutations. All mutations were confirmed by direct sequencing. Results Genetic testing was successfully completed for 244 of the 280 cases (87%). Among the 244 cases, three deleterious mutations were identified (two in BRCA1 and one in BRCA2) representing 1.2% of the total. The average age of breast cancer in the mutation-positive cases was 34 years. The two BRCA1 mutations were known founder mutations (3450del4 in exon 11 and A1708E in exon 18). The BRCA2 mutation was in exon 11 (5844del5) and has not been previously reported in individuals of Colombian descent. Among the three mutation-positive families was a breast cancer family and two families with no history of breast or ovarian cancer. Conclusion The frequency of BRCA mutations in unselected breast cancer cases from the Medellin region

  16. Mutational and protein analysis of patients and heterozygous women with X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Feigenbaum, V.; Guidoux, S.; Aubourg, P.

    1996-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a neurodegenerative disorder associated with impaired {beta}-oxidation of very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA), is due to mutations in a gene encoding a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter (ALD protein [ALDP]). We analyzed the open reading frame of the ALD gene in 44 French ALD kindred by using SSCP or denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis and studied the effect of mutations on ALDP by immunocytofluorescence and western blotting of fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. Mutations were detected in 37 of 44 kindreds and were distributed over the whole protein-coding region, with the exception of the C terminus encoded in exon 10. Except for two mutations (delAG1801 and P560L) observed four times each, nearly every ALD family has a different mutation. Twenty-four of 37 mutations were missense mutations leading to amino acid changes located in or close to putative transmembrane segments (TMS 2, 3, 4, and 5), in the EAA-like motif and in the nucleotide fold of the ATP-binding domain of ALDP. Of 38 ALD patients tested, 27 (71%) lacked ALDP immunoreactivity in their fibroblasts and/or white blood cells. More than half of missense mutations studied (11 of 21) resulted in a complete lack of ALDP immunoreactivity, and six missense mutations resulted in decreased ALDP expression. The fibroblasts and/or white blood cells of 15 of 15 heterozygous carrier from ALD kindred with no ALDP showed a mixture of positive- and negative-ALDP immunoreactivity due to X-inactivation. Since 5%-15% of heterozygous women have normal VLCFA levels, the immunodetection of ALDP in white blood cells can be applicable in a majority of ALD kindred, to identify heterozygous women, particularly when the ALD gene mutation has not yet been identified. 35 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Stability junction at a common mutation site in the collagenous domain of the mannose binding lectin.

    PubMed

    Mohs, Angela; Li, Yingjie; Doss-Pepe, Ellen; Baum, Jean; Brodsky, Barbara

    2005-02-15

    Missense mutations in the collagen triple-helix that replace one of the required Gly residues in the (Gly-Xaa-Yaa)(n)() repeating sequence have been implicated in various disorders. Although most hereditary collagen disorders are rare, a common occurrence of a Gly replacement mutation is found in the collagenous domain of mannose binding lectin (MBL). A Gly --> Asp mutation at position 54 in MBL is found at a frequency as high as 30% in certain populations and leads to increased susceptibility to infections. The structural and energetic consequences of this mutation are investigated by comparing a triple-helical peptide containing the N-terminal Gly-X-Y units of MBL with the homologous peptide containing the Gly to Asp replacement. The mutation leads to a loss of triple-helix content but only a small decrease in the stability of the triple-helix (DeltaT(m) approximately 2 degrees C) and no change in the calorimetric enthalpy. NMR studies on specifically labeled residues indicate the portion of the peptide C-terminal to residue 54 is in a highly ordered triple-helix in both peptides, while residues N-terminal to the mutation site have a weak triple-helical signal in the parent peptide and are completely disordered in the mutant peptide. These results suggest that the N-terminal triplet residues are contributing little to the stability of this peptide, a hypothesis confirmed by the stability and enthalpy of shorter peptides containing only the region C-terminal to the mutation site. The Gly to Asp replacement at position 54 in MBL occurs at the boundary of a highly stable triple-helix region and a very unstable sequence. The junctional position of this mutation minimizes its destabilizing effect, in contrast with the significant destabilization seen for Gly replacements in peptides modeling collagen diseases.

  18. Isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 is mutated in inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma with low-grade tubuloglandular histology but not in sporadic intestinal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Douglas J; Binion, David; Regueiro, Miguel; Schraut, Wolfgang; Bahary, Nathan; Sun, Weijing; Nikiforova, Marina; Pai, Reetesh K

    2014-08-01

    The underlying molecular alterations in chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma remain largely unknown. Somatic IDH mutations are often seen in gliomas and myeloid leukemia but have also been recently reported in a subset of other neoplasms. We analyzed a series of intestinal adenocarcinomas with (n=23) and without (n=39) associated chronic idiopathic inflammatory bowel disease treated at our institution for IDH1 and IDH2 mutations and correlated the clinicopathologic findings with mutation status. Compared with intestinal adenocarcinomas not associated with inflammatory bowel disease, adenocarcinomas associated with inflammatory bowel disease more frequently demonstrated IDH mutations (13% vs. 0%, P=0.047). All IDH mutations were identified in IDH1 and resulted in substitution of arginine by cysteine at position 132 (p.R132C, c.394C>T). IDH1 mutations were frequently (66%) associated with concurrent KRAS mutations (p.G12D, c.35G>A). IDH1-mutated intestinal adenocarcinomas were seen in the setting of both Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis and were located in both the ileum and colon. Compared with IDH1-negative inflammatory bowel disease-associated adenocarcinoma, IDH1-positive adenocarcinomas more frequently demonstrated tubuloglandular histology (100% vs. 25%, P=0.032) and were more frequently associated with precursor lesions exhibiting serrated morphology (66% vs. 6%, P=0.034). IDH1 mutations were also identified in the precursor dysplastic lesions associated with IDH1-positive adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, we demonstrate that IDH1 mutations are occasionally identified in inflammatory bowel disease-associated intestinal adenocarcinoma but not in intestinal adenocarcinoma not associated with inflammatory bowel disease. In addition, IDH1-mutated intestinal adenocarcinoma is associated with a characteristic low-grade tubuloglandular histology and often harbors concurrent KRAS mutations. Identification of patients

  19. SIL1 mutations and clinical spectrum in patients with Marinesco-Sjogren syndrome.

    PubMed

    Krieger, Michael; Roos, Andreas; Stendel, Claudia; Claeys, Kristl G; Sonmez, Fatma Mujgan; Baudis, Michael; Bauer, Peter; Bornemann, Antje; de Goede, Christian; Dufke, Andreas; Finkel, Richard S; Goebel, Hans H; Häussler, Martin; Kingston, Helen; Kirschner, Janbernd; Medne, Livija; Muschke, Petra; Rivier, François; Rudnik-Schöneborn, Sabine; Spengler, Sabrina; Inzana, Francesca; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Synofzik, Matthis; Lia Taratuto, Ana; Pirra, Laura; Tay, Stacey Kiat-Hong; Topaloglu, Haluk; Uyanik, Gökhan; Wand, Dorothea; Williams, Denise; Zerres, Klaus; Weis, Joachim; Senderek, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disorder featuring cerebellar ataxia, early-onset cataracts, chronic myopathy, variable intellectual disability and delayed motor development. More recently, mutations in the SIL1 gene, which encodes an endoplasmic reticulum resident co-chaperone, were identified as the main cause of Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome. Here we describe the results of SIL1 mutation analysis in 62 patients presenting with early-onset ataxia, cataracts and myopathy or combinations of at least two of these. We obtained a mutation detection rate of 60% (15/25) among patients with the characteristic Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome triad (ataxia, cataracts, myopathy) whereas the detection rate in the group of patients with more variable phenotypic presentation was below 3% (1/37). We report 16 unrelated families with a total of 19 different SIL1 mutations. Among these mutations are 15 previously unreported changes, including single- and multi-exon deletions. Based on data from our screening cohort and data compiled from the literature we found that SIL1 mutations are invariably associated with the combination of a cerebellar syndrome and chronic myopathy. Cataracts were observed in all patients beyond the age of 7 years, but might be missing in infants. Six patients with SIL1 mutations had no intellectual disability, extending the known wide range of cognitive capabilities in Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome to include normal intelligence. Modestly constant features were somatic growth retardation, skeletal abnormalities and pyramidal tract signs. Examination of mutant SIL1 expression in cultured patient lymphoblasts suggested that SIL1 mutations result in severely reduced SIL1 protein levels irrespective of the type and position of mutations. Our data broaden the SIL1 mutation spectrum and confirm that SIL1 is the major Marinesco-Sjögren syndrome gene. SIL1 patients usually present with the characteristic triad but cataracts might be

  20. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-06-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics, allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relation to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy and schizophrenia provides strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on many factors, including recurrence, previous evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation in the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals and membership of the candidate gene in disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss thes