Science.gov

Sample records for pneumococcal invasive disease

  1. Seasonal Patterns of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wright, Carolyn; Rose, Charles E.; Schuchat, Anne

    2003-01-01

    Pneumococcal infections increase each winter, a phenomenon that has not been well explained. We conducted population-based active surveillance for all cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in seven states; plotted annualized weekly rates by geographic location, age, and latitude; and assessed correlations by time-series analysis. In all geographic areas, invasive pneumococcal disease exhibited a distinct winter seasonality, including an increase among children in the fall preceding that for adults and a sharp spike in incidence among adults each year between December 24 and January 7. Pneumococcal disease correlated inversely with temperature (r –0.82 with a 1-week lag; p<0.0001), but paradoxically the coldest states had the lowest rates, and no threshold temperature could be identified. The pattern of disease correlated directly with the sinusoidal variations in photoperiod (r +0.85 with a 5-week lag; p<0.0001). Seemingly unrelated seasonal phenomena were also somewhat correlated. The reproducible seasonal patterns in varied geographic locations are consistent with the hypothesis that nationwide seasonal changes such as photoperiod-dependent variation in host susceptibility may underlie pneumococcal seasonality, but caution is indicated in assigning causality as a result of such correlations. PMID:12737741

  2. Seasonal Variation in Penicillin Susceptibility and Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Pui-Ying Iroh; Madoff, Lawrence C.; O'Connell, Michael; Pelton, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated prospectively laboratory surveillance data from Massachusetts to investigate whether seasonal variation in invasive pneumococcal disease is associated with the proportion of penicillin susceptible isolates. The proportion of penicillin susceptible isolates associated with invasive pneumococcal disease varied by season, with proportions highest in the winter and lowest in the summer, and rates of invasive disease were highest in the autumn and winter seasons and lowest in the summer. PMID:25379834

  3. Incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in Scotland, 1988-99.

    PubMed Central

    Kyaw, M. H.; Clarke, S.; Jones, I. G.; Campbell, H.

    2002-01-01

    A review of the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in Scotland was carried out using data from laboratory-based systems during the period 1988-99. This comprised 5456 (90.8%) isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, 467 (7.8%) from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and 84 (1.4%) from other sterile sites. The mean annual incidence of invasive disease was 9.8/10(5) population (9.0/10(5) for bacteraemia and 0.8/10(5) for meningitis). Invasive disease was highest in children < 2 years of age and in the elderly > or = 65 years (44.9/10(5) and 28.4/10(5) population in these age groups respectively). The highest incidence of pneumococcal meningitis, 11.8/10(5) persons occurred in children < 2 years of age. Males had a higher incidence of pneumococcal bacteraemia and meningitis than females (male:female = 1.2:1 for bacteraemia (RR = 1.17, 95 % CI 1.11, 1.24) and 1.5:1 for meningitis (RR = 1.41, 95 % CI 1.18, 1.70)). Pneumococcal disease was highest in winter periods and coincided with influenza activity. The proportion of penicillin and erythromycin non-susceptible isolates increased from 4.2% in 1992 to 12.6% in 1999 and from 5.6% in 1994 to 16.3% in 1999 respectively. Our data confirm the substantial and increasing disease burden from pneumococcal disease and rise in prevalence of antibiotic non-susceptibility among pneumococci in Scotland. Continued surveillance of groups at increased risk for pneumococcal disease and the antibiotic susceptibility and serotype distribution of isolates are important to develop appropriate policies for the prevention of pneumococcal disease in Scotland. PMID:12002530

  4. Pneumococcal Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... pneumococcal disease. Quick Facts About Pneumococcal Disease and Vaccination According to WHO, pneumococcal pneumonia and meningitis are ... of antibiotic treatment. (9, 10, 11) Conjugate pneumococcal vaccination is safe and effective for preventing severe childhood ...

  5. The impact of 10-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on serotype 19A invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The circulation in the community of pneumococcal serotype 19A, a highly invasive and frequently extremely resistant pneumococcal strain, has increased the focus on methods to control its presence and effect. Two vaccines have been developed: the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) and the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). Available data indicate that PCV13 is highly effective in reducing the risk of serotype 19A invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in both vaccinated children and unvaccinated adults. Positive data have also been published for PCV10 that suggest that the conjugated serotype 19F included in the vaccine could evoke a cross-reactive antibody response with serotype 19A. However, a great number of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) cases are associated with serotypes not included in either of the vaccines, and preparation of a vaccine containing all the serotypes is unrealistic. Protein vaccines are the real future to definitively reduce the pneumococcal disease burden.

  6. Microarray Analysis of Pneumococcal Gene Expression during Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela, Carlos J.; Radin, Jana N.; Sublett, Jack E.; Gao, Geli; Kaushal, Deepak; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease. This is the first study to examine the expression of S. pneumoniae genes in vivo by using whole-genome microarrays available from The Institute for Genomic Research. Total RNA was collected from pneumococci isolated from infected blood, infected cerebrospinal fluid, and bacteria attached to a pharyngeal epithelial cell line in vitro. Microarray analysis of pneumococcal genes expressed in these models identified body site-specific patterns of expression for virulence factors, transporters, transcription factors, translation-associated proteins, metabolism, and genes with unknown function. Contributions to virulence predicted for several unknown genes with enhanced expression in vivo were confirmed by insertion duplication mutagenesis and challenge of mice with the mutants. Finally, we cross-referenced our results with previous studies that used signature-tagged mutagenesis and differential fluorescence induction to identify genes that are potentially required by a broad range of pneumococcal strains for invasive disease. PMID:15385455

  7. Pneumococcal Serotypes and Mortality following Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Harboe, Zitta B.; Thomsen, Reimar W.; Riis, Anders; Valentiner-Branth, Palle; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Lambertsen, Lotte; Krogfelt, Karen A.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Benfield, Thomas L.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between specific pneumococcal serotypes and mortality from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Methods and Findings In a nationwide population-based cohort study of IPD in Denmark during 1977–2007, 30-d mortality associated with pneumococcal serotypes was examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis after controlling for potential confounders. A total of 18,858 IPD patients were included. Overall 30-d mortality was 18%, and 3% in children younger than age 5 y. Age, male sex, meningitis, high comorbidity level, alcoholism, and early decade of diagnosis were significantly associated with mortality. Among individuals aged 5 y and older, serotypes 31, 11A, 35F, 17F, 3, 16F, 19F, 15B, and 10A were associated with highly increased mortality as compared with serotype 1 (all: adjusted odds ratio ≥3, p<0.001). In children younger than 5 y, associations between serotypes and mortality were different than in adults but statistical precision was limited because of low overall childhood-related mortality. Conclusions Specific pneumococcal serotypes strongly and independently affect IPD associated mortality. PMID:19468297

  8. Invasive pneumococcal disease in England and Wales: vaccination implications.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, K; Knox, K; George, R; Miller, E; Waight, P; Griffiths, D; Efstratiou, A; Broughton, K; Mayon-White, R T; Moxon, E R; Crook, D W

    2001-01-15

    Knowledge of the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) will aid in planning the use of pneumococcal vaccines. A United Kingdom (UK)-based surveillance in England and Wales (1995-1997) of 11,528 individuals with IPD and a local enhanced surveillance in the Oxford (UK) area (1995-1999) have been analyzed. IPD has a high attack rate in children, with 37.1-48.1 cases per 100,000 infants <1 year old per year, and in older persons, with 21.2-36.2 cases per 100,000 persons >65 years old per year, for England, Wales, and Oxford. The 7-valent conjugate vaccine includes serotypes causing < or =79% of IPD in children <5 years old, but only 66% in adults >65 years old. The data also indicate that IPD varies by serotype, age, and country, emphasizing that the epidemiology of IPD is heterogeneous and requires continued surveillance. PMID:11120930

  9. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Australia, 2011 and 2012.

    PubMed

    Toms, Cindy; de Kluyver, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    In Australia, there were 1,883 cases (8.3 per 100,000 population) of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) notified to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS) in 2011 and 1,823 cases (8.0 per 100,000) in 2012. The overall rate of IPD in Indigenous Australians was 9 times the rate of IPD in non-Indigenous Australians in 2011 and 7 times in 2012. Following the July 2011 introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (13vPCV) to the National Immunisation Program, rates of IPD in children aged less than 5 years decreased from 19.5 per 100,000 in 2011 to 12.6 per 100,000 in 2012. In Indigenous adults aged 50 years or over the rates of IPD caused by serotypes included in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (23vPPV) continued to increase in both 2011 (47.2 per 100,000) and 2012 (51.2 per 100,000). The rates of IPD in non-Indigenous adults aged 65 years or over caused by serotypes included in the 23vPPV also increased in 2011 (10.1 per 100,000) and 2012 (11.2 per 100,000). There were 134 deaths attributable to IPD in 2011 and 126 in 2012, although it should be noted that deaths may be under-reported. The number of invasive pneumococcal isolates with reduced penicillin susceptibility remained low and reduced susceptibility to ceftriaxone/cefotaxime continued to be rare. PMID:27522138

  10. Clinical and bacteriological characteristics of invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine implementation in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Leite, Carolina Regis; Azevedo, Jailton; Galvão, Vivian Santos; Moreno-Carvalho, Otávio; Reis, Joice Neves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a relevant public health problem in Brazil, especially among children and the elderly. In July/2010 a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was introduced to the immunization schedule of Brazilian children under two years of age. Between July/2010 and December/2013 we conducted a case-series study on invasive pneumococcal disease in Salvador, Brazil to describe the clinical and bacteriological profile of invasive pneumococcal disease cases during the post-implementation period. Eighty-two cases were eligible. Mean age was 31 years (interquartile range, 3-42); 17.1% and 30.5% were under 2 years and 5 years, respectively. Pneumococcal meningitis (n=64, 78.1%), bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (n=12, 14.6%) and bacteraemia (n=6, 7.3%) were the clinical syndromes identified. Thirty-three different serotypes were found. Of these, serotype 14 (n=12, 14.6%) was the most common, followed by 23F (n=10, 12.2%), 12F (n=8, 9.8%), 18C (n=5, 6.1%) and 6B (n=5, 6.1%). Investigations conducted in Salvador in the pre-vaccine period did not identify serotype 12F as one of the most prevalent serotypes. Increase of serotype 12F was observed in different regions of Brazil, in the post-vaccine period. Among children under two years of age, the target group for 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, 11 (78.6%) of the 14 isolated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae belonged to vaccine serotypes; at least 50% of these children were not vaccinated. The relatively recent implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Brazil reinforces the need to maintain an active surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease cases, considering the possible increase of invasive pneumococcal disease cases related to non-vaccine serotypes and the changes on the clinical presentation of the disease. PMID:26706019

  11. Clinical and bacteriological characteristics of invasive pneumococcal disease after pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine implementation in Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Leite, Carolina Regis; Azevedo, Jailton; Galvão, Vivian Santos; Moreno-Carvalho, Otávio; Reis, Joice Neves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease is a relevant public health problem in Brazil, especially among children and the elderly. In July/2010 a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was introduced to the immunization schedule of Brazilian children under two years of age. Between July/2010 and December/2013 we conducted a case-series study on invasive pneumococcal disease in Salvador, Brazil to describe the clinical and bacteriological profile of invasive pneumococcal disease cases during the post-implementation period. Eighty-two cases were eligible. Mean age was 31 years (interquartile range, 3-42); 17.1% and 30.5% were under 2 years and 5 years, respectively. Pneumococcal meningitis (n=64, 78.1%), bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia (n=12, 14.6%) and bacteraemia (n=6, 7.3%) were the clinical syndromes identified. Thirty-three different serotypes were found. Of these, serotype 14 (n=12, 14.6%) was the most common, followed by 23F (n=10, 12.2%), 12F (n=8, 9.8%), 18C (n=5, 6.1%) and 6B (n=5, 6.1%). Investigations conducted in Salvador in the pre-vaccine period did not identify serotype 12F as one of the most prevalent serotypes. Increase of serotype 12F was observed in different regions of Brazil, in the post-vaccine period. Among children under two years of age, the target group for 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, 11 (78.6%) of the 14 isolated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae belonged to vaccine serotypes; at least 50% of these children were not vaccinated. The relatively recent implementation of 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Brazil reinforces the need to maintain an active surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease cases, considering the possible increase of invasive pneumococcal disease cases related to non-vaccine serotypes and the changes on the clinical presentation of the disease.

  12. Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children Can Reveal a Primary Immunodeficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gaschignard, Jean; Levy, Corinne; Chrabieh, Maya; Boisson, Bertrand; Bost-Bru, Cécile; Dauger, Stéphane; Dubos, François; Durand, Philippe; Gaudelus, Joël; Gendrel, Dominique; Gras Le Guen, Christèle; Grimprel, Emmanuel; Guyon, Gaël; Jeudy, Catherine; Jeziorski, Eric; Leclerc, Francis; Léger, Pierre-Louis; Lesage, Fabrice; Lorrot, Mathie; Pellier, Isabelle; Pinquier, Didier; de Pontual, Loïc; Sachs, Philippe; Thomas, Caroline; Tissières, Pierre; Valla, Frédéric V.; Desprez, Philippe; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Varon, Emmanuelle; Bossuyt, Xavier; Cohen, Robert; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Puel, Anne; Picard, Capucine

    2014-01-01

    Background. About 10% of pediatric patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) die from the disease. Some primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) are known to confer predisposition to IPD. However, a systematic search for these PIDs has never been carried out in children presenting with IPD. Methods. We prospectively identified pediatric cases of IPD requiring hospitalization between 2005 and 2011 in 28 pediatric wards throughout France. IPD was defined as a positive pneumococcal culture, polymerase chain reaction result, and/or soluble antigen detection at a normally sterile site. The immunological assessment included abdominal ultrasound, whole-blood counts and smears, determinations of plasma immunoglobulin and complement levels, and the evaluation of proinflammatory cytokines. Results. We included 163 children with IPD (male-to-female ratio, 1.3; median age, 13 months). Seventeen children had recurrent IPD. Meningitis was the most frequent type of infection (87%); other infections included pleuropneumonitis, isolated bloodstream infection, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, and mastoiditis. One patient with recurrent meningitis had a congenital cerebrospinal fluid fistula. The results of immunological explorations were abnormal in 26 children (16%), and a PID was identified in 17 patients (10%), including 1 case of MyD88 deficiency, 3 of complement fraction C2 or C3 deficiencies, 1 of isolated congenital asplenia, and 2 of Bruton disease (X-linked agammaglobulinemia). The proportion of PIDs was much higher in children aged >2 years than in younger children (26% vs 3%; P < .001). Conclusions. Children with IPD should undergo immunological investigations, particularly those aged >2 years, as PIDs may be discovered in up to 26% of cases. PMID:24759830

  13. New approaches to estimating national rates of invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Costa, Marcelo A; Huang, Susan S; Moore, Matthew; Kulldorff, Martin; Finkelstein, Jonathan A

    2011-07-15

    National infectious disease incidence rates are often estimated by standardizing locally derived rates using national-level age and race distributions. Data on other factors potentially associated with incidence are often not available in the form of patient-level covariates. Including characteristics of patients' area of residence may improve the accuracy of national estimates. The authors used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Active Bacterial Core Surveillance program (2004-2005), adjusted for census-based variables, to estimate the national incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). The authors tested Poisson and negative binomial models in a cross-validation procedure to select variables best predicting the incidence of IPD in each county. Including census-level information on race and educational attainment improved the fit of both Poisson and negative binomial models beyond that achieved by adjusting for other census variables or by adjusting for an individual's race and age alone. The Poisson model with census-based predictors led to a national estimate of IPD of 16.0 cases per 100,000 persons as compared with 13.5 per 100,000 persons using an individual's age and race alone. Accuracy of, and confidence intervals for, these estimates can only be determined by obtaining data from other randomly selected US counties. However, incorporating census-derived characteristics should be considered when estimating national incidence of IPD and other diseases.

  14. Racial and Regional Differences in Rates of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    de St Maurice, Annabelle; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Fonnesbeck, Christopher; Schaffner, William

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) remains an important cause of illness in US children. We assessed the impact of introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) on pediatric IPD rates, as well as changes in racial and regional differences in IPD, in Tennessee. METHODS: Data from active laboratory and population-based surveillance of IPD were used to compare IPD rates in the early-PCV7 (2001–2004), late-PCV7 (2005–2009), and post-PCV13 (2011–2012) eras. IPD rates were further stratified according to age, race, and region (east and middle-west TN). RESULTS: Among children aged <2 years, IPD rates declined by 70% from 67 to 19 per 100 000 person-years in the early-PCV7 era and post-PCV13 era, respectively. Similar decreasing trends in IPD rates were observed in older children aged 2 to 4 years and 5 to 17 years. In the late-PCV7 era, IPD rates in children aged <2 years were higher in black children compared with white children (70 vs 43 per 100 000 person-years); however, these racial differences in IPD rates were no longer significant after PCV13 introduction. Before PCV13, IPD rates in children aged <2 years were also higher in east Tennessee compared with middle-west Tennessee (91 vs 45 per 100 000 person-years), but these differences were no longer significant in the post-PCV13 era. CONCLUSIONS: PCV13 introduction led to substantial declines in childhood IPD rates and was associated with reduced regional and racial differences in IPD rates in Tennessee. PMID:26459652

  15. Increase in Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Infections in Children with Sickle Cell Disease since Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Licensure

    PubMed Central

    McCavit, Timothy L.; Quinn, Charles T.; Techasaensiri, Chonnamet; Rogers, Zora R.

    2010-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) has decreased with prophylactic penicillin, pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and pneumococcal protein-conjugate vaccine (PCV7) usage. We report 10 IPD cases since PCV7 licensure, including a recent surge of non-vaccine serotypes. IPD continues to be a serious risk in SCD. PMID:21193205

  16. Cigarette Smoke Attenuates the Nasal Host Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Predisposes to Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pamela; Morissette, Mathieu C.; Vanderstocken, Gilles; Gao, Yang; Hassan, Muhammad; Roos, Abraham; Thayaparan, Danya; Merlano, Maria; Dorrington, Michael G.; Nikota, Jake K.; Bauer, Carla M. T.; Kwiecien, Jacek M.; Labiris, Renee; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.; Stevenson, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial infections, with nasal colonization an important first step in disease. While cigarette smoking is a strong risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This is partly due to a lack of clinically relevant animal models investigating nasal pneumococcal colonization in the context of cigarette smoke exposure. We present a model of nasal pneumococcal colonization in cigarette smoke-exposed mice and document, for the first time, that cigarette smoke predisposes to invasive pneumococcal infection and mortality in an animal model. Cigarette smoke increased the risk of bacteremia and meningitis without prior lung infection. Mechanistically, deficiency in interleukin 1α (IL-1α) or platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), an important host receptor thought to bind and facilitate pneumococcal invasiveness, did not rescue cigarette smoke-exposed mice from invasive pneumococcal disease. Importantly, we observed cigarette smoke to attenuate nasal inflammatory mediator expression, particularly that of neutrophil-recruiting chemokines, normally elicited by pneumococcal colonization. Smoking cessation during nasal pneumococcal colonization rescued nasal neutrophil recruitment and prevented invasive disease in mice. We propose that cigarette smoke predisposes to invasive pneumococcal disease by suppressing inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory tract. Given that smoking prevalence remains high worldwide, these findings are relevant to the continued efforts to reduce the invasive pneumococcal disease burden. PMID:26930709

  17. Invasive pneumococcal disease in patients with haematological malignancies before routine use of conjugate vaccines in Finland.

    PubMed

    Lindström, Vesa; Aittoniemi, Janne; Lyytikäinen, Outi; Klemets, Peter; Ollgren, Jukka; Silvennoinen, Raija; Nuorti, J Pekka; Sinisalo, Marjatta

    2016-01-01

    The baseline national invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence rate, serotype distribution and serotype coverage of pneumococcal vaccines were evaluated in patients with Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, myeloma and leukaemia within 1 year after haematological diagnosis during 1995-2002, before introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Pneumococcal serotype distribution among these patients was different from serotypes causing IPD in the general population. The serotype coverages of PCV13 and PPSV23 were 57% and 64%, respectively, lower than in the general population. This reflects a higher predisposition to IPD in vaccinated patients with haematological malignancies and possibly less benefit of herd immunity gained with the wide use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in the general population. This data will be useful as a baseline for determining the future role of adult PCV vaccination in these patient groups.

  18. Risk factors for invasive pneumococcal disease among Navajo adults.

    PubMed

    Watt, James P; O'Brien, Katherine L; Benin, Andrea L; McCoy, Sandra I; Donaldson, Connie M; Reid, Raymond; Schuchat, Anne; Zell, Elizabeth R; Hochman, Michael; Santosham, Mathuram; Whitney, Cynthia G

    2007-11-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is 3-5 times more common among Navajo adults than in the general US population. The authors conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for IPD among Navajo adults. Navajos aged > or =18 years with IPD were identified through prospective, population-based active laboratory surveillance (December 1999-February 2002). Controls matched to cases on age, gender, and neighborhood were selected. Risk factors were identified through structured interviews and medical record reviews. The authors conducted a matched analysis based on 118 cases and 353 controls. Risk factors included in the final multivariable analysis were chronic renal failure (odds ratio (OR) = 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.9, 7.7), congestive heart failure (OR = 5.6, 95% CI: 2.2, 14.5), self-reported alcohol use or alcoholism (OR = 2.9, 95% CI: 1.5, 5.4), body mass index (weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) <5th (OR = 3.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 10.6) or >95th (OR = 2.8, 95% CI: 1.0, 8.0) percentile, and unemployment (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 1.2, 5.5). The population attributable fractions were 10% for chronic renal failure, 18% for congestive heart failure, 30% for self-reported alcohol use or alcoholism, 6% for body mass index, and 20% for unemployment. Several modifiable risk factors for IPD in Navajos were identified. The high prevalence of renal failure, alcoholism, and unemployment among Navajo adults compared with the general US population may explain some of their increased risk of IPD. PMID:17693393

  19. Overview of the disease burden of invasive pneumococcal disease in Asia.

    PubMed

    Bravo, L C

    2009-12-01

    This paper represents a collaborative effort by the Asian Strategic Alliance for Pneumococcal Disease Prevention (ASAP) Working Group to collate data on the disease burden due to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in participating Asian countries and territories; namely, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Korea, Macau, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan and Thailand. A review of both published and unpublished data revealed that the incidence of IPD in some countries is well documented by way of large, long-duration studies, while in other countries, much of the available data have been extrapolated from international studies or have come from small population studies of limited geographical coverage. This paper confirms that data regarding the incidence of IPD in Asia are grossly lacking and reinforces the need for urgent and more substantial studies. PMID:19393708

  20. Clinical Implications of Pneumococcal Serotypes: Invasive Disease Potential, Clinical Presentations, and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nahm, Moon H.; Moseley, M. Allen

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae can asymptomatically colonize the nasopharynx and cause a diverse range of illnesses. This clinical spectrum from colonization to invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) appears to depend on the pneumococcal capsular serotype rather than the genetic background. According to a literature review, serotypes 1, 4, 5, 7F, 8, 12F, 14, 18C, and 19A are more likely to cause IPD. Although serotypes 1 and 19A are the predominant causes of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia, serotype 14 remains one of the most common etiologic agents of non-bacteremic pneumonia in adults, even after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction. Serotypes 1, 3, and 19A pneumococci are likely to cause empyema and hemolytic uremic syndrome. Serotype 1 pneumococcal meningitis is prevalent in the African meningitis belt, with a high fatality rate. In contrast to the capsule type, genotype is more closely associated with antibiotic resistance. CC320/271 strains expressing serotype 19A are multidrug-resistant (MDR) and prevalent worldwide in the era of PCV7. Several clones of MDR serotype 6C pneumococci emerged, and a MDR 6D clone (ST282) has been identified in Korea. Since the pneumococcal epidemiology of capsule types varies geographically and temporally, a nationwide serosurveillance system is vital to establishing appropriate vaccination strategies for each country. PMID:23341706

  1. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis and antibiotic nonsusceptibility in invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Soeters, Heidi M; von Gottberg, Anne; Cohen, Cheryl; Quan, Vanessa; Klugman, Keith P

    2012-03-01

    Among 5,043 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) isolates identified through South African national surveillance from 2003 to 2007, we estimated the effect of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) prophylaxis on antimicrobial resistance. Patients on TMP-SMX prophylaxis were more likely to have a pneumococcal isolate nonsusceptible to TMP-SMX, penicillin, and rifampin. TMP-SMX nonsusceptibility was associated with nonsusceptibility to penicillin, erythromycin, and rifampin and multidrug resistance. This study informs empirical treatment of suspected IPD in patients with a history of TMP-SMX use. PMID:22232291

  2. Prediction of serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease in unvaccinated and vaccinated populations

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Daniel M.; Harboe, Zitta B.; Flasche, Stefan; Scott, J. Anthony; Lipsitch, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Before the introduction of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (Prevnar-7), the relative prevalence of serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae was fairly stable worldwide. We sought to develop a statistical tool to predict the relative frequency of different serotypes among disease isolates in the pre- and post-Prevnar-7 eras using the limited amount of data that is widely available. Methods We initially used pre-Prevnar-7 carriage prevalence and estimates of invasiveness derived from case-fatality data as predictors for the relative abundance of serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease during the pre- and post-Prevnar-7 eras, using negative binomial regression. We fit the model to pre-Prevnar-7 invasive pneumococcal disease data from England and Wales and used these data to (1) evaluate the performance of the model using several datasets and (2) evaluate the utility of the country-specific carriage data. We then fit an alternative model that used polysaccharide structure, a correlate of prevalence that does not require country-specific information and could be useful in determining the post-vaccine population structure, as a predictor. Results Predictions from the initial model fit data from several pediatric populations in the pre-Prevnar-7 era. Following the introduction of Prevnar-7, the model still had a good negative predictive value, though substantial unexplained variation remained. The alternative model had a good negative predictive value but poor positive predictive value. Both models demonstrate that the pneumococcal population follows a somewhat predictable pattern even after vaccination. Conclusions This approach provides a preliminary framework to evaluate the potential patterns and impact of serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:21646962

  3. The economic burden of childhood invasive pneumococcal diseases and pneumonia in Taiwan: Implications for a pneumococcal vaccination program.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Chien; Lee, Pei-Lun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Shiou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumonia are the major causes of morbidity and deaths in children in the world. The management of IPD and pneumonia is an important economic burden on healthcare systems and families. The aim of this study was to assess the economic burden of IPD and pneumonia among younger children in Taiwan. We used a cost-illness approach to identify the cost categories for analysis in this study according to various perspectives. We obtained data of admission, outpatient, and emergency department visit data from the National Health Insurance Research (NHIR) database for children <5 y of age between January 2008 and December 2008. A prospective survey was administered to the families of patients to obtain detailed personal costs. All costs are presented in US dollars and were estimated by extrapolating 2008 cost data to 2013 price levels. We estimated the number of pneumococcal disease cases that were averted if the PCV-13 vaccine had been available in 2008. The total annual social and hospital costs for IPD were US $4.3 million and US $926,000, respectively. The total annual social and hospital costs for pneumonia were US $150 million and US $17 million, respectively. On average, families spent US $653 or US $218 when their child was diagnosed with IPD or pneumonia, respectively. This cost is approximately 27%-81% of the monthly salary of an unskilled worker. In conclusion, a safe and effective pediatric pneumococcal vaccine is needed to reduce the economic burden caused by pneumococcal infection. PMID:25874476

  4. The economic burden of childhood invasive pneumococcal diseases and pneumonia in Taiwan: Implications for a pneumococcal vaccination program

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yi-Chien; Lee, Pei-Lun; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Chen, Shiou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pneumonia are the major causes of morbidity and deaths in children in the world. The management of IPD and pneumonia is an important economic burden on healthcare systems and families. The aim of this study was to assess the economic burden of IPD and pneumonia among younger children in Taiwan. We used a cost-illness approach to identify the cost categories for analysis in this study according to various perspectives. We obtained data of admission, outpatient, and emergency department visit data from the National Health Insurance Research (NHIR) database for children <5 y of age between January 2008 and December 2008. A prospective survey was administered to the families of patients to obtain detailed personal costs. All costs are presented in US dollars and were estimated by extrapolating 2008 cost data to 2013 price levels. We estimated the number of pneumococcal disease cases that were averted if the PCV-13 vaccine had been available in 2008. The total annual social and hospital costs for IPD were US $4.3 million and US $926,000, respectively. The total annual social and hospital costs for pneumonia were US $150 million and US $17 million, respectively. On average, families spent US $653 or US $218 when their child was diagnosed with IPD or pneumonia, respectively. This cost is approximately 27%–81% of the monthly salary of an unskilled worker. In conclusion, a safe and effective pediatric pneumococcal vaccine is needed to reduce the economic burden caused by pneumococcal infection. PMID:25874476

  5. Identifying host genetic risk factors in the context of public health surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Lingappa, Jairam R; Dumitrescu, Logan; Zimmer, Shanta M; Lynfield, Ruth; McNicholl, Janet M; Messonnier, Nancy E; Whitney, Cynthia G; Crawford, Dana C

    2011-01-01

    Host genetic factors that modify risk of pneumococcal disease may help target future public health interventions to individuals at highest risk of disease. We linked data from population-based surveillance for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with state-based newborn dried bloodspot repositories to identify biological samples from individuals who developed invasive pneumococcal disease. Genomic DNA was extracted from 366 case and 732 anonymous control samples. TagSNPs were selected in 34 candidate genes thought to be associated with host response to invasive pneumococcal disease, and a total of 326 variants were successfully genotyped. Among 543 European Americans (EA) (182 cases and 361 controls), and 166 African Americans (AA) (53 cases and 113 controls), common variants in surfactant protein D (SFTPD) are consistently underrepresented in IPD. SFTPD variants with the strongest association for IPD are intronic rs17886286 (allelic OR 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.25, 0.82], with p = 0.007) in EA and 5' flanking rs12219080 (allelic OR 0.32, 95%CI [0.13, 0.78], with p = 0.009) in AA. Variants in CD46 and IL1R1 are also associated with IPD in both EA and AA, but with effects in different directions; FAS, IL1B, IL4, IL10, IL12B, SFTPA1, SFTPB, and PTAFR variants are associated (p≤0.05) with IPD in EA or AA. We conclude that variants in SFTPD may protect against IPD in EA and AA and genetic variation in other host response pathways may also contribute to risk of IPD. While our associations are not corrected for multiple comparisons and therefore must be replicated in additional cohorts, this pilot study underscores the feasibility of integrating public health surveillance with existing, prospectively collected, newborn dried blood spot repositories to identify host genetic factors associated with infectious diseases.

  6. Serotype 5 Pneumococci Causing Invasive Pneumococcal Disease Outbreaks in Barcelona, Spain (1997 to 2011)

    PubMed Central

    Rolo, Dora; Fenoll, Asunción; Fontanals, Dionísia; Larrosa, Nieves; Giménez, Montserrat; Grau, Immaculada; Pallarés, Román; Liñares, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the clinical and molecular epidemiology of invasive serotype 5 (Ser5) pneumococcal isolates in four teaching hospitals in the Barcelona, Spain, area (from 1997 to 2011). Among 5,093 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected, 134 (2.6%) Ser5 isolates were detected. Although the overall incidence of Ser5-related invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was low (0.25 cases/100,000 inhabitants), three incidence peaks were detected: 0.63/100,000 in 1999, 1.15/100,000 in 2005, and 0.37/100,000 in 2009. The rates of Ser5 IPD were higher among young adults (18 to 64 years old) and older adults (>64 years old) in the first two peaks, whereas they were higher among children in 2009. The majority (88.8%) of the patients presented with pneumonia. Comorbid conditions were present in young adults (47.6%) and older adults (78.7%), the most common comorbid conditions being chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (20.6% and 38.3%, respectively) and cardiovascular diseases (11.1% and 38.3%, respectively). The mortality rates were higher among older adults (8.5%). All Ser5 pneumococci tested were fully susceptible to penicillin, cefotaxime, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. The resistance rates were 48.5% for co-trimoxazole, 6.7% for chloramphenicol, and 6% for tetracycline. Two major related sequence types (STs), ST1223 (n = 65) and ST289 (n = 61), were detected. The Colombia5-ST289 clone was responsible for all the cases in the Ser5 outbreak in 1999, whereas the ST1223 clone accounted for 73.8% and 61.5% of the isolates in 2005 and 2009, respectively. Ser5 pneumococci are a frequent cause of IPD outbreaks in the community and involve children and adults with or without comorbidities. The implementation of the new pneumococcal conjugated vaccines (PCV10 and PCV13) might prevent such outbreaks. PMID:23966486

  7. Minimum incidence of adult invasive pneumococcal disease in Blantyre, Malawi an urban african setting: a hospital based prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Mtunthama, Neema; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old) population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 53.7, 62.7) per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7) mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5) per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9). We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population level indirect

  8. Minimum Incidence of Adult Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Blantyre, Malawi an Urban African Setting: A Hospital Based Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Mtunthama, Neema; Gordon, Stephen B; Mwafulirwa, Gershom; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pneumococcal disease causes substantial morbidity and mortality in Africa. Evaluating population level indirect impact on adult disease of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programmes in infants requires baseline population incidence rates but these are often lacking in areas with limited disease surveillance. We used hospital based blood culture and cerebrospinal fluid surveillance to calculate minimal incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease in the adult (≥15 years old) population of Blantyre, a rapidly growing urban centre in southern Malawi, in the period preceding vaccine introduction. Invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in Blantyre district was high, mean 58.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 53.7, 62.7) per 100,000 person years and peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 108.8 (95%CI: 89.0, 131.7) mirroring the population age prevalence of HIV infection. For pneumococcal bacteraemia in urban Blantyre, mean incidence was 60.6 (95% CI: 55.2, 66.5) per 100,000 person years, peaking among 35 to 40 year olds at 114.8 (95%CI: 90.3, 143.9). We suspected that our surveillance may under-ascertain the true burden of disease, so we used location data from bacteraemic subjects and projected population estimates to calculate local sub-district incidence, then examined the impact of community level socio-demographic covariates as possible predictors of local sub-district incidence of pneumococcal and non-pneumococcal pathogenic bacteraemia. Geographic heterogeneity in incidence was marked with localised hotspots but ward level covariates apart from prison were not associated with pneumococcal bacteraemia incidence. Modelling suggests that the current sentinel surveillance system under-ascertains the true burden of disease. We outline a number of challenges to surveillance for pneumococcal disease in our low-resource setting. Subsequent surveillance in the vaccine era will have to account for geographic heterogeneity when evaluating population level indirect

  9. Effects of Infant Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination on Serotype Distribution in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease among Children and Adults in Germany.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Mark; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Perniciaro, Stephanie; Imöhl, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the effects of the introduction of universal infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in 2006 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children and adults in Germany with a focus on the dynamics of serotype distribution in vaccinated and non-vaccinated age groups. Over a period of 22 years (1992-2014), microbiological diagnostic laboratories from all over Germany have been sending isolates of IPD cases to the German National Reference Center for Streptococci on a voluntary basis. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were serotyped using Neufeld's Quellung method. Among children <16 years, the proportion of PCV7 serotypes among isolates from IPD cases decreased from 61.8% before vaccination (1997-2006) to 23.5% in the early vaccination period (2007-2010; p = 1.30E-72) and sank further to 5.2% in the late vaccination period (2010-2014; p = 4.59E-25). Similar reductions were seen for the separate age groups <2 years, 2-4 years and 5-15 years. Among adults, the proportion of PCV7 serotypes decreased from 43.4% in the pre-vaccination period (1992-2006) to 24.7% (p = 3.78E-88) in the early vaccination period and 8.2% (p = 5.97E-161) in the late vaccination period. Both among children and among adults, the non-PCV7 serotypes 1, 3, 7F and 19A significantly increased in the early vaccination period. After the switch from PCV7 to PVC10/PCV13 for infant vaccination in 2010, serotypes 1, 6A and 7F significantly decreased. A decrease in serotype 19A was only observed in 2013-2014, as compared to 2010-2011 (children p = 4.16E-04, adults p = 6.98E-06). Among adults, serotype 3, which strongly increased in the early vaccination period (p = 4.44E-15), remained at a constant proportion in the late vaccination period. The proportion of non-PCV13 vaccine serotypes increased over the whole vaccination period, with serotypes 10A, 12F, 23B, 24F and 38 most significantly increasing among children and serotypes 6C, 12F, 15A, 22F and 23B increasing among adults. Eight

  10. Effects of Infant Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination on Serotype Distribution in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease among Children and Adults in Germany

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Mark; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Perniciaro, Stephanie; Imöhl, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the effects of the introduction of universal infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in 2006 on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children and adults in Germany with a focus on the dynamics of serotype distribution in vaccinated and non-vaccinated age groups. Over a period of 22 years (1992–2014), microbiological diagnostic laboratories from all over Germany have been sending isolates of IPD cases to the German National Reference Center for Streptococci on a voluntary basis. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates were serotyped using Neufeld’s Quellung method. Among children <16 years, the proportion of PCV7 serotypes among isolates from IPD cases decreased from 61.8% before vaccination (1997–2006) to 23.5% in the early vaccination period (2007–2010; p = 1.30E-72) and sank further to 5.2% in the late vaccination period (2010–2014; p = 4.59E-25). Similar reductions were seen for the separate age groups <2 years, 2-4 years and 5-15 years. Among adults, the proportion of PCV7 serotypes decreased from 43.4% in the pre-vaccination period (1992–2006) to 24.7% (p = 3.78E-88) in the early vaccination period and 8.2% (p = 5.97E-161) in the late vaccination period. Both among children and among adults, the non-PCV7 serotypes 1, 3, 7F and 19A significantly increased in the early vaccination period. After the switch from PCV7 to PVC10/PCV13 for infant vaccination in 2010, serotypes 1, 6A and 7F significantly decreased. A decrease in serotype 19A was only observed in 2013–2014, as compared to 2010–2011 (children p = 4.16E-04, adults p = 6.98E-06). Among adults, serotype 3, which strongly increased in the early vaccination period (p = 4.44E-15), remained at a constant proportion in the late vaccination period. The proportion of non-PCV13 vaccine serotypes increased over the whole vaccination period, with serotypes 10A, 12F, 23B, 24F and 38 most significantly increasing among children and serotypes 6C, 12F, 15A, 22F and 23B increasing

  11. Twenty year surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease in Nottingham: serogroups responsible and implications for immunisation

    PubMed Central

    Ispahani, P; Slack, R; Donald, F; Weston, V; Rutter, N

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the incidence, spectrum of clinical manifestations, and outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children. To determine the major serogroups of Streptococcus pneumoniae responsible for invasive disease and the potential coverage by the new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Methods: Analysis of prospectively recorded information of all children admitted to two teaching hospitals in Nottingham with IPD between January 1980 and December 1999. Results: A total of 266 episodes of IPD in children were identified; 103 (39%) were aged <1 year and 160 (60%) <2 years. Major clinical presentations were meningitis in 86 (32%), pneumonia in 82 (31%), and bacteraemia without an obvious focus in 80 (30%). The age specific mean annual incidence rates of IPD overall among children aged <1, <2, and <5 years were 47.1, 37.8, and 20 per 100 000 population, respectively. Mortality rates for children with meningitis and non-meningitic infection were 20% and 7%, respectively. Neurological sequelae following meningitis were documented in 16 (26%) of the 61 survivors assessed. The potential coverage rates in children between the ages of 6 months and 5 years are 84% by the 7-valent, 91% by the 9-valent, and 95% by the 11-valent conjugate vaccines. Conclusion: This study indicates that inclusion of a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in the primary immunisation programme in the UK would have a considerable effect on the mortality and morbidity associated with IPD. PMID:15269078

  12. Influenza and RSV make a modest contribution to invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Nicoli, Emily J.; Trotter, Caroline L.; Turner, Katherine M.E.; Colijn, Caroline; Waight, Pauline; Miller, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objectives The common seasonality of incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and viral respiratory infections has long been recognized, however, the extent to which this affects the association between the pathogens is unknown. We have analysed weekly surveillance data of IPD, influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), using ambient temperature and hours of sunshine as measures of seasonality. Methods Reported cases of influenza, IPD and RSV, were collected in England and Wales, from week 1 (January) 1996 to week 23 (June) 2009. The associations between IPD and respiratory viral infections were analysed using several statistical methods, including correlation coefficients and both additive and multiplicative regression models. Results 6–7.5% of cases of IPD are attributable to influenza and 3–4% attributable to RSV. Correlation coefficients reported considerably stronger associations between IPD and the viral infections compared to regression models. Conclusions A small but potentially important percentage of IPD may be attributable to influenza and RSV when adjusted for seasonality by temperature. Jointly these viral infections may lead to over 10% of IPD cases. Therefore, prevention of viral respiratory infections may offer some additional benefit in reducing invasive pneumococcal infections. PMID:23473714

  13. Nitric oxide synthase 2A (NOS2A) polymorphisms are not associated with invasive pneumococcal disease

    PubMed Central

    Payton, Antony; Payne, Debbie; Mankhambo, Limangeni A; Banda, Daniel L; Hart, C Anthony; Ollier, William ER; Carrol, Enitan D

    2009-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is responsible for over one million deaths per year, with young children, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals being most at risk. Approximately half of East African children have been reported to be asymptomatic carriers of pneumococcus with invasive infection occurring after the disruption of the respiratory membrane which is believed to be caused by the host immune response. Racial incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) is higher in certain populations even after adjusting for environmental factors suggesting a genetic component to disease susceptibility. The nitric oxide synthase 2A (NOS2A) gene is responsible for the production of nitric oxide under pathological conditions including host defence against bacterial infection. Nitric oxide is a modulator of apoptotic and inflammatory cascades and endothelial permeability. We hypothesised that genetic variants within this gene may predispose to disease risk and survival. Methods A cohort of 299 children with IPD (221 meningitis, 41 pneumonia and 37 with bacteraemia) and 931 age matched controls from Malawi were used in this study. We investigated nine haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms within the NOS2A gene and compared the presence or absence of the minor alleles in cases and controls and survivors and non-survivors within the cases. Results We observed no significant associations between cases and controls or with survival in either all IPD cases or in the separate analysis of meningitis cases. A near significant association was obtained for the comparison of rs8078340 in cases and controls (p-value, 0.078). However, results were unadjusted for multiple testing. Conclusion Our results suggest that polymorphic variation within the NOS2A gene does not influence invasive pneumococcal disease susceptibility or survival. PMID:19309520

  14. Epidemiology of Serotype 1 Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, South Africa, 2003-2013.

    PubMed

    von Mollendorf, Claire; Cohen, Cheryl; Tempia, Stefano; Meiring, Susan; de Gouveia, Linda; Quan, Vanessa; Lengana, Sarona; Karstaedt, Alan; Dawood, Halima; Seetharam, Sharona; Lekalakala, Ruth; Madhi, Shabir A; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne

    2016-02-01

    In South Africa, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced in April 2009 and replaced with 13-valent PCV in April 2011. We describe the epidemiology of serotype 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae disease during the pre- and post-PCV eras (2003-2013). Using laboratory-based invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance, we calculated annual incidences, identified IPD clusters, and determined serotype 1-associated factors. Of 46,483 IPD cases, 4,544 (10%) were caused by serotype 1. Two clusters of serotype 1 infection were detected during 2003-2004 and 2008-2012, but incidence decreased after 2011. Among children <5 years of age, those who had non-serotype 1 IPD had shorter hospital stays, fewer cases of penicillin-nonsusceptible disease, and lower HIV prevalence and in-hospital death rates than did those with serotype 1 IPD; similar factors were noted for older patients. Serotype 1 IPD had distinctive clinical features in South Africa, and annual incidences fluctuated, with decreases noted after the introduction of PCV13.

  15. Epidemiology of Serotype 1 Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, South Africa, 2003–2013

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; Tempia, Stefano; Meiring, Susan; de Gouveia, Linda; Quan, Vanessa; Lengana, Sarona; Karstaedt, Alan; Dawood, Halima; Seetharam, Sharona; Lekalakala, Ruth; Madhi, Shabir A.; Klugman, Keith P.; von Gottberg, Anne

    2016-01-01

    In South Africa, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) was introduced in April 2009 and replaced with 13-valent PCV in April 2011. We describe the epidemiology of serotype 1 Streptococcus pneumoniae disease during the pre- and post-PCV eras (2003–2013). Using laboratory-based invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) surveillance, we calculated annual incidences, identified IPD clusters, and determined serotype 1–associated factors. Of 46,483 IPD cases, 4,544 (10%) were caused by serotype 1. Two clusters of serotype 1 infection were detected during 2003–2004 and 2008–2012, but incidence decreased after 2011. Among children <5 years of age, those who had non–serotype 1 IPD had shorter hospital stays, fewer cases of penicillin-nonsusceptible disease, and lower HIV prevalence and in-hospital death rates than did those with serotype 1 IPD; similar factors were noted for older patients. Serotype 1 IPD had distinctive clinical features in South Africa, and annual incidences fluctuated, with decreases noted after the introduction of PCV13. PMID:26812214

  16. PSGL-1 on Leukocytes is a Critical Component of the Host Immune Response against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Urzainqui, Ana; de Andrés, Belén; González-Tajuelo, Rafael; Domenech, Mirian; González-Camacho, Fernando; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Brown, Jeremy S.; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial uptake by phagocytic cells is a vital event in the clearance of invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. A major role of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on leukocytes against invasive pneumococcal disease is described in this study. Phagocytosis experiments using different serotypes demonstrated that PSGL-1 is involved in the recognition, uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae. Co-localization of several clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with PSGL-1 was demonstrated, observing a rapid and active phagocytosis in the presence of PSGL-1. Furthermore, the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide and the main autolysin of the bacterium ―the amidase LytA― were identified as bacterial ligands for PSGL-1. Experimental models of pneumococcal disease including invasive pneumonia and systemic infection showed that bacterial levels were markedly increased in the blood of PSGL-1−/− mice. During pneumonia, PSGL-1 controls the severity of pneumococcal dissemination from the lung to the bloodstream. In systemic infection, a major role of PSGL-1 in host defense is to clear the bacteria in the systemic circulation controlling bacterial replication. These results confirmed the importance of this receptor in the recognition and clearance of S. pneumoniae during invasive pneumococcal disease. Histological and cellular analysis demonstrated that PSGL-1−/− mice have increased levels of T cells migrating to the lung than the corresponding wild-type mice. In contrast, during systemic infection, PSGL-1−/− mice had increased numbers of neutrophils and macrophages in blood, but were less effective controlling the infection process due to the lack of this functional receptor. Overall, this study demonstrates that PSGL-1 is a novel receptor for S. pneumoniae that contributes to protection against invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:26975045

  17. PSGL-1 on Leukocytes is a Critical Component of the Host Immune Response against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Sevillano, Elisa; Urzainqui, Ana; de Andrés, Belén; González-Tajuelo, Rafael; Domenech, Mirian; González-Camacho, Fernando; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Brown, Jeremy S; García, Ernesto; Yuste, Jose

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial uptake by phagocytic cells is a vital event in the clearance of invading pathogens such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. A major role of the P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) on leukocytes against invasive pneumococcal disease is described in this study. Phagocytosis experiments using different serotypes demonstrated that PSGL-1 is involved in the recognition, uptake and killing of S. pneumoniae. Co-localization of several clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae with PSGL-1 was demonstrated, observing a rapid and active phagocytosis in the presence of PSGL-1. Furthermore, the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide and the main autolysin of the bacterium--the amidase LytA--were identified as bacterial ligands for PSGL-1. Experimental models of pneumococcal disease including invasive pneumonia and systemic infection showed that bacterial levels were markedly increased in the blood of PSGL-1-/- mice. During pneumonia, PSGL-1 controls the severity of pneumococcal dissemination from the lung to the bloodstream. In systemic infection, a major role of PSGL-1 in host defense is to clear the bacteria in the systemic circulation controlling bacterial replication. These results confirmed the importance of this receptor in the recognition and clearance of S. pneumoniae during invasive pneumococcal disease. Histological and cellular analysis demonstrated that PSGL-1-/- mice have increased levels of T cells migrating to the lung than the corresponding wild-type mice. In contrast, during systemic infection, PSGL-1-/- mice had increased numbers of neutrophils and macrophages in blood, but were less effective controlling the infection process due to the lack of this functional receptor. Overall, this study demonstrates that PSGL-1 is a novel receptor for S. pneumoniae that contributes to protection against invasive pneumococcal disease. PMID:26975045

  18. [Incidence and lethality of invasive pneumococcal disease in Tarragona, Spain, 2006-2009].

    PubMed

    Vila-Córcoles, Ángel; Salsench-Serrano, Elisabet; Ochoa-Gondar, Olga; Aguirre-Chavarría, Carlos; Utrera-Aponte, Jesús; Guzmán-Ávalos, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    An epidemiological study was conducted on all cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) diagnosed in Tarragona, Spain, between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009. A total of 286 IPD cases were observed, which was an overall incidence of 21.2 episodes per 100,000 persons-year (95% CI: 16.6-26.9). Incidence rates were 26.3/100,000 (95% CI: 14.4-44.3) among children, 12.2/100,000 (95% CI: 8.2-17.6) among patients between 15-64 years and 59.6/100,000 (95% CI: 40.0-85.8) in those ≥65 years. Overall lethality rate was 7.3% (none in children, 3.4% among patients 15-64 years, and 14.8% among patients ≥65 years; p<0.001). PMID:25613558

  19. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    PubMed

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  20. Serotype Changes and Drug Resistance in Invasive Pneumococcal Diseases in Adults after Vaccinations in Children, Japan, 2010–2013

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Naoko; Hanada, Shigeo; Morozumi, Miyuki; Wajima, Takeaki; Shouji, Michi; Iwata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    After 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) for children was introduced in Japan in November 2010, we examined changes in Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes and in genetic antimicrobial drug resistance of isolates from adults with invasive pneumococcal diseases. During April 2010–March 2013, a total of 715 isolates were collected from adults with invasive pneumococcal diseases. Seven-valent PCV serotypes in adults decreased from 43.3% to 23.8%, most noticeably for serotype 6B. Concomitantly, 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23) serotypes decreased from 82.2% to 72.2%; non-PPSV23 serotypes increased from 13.8% to 25.1%. Parallel with serotype changes, genotypic penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae decreased from 32.4% to 21.1%, and 6 non-PPSV23 serotypes emerged (6D, 15A, 15C, 16F, 23A, and 35B). Respective vaccine coverage rates for 13-valent PCV and PPSV23 differed by disease: 73.9% and 84.3% for patients with pneumonia, 56.4% and 69.2% for patients with bacteremia and sepsis, and 45.7% and 69.3% for patients with meningitis. PMID:26485679

  1. Invasive pneumococcal diseases in children in Hokkaido, Japan from April 2000, to March 2015.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) became commercially available as a voluntary vaccine in March 2010. It was included in the routine immunization schedule in April 2013 and was replaced by PCV-13 in November 2013. We evaluated 146 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in 142 children (2 developed the disease twice, and 1 developed it three times) treated in the northern district of Hokkaido, Japan from April 2000 to March 2015, before and after the introduction of PCV-7. The incidence rate per 100,000 people aged <5 years showed an increasing trend between April 2000 and March 2010, and reached 87.5 per 100,000 people per year between April 2009 and March 2010, which was immediately before the introduction of PCV-7. Subsequently, the incidence rate started to show a decreasing trend and reached as low as 9.5 per 100,000 people per year between April 2013 and March 2014. However, the incidence rate showed an increasing trend again between April 2014 and March 2015, reaching 33.4 per 100,000 people per year. Serotyping was performed for the 77 strains collected between April 2000 and March 2010. The most frequently isolated serotype was 6B (31.2%), followed by 23F (14.3%) and 19F (13.0%). Among them, 55 strains were covered by PCV-7 (71.4%), and 64 strains were covered by PCV-13 (83.1%). Of the 33 strains collected between April 2010 and March 2015, 14 were covered by PCV-7 (42.4%) and 16 were covered by PCV-13 (48.4%), showing a significant decrease (p < 0.01).

  2. Invasive pneumococcal disease in Oxford, 1985–2001: a retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C; Harnden, A; Jewell, G; Knox, K; Peto, T; Crook, D

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To describe a series of children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Methods: A review of patient records for children aged 0–18 years admitted to the John Radcliffe Hospital with IPD from 1985 to 2001. Social deprivation was measured by the Jarman index. The proportion of children with congenital abnormalities was compared with national data. Results: We identified 140 children with IPD; complete data were available for 136 children. The median age at diagnosis was 1.5 years. The social deprivation score of households of children with IPD was higher than that of the average Oxfordshire household (-2.5 v -7.3, p < 0.001). Forty four per cent of cases had at least one preceding health problem. The children with preceding health problems were significantly older than those with no preceding problems (median age 2.67 years, interquartile range 1.21 to 6.20 versus 1.11 years, interquartile range 0.51 to 2.21; p < 0.001). There was an increased risk of IPD for children with central nervous system malformations (OR = 99, 95% CI 31 to 236), congenital heart disease (OR = 62, 95% CI 24 to 131), and chromosomal abnormalities (OR = 32, 95% CI 6.6 to 96). Conclusions: There is an increased risk of IPD associated with increased social deprivation; and also with central nervous system malformations, congenital heart disease, and chromosomal abnormalities. PMID:12876171

  3. Recurrent invasive pneumococcal disease in children--host factors and vaccination response.

    PubMed

    Ingels, Helene Andrea Sinclair

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is still a leading cause of septicaemia, pneumonia and meningitis in young children world-wide with over half a million children dying annually from pneumococcal disease.  Some children are prone to repeated episodes of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) because of an underlying predisposing disease. Recurrent IPD (rIPD) is a rarity and published reports on rIPD are limited by having few children included, selected groups of patients or short follow-up periods. Deficiencies in the innate or adaptive immune system have been described in children with rIPD, but the frequency of immunodeficiency among such patients is unknown. The aim of this PhD thesis was to examine paediatric cases of laboratory-confirmed rIPD, over a 33-year period in Denmark, to determine risk factors and study aspects of the immunological background for this problem in children. In October 2007, a seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was implemented in the Danish infant immunization programme. An additional aim of the thesis was to examine the impact of vaccination on a population level, following the first three years of general PCV7 vaccination in Denmark. The thesis consists of three papers, which are all directly or indirectly based on data retrieved from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry. This registry is nationwide and dates back to 1938. The registry contains data from all laboratory-confirmed cases of IPD in Denmark and is continually updated for national surveillance. In Paper 1, we conducted a 33-year retrospective nationwide study of paediatric rIPD. By using data from the National Streptococcus Pneumoniae Registry combined with clinical data from hospital records, we could describe one of the largest known cohorts of children (n:59) with rIPD . We covered epidemiological, microbiological, and clinical features of this clinical entity. Of all children experiencing rIPD, 47% had a known predisposing underlying disease at the time of

  4. Evolution of antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal diseases in Algeria from 2005 to 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, N.; Ziane, H.; Bekhoucha, S.; Guechi, Z.; Azzam, A.; Touati, D.; Naim, M.; Azrou, S.; Hamidi, M.; Mertani, A.; Laraba, A.; Annane, T.; Kermani, S.; Tazir, M.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases. PCVs are not currently being used in Algeria. We conducted a prospective study from 2005 to 2012 in Algeria to determine antimicrobial drug resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children with pneumococcal disease. Among 270 isolated strains from children, 97 (36%) were invasive disease; of these, 48% were not susceptible to penicillin and 53% not susceptible to erythromycin. A high rate of antimicrobial nonsusceptibility was observed in strains isolated from children with meningitis. The serotype distribution from pneumococci isolated from children with invasive infections was (by order of prevalence): 14, 1, 19F, 19A, 6B, 5, 3, 6A and 23F. Multidrug resistance was observed in serotypes 14, 19F, 19A and 6B. The vaccine coverage of serotypes isolated from children aged <5 years was 55.3% for PCV7, 71.1% for PCV10 and 86.8% for PCV13. Our results highlight the burden of pneumococcal disease in Algeria and the increasing S. pneumoniae antibiotic resistance. The current pneumococcal vaccines cover a high percentage of the circulating strains. Therefore, vaccination would reduce the incidence of pneumococcal disease in Algeria. PMID:26106481

  5. Evolution of antimicrobial resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from children with invasive and noninvasive pneumococcal diseases in Algeria from 2005 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Ramdani-Bouguessa, N; Ziane, H; Bekhoucha, S; Guechi, Z; Azzam, A; Touati, D; Naim, M; Azrou, S; Hamidi, M; Mertani, A; Laraba, A; Annane, T; Kermani, S; Tazir, M

    2015-07-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) has dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases. PCVs are not currently being used in Algeria. We conducted a prospective study from 2005 to 2012 in Algeria to determine antimicrobial drug resistance and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae from children with pneumococcal disease. Among 270 isolated strains from children, 97 (36%) were invasive disease; of these, 48% were not susceptible to penicillin and 53% not susceptible to erythromycin. A high rate of antimicrobial nonsusceptibility was observed in strains isolated from children with meningitis. The serotype distribution from pneumococci isolated from children with invasive infections was (by order of prevalence): 14, 1, 19F, 19A, 6B, 5, 3, 6A and 23F. Multidrug resistance was observed in serotypes 14, 19F, 19A and 6B. The vaccine coverage of serotypes isolated from children aged <5 years was 55.3% for PCV7, 71.1% for PCV10 and 86.8% for PCV13. Our results highlight the burden of pneumococcal disease in Algeria and the increasing S. pneumoniae antibiotic resistance. The current pneumococcal vaccines cover a high percentage of the circulating strains. Therefore, vaccination would reduce the incidence of pneumococcal disease in Algeria.

  6. Capture-Recapture Estimators in Epidemiology with Applications to Pertussis and Pneumococcal Invasive Disease Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Braeye, Toon; Verheagen, Jan; Mignon, Annick; Flipse, Wim; Pierard, Denis; Huygen, Kris; Schirvel, Carole; Hens, Niel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Surveillance networks are often not exhaustive nor completely complementary. In such situations, capture-recapture methods can be used for incidence estimation. The choice of estimator and their robustness with respect to the homogeneity and independence assumptions are however not well documented. Methods We investigated the performance of five different capture-recapture estimators in a simulation study. Eight different scenarios were used to detect and combine case-information. The scenarios increasingly violated assumptions of independence of samples and homogeneity of detection probabilities. Belgian datasets on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and pertussis provided motivating examples. Results No estimator was unbiased in all scenarios. Performance of the parametric estimators depended on how much of the dependency and heterogeneity were correctly modelled. Model building was limited by parameter estimability, availability of additional information (e.g. covariates) and the possibilities inherent to the method. In the most complex scenario, methods that allowed for detection probabilities conditional on previous detections estimated the total population size within a 20–30% error-range. Parametric estimators remained stable if individual data sources lost up to 50% of their data. The investigated non-parametric methods were more susceptible to data loss and their performance was linked to the dependence between samples; overestimating in scenarios with little dependence, underestimating in others. Issues with parameter estimability made it impossible to model all suggested relations between samples for the IPD and pertussis datasets. For IPD, the estimates for the Belgian incidence for cases aged 50 years and older ranged from 44 to58/100,000 in 2010. The estimates for pertussis (all ages, Belgium, 2014) ranged from 24.2 to30.8/100,000. Conclusion We encourage the use of capture-recapture methods, but epidemiologists should preferably

  7. The association between asthma and invasive pneumococcal disease: a nationwide study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Byung Ok; Choung, Ji Tae; Park, Yong Mean

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between asthma and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in Korea. A retrospective population-based cohort study was conducted using the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment database 2010-2011. The subjects included 935,106 (2010) and 952,295 (2011), of whom 398 (2010) and 428 (2011) patients with IPD were identified. There was significant difference in the prevalence of IPD in patients with and without asthma (0.07% vs. 0.02% in 2010 and 0.08% vs. 0.01% in 2011; P<0.001). After adjusting for age and gender, patients with asthma showed over a three-fold increased risk of IPD compared with patients without asthma (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.02-5.03 in 2010 / aOR, 5.44; 95% CI, 4.10-7.22 in 2011; P<0.001). These findings were also significant in children (aOR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.25-3.45 in 2010; P=0.005 / aOR, 3.26; 95% CI, 1.74-6.11 in 2011; P<0.001). Although diabetes mellitus was also significantly associated with IPD, relatively low ORs compared with those of asthma were noted (aOR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.35-2.54 in 2010 / aOR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.78-3.24 in 2011; P<0.001). Both children and adults with asthma are at increased risk of developing IPD.

  8. Outbreak of invasive pneumococcal disease at a Belfast shipyard in men exposed to welding fumes, Northern Ireland, April-May 2015: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Patterson, L; Irvine, N; Wilson, A; Doherty, L; Loughrey, A; Jessop, L

    2015-05-28

    We report an outbreak of four confirmed cases of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in individuals occupationally exposed to welding fumes, at a Belfast shipyard (Northern Ireland). All cases were hospitalised. A high-risk sub-group of 679 workers has been targeted for antibiotic prophylaxis and pneumococcal vaccination. Physicians and public health institutions outside Northern Ireland should be alert to individuals presenting with pneumonia or IPD and recent links to the shipyard, to facilitate early assessment and treatment.

  9. Molecular epidemiology of penicillin-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with invasive pneumococcal disease in Germany.

    PubMed

    Reinert, R R; van der Linden, M; Seegmüller, I; Al-Lahham, A; Siedler, A; Weissmann, B; Toschke, A M; von Kries, R

    2007-04-01

    A population-based nationwide surveillance of antibiotic resistance associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children and adolescents (aged<16 years) was performed in Germany between 1997 and 2004. In total, 1517 isolates were collected, of which 5.1% and 1.1% were intermediately- or fully-resistant, respectively, to penicillin G. During the 8-year study period, an increase in resistance to both penicillin G and erythromycin A was observed, and the frequency of isolates exhibiting reduced susceptibility to penicillin G or erythromycin A increased from 1.4% and 11.1%, respectively, in 1997, to 8.7% and 29.0%, respectively, in 2004. Among the penicillin non-susceptible pneumococcal isolates, serotypes 14 (24.5% of isolates), 23F (16.0%) and 6B (16.0%) were found most frequently. Multilocus sequence typing of 58 (62%) penicillin G non-susceptible isolates revealed that sequence type (ST) 156 (Spain9V-3 clone) and its single-locus variant ST 557 were widespread in Germany. Moreover, 17 new penicillin G non-susceptible STs were defined for the first time. The study illustrated the genetic heterogeneity of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal isolates in Germany. PMID:17359319

  10. Effect of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination on Serotype-Specific Carriage and Invasive Disease in England: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Flasche, Stefan; Van Hoek, Albert Jan; Sheasby, Elizabeth; Waight, Pauline; Andrews, Nick; Sheppard, Carmen; George, Robert; Miller, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Background We investigated the effect of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) programme in England on serotype-specific carriage and invasive disease to help understand its role in serotype replacement and predict the impact of higher valency vaccines. Methods and Findings Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken from children <5 y old and family members (n = 400) 2 y after introduction of PCV7 into routine immunization programs. Proportions carrying Streptococcus pneumoniae and serotype distribution among carried isolates were compared with a similar population prior to PCV7 introduction. Serotype-specific case∶carrier ratios (CCRs) were estimated using national data on invasive disease. In vaccinated children and their contacts vaccine-type (VT) carriage decreased, but was offset by an increase in non-VT carriage, with no significant overall change in carriage prevalence, odds ratio 1.06 (95% confidence interval 0.76–1.49). The lower CCRs of the replacing serotypes resulted in a net reduction in invasive disease in children. The additional serotypes covered by higher valency vaccines had low carriage but high disease prevalence. Serotype 11C emerged as predominant in carriage but caused no invasive disease whereas 8, 12F, and 22F emerged in disease but had very low carriage prevalence. Conclusion Because the additional serotypes included in PCV10/13 have high CCRs but low carriage prevalence, vaccinating against them is likely to significantly reduce invasive disease with less risk of serotype replacement. However, a few serotypes with high CCRs could mitigate the benefits of higher valency vaccines. Assessment of the effect of PCV on carriage as well as invasive disease should be part of enhanced surveillance activities for PCVs. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary PMID:21483718

  11. Insight Into Resistance Phenotypes of Emergent Non 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Type Pneumococci Isolated From Invasive Disease After 13-valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Implementation in France

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, Claire; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Background. In 2010, the pneumococcal 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13), containing 6 additional serotypes including the multidrug-resistant 19A, replaced the PCV7 in France. This study aimed at analyzing trends in antibiotic resistance in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) isolates in France after PCV13 introduction. Methods. A total of 5243 pneumococci isolated from IPD in 2008–2009 (late PCV7 era) and 2011–2012 (PCV13 era) were studied according to their serotype and antibiotic resistance profile. Multilocus sequence typing analysis was performed on strains of the predominant serotypes (12F and 24F) isolated from young children. Results. Overall, the prevalence of antibiotic resistance decreased in France (−21.5% for penicillin from 2008–2009 to 2011–2012), mainly driven by the decline of the 19A serotype. Among non-PCV13 serotypes that concomitantly emerged, serotypes 12F, 24F, 15A, and 35B were consistently associated with resistance to 1 or more antibiotics. In children under 2 years, serotypes 15A, 35B, and 24F accounted together for 37.8% and 31.9% of penicillin-nonsusceptible and erythromycin-resistant isolates, respectively. Chloramphenicol and cotrimoxazole resistance were mainly associated with serotypes 12F and 24F, respectively. Genetic analysis showed that although emergence of serotype 12F pneumococci resulted from the expansion of various pre-existing lineages, increase in serotype 24F was related to the clonal expansion of the ST162 penicillin-susceptible cotrimoxazole-resistant lineage. Conclusions. We showed that decline of PCV13-related IPD was associated with a decline in antibiotic resistance in France, but that it likely favored the spread of several resistant nonvaccine serotypes. However, antibiotic resistance does not seem to be the only element that may drive this phenomenon. PMID:26955644

  12. The epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in older adults from 2007 to 2014 in Ontario, Canada: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Shalini; Policarpio, Michelle E.; Wong, Kenney; Gubbay, Jonathan; Fediurek, Jill; Deeks, Shelley

    2016-01-01

    Background: In Ontario, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been sequentially introduced into the publicly funded childhood vaccination program since 2005. A 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV23) has been routinely recommended for adults aged 65 years and older since 1996. To determine the effect of herd immunity, we examined the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in adults aged 65 years and older. Methods: Invasive pneumococcal disease is a provincially reportable disease. We were therefore able to conduct a descriptive epidemiologic analysis that included assessing time trends for patients aged 65 years and older using surveillance data from 2007 to 2014. Using serotype information within the surveillance data, cases were grouped into categories according to vaccine type and periods and then compared using Poisson regression. Results: A total of 3825 cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were reported among adults aged 65 years and older, for an overall annualized incidence of 25.4 cases per 100 000 population. There was a decrease in incidence due to serotypes included in 7-valent PCV (3.0 to 0.7 cases per 100 000 population) (p < 0.001). For 13-valent PCV serotypes, there was a decrease in incidence between 2011 and 2014 (9.8 to 5.3 cases per 100 000 population (p < 0.001)). Serotypes unique to PPV23 and those not included in a vaccine increased from 2.3 to 5.8 and from 2.4 to 7.2 cases per 100 000 population, respectively (p < 0.001). Interpretation: In older adults, among serotypes contained in PCVs, we have shown a decrease in incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease. This is likely due to herd immunity from the childhood program. A burden of illness due to unique PPV23 serotypes and those that are not covered by a vaccine exists and has increased over time. PMID:27730119

  13. Effectiveness of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines (PCV7 and PCV13) against Invasive Pneumococcal Disease among Children under Two Years of Age in Germany

    PubMed Central

    van der Linden, Mark; Falkenhorst, Gerhard; Perniciaro, Stephanie; Fitzner, Christina; Imöhl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Background In this study we calculate the effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) against invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among children under the age of two years using the indirect cohort method. We also discuss the timeliness of vaccination and the residual cases of vaccine type IPD. Methods and Findings From July 2006 until June 2015, 921 IPD cases were reported and for 618 children (67.1%), the vaccination status at the time of infection could be accurately determined. Of these, 379 (61.3%) were vaccinated and 239 (38.7%) were not vaccinated. The adjusted vaccine effectiveness (VE) of PCV7 for all included serotypes + 6A was 80% (95% CI: 63–89) for at least one dose, 97% (89–100) after three primary doses (post primary) and 95% (57–100) post booster. The adjusted overall VE of PCV13 was 86% (74–93) for at least one dose, 85% (62–94) post primary and 91% (61–99) post booster. For the additional serotypes included in PCV13, the adjusted VE was 82% (66–91), 80% (46–93) and 90% (54–98) respectively. The serotype specific VE for at least one dose was high for serotypes 1 (83%; 15–97), 3 (74%; 2–93), 7F (84%; 18–98) and 19A (77%; 47–90). Only 39.5% of children with IPD obtained their first dose of PCV7 according to schedule (2nd dose: 32.9%, 3rd dose: 22.0%, booster dose: 63.6%). For children vaccinated with PCV13 values were slightly better: 43.8%, 33.5%, 26.3% and 74.3% respectively. Among 90 residual cases with PCV7 serotypes, 73 (81.1%) were in unvaccinated children, and 15 (16.7%) in children who had not obtained the number of doses recommended for their age, and only two (2.2%) in children vaccinated according to age. Of 82 cases with PCV13 serotypes occurring after the switch from PCV7 to PCV13, 56 (68.3%) were not vaccinated, 22 (26.8%) were incompletely vaccinated, and four (4.9%) were vaccinated according to age. Conclusions Our data show a high effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Germany

  14. HIV Infection and the Epidemiology of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD) in South African Adults and Older Children Prior to the Introduction of a Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine (PCV)

    PubMed Central

    Meiring, Susan; Cohen, Cheryl; Quan, Vanessa; de Gouveia, Linda; Feldman, Charles; Karstaedt, Alan; Klugman, Keith P.; Madhi, Shabir A.; Rabie, Helene; Sriruttan, Charlotte; von Gottberg, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Streptococcus pneumoniae is the commonest cause of bacteremic pneumonia among HIV-infected persons. As more countries with high HIV prevalence are implementing infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) programs, we aimed to describe the baseline clinical characteristics of adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the pre-PCV era in South Africa in order to interpret potential indirect effects following vaccine use. Methods National, active, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD was conducted in South Africa from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2008. At 25 enhanced surveillance (ES) hospital sites, clinical data, including HIV serostatus, were collected from IPD patients ≥ 5 years of age. We compared the clinical characteristics of individuals with IPD in those HIV-infected and -uninfected using multivariable analysis. PCV was introduced into the routine South African Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in 2009. Results In South Africa, from 2003–2008, 17 604 cases of IPD occurred amongst persons ≥ 5 years of age, with an average incidence of 7 cases per 100 000 person-years. Against a national HIV-prevalence of 18%, 89% (4190/4734) of IPD patients from ES sites were HIV-infected. IPD incidence in HIV-infected individuals is 43 times higher than in HIV-uninfected persons (52 per 100 000 vs. 1.2 per 100 000), with a peak in the HIV-infected elderly population of 237 per 100 000 persons. Most HIV-infected individuals presented with bacteremia (74%, 3 091/4 190). HIV-uninfected individuals were older; and had more chronic conditions (excluding HIV) than HIV-infected persons (39% (210/544) vs. 19% (790/4190), p<0.001). During the pre-PCV immunization era in South Africa, 71% of serotypes amongst HIV-infected persons were covered by PCV13 vs. 73% amongst HIV-uninfected persons, p = 0.4, OR 0.9 (CI 0.7–1.1). Conclusion Seventy to eighty-five percent of adult IPD in the pre-PCV era were vaccine serotypes and 93% of cases had recognized risk

  15. Population snapshot of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in South Africa prior to introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ndlangisa, Kedibone M; du Plessis, Mignon; Wolter, Nicole; de Gouveia, Linda; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We determined the sequence types of isolates that caused invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) prior to routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) in South Africa. PCV-13 serotypes and 6C isolates collected in 2007 (1 461/2 437, 60%) from patients of all ages as part of on-going, national, laboratory-based surveillance for IPD, were selected for genetic characterization. In addition, all 134 non-PCV isolates from children <2 years were selected for characterization. Sequence type diversity by serotype and age category (children <5 years vs. individuals ≥5 years) was assessed for PCV serotypes using Simpson's index of diversity. Similar genotypes circulated among isolates from children and adults and the majority of serotypes were heterogeneous. While globally disseminated clones were common among some serotypes (e.g., serotype 1 [clonal complex (CC) 217, 98% of all serotype 1] and 14 [CC230, 43%)]), some were represented mainly by clonal complexes rarely reported elsewhere (e.g., serotype 3 [CC458, 60%] and 19A [CC2062, 83%]). In children <2 years, serotype 15B and 8 were the most common serotypes among non-PCV isolates (16% [22/134] and 15% [20/134] isolates, respectively). Sequence type 7052 and 53 were most common among serotypes 15B and 8 isolates and accounted for 58% (7/12) and 64% (9/14) of the isolates, respectively. Serotype 19F, 14, 19A and 15B had the highest proportions of penicillin non-susceptible isolates. Genotypes rarely reported in other parts of the world but common among some of our serotypes highlight the importance of our data as these genotypes may emerge post PCV introduction.

  16. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD.

  17. [Pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in chronic respiratory diseases].

    PubMed

    Casas Maldonado, F; Alfageme Michavila, I; Barchilón Cohen, V S; Peis Redondo, J I; Vargas Ortega, D A

    2014-09-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is an acute respiratory infectious disease which has an incidence of 3-8 cases/1,000 inhabitants, and increases with age and comorbidities. The pneumococcus is the organism most frequently involved in community-acquired pneumonia in the adult (30-35%). Around 40% of patients with community-acquired pneumonia require hospital admission, and around 10% need to be admitted to an intensive care unit. The most serious forms of pneumococcal infection include invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), which covers cases of bacteremia (associated or not to pneumonia), meningitis, pleuritis, arthritis, primary peritonitis and pericarditis. Currently, the biggest problem with the pneumococcus is the emergence of resistance to antimicrobial agents, and its high morbimortality, despite the use of appropriate antibiotics and proper medical treatment. Certain underlying medical conditions increase the risk of IPD and its complications, especially, from the respiratory diseases point of view, smoking and chronic respiratory diseases. Pneumococcal disease, according to the WHO, is the first preventable cause of death worldwide in children and adults. Among the strategies to prevent IPD is vaccination. WHO considers that its universal introduction and implementation against pneumococcus is essential and a priority in all countries. There are currently 2 pneumococcal vaccines for adults: the 23 serotypes polysaccharide and conjugate 13 serotypes. The scientific societies represented here have worked to develop some recommendations, based on the current scientific evidence, regarding the pneumococcal vaccination in the immunocompetent adult with chronic respiratory disease and smokers at risk of suffering from IPD. PMID:25107494

  18. [Pneumococcal vaccination in obstructive lung diseases -- what can we expect?].

    PubMed

    Rose, M; Lode, H; de Roux, A; Zielen, S

    2005-03-01

    Many countries' guidelines recommend pneumococcal vaccination for patients suffering from obstructive airway disease. This paper reviews the literature as to immunogenicity and safety of this immunization. There is no evidence for a negative effect of pneumococcal vaccination on these patients. Only a few data exist on the preventive impact of pneumococcal vaccination as to exacerbations of obstructive airway diseases. Existing studies mostly took up this question as a side aspect. The effect in children and adults appears limited. On the other hand, the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine prevents life-threatening invasive infections in children younger than 5 years, and pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine protects healthy adults against bacteriaemic pneumonia. Thus, pneumococcal vaccination of patients suffering from obstructive airway disease is recommendable.

  19. Evaluating the impact of PCV-10 on invasive pneumococcal disease in Brazil: A time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Ana Lucia; Minamisava, Ruth; Policena, Gabriela; Cristo, Elier B; Domingues, Carla Magda S; de Cunto Brandileone, Maria Cristina; Almeida, Samanta Cristine Grassi; Toscano, Cristiana Maria; Bierrenbach, Ana Luiza

    2016-01-01

    Routine infant immunization with 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-10) began in Brazil in 2010. The impact of the PCV-10 on rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) at the population level was not yet evaluated. Serotype-specific IPD changes after PCV-10 introduction is still to be determined. Data from national surveillance system for notifiable diseases (SINAN) and national reference laboratory for S. pneumoniae in Brazil (IAL) were linked to enhance case ascertainment of IPD. An interrupted time-series analysis was conducted to predict trends in the postvaccination IPD rates in the absence of PCV-10 vaccination, taking into consideration seasonality and secular trends. PCVs serotype-specific distribution were assessed before (2008-2009) and after (2011-2013) the introduction of PCV-10 in the immunization program. A total of 9,827 IPD cases were identified from 2008-2013 when combining SINAN and IAL databases. Overall, PCV-10 types decreased by 41.3% after PCV-10 vaccination period, mostly in children aged 2-23 months, while additional PCV-13 serotypes increased by 62.8% mainly in children under 5-year of age. For children aged 2-23 months, targeted by the immunization program, we observed a 44.2% (95%CI, 15.8-72.5%) reduction in IPD rates. In contrast, significant increase in IPD rates were observed for adults aged 18-39 y (18.9%, 95%CI 1.1-36.7%), 40-64 y (52.5%, 95%CI 24.8-80.3%), and elderly ≥ 65 y (79.3%, 95%CI 62.1-96.5%). This is the first report of a time-series analysis for PCV impact in IPD conducted at national level data in a developing country. We were able to show significant impact of PCV-10 on IPD for age groups targeted by vaccination in Brazil, 3 y after its introduction. No impact on other age groups was demonstrated.

  20. Impact of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine on invasive disease, antimicrobial resistance and colonization in Alaska Natives: progress towards elimination of a health disparity.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, Thomas W; Singleton, Rosalyn J; Bulkow, Lisa R; Bruden, Dana L; Hurlburt, Debby A; Parks, Debra; Moore, Matthew; Parkinson, Alan J; Schuchat, Anne; Butler, Jay C

    2005-12-01

    We evaluated invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), antimicrobial resistance and nasopharyngeal colonization before and after introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in Alaska Natives (AN), a population with high IPD rates. We obtained IPD rates from population-based surveillance. Colonization was determined from annual surveys among rural AN of all ages and from urban children. After vaccine introduction, vaccine-type IPD rates declined by 91% among AN children <2 years, by 80% among non-Natives <2 years, and by 40% for adults of all races (P<0.001 each). IPD decreased for isolates resistant to penicillin, erythromycin and cotrimoxazole (P<0.001 each). Vaccine-type colonization decreased among rural and urban children <5 years and among rural adults (P<0.001 each). PCV7 vaccine has eliminated a longstanding disparity of vaccine-type IPD for AN children. Decreased vaccine-type colonization and IPD in adults demonstrate indirect vaccine effects.

  1. Pneumococcal Disease Prevention Among Adults: Strategies for the Use of Pneumococcal Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pilishvili, Tamara; Bennett, Nancy M

    2015-12-01

    Use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines among children in the U.S. since 2000 has dramatically reduced pneumococcal disease burden among adults. Significant vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal infections still remains, especially among older adults. The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recently recommended the routine use of both pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide vaccines (PPSV23) for adults ≥65 years. These recommendations were based on the remaining burden of illness among adults and the importance of non-bacteremic pneumonia prevention in light of new evidence confirming the efficacy of PCV13 to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia among older adults. This paper reviews the evidence that led ACIP to make recommendations for PCV13 and PPSV23 use among adults, and highlights potential gaps to be addressed by future studies to inform adult vaccination policy. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia should be closely monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and continued utility of the current vaccination strategy, and to identify future directions for pneumococcal disease prevention among older adults.

  2. Pneumococcal disease prevention among adults: Strategies for the use of pneumococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pilishvili, Tamara; Bennett, Nancy M

    2015-11-27

    Use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines among children in the US since 2000 has dramatically reduced pneumococcal disease burden among adults. Significant vaccine-preventable morbidity and mortality from pneumococcal infections still remains, especially among older adults. The US Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recently recommended the routine use of both pneumococcal conjugate (PCV13) and polysaccharide vaccines (PPSV23) for adults ≥65 years. These recommendations were based on the remaining burden of illness among adults and the importance of non-bacteremic pneumonia prevention in light of new evidence confirming the efficacy of PCV13 to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia among older adults. This paper reviews the evidence that led the ACIP to make recommendations for PCV13 and PPSV23 use among adults, and highlights potential gaps to be addressed by future studies to inform adult vaccination policy. The changing epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease and pneumonia should be closely monitored to evaluate the effectiveness and continued utility of the current vaccination strategy, and to identify future directions for pneumococcal disease prevention among older adults.

  3. Pneumococcal serotype distribution in adults with invasive disease and in carrier children in Italy: Should we expect herd protection of adults through infants' vaccination?

    PubMed

    Azzari, Chiara; Cortimiglia, Martina; Nieddu, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Mattei, Romano; Zuliani, Massimo; Adriani, Beatrice; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Consales, Guglielmo; Aquilini, Donatella; Bini, Giancarlo; Di Natale, Massimo Edoardo; Canessa, Clementina; Ricci, Silvia; de Vitis, Elisa; Mangone, Giusi; Bechini, Angela; Bonanni, Paolo; Pasinato, Angela; Resti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) produced a significant herd protection in unvaccinated adult population mostly because of pneumococcus carriage decrease in vaccinated children. It is not known if the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine can give similar effect on adults. Aims of the work were to evaluate whether the 6 additional serotypes are present in nasopharynx of children and serotype distribution in invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) in adults. Realtime-PCR was used to evaluate pneumococcal serotypes in adults with confirmed IPD and in nasopharyngeal swabs (NP) from 629 children not vaccinated or vaccinated with PCV7 and resident in the same geographical areas. Two hundred twenty-one patients (116 males, median 67.9 years) with IPD were studied (pneumonia n = 103, meningitis n = 61 sepsis n = 50, other n = 7). Two hundred twelve were serotyped. The most frequent serotypes were 3, (31/212; 14.6%), 19A, (19/212; 9.0%), 12 (17/212; 8.0%), 7F, (14/212; 6.6%). In NP of children, the frequency of those serotypes causing over 50% of IPD in adults was very low, ranging from 0.48% for serotype 7F to 7.9% for serotype 19A. On the other side serotype 5, very frequent in NP (18.7%) caused <1% IPD. In conclusion serotypes causing IPD in adults are very rarely found in children NP. We suggest that herd protection obtainable with the additional 6 serotypes included in PCV13 may be more limited than that demonstrated with PCV7 in the past. In order to reduce the burden of disease in adults, adults should be offered a specific vaccination program with highly immunogenic PCV. PMID:26647277

  4. Pneumococcal serotype distribution in adults with invasive disease and in carrier children in Italy: Should we expect herd protection of adults through infants' vaccination?

    PubMed Central

    Azzari, Chiara; Cortimiglia, Martina; Nieddu, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Mattei, Romano; Zuliani, Massimo; Adriani, Beatrice; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Consales, Guglielmo; Aquilini, Donatella; Bini, Giancarlo; Di Natale, Massimo Edoardo; Canessa, Clementina; Ricci, Silvia; de Vitis, Elisa; Mangone, Giusi; Bechini, Angela; Bonanni, Paolo; Pasinato, Angela; Resti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) produced a significant herd protection in unvaccinated adult population mostly because of pneumococcus carriage decrease in vaccinated children. It is not known if the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine can give similar effect on adults. Aims of the work were to evaluate whether the 6 additional serotypes are present in nasopharynx of children and serotype distribution in invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) in adults.  Realtime-PCR was used to evaluate pneumococcal serotypes in adults with confirmed IPD and in nasopharyngeal swabs (NP) from 629 children not vaccinated or vaccinated with PCV7 and resident in the same geographical areas.    Two hundred twenty-one patients (116 males, median 67.9 years) with IPD were studied (pneumonia n = 103, meningitis n = 61 sepsis n = 50, other n = 7). Two hundred twelve were serotyped. The most frequent serotypes were 3, (31/212; 14.6%), 19A, (19/212; 9.0%), 12 (17/212; 8.0%), 7F, (14/212; 6.6%). In NP of children, the frequency of those serotypes causing over 50% of IPD in adults was very low, ranging from 0.48% for serotype 7F to 7.9% for serotype 19A. On the other side serotype 5, very frequent in NP (18.7%) caused <1% IPD. In conclusion serotypes causing IPD in adults are very rarely found in children NP. We suggest that herd protection obtainable with the additional 6 serotypes included in PCV13 may be more limited than that demonstrated with PCV7 in the past. In order to reduce the burden of disease in adults, adults should be offered a specific vaccination program with highly immunogenic PCV. PMID:26647277

  5. Pneumococcal serotype distribution in adults with invasive disease and in carrier children in Italy: Should we expect herd protection of adults through infants' vaccination?

    PubMed

    Azzari, Chiara; Cortimiglia, Martina; Nieddu, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Mattei, Romano; Zuliani, Massimo; Adriani, Beatrice; Degl'Innocenti, Roberto; Consales, Guglielmo; Aquilini, Donatella; Bini, Giancarlo; Di Natale, Massimo Edoardo; Canessa, Clementina; Ricci, Silvia; de Vitis, Elisa; Mangone, Giusi; Bechini, Angela; Bonanni, Paolo; Pasinato, Angela; Resti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) produced a significant herd protection in unvaccinated adult population mostly because of pneumococcus carriage decrease in vaccinated children. It is not known if the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine can give similar effect on adults. Aims of the work were to evaluate whether the 6 additional serotypes are present in nasopharynx of children and serotype distribution in invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) in adults. Realtime-PCR was used to evaluate pneumococcal serotypes in adults with confirmed IPD and in nasopharyngeal swabs (NP) from 629 children not vaccinated or vaccinated with PCV7 and resident in the same geographical areas. Two hundred twenty-one patients (116 males, median 67.9 years) with IPD were studied (pneumonia n = 103, meningitis n = 61 sepsis n = 50, other n = 7). Two hundred twelve were serotyped. The most frequent serotypes were 3, (31/212; 14.6%), 19A, (19/212; 9.0%), 12 (17/212; 8.0%), 7F, (14/212; 6.6%). In NP of children, the frequency of those serotypes causing over 50% of IPD in adults was very low, ranging from 0.48% for serotype 7F to 7.9% for serotype 19A. On the other side serotype 5, very frequent in NP (18.7%) caused <1% IPD. In conclusion serotypes causing IPD in adults are very rarely found in children NP. We suggest that herd protection obtainable with the additional 6 serotypes included in PCV13 may be more limited than that demonstrated with PCV7 in the past. In order to reduce the burden of disease in adults, adults should be offered a specific vaccination program with highly immunogenic PCV.

  6. Surveillance of pneumococcal diseases in Central and Eastern Europe

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Dagan, Ron; Sayiner, Abdullah; Chernyshova, Liudmyla; Dinleyici, Ener Çağrı; Hryniewicz, Waleria; Kulcsár, Andrea; Mad'arová, Lucia; Pazdiora, Petr; Sidorenko, Sergey; Streinu-Cercel, Anca; Tambić-Andrašević, Arjana; Yeraliyeva, Lyazzat

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pneumococcal infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The burden of disease associated with S. pneumoniae is largely preventable through routine vaccination. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (e.g. PCV7, PCV13) provide protection from invasive pneumococcal disease as well as non-invasive infection (pneumonia, acute otitis media), and decrease vaccine-type nasopharyngeal colonisation, thus reducing transmission to unvaccinated individuals. PCVs have also been shown to reduce the incidence of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal disease. Surveillance for pneumococcal disease is important to understand local epidemiology, serotype distribution and antibiotic resistance rates. Surveillance systems also help to inform policy development, including vaccine recommendations, and monitor the impact of pneumococcal vaccination. National pneumococcal surveillance systems exist in a number of countries in Central and Eastern Europe (such as Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania and Slovakia), and some have introduced PCVs (Czech Republic, Hungary, Kazakhstan, Russia, Slovakia and Turkey). Those countries without established programs (such as Kazakhstan, Russia and Ukraine) may be able to learn from the experiences of those with national surveillance systems. The serotype distributions and impact of PCV13 on pediatric pneumococcal diseases are relatively similar in different parts of the world, suggesting that approaches to vaccination used elsewhere are also likely to be effective in Central and Eastern Europe. This article briefly reviews the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease, presents the latest surveillance data from Central and Eastern Europe, and discusses any similarities and differences in these data as well the potential implications for vaccination policies in the region. PMID:27096714

  7. Impact of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Used in Children on Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Children and Adults in the United States: Analysis of Multisite, Population-based Surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Matthew R.; Link-Gelles, Ruth; Schaffner, William; Lynfield, Ruth; Lexau, Catherine; Bennett, Nancy M.; Petit, Susan; Zansky, Shelley M.; Harrison, Lee H.; Reingold, Arthur; Miller, Lisa; Scherzinger, Karen; Thomas, Ann; Farley, Monica M.; Zell, Elizabeth R.; Taylor, Thomas H.; Pondo, Tracy; Rodgers, Loren; McGee, Lesley; Beall, Bernard; Jorgensen, James H.; Whitney, Cynthia G.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Background In 2000, 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced in the U.S. and resulted in dramatic reductions in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and modest increases in non-PCV7-type IPD. In 2010, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced PCV7 in the U.S. immunization schedule. We evaluated the effect of PCV13 use in children on IPD in children and adults in the U.S. Methods We used laboratory- and population-based data on incidence of IPD from CDC’s Emerging Infections Program / Active Bacterial Core surveillance in a time-series model to estimate the impact of vaccination. Cases of IPD during July 2004–June 2013 were classified as being caused by the PCV13 serotypes against which PCV7 has no effect (PCV13/nonPCV7). Findings Compared with incidence expected among children <5 years old if PCV7 alone had been continued, incidence of IPD overall and IPD caused by PCV13/nonPCV7 serotypes declined by 64% (95% interval estimate [IE] 59–68 %) and 93% (95%IE 91–94), respectively, by July 2012–June 2013. Among adults, incidence of IPD overall and PCV13/nonPCV7-type IPD also declined by 12–32% and 58–72%, respectively, depending on age. In all age groups, reductions were driven principally by changes in incidence of serotypes 19A and 7F. We estimate that over 30,000 cases of IPD and 3,000 deaths were averted in the first 3 years following PCV13 introduction. Interpretation PCV13 has reduced IPD among all ages when used routinely in children in the U.S. Serotypes 19A and 7F, which emerged after PCV7 introduction, have been effectively controlled. PMID:25656600

  8. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Universal Routine Vaccination on Pneumococcal Disease in Italian Children

    PubMed Central

    Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico; Cappelli, Maria Giovanna; Cozza, Vanessa; Prato, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, the effectiveness of pneumococcal universal vaccination in preventing vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the PCV7/PCV13 shifting period was estimated to be 84.3% (95% CI: 84.0–84.6%) in children <5 years. This study aims at corroborating the estimation of both the effectiveness (VE) of PCVs and its impact in reducing pneumococcal diseases. A 1 : 3 matched-case-control study was conducted among children <5 years old hospitalized for IPD or pneumococcal pneumonia (PP) between 2006 and 2012 in the Puglia region. Moreover, hospitalizations for pneumococcal outcomes in the pre- and postvaccination period and the hospitalization risk ratios (HRRs) with 95% CIs were computed in Italy and in the first eight regions that introduced PCVs in 2006. The overall effectiveness of PCVs was 75% (95% CI: 61%–84%); it was 69% (95% CI: 30%–88%) against IPD and 77% (95% CI: 61%–87%) against PP. PCVs showed a significant impact on IPD and acute otitis media either at a national level or in those regions with a longer vaccination history, with a nearly 40% reduction of hospitalizations for both outcomes. Our findings provide further evidence of the effectiveness of PCVs against pneumococcal diseases and its impact on nasopharyngeal carriage in children <5 years, indicating the importance of maintaining high immunization coverage. PMID:26351644

  9. Serotype 3 Remains the Leading Cause of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Adults in Portugal (2012–2014) Despite Continued Reductions in Other 13-Valent Conjugate Vaccine Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Horácio, Andreia N.; Silva-Costa, Catarina; Lopes, Joana P.; Ramirez, Mário; Melo-Cristino, José; Vaz, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Since 2010 the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) replaced the 7-valent vaccine (PCV7) as the leading pneumococcal vaccine used in children through the private sector. Although, neither of the PCVs were used significantly in adults, changes in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) were expected due to herd protection. We characterized n = 1163 isolates recovered from IPD in adults in 2012–2014 with the goal of documenting possible changes in serotype prevalence and antimicrobial resistance. Among the 54 different serotypes detected, the most frequent, accounting for half of all IPD, were serotypes: 3 (14%), 8 (11%), 19A (7%), 22F (7%), 14 (6%), and 7F (5%). The proportion of IPD caused by PCV7 serotypes remained stable during the study period (14%), but was smaller than in the previous period (19% in 2009–2011, p = 0.003). The proportion of IPD caused by PCV13 serotypes decreased from 51% in 2012 to 38% in 2014 (p < 0.001), mainly due to decreases in serotypes 7F and 19A. However, PCV13 serotype 3 remained relatively stable and the most frequent cause of adult IPD. Non-PCV13 serotypes continued the increase initiated in the late post-PCV7 period, with serotypes 8 and 22F being the most important emerging serotypes. Serotype 15A increased in 2012–2014 (0.7% to 3.5%, p = 0.011) and was strongly associated with antimicrobial resistance. However, the decreases in resistant isolates among serotypes 14 and 19A led to an overall decrease in penicillin non-susceptibility (from 17 to 13%, p = 0.174) and erythromycin resistance (from 19 to 13%, p = 0.034). Introduction of PCV13 in the NIP for children, as well as its availability for adults may further alter the serotypes causing IPD in adults in Portugal and lead to changes in the proportion of resistant isolates. PMID:27790208

  10. Seasonal Drivers of Pneumococcal Disease Incidence: Impact of Bacterial Carriage and Viral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Daniel M.; Grant, Lindsay R.; Steiner, Claudia A.; Weatherholtz, Robert; Santosham, Mathuram; Viboud, Cécile; O'Brien, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Winter-seasonal epidemics of pneumococcal disease provide an opportunity to understand the drivers of incidence. We sought to determine whether seasonality of invasive pneumococcal disease is caused by increased nasopharyngeal transmission of the bacteria or increased susceptibility to invasive infections driven by cocirculating winter respiratory viruses. Methods. We analyzed pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease data collected from children <7 years old in the Navajo/White Mountain Apache populations between 1996 and 2012. Regression models were used to quantify seasonal variations in carriage prevalence, carriage density, and disease incidence. We also fit a multivariate model to determine the contribution of carriage prevalence and RSV activity to pneumococcal disease incidence while controlling for shared seasonal factors. Results. The seasonal patterns of invasive pneumococcal disease epidemics varied significantly by clinical presentation: bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia incidence peaked in late winter, whereas invasive nonpneumonia pneumococcal incidence peaked in autumn. Pneumococcal carriage prevalence and density also varied seasonally, with peak prevalence occurring in late autumn. In a multivariate model, RSV activity was associated with significant increases in bacteremic pneumonia cases (attributable percentage, 15.5%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.8%–26.1%) but was not associated with invasive nonpneumonia infections (8.0%; 95% CI, −4.8% to 19.3%). In contrast, seasonal variations in carriage prevalence were associated with significant increases in invasive nonpneumonia infections (31.4%; 95% CI, 8.8%–51.4%) but not with bacteremic pneumonia. Conclusions.The seasonality of invasive pneumococcal pneumonia could be due to increased susceptibility to invasive infection triggered by viral pathogens, whereas seasonality of other invasive pneumococcal infections might be primarily driven by increased nasopharyngeal

  11. Development and preliminary data on the use of a mobile app specifically designed to increase community awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Signori, Alessio; Landa, Paolo; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Given the growing use and great potential of mobile apps, this project aimed to develop and implement a user-friendly app to increase laypeople's knowledge and awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Despite the heavy burden of IPD, the documented low awareness of IPD among both laypeople and healthcare professionals and far from optimal pneumococcal vaccination coverage, no app specifically targeting IPD has been developed so far. The app was designed to be maximally functional and conceived in accordance with user-centered design. Its content, layout and usability were discussed and formally tested during several workshops that involved the principal stakeholders, including experts in IPD and information technology and potential end-users. Following several workshops, it was decided that, in order to make the app more interactive, its core should be a personal "checker" of the risk of contracting IPD and a user-friendly risk-communication strategy. The checker was populated with risk factors identified through both Italian and international official guidelines. Formal evaluation of the app revealed its good readability and usability properties. A sister web site with the same content was created to achieve higher population exposure. Seven months after being launched in a price- and registration-free modality, the app, named "Pneumo Rischio," averaged 20.9 new users/day and 1.3 sessions/user. The first in-field results suggest that "Pneumo Rischio" is a promising tool for increasing the population's awareness of IPD and its prevention through a user-friendly risk checker.

  12. Effectiveness of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine against vaccine-type invasive disease among children in Uruguay: an evaluation using existing data.

    PubMed

    Picón, Teresa; Alonso, Lucía; García Gabarrot, Gabriela; Speranza, Noelia; Casas, Mariana; Arrieta, Fernando; Camou, Teresa; Rosa, Raquel; De Oliveira, Lucia Helena; Verani, Jennifer Rabke

    2013-07-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced into the routine immunization program in Uruguay in March 2008 with a 2-dose primary series (given at 2 and 4 months) plus a booster (at 12 months) and a catch-up campaign (two doses given at 15 and 17 months). We used a case-control methodology and existing laboratory surveillance and immunization registry data from Uruguay to evaluate PCV7 effectiveness against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD). Cases of VT-IPD (with pneumococcus obtained from a normally sterile site) were identified through the National Reference Laboratory. Age- and neighborhood-matched controls were obtained through a national immunization registry in which all children are enrolled at birth regardless of vaccine receipt; all eligible controls were included. Immunization status of cases and controls was assessed through the immunization registry, and conditional logistic regression was used to calculate PCV7 effectiveness. Between April 2008 and February 2010, 44 cases of VT-IPD among children<5 years were identified; 43 (98%) of those children were located in the registry. Among located case patients, 7 (16.3%) were age-eligible to have received at least one dose of PCV7. A total of 637 matched controls were included. Vaccine effectiveness was 91.3% (95% CI: 46.4, 98.6) for ≥ 1 PCV7 doses and 94.8% (95% CI: 43.1, 99.5) for ≥ 2 PCV7 doses. Using existing data we demonstrated high effectiveness of PCV7 against VT-IPD in Uruguay-a middle-income country using a 2-dose primary series plus a booster dose and a limited catch-up campaign. These data also highlight the utility of surveillance and high-quality immunization registries for evaluating the effectiveness of vaccines.

  13. Development and preliminary data on the use of a mobile app specifically designed to increase community awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease and its prevention

    PubMed Central

    Panatto, Donatella; Domnich, Alexander; Gasparini, Roberto; Bonanni, Paolo; Icardi, Giancarlo; Amicizia, Daniela; Arata, Lucia; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Signori, Alessio; Landa, Paolo; Bechini, Angela; Boccalini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Given the growing use and great potential of mobile apps, this project aimed to develop and implement a user-friendly app to increase laypeople's knowledge and awareness of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Despite the heavy burden of IPD, the documented low awareness of IPD among both laypeople and healthcare professionals and far from optimal pneumococcal vaccination coverage, no app specifically targeting IPD has been developed so far. The app was designed to be maximally functional and conceived in accordance with user-centered design. Its content, layout and usability were discussed and formally tested during several workshops that involved the principal stakeholders, including experts in IPD and information technology and potential end-users. Following several workshops, it was decided that, in order to make the app more interactive, its core should be a personal “checker” of the risk of contracting IPD and a user-friendly risk-communication strategy. The checker was populated with risk factors identified through both Italian and international official guidelines. Formal evaluation of the app revealed its good readability and usability properties. A sister web site with the same content was created to achieve higher population exposure. Seven months after being launched in a price- and registration-free modality, the app, named “Pneumo Rischio,” averaged 20.9 new users/day and 1.3 sessions/user. The first in-field results suggest that “Pneumo Rischio” is a promising tool for increasing the population's awareness of IPD and its prevention through a user-friendly risk checker. PMID:26795065

  14. Evolution and genetic diversity of the Spain23F-ST81 clone causing adult invasive pneumococcal disease in Barcelona (1990–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Domenech, A.; Ardanuy, C.; Grau, I.; Calatayud, L.; Pallares, R.; Fenoll, A.; Brueggemann, A. B.; Liñares, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to analyse the clinical epidemiology and genetic diversity of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) episodes attributed to the Spain23F-ST81 (PMEN1) clone. Methods Fifty-eight (2.7%) of 2117 invasive pneumococci isolated from adult patients during the 1990–2012 period shared a PFGE pattern related to the PMEN1 clone. The genotype was confirmed by multilocus sequence typing. The pbp2x, pbp1a, pbp2b and pspA genes were PCR-amplified and sequenced. Polymorphisms in the pspC gene were identified by PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism. The presence of transposons with erythromycin and tetracycline resistance determinants was detected by PCR. Results The prevalence of the PMEN1 clone increased from 0.8% in 1991 to 6.2% in 2001, and decreased to 0% in 2010–12, concomitant with the introduction of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for children. A total of 93.1% of patients had pneumonia, meningitis or peritonitis; 87.9% of patients had associated underlying diseases, mainly cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes. Two closely related sequence types (STs) (ST81, n = 52; ST85, n = 6) were detected, with different serotypes: 23F (n = 42), 19A (n = 9) and 19F (n = 6). All the isolates were resistant to penicillin, co-trimoxazole and chloramphenicol. All the isolates also shared the same pbp1a allele, whereas multiple alleles of pbp2b, pbp2x, pspA and pspC were detected. Of the isolates, 89.7% were tetracycline resistant and 60.3% (n = 35) were macrolide resistant, and resistance was associated with different Tn916-like transposons. Conclusions Adult IPD caused by this clone was mainly detected in patients with underlying conditions, and genetic variability was observed among PMEN1 isolates collected in our area over the past 20 years. PMID:24324223

  15. Pneumococcal Disease: Risk Factors and Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foundation for Infectious Diseases Sepsis Risk Factors and Transmission Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this ... the brain and spinal cord) Who smoke cigarettes Transmission Pneumococcal bacteria spread from person-to-person by ...

  16. Serotypes and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Invasive Pneumococcal Disease and Asymptomatic Carriage in a Pre-vaccination Period, in Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Ziane, Hanifa; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Moura, Inês B.; Bektache, Soumia; Tazir, Mohamed; Caniça, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, few data is available concerning the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes and respective antibiotic resistance for the current pre-vaccination period, which is a public health concern. We identified the most frequent Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup/types implicated in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD; n = 80) and carriage (n = 138) in Algerian children younger than 5 years old. Serogroup/types of 78 IPD isolates were identified by capsular typing using a sequential multiplex PCR. Overall, serotypes 14, 19F, 6B, 23F, 18C, 1, 5, 7F, 19A, and 3 (55% of PCV7 serotypes, 71.3% of PCV10, and 90% of PCV13) were identified. Additionally, 7.5% of the non-vaccine serotypes 6C, 9N/L, 20, 24F, 35B, and 35F, were observed. In the case of S. pneumoniae asymptomatic children carriers, the most common serogroup/types were 6B, 14, 19F, 23F, 4, 9V/A, 1, 19A, 6A, and 3 (42.7% of PCV7 serotypes, 44.2% of PCV10, and 58% of PCV13). For 6.1% of the cases co-colonization was detected. Serotypes 14, 1, 5, and 19A were more implicated in IPD (p < 0.01), whereas serotype 6A was exclusively isolated from carriers (p < 0.01). Deaths associated with IPD were related to serotypes 19A, 14, 18C, and one non-typeable isolate. Among IPD related to vaccine serotypes, the rates of penicillin non-susceptible isolates were higher in no meningitis cases (80%) than in meningitis (66.7%), with serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, and 23F presenting the highest MIC levels (>2μg/ml). Resistance to cefotaxime was higher in isolates from meningitis (40.5%); however, resistance to erythromycin and co-trimoxazole (>40%) was more pronounced in no-meningeal forms. Overall, our results showed that PCV13 conjugate vaccine would cover up to 90% of the circulating isolates associated with IPD in Algeria, highlighting the importance of monitoring the frequency of S. pneumoniae serogroups/types during pre- and post-vaccination periods. PMID:27379023

  17. Application of the real-time PCR method for genotypic identification of β-lactam resistance in isolates from invasive pneumococcal diseases.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Naoko; Morozumi, Miyuki; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2012-04-01

    We sought to identify genotypic resistance classes by real-time PCR in 300 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from invasive pneumococcal diseases. Primers and molecular beacon probes were designed for the lytA gene, 3 pbp genes, and the mefA/ermB genes. Targeted sequences of pbp1a, pbp2x, and pbp2b genes in susceptible strain R6 corresponded to those of penicillin G-nonsusceptible strains, including sites within or adjacent to conserved amino acid motifs. If amplification did not occur, the corresponding penicillin-binding protein (PBP) was considered to possess amino acid substitution(s) affecting minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of β-lactam antibiotics. Real-time PCR required 90 min or less. Strains were assigned to six genotypic classes: Genotypic penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae (gPSSP) with 3 normal genes (22.3%); genotypic penicillin-intermediate S. pneumoniae (gPISP) (pbp2x) with an abnormal pbp2x gene (25.3%); gPISP (pbp2b) with an abnormal pbp2b gene (7.3%); gPISP (pbp1a+2x) with abnormal pbp1a+2x genes (11.3%); gPISP (pbp2x+2b) with abnormal pbp2x+2b genes (4.7%); or genotypic penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (gPRSP) with 3 abnormal PBP genes (29.0%). Sensitivity and specificity of real-time PCR compared with those of conventional PCR were high, 73.7-100% and 97.7-100%, respectively. As for relationships between genotype and β-lactam MICs, 90% of MICs for every resistance class were distributed within three serial dilutions for almost all antibiotics. MICs of each β-lactam antibiotic were estimated with high probability from genotypic patterns. In conclusion, determination of genotypic classes of S. pneumoniae using rapid real-time PCR is useful in selecting effective therapeutic agents for patients with pneumococcal infection.

  18. Serotypes and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Invasive Pneumococcal Disease and Asymptomatic Carriage in a Pre-vaccination Period, in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Hanifa; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Moura, Inês B; Bektache, Soumia; Tazir, Mohamed; Caniça, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, few data is available concerning the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes and respective antibiotic resistance for the current pre-vaccination period, which is a public health concern. We identified the most frequent Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup/types implicated in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD; n = 80) and carriage (n = 138) in Algerian children younger than 5 years old. Serogroup/types of 78 IPD isolates were identified by capsular typing using a sequential multiplex PCR. Overall, serotypes 14, 19F, 6B, 23F, 18C, 1, 5, 7F, 19A, and 3 (55% of PCV7 serotypes, 71.3% of PCV10, and 90% of PCV13) were identified. Additionally, 7.5% of the non-vaccine serotypes 6C, 9N/L, 20, 24F, 35B, and 35F, were observed. In the case of S. pneumoniae asymptomatic children carriers, the most common serogroup/types were 6B, 14, 19F, 23F, 4, 9V/A, 1, 19A, 6A, and 3 (42.7% of PCV7 serotypes, 44.2% of PCV10, and 58% of PCV13). For 6.1% of the cases co-colonization was detected. Serotypes 14, 1, 5, and 19A were more implicated in IPD (p < 0.01), whereas serotype 6A was exclusively isolated from carriers (p < 0.01). Deaths associated with IPD were related to serotypes 19A, 14, 18C, and one non-typeable isolate. Among IPD related to vaccine serotypes, the rates of penicillin non-susceptible isolates were higher in no meningitis cases (80%) than in meningitis (66.7%), with serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, and 23F presenting the highest MIC levels (>2μg/ml). Resistance to cefotaxime was higher in isolates from meningitis (40.5%); however, resistance to erythromycin and co-trimoxazole (>40%) was more pronounced in no-meningeal forms. Overall, our results showed that PCV13 conjugate vaccine would cover up to 90% of the circulating isolates associated with IPD in Algeria, highlighting the importance of monitoring the frequency of S. pneumoniae serogroups/types during pre- and post-vaccination periods.

  19. Serotypes and Antibiotic Susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates from Invasive Pneumococcal Disease and Asymptomatic Carriage in a Pre-vaccination Period, in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Ziane, Hanifa; Manageiro, Vera; Ferreira, Eugénia; Moura, Inês B; Bektache, Soumia; Tazir, Mohamed; Caniça, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    In Algeria, few data is available concerning the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes and respective antibiotic resistance for the current pre-vaccination period, which is a public health concern. We identified the most frequent Streptococcus pneumoniae serogroup/types implicated in invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD; n = 80) and carriage (n = 138) in Algerian children younger than 5 years old. Serogroup/types of 78 IPD isolates were identified by capsular typing using a sequential multiplex PCR. Overall, serotypes 14, 19F, 6B, 23F, 18C, 1, 5, 7F, 19A, and 3 (55% of PCV7 serotypes, 71.3% of PCV10, and 90% of PCV13) were identified. Additionally, 7.5% of the non-vaccine serotypes 6C, 9N/L, 20, 24F, 35B, and 35F, were observed. In the case of S. pneumoniae asymptomatic children carriers, the most common serogroup/types were 6B, 14, 19F, 23F, 4, 9V/A, 1, 19A, 6A, and 3 (42.7% of PCV7 serotypes, 44.2% of PCV10, and 58% of PCV13). For 6.1% of the cases co-colonization was detected. Serotypes 14, 1, 5, and 19A were more implicated in IPD (p < 0.01), whereas serotype 6A was exclusively isolated from carriers (p < 0.01). Deaths associated with IPD were related to serotypes 19A, 14, 18C, and one non-typeable isolate. Among IPD related to vaccine serotypes, the rates of penicillin non-susceptible isolates were higher in no meningitis cases (80%) than in meningitis (66.7%), with serotypes 14, 19A, 19F, and 23F presenting the highest MIC levels (>2μg/ml). Resistance to cefotaxime was higher in isolates from meningitis (40.5%); however, resistance to erythromycin and co-trimoxazole (>40%) was more pronounced in no-meningeal forms. Overall, our results showed that PCV13 conjugate vaccine would cover up to 90% of the circulating isolates associated with IPD in Algeria, highlighting the importance of monitoring the frequency of S. pneumoniae serogroups/types during pre- and post-vaccination periods. PMID:27379023

  20. Active hospital-based surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease and clinical pneumonia in infants and young children in two Polish counties

    PubMed Central

    Sluzewski, Wojciech; Gutterman, Elane; Jouve, Sylvie; Moscariello, Michele; Balter, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence, serotype distribution, and antibiotic susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae were estimated in children aged 28 days to < 60 months. Material and methods One-year prospective, hospital-based surveillance was conducted starting on February 15, 2008, at two children's hospitals serving the city and surrounding county of Poznań and Poznański, Poland. Eligible children had fever ≥ 39.0°C or physician-suspected IPD. Blood cultures were obtained from all children, cerebrospinal fluid in suspected meningitis cases, and chest radiographs (CXRs) in suspected pneumonia cases. Results Seven of 1,581 eligible children had confirmed IPD. Estimated IPD incidence per 100,000 children was 11.89 (95% CI: 4.78–24.50) overall and 20.1 (95% CI: 6.52–46.84) in subjects aged 28 days to < 24 months. One S. pneumoniae isolate of each of the following serotypes was obtained: 6B, 14, 23A, 23F, and 33F. Two isolates were resistant to both trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and erythromycin. Clinical pneumonia incidence among children aged 28 days to < 24 months and 24 months to < 60 months was 3,151.3 (95% CI: 2934.7–3379.7) and 962.7 (95% CI: 861.2–10,072.9) per 100,000 children, respectively. CXR-confirmed pneumonia rates in the same groups were 1,035.7 (95% CI: 913.2–1,170.1) and 379.8 (95% CI: 317.1–451.3) per 100,000 children, respectively. Conclusions IPD is an important cause of morbidity in Poznań and Poznański county, Poland. Among participants aged < 5 years with fever or suspected IPD, pneumonia was the most common diagnosis and was highest in children aged < 24 months. PMID:27279858

  1. Secular trends (1990-2013) in serotypes and associated non-susceptibility of S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease in the pre-/post-era of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Spanish regions without universal paediatric pneumococcal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, Asunción; Granizo, Juan-José; Giménez, María-José; Yuste, José; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2015-10-13

    This study analyzed temporal trends of non-susceptibility/serotypes in invasive pneumococci from Spanish regions where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) were not included in paediatric immunization programmes. All invasive pneumococcal isolates voluntarily sent to the Spanish Reference Laboratory for Pneumococci (January 1990-December 2013) from hospitals located in target study regions were analyzed by age group. The PCV estimated coverage in children <24 months was correlated with 13-valent PCV (PCV13) serotypes trends. A total of 28,124 invasive isolates were analyzed: 3138 (11.2%) from children <24 months, 2161 (7.7%) from children 24-59 months, 781 (2.8%) from children 5-14 years, and 22,044 (78.4%) from adults. The estimated coverage increased from 17.6% (2002) to around 40% (2010-2013). The percentage of PCV13 serotypes among all isolates over time followed a cubic significant trend (R(2)=0.884), with an increasing trend up to 2001 followed by a decrease (more prominent from 2010 onwards). The estimated PCVs coverage was significantly correlated with the decrease in the percentage of PCV13 isolates in children <24 months (r(2)=0.824) and in adults (r(2)=0.786), mainly due to decreases in serotypes 1 and 7F in adults, and in serogroup 6 and serotypes 7F and 19A in children <24 months. None of the non-PCV13 serotypes stood out with substantial increases in the last period. This study showed that the different serotypes (and its associated non-susceptibility trends) were not equally affected by low PCVs disposition. Lack of impact in certain serotypes as serotype 1 (in children 24-59 months), 6C (in all age groups), and 19A (in adults) suggests the need for increasing vaccine coverage in the target vaccine population to increase direct and indirect protection. PMID:26341563

  2. Secular trends (1990-2013) in serotypes and associated non-susceptibility of S. pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease in the pre-/post-era of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in Spanish regions without universal paediatric pneumococcal vaccination.

    PubMed

    Fenoll, Asunción; Granizo, Juan-José; Giménez, María-José; Yuste, José; Aguilar, Lorenzo

    2015-10-13

    This study analyzed temporal trends of non-susceptibility/serotypes in invasive pneumococci from Spanish regions where pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) were not included in paediatric immunization programmes. All invasive pneumococcal isolates voluntarily sent to the Spanish Reference Laboratory for Pneumococci (January 1990-December 2013) from hospitals located in target study regions were analyzed by age group. The PCV estimated coverage in children <24 months was correlated with 13-valent PCV (PCV13) serotypes trends. A total of 28,124 invasive isolates were analyzed: 3138 (11.2%) from children <24 months, 2161 (7.7%) from children 24-59 months, 781 (2.8%) from children 5-14 years, and 22,044 (78.4%) from adults. The estimated coverage increased from 17.6% (2002) to around 40% (2010-2013). The percentage of PCV13 serotypes among all isolates over time followed a cubic significant trend (R(2)=0.884), with an increasing trend up to 2001 followed by a decrease (more prominent from 2010 onwards). The estimated PCVs coverage was significantly correlated with the decrease in the percentage of PCV13 isolates in children <24 months (r(2)=0.824) and in adults (r(2)=0.786), mainly due to decreases in serotypes 1 and 7F in adults, and in serogroup 6 and serotypes 7F and 19A in children <24 months. None of the non-PCV13 serotypes stood out with substantial increases in the last period. This study showed that the different serotypes (and its associated non-susceptibility trends) were not equally affected by low PCVs disposition. Lack of impact in certain serotypes as serotype 1 (in children 24-59 months), 6C (in all age groups), and 19A (in adults) suggests the need for increasing vaccine coverage in the target vaccine population to increase direct and indirect protection.

  3. Pneumococcal Disease: Symptoms and Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... bacteremia and sepsis are blood infections. Symptoms include: Fever Chills Low alertness Pneumococcus bacteria causes up to half of middle ear infections (otitis media). Symptoms include: Ear pain A red, swollen ear drum Fever Sleepiness  Top of Page Complications Some pneumococcal ...

  4. A current and historical perspective on disparities in US childhood pneumococcal conjugate vaccine adherence and in rates of invasive pneumococcal disease: Considerations for the routinely-recommended, pediatric PCV dosing schedule in the United States

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, John M; Utt, Eric A; Hill, Nina M; Welch, Verna L; Power, Edward; Sylvester, Gregg C

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that reducing the US 4-dose PCV13 schedule to a 3-dose schedule may provide cost savings, despite more childhood pneumococcal disease. The study also stressed that dose reduction should be coupled with improved PCV adherence, however, US PCV uptake has leveled-off since 2008. An estimated 24–36% of US children aged 5–19 months are already receiving a reduced PCV schedule (i.e., missing ≥1 dose). This raises a practical concern that, under a reduced, 3-dose schedule, a similar proportion of children may receive ≤2 doses. It is also unknown if a reduced, 3-dose PCV schedule in the United States will afford the same disease protection as 3-dose schedules used elsewhere, given lower US PCV adherence. Finally, more assurance is needed that, under a reduced schedule, racial, socioeconomic, and geographic disparities in PCV adherence will not correspond with disproportionately higher rates of pneumococcal disease among poor or minority children. PMID:26376039

  5. American Academy of Pediatrics. Committee on Infectious Diseases. Technical report: prevention of pneumococcal infections, including the use of pneumococcal conjugate and polysaccharide vaccines and antibiotic prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Overturf, G D

    2000-08-01

    Pneumococcal infections are the most common invasive bacterial infections in children in the United States. The incidence of invasive pneumococcal infections peaks in children younger than 2 years, reaching rates of 228/100,000 in children 6 to 12 months old. Children with functional or anatomic asplenia (including sickle cell disease [SCD]) and children with human immunodeficiency virus infection have pneumococcal infection rates 20- to 100-fold higher than those of healthy children during the first 5 years of life. Others at high risk of pneumococcal infections include children with congenital immunodeficiency; chronic cardiopulmonary disease; children receiving immunosuppressive chemotherapy; children with immunosuppressive neoplastic diseases; children with chronic renal insufficiency, including nephrotic syndrome; children with diabetes; and children with cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Children of Native American (American Indian and Alaska Native) or African American descent also have higher rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. Outbreaks of pneumococcal infection have occurred with increased frequency in children attending out-of-home care. Among these children, nasopharyngeal colonization rates of 60% have been observed, along with pneumococci resistant to multiple antibiotics. The administration of antibiotics to children involved in outbreaks of pneumococcal disease has had an inconsistent effect on nasopharyngeal carriage. In contrast, continuous penicillin prophylaxis in children younger than 5 years with SCD has been successful in reducing rates of pneumococcal disease by 84%. Pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have been recommended since 1985 for children older than 2 years who are at high risk of invasive disease, but these vaccines were not recommended for younger children and infants because of poor antibody response before 2 years of age. In contrast, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (Prevnar) induce proposed protective antibody responses (>.15

  6. Pneumococcal Vaccination Strategies. An Update and Perspective.

    PubMed

    Berical, Andrew C; Harris, Drew; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Possick, Jennifer D

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an important global pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical disease in children and adults. Pneumococcal pneumonia is by far the common presentation of noninvasive and invasive pneumococcal disease and affects the young, the elderly, and the immunocompromised disproportionately. Patients with chronic pulmonary diseases are also at higher risk for pneumococcal infections. Substantial progress over the century has been made in the understanding of pneumococcal immunobiology and the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease through vaccination. Currently, two pneumococcal vaccines are available for individuals at risk of pneumococcal disease: the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the 13-valent pneumococcal protein-conjugate vaccine (PCV13). The goal of pneumococcal vaccination is to stimulate effective antipneumococcal antibody and mucosal immunity response and immunological memory. Vaccination of infants and young children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has led to significant decrease in nasal carriage rates and pneumococcal disease in all age groups. Recent pneumococcal vaccine indication and schedule recommendations on the basis of age and risk factors are outlined in this Focused Review. As new pneumococcal vaccine recommendations are being followed, continued efforts are needed to address the vaccine efficacy in the waning immunity of the ever-aging population, the implementation of vaccines using two different vaccines under very specific schedules and their real world clinical and cost effectiveness, and the development of next generation pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:27088424

  7. Should Pneumococcal Vaccines Eliminate Nasopharyngeal Colonization?

    PubMed Central

    Swiatlo, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Streptococcus pneumoniae remains an important human pathogen. For more than 100 years, there have been vaccine efforts to prevent pneumococcal infection. The pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have significantly reduced invasive disease. However, these vaccines have changed pneumococcal ecology within the human nasopharynx. We suggest that elimination of the pneumococcus from the human nasopharynx can have consequences that should be considered as the next generation of pneumococcal vaccines is developed. PMID:27222469

  8. Novel clones of Streptococcus pneumoniae causing invasive disease in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Jefferies, Johanna M; Mohd Yusof, Mohd Yasim; Devi Sekaran, Shamala; Clarke, Stuart C

    2014-01-01

    Although Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of childhood disease in South East Asia, little has previously been reported regarding the epidemiology of invasive pneumococcal disease in Malaysia and very few studies have explored pneumococcal epidemiology using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Here we describe serotype, multilocus sequence type (ST), and penicillin susceptibility of thirty pneumococcal invasive disease isolates received by the University of Malaya Medical Centre between February 2000 and January 2007 and relate this to the serotypes included in current pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. A high level of diversity was observed; fourteen serotypes and 26 sequence types (ST), (11 of which were not previously described) were detected from 30 isolates. Penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci accounted for 33% of isolates. The extent of molecular heterogeneity within carried and disease-causing Malaysian pneumococci remains unknown. Larger surveillance and epidemiological studies are now required in this region to provide robust evidence on which to base future vaccine policy.

  9. Streptococcus pneumoniae capsule determines disease severity in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Grandgirard, Denis; Valente, Luca G.; Täuber, Martin G.; Leib, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria can be characterized into over 90 serotypes according to the composition of their polysaccharide capsules. Some serotypes are common in nasopharyngeal carriage whereas others are associated with invasive disease, but when carriage serotypes do invade disease is often particularly severe. It is unknown whether disease severity is due directly to the capsule type or to other virulence factors. Here, we used a clinical pneumococcal isolate and its capsule-switch mutants to determine the effect of capsule, in isolation from the genetic background, on severity of meningitis in an infant rat model. We found that possession of a capsule was essential for causing meningitis. Serotype 6B caused significantly more mortality than 7F and this correlated with increased capsule thickness in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a stronger inflammatory cytokine response in the CSF and ultimately more cortical brain damage. We conclude that capsule type has a direct effect on meningitis severity. This is an important consideration in the current era of vaccination targeting a subset of capsule types that causes serotype replacement. PMID:27009189

  10. Development of pneumococcal mastoiditis due to multidrug-resistant serotype 19A despite three doses of 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Richard C; Eberly, Matthew D

    2012-12-01

    Acute mastoiditis is a potential complication of acute otitis media (AOM), with Streptococcus pneumoniae historically the most common pathogen isolated. Following the release of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in 2000, a marked decline in invasive pneumococcal disease and a smaller reduction in pneumococcal AOM were observed, but data regarding its impact on acute mastoiditis are limited. With the recent introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), it is anticipated that pneumococcal AOM and invasive disease will further diminish. We report a case of acute mastoiditis from a multidrug-resistant serotype 19A S. pneumoniae in an immunocompetent child who had received three PCV13 vaccinations.

  11. Pneumococcal disease in HIV-infected Malawian adults: acute mortality and long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Stephen B.; Chaponda, Mas; Walsh, Amanda L.; Whitty, Christopher J.M.; Gordon, Melita A.; Machili, C. Edward; Gilks, Charles F.; Boeree, Martin J.; Kampondeni, Sam; Read, Robert C.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective HIV-infected patients in Africa are vulnerable to severe recurrent infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae, but no effective preventive strategy has been developed. We set out to determine which factors influence in-hospital mortality and long-term survival of Malawians with invasive pneumococcal disease. Design, setting and patients Acute clinical features, inpatient mortality and long-term survival were described among consecutively admitted hospital patients with S. pneumoniae in the blood or cerebrospinal fluid. Factors associated with inpatient mortality were determined, and patients surviving to discharge were followed to determine their long-term outcome. Results A total of 217 patients with pneumococcal disease were studied over an 18-month period. Among these, 158 out of 167 consenting to testing (95%) were HIV positive. Inpatient mortality was 65% for pneumococcal meningitis (n = 64), 20% for pneumococcaemic pneumonia (n = 92), 26% for patients with pneumococcaemia without localizing signs (n = 43), and 76% in patients with probable meningitis (n = 17). Lowered consciousness level, hypotension, and age exceeding 55 years at presentation were associated with inpatient death, but not long-term outcome in survivors. Hospital survivors were followed for a median of 414 days; 39% died in the community during the study period. Outpatient death was associated with multilobar chest signs, oral candidiasis, and severe anaemia as an inpatient. Conclusion Most patients with pneumococcal disease in Malawi have HIV co-infection. They have severe disease with a high mortality rate. At discharge, all HIV-infected adults have a poor prognosis but patients with multilobar chest signs or anaemia are at particular risk. PMID:12131218

  12. Antibiotic susceptibility rates of invasive pneumococci before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Germany.

    PubMed

    Imöhl, Matthias; Reinert, Ralf René; van der Linden, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Continuous nationwide surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was conducted in Germany. A total of 22,208 isolates from invasive pneumococcal disease were collected between July 1, 1992 and June 30, 2013. The present study was conducted to analyze changes in antimicrobial susceptibility and pneumococcal vaccine coverage after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Germany. Most of the isolates originated from adults ≥16 years (82.5%), while 17.5% were obtained from children <16 years. Penicillin resistance was observed in 7.2% of meningitis cases both among children and adults during the entire study period. In the post-PCV13 period, the resistance rate was 11.3% in children and 10.0% in adults, which is higher than in the pre-PCV7 and post-PCV7 periods. In the non-meningitis group, an overall penicillin nonsusceptibility rate (intermediate resistance and resistance) of 0.5% was detected both among children and adults. Nonsusceptibility rates among children were 6.3% (pre-PCV7), 7.6% (post-PCV7) and 9.0% (post-PCV13). The corresponding nonsusceptibility rates among adults were 4.4%, 6.0% and 7.9%, respectively. Concerning cefotaxime, in meningitis cases 0.8% of all isolates were intermediate and 0.5% resistant among children, while among adults, 0.9% were intermediate and 0.2% resistant. In non meningitis cases, cefotaxime nonsusceptibility rates were 0.5% in children and 0.3% in adults. Macrolide nonsusceptibility rates were lower in the post-PCV13 period (children 8.2%; adults 8.8%) than in the post-PCV7 period (children 17.3%; adults 13.0%) and the pre-PCV7 period (children 24.8%; adults 13.3%). In the pre-PCV7 period, macrolide resistance was mainly caused by M-phenotype clones carrying the mefA gene. In the post-PCV7/13 period, ermB (MLSb-phenotype) was the dominant resistance marker. Overall nonsusceptibility rates were 5.5% for clindamycin (intermediate 0.3%, resistant 5.2%), 0.7% for levofloxacin (intermediate 0

  13. Antibiotic susceptibility rates of invasive pneumococci before and after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Germany.

    PubMed

    Imöhl, Matthias; Reinert, Ralf René; van der Linden, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Continuous nationwide surveillance of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) was conducted in Germany. A total of 22,208 isolates from invasive pneumococcal disease were collected between July 1, 1992 and June 30, 2013. The present study was conducted to analyze changes in antimicrobial susceptibility and pneumococcal vaccine coverage after the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in Germany. Most of the isolates originated from adults ≥16 years (82.5%), while 17.5% were obtained from children <16 years. Penicillin resistance was observed in 7.2% of meningitis cases both among children and adults during the entire study period. In the post-PCV13 period, the resistance rate was 11.3% in children and 10.0% in adults, which is higher than in the pre-PCV7 and post-PCV7 periods. In the non-meningitis group, an overall penicillin nonsusceptibility rate (intermediate resistance and resistance) of 0.5% was detected both among children and adults. Nonsusceptibility rates among children were 6.3% (pre-PCV7), 7.6% (post-PCV7) and 9.0% (post-PCV13). The corresponding nonsusceptibility rates among adults were 4.4%, 6.0% and 7.9%, respectively. Concerning cefotaxime, in meningitis cases 0.8% of all isolates were intermediate and 0.5% resistant among children, while among adults, 0.9% were intermediate and 0.2% resistant. In non meningitis cases, cefotaxime nonsusceptibility rates were 0.5% in children and 0.3% in adults. Macrolide nonsusceptibility rates were lower in the post-PCV13 period (children 8.2%; adults 8.8%) than in the post-PCV7 period (children 17.3%; adults 13.0%) and the pre-PCV7 period (children 24.8%; adults 13.3%). In the pre-PCV7 period, macrolide resistance was mainly caused by M-phenotype clones carrying the mefA gene. In the post-PCV7/13 period, ermB (MLSb-phenotype) was the dominant resistance marker. Overall nonsusceptibility rates were 5.5% for clindamycin (intermediate 0.3%, resistant 5.2%), 0.7% for levofloxacin (intermediate 0

  14. Assessing the Immunogenic Response of a Single Center's Pneumococcal Vaccination Protocol in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Myers, Leann; Kanter, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hematologic disorder in the United States. Patients with SCD are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease and are reliant on both early penicillin prophylaxis and antipneumococcal vaccination for prevention of infection. Although studies examining vaccine response have demonstrated a drop-off of titer response after 3 years, an optimal vaccination regimen has not been identified. Our study sought to assess the immunogenicity of our center's pneumococcal vaccination strategy, which included Prevnar (PCV-7) (before the introduction of PCV-13) followed by Pneumovax (PPV-23) given routinely at 2 and 5 years of age and then every 5 years thereafter. Our goal was to assess vaccine response in a population of patients with SCD who had received vaccines according to this regimen using multiplex bead analysis. Our study demonstrated a significant percentage of persons with SCD do not maintain a sufficient vaccination response to PPV-23 for 5 years. Our study revealed that only 36% of patients had protective levels of antipneumococcal antibody titers at an average of 37 months after vaccination. Most alarmingly, within the group of patients with subtherapeutic titers, 64% demonstrated vaccine response to <25% of the tested serotypes. These findings were significantly associated with duration of time since last vaccine administration, but the mean age of lack of response was below the 3-year window where vaccine response was previously reported to wane. Our results indicate antipneumococcal immunity may not be optimally maintained using this vaccination strategy in patients with SCD leaving them vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease. Many pediatric hematologists stop prophylactic penicillin at 5 years of age making these results alarming. We recommend further investigation into an optimal vaccine schedule and monitoring of antipneumococcal titers in at-risk patients. PMID:26886376

  15. Assessing the Immunogenic Response of a Single Center's Pneumococcal Vaccination Protocol in Sickle Cell Disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Myers, Leann; Kanter, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is the most common inherited hematologic disorder in the United States. Patients with SCD are at increased risk of invasive pneumococcal disease and are reliant on both early penicillin prophylaxis and antipneumococcal vaccination for prevention of infection. Although studies examining vaccine response have demonstrated a drop-off of titer response after 3 years, an optimal vaccination regimen has not been identified. Our study sought to assess the immunogenicity of our center's pneumococcal vaccination strategy, which included Prevnar (PCV-7) (before the introduction of PCV-13) followed by Pneumovax (PPV-23) given routinely at 2 and 5 years of age and then every 5 years thereafter. Our goal was to assess vaccine response in a population of patients with SCD who had received vaccines according to this regimen using multiplex bead analysis. Our study demonstrated a significant percentage of persons with SCD do not maintain a sufficient vaccination response to PPV-23 for 5 years. Our study revealed that only 36% of patients had protective levels of antipneumococcal antibody titers at an average of 37 months after vaccination. Most alarmingly, within the group of patients with subtherapeutic titers, 64% demonstrated vaccine response to <25% of the tested serotypes. These findings were significantly associated with duration of time since last vaccine administration, but the mean age of lack of response was below the 3-year window where vaccine response was previously reported to wane. Our results indicate antipneumococcal immunity may not be optimally maintained using this vaccination strategy in patients with SCD leaving them vulnerable to invasive pneumococcal disease. Many pediatric hematologists stop prophylactic penicillin at 5 years of age making these results alarming. We recommend further investigation into an optimal vaccine schedule and monitoring of antipneumococcal titers in at-risk patients.

  16. Pneumococcal vaccination rates in VHA patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Case, David J; Copeland, Laurel A; Stock, Eileen M; Herrera, Henry R; Pfanner, Timothy P

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is an inflammatory condition of the digestive tract not caused by infectious agents. Symptoms of IBD, such as diarrhea and pain, diminish one's quality of life. Underlying immune dysregulation may put IBD patients at risk for severe infectious disease making preventative vaccination highly recommended. Therefore, this study sought to assess rates of pneumococcal vaccination in patients with IBD.A cross-sectional observational study was employed utilizing administrative data extracts from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to identify patients diagnosed with IBD per International Classification of Diseases, Version 9, Clinical Modification codes. Their pneumococcal vaccine histories were determined from Common Procedural Terminology codes. Data were aggregated to the patient level and subjected to multivariable logistic regression to assess factors associated with receipt of the vaccination and 1-year mortality; survival analyses extended follow-up to as much as 4 years following IBD diagnosis.From October 2004 to September 2009, 49,350 patients were diagnosed with IBD in the VHA. Incidence was approximately 6000 cases/y. Patients averaged 62 years (±15, range 19-98) with 45% aged 65 or older. Approximately 6% were women, 21% were highly disabled from a military service-connected condition, 46% had hypertension, 38% dyslipidemia, and 18% diabetes. Only 20% of the cohort received pneumococcal vaccination including 5% vaccinated prior to IBD diagnosis, 2% on the date of diagnosis, and 13% subsequently. Being married, living outside the Northeast, and having more comorbidities were associated with vaccination before IBD diagnosis; models of vaccination at or after diagnosis demonstrated poor fit: little better than chance. Vaccinations before, after, and at diagnosis were protective against 1-year mortality adjusting for clinical and demographic covariates. Living in the South was an independent risk factor for death among IBD

  17. AdcAII of Streptococcus pneumoniae Affects Pneumococcal Invasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lindsey R.; Gunnell, Steven M.; Cassella, Adam N.; Keller, Lance E.; Scherkenbach, Lisa A.; Mann, Beth; Brown, Matthew W.; Hill, Rebecca; Fitzkee, Nicholas C.; Rosch, Jason W.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Thornton, Justin A.

    2016-01-01

    Across bacterial species, metal binding proteins can serve functions in pathogenesis in addition to regulating metal homeostasis. We have compared and contrasted the activities of zinc (Zn2+)-binding lipoproteins AdcA and AdcAII in the Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 background. Exposure to Zn2+-limiting conditions resulted in delayed growth in a strain lacking AdcAII (ΔAdcAII) when compared to wild type bacteria or a mutant lacking AdcA (ΔAdcA). AdcAII failed to interact with the extracellular matrix protein laminin despite homology to laminin-binding proteins of related streptococci. Deletion of AdcA or AdcAII led to significantly increased invasion of A549 human lung epithelial cells and a trend toward increased invasion in vivo. Loss of AdcAII, but not AdcA, was shown to negatively impact early colonization of the nasopharynx. Our findings suggest that expression of AdcAII affects invasiveness of S. pneumoniae in response to available Zn2+ concentrations. PMID:26752283

  18. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Invasive Pneumococcal Isolates in North West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    lliyasu, Garba; Habib, Abdulrazaq G; Mohammad, Aminu B

    2015-01-01

    Background: An alarming increase in infections due to penicillin non-susceptible pneumococci (PNSP) has been documented in nearly all countries. Increasingly, PNSP are also resistant to other antibiotics, and a growing number of clinical failures following the use of these agents have been reported. Aims: To determine the resistance pattern of pneumococcal isolates from patients with invasive pneumococcal infection in North West Nigeria. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study clinical specimens were obtained from patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP), meningitis and bacteraemia over a 2 year period. Pneumococcus strains were identified. Isolates were tested against a panel of antibiotics using E-test strips, and interpreted according to the CLSI criteria. 0.06 μg/ml was used as break point for penicillin. Analysis was carried out using descriptive statistics; relationships determined using chi-squared or Fisher's exact tests, with P < 0.05 regarded as significant. Results: Total number of isolates was 132. Twenty-two (16.7%) of the isolates were fully sensitive to penicillin while 73 (55.3%) and 37 (28.0%) were intermediately and fully resistant, respectively. One hundred and twenty-seven (96.2%) of the isolates were fully resistant to trimethoprim–sulphamethoxazole. Eleven (8.5%) were fully resistant to amoxicillin and 104 (78.8%) and 17 (12.9%) were intermediately resistant and fully susceptible. One hundred and six (80.3%) of the isolates were fully susceptible to chloramphenicol. Resistance to penicillin was shown to infer resistance to other antibiotics. Conclusions: Pneumococcal resistance is common in North West Nigeria. Ceftriaxone retains excellent activity against most of the invasive isolate, while trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole is almost uniformly resistant. PMID:26069426

  19. Pneumococcal Vaccine in Diabetes: Relevance in India.

    PubMed

    Shashank, R Joshi; Samika, S Joshi; Siddharth, N Shah

    2015-04-01

    Currently we have more than 65 million Diabetes patients in India with estimated 80 million prediabetics. Diabetes is a immunologically vulnerable population to develop all types of microbial infections. Pneumoccocal infections do have a substantial morbidity and mortality burden in the community. India has a large geriatric pool now which has substantially increased pneumococcal disease burden. Diabetes is a well-known risk factor for pneumococcal infection and predisposes individuals to nasopharyngeal colonization with the pneumococcus which is associated with invasive infection. In diabetics who are elderly, with chronic kidney or pulmonary disease and long standing duration of the disease with poor glycemic control are the highest risk group susceptible to invasive pneumococcal disease. With now availibilty of Pneumoccal vaccine in India, now it may be an preventive option which can be offered. Most global organisations recommend pneumococcal vaccination to diabetics. PMID:26562963

  20. Pneumococcal disease in the Arabian Gulf: recognizing the challenge and moving toward a solution.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Charles; Abdulkarim, Emad; Alattar, Fatma; Al Lawati, Faryal; Al Khatib, Hisham; Al Maslamani, Muna; Al Obaidani, Idris; Al Salah, Mosaab; Farghaly, Mohamed; Husain, Entesar H; Mokadas, Eiman

    2013-12-01

    Pneumococcal disease has substantial incidence, morbidity and mortality in older adults. Decreased birth rates and longer lifespans indicate that the global population is aging, although rates of aging differ between countries [1]. In 2010, the proportion of the population aged >60 years in the general Arab Region was 7%, and this proportion is expected to rise to 19% by 2050 for the region as a whole [2]; the United Nations estimates for the individual countries of the Arabian Gulf by 2050 are 25.7%, 24.9%, 20.7%, 26.7% and 10.5% in the Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Oman, respectively, which are comparable to the 26.9% predicted for the USA and lower than that predicted in European countries, in which the 2050 estimates are 32.7%, 34.0% and 38.1% for France, the UK and Germany, respectively [1]. Globally and in the Gulf Region, pneumococcal disease is an increasingly important public health burden in the elderly. The burden of pneumococcal disease can be reduced by effective vaccination programs, but the recommendations on pneumococcal vaccination in adults vary widely. The major barriers to vaccine implementation among healthcare professionals are an incomplete awareness of pneumococcal disease and the vaccination options in adults. The Gulf Advocate Group calls for healthcare providers in the countries of the Arabian Gulf (Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, United Arab Emirates and Oman) to support awareness and education programs about adult pneumococcal disease, particularly in high-risk groups such as those >65 years of age, those with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hematological malignancy, organ and bone marrow transplantation or chronic kidney or lung diseases and pilgrims undertaking the Hajj to improve pneumococcal disease surveillance and optimize and disseminate recommendations for adult vaccination. The Gulf Advocate Group recommends following the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for pneumococcal vaccination [3,4].

  1. Association between pneumococcal load and disease severity in adults with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Werno, Anja M; Anderson, Trevor P; Murdoch, David R

    2012-08-01

    Determination of pneumococcal load by quantitative PCR may be useful for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. We hypothesized that higher pneumococcal load would be associated with increased pneumonia severity. Therefore, we tested serum, sputum and urine specimens from 304 adults with community-acquired pneumonia by using a quantitative lytA pneumococcal real-time PCR assay. The association between pneumococcal load and disease severity was assessed using several markers of severity: CURBage score, PSI risk class, intensive care unit admission, in-hospital death and admission duration. For PCR-positive specimens, the bacterial loads were higher in sputum specimens [median 8.55×10(5) copies ml(-1); interquartile range (IQR) 4.70×10(4)-4.69×10(6) copies ml(-1)] than either serum (median 180 copies ml(-1); IQR 165-8970 copies ml(-1)) or urine (median 623 copies ml(-1); IQR 510-650 copies ml(-1)). Detection of pneumococcal DNA in serum was associated with severe disease, and there was evidence of a dose-response effect with increased bacterial load being associated with increased severity. The same observations were not observed for other specimen types. This study adds to an increasing body of evidence suggesting that determination of pneumococcal load has a clinical utility. Further work is needed to determine whether measuring pneumococcal load in respiratory specimens from adults will differentiate colonization from coincidental carriage.

  2. A population-based analysis of pneumococcal disease mortality in California, 1989-1998.

    PubMed Central

    Redelings, Matthew D.; Sorvillo, Frank; Simon, Paul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Pneumococcal disease is an important cause of vaccine-preventable mortality. It is important to understand the burden and distribution of mortality so that prevention efforts can be targeted appropriately. This study evaluated pneumococcal disease mortality and its demographic correlates in California from 1989 to 1998. METHODS: Deaths due to pneumococcal disease were identified from statewide vital records data using multiple cause-coded information. Denominator data were obtained from estimates from the California Department of Finance. Crude and age-adjusted mortality rates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated for each age, gender, and racial/ethnic group. RESULTS: The age-adjusted pneumococcal disease mortality rate was 2.05 deaths per 100,000 population. Mortality was highest in elderly individuals (reaching 38.29 deaths per 100,000 population in individuals older than age 85). Age-adjusted mortality rates were elevated in the African American race/ethnicity group (2.96 deaths per 100,000 population) and males (2.67 deaths per 100,000 population). The majority of individuals who died of pneumococcal disease (78.9%) fell into at-risk groups indicated for vaccination. The majority of all pneumococcal deaths were caused by pneumococcal pneumonia. Mortality was seasonal, reaching a peak in the winter months. A decreasing trend in mortality was observed over the 10-year period examined. CONCLUSIONS: Pneumococcal disease remains a significant cause of vaccine-preventable mortality in the California population. Greater efforts must be made to vaccinate at-risk individuals, especially those in demographic groups at highest risk of death. PMID:15842117

  3. Further available immunization option to prevent pneumococcal disease

    PubMed Central

    Vojtek, Ivo; Hoet, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In their recent review, Charles Feldman and Ronald Anderson provide an overview of various clinical aspects of pneumococcal infections. We would like to complete this report by providing some additional information on a widely-used immunization option, which was not originally mentioned in the article. The protein D pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) has been pre-approved by WHO and its impact is supported by real-life data from the regions of its use. PMID:25866621

  4. Further available immunization option to prevent pneumococcal disease.

    PubMed

    Vojtek, Ivo; Hoet, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In their recent review, Charles Feldman and Ronald Anderson provide an overview of various clinical aspects of pneumococcal infections. We would like to complete this report by providing some additional information on a widely-used immunization option, which was not originally mentioned in the article. The protein D pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) has been pre-approved by WHO and its impact is supported by real-life data from the regions of its use.

  5. Risk factors for pneumococcal nasopharyngeal colonization before and after pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in persons with HIV: brief report.

    PubMed

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Søgaard, Ole S; Harboe, Zitta B; Schønheyder, Henrik C

    2012-04-01

    HIV-infected individuals have excess rates of invasive pneumococcal disease. We investigated risk factors for nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization at baseline and after 9 months in 96 HIV patients immunized twice with 7- valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine ±1mg CPG 7909. In total, 22 patients (23%) were colonized, 11 at baseline only, four at both baseline and 9 months, and seven at 9 months only. Compared to non-colonized patients, more colonized patients were smokers, had lower CD4+ nadir and had an AIDS-diagnosis. Immunization, antiretroviral treatment and the CPG adjuvant had no impact on colonization. These results suggest preventive strategies in addition to pneumococcal immunization. PMID:22384845

  6. Non-Invasive Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Portugal—Serotype Distribution and Antimicrobial Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Horácio, Andreia N.; Lopes, Joana P.; Ramirez, Mário; Melo-Cristino, José

    2014-01-01

    There is limited information on the serotypes causing non-invasive pneumococcal pneumonia (NIPP). Our aim was to characterize pneumococci causing NIPP in adults to determine recent changes in serotype prevalence, the potential coverage of pneumococcal vaccines and changes in antimicrobial resistance. Serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of a sample of 1300 isolates recovered from adult patients (≥18 yrs) between 1999 and 2011 (13 years) were determined. Serotype 3 was the most frequent cause of NIPP accounting for 18% of the isolates. The other most common serotypes were 11A (7%), 19F (7%), 19A (5%), 14 (4%), 22F (4%), 23F (4%) and 9N (4%). Between 1999 and 2011, there were significant changes in the proportion of isolates expressing vaccine serotypes, with a steady decline of the serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine from 31% (1999–2003) to 11% (2011) (P<0.001). Taking together the most recent study years (2009–2011), the potential coverage of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine was 44% and of the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine was 66%. While erythromycin resistance increased from 8% in 1999–2003 to 18% in 2011 (P<0.001), no significant trend was identified for penicillin non-susceptibility, which had an average value of 18.5%. The serotype distribution found in this study for NIPP was very different from the one previously described for IPD, with only two serotypes in common to the ones responsible for half of each presentation in 2009–2011 – serotypes 3 and 19A. In spite of these differences, the overall prevalence of resistant isolates was similar in NIPP and in IPD. PMID:25075961

  7. Health-system pharmacists' role in immunizing adults against pneumococcal disease and influenza.

    PubMed

    Grabenstein, J D; Bonasso, J

    1999-09-01

    The role of pharmacists in immunizing adults against pneumococcal disease and influenza is discussed. Pneumococcal disease and influenza each cause up to 40,000 deaths annually in the United States. Vaccination against these diseases is encouraged for all people 65 years of age or older and for those with certain chronic diseases or immunosuppression. Influenza virus vaccine should also be given to residents of long-term-care facilities, many pregnant women, and health care workers. Pneumococcal vaccine is usually given once in a lifetime; influenza virus vaccine is given annually in the fall. Advocacy of immunization is consistent with the precepts of pharmaceutical care, and pharmacists can promote immunization by assuming the roles of educator, facilitator, and immunizer. Despite lack of specific mention of it in accreditation standards, health-system personnel have a duty to vaccinate adults, just as they do pediatric patients. Pharmacists should review immunization records with patients periodically and at the time of immunization. As with other drug products, formulary decisions and the distribution, storage, and handling of vaccines are important pharmacist responsibilities. Pharmacoeconomic studies have demonstrated the value of pneumococcal and influenza virus vaccines. Medicare covers these vaccines under Part B. Pharmacists have an important role to play in promoting adult immunizations against pneumococcal disease and influenza.

  8. South Asia symposium on pneumococcal disease and the promise of vaccines – Meeting report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Arora, Narendra; Santosham, Mathuram

    2016-01-01

    Despite the licensure of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in the US and other Western countries for over 14 years, as of September 2014 only 4 South Asian countries were using PCV in their universal immunization program. To generate momentum toward addressing this issue a “South Asia symposium on pneumococcal disease and the promise of vaccines” was organized just prior to the 9th international symposium on pneumococci and pneumococcal diseases held in India recently. Leading scientists, program managers, and decision makers including ministry officials from the region participated in the meeting. The participants discussed available data on pneumococcal disease burden in South Asia, surveillance methods, efficacy and safety of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV), the status of PCV introduction, programmatic challenges in introducing PCV and available data on the impact of PCV in South Asia and globally. There was a strong consensus that available data on disease burden and the global experience with PCV justified the introduction PCV in all Asian countries in order to accelerate the gains in child survival in the region. PMID:27026150

  9. South Asia symposium on pneumococcal disease and the promise of vaccines - Meeting report.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Arora, Narendra; Santosham, Mathuram

    2016-05-17

    Despite the licensure of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) in the US and other Western countries for over 14 years, as of September 2014 only 4 South Asian countries were using PCV in their universal immunization program. To generate momentum toward addressing this issue a "South Asia symposium on pneumococcal disease and the promise of vaccines" was organized just prior to the 9th international symposium on pneumococci and pneumococcal diseases held in India recently. Leading scientists, program managers, and decision makers including ministry officials from the region participated in the meeting. The participants discussed available data on pneumococcal disease burden in South Asia, surveillance methods, efficacy and safety of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV), the status of PCV introduction, programmatic challenges in introducing PCV and available data on the impact of PCV in South Asia and globally. There was a strong consensus that available data on disease burden and the global experience with PCV justified the introduction PCV in all Asian countries in order to accelerate the gains in child survival in the region.

  10. Pneumococcal hemolytic uremic syndrome and steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Groves, Andrew P.; Reich, Patrick; Sigdel, Binayak; Davis, T. Keefe

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (pHUS) is a rare but severe complication of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. We report the case of a 12-year-old female with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome treated with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (H.P. Acthar® Gel), who developed pneumococcal pneumonia and subsequent pHUS. While nephrotic syndrome is a well-known risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease, this is the first reported case of pHUS in an adolescent patient with nephrotic syndrome, and reveals novel challenges in the diagnosis, treatment and potential prevention of this complication. PMID:27478599

  11. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Reich, Jason S.; Miller, Hannah L.; Wasan, Sharmeel K.; Noronha, Ansu; Ardagna, Eileen; Sullivan, Kathleen; Jacobson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at an increased risk for vaccine-preventable illnesses, such as pneumococcal pneumonia and influenza. We hypothesized that a patient-directed educational program would increase vaccination rates of patients with IBD. We developed a written educational form that was given to all patients over a 15-month period. The form included information about the importance of vaccination and asked patients about their vaccination status. If patients indicated that they were not vaccinated, they were offered a vaccination at the time of their visit. For influenza, the vaccination rates during 3 seasons were compared. For pneumococcal pneumonia, the vaccination rates during a 6-month period before the introduction of the educational program and the rates during the 15-month period after implementation of the intervention were compared. Our form increased the percentage of patients who reported having an influenza vaccination (23% vs 47%; P<.001) and the percentage of patients who reported having a pneumococcal pneumonia vaccination (21% vs 32%; P<.001). We concluded that a simple written educational form designed to assess vaccination status and enable providers to offer same-day influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia vaccinations resulted in a significant increase in influenza and pneumococcal pneumonia vaccination rates among patients in an IBD specialty clinic. PMID:27118933

  12. Theory and strategy for Pneumococcal vaccines in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Funatsu, Yohei; Kimizuka, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Kazuma; Asami, Takahiro; Asakura, Takanori; Suzuki, Shoji; Kamo, Testuro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the fourth-leading cause of death globally, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most important causative pathogen. Because the incidence of pneumococcal diseases is likely to increase with the aging society, we should determine an optimal strategy for pneumococcal vaccination. While consensus indicates that 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD), its effects on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain controversial. Recently, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was released. The latest clinical study (CAPiTA study) showed that PCV13 reduced vaccine-type CAP and IPD. Based on these results, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended initial vaccination with PCV13 for the elderly. Scientific evidence regarding immunosenescence is needed to determine a more ideal vaccination strategy for the elderly with impaired innate and adaptive immunity. Continuing research on the cost effectiveness of new vaccine strategies considering constantly changing epidemiology is also warranted. PMID:26406267

  13. Theory and strategy for Pneumococcal vaccines in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Ho; Ishii, Makoto; Funatsu, Yohei; Kimizuka, Yoshifumi; Yagi, Kazuma; Asami, Takahiro; Asakura, Takanori; Suzuki, Shoji; Kamo, Testuro; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Pneumonia is the fourth-leading cause of death globally, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most important causative pathogen. Because the incidence of pneumococcal diseases is likely to increase with the aging society, we should determine an optimal strategy for pneumococcal vaccination. While consensus indicates that 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine prevents invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD), its effects on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remain controversial. Recently, a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was released. The latest clinical study (CAPiTA study) showed that PCV13 reduced vaccine-type CAP and IPD. Based on these results, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended initial vaccination with PCV13 for the elderly. Scientific evidence regarding immunosenescence is needed to determine a more ideal vaccination strategy for the elderly with impaired innate and adaptive immunity. Continuing research on the cost effectiveness of new vaccine strategies considering constantly changing epidemiology is also warranted. PMID:26406267

  14. [Pneumococcal vaccination for children and adults].

    PubMed

    Albrich, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococci are the leading bacterial causes of respiratory tract infections, bacteremia and meningitis. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV) are effective and safe in young children. Their introduction led to significant reductions of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), pneumonia, otitis media and antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal infections. Beyond these effects in the vaccinated age groups, there is a reduction in nasopharyngeal pneumococcal carriage and therefore in transmission. This in turn led to marked reductions in IPD and pneumonia in non-vaccinated age groups, particularly elderly adults as evidence of herd protection. Recently it was shown that the 13-valent PCV13 is effective and safe in adults leading to the age-independent recommendation of PCV13 in all persons with risk factors. PMID:27268445

  15. Serotype-Specific Pneumococcal Status prior to PCV 13 Administration in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Targońska, Brygida; Kowalska-Duplaga, Kinga; Karolewska-Bochenek, Katarzyna; Sieczkowska, Agnieszka; Gawrońska, Agnieszka; Grzybowska-Chlebowczyk, Urszula; Krzesiek, Elzbieta; Łazowska-Przeorek, Izabella; Kotowska, Maria; Sienkiewicz, Edyta; Walkowiak, Jarosław; Gregorek, Hanna; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the serotype-specific pneumococcal status of children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who were naïve to pneumococcal vaccination before administering the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV 13). This was an open, prospective study on children and adolescents aged 5-18 years who had IBD and were naïve to pneumococcal vaccination. A single dose of PCV 13 was administered to each patient. The geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were measured for all 13 serotypes. A total of 122 subjects completed the study. Prevaccination GMCs ranged from 0.55 μg/ml (serotype 4) to 4.26 μg/mI (serotype 19A). Prior to the administration of PCV 13, high GMCs were detected in older children and adolescents who had IBD and were naïve to pneumococcal vaccination. PMID:27281998

  16. Intraclonal Variations Among Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates Influence the Likelihood of Invasive Disease in Children

    PubMed Central

    Browall, Sarah; Norman, Martin; Tångrot, Jeanette; Galanis, Ilias; Sjöström, Karin; Dagerhamn, Jessica; Hellberg, Christel; Pathak, Anuj; Spadafina, Tiziana; Sandgren, Andreas; Bättig, Patrick; Franzén, Oscar; Andersson, Björn; Örtqvist, Åke; Normark, Staffan; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pneumococcal serotypes are represented by a varying number of clonal lineages with different genetic contents, potentially affecting invasiveness. However, genetic variation within the same genetic lineage may be larger than anticipated. Methods. A total of 715 invasive and carriage isolates from children in the same region and during the same period were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing. Bacterial genome sequencing, functional assays, and in vivo virulence mice studies were performed. Results. Clonal types of the same serotype but also intraclonal variants within clonal complexes (CCs) showed differences in invasive-disease potential. CC138, a common CC, was divided into several PFGE patterns, partly explained by number, location, and type of temperate bacteriophages. Whole-genome sequencing of 4 CC138 isolates representing PFGE clones with different invasive-disease potentials revealed intraclonal sequence variations of the virulence-associated proteins pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) and pneumococcal choline-binding protein C (PspC). A carrier isolate lacking PcpA exhibited decreased virulence in mice, and there was a differential binding of human factor H, depending on invasiveness. Conclusions. Pneumococcal clonal types but also intraclonal variants exhibited different invasive-disease potentials in children. Intraclonal variants, reflecting different prophage contents, showed differences in major surface antigens. This suggests ongoing immune selection, such as that due to PspC-mediated complement resistance through varied human factor H binding, that may affect invasiveness in children. PMID:24009156

  17. Levofloxacin-resistant invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in the United States: evidence for clonal spread and the impact of conjugate pneumococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pletz, Mathias W R; McGee, Lesley; Jorgensen, James; Beall, Bernard; Facklam, Richard R; Whitney, Cynthia G; Klugman, Keith P

    2004-09-01

    The emergence of fluoroquinolone resistance in sterile-site isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae is documented in this study characterizing all invasive levofloxacin-resistant (MIC, > or = 8 mg/liter) S. pneumoniae isolates (n = 50) obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Active Bacterial Core Surveillance from 1998 to 2002. Resistance among all isolates increased from 0.1% in 1998 to 0.6% in 2001 (P = 0.008) but decreased to 0.4% in 2002, while resistance among vaccine serotypes continued to increase from 0.3% in 1998 to 1.0% in 2002, suggesting that fluoroquinolones continue to exert selective pressure on these vaccine serotypes. Only 22% of resistant isolates were not covered by the conjugate vaccine serogroups. Multilocus sequence typing revealed that 58% of resistant strains were related to five international clones identified by the Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network, with the Spain(23F)-1 clone being most frequent (16% of all isolates). Thirty-six percent of the isolates were coresistant to penicillin, 44% were coresistant to macrolides, and 28% were multiresistant to penicillin, macrolides, and fluoroquinolones. Fifty percent of the isolates were resistant to any three drug classes. Ninety-four percent of the isolates had multiple mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes. In 16% of the isolates, there was evidence of an active efflux mechanism. An unusual isolate was found that showed only a single parE mutation and for which the ciprofloxacin MIC was lower (2 mg/liter) than that of levofloxacin (8 mg/liter). Our results suggest that invasive pneumococcal isolates resistant to levofloxacin in the United States show considerable evidence of multiple resistance and of clonal spread. PMID:15328116

  18. Distribution of capsular types and antimicrobial susceptibility of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Colombian children. Pneumococcal Study Group in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, E; Leal, A L; Castillo, O; De La Hoz, F; Vela, M C; Arango, M; Trujillo, H; Levy, A; Gama, M E; Calle, M; Valencia, M L; Parra, W; Agudelo, N; Mejía, G I; Jaramillo, S; Montoya, F; Porras, H; Sánchez, A; Saa, D; Di Fabio, J L; Homma, A

    1997-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of childhood pneumonia in the developing world. This study describes the type distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of invasive pneumococcal isolates from Colombian children and is part of the Sistema Regional de Vacunas (SIREVA), a PAHO regional initiative designed to determine the ideal serotype composition of a protein polysaccharide pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for use in children less than 5 years old in Latin America. In Colombia, during the study period, centres in Bogota, Medellin, and Cali collected 324 S. pneumoniae isolates from invasive diseases, 238 (73.5%) from children under the age of 2. Pneumonia was the clinical diagnosis in 41.3% cases, meningitis in 41%, and sepsis in 11.2%. The seven most frequent types included 14(21.9%), 5(10.5%), 23F(9.6%), 1(9%), 6B(9%), 19F(7.1%), and 6A(6.2%). The frequency of diminished susceptibility to penicillin (DSP) was 12%, with 8.9% of isolates showing intermediate level resistance and 3.1% showing high level resistance. Among DSP isolates, 23% were also resistant to cefotaxime, 33.3% to erythromycin, 48.7% to chloramphenicol, and 74.3% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Multiple resistance was detected in 59% of the isolates that have DSP. Penicillin resistance was associated with types 23F (53.8%) and 14 (25.6%). These data provides information on capsular types prevalent in Colombia that will not only allow the formulation of an ideal vaccine for the region but also reinforce the need for ongoing regional surveillance.

  19. Streptococcus pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Piet, Jurgen R; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van Schaik, Barbera D C; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Valls Seron, Mercedes; Jakobs, Marja E; Schipper, Kim; Pannekoek, Yvonne; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; van der Poll, Tom; van Kampen, Antoine H C; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a major human pathogen causing pneumonia, sepsis and bacterial meningitis. Using a clinical phenotype based approach with bacterial whole-genome sequencing we identified pneumococcal arginine biosynthesis genes to be associated with outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. Pneumococci harboring these genes show increased growth in human blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Mouse models of meningitis and pneumonia showed that pneumococcal strains without arginine biosynthesis genes were attenuated in growth or cleared, from lung, blood and CSF. Thus, S. pneumoniae arginine synthesis genes promote growth and virulence in invasive pneumococcal disease.

  20. Novel Strategy To Protect against Influenza Virus-Induced Pneumococcal Disease without Interfering with Commensal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Christopher J; Marks, Laura R; Hu, John C; Reddinger, Ryan; Mandell, Lorrie; Roche-Hakansson, Hazeline; King-Lyons, Natalie D; Connell, Terry D; Hakansson, Anders P

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae commonly inhabits the nasopharynx as a member of the commensal biofilm. Infection with respiratory viruses, such as influenza A virus, induces commensal S. pneumoniae to disseminate beyond the nasopharynx and to elicit severe infections of the middle ears, lungs, and blood that are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current preventive strategies, including the polysaccharide conjugate vaccines, aim to eliminate asymptomatic carriage with vaccine-type pneumococci. However, this has resulted in serotype replacement with, so far, less fit pneumococcal strains, which has changed the nasopharyngeal flora, opening the niche for entry of other virulent pathogens (e.g., Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, and potentially Haemophilus influenzae). The long-term effects of these changes are unknown. Here, we present an attractive, alternative preventive approach where we subvert virus-induced pneumococcal disease without interfering with commensal colonization, thus specifically targeting disease-causing organisms. In that regard, pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA), a major surface protein of pneumococci, is a promising vaccine target. Intradermal (i.d.) immunization of mice with recombinant PspA in combination with LT-IIb(T13I), a novel i.d. adjuvant of the type II heat-labile enterotoxin family, elicited strong systemic PspA-specific IgG responses without inducing mucosal anti-PspA IgA responses. This response protected mice from otitis media, pneumonia, and septicemia and averted the cytokine storm associated with septic infection but had no effect on asymptomatic colonization. Our results firmly demonstrated that this immunization strategy against virally induced pneumococcal disease can be conferred without disturbing the desirable preexisting commensal colonization of the nasopharynx. PMID:27001538

  1. Impacts of the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Children.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Applications of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the pediatric immunization schedule have dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases in both vaccinated children and unvaccinated individuals of all ages. However, increased infections caused by non-PCV7 serotypes have been reported by several groups. To overcome this problem, new vaccines covering more serotypes including the emerging serotypes have been developed. The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) currently covers the 7 PCV7 serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F) and 6 additional serotypes 1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F, and 19A. After the first year of PCV13 applications in the immunization schedule in young children, global evaluation studies demonstrated that PCV13 provided a wider coverage and more effective prevention than PCV7 against invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs), mucosal pneumococcal diseases, and pneumococcal carriage. We reviewed the effects of PCV13 in the control of pneumococcal diseases in children based on previous studies.

  2. Impacts of the 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Children

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Applications of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in the pediatric immunization schedule have dramatically reduced the incidence of pneumococcal diseases in both vaccinated children and unvaccinated individuals of all ages. However, increased infections caused by non-PCV7 serotypes have been reported by several groups. To overcome this problem, new vaccines covering more serotypes including the emerging serotypes have been developed. The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) currently covers the 7 PCV7 serotypes (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F) and 6 additional serotypes 1, 3, 5, 6A, 7F, and 19A. After the first year of PCV13 applications in the immunization schedule in young children, global evaluation studies demonstrated that PCV13 provided a wider coverage and more effective prevention than PCV7 against invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs), mucosal pneumococcal diseases, and pneumococcal carriage. We reviewed the effects of PCV13 in the control of pneumococcal diseases in children based on previous studies. PMID:26351648

  3. A Case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen Syndrome Resulting from an Invasive Pneumococcal Infection in a Patient with a Hypoplastic Spleen

    PubMed Central

    Emori, Kazumasa; Takeuchi, Nobuhiro; Soneda, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was brought to our emergency department by ambulance with complaints of pain and numbness in both legs. At arrival, purple spots were evident on his neck and face. Examination of the vital sign indicated septic shock. Laboratory data and blood gas analysis revealed disseminated intravascular coagulation, multiple organ failure, and metabolic acidosis. Peripheral blood smears revealed Howell-Jolly bodies, indicating decreased splenic function. A rapid urinary pneumococcal antigen test was also found to be positive. After admission to the intensive care unit, extensive treatment, including polymyxin-B direct hemoperfusion and administration of methylprednisolone and broad spectrum antibiotics was immediately initiated. Despite of our efforts to save his life, the patient died six hours after the arrival. The following day, blood cultures revealed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae. An autopsy revealed a hypoplastic spleen and a bilateral adrenal hemorrhage, indicating acute adrenal insufficiency caused by sepsis. Finally, the patient was diagnosed with Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome. Although severe infection may be seen in the splenectomized patients, it should be noted that patients with a hypoplastic spleen may have acute severe infections. We, therefore, report a case of Waterhouse-Friderichsen syndrome resulting from an invasive pneumococcal infection in a patient with a hypoplastic spleen. PMID:26942021

  4. Pathogenesis and Pathophysiology of Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mook-Kanamori, Barry B.; Geldhoff, Madelijn; van der Poll, Tom; van de Beek, Diederik

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with high rates of mortality and long-term neurological sequelae. The most common route of infection starts by nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae, which must avoid mucosal entrapment and evade the host immune system after local activation. During invasive disease, pneumococcal epithelial adhesion is followed by bloodstream invasion and activation of the complement and coagulation systems. The release of inflammatory mediators facilitates pneumococcal crossing of the blood-brain barrier into the brain, where the bacteria multiply freely and trigger activation of circulating antigen-presenting cells and resident microglial cells. The resulting massive inflammation leads to further neutrophil recruitment and inflammation, resulting in the well-known features of bacterial meningitis, including cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis, cochlear damage, cerebral edema, hydrocephalus, and cerebrovascular complications. Experimental animal models continue to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis and provide the platform for the development of new adjuvant treatments and antimicrobial therapy. This review discusses the most recent views on the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis, as well as potential targets for (adjunctive) therapy. PMID:21734248

  5. [Statement of the Advisory Immunization Committee of the Chilean Society of Infectious Diseases on the emergence of serotype 19A pneumococcal infection and the use of pneumococcal conjugated vaccine in Chilean children].

    PubMed

    Potin, Marcela; Fica, Alberto; Wilhem, Jan; Cerda, Jaime; Contreras, Lily; Escobar, Carola; Moreno, Gabriela; Muñoz, Alma; Véliz, Liliana

    2016-06-01

    Inclusion of the 10-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV10) in the Chilean infant vaccination Program in 2011 was followed by a reduction of hospital admissions and pneumonia-related deaths in this age group. However, a progressive increase of serotype 19A pneumococcal isolates (not included in PCV10) has been observed. According to the analysis of pneumococcal strains performed by the national reference laboratory of the Institute of Public Health as part of a national surveillance on invasive pneumococcal infections, the relative proportion of serotype 19A isolates increased from <5% before 2010 to 12-23% in years 2014-2015. Serotype 19A represented 4-8% of the isolates in the pre-vaccine era among children less than 2 years, increasing to 25% during 2014. This increase has been documented in two-thirds of the national territory. Aimong children <5 years of age, 25% of 19A serotype isolates from non-meningeal infections were penicillin resistant wheras from meningeal infections near 100% were penicillin resistant. Genetic analysis indicates that 48% of these 19A strains belong to clonal complex 320, recognized for its pandemic potential and high antimicrobial resistance. Among children, most invasive infections secondary to serotype 19A have occurred in patients fully vaccinated with PCV10. These epidemiological changes indicate an increase in invasive pneumococcal infections by serotype 19A in Chile and the need to control this problem by changing the current PCV10 for the PCV13 vaccine containing serotype 19A. PMID:27598280

  6. Pneumococcal bacteremia in Monroe County, New York.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, N M; Buffington, J; LaForce, F M

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. Knowledge of the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease is critical for public health planning, evaluation of preventive strategies, and development of immunization recommendations. METHODS. We studied the incidence and case-fatality rates of pneumococcal bacteremia as a proxy for pneumococcal disease in Monroe County, New York, from 1985 through 1989 by reviewing the laboratory and clinical care records of all cases occurring among residents. RESULTS. There were 671 cases identified, for an overall yearly rate of 18.8 per 100,000. The rates were highest in the very young, in the very old, and in non-White populations. Age-specific rates were consistently higher in Blacks than in Whites. Predisposing medical conditions were present in 61% of cases. Case-fatality rates were 15% overall, 27% in those with predisposing medical conditions, and approximately 30% in Blacks older than 55 years and Whites older than 65 years. CONCLUSIONS. This study documents the incidence of and mortality from pneumococcal bacteremia. It supports previous observations that Black populations have an increased risk of invasive pneumococcal infection and suggests that immunization should be considered for Blacks older than 55 years. PMID:1443302

  7. A Review of Pneumococcal Vaccines: Current Polysaccharide Vaccine Recommendations and Future Protein Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Calvin C.; Rogers, P. David

    2016-01-01

    This review describes development of currently available pneumococcal vaccines, provides summary tables of current pneumococcal vaccine recommendations in children and adults, and describes new potential vaccine antigens in the pipeline. Streptococcus pneumoniae, the bacteria responsible for pneumonia, otitis media, meningitis and bacteremia, remains a cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults. Introductions of unconjugated and conjugated pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccines have each reduced the rate of pneumococcal infections caused by the organism S. pneumoniae. The first vaccine developed, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPSV23), protected adults and children older than 2 years of age against invasive disease caused by the 23 capsular serotypes contained in the vaccine. Because PPSV23 did not elicit a protective immune response in children younger than 2 years of age, the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) containing seven of the most common serotypes from PPSV23 in pediatric invasive disease was developed for use in children younger than 2 years of age. The last vaccine to be developed, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), contains the seven serotypes in PCV7, five additional serotypes from PPSV23, and a new serotype not contained in PPSV23 or PCV7. Serotype replacement with virulent strains that are not contained in the polysaccharide vaccines has been observed after vaccine implementation and stresses the need for continued research into novel vaccine antigens. We describe eight potential protein antigens that are in the pipeline for new pneumococcal vaccines. PMID:26997927

  8. Impact of routine PCV7 (Prevenar) vaccination of infants on the clinical and economic burden of pneumococcal disease in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal disease is the leading cause of vaccine-preventable death in children younger than 5 years of age worldwide. The World Health Organization recommends pneumococcal conjugate vaccine as a priority for inclusion into national childhood immunization programmes. Pneumococcal vaccine has yet to be included as part of the national vaccination programme in Malaysia although it has been available in the country since 2005. This study sought to estimate the disease burden of pneumococcal disease in Malaysia and to assess the cost effectiveness of routine infant vaccination with PCV7. Methods A decision model was adapted taking into consideration prevalence, disease burden, treatment costs and outcomes for pneumococcal disease severe enough to result in a hospital admission. Disease burden were estimated from the medical records of 6 hospitals. Where local data was unavailable, model inputs were obtained from international and regional studies and from focus group discussions. The model incorporated the effects of herd protection on the unvaccinated adult population. Results At current vaccine prices, PCV7 vaccination of 90% of a hypothetical 550,000 birth cohort would incur costs of RM 439.6 million (US$128 million). Over a 10 year time horizon, vaccination would reduce episodes of pneumococcal hospitalisation by 9,585 cases to 73,845 hospitalisations with cost savings of RM 37.5 million (US$10.9 million) to the health system with 11,422.5 life years saved at a cost effectiveness ratio of RM 35,196 (US$10,261) per life year gained. Conclusions PCV7 vaccination of infants is expected to be cost-effective for Malaysia with an incremental cost per life year gained of RM 35,196 (US$10,261). This is well below the WHO's threshold for cost effectiveness of public health interventions in Malaysia of RM 71,761 (US$20,922). PMID:21936928

  9. A multilocus sequence typing scheme for Streptococcus pneumoniae: identification of clones associated with serious invasive disease.

    PubMed

    Enright, M C; Spratt, B G

    1998-11-01

    The population biology of Streptococcus pneumoniae is poorly understood. Most of the important issues could be addressed by the molecular characterization of large, well sampled populations from carriage and from the different manifestations of pneumococcal disease. The authors have therefore developed a pneumococcal multilocus sequence typing scheme and database by sequencing approximately 450 bp fragments of seven housekeeping loci from 295 isolates. The combination of alleles at the seven loci provided an allelic profile, or sequence type (ST), and the relatedness between isolates was obtained by constructing a dendrogram from the matrix of pairwise differences between STs. The typing scheme was validated using pneumococci of known genetic relatedness and could resolve >6 billion STs. Among 274 isolates from recent cases of invasive pneumococcal disease in eight countries, 143 STs were resolved, but 12 STs contained at least five isolates (range 5-21 isolates). The repeated recovery of indistinguishable isolates from invasive disease in different countries implies that these STs define strains with an increased capacity to cause invasive disease. The relationship between STs and serotypes suggested that, in the longer term, capsular genes have been distributed horizontally within the pneumococcal population, but in the short term, expansion of clones occurs with only occasional changes of serotype. The multilocus sequence typing scheme provides a powerful new approach to the characterization of pneumococci, since it provides molecular typing data that are electronically portable between laboratories, and which can be used to probe aspects of the population and evolutionary biology of these organisms. A Web site for the molecular characterization of pneumococci by MLST is available (http ://mlst.zoo.ox.ac.uk).

  10. Antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsular Polysaccharide Enhance Pneumococcal Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Masahide; Gohil, Shruti; Coleman, J. Robert; Manix, Catherine; Pirofski, Liise-anne

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide (PPS)-based vaccines has resulted in a substantial reduction in invasive pneumococcal disease. However, much remains to be learned about vaccine-mediated immunity, as seven-valent PPS-protein conjugate vaccine use in children has been associated with nonvaccine serotype replacement and 23-valent vaccine use in adults has not prevented pneumococcal pneumonia. In this report, we demonstrate that certain PPS-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) enhance the transformation frequency of two different Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. This phenomenon was mediated by PPS-specific MAbs that agglutinate but do not promote opsonic effector cell killing of the homologous serotype in vitro. Compared to the autoinducer, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) alone, transcriptional profiling of pneumococcal gene expression after incubation with CSP and one such MAb to the PPS of serotype 3 revealed changes in the expression of competence (com)-related and bacteriocin-like peptide (blp) genes involved in pneumococcal quorum sensing. This MAb was also found to induce a nearly 2-fold increase in CSP2-mediated bacterial killing or fratricide. These observations reveal a novel, direct effect of PPS-binding MAbs on pneumococcal biology that has important implications for antibody immunity to pneumococcus in the pneumococcal vaccine era. Taken together, our data suggest heretofore unsuspected mechanisms by which PPS-specific antibodies could affect genetic exchange and bacterial viability in the absence of host cells. PMID:21917597

  11. Vaccines against invasive Salmonella disease

    PubMed Central

    MacLennan, Calman A; Martin, Laura B; Micoli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Though primarily enteric pathogens, Salmonellae are responsible for a considerable yet under-appreciated global burden of invasive disease. In South and South-East Asia, this manifests as enteric fever caused by serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. In sub-Saharan Africa, a similar disease burden results from invasive nontyphoidal Salmonellae, principally serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. The existing Ty21a live-attenuated and Vi capsular polysaccharide vaccines target S. Typhi and are not effective in young children where the burden of invasive Salmonella disease is highest. After years of lack of investment in new Salmonella vaccines, recent times have seen increased interest in the area led by emerging-market manufacturers, global health vaccine institutes and academic partners. New glycoconjugate vaccines against S. Typhi are becoming available with similar vaccines against other invasive serovars in development. With other new vaccines under investigation, including live-attenuated, protein-based and GMMA vaccines, now is an exciting time for the Salmonella vaccine field. PMID:24804797

  12. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  13. Non-invasive pneumococcal serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities in a paediatric hospital in the era of conjugate vaccines.

    PubMed

    McElligott, Martha; Vickers, Imelda; Cafferkey, Mary; Cunney, Robert; Humphreys, Hilary

    2014-06-12

    To evaluate the effects of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) introduction to the routine childhood immunisation schedule in 2008 and its replacement by PCV13 in 2010 in Ireland, we surveyed the serotypes and antimicrobial susceptibilities of 339 pneumococci associated with carriage and non-invasive infection (NII) in a Dublin paediatric hospital from 2009 to 2012. Furthermore, we compared the distribution of pneumococcal serotypes collected from 2009 to 2012 to 105 NII pneumococci isolated in 2007, the year before conjugate vaccine introduction. PCV7 serotypes declined from 2007 to 2012 as follows: carriage, 67-23% (p=0.0004); conjunctivitis, 58-0% (p<0.0001); non-bacteraemic lower respiratory tract infection, 50-19% (p=0.0363) and otitis media 54-27%. Notably, antimicrobial resistant (AMR) PCV7 serotypes showed a significant decrease by the end of the study period (i.e. 2012) (p<0.0001). Compared with 2007 the overall occurrence of serotype 19A increased from 1.9 to 10% in 2010 (p=0.0132) and to 15% in 2011 (p=0.0005). Importantly, serotype 19A declined significantly from 2011 levels to an overall prevalence of 4.8% in 2012 (p=0.0243). Most striking was the significant reduction of AMR 19A (p=0.0195). Conversely, increases were observed in non-vaccine type (NVT) pneumococci in 2009-2012, of which serotypes 11A (n=30), 15B/C (n=17), 22F (n=14), 35Bn=13), non-typeable pneumococci (n=13) and 23A (n=12) were the most prevalent. Moreover, an increase in NVT non-susceptible to at least one antimicrobial in 2009-2012 was noted, attributable to serotypes 35B (n=10) and 15A (n=7). In summary, this study has shown that PCV7 and PCV13 introduction has had a positive impact on their target serotypes and antimicrobial resistance amongst pneumococci within a paediatric hospital within a short time period. However, the increase in NVT prevalence highlights the need for continued surveillance. PMID:24795223

  14. The Saudi Thoracic Society pneumococcal vaccination guidelines-2016

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, N. S.; Al-Barrak, A. M.; Al-Moamary, M. S.; Zeitouni, M. O.; Idrees, M. M.; Al-Ghobain, M. O.; Al-Shimemeri, A. A.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Saudi Arabia is a host to millions of pilgrims who travel annually from all over the world for Umrah and the Hajj pilgrimages and are at risk of developing pneumococcal pneumonia or invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). There is also the risk of transmission of S. pneumoniae including antibiotic resistant strains between pilgrims and their potential global spread upon their return. The country also has unique challenges posed by susceptible population to IPD due to people with hemoglobinopathies, younger age groups with chronic conditions, and growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Since the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease is constantly changing, with an increase in nonvaccine pneumococcal serotypes, vaccination policies on the effectiveness and usefulness of vaccines require regular revision. As part of the Saudi Thoracic Society (STS) commitment to promote the best practices in the field of respiratory diseases, we conducted a review of S. pneumoniae infections and the best evidence base available in the literature. The aim of the present study is to develop the STS pneumococcal vaccination guidelines for healthcare workers in Saudi Arabia. We recommend vaccination against pneumococcal infections for all children <5 years old, adults ≥50 years old, and people ≥6 years old with certain risk factors. These recommendations are based on the presence of a large number of comorbidities in Saudi Arabia population <50 years of age, many of whom have risk factors for contracting pneumococcal infections. A section for pneumococcal vaccination before the Umrah and Hajj pilgrimages is included as well. PMID:27168856

  15. Genetic Variation in NFKBIE Is Associated With Increased Risk of Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Lundbo, Lene F.; Harboe, Zitta Barrella; Clausen, Louise N.; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Sørensen, Henrik T.; Hougaard, David M.; Konradsen, Helle B.; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis are frequent pathogens in life-threatening infections. Genetic variation in the immune system may predispose to these infections. Nuclear factor-κB is a key component of the TLR-pathway, controlled by inhibitors, encoded by the genes NFKBIA, NFKBIE and NFKBIZ. We aimed to replicate previous findings of genetic variation associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), and to assess whether similar associations could be found in invasive meningococcal disease (IMD). Methods Cases with IPD and IMD and controls were identified by linking Danish national registries. DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. The association between SNPs and susceptibility to IPD and IMD, mortality and pneumococcal serotypes was investigated. Results 372 children with pneumococcal meningitis, 907 with pneumococcal bacteremia and 1273 controls were included. We included 406 cases with meningococcal meningitis, 272 with meningococcal bacteremia, and 672 controls. The NFKBIE SNP was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis (aOR 1.68; 95% CI: 1.20–2.36), but not bacteremia (aOR 1.08; 95% CI: 0.86–1.35). The remaining SNPs were not associated with susceptibility to invasive disease. None of the SNPs were associated with risk of IMD or mortality. Conclusions A NFKBIE polymorphism was associated with increased risk of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:26870821

  16. Pneumococcal vaccination in people living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, John; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Orkin, Chloe

    2015-06-22

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading bacterial opportunistic infection (OI) in HIV positive individuals. Anti-retroviral treatment (ART) reduces their risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease (IPD), however, it remains 20- to 40-fold greater than that of the general population. In HIV-infected adults, pneumococcal vaccination (PCV) induces more durable and functional antibody responses in individuals on ART at the time of vaccination than in ART-naive adults, independently of the baseline CD4+ cell count. National guidelines in the UK recommend vaccination in HIV-infected adults with CD4 count >200cells/mL and advise that it be considered for those with CD4 count <200cells/mL(3). We report data on IPD from a London HIV cohort of 3500 north-east London patients from 2009 to 2012. IPD was defined as a positive pneumococcal culture from blood, CSF, joint aspirate or pericardial fluid. HIV positive cases were identified by cross-referencing hospital identifiers with a positive HIV Ab/Ag test result or HIV viral load test result on the virology database. There were a total 189 cases of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease identified over the three years. 4.8% (n=9) were known to be HIV positive at the time of their Invasive Pneumococcal infection. The serotypes of S. pneumoniae in the HIV positive cases included 3, 7F, 10F, 19A (n=2), 19F and 31. The estimated incidence of IPD in our HIV cohort was 85.7 per 100,000, (based on an overall HIV cohort size of 3500) which is significantly higher when compared to the general population in London (local epidemiological data reported the incidence rate for IPD at 7.5 per 100,000 in London). Given the higher burden of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in this cohort, low levels of vaccination, and the predominance of vaccine sensitive strains in our cases, vaccination and strategies to improve vaccine uptake is a priority in this at risk group.

  17. Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae in Canada, 2011-2014: Characterization of new candidate 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotypes 22F and 33F.

    PubMed

    Golden, Alyssa R; Adam, Heather J; Zhanel, George G

    2016-05-17

    Emerging non-PCV-13 Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 22F and 33F are included in a new 15-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine currently undergoing clinical trials in the United States. This study assessed the antimicrobial resistance and genetic relatedness of these two emerging pneumococcal serotypes. Of the 5075 invasive pneumococcal isolates collected in Canada from 2011 to 2014, 9.8% (497/5075) were serotype 22F and 3.2% (160/5075) were serotype 33F. Despite being among the top 4 most common serotypes collected each study year, serotype 22F demonstrated ≥98% susceptibility to all antimicrobials tested except clarithromycin and few were multi-drug resistant (MDR) (0.8%, 4/497). Serotype 22F isolates were highly clonal (ST433), with two isolates showing high relatedness to MDR international clone Sweden(15A)-25 (ST63). Conversely, serotype 33F showed greater antimicrobial resistance, greater genetic diversity and a higher proportion of MDR isolates (8.8%, 14/160). The prevalence of serotype 33F increased significantly during 2011-2014 (p=0.005).

  18. Serotype distribution of pneumococci isolated from pediatric patients with acute otitis media and invasive infections, and potential coverage of pneumococcal conjugated vaccines.

    PubMed

    Reijtman, Vanesa; Fossati, Sofía; Hernández, Claudia; Sommerfleck, Patricia; Bernáldez, Patricia; Litterio, Mirta; Berberian, Griselda; Regueira, Mabel; Lopardo, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    A 16-month prospective, descriptive study was conducted on pneumococcal serotype distribution isolated from children with acute otitis media (AOM) and invasive infections (INV). Eighty-nine children with pneumococcal INV and 324 with a first episode of AOM were included. Bacterial pathogens (N = 326) were isolated from the middle-ear fluid of 250 patients. A total of 30 pneumococcal serotypes were identified. Prevalent serotypes were 14, 19A, 9V, 3, 19F, 6A, 23F, and 18C in AOM and 14, 1, 19A, 5, 12F, 6B, and 18C in INV. Potential coverage with PCV10 vaccine would be 46.5 % and 60.7 % for pneumococci involved in AOM and INV, respectively; it would be 71.7 % and 73 % with PCV13. PCV10, conjugated with a Haemophilus protein, would have an immunologic coverage of 39.9 % for AOM vs. 18.5 % with PCV13. However, differences in the prevention of INV were crucial for the decision to include the 13-valent vaccine in the national calendar for children less than two years old in Argentina.

  19. Ability of Antibiotic-Resistant Nonvaccine-Type Pneumococcal Clones to Cause Otitis Media in an Infant Mouse Model of Pneumococcal-Influenza Virus Coinfection.

    PubMed

    Frazão, Nelson; Hermans, Peter; van Selm, Saskia; Sá-Leão, Raquel; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Tomasz, Alexander; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Portugal resulted in reduced carriage in children by vaccine-type strains and an increased carriage of three major antibiotic-resistant clones, ST2191, ST276, and ST63 expressing capsules 6A, 19A, and 15A, respectively. Pneumococcal otitis media (OM), a frequent infection among preschool age children, is often associated with viral coinfection. To evaluate the ability of these three antibiotic-resistant clones to cause disease, we used an infant mouse model of influenza virus pneumococcal coinfection. The 6A and 19A clonal types induced OM, while 15A induced pneumococcal pneumonia and bloodstream infection, suggesting potential for invasive disease.

  20. Pre- and Postvaccination Clonal Compositions of Invasive Pneumococcal Serotypes for Isolates Collected in the United States in 1999, 2001, and 2002

    PubMed Central

    Beall, Bernard; McEllistrem, M. Catherine; Gertz, Robert E.; Wedel, Stephanie; Boxrud, David J.; Gonzalez, Antonio L.; Medina, Marie-Jo; Pai, Rekha; Thompson, Terry A.; Harrison, Lee H.; McGee, Lesley; Whitney, Cynthia G.

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring of serotypes and their clonal associations is critical as pneumococci adapt to the selective pressures exerted by the pneumococcal seven-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV7). We genotyped 1,476 invasive isolates from the Active Bacterial Core surveillance (705 [89.8%] of the isolates were obtained from children <5 years of age, and 771 [18.4%] of the isolates were obtained from individuals >5 years of age) in 2001 and 2002 (after the introduction of PCV7). The data were compared to the results for 1,168 invasive isolates (855 [83.9%] of the isolates were from children <5 years of age) collected in 1999. Among children <5 years of age, the incidence of invasive disease due to non-PCV7 serogroups together with serogroup 19A increased (P < 0.001). Eighty-three clonal sets, representing 177 multilocus sequence types (STs), were compiled from the 3-year isolate set. Among the non-PCV7 serogroups, newly emerging clones were uncommon; and a significant expansion of already established clones occurred for serotypes 3 (ST180), 7F (ST191), 15BCF (ST199), 19A (ST199), 22F (ST433), 33F (ST662), and 38 (ST393). However, additional minor clonal types within serotypes 1, 6A, 6B, 7C, 9N, 10A, 12F, 14, 15B/C, 17F, 19A, 19F, 20, 22F, and 33F that were absent in 1999 were found during 2001 and 2002. Although 23 clonal sets exhibited multiple serotypes, for most serotypes there were either no changes or modest changes in clonal compositions since the introduction of PCV7. The only example of an identical ST shared between non-PCV7 and PCV7 or PCV7-related serotypes was ST199; however, ST199 was prevalent within serotypes 15B/C and 19A before and after PCV7 introduction. Continued genotypic surveillance is warranted, since certain clones not targeted by PCV7 are expanding, and their emergence as significant pathogens could occur with maintained vaccine pressure. PMID:16517889

  1. Pneumococcal infections and pneumococcal vaccine: an update.

    PubMed

    Rytel, M W

    1982-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia continues to be an important disease in terms of prevalence, morbidity and mortality. With the discovery of penicillin and its wide clinical use, the overall mortality of pneumococcal pneumonia has been significantly reduced, but problems remain. These include: 1) death rate is uninfluenced by the antibiotic in the first five days of illness; 2) death rate in certain high risk groups and in patients infected with type 3 pneumococcus exceeds 25%; and 3) penicillin resistant strains of pneumococci have emerged. Because of these and other considerations, a modern 14-valent pneumococcal vaccine has been developed by Robert Austrian and his co-workers. The vaccine has been found to be immunogenic and effective in a number of populations studied. Additional efficacy studies are needed, however, particularly in certain high risk groups, such as the elderly and immunocompromised patients.

  2. Modelling the effect of conjugate vaccines in pneumococcal disease: cohort or population models?

    PubMed

    Standaert, Baudouin; Demarteau, Nadia; Talbird, Sandra; Mauskopf, Josephine

    2010-11-19

    Cohort and population models estimate vaccine impact on disease events, and yield different estimates in countries with different demographic compositions. We compared administration of the new 10-valent pneumococcal Haemophilus influenzae-protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) with no vaccination in two countries, the United Kingdom (UK) and Mexico, using two modelling strategies: a cohort model and a population model. The cohort model followed a birth cohort over a lifetime, beginning 10 years after initiation of the vaccine program, when vaccine efficacy steady state had been reached. The population model examined the country-specific population over 1 year, also beginning 10 years after initiation of the vaccine program. Both models included the same age-specific disease rates of meningitis, bacteraemia, pneumonia, and otitis media. The output variables were the numbers of specific events, with and without indirect vaccine effects. Without indirect effects, the cohort and population models produced similar results for both countries (deviation of <20% difference per output measure for most outcomes). The difference between the model types was much greater when indirect vaccine effects were included, especially in Mexico (up to 120% difference). Cohort and population modelling methods produce different results depending on the disease, the intervention, the demographic composition, and the time horizon evaluated. Results from the two model types provide different information about the impact of interventions on events: accumulated vaccine benefit for an individual in a cohort model; vaccine benefit for a whole population at a specific time point in a population model.

  3. Pneumococcal Sepsis Complicated by Splenic Abscesses and Purpura Fulminans in a 15-Month-Old Child

    PubMed Central

    Pangonis, Scott; Patamasucon, Pisespong; Fitzpatrick, Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an invasive organism that causes a wide range of common diseases, including sinusitis, acute otitis media, and pneumonia. Splenic abscesses and purpura fulminans (PF) are rare complications of pneumococcal disease. Splenic abscesses caused by S pneumoniae have only been reported in the adult literature. PF has been described in the pediatric population as a rare complication in patients with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with and without underlying immunological disorders such as asplenia. Here, we report a patient with IPD complicated by splenic abscesses and PF. Our patient initially presented with bacteremia, septic shock, and disseminated intravascular coagulation. She subsequently developed PF and splenic abscesses. She survived her illness after receiving a total of 8 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This case highlights 2 rare complications of IPD and demonstrates the need to keep pneumococcal disease in the differential diagnosis even in children whose vaccination status is up to date. PMID:27006958

  4. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S

    2012-01-01

    Executive Summary In July 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat (MAS) began work on a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) evidentiary framework, an evidence-based review of the literature surrounding treatment strategies for patients with COPD. This project emerged from a request by the Health System Strategy Division of the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care that MAS provide them with an evidentiary platform on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of COPD interventions. After an initial review of health technology assessments and systematic reviews of COPD literature, and consultation with experts, MAS identified the following topics for analysis: vaccinations (influenza and pneumococcal), smoking cessation, multidisciplinary care, pulmonary rehabilitation, long-term oxygen therapy, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation for acute and chronic respiratory failure, hospital-at-home for acute exacerbations of COPD, and telehealth (including telemonitoring and telephone support). Evidence-based analyses were prepared for each of these topics. For each technology, an economic analysis was also completed where appropriate. In addition, a review of the qualitative literature on patient, caregiver, and provider perspectives on living and dying with COPD was conducted, as were reviews of the qualitative literature on each of the technologies included in these analyses. The Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Mega-Analysis series is made up of the following reports, which can be publicly accessed at the MAS website at: http://www.hqontario.ca/en/mas/mas_ohtas_mn.html. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Evidentiary Framework Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccinations for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Smoking Cessation for Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): An Evidence-Based Analysis Community-Based Multidisciplinary Care for Patients With Stable Chronic Obstructive

  5. The impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on carriage of and disease caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes 6C and 6D in southern Israel.

    PubMed

    Porat, Nurith; Benisty, Rachel; Givon-Lavi, Noga; Trefler, Ronit; Dagan, Ron

    2016-05-27

    The introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) followed by PCV13 resulted in a dramatic reduction in carriage and disease rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae (Sp) serotype 6B (Sp6B) and Sp6A. The structural modifications of the capsule of Sp6A and Sp6B to become Sp6C and Sp6D, respectively, raised a concern that eradication of Sp6A/Sp6B by PCV could be accompanied by an increase in Sp6C/Sp6D. This study examines the dynamics and clonal distribution of Sp6C/Sp6D relative to Sp6A/Sp6B during 1999-2014, pre- and post-PCV implementation. Sp were cultured from Blood/CSF and MEF of children <2 years, and from conjunctiva and nasopharynx of children <5 years. PCR was applied for Sp6C and Sp6D identification. Clonality was determined by PFGE and MLST. PCV introduction resulted in decreased carriage rates and conjunctivitis caused by serogroup 6 serotypes. Incidence of Sp6A, Sp6B and Sp6D in otitis media dropped gradually along with PCV7/13 introduction, whereas Sp6C rates increased in the PCV7 period and then decreased following PCV13 implementation. In invasive pneumococcal disease, complete elimination of serogroup 6 was found in the PCV era. Similar clonal composition was found for Sp6C and Sp6D pre- and post-PCV. We conclude that Sp6C and Sp6D do not act as replacement serotypes for Sp6A and Sp6B following vaccination with PCV13. The major Sp6C and Sp6D clones present pre-PCV persisted also post-PCV implementation, suggesting that these clones possess an advantage retained post-vaccination. PMID:27113163

  6. Serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae in children with invasive diseases in Turkey: 2008–2014

    PubMed Central

    Ceyhan, Mehmet; Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Gürler, Nezahat; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Aydemir, Sohret; Ozkan, Sengul; Yuksekkaya, Serife; Keser Emiroglu, Melike; Gültekin, Meral; Yaman, Akgün; Kiremitci, Abdurrahman; Yanık, Keramettin; Karli, Arzu; Ozcinar, Hatice; Aydin, Faruk; Bayramoglu, Gulcin; Zer, Yasemin; Gulay, Zeynep; Gayyurhan, Efgan Dogan; Gül, Mustafa; Özakın, Cüneyt; Güdücüoğlu, Hüseyin; Perçin, Duygu; Akpolat, Nezahat; Ozturk, Candan; Camcıoğlu, Yıldız; Karadağ Öncel, Eda; Çelik, Melda; Şanal, Laser; Uslu, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Successful vaccination policies for protection from invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) dependent on determination of the exact serotype distribution in each country. We aimed to identify serotypes of pneumococcal strains causing IPD in children in Turkey and emphasize the change in the serotypes before and after vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) was included and PCV-13 was newly changed in Turkish National Immunization Program. Streptococcus pneumoniae strains were isolated at 22 different hospitals of Turkey, which provide healthcare services to approximately 65% of the Turkish population. Of the 335 diagnosed cases with S. pneumoniae over the whole period of 2008–2014, the most common vaccine serotypes were 19F (15.8%), 6B (5.9%), 14 (5.9%), and 3 (5.9%). During the first 5 y of age, which is the target population for vaccination, the potential serotype coverage ranged from 57.5 % to 36.8%, from 65.0% to 44.7%, and from 77.4% to 60.5% for PCV-7, PCV-10, and PCV-13 in 2008–2014, respectively. The ratio of non-vaccine serotypes was 27.2% in 2008–2010 whereas was 37.6% in 2011–2014 (p=0.045). S. penumoniae serotypes was less non-susceptible to penicillin as compared to our previous results (33.7 vs 16.5 %, p=0.001). The reduction of those serotype coverage in years may be attributed to increasing vaccinated children in Turkey and the increasing non-vaccine serotype may be explained by serotype replacement. Our ongoing IPD surveillance is a significant source of information for the decision-making processes on pneumococcal vaccination. PMID:26325175

  7. Pneumococcal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor will do a physical exam and health history. Possible tests may include blood, imaging, or lab tests. Treatment is with antibiotics. Vaccines can prevent pneumococcal infections. There are two ...

  8. Meningitis - pneumococcal

    MedlinePlus

    ... opisthotonos ) Pneumococcal meningitis is an important cause of fever in children. ... room if you suspect meningitis in a young child who has the following ... fever Call the local emergency number if you develop ...

  9. PCR-Based Quantitation and Clonal Diversity of the Current Prevalent Invasive Serogroup 6 Pneumococcal Serotype, 6C, in the United States in 1999 and 2006 to 2007▿

    PubMed Central

    da Gloria Carvalho, Maria; Pimenta, Fabiana C.; Gertz, Robert E.; Joshi, Hari Har; Trujillo, Alma A.; Keys, Logan E.; Findley, Joy; Moura, Iaci S.; Park, In H.; Hollingshead, Susan K.; Pilishvili, Tamara; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Nahm, Moon H.; Beall, Bernard W.

    2009-01-01

    Following introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to the United States, rates of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) caused by serotype 6A declined among all age groups, while rates of IPD caused by newly identified serotype 6C increased slightly among persons 5 years of age and older. Conventionally serotyped 6A isolates (CS6As) from active population-based surveillance during 1999 and 2006 to 2007 were classified as serotypes 6A and 6C by an expedient and highly accurate serotype 6C-specific PCR assay developed during this study. PCR testing of 636 year 1999, 2006, and 2007 CS6As revealed 6C proportions of 35/214 (16.4%), 141/218 (64.7%), and 141/204 (69.1%), respectively. These results agreed with those from a previously devised monoclonal antibody-based serotyping system (346 CS6As compared). Type 6C IPD incidence significantly increased during 2006 and 2007 compared to during 1999 (0.57 to 0.58 cases per 100,000 and 0.22 cases per 100,000, respectively; 164% increase from 1999 to 2007 [95% confidence interval, 87 to 270%]), while rates of IPD due to types 6A and 6B markedly decreased. In 2007, 31.2% of 6C isolates were not susceptible to penicillin. Serotype 6C is now the predominant serotype associated with serogroup 6 IPD in the United States and is often penicillin nonsusceptible. We performed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) on a limited sampling of 6C isolates with different antimicrobial susceptibility profiles. MLST of 42 6C isolates revealed 12 genotypes distributed among six distinct genetic groups. Fifteen 6C isolates shared one of four different MLST types with 6C-negative CS6As. MLST results suggest 6C strains arose from independent recombination events involving only serotype 6A and 6C parental strains. PMID:19116353

  10. Invasive pneumococci before the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Turkey: antimicrobial susceptibility, serotype distribution, and molecular identification of macrolide resistance.

    PubMed

    Altun, Hatice Uludag; Hascelik, Gülsen; Gür, Deniz; Eser, Özgen Köseoglu

    2015-02-01

    This study evaluates the antimicrobial susceptibilities and serotype distributions of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) isolates identified in a Turkish hospital before the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7). The susceptibilities of all isolates were determined by evaluating six antibiotics: penicillin (PEN), ceftriaxone (CRO), levofloxacin (LEV), erythromycin (ERY), clindamycin (CD), and vancomycin (VAN). Serotyping and amplification of macrolide resistance genes were performed. Sixteen (50%) and four (2%) isolates were resistant to PEN and LEV, respectively. No isolates demonstrated VAN resistance. Intermediate resistance to CRO was found in 4% of all invasive isolates. Twenty-three (12.6%) isolates were resistant to ERY. Four (2%) invasive SP isolates demonstrated multidrug resistance. Serogroups 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, and 23 were the most common in both age groups. The potential coverage rates of PCV7 and PCV13 were 44.1 and 66.1% in children and 39.8 and 71.5% in adults, respectively. Continuous surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is required.

  11. Invasive Disease Caused by Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of severe Haemophilus influenza infections, such as sepsis and meningitis, has declined substantially since the introduction of the H. influenzae serotype b vaccine. However, the H. influenzae type b vaccine fails to protect against nontypeable H. influenzae strains, which have become increasingly frequent causes of invasive disease, especially among children and the elderly. We summarize recent literature supporting the emergence of invasive nontypeable H. influenzae and describe mechanisms that may explain its increasing prevalence over the past 2 decades. PMID:26407156

  12. The Majority of Adult Pneumococcal Invasive Infections in Portugal Are Still Potentially Vaccine Preventable in Spite of Significant Declines of Serotypes 1 and 5

    PubMed Central

    Horácio, Andreia N.; Diamantino-Miranda, Jorge; Aguiar, Sandra I.; Ramirez, Mário; Melo-Cristino, José

    2013-01-01

    In Portugal, pneumococcal conjugate vaccines have been administered to children outside of the national immunization plan since 2001. We determined the serotype and antimicrobial susceptibility of 1265 isolates responsible for adult invasive pneumococcal infections (IPD) between 2009 and 2011 and compared the results with previously published data from 1999 to 2008. Serotypes 3 (12.6%), 7F (10.0%), 19A (9.1%), 14 (8.4%), 1 (6.9%) and 8 (6.2%) were the most frequent and together accounted for 53.2% of adult IPD. Serotypes 1 and 5 declined significantly while serotype 34, not included in any vaccine, increased. Taken together, the serotypes included in the 13-valent conjugate vaccine (PCV13) peaked among adult IPD isolates in 2008 (70.2%) and declined since then reaching 53.5% in 2011. The decline in the serotypes included in the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine since 2007 was also significant but much more modest with 79.2% of the isolates causing IPD in 2011 expressing these serotypes. Since the changes in serotypes causing IPD in adults coincided with the 10-valent and PCV13 introduction in children, it is unlikely that vaccination triggered these changes although it may have accelerated them. The proportion of IPD caused by serotypes included in the 7-valent conjugate vaccine remained stable (19.0%). Both penicillin non-susceptibility and erythromycin resistance increased in the study period, with serotypes 14 and 19A accounting for the majority of resistant isolates. PMID:24066064

  13. Parental views on the introduction of an infant pneumococcal vaccine.

    PubMed

    Chantler, Tracey; Newton, Sarah; Lees, Amanda; Diggle, Linda; Mayon-White, Richard; Pollard, A J; Fitzpatrick, Ray

    2006-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of early childhood morbidity and mortality. A heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PnC7) is licensed for use and could prevent the majority of infant invasive pneumococcal infections. A recent announcement confirmed its inclusion into the U.K. childhood immunisation programme. In anticipation of PnC7 being recommended for use, this study explored parental understanding of pneumococcal disease and their views on the possible introduction of this vaccine. Twenty three interviews and two focus groups were held with parents of children under two years of age. Four main themes emerged from the data analysis: 'Confidence and belief in immunisation'; 'Anxiety about immunisation'; 'Trust and understanding of immunisation information' and 'Response to a new immunisation'. Overall parental confidence in immunisation has been affected by the MMR controversy. With little knowledge of pneumococcal disease, parents want information about the safety and effectiveness of PnC7. Information needs to be conveyed in a way that restores parents' trust in immunisation. PMID:16878519

  14. [Pneumococcal vaccination: conjugated vaccine induces herd immunity and reduces antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Pletz, M W; Maus, U; Hohlfeld, J M; Lode, H; Welte, T

    2008-02-01

    Pneumococcal infections (pneumonia, otitis media, sinusitis, meningitis) are common and usually involve toddlers and the elderly. Currently, two pneumococcal vaccines are in clinical use. The older vaccine consists of pure capsular polysaccharides from 23 pneumococcal serotypes and induces only a limited B-cell response because polysaccharides are poor antigens that stimulate mainly B-cells. In 2000, a vaccination program with a novel 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine was launched in the U.S. The conjugation of capsular polysaccharides with a highly immunogenic diphtheria toxoid protein induces both a T cell and B cell response that results in specific humoral and mucosal immunity. Since children are the main reservoir of pneumococci, the 7-valent conjugate vaccine seems to eradicate the respective pneumococcal serotypes within the population, as demonstrated by recent US data. Pronounced herd immunity resulted in a decrease in invasive pneumococcal diseases in vaccinees and non-vaccinees as well as in a reduction of antibiotic resistance rates. However, recent data suggest a replacement of vaccine-serotypes by non-vaccine serotypes, which conquer the ecological niche created by the vaccine. In order to encounter this problem a 13-valent conjugated vaccine is currently under development.

  15. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased surgical morbidity in this high-risk population. However, to reduce the physical trauma of surgery, technologic advances and worldwide experience with minimally invasive surgery have allowed laparoscopic management of patients to become standard of care, with significant short- and long-term patient benefits compared with the open approach. In this review, we will describe the current state-of the-art for minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease and the caveats inherent with this practice in this complex patient population. Also, we will review the applicability of current and future trends in minimally invasive surgical technique, such as laparoscopic “incisionless,” single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), robotic-assisted, and other techniques for the patient with inflammatory bowel disease. There can be no doubt that minimally invasive surgery has been proven to decrease the short- and long-term burden of surgery of these chronic illnesses and represents high-value care for both patient and society. PMID:25989341

  16. Pneumococcal vaccination in a remote population of high-risk Alaska Natives.

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, M; Chamblee, C; Campbell, H G; Bulkow, L R; Taylor, G E; Lanier, A P; Berner, J; Spika, J S; Williams, W W; Middaugh, J P

    1993-01-01

    In response to an increasing prevalence of serious pneumococcal disease among adult Alaska Natives of northwest Alaska, a 3-year program was begun in 1987 to identify residents of that remote region who were at high risk for developing invasive pneumococcal disease, to determine their pneumococcal vaccination status, and to deliver vaccine to at least 80 percent of those at risk. After reviewing public health nursing and Indian Health Service data bases, the authors identified 1,337 persons, 20 percent of the 6,692 residents of the region, at high risk for invasive pneumococcal infection, defined either by having a specific chronic disease or by age criteria. Cardiovascular disease and alcoholism were the two most common chronic diseases. Only 30 percent of those determined to be at high risk had received one or more doses of pneumococcal vaccine previously. Half of those persons had received their most recent vaccination 6 or more years earlier. The program used both customary and innovative methods to deliver 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine to 1,046 of those at high risk (78 percent), including 388 persons who were revaccinated. At the completion of the project, 1,123 persons, 84 percent of those at high risk, had received at least 1 dose. They included 1,088 persons, 81 percent of those at high risk, with vaccination within the previous 5 years as a result of the project, compared with a 15-percent rate prior to the vaccination phase of the project. The program demonstrated that high levels of vaccination against pneumococcal disease, exceeding Year 2000 objectives of 60 percent, are attainable in a remote rural Alaskan population. PMID:8341777

  17. Persisting high prevalence of pneumococcal carriage among HIV-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Malawi: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Heinsbroek, Ellen; Tafatatha, Terence; Phiri, Amos; Ngwira, Bagrey; Crampin, Amelia C.; Read, Jonathan M.; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HIV-infected adults have high rates of pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease. We investigated the effect of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults prior to infant pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) rollout. Design: Observational cohort study. Methods: We recruited HIV-infected adults newly attending a rural HIV clinic in northern Malawi between 2008 and 2010. Nasopharyngeal samples were taken at baseline and after 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. We compared pneumococcal carriage by ART status using generalized estimated equation models adjusted for CD4+ cell count, sex, seasonality, and other potential confounders. Results: In total, 336 individuals were included, of which 223 individuals started ART during follow-up. Individuals receiving ART had higher pneumococcal carriage than individuals not receiving ART (25.9 vs. 19.8%, P = 0.03) particularly for serotypes not included in PCV13 (16.1 vs. 9.6% P = 0.003). Following adjustment, increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes was still observed for individuals on ART, but results for all serotypes were nonsignificant [all serotypes: adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.22 (0.95–1.56); non-PCV13 serotypes: aRR 1.72, 95% CI 1.13–2.62]. Conclusion: Pneumococcal carriage in HIV-infected adults in Malawi remained high despite use of ART, consistent with failure of mucosal immune reconstitution in the upper respiratory tract. There was evidence of increased carriage of non-PCV13 serotypes. HIV-infected adults on ART could remain an important reservoir for pneumococcal diversity post infant pneumococcal vaccine introduction. Control of pneumococcal disease in African HIV remains a priority. PMID:26218599

  18. Optimising assessments of the epidemiological impact in The Netherlands of paediatric immunisation with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine using dynamic transmission modelling.

    PubMed

    De Cao, Elisabetta; Melegaro, Alessia; Klok, Rogier; Postma, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    This work is the first attempt to quantify the overall effects of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) vaccination programme in the Dutch population taking into account all the direct and indirect effects of the vaccine on invasive pneumococcal disease. Using available Dutch data, a dynamic transmission model for the spread of pneumococci and potential subsequent invasive pneumococcal disease has been adapted to the Dutch setting. Overall, invasive pneumococcal disease cases in the Netherlands are predicted to decrease from a pre-vaccination level of 2623 cases annually to 2475, 2289, 2185, 2179, and 2178 cases annually 5-, 10-, 20-, 30-, and 40-years, respectively, post-vaccination. Therefore, vaccination with PCV13 in the Netherlands is predicted to lower invasive pneumococcal disease cases per year by up to 445 cases in the medium- to long-term. The results are quite robust for the sensitivity analyses performed on the parameters that regulate herd immunity and competition between vaccine and non-vaccine types.

  19. Pneumococcal pneumonia prevention among adults: is the herd effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in children as good a way as the active immunization of the elderly?

    PubMed

    Prato, Rosa; Fortunato, Francesca; Martinelli, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The indirect protection of adults as a result of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination of infants has been discussed from different epidemiological points of view. In some countries, including Italy, even after pediatric vaccination, vaccine serotypes are still responsible for most pneumonia and invasive diseases in the elderly. Although the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPITA) produced encouraging results, it has not showed the efficacy of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine in preventing pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia regardless of the number of episodes and serotype. Addressing these points by monitoring the direct impact of adult vaccination in real life distinguished from the effects of herd immunity will assist public health decision-making on the most effective adult pneumococcal vaccination strategies.

  20. Dominance of multidrug-resistant Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) clone among Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A isolates causing pneumococcal disease in Bulgaria from 1992 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Setchanova, Lena Petrova; Alexandrova, Alexandra; Dacheva, Daniela; Mitov, Ivan; Kaneva, Radka; Mitev, Vanio

    2015-02-01

    A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) was introduced in Bulgarian national immunization program since April 2010. Clonal composition based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing genotyping of 52 serotype 19A Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates was analyzed. These were invasive and respiratory isolates collected between 1992 and 2013 from both children (78.8% <5 years) and adults with pneumococcal infections. Multidrug resistance was found in 82.7% of all 19A isolates. The most prevalent genotype (63.5%) among serotype 19A pneumococcal strains was the multidrug-resistant clonal complex CC230, which is a capsular switched variant of the Denmark(14)-32 (ST230) global clone. The most frequent sequence type (ST) was ST230 (48.1%) and together with four other closely related STs (15.4%), belonging to ST1611, ST276, ST7466, and ST2013, which were single- and double-locus variants; they were included in the main CC230. The disappearance of highly drug-resistant ST663 clone and emergence of new clones as CC320 and CC199 was also observed among the rest 19A isolates. A comparison of clonal composition between invasive and noninvasive isolates did not show a great genetic diversity among both kinds of isolates. Continuous surveillance of serotype 19A population following the introduction of PCV10 is essential to evaluate the impact of the vaccine on the epidemiology of this serotype.

  1. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  2. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  3. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  4. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  5. 42 CFR 410.57 - Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. 410.57... § 410.57 Pneumococcal vaccine and flu vaccine. (a) Medicare Part B pays for pneumococcal vaccine and its administration when reasonable and necessary for the prevention of disease, if the vaccine is ordered by a...

  6. Molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates from children in China

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Li-Hua; Liu, Meng-Juan; Xu, Wen-Chun; Cui, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Wu, Kai-Feng; Zhang, Qun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal isolates in Chongqing, China. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 51 invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) strains were from children with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and 32 carriage strains from healthy children from January 2010 to December 2013 at the Children’s Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Multilocus sequence typing was used to identify the sequence types (STs). Capsular serotypes were determined by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Drug susceptibility and resistance was determined by minimum inhibitory concentrations. Results: In this study, 11 serotypes were identified among the 83 S. pneumoniae clinical isolates tested. Prevalent serotypes were 19A (20.4%), 6A/B (20.4%), 19F (15.7%), 14 (14.5%), and 23F (10.8%). Serotype 19F was the most frequent carriage strain, and serotype 19A was the most frequent invasive strain. The ST983 was the most prevalent ST for carriage strains, and ST320 was the most prevalent ST for invasive strains. For gene analysis, psaA (99.5%) and piaA (98.6%) were present and much conserved in all pneumococci tested. The cps2A and pcsB genes were more frequent in invasive isolates than carriage strains. Antimicrobial resistance rates of invasive pneumococcal isolates to erythromycin, penicillin, meropenem, cefotaxime, and clindamycin were higher than the carriage isolates from children. Conclusion: Our epidemiological evidence shows that 19A, 6A/B, 19F, 14, and 23F remain the most prevalent serotypes, which can be targeted by PCV13. Genotypes and drug resistance varied between carriage and invasive strains. The PsaA and PiaA may be good protein vaccine candidates. PMID:27052283

  7. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in adults.

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, J.; Cartwright, K.; Stuart, J.; Brookes, S.; Morris, R.; Slack, M.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed retrospectively all invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) infections in adults ascertained from reference laboratory records and notifications from five NHS regions over the 5 years from 1 October 1990, a period encompassing the introduction of routine Hib childhood immunization (October 1992). A total of 446 cases were identified, a rate of 0.73 infections per 10(5) adults per annum. Though numbers of Hib infections in adults fell after the introduction of Hib vaccines for children (P = 0.035), and there was no increase in infections caused by other capsulated Hi serotypes, total numbers of invasive Hi infections increased due to a large rise in infections caused by non-capsulated Hi (ncHi) strains (P = 0.0067). There was an unexpectedly low rate of infections in those aged 75 years or more (P < 0.0001). The commonest clinical presentations were pneumonia with bacteraemia (227/350, 65%) and bacteraemia alone (62/350, 18%) and the highest rates of disease were in the 65-74 years age group (P < 0.0001). Clinical presentation was not influenced by the capsulation status of the invading Hi strain. 103/350 cases (29%) died within 1 month, and 207/350 (59%) within 6 months of their Hi infection. Case fatality rates were high in all age groups. Pre-existing diseases were noted in 220/350 cases and were associated with a higher case fatality rate (82% vs. 21%, P < 0.0001). After the introduction of Hib immunization in children, invasive Hib infections in unimmunized adults also declined, but the overall rate of invasive Hi disease in adults increased, with most infections now caused by non-capsulated strains. Physicians and microbiologists should be aware of the changing epidemiology, the high associated mortality and high risk of underlying disease. Invasive haemophilus infections in adults should be investigated and treated aggressively. PMID:10982068

  8. Association of Secondhand Smoke Exposure with Pediatric Invasive Bacterial Disease and Bacterial Carriage: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chien-Chang; Middaugh, Nicole A.; Howie, Stephen R. C.; Ezzati, Majid

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of epidemiologic studies have observed an association between secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure and pediatric invasive bacterial disease (IBD) but the evidence has not been systematically reviewed. We carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis of SHS exposure and two outcomes, IBD and pharyngeal carriage of bacteria, for Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis), Haemophilus influenzae type B (Hib), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae). Methods and Findings Two independent reviewers searched Medline, EMBASE, and selected other databases, and screened articles for inclusion and exclusion criteria. We identified 30 case-control studies on SHS and IBD, and 12 cross-sectional studies on SHS and bacterial carriage. Weighted summary odd ratios (ORs) were calculated for each outcome and for studies with specific design and quality characteristics. Tests for heterogeneity and publication bias were performed. Compared with those unexposed to SHS, summary OR for SHS exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.52–2.69) for invasive meningococcal disease, 1.21 (95% CI 0.69–2.14) for invasive pneumococcal disease, and 1.22 (95% CI 0.93–1.62) for invasive Hib disease. For pharyngeal carriage, summary OR was 1.68 (95% CI, 1.19–2.36) for N. meningitidis, 1.66 (95% CI 1.33–2.07) for S. pneumoniae, and 0.96 (95% CI 0.48–1.95) for Hib. The association between SHS exposure and invasive meningococcal and Hib diseases was consistent regardless of outcome definitions, age groups, study designs, and publication year. The effect estimates were larger in studies among children younger than 6 years of age for all three IBDs, and in studies with the more rigorous laboratory-confirmed diagnosis for invasive meningococcal disease (summary OR 3.24; 95% CI 1.72–6.13). Conclusions When considered together with evidence from direct smoking and biological mechanisms, our systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that SHS exposure may be

  9. [Minimally Invasive Treatment of Esophageal Benign Diseases].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    As a minimally invasive treatment of esophageal achalasia per-oral endoscopic myotomy( POEM) was developed in 2008. More than 1,100 cases of achalasia-related diseases received POEM. Success rate of the procedure was more than 95%(Eckerdt score improvement 3 points and more). No serious( Clavian-Dindo classification III b and more) complication was experienced. These results suggest that POEM becomes a standard minimally invasive treatment for achalasia-related diseases. As an off-shoot of POEM submucosal tumor removal through submucosal tunnel (per-oral endoscopic tumor resection:POET) was developed and safely performed. Best indication of POET is less than 5 cm esophageal leiomyoma. A novel endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was developed. Anti-reflux mucosectomy( ARMS) is nearly circumferential mucosal reduction of gastric cardia mucosa. ARMS is performed in 56 consecutive cases of refractory GERD. No major complications were encountered and excellent clinical results. Best indication of ARMS is a refractory GERD without long sliding hernia. Longest follow-up case is more than 10 years. Minimally invasive treatments for esophageal benign diseases are currently performed by therapeutic endoscopy. PMID:27440038

  10. Serotypes and Clonal Diversity of Streptococcus pneumoniae Causing Invasive Disease in the Era of PCV13 in Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    del Amo, Eva; Esteva, Cristina; Hernandez-Bou, Susanna; Galles, Carmen; Navarro, Marian; Sauca, Goretti; Diaz, Alvaro; Gassiot, Paula; Marti, Carmina; Larrosa, Nieves; Ciruela, Pilar; Jane, Mireia; Sá-Leão, Raquel; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the serotypes and clonal diversity of pneumococci causing invasive pneumococcal disease in Catalonia, Spain, in the era of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). In our region, this vaccine is only available in the private market and it is estimated a PCV13 vaccine coverage around 55% in children. A total of 1551 pneumococcal invasive isolates received between 2010 and 2013 in the Molecular Microbiology Department at Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, were included. Fifty-two serotypes and 249 clonal types—defined by MLST—were identified. The most common serotypes were serotype 1 (n = 182; 11.7%), 3 (n = 145; 9.3%), 19A (n = 137; 8.8%) and 7F (n = 122; 7.9%). Serotype 14 was the third most frequent serotype in children < 2 years (15 of 159 isolates). PCV7 serotypes maintained their proportion along the period of study, 16.6% in 2010 to 13.4% in 2013, whereas there was a significant proportional decrease in PCV13 serotypes, 65.3% in 2010 to 48.9% in 2013 (p<0.01). This decrease was mainly attributable to serotypes 19A and 7F. Serotype 12F achieved the third position in 2013 (n = 22, 6.4%). The most frequent clonal types found were ST306 (n = 154, 9.9%), ST191 (n = 111, 7.2%), ST989 (n = 85, 5.5%) and ST180 (n = 80, 5.2%). Despite their decrease, PCV13 serotypes continue to be a major cause of disease in Spain. These results emphasize the need for complete PCV13 vaccination. PMID:26953887

  11. Behind the data: Establishing the Network for Surveillance for Pneumococcal Diseases in the East African Region, netSPEAR

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Ben; Kisakye, Annet; Makewa, Douglas; Mudhune, Sandra; Mwamtemi, Hadija; Nansera, Dennis; Ngwiri, Thomas; Wamae, Maranga; English, Mike

    2009-01-01

    In a region with high rates of mortality among children aged <5 years, the underfunded health care systems of sub-Saharan Africa have few resources available to perform surveillance activities that can help determine the causes of morbidity and mortality in the region. At present, there are few examples of attempts to promote public health care surveillance that might inform current debates about how to expand and improve surveillance, particularly for bacterial diseases. Driven by this gap in knowledge, we attempted to explore the successes and failures of the Network for Surveillance of Pneumococcal Disease in the East African Region and to share the experiences of what are essentially non research public-sector hospitals in East Africa, with the hopes that surveillance systems for other diseases, especially those that require complex diagnostic support, may be informed by these experiences. The state of services essential for surveillance and the measures taken to overcome any shortcomings are described, as is the progress made in improving clinical diagnosis, laboratory processing, and data management. For surveillance to play a role in public health care, ministries of health and associated institutions must own and push forward the surveillance agenda, with support from global partners, and take advantage of the developments that have been achieved within the institutions. PMID:19191612

  12. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine on diabetic elderly.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Lu, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yu-Kang; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Hung, Shou-Hung; Yang, Ming-Ching; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2016-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is recommended for prevention of pneumonia. However, the effectiveness of PPV23 remains unclear in the older diabetic patients who usually have compromised immune function.We used data extracted from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from 2000 to 2009 to conduct a population-based retrospective cohort study, comparing the incidence of pneumococcal diseases among PPV23-vaccinated and propensity-score matched PPV23-unvaccinated groups in diabetic elderly. The primary outcome was invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs), and the secondary outcomes were medical utilization.PPV23-vaccinated group had reduced risks of IPD (adjusted OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.78-0.94), respiratory failure (0.84, 0.77-0.93), and shorter length of hospitalization (-1.27 ± 0.19 days, P value: 0.0012). In flu-vaccinated group, subjects who received PPV23 had reduced risks of IPD, hospitalization, and respiratory failure; had shorter lengths of hospitalization; and less medical costs, than those without receiving PPV23. In not flu-vaccinated group, PPV23 vaccination was associated with reduced risks of IPD and respiratory failure. Receiving both vaccines could bring better protection in IPD, hospitalization, visits of emergency department, and respiratory failure.PPV23 vaccination was effective in prevention of pneumococcal diseases and reduction of medical utilization in diabetic elderly aged 75 and more. Receiving both vaccines resulted in better outcomes than PPV vaccination alone. PMID:27368047

  13. Effectiveness of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine on diabetic elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Chia-Sheng; Lu, Chia-Wen; Chang, Yu-Kang; Yang, Kuen-Cheh; Hung, Shou-Hung; Yang, Ming-Ching; Chang, Hao-Hsiang; Huang, Chi-Ting; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Huang, Kuo-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Diabetes mellitus is associated with increased risk of pneumonia, and 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) is recommended for prevention of pneumonia. However, the effectiveness of PPV23 remains unclear in the older diabetic patients who usually have compromised immune function. We used data extracted from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) from 2000 to 2009 to conduct a population-based retrospective cohort study, comparing the incidence of pneumococcal diseases among PPV23-vaccinated and propensity-score matched PPV23-unvaccinated groups in diabetic elderly. The primary outcome was invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPDs), and the secondary outcomes were medical utilization. PPV23-vaccinated group had reduced risks of IPD (adjusted OR: 0.86, 95% CI: 0.78–0.94), respiratory failure (0.84, 0.77–0.93), and shorter length of hospitalization (−1.27 ± 0.19 days, P value: 0.0012). In flu-vaccinated group, subjects who received PPV23 had reduced risks of IPD, hospitalization, and respiratory failure; had shorter lengths of hospitalization; and less medical costs, than those without receiving PPV23. In not flu-vaccinated group, PPV23 vaccination was associated with reduced risks of IPD and respiratory failure. Receiving both vaccines could bring better protection in IPD, hospitalization, visits of emergency department, and respiratory failure. PPV23 vaccination was effective in prevention of pneumococcal diseases and reduction of medical utilization in diabetic elderly aged 75 and more. Receiving both vaccines resulted in better outcomes than PPV vaccination alone. PMID:27368047

  14. Herd immunity and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: a quantitative model.

    PubMed

    Haber, Michael; Barskey, Albert; Baughman, Wendy; Barker, Lawrence; Whitney, Cynthia G; Shaw, Kate M; Orenstein, Walter; Stephens, David S

    2007-07-20

    Invasive pneumococcal disease in older children and adults declined markedly after introduction in 2000 of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for young children. An empirical quantitative model was developed to estimate the herd (indirect) effects on the incidence of invasive disease among persons >or=5 years of age induced by vaccination of young children with 1, 2, or >or=3 doses of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine, Prevnar (PCV7), containing serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F. From 1994 to 2003, cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were prospectively identified in Georgia Health District-3 (eight metropolitan Atlanta counties) by Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs). From 2000 to 2003, vaccine coverage levels of PCV7 for children aged 19-35 months in Fulton and DeKalb counties (of Atlanta) were estimated from the National Immunization Survey (NIS). Based on incidence data and the estimated average number of doses received by 15 months of age, a Poisson regression model was fit, describing the trend in invasive pneumococcal disease in groups not targeted for vaccination (i.e., adults and older children) before and after the introduction of PCV7. Highly significant declines in all the serotypes contained in PCV7 in all unvaccinated populations (5-19, 20-39, 40-64, and >64 years) from 2000 to 2003 were found under the model. No significant change in incidence was seen from 1994 to 1999, indicating rates were stable prior to vaccine introduction. Among unvaccinated persons 5+ years of age, the modeled incidence of disease caused by PCV7 serotypes as a group dropped 38.4%, 62.0%, and 76.6% for 1, 2, and 3 doses, respectively, received on average by the population of children by the time they are 15 months of age. Incidence of serotypes 14 and 23F had consistent significant declines in all unvaccinated age groups. In contrast, the herd immunity effects on vaccine-related serotype 6A incidence were inconsistent. Increasing trends of non

  15. Pneumococcal vaccine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal vaccine is an immunization against Streptococcus pneumoniae , a bacterium that frequently causes meningitis and pneumonia in the elderly, and people with chronic illnesses. Pneumococcal pneumonia accounts for 10 ...

  16. Evolving pneumococcal serotypes and sequence types in relation to high antibiotic stress and conditional pneumococcal immunization.

    PubMed

    Su, Lin-Hui; Kuo, An-Jing; Chia, Ju-Hsin; Li, Hsin-Chieh; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Feng, Ye; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2015-11-02

    In Taiwan, beginning in 2013, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was provided free of charge to children 2-5 years of age. In 2014, this was extended to children 1-5 years old. During 2012-2014, 953 cases of culture-confirmed pneumococcal disease (CCPD), including 104 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), were prospectively identified and analyzed at a 3,700-bed hospital in Taiwan. From 2012 to 2014, the incidence per 10,000 admissions decreased from 26.7 to 20.4 for CCPD (P < 0.001) and from 3.2 to 1.9 for IPD (P < 0.05). Significant reduction of PCV13 serotypes was firstly noted in children in 2013 and extended to both paediatric and adult populations in 2014. Simultaneously, the incidence per 10,000 admissions of non-PCV13 serotypes increased from 6.1 in 2012 to 9.3 in 2014 (P < 0.005). The most prevalent non-PCV13 serotypes were 15A, 15B, and 23A, each containing a predominant clone, ST63(15A), ST83(15B), and ST338(23A). From 2012 to 2014, isolates with penicillin minimum inhibitory concentrations >2 mg/L decreased from 27.8% to 8.1% (P < 0.001) among all isolates. PCV13 immunization in young children demonstrated an early protective effect in all ages. However, in the elderly, the effect was compromised by an emergence of non-PCV13 serotypes.

  17. Minimally invasive surgery for thyroid eye disease.

    PubMed

    Naik, Milind Neilkant; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Gupta, Adit; Kamal, Saurabh

    2015-11-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) can affect the eye in myriad ways: proptosis, strabismus, eyelid retraction, optic neuropathy, soft tissue changes around the eye and an unstable ocular surface. TED consists of two phases: active, and inactive. The active phase of TED is limited to a period of 12-18 months and is mainly managed medically with immunosuppression. The residual structural changes due to the resultant fibrosis are usually addressed with surgery, the mainstay of which is orbital decompression. These surgeries are performed during the inactive phase. The surgical rehabilitation of TED has evolved over the years: not only the surgical techniques, but also the concepts, and the surgical tools available. The indications for decompression surgery have also expanded in the recent past. This article discusses the technological and conceptual advances of minimally invasive surgery for TED that decrease complications and speed up recovery. Current surgical techniques offer predictable, consistent results with better esthetics.

  18. [Public health management in invasive meningococcal diseases].

    PubMed

    Ehrhard, I; Arndt, U

    2004-12-01

    At the 54(th) Scientific Congress of the German Professional Association of Public Health Service Physicians and Dentists in Marburg on 6th May 2004 the working group on meningococci (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Meningokokken, AGMK) organised the international workshop "Public Health Management of invasive Meningococcal Disease". In recent years significant changes in the epidemiology of meningococcal disease took place in Europe: in some countries and regions the number of disease caused by meningococci serogroup C has increased significantly. In the Netherlands this increase led to the introduction of an immunisation programme with conjugated meningococcal vaccines targeting children aged 1 up to 18 years. In Switzerland a peak in the number of reported meningococcal group C cases could be observed in some regions. Therefore, a regional vaccination programme has been introduced. Nevertheless, compared with Germany, the indications for vaccination against meningococci in Switzerland are more extensive. In the workshop, Professor Ulrich Vogel and Dr. Ingrid Ehrhard presented the epidemiological situation in Germany and the recommended prophylaxis regimen against meningococci. PMID:15609213

  19. The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Cremers, Amelieke J. H.; Mobegi, Fredrick M.; de Jonge, Marien I.; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Meis, Jacques F.; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Ferwerda, Gerben; Bentley, Stephen D.; Zomer, Aldert L.

    2015-01-01

    The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugated vaccine (PCV7) has affected the genetic population of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pediatric carriage. Little is known however about pneumococcal population genomics in adult invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) under vaccine pressure. We sequenced and serotyped 349 strains of S. pneumoniae isolated from IPD patients in Nijmegen between 2001 and 2011. Introduction of PCV7 in the Dutch National Immunization Program in 2006 preluded substantial alterations in the IPD population structure caused by serotype replacement. No evidence could be found for vaccine induced capsular switches. We observed that after a temporary bottleneck in gene diversity after the introduction of PCV7, the accessory gene pool re-expanded mainly by genes already circulating pre-PCV7. In the post-vaccine genomic population a number of genes changed frequency, certain genes became overrepresented in vaccine serotypes, while others shifted towards non-vaccine serotypes. Whether these dynamics in the invasive pneumococcal population have truly contributed to invasiveness and manifestations of disease remains to be further elucidated. We suggest the use of whole genome sequencing for surveillance of pneumococcal population dynamics that could give a prospect on the course of disease, facilitating effective prevention and management of IPD. PMID:26492862

  20. Prognostic score systems and community-acquired bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Spindler, C; Ortqvist, A

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of three score systems: the pneumonia severity index (PSI); CURB-65 (confusion; urea >7 mM; respiratory rate > or =30 breaths x min(-1); blood pressure <90 mmHg systolic or < or =60 mmHg diastolic; aged > or =65 yrs old); and modified American Thoracic Society rule for predicting intensive care unit (ICU) need and mortality due to bacteraemic pneumococcal pneumonia. All adult patients (n = 114) with invasive pneumococcal pneumonia at the Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden, 1999-2000, were included in the study. Severity scores were calculated and the independent prognostic importance of different variables was analysed by multiple regression analyses. PSI > or = IV, CURB-65 > or = 2, and the presence of one major or more than one minor risk factor in mATS all had a high sensitivity, but somewhat lower specificity for predicting death and ICU need. The death rate was 12% (13 out of 114). Severity score and treatment in departments other than the Dept of Infectious Diseases were the only factors independently correlated to death. Patients treated in other departments more often had severe underlying illnesses and were more severely ill on admission. However, a significant difference in death rates remained after adjustment for severity between the two groups. In conclusion, all score systems were useful for predicting the need for intensive care unit treatment and death due to bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia. The pneumonia severity index was the most sensitive, but CURB-65 was easier to use.

  1. Efficacy Profiles of Daptomycin for Treatment of Invasive and Noninvasive Pulmonary Infections with Streptococcus pneumoniae▿

    PubMed Central

    Henken, Stefanie; Bohling, Jennifer; Martens-Lobenhoffer, Jens; Paton, James C.; Ogunniyi, A. David; Briles, David E.; Salisbury, Vyvyan C.; Wedekind, Dirk; Bode-Böger, Stefanie M.; Welsh, Thomas; Bange, Franz C.; Welte, Tobias; Maus, Ulrich A.

    2010-01-01

    Daptomycin is a novel lipopeptide antibiotic with excellent activity against Gram-positive bacterial pathogens, but its therapeutic value for the treatment of invasive pneumococcal disease compared to that for the treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia is incompletely defined. We investigated the efficacy of daptomycin in two models of Streptococcus pneumoniae-induced lung infection, i.e., pneumococcal pneumonia and septic pneumococcal disease. Mice were infected with a bioluminescent, invasive serotype 2 S. pneumoniae strain or a less virulent serotype 19 S. pneumoniae strain and were then given semitherapeutic or therapeutic daptomycin or ceftriaxone. Readouts included survival; bacterial loads; and septic disease progression, as determined by biophotonic imaging. Semitherapeutic daptomycin treatment fully protected the mice against the progression of septic disease induced by serotype 2 S. pneumoniae, while therapeutic treatment of the mice with daptomycin or ceftriaxone led to ∼70% or ∼60% survival, respectively. In contrast, mice infected with serotype 19 S. pneumoniae developed severe pneumonia and lung leakage even in the presence of increased intra-alveolar daptomycin levels, resulting in only 40% survival, whereas the ceftriaxone-treated mice had 100% survival. Together, although daptomycin demonstrates little efficacy in the treatment of pneumococcal pneumonia, daptomycin is highly effective in preventing S. pneumoniae-induced septic death, thus possibly offering a therapeutic option for patients with life-threatening septic pneumococcal disease. PMID:19917756

  2. [Streptococcus pneumoniae Vaccination in Children and Adolescents at High Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease].

    PubMed

    Tendais-Almeida, Marta; Ferreira-Magalhães, Manuel; Alves, Inês; Tavares, Margarida; Azevedo, Inês

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Em Portugal, a vacinação anti-pneumocócica é gratuita e recomendada pela Direção-Geral da Saúde na população pediátrica de alto risco para doença invasiva pneumocócica. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar o cumprimento vacinal numa população pediátrica seguida em consulta hospitalar. Material e Métodos: Estudo observacional transversal, em crianças com diagnóstico de alto risco de doença invasiva pneumocócica e consulta num hospital nível três, entre julho e dezembro de 2014. Os dados foram obtidos através do processo clínico, Boletim Individual de Saúde e Plataforma de Dados da Saúde®. Resultados: Dos 122 participantes, 95,9% realizaram, pelo menos, uma dose de vacina mas, destes, só 64,8% efetuaram o esquema completo. O cumprimento do esquema vacinal foi melhor nos de idade inferior a cinco anos (p < 0,01). A proporção de crianças com esquema completo foi de: 100% nas hemoglobinopatias, 100% nas infeções por vírus da imunodeficiência humana, 66,7% nos prematuros com idade gestacional ⤠28 semanas, 62,5% nos esplenectomizados e 54,7% na síndrome de Down. As crianças têm mais esquemas completos quando são seguidas em consulta de Infeciologia (100%) e de Pneumologia pediátricas (88,2%). O grupocom idade superior a cinco anos está mais vacinado com a vacina polissacarida 23-valente do que o dos 2-5 anos (74,5% vs 40,5%; p < 0,01).Discussão: A maioria da nossa população de alto risco para doença invasiva pneumocócica efetuou vacinação anti-pneumocócica, mas apenas dois terços completaram o esquema recomendado, sendo a maior falha na administração da vacina polissacarida 23-valente. Conclusões: Embora estes resultados sejam melhores do que em países europeus com recomendações semelhantes, é necessário explorar as causas das falhas observadas para otimizar a vacinação.

  3. A cross-sectional observational study of pneumococcal carriage in children, their parents, and older adults following the introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hamaluba, Mainga; Kandasamy, Rama; Ndimah, Susan; Morton, Richard; Caccamo, Marisa; Robinson, Hannah; Kelly, Sarah; Field, Aimee; Norman, Lily; Plested, Emma; Thompson, Ben A V; Zafar, Azhar; Kerridge, Simon A; Lazarus, Rajeka; John, Tessa; Holmes, Jane; Fenlon, Shannon N; Gould, Katherine A; Waight, Pauline; Hinds, Jason; Crook, Derrick; Snape, Matthew D; Pollard, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Using nasopharyngeal carriage as a marker of vaccine impact, pneumococcal colonization and its relation to invasive disease were examined in children, their parents, and older adults in the United Kingdom following introduction of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) and prior to 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13).A cross-sectional observational study was conducted, collecting nasopharyngeal swabs from children aged 25 to 55 months who had previously received 3 doses of PCV7, their parents, and adults aged ≥65 years. Pneumococcal serotyping was conducted according to World Health Organization guidelines with nontypeable isolates further analyzed by molecular serotyping. A national invasive disease surveillance program was conducted throughout the corresponding period.Pneumococcus was isolated from 47% of children, 9% of parents, and 2.2% of older adults. For these groups, the percentage of serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.5%, 0.0%, and 15.4%, with a further 20.1%, 44.4%, and 7.7% coverage added by those in PCV13. In each group, the percentage of disease due to serotypes covered by PCV7 were 1.0%, 7.4% and 5.1% with a further 65.3%, 42.1%, and 61.4% attributed to those in PCV13.The prevalence of carriage is the highest in children, with direct vaccine impact exemplified by low carriage and disease prevalence of PCV7 serotypes in vaccinated children, whereas the indirect effects of herd protection are implied by similar observations in unvaccinated parents and older adults. PMID:25569650

  4. Underestimation of Invasive Meningococcal Disease in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Nieddu, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Indolfi, Giuseppe; Canessa, Clementina; Ricci, Silvia; Bianchi, Leila; Serranti, Daniele; Poggi, Giovanni Maria; Resti, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Knowing the incidence of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) is essential for planning appropriate vaccination policies. However, IMD may be underestimated because of misdiagnosis or insufficiently sensitive laboratory methods. Using a national molecular surveillance register, we assessed the number of cases misdiagnosed and diagnoses obtained postmortem with real-time PCR (rPCR), and we compared sensitivity of rPCR versus culture-based testing. A total of 222 IMD cases were identified: 11 (42%) of 26 fatal cases had been misdiagnosed or undiagnosed and were reclassified as IMD after rPCR showed meningococcal DNA in all available specimens taken postmortem. Of the samples tested with both rPCR and culture, 58% were diagnosed by using rPCR alone. The underestimation factor associated with the use of culture alone was 3.28. In countries such as Italy, where rPCR is in limited use, IMD incidence may be largely underestimated; thus, assessments of benefits of meningococcal vaccination may be prone to error. PMID:26890305

  5. Advances in pneumococcal vaccines: what are the advantages for the elderly?

    PubMed

    Vila-Córcoles, Angel

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes considerable morbidity and mortality in the elderly. There are three established approaches to pneumococcal vaccination: polysaccharide vaccines, protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines and protein-based vaccines. This article reviews advances in anti-pneumococcal vaccines, with reference to advantages and shortcomings for the elderly in particular. The 23-valent polysaccharide pneumococcal vaccine (PPV) is currently recommended for high-risk patients and the general elderly population. Although the effectiveness of PPV against pneumonia is unclear, recent studies point to significant protective effects in preventing pneumococcal pneumonia and reducing the severity of disease in vaccinated elderly patients. PPV offers high serotype coverage and, although it is poorly immunogenic in some individuals, provides approximately 60% protection against invasive disease in the general elderly population. PPV vaccination appears cost effective for elderly patients although the vaccine might only be effective in preventing invasive disease. Additional benefits could mean a greater level of vaccine cost effectiveness. However, it is important to understand that PPV provides incomplete protection, especially in those with underlying high-risk conditions, and development of more effective pneumococcal vaccination strategies for elderly patients is still needed. In recent years, the most important advance in the prevention of pneumococcal infections in the elderly has been the introduction of a 7-valent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (CPV) as a routine vaccination for infants. In addition to dramatically reducing invasive infection in children, CPV has been observed to have a considerable indirect protective effect in parents and grandparents. While the possibility of using CPV in elderly patients has been suggested, currently there are only limited immunogenicity data and no efficacy data in adults. The low serotype coverage is an important

  6. Evolving microbiology and molecular epidemiology of acute otitis media in the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E; Casey, Janet R

    2007-10-01

    The addition of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) to the routine immunization schedule in the United States for infants has produced a much more favorable impact on the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM) than anticipated. Because the serotypes included in PCV7 were those most frequently expressing antibiotic resistance in 2001, predictions were made that up to 98% of pneumococcal AOM episodes would be caused by penicillin susceptible strains. However, recent studies have shown that the benefits of PCV7 are becoming eroded. Replacement serotypes of pneumococci have emerged, expressing polysaccharide capsules different from those included in PCV7, with increasing frequency. These replacement strains are coming to dominate in the nasopharynx and in AOM isolates (and in invasive disease). Expansion in the isolation of serotypes 3, 7F, 15B/C/F, 19A, 22F, 33F, and 38 has been described in various surveillance systems. Pneumococcal strains expressing non-PCV7 capsular serotypes also appear to be rapidly acquiring resistance to penicillin and other antibiotics. Emergence of strains of pneumococci expressing non-PCV7 capsular serotypes is occurring by multiple mechanisms including capsular switching as suggested by molecular epidemiology studies. Expansion of the number of serotypes included in pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is needed to sustain a long-term benefit from immunization against these bacteria.

  7. Nanogel-based PspA intranasal vaccine prevents invasive disease and nasal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Yuki, Yoshikazu; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2013-05-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  8. Nanogel-Based PspA Intranasal Vaccine Prevents Invasive Disease and Nasal Colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Il Gyu; Sato, Ayuko; Nochi, Tomonori; Takahashi, Haruko; Sawada, Shinichi; Mejima, Mio; Kurokawa, Shiho; Okada, Kazunari; Sato, Shintaro; Briles, David E.; Kunisawa, Jun; Inoue, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Akiyoshi, Kazunari

    2013-01-01

    To establish a safer and more effective vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infections, current knowledge regarding the antigens common among pneumococcal strains and improvements to the system for delivering these antigens across the mucosal barrier must be integrated. We developed a pneumococcal vaccine that combines the advantages of pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA) with a nontoxic intranasal vaccine delivery system based on a nanometer-sized hydrogel (nanogel) consisting of a cationic cholesteryl group-bearing pullulan (cCHP). The efficacy of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine (cCHP-PspA) was tested in murine pneumococcal airway infection models. Intranasal vaccination with cCHP-PspA provided protective immunity against lethal challenge with Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, reduced colonization and invasion by bacteria in the upper and lower respiratory tracts, and induced systemic and nasal mucosal Th17 responses, high levels of PspA-specific serum immunoglobulin G (IgG), and nasal and bronchial IgA antibody responses. Moreover, there was no sign of PspA delivery by nanogel to either the olfactory bulbs or the central nervous system after intranasal administration. These results demonstrate the effectiveness and safety of the nanogel-based PspA nasal vaccine system as a universal mucosal vaccine against pneumococcal respiratory infection. PMID:23460513

  9. Trend of invasive pneumococal disease (IPD) in a South Western, Nigerian hospital

    PubMed Central

    Olanrewaju, Motayo Babatunde; Olusola, Akingbade; Victor, Nwadike; Olabode, Shobayo; Joseph, Ogiogwa; Akiniyi, Akinduti; Iheanyi, Okonko

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of the Heptavalent-pneumococcal vaccine (PCV-7) by private pharmaceutical companies in Nigeria, has generated interest in invasive bacterial diseases particularly IPD. Our objective in this study is to investigate the trend and occurrence rate of IPD in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Suspected IPD cases were assessed from Jan 2010 to Dec 2010 for demographic and Microbiological characteristics. Bacterial isolations and antibiotics susceptibility testing followed standard bacteriological procedure. Overall 471 cases of probable IPD was assessed, with 21(4.5%) cases of suspected pneumonia, 109(23.1%) cases of suspected meningitis, and 341(72.4%) cases of suspected septicaemia. Confirmed IPD cases were 9 with 2 cases of meningitis, 3 cases of septicaemia and 4 cases of pneumonia. Age range distribution showed, high distribution of IPD cases among children >1 with 5(55.6%) there was a statistically significant difference in gender p< 0.05 (X2 test) with females recording a higher occurrence than males. We conclude by advocating for better detection methods against IPD meningitis cases, and continuous surveillance into the serotypes of streptococcus pneumonia as well inclusion of the PCV vaccine into our childhood immunization program. PMID:27279965

  10. Trend of invasive pneumococal disease (IPD) in a South Western, Nigerian hospital.

    PubMed

    Olanrewaju, Motayo Babatunde; Olusola, Akingbade; Victor, Nwadike; Olabode, Shobayo; Joseph, Ogiogwa; Akiniyi, Akinduti; Iheanyi, Okonko

    2016-01-01

    The recent introduction of the Heptavalent-pneumococcal vaccine (PCV-7) by private pharmaceutical companies in Nigeria, has generated interest in invasive bacterial diseases particularly IPD. Our objective in this study is to investigate the trend and occurrence rate of IPD in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Suspected IPD cases were assessed from Jan 2010 to Dec 2010 for demographic and Microbiological characteristics. Bacterial isolations and antibiotics susceptibility testing followed standard bacteriological procedure. Overall 471 cases of probable IPD was assessed, with 21(4.5%) cases of suspected pneumonia, 109(23.1%) cases of suspected meningitis, and 341(72.4%) cases of suspected septicaemia. Confirmed IPD cases were 9 with 2 cases of meningitis, 3 cases of septicaemia and 4 cases of pneumonia. Age range distribution showed, high distribution of IPD cases among children >1 with 5(55.6%) there was a statistically significant difference in gender p< 0.05 (X2 test) with females recording a higher occurrence than males. We conclude by advocating for better detection methods against IPD meningitis cases, and continuous surveillance into the serotypes of streptococcus pneumonia as well inclusion of the PCV vaccine into our childhood immunization program. PMID:27279965

  11. [Pneumococcal carriage in mothers and children of the Panare Amerindians from the State of Bolivar, Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Bello González, T; Rivera-Olivero, I A; Pocaterra, L; Spadola, E; Araque, M; Hermans, P W M; De Waard, J H

    2010-01-01

    In North America, the indigenous groups have been identified as a population with increased risk of pneumococcal colonization and pneumococcal invasive disease. However, little information is available from South American natives. In the present study we evaluated the nasopharyngeal carriage and serotype distribution of Streptococcus pneumoniae in mothers and children of the Panare people from Venezuela. In May 2008, in 8 distinct geographically isolated communities, 148 nasopharyngeal samples were obtained from 64 healthy mothers and 84 healthy Panare children under 5 years of age. S. pneumoniae was isolated and identified by standard techniques. Strains were typified by multiplex PCR and resistance patterns were determined by the disk diffusion method. A total of 65 strains were isolated; 11% of the mothers and 69% of the children carried S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 6B (48%), 33F (21,5%), 6A (6%), 19A (3,1%) and 23F (1,5%) were the most predominant. Of the 6 colonized mother-child pairs, 3 pairs (2 with 6B), were colonized with the same serotype. All strains were sensitive to penicillin and 13,7% were resistant to macrolides. The high colonization rates in the Panare people suggest that the children are at increased risk of pneumococcal invasive disease and could benefit from vaccination. Four conjugate vaccine serotypes (6B, 6A, 19A and 23F) representing 58 % of all strains were present in the population at the moment of sampling. Resistance to antibiotics is (still) not a problem. PMID:20461291

  12. Pneumococcal Infection among Children before Introduction of 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Turner, Paul; Turner, Claudia; Suy, Kuong; Soeng, Sona; Ly, Sokeng; Miliya, Thyl; Goldblatt, David; Day, Nicholas P J

    2015-11-01

    Vaccination of children with pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was initiated in Cambodia in 2015. To determine baseline data, we collected samples from children in 2013 and 2014. PCV13 serotypes accounted for 62.7% of colonizing organisms in outpatients and 88.4% of invasive pneumococci overall; multidrug resistance was common. Thus, effectiveness of vaccination should be high.

  13. Vaccine Failures in Patients Properly Vaccinated with 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine in Catalonia, a Region with Low Vaccination Coverage.

    PubMed

    Moraga-Llop, Fernando; Garcia-Garcia, Juan-Jose; Díaz-Conradi, Alvaro; Ciruela, Pilar; Martínez-Osorio, Johanna; González-Peris, Sebastià; Hernández, Sergi; de Sevilla, Mariona Fernández; Uriona, Sonia; Izquierdo, Conchita; Selva, Laura; Campins, Magda; Codina, Gemma; Batalla, Joan; Esteva, Cristina; Domínguez, Àngela; Muñoz-Almagro, Carmen

    2016-04-01

    Vaccine failures occurring with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in 3 pediatric hospitals in Barcelona (2012-2013) are described. PCV13 vaccine failure was defined as the occurrence of an invasive pneumococcal infection in children properly vaccinated by PCV13. Among 84 patients with invasive pneumococcal infection, 32 had received at least one dose of PCV13. Seventeen of them had invasive pneumococcal infection produced by a PCV13 serotype. Among those, 9 patients were considered to have a PCV13 vaccine failure. Serotype 3 was isolated in 6 patients, serotype 19A in 2 and serotype 6B in 1. PMID:26658626

  14. Adult zebrafish model for pneumococcal pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Saralahti, Anni; Piippo, Hannaleena; Parikka, Mataleena; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Rämet, Mika; Rounioja, Samuli

    2014-02-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a leading cause of community acquired pneumonia, septicemia, and meningitis. Due to incomplete understanding of the host and bacterial factors contributing to these diseases optimal treatment and prevention methods are lacking. In the present study we examined whether the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) can be used to investigate the pathophysiology of pneumococcal diseases. Here we show that both intraperitoneal and intramuscular injections of the pneumococcal strain TIGR4 cause a fulminant, dose-dependent infection in adult zebrafish, while isogenic mutant bacteria lacking the polysaccharide capsule, autolysin, or pneumolysin are attenuated in the model. Infection through the intraperitoneal route is characterized by rapid expansion of pneumococci in the bloodstream, followed by penetration of the blood-brain barrier and progression to meningitis. Using Rag1 mutant zebrafish, which are devoid of somatic recombination and thus lack adaptive immune responses, we show that clearance of pneumococci in adult zebrafish depends mainly on innate immune responses. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that the adult zebrafish can be used as a model for a pneumococcal infection, and that it can be used to study both host and bacterial factors involved in the pathogenesis. However, our results do not support the use of the zebrafish in studies on the role of adaptive immunity in pneumococcal disease or in the development of new pneumococcal vaccines.

  15. The acceptability of pneumococcal vaccine to older persons in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Bedford, D; Igoe, G; White, M; Parsons, B; Foyle, D; Howell, F; Corcoran, R

    2000-01-01

    A study was carried out to demonstrate in an Irish population whether older persons at risk from pneumococcal disease would accept an offer of the pneumococcal vaccine at the same time as their influenza vaccination. Of the 450 patients from 2 practices invited to attend for vaccination, 367 (81.6%) accepted both vaccines, a further 17 (3.8%) accepted the influenza vaccine only and a further 3 (0.7%) accepted the pneumococcal vaccine only. Three hundred and seven (68.2%) patients had received influenza vaccine at some time in previous years and these were statistically more likely to accept either vaccine than those who had not. This study has demonstrated that older persons at risk from pneumococcal disease will respond positively to a written invitation from their GP to avail of the pneumococcal vaccine. PMID:11037249

  16. Anatomical site-specific contributions of pneumococcal virulence determinants

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Anukul T.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen globally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is capable of causing a wide range of diseases including sinusitis, conjunctivitis, otitis media, pneumonia, bacteraemia, sepsis, and meningitis. While its capsular polysaccharide is indispensible for invasive disease, and opsonising antibodies against the capsule are the basis for the current vaccines, a long history of biomedical research indicates that other components of this Gram-positive bacterium are also critical for virulence. Herein we review the contribution of pneumococcal virulence determinants to survival and persistence in the context of distinct anatomical sites. We discuss how these determinants allow the pneumococcus to evade mucociliary clearance during colonisation, establish lower respiratory tract infection, resist complement deposition and opsonophagocytosis in the bloodstream, and invade secondary tissues such as the central nervous system leading to meningitis. We do so in a manner that highlights both the critical role of the capsular polysaccharide and the accompanying and necessary protein determinants. Understanding the complex interplay between host and pathogen is necessary to find new ways to prevent pneumococcal infection. This review is an attempt to do so with consideration for the latest research findings. PMID:27635368

  17. Anatomical site-specific contributions of pneumococcal virulence determinants

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Anukul T.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an opportunistic pathogen globally associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is capable of causing a wide range of diseases including sinusitis, conjunctivitis, otitis media, pneumonia, bacteraemia, sepsis, and meningitis. While its capsular polysaccharide is indispensible for invasive disease, and opsonising antibodies against the capsule are the basis for the current vaccines, a long history of biomedical research indicates that other components of this Gram-positive bacterium are also critical for virulence. Herein we review the contribution of pneumococcal virulence determinants to survival and persistence in the context of distinct anatomical sites. We discuss how these determinants allow the pneumococcus to evade mucociliary clearance during colonisation, establish lower respiratory tract infection, resist complement deposition and opsonophagocytosis in the bloodstream, and invade secondary tissues such as the central nervous system leading to meningitis. We do so in a manner that highlights both the critical role of the capsular polysaccharide and the accompanying and necessary protein determinants. Understanding the complex interplay between host and pathogen is necessary to find new ways to prevent pneumococcal infection. This review is an attempt to do so with consideration for the latest research findings.

  18. [Pneumococcal vaccines. New conjugate vaccines for adults].

    PubMed

    Campins Martí, Magda

    2015-11-01

    Pneumococcal infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, and are one of the 10 leading causes of death worldwide. Children under 2 years have a higher incidence rate, followed by adults over 64 years. The main risk group are individuals with immunodeficiency, and those with anatomical or functional asplenia, but can also affect immunocompetent persons with certain chronic diseases. Significant progress has been made in the last 10 years in the prevention of these infections. Until a few years ago, only the 23-valent non-conjugate pneumococcal vaccine was available. Its results were controversial in terms of efficacy and effectiveness, and with serious limitations on the type of immune response induced. The current possibility of using the 13-valent conjugate vaccine in adults has led to greater expectations in improving the prevention of pneumococcal disease in these age groups.

  19. [Minimally invasive cardiac surgery for aortic valve disease].

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Y; Katoh, T; Hamano, K; Gohra, H; Tsuboi, H; Esato, K

    1998-12-01

    Recent surgical advances leading to good operative results have contributed to the trend to useminimally invasive approaches, even in cardiac surgery. Smaller incisions are clearly more cosmetically acceptable to patients. When using a minimally invasive approach, it is most important to maintain surgical quality without jeopardizing patients. A good operative visual field leads to good surgical results. In the parasternal approach, we use a retractor to harvest an internal thoracic artery in coronary artery bypass surgery. Retracting the sternum upward allows for a good surgical view and permits the use of an arch cannula rather than femoral cannulation. When reoperating for aortic valve repair, the j-sternotomy approach requires less adhesiolysis compared with the traditional full sternotomy. No special technique is necessary to perform aortic valve surgery using the j-sternotomy approach. However, meticulous attention must be paid to avoiding left ventricular air embolisms to prevent postoperative stroke or neurocognitive deficits, especially when utilizing a minimally invasive approach. Transesophageal echo is useful not only for monitoring cardiac function but also for monitoring the persence of air in the left ventricle and atrium. This paper compare as the degree of invasion of minimally invasive cardiac surgery and the traditional full sternotomy. No differences were found in the occurrence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome between patients undergoing minimally invasive cardiac surgery and the traditional technique. Therefore it is concluded that minimally invasive surgery for patients with aortic valve disease may become the standard approach in the near future.

  20. Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Know About Zika & Pregnancy Your Child's Immunizations: Pneumococcal Vaccines (PCV, PPSV) KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Immunizations: ... or HIV infection); or cochlear implants. Why the Vaccines Are Recommended Children younger than 2 years old, ...

  1. Control of invasive meningococcal disease: is it achievable?

    PubMed

    Marshall, Helen; Wang, Bing; Wesselingh, Steve; Snape, Matthew; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    Neisseria meningitidis still leads to deaths and severe disability in children, adolescents and adults. Six different capsular groups of N. meningitidis cause invasive meningococcal disease in the form of meningitis and septicaemia in humans. Although conjugate meningococcal vaccines have been developed to provide protection against four of the capsular groups causing most diseases in humans, vaccines against capsular group B, which causes 85% of cases in Australia and the United Kingdom, have only recently been developed. A capsular group B meningococcal vaccine - 4CMenB (Bexsero) - has recently been licensed in the European Union, Canada and Australia. In Australia, a submission for inclusion of 4CMenB in the funded national immunization programme has recently been rejected. The vaccine will now be introduced into the national immunization programme in the United Kingdom following negotiation of a cost-effective price. With the current low incidence of invasive meningococcal disease in many regions, cost-effectiveness of a new capsular group B meningococcal vaccine is borderline in both the United Kingdom and Australia. Cost-effectiveness of an infant programme is determined largely by the direct protection of those vaccinated and is driven by the higher rate of disease in this age group. However, for an adolescent programme to be cost-effective, it must provide both long-term protection against both disease and carriage. The potential of vaccination to reduce the rate of severe invasive disease is a real possibility. A dual approach using both an infant and adolescent immunization programme to provide direct protection to those age groups at highest risk of meningococcal disease and to optimize the potential herd immunity effects is likely to be the most effective means of reducing invasive meningococcal disease. This commentary aims to describe the known disease burden and consequences of meningococcal disease, and the development and potential effectiveness of

  2. Monitoring the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines into West Africa: design and implementation of a population-based surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Grant A; Plumb, Ian D; Sambou, Sana; Saha, Debasish; Uchendu, Uchendu; Akinsola, Bolanle; Ikumapayi, Usman N; Baldeh, Ignatius; Usuf, Effua; Touray, Kebba; Jasseh, Momodou; Howie, Stephen R C; Wattiaux, Andre; Lee, Ellen; Knoll, Maria Deloria; Levine, Orin S; Greenwood, Brian M; Adegbola, Richard A; Hill, Philip C

    2012-01-01

    Routine use of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in developing countries is expected to lead to a significant reduction in childhood deaths. However, PCVs have been associated with replacement disease with non-vaccine serotypes. We established a population-based surveillance system to document the direct and indirect impact of PCVs on the incidence of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and radiological pneumonia in those aged 2 months and older in The Gambia, and to monitor changes in serotype-specific IPD. Here we describe how this surveillance system was set up and is being operated as a partnership between the Medical Research Council Unit and the Gambian Government. This surveillance system is expected to provide crucial information for immunisation policy and serves as a potential model for those introducing routine PCV vaccination in diverse settings.

  3. Population Structure of Streptococcus pneumoniae Causing Invasive Disease in Adults in Portugal before PCV13 Availability for Adults: 2008-2011

    PubMed Central

    Horácio, Andreia N.; Silva-Costa, Catarina; Diamantino-Miranda, Jorge; Lopes, Joana P.; Ramirez, Mario; Melo-Cristino, José

    2016-01-01

    Among the 1660 isolates recovered from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in adults (> = 18 yrs) in 2008–2011, a random sample of ≥50% of each serotype (n = 871) was chosen for MLST analysis and evaluation for the presence and type of pilus islands (PIs). The genetic diversity was high with 206 different sequence types (STs) detected, but it varied significantly between serotypes. The different STs represented 80 clonal complexes (CCs) according to goeBURST with the six more frequent accounting for more than half (50.6%) of the isolates—CC156 (serotypes 14, 9V and 23F), CC191 (serotype 7F), CC180 (serotype 3), CC306 (serotype 1), CC62 (serotypes 8 and 11A) and CC230 (serotype 19A). Most of the isolates (n = 587, 67.3%) were related to 29 Pneumococcal Molecular Epidemiology Network recognized clones. The overall proportion of isolates positive for any of the PIs was small (31.9%) and declined gradually during the study period (26.6% in 2011), mostly due to the significant decline of serotype 1 which is associated with PI-2. The changes in serotypes that occurred in adult IPD after the introduction of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) for children were mostly due to the expansion of previously circulating clones, while capsular switching was infrequent and not related to vaccine use. The reduction of IPD caused by PCV7 serotypes in the years following PCV7 implementation did not result in a decline of antimicrobial resistance in part due to the selection of resistant genotypes among serotypes 14 and 19A. PMID:27168156

  4. Strain features and distributions in pneumococci from children with invasive disease before and after 13-valent conjugate vaccine implementation in the USA

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, B.J.; Gertz, R.E.; Gladstone, R.A.; Walker, H.; Sherwood, L.K.; Jackson, D.; Li, Z.; Law, C.; Hawkins, P.A.; Chochua, S.; Sheth, M.; Rayamajhi, N.; Bentley, S.D.; Kim, L.; Whitney, C.G.; McGee, L.; Beall, B.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of second-generation pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) strain distributions have not yet been well described. We analysed IPD isolates recovered from children aged <5 years through Active Bacterial Core surveillance before (2008–2009; n = 828) and after (2011–2013; n = 600) 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) implementation. We employed conventional testing, PCR/electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and whole genome sequence (WGS) analysis to identify serotypes, resistance features, genotypes, and pilus types. PCV13, licensed in February 2010, effectively targeted all major 19A and 7F genotypes, and decreased antimicrobial resistance, primarily owing to removal of the 19A/ST320 complex. The strain complex contributing most to the remaining β-lactam resistance during 2011–2013 was 35B/ST558. Significant emergence of non-vaccine clonal complexes was not evident. Because of the removal of vaccine serotype strains, positivity for one or both pilus types (PI-1 and PI-2) decreased in the post-PCV13 years 2011–2013 relative to 2008–2009 (decreases of 32–55% for PI-1, and >95% for PI-2 and combined PI-1 + PI-2). β-Lactam susceptibility phenotypes correlated consistently with transpeptidase region sequence combinations of the three major penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) determined through WGS analysis. Other major resistance features were predictable by DNA signatures from WGS analysis. Multilocus sequence data combined with PBP combinations identified progeny, serotype donors and recipient strains in serotype switch events. PCV13 decreased the frequency of all PCV13 serotype clones and concurrently decreased the frequency of strain subsets with resistance and/or adherence features conducive to successful carriage. Our results serve as a reference describing key features of current paediatric IPD strains in the USA after PCV13 implementation. PMID:26363404

  5. Prevention of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering.

    PubMed

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    The interest in mass gathering and its implications has been increasing due to globalization and international travel. The potential occurrence of infectious disease outbreaks during mass gathering is most feared. In this context, respiratory tract infections are of great concern due to crowding in a limited space which facilitates and magnifies the potential of disease spread among attendees. Pneumococcal disease is best described among pilgrims to Makkah and vaccination is one of the methods for the prevention of this disease. Pneumonia was described in a mass gathering with a prevalence of 4.8/100,000 pilgrims and contributes to 15-39% of hospitalizations. Various studies showed that 7-37% of pilgrims are 65 y of age or older. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccine among pilgrims is low at 5%. There is no available data to make strong recommendations for S. pneumoniae vaccination of all pilgrims, it is important that a high risk population receive the indicated vaccination. We reviewed the available literature on the burden of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering and evaluate the available literature on pneumococcal vaccinations for attendees of mass gathering.

  6. Prevention of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    The interest in mass gathering and its implications has been increasing due to globalization and international travel. The potential occurrence of infectious disease outbreaks during mass gathering is most feared. In this context, respiratory tract infections are of great concern due to crowding in a limited space which facilitates and magnifies the potential of disease spread among attendees. Pneumococcal disease is best described among pilgrims to Makkah and vaccination is one of the methods for the prevention of this disease. Pneumonia was described in a mass gathering with a prevalence of 4.8/100,000 pilgrims and contributes to 15–39% of hospitalizations. Various studies showed that 7–37% of pilgrims are 65 y of age or older. The uptake of pneumococcal vaccine among pilgrims is low at 5%. There is no available data to make strong recommendations for S. pneumoniae vaccination of all pilgrims, it is important that a high risk population receive the indicated vaccination. We reviewed the available literature on the burden of pneumococcal infections during mass gathering and evaluate the available literature on pneumococcal vaccinations for attendees of mass gathering. PMID:26176306

  7. Common invasive fungal diseases: an overview of invasive candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Schmiedel, Yvonne; Zimmerli, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Every year, Candida, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus and Pneumocystis infect an estimated two million individuals worldwide. Most are immunocompromised or critically ill. Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of the critically ill and of recipients of transplanted abdominal organs. In high-risk haemato-oncological patients, in contrast, the introduction of antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole and later with mould-active posaconazole has led to a remarkable reduction of invasive candidiasis and is likely to have a similar effect on invasive aspergillosis. Invasive aspergillosis remains the dominant invasive fungal disease (IFD) of haemato-oncological patients and solid-organ transplant recipients and is increasingly found in individuals with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on corticosteroids. In the developed world, owing to antiretroviral therapy Pneumocystis pneumonia and cryptococcosis have become rare in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are mainly found in solid-organ transplant recipients or immunocompromised patients. In the developing world, cryptococcosis remains a common and highly lethal disease of HIV positive individuals. With invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis, timely diagnosis is the principal challenge. The clinical presentation is nonspecific and current diagnostic tests lack sensitivity and specificity. The combination of several tests improves sensitivity, but not specificity. Standardised polymerase chain-reaction-based assays may be promising tools for more rapid and specific diagnosis of candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Nevertheless, initiation of treatment is often based solely on clinical suspicion. Empirical therapy, however, may lead to over-treatment of patients without IFD or it may miss its target in the case of resistance. Despite the success of antifungal prophylaxis in reducing the incidence of IFDs in haemato-oncological patients, there are a considerable number of

  8. Cost-effectiveness and cost utility analysis of three pneumococcal conjugate vaccines in children of Peru

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The clinical and economic burden associated with invasive and non-invasive pneumococcal and non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) diseases is substantial in the Latin America and Caribbean region, where pneumococcal vaccines have only been introduced to a few countries. This study analyzed the cost-effectiveness and cost utility of three different pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) for Peru. Methods A Markov model that simulated the disease processes in a birth cohort over a lifetime, within 1,128 month cycles was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of 10-valent pneumococcal NTHi protein D conjugate vaccine (PHiD-CV) and 7- and 13-valent PCVs (PCV-7 and PCV-13). Expected quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), cost-savings and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were calculated. Results Without vaccination, pneumonia was associated with the greatest health economic burden (90% of QALYs lost and 63% of lifetime direct medical costs); while acute otitis media (AOM) was responsible for 1% of QALYs lost and 25% of direct medical costs. All vaccines were predicted to be cost-effective for Peru, with PHiD-CV being most cost-effective. PHiD-CV was predicted to generate 50 more QALYs gained and required a reduced investment (−US$ 3.4 million) versus PCV-13 (discounted data), and was therefore dominant and cost saving. The probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that PHiD-CV generated more QALYs gained at a reduced cost than PCV-13 in 84% of the simulations and less QALYs gains at a reduced cost in 16%. Additional scenarios using different assumptions on vaccine efficacies based on previous evidence were explored, but no significant change in the overall cost-effective results were observed. Conclusions The results of this modeling study predict that PCVs are likely to be a cost-effective strategy to help relieve the epidemiological and economic burden associated with pediatric pneumococcal and NTHi diseases for Peru. PHiD-CV is likely

  9. Cost-effectiveness of adult pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Rozenbaum, Mark H; Huijts, Susanne M; van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; Postma, Douwe F; Atwood, Mark; van Deursen, Anna M M; van der Ende, Arie; Grobbee, Diederick E; Sanders, Elisabeth A M; Sato, Reiko; Verheij, Theo J M; Vissink, Conrad E; Bonten, Marc J M; de Wit, G Ardine

    2015-11-01

    The Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) demonstrated the efficacy of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in preventing vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia and vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease in elderly subjects. We examined the cost-effectiveness of PCV13 vaccination in the Netherlands. Using a Markov-type model, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) of PCV13 vaccination in different age- and risk-groups for pneumococcal disease were evaluated using a societal perspective. Estimates of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs, vaccine efficacy and epidemiological data were based on the CAPiTA study and other prospective studies. The base-case was PCV13 vaccination of adults aged 65-74 years compared to no vaccination, assuming no net indirect effects in base-case due to paediatric 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use. Analyses for age- and risk-group specific vaccination strategies and for different levels of hypothetical herd effects from a paediatric PCV programme were also conducted. The ICER for base-case was €8650 per QALY (95% CI 5750-17,100). Vaccination of high-risk individuals aged 65-74 years was cost-saving and extension to medium-risk individuals aged 65-74 years yielded an ICER of €2900. Further extension to include medium- and high-risk individuals aged ≥18 years yielded an ICER of €3100.PCV13 vaccination is highly cost-effective in the Netherlands. The transferability of our results to other countries depends upon vaccination strategies already implemented in those countries.

  10. Cost-effectiveness of adult pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Rozenbaum, Mark H.; Huijts, Susanne M.; van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Postma, Douwe F.; Atwood, Mark; van Deursen, Anna M.M.; van der Ende, Arie; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Sanders, Elisabeth A.M.; Sato, Reiko; Verheij, Theo J.M.; Vissink, Conrad E.; Bonten, Marc J.M.; de Wit, G. Ardine

    2015-01-01

    The Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) demonstrated the efficacy of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in preventing vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia and vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease in elderly subjects. We examined the cost-effectiveness of PCV13 vaccination in the Netherlands. Using a Markov-type model, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) of PCV13 vaccination in different age- and risk-groups for pneumococcal disease were evaluated using a societal perspective. Estimates of quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs, vaccine efficacy and epidemiological data were based on the CAPiTA study and other prospective studies. The base-case was PCV13 vaccination of adults aged 65–74 years compared to no vaccination, assuming no net indirect effects in base-case due to paediatric 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine use. Analyses for age- and risk-group specific vaccination strategies and for different levels of hypothetical herd effects from a paediatric PCV programme were also conducted. The ICER for base-case was €8650 per QALY (95% CI 5750–17 100). Vaccination of high-risk individuals aged 65–74 years was cost-saving and extension to medium-risk individuals aged 65–74 years yielded an ICER of €2900. Further extension to include medium- and high-risk individuals aged ≥18 years yielded an ICER of €3100. PCV13 vaccination is highly cost-effective in the Netherlands. The transferability of our results to other countries depends upon vaccination strategies already implemented in those countries. PMID:26160871

  11. Dosing schedules for pneumococcal conjugate vaccine: considerations for policy makers.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Cynthia G; Goldblatt, David; O'Brien, Katherine L

    2014-01-01

    Since second generation pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) targeting 10 and 13 serotypes became available in 2010, the number of national policy makers considering these vaccines has steadily increased. An important consideration for a national immunization program is the timing and number of doses-the schedule-that will best prevent disease in the population. Data on disease epidemiology and the efficacy or effectiveness of PCV schedules are typically considered when choosing a schedule. Practical concerns, such as the existing vaccine schedule, and vaccine program performance are also important. In low-income countries, pneumococcal disease and deaths typically peak well before the end of the first year of life, making a schedule that provides PCV doses early in life (eg, a 6-, 10- and 14-week schedule) potentially the best option. In other settings, a schedule including a booster dose may address disease that peaks in the second year of life or may be seen to enhance a schedule already in place. A large and growing body of evidence from immunogenicity studies, as well as clinical trials and observational studies of carriage, pneumonia and invasive disease, has been systematically reviewed; these data indicate that schedules of 3 or 4 doses all work well, and that the differences between these regimens are subtle, especially in a mature program in which coverage is high and indirect (herd) effects help enhance protection provided directly by a vaccine schedule. The recent World Health Organization policy statement on PCVs endorsed a schedule of 3 primary doses without a booster or, as a new alternative, 2 primary doses with a booster dose. While 1 schedule may be preferred in a particular setting based on local epidemiology or practical considerations, achieving high coverage with 3 doses is likely more important than the specific timing of doses.

  12. T cell immunity and vaccines against invasive fungal diseases.

    PubMed

    Ito, James Isami

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades much has been learned about the immunology of invasive fungal infection, especially invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Although quite different in their pathogenesis, the major common protective host response is Th1 mediated. It is through Th1 cytokine production that the effector cells, phagocytes, are activated to kill the fungus. A more thorough understanding of the pathogenesis of disease, the elicited protective Th1 immune response, the T cell antigen(s) which elicit this response, and the mechanism(s) whereby one can enhance, reconstitute, or circumvent the immunosuppressed state will, hopefully, lead to the development of a vaccine(s) capable of protecting even the most immunocompromised of hosts.

  13. Minimally invasive treatment of Peyronie's disease: evidence-based progress.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Gerald H; Carson, Culley C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2014-07-01

    Peyronie's disease (PD) is often physically and psychologically devastating for patients, and the goal of treatment is to improve symptoms and sexual function without adding treatment-related morbidity. The potential for treatment-related morbidity after more invasive interventions, e.g. surgery, creates a need for effective minimally invasive treatments. We critically examined the available literature using levels of evidence to determine the reported support for each treatment. Most available minimally invasive treatments lack critical support for effectiveness due to the absence of randomised, placebo-controlled trials (RCTs) or non-significant results after RCTs. Iontophoresis, oral therapies (vitamin E, potassium para-aminobenzoate, tamoxifen, carnitine, and colchicine), extracorporeal shockwave therapy, and intralesional injection with verapamil or nicardipine have shown mixed or negative results. Treatments that have decreased penile curvature deformity in Level 1 or Level 2 evidence-based, placebo-controlled studies include intralesional injection with interferon α-2b or collagenase clostridium histolyticum.

  14. Organising pneumonia mimicking invasive fungal disease in patients with leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Forghieri, Fabio; Potenza, Leonardo; Morselli, Monica; Maccaferri, Monica; Pedrazzi, Letizia; Barozzi, Patrizia; Vallerini, Daniela; Riva, Giovanni; Zanetti, Eleonora; Quadrelli, Chiara; Rossi, Giulio; Rivasi, Francesco; Messino', Massimino; Rumpianesi, Fabio; Grottola, Antonella; Venturelli, Claudia; Pecorari, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Torelli, Giuseppe; Luppi, Mario

    2010-07-01

    Clinical charts from 63 consecutive highly immunocompromised haematologic patients presenting with pulmonary nodular lesions on CT scan, classified as either probable or possible invasive fungal disease (IFD) according to the revised EORTC/MSG classification, were retrospectively studied. Histopathological analysis of lung tissues, available for 23 patients, demonstrated proven IFD in 17 cases (14 invasive aspergillosis and 3 invasive zygomycosis), diffuse alveolar damage in one and organising pneumonia (OP) in five cases. In the OP cases, three of which have been defined as probable IFD according to EORTC/MSG classification, extensive immunohistochemical, molecular and immunological analyses for fungi were negative. Our case descriptions extend the notion that OP may be encountered as a distinct histopathological entity in pulmonary nodular lesions in patients with leukaemia with probable/possible IFD.

  15. Minimally invasive approaches for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Zoccali, Marco; Fichera, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in medical management of inflammatory bowel disease, many of these patients still require surgery at some point in the course of their disease. Their young age and poor general conditions, worsened by the aggressive medical treatments, make minimally invasive approaches particularly enticing to this patient population. However, the typical inflammatory changes that characterize these diseases have hindered wide diffusion of laparoscopy in this setting, currently mostly pursued in high-volume referral centers, despite accumulating evidences in the literature supporting the benefits of minimally invasive surgery. The largest body of evidence currently available for terminal ileal Crohn’s disease shows improved short term outcomes after laparoscopic surgery, with prolonged operative times. For Crohn’s colitis, high quality evidence supporting laparoscopic surgery is lacking. Encouraging preliminary results have been obtained with the adoption of laparoscopic restorative total proctocolectomy for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. A consensus about patients’ selection and the need for staging has not been reached yet. Despite the lack of conclusive evidence, a wave of enthusiasm is pushing towards less invasive strategies, to further minimize surgical trauma, with single incision laparoscopic surgery being the most realistic future development. PMID:23239913

  16. A Perspective on Invasive Salmonella Disease in Africa.

    PubMed

    Crump, John A; Heyderman, Robert S

    2015-11-01

    Salmonella enterica is a leading cause of community-acquired bloodstream infection in Africa. The contribution of typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella serovars to invasive disease varies considerably in place and time, even within the same country. Nonetheless, many African countries are now thought to experience typhoid fever incidence >100 per 100,000 per year with approximately 1% of patients dying. Invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease was estimated to cause 3.4 million illnesses and 681 316 deaths in 2010, with the most disease in Africa. Antimicrobial drug resistance is a growing problem in S. enterica that threatens to further compromise patient outcomes. Reservoirs for nontyphoidal Salmonella and the predominant routes of transmission for typhoidal and nontyphoidal Salmonella are not well understood in Africa, hampering the design of evidence-based, non-vaccine- and vaccine-based prevention measures. It is difficult to distinguish clinically invasive Salmonella disease from febrile illnesses caused by other pathogens. Blood cultures are the mainstay of laboratory diagnosis, but lack sensitivity due to the low magnitude of bacteremia, do not produce results at point of care, and are not widely available in Africa. Serologic approaches to diagnosis remain inaccurate, and nucleic acid amplification tests are also compromised by low concentrations of bacteria. High-throughput whole-genome sequencing, together with a range of novel analytic pipelines, has provided new insights into the complex pattern of epidemiology, pathogenesis, and host adaptation. Concerted efforts are therefore needed to apply these new tools in the context of high-quality field surveillance to improve diagnosis, patient management, control, and prevention of invasive Salmonella infections in Africa. PMID:26449937

  17. The Community-Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA): what is the future of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination in elderly?

    PubMed

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    Pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (PCAP) and invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) are important causes of morbidity and mortality in elderly. In the Community-Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA), a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial of 84,496 community-dwelling immunocompetent adults over 65 years of age, the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) reduced the incidence of first episode of vaccine-type (VT) PCAP with 38 and of VT-IPD with 76% in the modified intention-to-treat population. In The Netherlands, where PCV7 immunization of newborns was introduced in 2007 and replaced by PCV10 in 2011, introduction of PCV13 immunization of elderly--based on 2012 data--would be highly cost effective. However, this is probably different in countries where the VT disease burden has declined more, for instance due to herd effects following child immunization with PCV13. Apart from cost-effectiveness analyses, ethical aspects of PCAP prevention should be taken into account in policy making for pneumococcal vaccination in elderly.

  18. A neonatal pneumococcal conjugate vaccine trial in Papua New guinea: study population, methods and operational challenges.

    PubMed

    Phuanukoonnon, S; Reeder, J C; Pomat, W S; Van den Biggelaar, A H J; Holt, P G; Saleu, G; Opa, C; Michael, A; Aho, C; Yoannes, M; Francis, J; Orami, T; Namuigi, P; Siba, P M; Richmond, P C; Lehmann, D

    2010-01-01

    Infants in Papua New Guinea (PNG) are at a high risk of invasive pneumococcal disease, and a substantial burden of this falls on children less than six months old. PNG is planning to introduce a pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for infants in the near future, but to make the maximum impact neonatal immunization will have to be considered. To provide evidence on safety and immunogenicity for neonatal and early infant immunization, we undertook an open randomized controlled trial of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV). 318 children received 7vPCV at ages 0, 1 and 2 months or at 1, 2 and 3 months or not at all. All children received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine at age 9 months. This was a large and complex trial: village reporters visited participants weekly during the first year and fortnightly for a further 6 months and nurses monitored self-reported morbidity and collected many thousands of biological samples. The study team was remarkably successful in achieving the study aims, with 18-month follow-up completed on 77% of enrolled children and over 80% of scheduled samples collected. While the results of the trial will be reported elsewhere, this paper discusses the design of the study and dissects out some of the main reasons for its successful completion. Strong community engagement was an essential factor in success and the principles of equitable partnership and service provision led to a strong research partnership. A two-stage consent process, comprising primary assent followed by later informed consent, led to a high drop-out before initial enrolment, but an outstanding retention of those enrolled in the study. We conclude that factors such as strong community participation, reciprocity and a good relationship between the study team and participants are just as important as the technical elements of laboratory testing and data handling in ensuring the success of a vaccine trial in PNG. PMID:23163191

  19. [State of the art in invasive diseases by filamentous fungi].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections have become a major cause of morbimortality in intensive care patients, persons suffering from cancer or immune deficiencies, and other diseases with impaired immunity. Candida albicans remains the most frequent fungal pathogen, but advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of invasive candidiasis are leading to important etiological changes. Among the emerging invasive mycoses, are those caused by filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus, Lomentospora/Scedosporium, Fusarium or the Mucorales. Invasive aspergillosis is difficult to diagnose, and although there are diagnostic tools available, their use is not widespread, and their effectiveness vary depending on the group of patients. Clinical suspicion in high-risk patients, radiological diagnosis and the use of biomarkers, such as 1,3-β-D-glucan and galactomannan, can be of great help. However, diagnostic resources are limited in other mycoses, but radiology, pathological studies and the microbiological diagnosis can be useful. The high mortality of these mycoses requires early empirical antifungal treatment in many cases. Voriconazole is the first choice for treatment of the majority of aspergillosis, scedosporiasis, fusariosis and other hyalohyphomycoses. The treatment of mucormycoses, Lomentospora prolificans infections or mycoses by dematiaceous fungi are more complicated. Amphotericin B is active against many mucoralean fungi, but the combination of two or more antifungal agents could be a therapeutic alternative in many amphotericin B-refractory mycoses. Current clinical challenges include improving the diagnosis and the treatment of these mycoses, along with improving the adequate prevention in patients at high risk of suffering from them.

  20. Influenza-induced inflammation drives pneumococcal otitis media.

    PubMed

    Short, Kirsty R; Reading, Patrick C; Brown, Lorena E; Pedersen, John; Gilbertson, Brad; Job, Emma R; Edenborough, Kathryn M; Habets, Marrit N; Zomer, Aldert; Hermans, Peter W M; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A; Wijburg, Odilia L

    2013-03-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) predisposes individuals to secondary infections with the bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus). Infections may manifest as pneumonia, sepsis, meningitis, or otitis media (OM). It remains controversial as to whether secondary pneumococcal disease is due to the induction of an aberrant immune response or IAV-induced immunosuppression. Moreover, as the majority of studies have been performed in the context of pneumococcal pneumonia, it remains unclear how far these findings can be extrapolated to other pneumococcal disease phenotypes such as OM. Here, we used an infant mouse model, human middle ear epithelial cells, and a series of reverse-engineered influenza viruses to investigate how IAV promotes bacterial OM. Our data suggest that the influenza virus HA facilitates disease by inducing a proinflammatory response in the middle ear cavity in a replication-dependent manner. Importantly, our findings suggest that it is the inflammatory response to IAV infection that mediates pneumococcal replication. This study thus provides the first evidence that inflammation drives pneumococcal replication in the middle ear cavity, which may have important implications for the treatment of pneumococcal OM.

  1. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of general immunisation of infants and young children with the heptavalent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Katja; Pichlbauer, Ernest; Stürzlinger, Heidi

    2005-01-01

    Background The European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA) granted market authorisation to the heptavalent pneumococcal vaccine Prevenar (Wyeth) in the year 2001. The indication of Prevenar is the active immunisation of infants and young children under the age of two against invasive disease caused by Streptococcus pneumonia serotypes 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F and 23F. At the time of this study the German vaccination scheme advises the immunisation with Prevenar only for children at high risk. Objectives The objective of the study is first to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of the immunisation of all children with the heptavalent conjugated pneumococcal vaccine in Germany and second, whether a general recommendation for vaccination of all children would be cost-effective. Methods A systematic literature search was performed in 29 relevant databases for the period of January 1999 to June 2004. Thus 1,884 articles were identified which were then assessed according to predefined selection criteria. Results There is evidence for the medical effectiveness of Prevenar against invasive pneumococcal disease caused by the covered serotypes from a major double-blinded RCT undertaken in California. The vaccine shows lower values of effectiveness against otitis media and pneumonia. The values for effectiveness of the vaccine in Germany are below the data for California because of the different incidence of Serotypes. The cost-effectiveness rates for an immunisation of all children with Prevenar vary across different countries. One reason - besides different Health Systems - can be seen in the uncertainty about the duration of protection, another in the assumption on regional serotype coverage of the vaccine. From the healthcare payers' perspective a general vaccination of all children in Germany is not cost-effective, from a societal perspective the benefits from vaccination could prevail the cost. The actual price of the vaccine (if financed by the

  2. Potential role for mucosally active vaccines against pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Jambo, Kondwani C.; Sepako, Enoch; Heyderman, Robert S.; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2010-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a life-threatening disease with high mortality and morbidity among children under 5 years of age, the elderly and immunocompromised individuals worldwide. Protection against pneumococcal pneumonia relies on successful regulation of colonisation in the nasopharynx and a brisk alveolar macrophage-mediated immune response in the lung. Therefore, enhancing pulmonary mucosal immunity (which includes a combination of innate, humoral and cell-mediated immunity) through mucosal vaccination might be the key to prevention of pneumococcal infection. Current challenges include a lack of information in humans on mucosal immunity against pneumococci and a lack of suitable adjuvants for new vaccines. Data from mouse models, however, suggest that mucosally active vaccines will enhance mucosal and systemic immunity for protection against pneumococcal infection. PMID:20031415

  3. Invasive non-Typhi Salmonella disease in Africa.

    PubMed

    Morpeth, Susan C; Ramadhani, Habib O; Crump, John A

    2009-08-15

    Invasive non-Typhi Salmonella is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa, where it is a leading cause of bloodstream infection. Some host risk factors have been established, but little is known about environmental reservoirs and predominant modes of transmission, so prevention strategies are underdeveloped. Although foodborne transmission from animals to humans predominates in high-income countries, it has been postulated that transmission between humans, both within and outside health care facilities, may be important in sub-Saharan Africa. Antimicrobial resistance to ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and chloramphenicol is common among non-Typhi Salmonella strains; therefore, wider use of alternative agents may be warranted for empirical therapy. Development of vaccines targeting the leading invasive non-Typhi Salmonella serotypes Typhimurium and Enteritidis is warranted. The clinical presentation of non-Typhi Salmonella bacteremia is nonspecific and, in the absence of blood culture, may be confused with other febrile illnesses, such as malaria. Much work remains to be done to understand and control invasive non-Typhi Salmonella disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

  4. Does high biodiversity reduce the risk of Lyme disease invasion?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It has been suggested that increasing biodiversity, specifically host diversity, reduces pathogen and parasite transmission amongst wildlife (causing a “dilution effect”), whereby transmission amongst efficient reservoir hosts, (e.g. Peromyscus spp. mice for the agent of Lyme disease Borrelia burgdorferi) is reduced by the presence of other less efficient host species. If so, then increasing biodiversity should inhibit pathogen and parasite invasion. Methods We investigated this hypothesis by studying invasion of B. burgdorferi and its tick vector Ixodes scapularis in 71 field sites in southeastern Canada. Indices of trapped rodent host diversity, and of biodiversity of the wider community, were investigated as variables explaining the numbers of I. scapularis collected and B. burgdorferi infection in these ticks. A wide range of alternative environmental explanatory variables were also considered. Results The observation of low I. scapularis abundance and low B. burgdorferi infection prevalence in sites where I. scapularis were detected was consistent with early-stage invasion of the vector. There were significant associations between the abundance of ticks and season, year of study and ambient temperature. Abundance of host-seeking larvae was significantly associated with deer density, and abundance of host-seeking larvae and nymphs were positively associated with litter layer depth. Larval host infestations were lower where the relative proportion of non-Peromyscus spp. was high. Infestations of hosts with nymphs were lower when host species richness was higher, but overall nymphal abundance increased with species richness because Peromyscus spp. mouse abundance and host species richness were positively correlated. Nymphal infestations of hosts were lower where tree species richness was higher. B. burgdorferi infection prevalence in ticks varied significantly with an index of rates of migratory bird-borne vector and pathogen invasion. Conclusions

  5. Pneumococcal Infections - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) Farsi (فارسی) Russian (Русский) Spanish (español) Tagalog (Tagalog) Thai ( ... Action Coalition; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Farsi (فارسی) Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine English (Farsi) واکسن توأمان ...

  6. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases. PMID:26767542

  7. Bone marrow invasion in multiple myeloma and metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, J C; Luna, A

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine is the imaging study of choice for the management of bone marrow disease. MRI sequences enable us to integrate structural and functional information for detecting, staging, and monitoring the response the treatment of multiple myeloma and bone metastases in the spine. Whole-body MRI has been incorporated into different guidelines as the technique of choice for managing multiple myeloma and metastatic bone disease. Normal physiological changes in the yellow and red bone marrow represent a challenge in analyses to differentiate clinically significant findings from those that are not clinically significant. This article describes the findings for normal bone marrow, variants, and invasive processes in multiple myeloma and bone metastases.

  8. [A pediatric case of pneumococcal meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 35F].

    PubMed

    Kara, Soner Sertan; Polat, Meltem; Tapisiz, Anıl; Nar Otgun, Selin; Tezer, Hasan

    2014-04-01

    Pneumococci are one of the most common causes of bacterial meningitis in children. It's also responsible for the other invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) including bacteremia and pneumonia worldwide. Unvaccinated children are more prone to IPD. Although IPD tend to have a higher prevalence under 2 years of age and in children with primary/secondary immunodeficiencies, and various predisposing factors, older age groups with no underlying diseases also experience IPD. In this report, a pediatric case diagnosed with meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 35F with no underlying condition and no history of pneumococcal vaccination was presented. An 11-year-old male patient was admitted to the hospital with the complaints of high (39.4°C) fever, headache, vomiting and sleepiness. On the basis of findings from physical examination and laboratory results, the patient was prediagnosed as bacterial meningitis and empirical ceftriaxone and vancomycin therapy was initiated. The cerebrospinal fluid culture of the patient yielded penicillin-susceptible pneumococci and the isolate was identified as serotype 35F by quellung reaction. Vancomycin treatment discontinued depending on the culture result, and the patient fully recovered with 14-days of ceftriaxone therapy without any complications during his follow-ups. Although effective antibiotics are available for IPD, vaccination is indispensable considering the high mortality rates. Seven serotypes (1, 5, 6A, 6B, 14, 19F, 23F) which are currently included in the vaccine, were the most common serotypes related to IPD globally. After mass infant vaccination has been introduced, invasive pneumococcal diseases due to the vaccine serotypes have tended to decrease in both vaccinated young children and non-vaccinated age groups due to herd immunity. Nevertheless, non-vaccine serotypes (NVTs) have emerged as the agents of IPD as a result of serotype replacement. 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was

  9. Necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 19A in a healthy 4-year-old girl after one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shay; Tsai, Jeng-Dau; Tsao, Ten-Fu; Liao, Pei-Fen; Sheu, Ji-Nan

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of infectious diseases in children that may lead to life-threatening complications. Acute purulent pericarditis is an uncommon complication of S. pneumoniae in the antibiotic era. A healthy 4-year-old girl was admitted with pneumonia and pleural effusion. She had received one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age. She rapidly developed necrotizing pneumonia, complicated by bronchopleural fistula presenting as subcutaneous emphysema and pneumothorax and acute purulent pericarditis. S. pneumoniae serotype 19A was subsequently identified from blood, empyema and pericardial fluid cultures. After appropriate antibiotic therapy and a right lower lobectomy, her condition stabilized and she promptly recovered. This case highlights two rare potential clinical complications of pneumococcal disease in a child: necrotizing pneumonia and acute purulent pericarditis. This is the first report of a child who received just one catch-up dose of 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine at 2 years of age, as per the United States' Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice's recommendations, but who still developed severe invasive pneumococcal disease with life-threatening complications caused by S. pneumoniae serotype 19A.

  10. Pneumococcal vaccines and the prevention of community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Susanna; Principi, Nicola

    2015-06-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a disease that frequently affects children and adults throughout the world. As it places a considerable burden on society and, particularly, healthcare resources, any means of reducing its incidence and impact arouses great interest. A substantial number of paediatric and adult CAP cases are due to Streptococcus pneumoniae but, fortunately, there are effective vaccines available that are likely to have a significant impact on CAP-related medical, social and economic problems. The main aim of this paper is to evaluate the published evidence concerning the impact of pneumococcal vaccines on CAP in children and adults. The original 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV-7) completely modified the total burden of pneumococcal diseases in vaccinated children and unvaccinated contacts of any age. However, the existence of some problems moderately reducing its preventive efficacy has led to the development of PCVs with a larger number of pneumococcal serotypes, including those that were previously of marginal importance but now cause of severe disease. It is reasonable to think that these PCVs (particularly PCV13, which includes all of the most important serotypes emerging since the introduction of PCV7) will further reduce the importance of pneumococcal diseases, although it is still not clear whether the replacement of the 23-valent polysaccharide vaccine with PCV13 would be more protective in adults.

  11. Improving Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination Rates in Ambulatory Specialty Practices

    PubMed Central

    Pennant, Keyana N.; Costa, John J.; Fuhlbrigge, Anne L.; Sax, Paul E.; Szent-Gyorgyi, Lara E.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Desai, Sonali P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are recommended for elderly and high-risk patients; however, rates of adherence are low. We sought to implement influenza and pneumococcal vaccine initiatives in 4 different ambulatory specialty practices, using 3 unique approaches. Methods. Four specialties with high-risk patient populations were selected for intervention: allergy (asthma), infectious disease (ID) (human immunodeficiency virus), pulmonary (chronic lung disease), and rheumatology (immunocompromised). Allergy and ID focused on influenza vaccination, and pulmonary and rheumatology focused on pneumococcal vaccination. We used 3 strategies for quality improvement: physician reminders, patient letters, and a nurse-driven model. Physicians were provided their performance data on a monthly basis and presented trended data on a quarterly basis at staff meetings. Results. All 4 specialties developed processes for improving vaccination rates with all showing some increase. Higher rates were achieved with pneumococcal vaccine than influenza. Pneumococcal vaccine rates showed steady improvement from year to year while influenza vaccine rates remained relatively constant. Allergy's influenza rate was 59% in 2011 and 64% in the 2014 flu season. Infectious disease influenza rates moved from 74% in the 2011 flu season to 86% for the 2014 season. Pneumococcal vaccine in pulmonary patients' rate was 52% at the start of intervention in February 2009 and 79% as of January 2015. Rheumatology rates rose from 50% in February 2009 to 87% in January 2015. Conclusions. Integrated routine workflow and performance data sharing can effectively engage specialists and staff in vaccine adherence improvement. Influenza vaccination may require other approaches to achieve the rates seen with pneumococcal vaccine. PMID:26430697

  12. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Valls Serón, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Engelen-Lee, JooYeon; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Jaspers, Valery; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tanck, Michael W; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-05-18

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Here, we have performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study using the Human Exome BeadChip and identified gene variants in encoding dynactin 4 (DCTN4), retinoic acid early transcript 1E (RAET1E), and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. No clinical replication cohort is available, so we validated the role of one of these targets, AKT3, in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model. Akt3 deficient mice had worse survival and increased histopathology scores for parenchymal damage (infiltration) and vascular infiltration (large meningeal artery inflammation) but similar bacterial loads, cytokine responses, compared to wild-type mice. We found no differences in cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels between patients with risk or non-risk alleles. Patients with the risk genotype (rs10157763, AA) presented with low scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale and high rate of epileptic seizures. Thus, our results show that AKT3 influences outcome of pneumococcal meningitis.

  13. How many episodes of hospital care might be prevented by widespread uptake of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine?

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, E

    2003-01-01

    Background: It is likely that disease specific infectious morbidity is under-reported. Microbiologically identifiable diseases may be "hidden" in ICD-10 code as "unspecified" disease. Aims: To estimate the proportion of "unspecified" morbidity of infectious cause in infants and young children reported by Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) in England in 1999 that could reasonably be attributed to Streptococcus pneumoniae, and to calculate what number and proportion of diseases could potentially be prevented by a programme of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination. Methods: Proportions of HES "unspecified" septicaemia, meningitis, and pneumonia attributable to pneumococcal infection were estimated by applying theoretical rates obtained from studies using highly sensitive diagnostic tests. The numbers obtained were added to those coded as pneumococcal in origin. The vaccine preventable proportion was then calculated using serogroup coverage, disease specific efficacy, and vaccine uptake. Results: For infants and children 3 months to 5 years of age in 1999, HES reported 134, 245, and 216 episodes of pneumococcal septicaemia, meningitis, and pneumonia respectively. In addition, 68, 36, and 2548 episodes of "unspecified" disease respectively are probably pneumococcal in origin. For hospitalisations in England in this age group, 157/202 (78%) cases of pneumococcal septicaemia, 218/281 (76%) cases of pneumococcal meningitis, and 452/2764 (16%) cases of pneumococcal pneumonia may be preventable annually by means of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination. Conclusions: Paediatric hospital morbidity in England due to pneumococcal septicaemia, meningitis, and pneumonia is under-reported by 34%, 13% and 92% respectively. A larger proportion of morbidity is preventable than implied by ICD-10 code alone. PMID:14500302

  14. Chronic helminth infections impair pneumococcal vaccine responses.

    PubMed

    Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Thomas, Paul G; Iverson, Amy R; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-09-22

    Pneumonia is the leading killer of children and disproportionately affects developing countries. Vaccination campaigns against Streptococcus pneumoniae, the leading cause of pneumonia, have recently been launched with a new conjugate vaccine in Africa. Using a mouse model, we assessed the potential role that the high burden of helminth infections in the countries targeted for vaccine might have on vaccine effectiveness. Mice vaccinated with either commercial conjugate or purified polysaccharide vaccines had impaired antibody responses if they were chronically infected with Taenia crassiceps. This translated to increased susceptibility to pneumococcal pneumonia and high mortality compared to helminth-negative vaccinated animals, which were fully protected from disease and death. Antibodies taken from Taenia-infected, vaccinated mice were unable to effectively opsonize S. pneumoniae for killing by alveolar macrophages, and did not protect against pneumococcal challenge when adoptively transferred into naïve animals. These data may have implications for vaccination programs in countries endemic with helminths.

  15. Cost-effectiveness of heptavalent conjugate pneumococcal vaccine (Prevenar) in Germany: considering a high-risk population and herd immunity effects.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Adam; Patel, Nishma; Scott, David A; Runge, Claus; Claes, Christa; Rose, Markus

    2008-02-01

    In Germany, the seven-valent conjugate vaccine Prevenar is recommended for use in children at high risk of pneumococcal disease. Recent data suggest that giving conjugate vaccine to all children may lead to a decline in pneumococcal disease in unvaccinated adults, a phenomenon known as herd immunity. This analysis evaluated the cost and economic consequences in Germany of vaccinating (1) children at high risk, (2) all children when considering only benefits for vaccinated individuals and (3) all children when also considering herd immunity benefits. Costs in the model included vaccination, management of meningitis, bacteraemia, pneumonia and acute otitis media, insurance payments to parents and the costs of care for long-term disabilities. The model estimated that the cost-effectiveness of vaccination would be 38,222 euros per life year gained in children at high risk and 100,636 euros per life year gained in all children when not considering herd immunity. When considering herd immunity effects, the model estimated that offering vaccination for all children would reduce adult deaths by 3,027 per year, and vaccination would be broadly cost neutral. The findings are sensitive to the effect of conjugate vaccine on the rates of pneumonia and invasive disease in the elderly. If the herd immunity effect of conjugate vaccination in Germany is similar to that observed elsewhere, offering vaccine to all children will be more attractive than the current policy of restricting vaccination to children at high risk of pneumococcal disease.

  16. The role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease causing respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Kosky, Christopher; Turton, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease can usually be managed initially with medical treatment and non- invasive ventilation. In circumstances where non- invasive ventilation cannot be used or has failed, intubation and invasive ventilation may be lifesaving. The outcome of patients with an exacerbation of COPD requiring invasive ventilation is better than often thought, with a hospital survival of 70-89%. Decisions regarding invasive ventilation made by physicians and patients with COPD are unpredictable and vary with the individual. This article reviews the role of invasive ventilation in exacerbations of COPD to assist decision making.

  17. Duelling timescales of host mixing and disease spread determine invasion of disease in structured populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, P.C.; Lloyd-Smith, J. O.; Johnson, P.L.F.; Getz, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The epidemic potential of a disease is traditionally assessed using the basic reproductive number, R0. However, in populations with social or spatial structure a chronic disease is more likely to invade than an acute disease with the same R0, because it persists longer within each group and allows for more host movement between groups. Acute diseases ‘perceive’ a more structured host population, and it is more important to consider host population structure in analyses of these diseases. The probability of a pandemic does not arise independently from characteristics of either the host or disease, but rather from the interaction of host movement and disease recovery timescales. The R* statistic, a group-level equivalent of R0, is a better indicator of disease invasion in structured populations than the individual-level R0.

  18. Isavuconazole: a new extended spectrum triazole for invasive mold diseases.

    PubMed

    Ananda-Rajah, Michelle R; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    Isavuconazole is the first broad spectrum prodrug triazole with efficacy against invasive fungal diseases including aspergillosis and mucormycosis. Characteristics include linear dose-proportional pharmacokinetics, intravenous and oral formulations allowing therapeutic streamlining, once daily dosing, absence of nephrotoxic solubilizing agents and excellent oral bioavailability independent of prandial status and gastric acidity. An open label noncomparator study demonstrated encouraging results for isavuconazole as primary or salvage therapy for a range of fungi including mucormycosis. Isavuconazole had fewer premature drug discontinuations and adverse events in the eye, hepatobiliary and psychiatry systems than the comparator agent, voriconazole in a randomized double-blind clinical trial. Cross-resistance of isavuconazole best correlates with voriconazole. In vitro resistance is not invariably predictive of clinical failure. Isavuconazole signals progress in pharmacokinetics, bioavailability and toxicity/tolerability supported by clinical efficacy from Phase III trials.

  19. Invasive fungal diseases in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nicolato, Andrea; Nouér, Simone A; Garnica, Marcia; Portugal, Rodrigo; Maiolino, Angelo; Nucci, Marcio

    2016-09-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) represents an important complication in patients with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of IFD in ALL patients with neutropenia, identify factors associated with IFD, and estimate the impact of IFD on the outcome. All patients with ALL who developed febrile neutropenia from 1987 to 2013 were evaluated. Cases of IFD were classified as proven or probable. Factors associated with IFD were evaluated by comparing episodes with and without a diagnosis of IFD. Among 350 episodes of febrile neutropenia, 31 IFDs were diagnosed (8.8%). Prolonged neutropenia was the only factor associated with IFD caused by yeasts. Factors associated with IFD caused by molds by multivariate analysis were the period after 2008, receipt of allogeneic transplant, relapsed ALL and prolonged neutropenia. Patients in relapse should receive induction chemotherapy in rooms with HEPA filter and receive antifungal prophylaxis. PMID:26949001

  20. Non-invasive diagnosis of alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Sebastian; Seitz, Helmut Karl; Rausch, Vanessa

    2014-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is the most common liver disease in the Western world. For many reasons, it is underestimated and underdiagnosed. An early diagnosis is absolutely essential since it (1) helps to identify patients at genetic risk for ALD; (2) can trigger efficient abstinence namely in non-addicted patients; and (3) initiate screening programs to prevent life-threatening complications such as bleeding from varices, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis or hepatocellular cancer. The two major end points of ALD are alcoholic liver cirrhosis and the rare and clinically-defined alcoholic hepatitis (AH). The prediction and early diagnosis of both entities is still insufficiently solved and usually relies on a combination of laboratory, clinical and imaging findings. It is not widely conceived that conventional screening tools for ALD such as ultrasound imaging or routine laboratory testing can easily overlook ca. 40% of manifest alcoholic liver cirrhosis. Non-invasive methods such as transient elastography (Fibroscan), acoustic radiation force impulse imaging or shear wave elastography have significantly improved the early diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis. Present algorithms allow either the exclusion or the exact definition of advanced fibrosis stages in ca. 95% of patients. The correct interpretation of liver stiffness requires a timely abdominal ultrasound and actual transaminase levels. Other non-invasive methods such as controlled attenuation parameter, serum levels of M30 or M65, susceptometry or breath tests are under current evaluation to assess the degree of steatosis, apoptosis and iron overload in these patients. Liver biopsy still remains an important option to rule out comorbidities and to confirm the prognosis namely for patients with AH. PMID:25356026

  1. Global burden of invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella disease, 2010(1).

    PubMed

    Ao, Trong T; Feasey, Nicholas A; Gordon, Melita A; Keddy, Karen H; Angulo, Frederick J; Crump, John A

    2015-06-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella is a major cause of bloodstream infections worldwide, and HIV-infected persons and malaria-infected children are at increased risk for the disease. We conducted a systematic literature review to obtain age group-specific, population-based invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) incidence data. Data were categorized by HIV and malaria prevalence and then extrapolated by using 2010 population data. The case-fatality ratio (CFR) was determined by expert opinion consensus. We estimated that 3.4 (range 2.1-6.5) million cases of iNTS disease occur annually (overall incidence 49 cases [range 30-94] per 100,000 population). Africa, where infants, young children, and young adults are most affected, has the highest incidence (227 cases [range 152-341] per 100,000 population) and number of cases (1.9 [range 1.3-2.9] million cases). An iNTS CFR of 20% yielded 681,316 (range 415,164-1,301,520) deaths annually. iNTS disease is a major cause of illness and death globally, particularly in Africa. Improved understanding of the epidemiology of iNTS is needed.

  2. Structure of Pneumococcal Peptidoglycan Hydrolase LytB Reveals Insights into the Bacterial Cell Wall Remodeling and Pathogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiao-Hui; Chen, Hui-Jie; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Wen, Zhensong; Huang, Yubin; Cheng, Wang; Li, Qiong; Qi, Lei; Zhang, Jing-Ren; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes a series of devastating infections in humans. Previous studies have shown that the endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase LytB is critical for pneumococcal cell division and nasal colonization, but the biochemical mechanism of LytB action remains unknown. Here we report the 1.65 Å crystal structure of the catalytic domain (residues Lys-375–Asp-658) of LytB (termed LytBCAT), excluding the choline binding domain. LytBCAT consists of three structurally independent modules: SH3b, WW, and GH73. These modules form a “T-shaped” pocket that accommodates a putative tetrasaccharide-pentapeptide substrate of peptidoglycan. Structural comparison and simulation revealed that the GH73 module of LytB harbors the active site, including the catalytic residue Glu-564. In vitro assays of hydrolytic activity indicated that LytB prefers the peptidoglycan from the lytB-deficient pneumococci, suggesting the existence of a specific substrate of LytB in the immature peptidoglycan. Combined with in vitro cell-dispersing and in vivo cell separation assays, we demonstrated that all three modules are necessary for the optimal activity of LytB. Further functional analysis showed that the full catalytic activity of LytB is required for pneumococcal adhesion to and invasion into human lung epithelial cells. Structure-based alignment indicated that the unique modular organization of LytB is highly conserved in its orthologs from Streptococcus mitis group and Gemella species. These findings provided structural insights into the pneumococcal cell wall remodeling and novel hints for the rational design of therapeutic agents against pneumococcal growth and thereby the related diseases. PMID:25002590

  3. Low Serum Fetuin-A as a Biomarker to Predict Pneumococcal Necrotizing Pneumonia and Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome in Children

    PubMed Central

    Janapatla, Rajendra Prasad; Hsu, Mei-Hua; Liao, Wan-Ting; Chien, Kun-Yi; Lee, Hao-Yuan; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Streptococcus pneumoniae, a neuraminidase-producing pathogen, can cause invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) with or without hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. We aimed to identify serum sialoglycoproteins that are targeted by neuraminidases in severe pneumococcal infection. We hypothesized that serum sialoglycoprotein such as fetuin-A can serve as a biomarker to predict IPD or HUS. We constructed serum sialoglycoprotein profiles before and after pneumococcal neuraminidase treatment using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), a proteomic approach. An observational study was conducted using clinical data and serum samples from pediatric patients with pneumococcal infection to verify the predictive role of fetuin-A in IPD. Serum fetuin-A levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The most abundant serum sialoglycoproteins identified by LC-MS/MS after neuraminidase treatment and peanut lectin capture were immunoglobulins, apolipoproteins, fibrinogens, keratins, complement system proteins, and fetuin-A. Serum fetuin-A levels in the HUS patients were significantly lower (207 ± 80 mg/L, P < 0.001) than in patients with lobar pneumonia (610 ± 190 mg/L) as well as the healthy controls (630 ± 250 mg/L). In comparing HUS with necrotizing pneumonia and lobar pneumonia, the ROC area under the curve was 0.842; a cutoff value of 298 mg/L yielded sensitivity of 92.9% (95% CI: 68.5–98.7%) and specificity of 71.9% (95% CI: 54.6–84.4%). This observational study with validation cohorts of patients with HUS, complicated pneumonia, and lobar pneumonia demonstrates the high performance of low serum fetuin-A levels as a biomarker to predict severe IPD and HUS in children. PMID:27043691

  4. A live-attenuated pneumococcal vaccine elicits CD4+ T-cell dependent class switching and provides serotype independent protection against acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Rosch, Jason W; Iverson, Amy R; Humann, Jessica; Mann, Beth; Gao, Geli; Vogel, Peter; Mina, Michael; Murrah, Kyle A; Perez, Antonia C; Edward Swords, W; Tuomanen, Elaine I; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae remains one of the most common infectious diseases worldwide despite widespread vaccination. A major limitation of the currently licensed pneumococcal vaccines is the lack of efficacy against mucosal disease manifestations such as AOM, acute bacterial sinusitis and pneumonia. We sought to generate a novel class of live vaccines that (1) retain all major antigenic virulence proteins yet are fully attenuated and (2) protect against otitis media. A live vaccine candidate based on deletion of the signal recognition pathway component ftsY induced potent, serotype-independent protection against otitis media, sinusitis, pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Protection was maintained in animals coinfected with influenza virus, but was lost if mice were depleted of CD4(+) T cells at the time of vaccination. The live vaccine induced a strong serum IgG2a and IgG2b response that correlated with CD4(+) T-cell mediated class switching. Deletion of genes required for microbial adaptation to the host environment is a novel live attenuated vaccine strategy yielding the first experimental vaccine effective against pneumococcal otitis media.

  5. Reactogenicity, safety and immunogenicity of a protein-based pneumococcal vaccine in Gambian children aged 2-4 years: A phase II randomized study.

    PubMed

    Odutola, A; Ota, M O; Ogundare, E O; Antonio, M; Owiafe, P; Worwui, A; Greenwood, B; Alderson, M; Traskine, M; Verlant, V; Dobbelaere, K; Borys, D

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been successful in preventing invasive pneumococcal disease but effectiveness has been challenged by replacement of vaccine serotypes with non-vaccine serotypes. Vaccines targeting common pneumococcal protein(s) found in most/all pneumococci may overcome this limitation. This phase II study assessed safety and immunogenicity of a new protein-based pneumococcal vaccine containing polysaccharide conjugates of 10 pneumococcal serotypes combined with pneumolysin toxoid(dPly) and pneumococcal histidine triad protein D(PhtD) (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30) in African children. 120 Gambian children (2-4 years, not previously vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae) randomized (1:1) received a single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 or PCV13. Adverse events occurring over 4 d post-vaccination were reported, and blood samples obtained pre- and 1-month post-vaccination. Serious adverse events were reported for 6 months post-vaccination. Solicited local and systemic adverse events were reported at similar frequency in each group. One child (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 group) reported a grade 3 local reaction to vaccination. Haematological and biochemical parameters seemed similar pre- and 1-month post-vaccination in each group. High pre-vaccination Ply and PhtD antibody concentrations were observed in each group, but only increased in PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees one month post-vaccination. One month post-vaccination, for each vaccine serotype ≥96.2% of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees had serotype-specific polysaccharide antibody concentrations ≥0.20µg/mL except serotypes 6B (80.8%) and 23F (65.4%), and ≥94.1% had OPA titres of ≥8 except serotypes 1 (51.9%), 5 (38.5%) and 6B (78.0%), within ranges seen in PCV13-vaccinated children. A single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccine, administered to Gambian children aged 2-4 y not previously vaccinated with a pneumococcal vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic.

  6. Reactogenicity, safety and immunogenicity of a protein-based pneumococcal vaccine in Gambian children aged 2–4 years: A phase II randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Odutola, A; Ota, MO; Ogundare, EO; Antonio, M; Owiafe, P; Worwui, A; Greenwood, B; Alderson, M; Traskine, M; Verlant, V; Dobbelaere, K; Borys, D

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have been successful in preventing invasive pneumococcal disease but effectiveness has been challenged by replacement of vaccine serotypes with non-vaccine serotypes. Vaccines targeting common pneumococcal protein(s) found in most/all pneumococci may overcome this limitation. This phase II study assessed safety and immunogenicity of a new protein-based pneumococcal vaccine containing polysaccharide conjugates of 10 pneumococcal serotypes combined with pneumolysin toxoid(dPly) and pneumococcal histidine triad protein D(PhtD) (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30) in African children. 120 Gambian children (2–4 years, not previously vaccinated against Streptococcus pneumoniae) randomized (1:1) received a single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 or PCV13. Adverse events occurring over 4 d post-vaccination were reported, and blood samples obtained pre- and 1-month post-vaccination. Serious adverse events were reported for 6 months post-vaccination. Solicited local and systemic adverse events were reported at similar frequency in each group. One child (PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 group) reported a grade 3 local reaction to vaccination. Haematological and biochemical parameters seemed similar pre- and 1-month post-vaccination in each group. High pre-vaccination Ply and PhtD antibody concentrations were observed in each group, but only increased in PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees one month post-vaccination. One month post-vaccination, for each vaccine serotype ≥96.2% of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccinees had serotype-specific polysaccharide antibody concentrations ≥0.20µg/mL except serotypes 6B (80.8%) and 23F (65.4%), and ≥94.1% had OPA titres of ≥8 except serotypes 1 (51.9%), 5 (38.5%) and 6B (78.0%), within ranges seen in PCV13-vaccinated children. A single dose of PHiD-CV/dPly/PhtD-30 vaccine, administered to Gambian children aged 2–4 y not previously vaccinated with a pneumococcal vaccine, was well-tolerated and immunogenic. PMID:26618243

  7. Pneumococcal resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Klugman, K P

    1990-01-01

    The geographic distribution of pneumococci resistant to one or more of the antibiotics penicillin, erythromycin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, and tetracycline appears to be expanding, and there exist foci of resistance to chloramphenicol and rifampin. Multiply resistant pneumococci are being encountered more commonly and are more often community acquired. Factors associated with infection caused by resistant pneumococci include young age, duration of hospitalization, infection with a pneumococcus of serogroup 6, 19, or 23 or serotype 14, and exposure to antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. At present, the most useful drugs for the management of resistant pneumococcal infections are cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, vancomycin, and rifampin. If the strains are susceptible, chloramphenicol may be useful as an alternative, less expensive agent. Appropriate interventions for the control of resistant pneumococcal outbreaks include investigation of the prevalence of resistant strains, isolation of patients, possible treatment of carriers, and reduction of usage of antibiotics to which the strain is resistant. The molecular mechanisms of penicillin resistance are related to the structure and function of penicillin-binding proteins, and the mechanisms of resistance to other agents involved in multiple resistance are being elucidated. Recognition is increasing of the standard screening procedure for penicillin resistance, using a 1-microgram oxacillin disk. PMID:2187594

  8. Cost-effectiveness analysis of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13-valent in older adults in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nowadays, there are two vaccination strategies in Colombia to prevent pneumococcal diseases in people over 50 years. Our aim is to estimate cost-effectiveness of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine 13-valent (PCV13) versus pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine 23-valent (PPSV23) to prevent pneumococcal diseases and their related mortality in people over 50 years old in Colombia. Methods A Markov model was developed with national data, including pneumococcal serotypes distribution in Colombia between 2005 and 2010. Vaccination of a cohort was simulated and a five year time horizon was assumed. Analysis was done from a perspective of a third party payer. Direct costs were provided by a national insurance company; sensitive univariate and probabilistic analysis were done for epidemiological and clinical effectiveness parameters and costs. Results PCV13 avoids 3 560 deaths by pneumococcal infections versus PPSV23 and 4 255 deaths versus no vaccine. PCV13 prevents 79 633 cases by all-cause pneumonia versus PPSV23 and 81 468 cases versus no vaccine. Total costs (healthcare and vaccines costs) with PCV13 would be U.S. $ 97,587,113 cheaper than PPSV23 and it would save U.S. $ 145,196,578 versus no vaccine. Conclusion PCV13 would be a cost-saving strategy in the context of a mass vaccination program in Colombia to people over 50 years old because it would reduce burden of disease and specific mortality by pneumococcal diseases, besides, it saves money versus PPSV23. PMID:24679135

  9. Pneumococcal Capsules and Their Types: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Geno, K. Aaron; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.; Song, Joon Young; Skovsted, Ian C.; Klugman, Keith P.; Jones, Christopher; Konradsen, Helle B.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Its virulence is largely due to its polysaccharide capsule, which shields it from the host immune system, and because of this, the capsule has been extensively studied. Studies of the capsule led to the identification of DNA as the genetic material, identification of many different capsular serotypes, and identification of the serotype-specific nature of protection by adaptive immunity. Recent studies have led to the determination of capsular polysaccharide structures for many serotypes using advanced analytical technologies, complete elucidation of genetic basis for the capsular types, and the development of highly effective pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Conjugate vaccine use has altered the serotype distribution by either serotype replacement or switching, and this has increased the need to serotype pneumococci. Due to great advances in molecular technologies and our understanding of the pneumococcal genome, molecular approaches have become powerful tools to predict pneumococcal serotypes. In addition, more-precise and -efficient serotyping methods that directly detect polysaccharide structures are emerging. These improvements in our capabilities will greatly enhance future investigations of pneumococcal epidemiology and diseases and the biology of colonization and innate immunity to pneumococcal capsules. PMID:26085553

  10. Nasopharyngeal microbial interactions in the era of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Eileen M; Smith-Vaughan, Heidi C; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Mulholland, E Kim; Satzke, Catherine

    2013-05-01

    The nasopharynx of children is often colonised by microorganisms such as Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) that can cause infections including pneumonia and otitis media. In this complex environment, bacteria and viruses may impact each other through antagonistic as well as synergistic interactions. Vaccination may alter colonisation dynamics, evidenced by the rise in non-vaccine serotypes following pneumococcal conjugate vaccination. Discovery of an inverse relationship between S. pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus carriage generated concern that pneumococcal vaccination could increase S. aureus carriage and disease. Here we review data on co-colonisation of pathogens in the nasopharynx, focusing on S. pneumoniae and the impact of pneumococcal vaccination. Thus far, pneumococcal vaccination has not had a sustained impact on S. aureus carriage but it is associated with an increase in non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae in acute otitis media aetiology. Advances in bacterial and viral detection methodologies have facilitated research in nasopharyngeal microbiology and will aid investigation of potential vaccine-induced changes, particularly when baseline studies can be conducted prior to pneumococcal vaccine introduction.

  11. Pneumococcal Capsules and Their Types: Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Geno, K Aaron; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Song, Joon Young; Skovsted, Ian C; Klugman, Keith P; Jones, Christopher; Konradsen, Helle B; Nahm, Moon H

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is an important human pathogen. Its virulence is largely due to its polysaccharide capsule, which shields it from the host immune system, and because of this, the capsule has been extensively studied. Studies of the capsule led to the identification of DNA as the genetic material, identification of many different capsular serotypes, and identification of the serotype-specific nature of protection by adaptive immunity. Recent studies have led to the determination of capsular polysaccharide structures for many serotypes using advanced analytical technologies, complete elucidation of genetic basis for the capsular types, and the development of highly effective pneumococcal conjugate vaccines. Conjugate vaccine use has altered the serotype distribution by either serotype replacement or switching, and this has increased the need to serotype pneumococci. Due to great advances in molecular technologies and our understanding of the pneumococcal genome, molecular approaches have become powerful tools to predict pneumococcal serotypes. In addition, more-precise and -efficient serotyping methods that directly detect polysaccharide structures are emerging. These improvements in our capabilities will greatly enhance future investigations of pneumococcal epidemiology and diseases and the biology of colonization and innate immunity to pneumococcal capsules. PMID:26085553

  12. Invasive Group A streptococcal disease in Ireland, 2004 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Murchan, S; O'Flanagan, D; Fitzpatrick, F

    2011-01-01

    Invasive group A streptococcal infections (iGAS) are a major clinical and public health challenge. iGAS is a notifiable disease in Ireland since 2004. The aim of this paper is to describe the epidemiology of iGAS in Ireland for the first time over the seven-year period from 2004 to 2010. The Irish national electronic infectious disease reporting system was used by laboratories to enter the source of iGAS isolates, and by departments of public health to enter clinical and epidemiological details. We extracted and analysed data from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2010. Over the study period, 400 iGAS cases were notified. The annual incidence of iGAS doubled, from 0.8 per 100,000 population in 2004 to 1.6 in 2008, and then remained the same in 2009 and 2010. The reported average annual incidence rates were highest among children up to five years of age (2.3/100,000) and adults aged over 60 years (3.2/100,000). The most common risk factors associated with iGAS were skin lesions or wounds. Of the 174 people for whom clinical syndrome information was available, 28 (16%) cases presented with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome and 19 (11%) with necrotising fasciitis. Of the 141 cases for whom seven-day outcomes were recorded, 11 people died with iGAS identified as the main cause of death (seven-day case fatality rate 8%). The notification rate of iGAS in Ireland was lower than that reported in the United Kingdom, Nordic countries and North America but higher than southern and eastern European countries. The reasons for lower notification rates in Ireland compared with other countries may be due to a real difference in incidence, possibly due to prescribing practices, or due to artefacts resulting from the specific Irish case definition and/or low reporting in the early stages of a new surveillance system. iGAS disease remains an uncommon but potentially severe disease in Ireland. Ongoing surveillance is required in order to undertake appropriate control measures and gain a

  13. Pneumococcal Vaccination: Who Needs It?

    MedlinePlus

    ... News and Media Resources News Newsletters Events Pneumococcal Vaccination: Who Needs It? Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... doses will depend on the child's age when vaccination begins. Ask your healthcare provider for details. Children ...

  14. Pneumococcal Serotypes Colonise the Nasopharynx in Children at Different Densities

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Fernanda; Danon, Leon; Morales-Aza, Begonia; Sikora, Paulina; Thors, Valtyr; Ferreira, Muriel; Gould, Katherine; Hinds, Jason; Finn, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Prevalence of pneumococcal serotypes in carriage and disease has been described but absolute serotype colonisation densities have not been reported. 515 paediatric nasal swab DNA extracts were subjected to lytA qPCR and molecular serotyping by microarray. Absolute serotype densities were derived from total pneumococcal density (qPCR cycle threshold and standard curve) and relative abundance (microarray) and varied widely. Compared to all serotype densities observed, the strongest evidence of differences was seen for serotypes 21 and 35B (higher) and 3, 38 and non-typeables (lower) (p<0.05) with a similar hierarchy when only a single serotype carriage was assessed. There was no evidence of any overall density differences between children with single or multiple serotypes detected but serotypes with mid-range densities were more prevalent. The hierarchy of distinct pneumococcal serotype carriage densities described here for the first time, may help explain the dynamics of transmission between children. PMID:27685088

  15. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Barberán, José; Mensa, José

    2014-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is a common infection in immunocompromised patients with hematological malignancies or allogenic stem cell transplantation, and is less frequent in the context of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mucociliary activity impairment, immunosuppression due to the inhibition of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils by steroids, and receiving broad-spectrum antibiotics, play a role in the development of IPA in COPD patients. Colonized patients or those with IPA are older, with severe CODP stage (GOLD≥III), and have a higher number of comorbidities. The mortality rate is high due to the fact that having a definitive diagnosis of IPA in COPD patients is often difficult. The main clinical and radiological signs of IPA in these types of patients are non-specific, and tissue samples for definitive diagnosis are often difficult to obtain. The poor prognosis of IPA in COPD patients could perhaps be improved by faster diagnosis and prompt initiation of antifungal treatment. Some tools, such as scales and algorithms based on risk factors of IPA, may be useful for its early diagnosis in these patients.

  16. Capsular switching as a strategy to increase pneumococcal virulence in experimental otitis media model.

    PubMed

    Sabharwal, Vishakha; Stevenson, Abbie; Figueira, Marisol; Orthopoulos, George; Trzciński, Krzysztof; Pelton, Stephen I

    2014-04-01

    We hypothesized that capsular switch event, in which pneumococcus acquires a new capsule operon by horizontal gene transfer, may result in emergence of strains with increased virulence in acute otitis media. Using serotype 6A strain from a patient with invasive pneumococcal disease and clonally distant serotype 6C strain isolated from asymptomatic carrier we created 6A:6C (6A background with 6C capsule) capsular transformants and applied whole genome macro-restriction analysis to assess conservation of the 6A chassis. Next, we assessed complement (C3) and antibodies deposition on surface of pneumococcal cells and tested capsule recipient, capsule donor and two 6A:6C transformants for virulence in chinchilla experimental otitis media model. Both 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants bound less C3 compared to 6C capsule-donor strain but more compared to serotype 6A capsule-recipient strain. Pneumococci were present in significantly higher proportion of ears among animals challenged with either of two 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants compared to chinchillas infected with 6C capsule-donor strain [p < 0.001] whereas a significantly decreased proportion of ears were infected with 6A:6C(1 or 2) transformants as compared to 6A capsule-recipient strain. Our observations though limited to two serotypes demonstrate that capsular switch events can result in Streptococcus pneumoniae strains of enhanced virulence for respiratory tract infection.

  17. Impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines on microbial epidemiology and clinical outcomes of acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Hau, Isabelle; Levy, Corinne; Caeymaex, Laurence; Cohen, Robert

    2014-02-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is the leading bacterial infection in childhood and the main reason for antibiotic prescriptions in children. The success of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in reducing invasive pneumococcal disease has been demonstrated in many studies. Because Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the two main bacterial species implicated in AOM, the incidence and characteristics of AOM might also be modified by PCVs. Pre-licensure controlled studies showed that the effect was modest. However, after PCV7 implementation, the impact on the AOM burden appeared to be more marked, despite the fact that serotype replacement in the nasopharynx was almost complete. Most data on the impact of PCVs on nasopharyngeal flora have been drawn from studies with PCV7. No difference was observed with PCV10 compared with PCV7 concerning S. pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenza carriage. For PCV13 compared with PCV7, additional reduction of carriage of serotypes 1, 6A, 7F, 6C, 19A, and 19F was observed, but for the other serotypes, the two PCVs seemed to have the same effect.

  18. Antibiotic use in Thailand: quantifying impact on blood culture yield and estimates of pneumococcal bacteremia incidence.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Julia; Hyder, Joseph A; Peruski, Leonard F; Fisher, Cindy; Jorakate, Possawat; Kaewpan, Anek; Dejsirilert, Surang; Thamthitiwat, Somsak; Olsen, Sonja J; Dowell, Scott F; Chantra, Somrak; Tanwisaid, Kittisak; Maloney, Susan A; Baggett, Henry C

    2010-08-01

    No studies have quantified the impact of pre-culture antibiotic use on the recovery of individual blood-borne pathogens or on population-level incidence estimates for Streptococcus pneumoniae. We conducted bloodstream infection surveillance in Thailand during November 2005-June 2008. Pre-culture antibiotic use was assessed by reported use and by serum antimicrobial activity. Of 35,639 patient blood cultures, 27% had reported pre-culture antibiotic use and 24% (of 24,538 tested) had serum antimicrobial activity. Pathogen isolation was half as common in patients with versus without antibiotic use; S. pneumoniae isolation was 4- to 9-fold less common (0.09% versus 0.37% by reported antibiotic use; 0.05% versus 0.45% by serum antimicrobial activity, P < 0.01). Pre-culture antibiotic use by serum antimicrobial activity reduced pneumococcal bacteremia incidence by 32% overall and 39% in children < 5 years of age. Our findings highlight the limitations of culture-based detection methods to estimate invasive pneumococcal disease incidence in settings where pre-culture antibiotic use is common.

  19. Impact of the 2009 Influenza Pandemic on Pneumococcal Pneumonia Hospitalizations in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Lone; Jordan, Richard; Steiner, Claudia; Miller, Mark; Viboud, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Grijalva and Griffin on pages 355–7.) Background. Infection with influenza virus increases the risk for developing pneumococcal disease. The A/H1N1 influenza pandemic in autumn 2009 provided a unique opportunity to evaluate this relationship. Methods. Using weekly age-, state-, and cause-specific hospitalizations from the US State Inpatient Databases of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project 2003–2009, we quantified the increase in pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates above a seasonal baseline during the pandemic period. Results. We found a significant increase in pneumococcal hospitalizations from late August to mid-December 2009, which corresponded to the timing of highest pandemic influenza activity. Individuals aged 5–19 years, who have a low baseline level of pneumococcal disease, experienced the largest relative increase in pneumococcal hospitalizations (ratio, 1.6 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.4–1.7]), whereas the largest absolute increase was observed among individuals aged 40–64 years. In contrast, there was no excess disease in the elderly. Geographical variation in the timing of excess pneumococcal hospitalizations matched geographical patterns for the fall pandemic influenza wave. Conclusions. The 2009 influenza pandemic had a significant impact on the rate of pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalizations, with the magnitude of this effect varying between age groups and states, mirroring observed variations in influenza activity. PMID:22158564

  20. Global parasite and Rattus rodent invasions: The consequences for rodent-borne diseases.

    PubMed

    Morand, Serge; Bordes, Frédéric; Chen, Hsuan-Wien; Claude, Julien; Cosson, Jean-François; Galan, Maxime; Czirják, Gábor Á; Greenwood, Alex D; Latinne, Alice; Michaux, Johan; Ribas, Alexis

    2015-09-01

    We summarize the current knowledge on parasitism-related invasion processes of the globally invasive Rattus lineages, originating from Asia, and how these invasions have impacted the local epidemiology of rodent-borne diseases. Parasites play an important role in the invasion processes and successes of their hosts through multiple biological mechanisms such as "parasite release," "immunocompetence advantage," "biotic resistance" and "novel weapon." Parasites may also greatly increase the impact of invasions by spillover of parasites and other pathogens, introduced with invasive hosts, into new hosts, potentially leading to novel emerging diseases. Another potential impact is the ability of the invader to amplify local parasites by spillback. In both cases, local fauna and humans may be exposed to new health risks, which may decrease biodiversity and potentially cause increases in human morbidity and mortality. Here we review the current knowledge on these processes and propose some research priorities.

  1. Invasion of two tick-borne diseases across New England: harnessing human surveillance data to capture underlying ecological invasion processes.

    PubMed

    Walter, Katharine S; Pepin, Kim M; Webb, Colleen T; Gaff, Holly D; Krause, Peter J; Pitzer, Virginia E; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A

    2016-06-15

    Modelling the spatial spread of vector-borne zoonotic pathogens maintained in enzootic transmission cycles remains a major challenge. The best available spatio-temporal data on pathogen spread often take the form of human disease surveillance data. By applying a classic ecological approach-occupancy modelling-to an epidemiological question of disease spread, we used surveillance data to examine the latent ecological invasion of tick-borne pathogens. Over the last half-century, previously undescribed tick-borne pathogens including the agents of Lyme disease and human babesiosis have rapidly spread across the northeast United States. Despite their epidemiological importance, the mechanisms of tick-borne pathogen invasion and drivers underlying the distinct invasion trajectories of the co-vectored pathogens remain unresolved. Our approach allowed us to estimate the unobserved ecological processes underlying pathogen spread while accounting for imperfect detection of human cases. Our model predicts that tick-borne diseases spread in a diffusion-like manner with occasional long-distance dispersal and that babesiosis spread exhibits strong dependence on Lyme disease.

  2. Invasion of two tick-borne diseases across New England: harnessing human surveillance data to capture underlying ecological invasion processes.

    PubMed

    Walter, Katharine S; Pepin, Kim M; Webb, Colleen T; Gaff, Holly D; Krause, Peter J; Pitzer, Virginia E; Diuk-Wasser, Maria A

    2016-06-15

    Modelling the spatial spread of vector-borne zoonotic pathogens maintained in enzootic transmission cycles remains a major challenge. The best available spatio-temporal data on pathogen spread often take the form of human disease surveillance data. By applying a classic ecological approach-occupancy modelling-to an epidemiological question of disease spread, we used surveillance data to examine the latent ecological invasion of tick-borne pathogens. Over the last half-century, previously undescribed tick-borne pathogens including the agents of Lyme disease and human babesiosis have rapidly spread across the northeast United States. Despite their epidemiological importance, the mechanisms of tick-borne pathogen invasion and drivers underlying the distinct invasion trajectories of the co-vectored pathogens remain unresolved. Our approach allowed us to estimate the unobserved ecological processes underlying pathogen spread while accounting for imperfect detection of human cases. Our model predicts that tick-borne diseases spread in a diffusion-like manner with occasional long-distance dispersal and that babesiosis spread exhibits strong dependence on Lyme disease. PMID:27252022

  3. Many radiologic facies of pneumococcal pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Kantor, H.G.

    1981-12-01

    In 1978, 89 patients were treated for (S. pneumoniae) pneumonia at New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center. Only 40 cases met rather strict diagnostic criteria. Of these, 12 demonstrated the classical consolidative (air space) pattern usually ascribed to this disease. A bronchopneumonic (patch) pattern was demonstrated in an equal number of patients; interstitial (irregular linear) infiltrates were manifest in nine cases and a mixed interstitial and patchy presentation shown in seven cases. Absence of the consolidative pattern does not exclude pneumococcal pneumonia. Bacteriologic investigation is required to determine the proper diagnosis and course of therapy.

  4. Pneumococcal Disease: Diagnosis and Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 3 out of every 10 cases. Antibiotic sensitivity testing shows which antibiotics will be most successful ... ‘broad-spectrum’ antibiotics until results of antibiotic sensitivity testing are available. Broad-spectrum antibiotics work against ...

  5. Generation and Improvement of Effector Function of a Novel Broadly Reactive and Protective Monoclonal Antibody against Pneumococcal Surface Protein A of Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Rebecca; Groff, Brian C.; Kubota, Tsuguo; Destito, Giuseppe; Laudenslager, John; Koriazova, Lilia; Tahara, Tomoyuki; Kanda, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A proof-of-concept study evaluating the potential of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumococcal Surface Protein A (PspA) as a passive immunization target was conducted. We describe the generation and isolation of several broadly reactive mouse anti-PspA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). MAb 140H1 displayed (i) 98% strain coverage, (ii) activity in complement deposition and opsonophagocytic killing (OPK) assays, which are thought to predict the in vivo efficacy of anti-pneumococcal mAbs, (iii) efficacy in mouse sepsis models both alone and in combination with standard-of-care antibiotics, and (iv) therapeutic activity in a mouse pneumonia model. Moreover, we demonstrate that antibody engineering can significantly enhance anti-PspA mAb effector function. We believe that PspA has promising potential as a target for the therapy of invasive pneumococcal disease by mAbs, which could be used alone or in conjunction with standard-of-care antibiotics. PMID:27171010

  6. Generation and Improvement of Effector Function of a Novel Broadly Reactive and Protective Monoclonal Antibody against Pneumococcal Surface Protein A of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Kristian, Sascha A; Ota, Takayuki; Bubeck, Sarah S; Cho, Rebecca; Groff, Brian C; Kubota, Tsuguo; Destito, Giuseppe; Laudenslager, John; Koriazova, Lilia; Tahara, Tomoyuki; Kanda, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    A proof-of-concept study evaluating the potential of Streptococcus pneumoniae Pneumococcal Surface Protein A (PspA) as a passive immunization target was conducted. We describe the generation and isolation of several broadly reactive mouse anti-PspA monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). MAb 140H1 displayed (i) 98% strain coverage, (ii) activity in complement deposition and opsonophagocytic killing (OPK) assays, which are thought to predict the in vivo efficacy of anti-pneumococcal mAbs, (iii) efficacy in mouse sepsis models both alone and in combination with standard-of-care antibiotics, and (iv) therapeutic activity in a mouse pneumonia model. Moreover, we demonstrate that antibody engineering can significantly enhance anti-PspA mAb effector function. We believe that PspA has promising potential as a target for the therapy of invasive pneumococcal disease by mAbs, which could be used alone or in conjunction with standard-of-care antibiotics. PMID:27171010

  7. Genetic stability of pneumococcal isolates during 35 days of human experimental carriage

    PubMed Central

    Gladstone, R.A.; Gritzfeld, J.F.; Coupland, P.; Gordon, S.B.; Bentley, S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumococcal carriage is a reservoir for transmission and a precursor to pneumococcal disease. The experimental human pneumococcal carriage model provides a useful tool to aid vaccine licensure through the measurement of vaccine efficacy against carriage (VEcol). Documentation of the genetic stability of the experimental human pneumococcal carriage model is important to further strengthen confidence in its safety and conclusions, enabling it to further facilitate vaccine licensure through providing evidence of VEcol. Methods 229 isolates were sequenced from 10 volunteers in whom experimental human pneumococcal carriage was established, sampled over a period of 35 days. Multiple isolates from within a single volunteer at a single time provided a deep resolution for detecting variation. HiSeq data from the isolates were mapped against a PacBio reference of the inoculum to call variable sites. Results The observed variation between experimental carriage isolates was minimal with the maximum SNP distance between any isolate and the reference being 3 SNPs. Conclusion The low-level variation described provides evidence for the stability of the experimental human pneumococcal carriage model over 35 days, which can be reliably and confidently used to measure VEcol and aid future progression of pneumococcal vaccination. PMID:26006086

  8. Clonal Expansion of the Macrolide Resistant ST386 within Pneumococcal Serotype 6C in France

    PubMed Central

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002–2003) to the PCV13 era (2010–2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter. PMID:24603763

  9. Clonal expansion of the macrolide resistant ST386 within pneumococcal serotype 6C in France.

    PubMed

    Janoir, Claire; Cohen, Robert; Levy, Corinne; Bingen, Edouard; Lepoutre, Agnès; Gutmann, Laurent; Varon, Emmanuelle

    2014-01-01

    In France, the use of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) lead to an overall significant decrease in PCV7 invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) incidence. However, the decrease in vaccine serotype prevalence was partially counterbalanced by the serotype replacement phenomenon. In this study, we analyzed the role of the newly described serotype 6C as one of the replacement serotypes. This work was conducted on a large time scale from the early PCV7 era (2002-2003) to the PCV13 era (2010-2011), both on IPD strains recovered from the whole population and nasopharyngeal colonizing strains isolated in infant less than two years, who are known to be the main reservoir for pneumococci. Serotype 6C took advantage over 6A and 6B serotypes, which both decreased over time. A continuous and significant increase in 6C IPD was observed in adults along the study period; in contrast, in children less than two years, only an increase in 6C nasopharyngeal carriage was found, the prevalence of serotype 6C in IPD remaining very low over time. Among 101 6C invasive and colonizing strains studied by MLST, 24 STs were found to be related to three major clonal complexes, CC395, CC176, and CC315. STs related to CC176 tend to disappear after 2009 and were essentially replaced by ST386 (CC315), which dramatically increased over time. This clonal expansion may be explained by the erythromycin and tetracycline resistances associated with this clone. Finally, the decrease observed in nasopharyngeal 6C carriage since 2010, likely related to the PCV13 introduction in the French immunization schedule, is expected to lead to a decrease in 6C IPD in adults thereafter.

  10. The potential impact of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in Africa: Considerations and early lessons learned from the South African experience

    PubMed Central

    Madhi, Shabir A; Nunes, Marta C

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) into the South African public immunization program since 2009 adopted a novel vaccination schedule of 3 doses at 6, 14 and 40 weeks of age. Over the past 5 y it has been shown that infant PCV immunization in South Africa is effective in reducing the burden of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children. Furthermore, indirect protection of unvaccinated age-groups (including high risk groups such as HIV-infected adults) against IPD was demonstrated despite the absence of any substantial catch-up campaign of older children. This indirect effect against IPD is corroborated by the temporal reduction in vaccine-serotype colonization among age-groups targeted for PCV immunization as well as unvaccinated HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults, which was evident within 2 y of PCV introduction into the immunization program. Vaccine effectiveness has also been demonstrated in children against presumed bacterial pneumonia. The evaluation of the impact of PCV in South Africa, however, remains incomplete. The knowledge gaps remaining include the evaluation of PCV on the incidence of all-cause pneumonia hospitalization among vaccinated and unvaccinated age-groups. Furthermore, ongoing surveillance is required to determine whether there is ongoing replacement disease by non-vaccine serotypes, which could offset the early gains associated with the immunization program in the country. PMID:26317537

  11. Minimally Invasive Procedures - Direct and Video-Assisted Forms in the Treatment of Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Josué Viana; Melo, Emanuel Carvalho; Silva, Juliana Fernandes; Rebouças, Leonardo Lemos; Corrêa, Larissa Chagas; Germano, Amanda de Queiroz; Machado, João José Aquino

    2014-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive cardiovascular procedures have been progressively used in heart surgery. Objective To describe the techniques and immediate results of minimally invasive procedures in 5 years. Methods Prospective and descriptive study in which 102 patients were submitted to minimally invasive procedures in direct and video-assisted forms. Clinical and surgical variables were evaluated as well as the in hospital follow-up of the patients. Results Fourteen patients were operated through the direct form and 88 through the video-assisted form. Between minimally invasive procedures in direct form, 13 had aortic valve disease. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 43 had mitral valve disease, 41 atrial septal defect and four tumors. In relation to mitral valve disease, we replaced 26 and reconstructed 17 valves. Aortic clamp, extracorporeal and procedure times were, respectively, 91,6 ± 21,8, 112,7 ± 27,9 e 247,1 ± 20,3 minutes in minimally invasive procedures in direct form. Between minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms, 71,6 ± 29, 99,7 ± 32,6 e 226,1 ± 42,7 minutes. Considering intensive care and hospitalization times, these were 41,1 ± 14,7 hours and 4,6 ± 2 days in minimally invasive procedures in direct and 36,8 ± 16,3 hours and 4,3 ± 1,9 days in minimally invasive procedures in video-assisted forms procedures. Conclusion Minimally invasive procedures were used in two forms - direct and video-assisted - with safety in the surgical treatment of video-assisted, atrial septal defect and tumors of the heart. These procedures seem to result in longer surgical variables. However, hospital recuperation was faster, independent of the access or pathology. PMID:24553983

  12. Maternal Antibodies to Pneumolysin but Not to Pneumococcal Surface Protein A Delay Early Pneumococcal Carriage in High-Risk Papua New Guinean Infants▿

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Jacinta P.; Richmond, Peter C.; Pomat, William S.; Michael, Audrey; Keno, Helen; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Nelson, Jan B.; Whinnen, Melissa; Heinrich, Tatjana; Smith, Wendy-Anne; Prescott, Susan L.; Holt, Patrick G.; Siba, Peter M.; Lehmann, Deborah; van den Biggelaar, Anita H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Immunization of pregnant women can be an efficient strategy to induce early protection in infants in developing countries. Pneumococcal protein-based vaccines may have the capacity to induce pneumococcal serotype-independent protection. To understand the potential of maternal pneumococcal protein-specific antibodies in infants in high-risk areas, we studied the placental transfer of naturally acquired antibodies to pneumolysin (Ply) and pneumococcal surface protein A family 1 and 2 (PspA1 and PspA2) in relation to onset of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage in infants in Papua New Guinea (PNG). In this study, 76% of the infants carried Streptococcus pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract within the first month of life, at a median age of 19 days. Maternal and cord blood antibody titers to Ply (ρ = 0.824, P < 0.001), PspA1 (ρ = 0.746, P < 0.001), and PspA2 (ρ = 0.631, P < 0.001) were strongly correlated. Maternal pneumococcal carriage (hazard ratio [HR], 2.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25 to 5.39) and younger maternal age (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.54 to 1.00) were independent risk factors for early carriage, while higher cord Ply-specific antibody titers predicted a significantly delayed onset (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.00) and cord PspA1-specific antibodies a significantly younger onset of carriage in PNG infants (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.40). Maternal vaccination with a pneumococcal protein-based vaccine should be considered as a strategy to protect high-risk infants against pneumococcal disease by reducing carriage risks in both mothers and infants. PMID:19776196

  13. Maternal antibodies to pneumolysin but not to pneumococcal surface protein A delay early pneumococcal carriage in high-risk Papua New Guinean infants.

    PubMed

    Francis, Jacinta P; Richmond, Peter C; Pomat, William S; Michael, Audrey; Keno, Helen; Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Nelson, Jan B; Whinnen, Melissa; Heinrich, Tatjana; Smith, Wendy-Anne; Prescott, Susan L; Holt, Patrick G; Siba, Peter M; Lehmann, Deborah; van den Biggelaar, Anita H J

    2009-11-01

    Immunization of pregnant women can be an efficient strategy to induce early protection in infants in developing countries. Pneumococcal protein-based vaccines may have the capacity to induce pneumococcal serotype-independent protection. To understand the potential of maternal pneumococcal protein-specific antibodies in infants in high-risk areas, we studied the placental transfer of naturally acquired antibodies to pneumolysin (Ply) and pneumococcal surface protein A family 1 and 2 (PspA1 and PspA2) in relation to onset of pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage in infants in Papua New Guinea (PNG). In this study, 76% of the infants carried Streptococcus pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract within the first month of life, at a median age of 19 days. Maternal and cord blood antibody titers to Ply (rho = 0.824, P < 0.001), PspA1 (rho = 0.746, P < 0.001), and PspA2 (rho = 0.631, P < 0.001) were strongly correlated. Maternal pneumococcal carriage (hazard ratio [HR], 2.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25 to 5.39) and younger maternal age (HR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.54 to 1.00) were independent risk factors for early carriage, while higher cord Ply-specific antibody titers predicted a significantly delayed onset (HR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.52 to 1.00) and cord PspA1-specific antibodies a significantly younger onset of carriage in PNG infants (HR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.03 to 2.40). Maternal vaccination with a pneumococcal protein-based vaccine should be considered as a strategy to protect high-risk infants against pneumococcal disease by reducing carriage risks in both mothers and infants. PMID:19776196

  14. Methodological criticisms in the evaluation of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Trucchi, C; Paganino, C; Ansaldi, F

    2015-01-01

    Globally, lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), including community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), cause considerable of morbidity and mortality in adults, especially in the elderly. In addition to age, underlying medical conditions are associated with an increased risk of CAP. From an aetiological point of view, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of adult CAP throughout the world. Two types of vaccine are available for the prevention of pneumococcal diseases: the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV23) and the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13). An accurate understanding of the LRTIs burden and the types of subjects at risk of CAP, allow to find an appropriately targeted immunization strategy and provide baseline data to evaluate pneumococcal vaccine effectiveness. Given the high variability in available estimates of LRTIs burden and associated risk factors, the objective of the study was to discuss the methodological criticism in its evaluation, in the light of the gradual introduction of PCV13 immunization strategy targeted to elderly and risk groups in middle-high income countries. PMID:26788736

  15. [Invasive fungal disease due to Scedosporium, Fusarium and mucorales].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Salavert, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The number of emerging organisms causing invasive fungal infections has increased in the last decades. These etiological agents include Scedosporium, Fusarium and mucorales. All of them can cause disseminated, virulent, and difficult-to treat infections in immunosuppressed patients, the most affected, due to their resistance to most available antifungal agents. Current trends in transplantation including the use of new immunosuppressive treatments, the common prescription of antifungal agents for prophylaxis, and new ecological niches could explain the emergence of these fungal pathogens. These pathogens can also affect immunocompetent individuals, especially after natural disasters (earthquakes, floods, tsunamis), combat wounds or near drowning. All the invasive infections caused by Scedosporium, Fusarium, and mucorales are potentially lethal and a favourable outcome is associated with rapid diagnosis by direct microscopic examination of the involved tissue, wide debridement of infected material, early use of antifungal agents including combination therapy, and an improvement in host defenses, especially neutropenia. PMID:25442383

  16. Antimicrobial resistance and management of invasive Salmonella disease

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Samuel; Gordon, Melita A.; Feasey, Nicholas; Parry, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Invasive Salmonella infections (typhoidal and non-typhoidal) cause a huge burden of illness estimated at nearly 3.4 million cases and over 600,000 deaths annually especially in resource-limited settings. Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) infections are particularly important in immunosuppressed populations especially in sub-Saharan Africa, causing a mortality of 20–30% in vulnerable children below 5 years of age. In these settings, where routine surveillance for antimicrobial resistance is rare or non-existent, reports of 50–75% multidrug resistance (MDR) in NTS are common, including strains of NTS also resistant to flouroquinolones and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Typhoid (enteric) fever caused by Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia and Africa. Currently over a third of isolates in many endemic areas are MDR, and diminished susceptibility or resistance to fluoroquinolones, the drugs of choice for MDR cases over the last decade is an increasing problem. The situation is particularly worrying in resource-limited settings where the few remaining effective antimicrobials are either unavailable or altogether too expensive to be afforded by either the general public or by public health services. Although the prudent use of effective antimicrobials, improved hygiene and sanitation and the discovery of new antimicrobial agents may offer hope for the management of invasive salmonella infections, it is essential to consider other interventions including the wider use of WHO recommended typhoid vaccines and the acceleration of trials for novel iNTS vaccines. The main objective of this review is to describe existing data on the prevalence and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant invasive Salmonella infections and how this affects the management of these infections, especially in endemic developing countries. PMID:25912288

  17. Antimicrobial resistance and management of invasive Salmonella disease.

    PubMed

    Kariuki, Samuel; Gordon, Melita A; Feasey, Nicholas; Parry, Christopher M

    2015-06-19

    Invasive Salmonella infections (typhoidal and non-typhoidal) cause a huge burden of illness estimated at nearly 3.4 million cases and over 600,000 deaths annually especially in resource-limited settings. Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) infections are particularly important in immunosuppressed populations especially in sub-Saharan Africa, causing a mortality of 20-30% in vulnerable children below 5 years of age. In these settings, where routine surveillance for antimicrobial resistance is rare or non-existent, reports of 50-75% multidrug resistance (MDR) in NTS are common, including strains of NTS also resistant to flouroquinolones and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Typhoid (enteric) fever caused by Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia and Africa. Currently over a third of isolates in many endemic areas are MDR, and diminished susceptibility or resistance to fluoroquinolones, the drugs of choice for MDR cases over the last decade is an increasing problem. The situation is particularly worrying in resource-limited settings where the few remaining effective antimicrobials are either unavailable or altogether too expensive to be afforded by either the general public or by public health services. Although the prudent use of effective antimicrobials, improved hygiene and sanitation and the discovery of new antimicrobial agents may offer hope for the management of invasive salmonella infections, it is essential to consider other interventions including the wider use of WHO recommended typhoid vaccines and the acceleration of trials for novel iNTS vaccines. The main objective of this review is to describe existing data on the prevalence and epidemiology of antimicrobial resistant invasive Salmonella infections and how this affects the management of these infections, especially in endemic developing countries.

  18. Influenza promotes pneumococcal growth during co-infection by providing host sialylated substrates as a nutrient source

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Steven J.; Roche, Aoife M.; Weiser, Jeffrey N.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Much of the mortality attributed to influenza virus is due to secondary bacterial pneumonia, particularly from Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, mechanisms underlying this co-infection are incompletely understood. We find that prior influenza infection enhances pneumococcal colonization of the murine nasopharynx, which in-turn promotes bacterial spread to the lungs. Influenza accelerates bacterial replication in vivo, and sialic acid, a major component of airway glycoconjugates, is identified as the host-derived metabolite that stimulates pneumococcal proliferation. Influenza infection increases sialic acid and sialylated mucin availability, and enhances desialylation of host glycoconjugates. Pneumococcal genes for sialic acid catabolism are required for influenza to promote bacterial growth. Decreasing sialic acid availability in vivo by genetic deletion of the major airway mucin Muc5ac or mucolytic treatment limits influenza-induced pneumococcal replication. Our findings suggest that higher rates of disease during co-infection could stem from influenza-provided sialic acid, which increases pneumococcal proliferation, colonization and aspiration. PMID:25011108

  19. Physiological Roles of Pneumococcal Peptidases

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Mary K.

    1974-01-01

    A methionyl-specific dipeptidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae has been described. This enzyme and the pneumococcal tripeptidase have been shown to be intracellular, soluble, and constitutive. In addition to their function in cleavage of peptide nutrients, these peptidases may play a role in protein synthesis and turnover. PMID:4212242

  20. A review of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in the Indigenous populations of North America.

    PubMed

    Tsang, R S W; Bruce, M G; Lem, M; Barreto, L; Ulanova, M

    2014-07-01

    Historically, the highest incidence rates of invasive Haemophilus influenzae disease in the world were found in North American and Australian Indigenous children. Although immunization against H. influenzae type b (Hib) led to a marked decrease in invasive Hib disease in countries where it was implemented, this disease has not been eliminated and its rates in Indigenous communities remain higher than in the general North American population. In this literature review, we examined the epidemiology of invasive H. influenzae disease in the pre-Hib vaccine era, effect of carriage on disease epidemiology, immune response to H. influenzae infection and Hib vaccination in Indigenous and Caucasian children, and the changing epidemiology after Hib conjugate vaccine has been in use for more than two decades in North America. We also explored reasons behind the continued high rates of invasive H. influenzae disease in Indigenous populations in North America. H. influenzae type a (Hia) has emerged as a significant cause of severe disease in North American Indigenous communities. More research is needed to define the genotypic diversity of Hia and the disease burden that it causes in order to determine if a Hia vaccine is required to protect the vulnerable populations.

  1. Postoperative Recurrence of Invasive Thymoma with Cold Agglutinin Disease and Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Taro; Koba, Hayato; Tanimura, Kota; Ogawa, Naohiko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Hara, Johsuke; Abo, Miki; Sone, Takashi; Kimura, Hideharu; Kasahara, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    A 50-year-old man presented to our hospital in 1995. Invasive thymoma was diagnosed and extended thymectomy and left upper lobe partial resection were performed. In 2013, he complained of dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma. Several chemotherapies were administered. Severe anemia and an increase in the total bilirubin level were observed with chemotherapies. In additional, an examination showed that the direct Coombs test was positive. Cold agglutinin was also high. We herein experienced a rare case of postoperative recurrence of invasive thymoma with cold agglutinin disease and autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:27629968

  2. Factors associated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination of the elderly in Spain: A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Domínguez, Angela; Soldevila, Núria; Toledo, Diana; Godoy, Pere; Torner, Núria; Force, Luis; Castilla, Jesús; Mayoral, José María; Tamames, Sonia; Martín, Vicente; Egurrola, Mikel; Sanz, Francisco; Astray, Jenaro; Project Pi12/02079 Working Group

    2016-07-01

    Vaccination of the elderly is an important factor in limiting the impact of pneumonia in the community. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors associated with pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination in patients aged ≥ 65 years hospitalized for causes unrelated to pneumonia, acute respiratory disease, or influenza-like illness in Spain. We made a cross-sectional study during 2013-2014. A bivariate analysis was performed comparing vaccinated and unvaccinated patients, taking into account sociodemographic variables and risk medical conditions. A multivariate analysis was performed using multilevel regression models. 921 patients were included; 403 (43.8%) had received the pneumococcal vaccine (394 received the polysaccharide vaccine). Visiting the general practitioner ≥ 3 times during the last year (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.25-2.57); having received the influenza vaccination in the 2013-14 season (OR = 2.57; 95% CI 1.72-3.84) or in any of the 3 previous seasons (OR = 11.70; 95% CI 7.42-18.45) were associated with receiving the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Pneumococcal vaccination coverage of hospitalized elderly people is low. The elderly need to be targeted about pneumococcal vaccination and activities that encourage healthcare workers to proactively propose vaccination might be useful. Educational campaigns aimed at the elderly could also help to increase vaccination coverages and reduce the burden of pneumococcal disease in the community.

  3. Minimally invasive surgery for paediatric inflammatory bowel disease: Personal experience and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Pini-Prato, Alessio; Faticato, Maria Grazia; Barabino, Arrigo; Arrigo, Serena; Gandullia, Paolo; Mazzola, Cinzia; Disma, Nicola; Montobbio, Giovanni; Mattioli, Girolamo

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of paediatric inflammatory bowel disease (PIBD) has dramatically increased in the last 20 years. Although first reported in mid 1970s’, diagnostic laparoscopy has started to be routinely adopted in paediatric surgical practice since late 1990s’. Minimally invasive surgery was first limited to diagnostic purposes. After 2002 it was also applied to the radical treatment of PIBD, either Crohn’s disease (CD) or Ulcerative colitis. During the last decade minimally invasive approaches to PIBD have gained popularity and have recently became the “gold standard” for the treatment of such invalidating and troublesome chronic diseases. The authors describe and track the historical evolution of minimally invasive surgery for PIBD and address all available opportunities, including most recent advancements such as robotic surgery, single port approaches and minimally invasive treatment of perianal fistulising CD. A systematic review of all series of PIBD treated with minimally invasive approaches published so far is provided in order to determine the incidence and type of patients’ complications reported up to present days. The authors also describe their experience with minimally invasive surgery for PIBD and will report the results of 104 laparoscopic procedures performed in a series of 61 patients between January 2006 and December 2014. PMID:26525138

  4. Exome Array Analysis of Susceptibility to Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kloek, Anne T.; van Setten, Jessica; van der Ende, Arie; Bots, Michiel L.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Serón, Mercedes Valls; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van de Beek, Diederik; Ferwerda, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Host genetic variability may contribute to susceptibility of bacterial meningitis, but which genes contribute to the susceptibility to this complex disease remains undefined. We performed a genetic association study in 469 community-acquired pneumococcal meningitis cases and 2072 population-based controls from the Utrecht Health Project in order to find genetic variants associated with pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility. A HumanExome BeadChip was used to genotype 102,097 SNPs in the collected DNA samples. Associations were tested with the Fisher exact test. None of the genetic variants tested reached Bonferroni corrected significance (p-value <5 × 10−7). Our strongest signals associated with susceptibility to pneumococcal meningitis were rs139064549 on chromosome 1 in the COL11A1 gene (p = 1.51 × 10−6; G allele OR 3.21 [95% CI 2.05–5.02]) and rs9309464 in the EXOC6B gene on chromosome 2 (p = 6.01 × 10−5; G allele OR 0.66 [95% CI 0.54–0.81]). The sequence kernel association test (SKAT) tests for associations between multiple variants in a gene region and pneumococcal meningitis susceptibility yielded one significant associated gene namely COL11A1 (p = 1.03 × 10−7). Replication studies are needed to validate these results. If replicated, the functionality of these genetic variations should be further studied to identify by which means they influence the pathophysiology of pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:27389768

  5. Pneumococcal and seasonal influenza vaccination among elderly patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gorska-Ciebiada, Małgorzata; Saryusz-Wolska, Małgorzata; Ciebiada, Maciej; Loba, Jerzy

    2015-10-28

    Both seasonal influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for elderly diabetics. The aim of the study was to determine the rate of seasonal influenza vaccination over the previous twelve months, pneumococcal vaccination over a lifetime, and to identify predictors which affect likelihood of vaccination. 219 diabetics elders were detailed questioned 3 months after the end of 2012/2013 influenza season. 26.48% of patients have been vaccinated against influenza in the last year and only 9.13% of patients reported pneumococcal vaccination in the past. The logistic regression analysis revealed that variables which increased the likelihood of having been vaccinated against influenza were: higher number of anti-hyperglycemic medications, increased number of co-morbidities, higher patients' income, recommendation of vaccination from General Practitioners (GPs) and specialist. Significant predictors of pneumococcal vaccine uptake included increased number of co-morbidities and recommendation of vaccination received from GPs and specialist. The commonest reasons given by those unvaccinated were lack of information about immunization and low perceived benefits of vaccination. Of patients who were not treated with influenza vaccine 86.7% had never received recommendation from specialist and 71.4% had never been advised by GPs. Influenza vaccination was too expensive to 24.85% of patients. The vaccination rate among elderly diabetics in Poland is low. Lack of knowledge and patients' income are the main barriers. Increased awareness of healthcare professionals to educate and encourage vaccination and propagation of free vaccinations to all people at risk may increase the rate of vaccination against influenza and pneumococcal disease.

  6. Pneumococcal and seasonal influenza vaccination among elderly patients with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gorska-Ciebiada, Małgorzata; Saryusz-Wolska, Małgorzata; Ciebiada, Maciej; Loba, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Both seasonal influenza vaccination and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for elderly diabetics. The aim of the study was to determine the rate of seasonal influenza vaccination over the previous twelve months, pneumococcal vaccination over a lifetime, and to identify predictors which affect likelihood of vaccination. 219 diabetics elders were detailed questioned 3 months after the end of 2012/2013 influenza season. 26.48% of patients have been vaccinated against influenza in the last year and only 9.13% of patients reported pneumococcal vaccination in the past. The logistic regression analysis revealed that variables which increased the likelihood of having been vaccinated against influenza were: higher number of anti-hyperglycemic medications, increased number of co-morbidities, higher patients' income, recommendation of vaccination from General Practitioners (GPs) and specialist. Significant predictors of pneumococcal vaccine uptake included increased number of co-morbidities and recommendation of vaccination received from GPs and specialist. The commonest reasons given by those unvaccinated were lack of information about immunization and low perceived benefits of vaccination. Of patients who were not treated with influenza vaccine 86.7% had never received recommendation from specialist and 71.4% had never been advised by GPs. Influenza vaccination was too expensive to 24.85% of patients. The vaccination rate among elderly diabetics in Poland is low. Lack of knowledge and patients' income are the main barriers. Increased awareness of healthcare professionals to educate and encourage vaccination and propagation of free vaccinations to all people at risk may increase the rate of vaccination against influenza and pneumococcal disease. PMID:26561844

  7. Potential carrier priming effect in Australian infants after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction

    PubMed Central

    Tashani, Mohamed; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Harboe, Zitta B; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate evidence of clinical protection in infants after one dose of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) owing to carrier priming. METHODS Using Australian National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System data, we conducted a descriptive analysis of cases of vaccine type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD) during “catch-up” years, when 7vPCV was carrier primed by prior administration of DTPa vaccine. We compared the number of VT-IPD cases occurring 2-9 wk after a single dose of 7vPCV (carrier primed), with those < 2 wk post vaccination, when no protection from 7vPCV was expected yet. Further comparison was conducted to compare the occurrence of VT-IPD cases vs non-VT-IPD cases after a single carrier-primed dose of 7vPCV. RESULTS We found four VT-IPD cases occurring < 2 wk after one carrier primed dose of 7vPCV while only one case occurred 2-9 wk later. Upon further comparison with the non-VT-IPD cases that occurred after one carrier primed dose of 7vPCV, two cases were detected within 2 wk, whereas seven occurred within 2-9 wk later; suggesting a substantial level of protection from VT-IPD occurring from 2 wk after carrier-primed dose of 7vPCV. CONCLUSION This data suggest that infants may benefit from just one dose of 7vPCV, likely through enhanced immunity from carrier priming effect. If this is proven, an adjusted 2-dose schedule (where the first dose of PCV is not given until after DTPa) may be sufficient and more cost-effective. PMID:27610348

  8. Potential carrier priming effect in Australian infants after 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction

    PubMed Central

    Tashani, Mohamed; Jayasinghe, Sanjay; Harboe, Zitta B; Rashid, Harunor; Booy, Robert

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate evidence of clinical protection in infants after one dose of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (7vPCV) owing to carrier priming. METHODS Using Australian National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System data, we conducted a descriptive analysis of cases of vaccine type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD) during “catch-up” years, when 7vPCV was carrier primed by prior administration of DTPa vaccine. We compared the number of VT-IPD cases occurring 2-9 wk after a single dose of 7vPCV (carrier primed), with those < 2 wk post vaccination, when no protection from 7vPCV was expected yet. Further comparison was conducted to compare the occurrence of VT-IPD cases vs non-VT-IPD cases after a single carrier-primed dose of 7vPCV. RESULTS We found four VT-IPD cases occurring < 2 wk after one carrier primed dose of 7vPCV while only one case occurred 2-9 wk later. Upon further comparison with the non-VT-IPD cases that occurred after one carrier primed dose of 7vPCV, two cases were detected within 2 wk, whereas seven occurred within 2-9 wk later; suggesting a substantial level of protection from VT-IPD occurring from 2 wk after carrier-primed dose of 7vPCV. CONCLUSION This data suggest that infants may benefit from just one dose of 7vPCV, likely through enhanced immunity from carrier priming effect. If this is proven, an adjusted 2-dose schedule (where the first dose of PCV is not given until after DTPa) may be sufficient and more cost-effective.

  9. Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... years of age who has a long-term health problem such as: heart disease, lung disease, sickle cell disease, diabetes, alcoholism, cirrhosis, ... sources of information. Call your local or state health department. Contact the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): call 1-800-232- ...

  10. Rapid non-invasive tests for diagnostics of infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    A rapid test for an infectious disease that can be used at point-of-care at a physician's office, a pharmacy, or in the field is critical for the prompt and appropriate therapeutic intervention. Ultimately by treating infections early on will decrease transmission of the pathogen. In contrast to metabolic diseases or cancer where multiple biomarkers are required, infectious disease targets (e.g. antigen, antibody, nucleic acid) are simple and specific for the pathogen causing the disease. Our laboratory has focused on three major infectious disease; HIV, Tuberculosis, and Malaria. These diseases are pandemic in much of the world thus putting natives, tourists and military personnel at risk for becoming infected, and upon returning to the U.S., transmitting these diseases to their contacts. Our devices are designed to detect antigens, antibodies or nucleic acids in blood or saliva samples in less than 30 minutes. An overview describing the current status of each of the three diagnostic platforms is presented. These microfluidic point-of-care devices will be relatively inexpensive, disposable, and user friendly.

  11. Clinical and Microbiological Factors Associated with High Nasopharyngeal Pneumococcal Density in Patients with Pneumococcal Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Alpkvist, Helena; Athlin, Simon; Nauclér, Pontus; Herrmann, Björn; Abdeldaim, Guma; Slotved, Hans-Christian; Hedlund, Jonas; Strålin, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Background We aimed to study if certain clinical and/or microbiological factors are associated with a high nasopharyngeal (NP) density of Streptococcus pneumoniae in pneumococcal pneumonia. In addition, we aimed to study if a high NP pneumococcal density could be useful to detect severe pneumococcal pneumonia. Methods Adult patients hospitalized for radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia were included in a prospective study. NP aspirates were collected at admission and were subjected to quantitative PCR for pneumococcal DNA (Spn9802 DNA). Patients were considered to have pneumococcal etiology if S. pneumoniae was detected in blood culture and/or culture of respiratory secretions and/or urinary antigen test. Results Of 166 included patients, 68 patients had pneumococcal DNA detected in NP aspirate. Pneumococcal etiology was noted in 57 patients (84%) with positive and 8 patients (8.2%) with negative test for pneumococcal DNA (p<0.0001). The median NP pneumococcal density of DNA positive patients with pneumococcal etiology was 6.83 log10 DNA copies/mL (range 1.79–9.50). In a multivariate analysis of patients with pneumococcal etiology, a high pneumococcal density was independently associated with severe pneumonia (Pneumonia Severity Index risk class IV-V), symptom duration ≥2 days prior to admission, and a medium/high serum immunoglobulin titer against the patient’s own pneumococcal serotype. NP pneumococcal density was not associated with sex, age, smoking, co-morbidity, viral co-infection, pneumococcal serotype, or bacteremia. Severe pneumococcal pneumonia was noted in 28 study patients. When we studied the performance of PCR with different DNA cut-off levels for detection of severe pneumococcal pneumonia, we found sensitivities of 54–82% and positive predictive values of 37–56%, indicating suboptimal performance. Conclusions Pneumonia severity, symptom duration ≥2 days, and a medium/high serum immunoglobulin titer against the patient

  12. Assessing pneumococcal meningitis association with viral respiratory infections and antibiotics: insights from statistical and mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Opatowski, Lulla; Varon, Emmanuelle; Dupont, Claire; Temime, Laura; van der Werf, Sylvie; Gutmann, Laurent; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Watier, Laurence; Guillemot, Didier

    2013-08-01

    Pneumococcus is an important human pathogen, highly antibiotic resistant and a major cause of bacterial meningitis worldwide. Better prevention requires understanding the drivers of pneumococcal infection incidence and antibiotic susceptibility. Although respiratory viruses (including influenza) have been suggested to influence pneumococcal infections, the underlying mechanisms are still unknown, and viruses are rarely considered when studying pneumococcus epidemiology. Here, we propose a novel mathematical model to examine hypothetical relationships between Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis incidence (SPMI), acute viral respiratory infections (AVRIs) and antibiotic exposure. French time series of SPMI, AVRI and penicillin consumption over 2001-2004 are analysed and used to assess four distinct virus-bacteria interaction submodels, ascribing the interaction on pneumococcus transmissibility and/or pathogenicity. The statistical analysis reveals strong associations between time series: SPMI increases shortly after AVRI incidence and decreases overall as the antibiotic-prescription rate rises. Model simulations require a combined impact of AVRI on both pneumococcal transmissibility (up to 1.3-fold increase at the population level) and pathogenicity (up to threefold increase) to reproduce the data accurately, along with diminished epidemic fitness of resistant pneumococcal strains causing meningitis (0.97 (0.96-0.97)). Overall, our findings suggest that AVRI and antibiotics strongly influence SPMI trends. Consequently, vaccination protecting against respiratory virus could have unexpected benefits to limit invasive pneumococcal infections.

  13. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Causing Invasive Disease in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Puig, Carmen; Grau, Imma; Tubau, Fe; Calatayud, Laura; Pallares, Roman; Liñares, Josefina

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The epidemiology of invasive Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) has changed since the introduction of the Hi type b (Hib) vaccine. The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and molecular epidemiology of Hi invasive disease in adults. Methods Clinical data of the 82 patients with Hi invasive infections were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility, serotyping, and genotyping were studied (2008–2013). Results Men accounted for 63.4% of patients (whose mean age was 64.3 years). The most frequent comorbidities were immunosuppressive therapy (34.1%), malignancy (31.7%), diabetes, and COPD (both 22%). The 30-day mortality rate was 20.7%. The majority of the strains (84.3%) were nontypeable (NTHi) and serotype f was the most prevalent serotype in the capsulated strains. The highest antimicrobial resistance was for cotrimoxazole (27.1%) and ampicillin (14.3%). Twenty-three isolates (32.9%) had amino acid changes in the PBP3 involved in resistance. Capsulated strains were clonal and belonged to clonal complexes 6 (serotype b), 124 (serotype f), and 18 (serotype e), whereas NTHi were genetically diverse. Conclusions Invasive Hi disease occurred mainly in elderly and those with underlying conditions, and it was associated with a high mortality rate. NTHi were the most common cause of invasive disease and showed high genetic diversity. PMID:25379704

  14. Impact of Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines on the Incidence of Pneumonia in Hospitalized Children after Five Years of Its Introduction in Uruguay

    PubMed Central

    Hortal, María; Estevan, Miguel; Meny, Miguel; Iraola, Inés; Laurani, Hilda

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on the burden of pneumococcal disease and the most frequent serotypes demonstrated that invasive disease and pneumonia were important manifestations affecting children under 5 years of age. Therefore, pneumococcal diseases prevention became a public health priority. Uruguay was the first Latin American country to incorporate PCV7 into its National Immunization Program. The aim of this study is to compare the incidence rates for hospitalized pneumonia in children from the pre PCV introduction period and the following five years of PCVs application in Uruguay. Methods and Findings Population-based surveillance of pneumonia hospitalization rates, in children, less than 14 years of age, had been performed prior pneumococcal vaccination, and continued following PCV7 introduction and PCV13 replacement, using the same methodology. Hospitalized children with pneumonia were enrolled from January 1, 2009 through December 31st, 2012. The study was carried out in an area with a population of 238,002 inhabitants of whom 18, 055 were under five years of age. Patients with acute lower respiratory infections for whom a chest radiograph was performed on admission were eligible. Digitalized radiographs were interpreted by a reference radiologist, using WHO criteria. Pneumonia was confirmed in 2,697 patients, 1,267 with consolidated and 1,430 with non consolidated pneumonia of which incidence decrease, between 2009 and 2012, was 27.3% and 46.4% respectively. 2001–2004 and 2009–2012 comparison showed a significant difference of 20.4% for consolidated pneumonia hospitalizations. A significant incidence decline was recorded among children 6 to 35 months of age. Conclusions An overall significant reduction in pneumonia hospitalizations was observed following the introduction of PCV7 and furthermore following the change to PCV13. PMID:24905093

  15. Variant histology in bladder cancer: how it should change the management in non-muscle invasive and muscle invasive disease?

    PubMed Central

    Klaile, Yvonne; Schlack, Katrin; Boegemann, Martin; Steinestel, Julie; Schrader, Andres Jan

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is a frequent type of carcinoma with an estimated incidence of approximately 100,000 men and women each year in the European Union (EU) with an associated mortality of 30,000 of these patients. In more than 70% the disease is diagnosed in a non-muscle invasive stage with the chance of minimally invasive, local treatment only, which might be required repetitively due to high rate of recurrence. In contrast, muscle invasive or metastatic stages need multimodal treatment strategies including surgical treatment and chemotherapy (CTX) in neoadjuvant (NAC), adjuvant, or palliative settings. Therapy recommendations and guidelines mainly refer to the most common histological type of BC, pure urothelial carcinoma (UC). However, BC can be classified as urothelial and non-UC. Non-urothelial BC and variants of UC account for up to 25% of all BCs. Further discrimination can be made into epithelial and non-epithelial non-UC. Most of the non-UCs are of epithelial origin (approximately 90%) including squamous-cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma and small-cell carcinoma. Non-epithelial tumors are rare and include variants as sarcoma, carcinosarcoma, paraganglioma, melanoma and lymphoma. Even though it is unclear whether the prognosis of non-urothelial cancer truly differs from that of UC, there is evidence that additional variant histology might prognosticate an impaired prognosis. Accordingly, aggressive behavior and often advanced stages at primary presentation are frequently observed in non-UC arguing for radical and sometimes different treatment strategies as compared to pure UC. This review aims to summarize the available data for the most common histological variants of non-urothelial BC. PMID:27785426

  16. Safety and Immunogenicity of Neonatal Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccination in Papua New Guinean Children: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Phuanukoonnon, Suparat; Francis, Jacinta; Jacoby, Peter; Siba, Peter M.; Alpers, Michael P.; Reeder, John C.; Holt, Patrick G.; Richmond, Peter C.; Lehmann, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background Approximately 826,000 children, mostly young infants, die annually from invasive pneumococcal disease. A 6-10-14-week schedule of pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) is efficacious but neonatal PCV may provide earlier protection and better coverage. We conducted an open randomized controlled trial in Papua New Guinea to compare safety, immunogenicity and priming for memory of 7-valent PCV (PCV7) given in a 0-1-2-month (neonatal) schedule with that of the routine 1-2-3-month (infant) schedule. Methods We randomized 318 infants at birth to receive PCV7 in the neonatal or infant schedule or no PCV7. All infants received 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PPV) at age 9 months. Serotype-specific serum IgG for PCV7 (VT) serotypes and non-VT serotypes 2, 5 and 7F were measured at birth and 2, 3, 4, 9, 10 and 18 months of age. Primary outcomes were geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) and proportions with concentration ≥0.35 µg/ml of VT serotype-specific pneumococcal IgG at age 2 months and one month post-PPV. Results We enrolled 101, 105 and 106 infants, respectively, into neonatal, infant and control groups. Despite high background levels of maternally derived antibody, both PCV7 groups had higher GMCs than controls at age 2 months for serotypes 4 (p<0.001) and 9V (p<0.05) and at age 3 months for all VTs except 6B. GMCs for serotypes 4, 9V, 18C and 19F were significantly higher (p<0.001) at age 2 months in the neonatal (one month post-dose2 PCV7) than in the infant group (one month post-dose1 PCV7). PPV induced significantly higher VT antibody responses in PCV7-primed than unprimed infants, with neonatal and infant groups equivalent. High VT and non-VT antibody concentrations generally persisted to age 18 months. Conclusions PCV7 is well-tolerated and immunogenic in PNG neonates and young infants and induces immunologic memory to PPV booster at age 9 months with antibody levels maintained to age 18 months. Trial Registration Clinical

  17. Serotype distribution and antimicrobial resistance patterns of invasive isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae: Alaska, 1991-1998.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, K M; Parkinson, A J; Reasonover, A L; Bulkow, L R; Parks, D J; Butler, J C

    2000-08-01

    From January 1991 through December 1998, a total of 1046 pneumococcal isolates were received from 23 laboratories participating in the statewide surveillance system. Of these, 1037 were recovered from normally sterile sites (blood and cerebrospinal and pleural fluid) and were available for serotyping and susceptibility testing. Ninety-two percent of these isolates were serotypes represented in the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine. Serotypes in the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F) were recovered from 72% of Alaska Natives and 84% of non-Native children <5 years old with invasive disease. Statewide, 7.3% and 3.2% of isolates had intermediate and high levels of resistance to penicillin, respectively; 9.2% were resistant to erythromycin (minimal inhibitory concentration, >/=1 microg/mL) and 19% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (minimal inhibitory concentration, >/=4/76 microg/mL). Twelve percent of invasive isolates were resistant to >/=2 classes of antibiotics; of these, serotype 6B accounted for 33%, and 63% were recovered from children <5 years old.

  18. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: non-invasive investigation and risk stratification.

    PubMed

    Dyson, J K; McPherson, S; Anstee, Q M

    2013-12-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a histological spectrum of liver disease, from simple steatosis through to cirrhosis. As the worldwide rates of obesity have increased, NAFLD has become the commonest cause of liver disease in many developed countries, affecting up to a third of the population. The majority of patients have simple steatosis that carries a relatively benign prognosis. However, a significant minority have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, and have increased liver related and cardiovascular mortality. Identifying those at risk of progressive disease is crucial. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard investigation for assessing stage of disease but its invasive nature makes it impractical for widespread use as a prognostic tool. Non-invasive tools for diagnosis and disease staging are required, reserving liver biopsy for those patients where it offers clinically relevant additional information. This review discusses the non-invasive modalities available for assessing steatosis, steatohepatitis and fibrosis. We propose a pragmatic approach for the assessment of patients with NAFLD to identify those at high risk of progressive disease who require referral to specialist services. PMID:23940130

  19. Passive smoking, invasive meningococcal disease and preventive measures: a commentary

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Active smoking is a recognized risk factor of various infectious diseases. In a systematic review published in BMC Public Health, Murray et al. demonstrated that exposure to passive smoking significantly increased the risk of meningococcal disease among children. Their review especially highlights that the risk remains high even if the exposure occurs during pregnancy or after birth, although the authors could not disentangle the independent effects of smoking during pregnancy from those in the postnatal period. How passive smoking increases the risk of childhood meningococcal disease is not precisely known. Both exposure to 'smoke', or 'smokers' (who are highly susceptible to pharyngeal carriage of meningococci) are postulated mechanisms, but unfortunately very few studies have examined the risk of exposure by considering these two variables separately, and this therefore remains a research priority. Quitting may well be the mainstay of preventing tobacco-related hazards but the available global data suggest that most smokers are reluctant to quit. Among other interventions, immunizing children with a meningococcal conjugate vaccine could, theoretically, reduce the risk of meningococcal disease among children and their smoker household contacts through herd immunity. See related article http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/12/1062 PMID:23228079

  20. Development of poorly differentiated invasive squamous cell carcinoma in giant Bowen’s disease: a case report with dermatoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Akay, Bengu Nisa; Maden, Aysenur; Kocak, Oguzhan; Bostanci, Seher; Boyvat, Ayşe; Kocyigit, Pelin; Heper, Aylin Okcu

    2016-01-01

    Bowen’s disease (BD) is an in situ form of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), often occurring in the chronically UV-damaged skin of elderly people. The risk of progression of BD to invasive SCC varies between 3% and 5%, and one-third of invasive tumors may metastasize. Herein we discuss the dermatoscopic findings of a case of giant Bowen’s disease, which progressed to poorly differentiated invasive SCC. PMID:27222765

  1. Minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease: Review of current developments and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Philipp-Alexander; Rijcken, Emile

    2016-01-01

    Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprise a population of patients that have a high likelihood of both surgical treatment at a young age and repetitive operative interventions. Therefore surgical procedures need to aim at minimizing operative trauma with best postoperative recovery. Minimally invasive techniques have been one of the major advancements in surgery in the last decades and are nowadays almost routinely performed in colorectal resections irrespective of underlying disease. However due to special disease related characteristics such as bowel stenosis, interenteric fistula, abscesses, malnutrition, repetitive surgeries, or immunosuppressive medications, patients with IBD represent a special cohort with specific needs for surgery. This review summarizes current evidence of minimally invasive surgery for patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis and gives an outlook on the future perspective of technical advances in this highly moving field with its latest developments in single port surgery, robotics and trans-anal techniques. PMID:27158537

  2. Invasion speeds of Triatoma dimidiata, vector of Chagas disease: An application of orthogonal polynomials method.

    PubMed

    Mesk, Mohammed; Mahdjoub, Tewfik; Gourbière, Sébastien; Rabinovich, Jorge E; Menu, Frédéric

    2016-04-21

    Demographic processes and spatial dispersal of Triatoma dimidiata, a triatomine species vector of Chagas disease, are modeled by integrodifference equations to estimate invasion capacity of this species under different ecological conditions. The application of the theory of orthogonal polynomials and the steepest descent method applied to these equations, allow a good approximation of the abundance of the adult female population and the invasion speed. We show that: (1) under the same mean conditions of demography and dispersal, periodic spatial dispersal results in an invasion speed 2.5 times larger than the invasion speed when spatial dispersal is continuous; (2) when the invasion speed of periodic spatial dispersal is correlated to adverse demographic conditions, it is 34.7% higher as compared to a periodic dispersal that is correlated to good demographic conditions. From our results we conclude, in terms of triatomine population control, that the invasive success of T. dimidiata may be most sensitive to the probability of transition from juvenile to adult stage. We discuss our main theoretical predictions in the light of observed data in different triatomines species found in the literature. PMID:26807809

  3. Draft Genome Sequences of Six Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae Strains That Establish Bacteremia in the Infant Rat Model of Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    VanWagoner, Timothy M.; Seale, Thomas W.; Mussa, Huda J.; Cole, Brett K.; Whitby, Paul W.; Stull, Terrence L.

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of invasive disease. The infant rat is the accepted model of invasive H. influenzae disease. Here, we report the genome sequences of six nontypeable H. influenzae strains that establish bacteremia in the infant rat. PMID:26404588

  4. Utility of R0 as a predictor of disease invasion in structured populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, P.C.; Johnson, P.L.F.; Lloyd-Smith, J. O.; Getz, W.M.

    2007-01-01

    Early theoretical work on disease invasion typically assumed large and well-mixed host populations. Many human and wildlife systems, however, have small groups with limited movement among groups. In these situations, the basic reproductive number, R0, is likely to be a poor predictor of a disease pandemic because it typically does not account for group structure and movement of individuals among groups. We extend recent work by combining the movement of hosts, transmission within groups, recovery from infection and the recruitment of new susceptibles into a stochastic model of disease in a host metapopulation. We focus on how recruitment of susceptibles affects disease invasion and how population structure can affect the frequency of superspreading events (SSEs). We show that the frequency of SSEs may decrease with the reduced movement and the group sizes due to the limited number of susceptible individuals available. Classification tree analysis of the model results illustrates the hierarchical nature of disease invasion in host metapopulations. First, the pathogen must effectively transmit within a group (R0 > 1), and then the pathogen must persist within a group long enough to allow for movement among the groups. Therefore, the factors affecting disease persistence - such as infectious period, group size and recruitment of new susceptibles - are as important as the local transmission rates in predicting the spread of pathogens across a metapopulation. ?? 2006 The Royal Society.

  5. Long-term immune responses and comparative effectiveness of one or two doses of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) in HIV-positive adults in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Aristine; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Tsai, Mao-Song; Su, Yi-Ching; Liu, Wen-Chun; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection impairs maintenance of immunological memory, yet few studies of HIV-positive adults receiving 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) have followed them beyond the first year. We determined and compared the durability of serological responses and the clinical outcomes of HIV-positive adults annually for five years following vaccination with one or two doses of PCV7. Methods In this non-randomized clinical trial, 221 pneumococcal vaccine-naïve HIV-positive adults receiving one (n=109) or two doses four weeks apart (n=112) of PCV7 between 2008 and 2010 were longitudinally followed for evaluation of significant serological response and for episodes of pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease. Results At the time of vaccination, the two groups were well matched for age, risk factors, combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) coverage, CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA load (PVL). At the end of five years, the CD4 counts for the one- and two-dose groups had increased from 407 and 406 to 550 and 592 cells/µL, respectively, and 82.4 and 81.6% of the participants had fully suppressed PVL. Significant immune responses to ≥2 serotypes persisted for 67.9 vs 78.6%, 64.2 vs 71.4%, 66.1 vs 71.4%, 57.8 vs 69.6% in the second, third, fourth and fifth years after one and two doses of PCV7 in the intention-to-treat analysis, respectively. In multivariate analysis, immunization with two doses of PCV7 (odds ratio (OR) 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.10 to 2.65, p=0.016), concurrent cART (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.16 to 4.00, p=0.015) and CD4 proliferation (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.27, p=0.031) were predictive of persistent serological responses in the fifth year. Only one patient in the one-dose group had documented pneumococcal pneumonia (non-bacteraemic) and none had invasive pneumococcal disease in the 6.5 years of follow-up. Conclusions One or two doses of PCV7 achieve durable seroprotective responses in HIV-treated participants; however, two

  6. [2011 news in infections diseases: selected readings].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, J-D; Christin, L

    2012-01-11

    A study published in 1998 linking MMR vaccine and autism was recently retracted by the Lancet because the data were falsified. The impressive reduction of invasive pneumococcal diseases with the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine is due to a more than 90% reduction in rates of infections due to vaccinal serotypes at the expense of a slight increase in non-vaccinal serotypes. Genes encoding resistance factors to several antibiotic classes were detected in 30000-year-old samples. New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase 1 was frequently detected in street water in New Dehli. Azithromycin decreased COPD exacerbations in a select group of patients with COPD at the cost of more frequent small decrements in hearing. Cranberry juice did not prevent recurrent urinary tract infections. Some patients with persistent symptoms after Lyme disease had higher levels of anti-Borrelia antibodies than cured patients. PMID:22303737

  7. Serological diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia using protein antigens: A study of cut-offs with positive and negative controls.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dafne Carvalho; Borges, Igor Carmo; Ivaska, Lauri; Peltola, Ville; Meinke, Andreas; Barral, Aldina; Käyhty, Helena; Ruuskanen, Olli; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria

    2016-06-01

    The etiological diagnosis of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae in children is difficult, and the use of indirect techniques is frequently warranted. We aimed to study the use of pneumococcal proteins for the serological diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia. We analyzed paired serum samples from 13 Brazilian children with invasive pneumococcal pneumonia (positive control group) and 23 Finnish children with viral pharyngitis (negative control group), all aged <5years-old. Children with pharyngitis were evaluated for oropharyngeal colonization, and none of them carried S. pneumoniae. We used a multiplex bead-based assay with eight proteins: Ply, CbpA, PspA1 and 2, PcpA, PhtD, StkP and PcsB. The optimal cut-off for increase in antibody level for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection was determined for each antigen by ROC curve analysis. The positive control group had a significantly higher rate of ≥2-fold rise in antibody levels against all pneumococcal proteins, except Ply, compared to the negative controls. The cut-off of ≥2-fold increase in antibody levels was accurate for pneumococcal infection diagnosis for all investigated antigens. However, there was a substantial increase in the accuracy of the test with a cut-off of ≥1.52-fold rise in antibody levels for PcpA. When using the investigated protein antigens for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection, the detection of response against at least one antigen was highly sensitive (92.31%) and specific (91.30%). The use of serology with pneumococcal proteins is a promising method for the diagnosis of pneumococcal infection in children with pneumonia. The use of a ≥2-fold increase cut-off is adequate for most pneumococcal proteins. PMID:26928648

  8. Non-Invasive Therapy of Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Marcial, José M; Pérez, Reynerio; Vargas, Pedro; Franqui-Rivera, Hilton

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Lifestyle changes, like the cessation of the use of tobacco as well as a modification of dietary and exercise habits, can be the most cost-effective interventions in patients with PAD. Smocking cessation is the most important intervention, since it increases survival in these patients. Antiplatelet therapy is an essential component in the treatment of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower extremities. In addition to delaying arterial obstructive progression, these agents are most usefull in reducing adverse cardiovascular events such as non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and vascular death. Mainstay of treatment continues to be aspirin monotherapy (75-325mg daily). Current treatment for lower extremity PAD is directed towards the relief of symptoms and improvement in QoL. The two agents which have consistently been found to be most efficient in achieving these goals are cilostazol and naftidrofuryl oxalate. Naftidrofuryl oxalate may emerge as the most efficient and cost-effective treatment for symptom relief. PMID:26742197

  9. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Pneumococcal Serotyping on Isolates and Nasopharyngeal Samples

    PubMed Central

    Pholwat, Suporn; Sakai, Fuminori; Turner, Paul; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both a commensal and a major pathogen that causes invasive disease in people of all ages. The introduction of serotype-specific pneumococcal vaccines has reduced the burden of disease but has also led to replacement with new strains; thus, serotyping remains important for vaccine-related disease surveillance. Conventional serotyping methods are laborious and expensive. We developed an easy-to-perform genotypic TaqMan array card (TAC) to identify S. pneumoniae strains, including lytA-based sequences, and 53 sequence-specific PCRs to identify 74 serotypes/serogroups covering all current vaccine types as well as prevalent nonvaccine types. The TAC method was evaluated on 146 clinical S. pneumoniae isolates and 13 nonpneumococcal species that naturally inhabit the upper respiratory tract and yielded 97% (142/146) sensitivity and 100% (13/13) specificity versus results of standard Quellung serotyping. The calculated limit of detection was 20 to 200 fg (∼8 to 84 genome equivalents) per reaction. On 23 blinded nasopharyngeal specimens that were pneumococcus culture positive, the TAC pan-pneumococcus lytA assay was positive in 21 (91% sensitivity versus culture). On TAC lytA-positive specimens, a serotype result was obtained on 86%, and the result was 95% accurate versus the subsequent culture's Quellung result. TAC also detected mixed serotypes in two specimens where Quellung detected only the predominant serotype. This TAC method yields fast and comprehensive serotyping compared to the standard method and may be useful on direct specimens. PMID:27170020

  10. Comparative simulation of pneumococcal serogroup 19 polysaccharide repeating units with two carbohydrate force fields.

    PubMed

    Kuttel, Michelle; Gordon, Marc; Ravenscroft, Neil

    2014-05-22

    Streptococcus pneumoniae causes meningitis, pneumonia and severe invasive disease (IPD) in young children. Although widespread infant immunisation with the PCV7 seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine has led to a dramatic decrease in IPD, infections due to non-vaccine serotypes, particularly serotype 19A, have increased. As the 19F polysaccharide differs from 19A at a single linkage position, it was assumed that PCV7 (containing 19F) would cross-protect against 19A disease. However, vaccination with PCV7 results in only 26% effectiveness against IPD caused by 19A. We explored the conformations and dynamics of the polysaccharide repeating units from serotypes 19F and 19A, comparing free energy surfaces for glycosidic linkages with 100ns aqueous molecular dynamics simulations of the di- and trisaccharide components. All calculations were performed with both the CHARMM and the GLYCAM carbohydrate force fields to establish whether the choice of model affects the predicted molecular behaviour. Although we identified key differences between the force fields, overall they were in agreement in predicting a 19F repeating unit with a wider range of conformation families than the more restricted 19A trisaccharide. This suggests a probable conformational difference between the 19F and 19A polysaccharides, which may explain the low cross-protection of 19F vaccines against 19A disease.

  11. Development of a TaqMan Array Card for Pneumococcal Serotyping on Isolates and Nasopharyngeal Samples.

    PubMed

    Pholwat, Suporn; Sakai, Fuminori; Turner, Paul; Vidal, Jorge E; Houpt, Eric R

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is both a commensal and a major pathogen that causes invasive disease in people of all ages. The introduction of serotype-specific pneumococcal vaccines has reduced the burden of disease but has also led to replacement with new strains; thus, serotyping remains important for vaccine-related disease surveillance. Conventional serotyping methods are laborious and expensive. We developed an easy-to-perform genotypic TaqMan array card (TAC) to identify S. pneumoniae strains, including lytA-based sequences, and 53 sequence-specific PCRs to identify 74 serotypes/serogroups covering all current vaccine types as well as prevalent nonvaccine types. The TAC method was evaluated on 146 clinical S. pneumoniae isolates and 13 nonpneumococcal species that naturally inhabit the upper respiratory tract and yielded 97% (142/146) sensitivity and 100% (13/13) specificity versus results of standard Quellung serotyping. The calculated limit of detection was 20 to 200 fg (∼8 to 84 genome equivalents) per reaction. On 23 blinded nasopharyngeal specimens that were pneumococcus culture positive, the TAC pan-pneumococcus lytA assay was positive in 21 (91% sensitivity versus culture). On TAC lytA-positive specimens, a serotype result was obtained on 86%, and the result was 95% accurate versus the subsequent culture's Quellung result. TAC also detected mixed serotypes in two specimens where Quellung detected only the predominant serotype. This TAC method yields fast and comprehensive serotyping compared to the standard method and may be useful on direct specimens. PMID:27170020

  12. Invasive honeysuckle eradication reduces tick-borne disease risk by altering host dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Allan, Brian F.; Dutra, Humberto P.; Goessling, Lisa S.; Barnett, Kirk; Chase, Jonathan M.; Marquis, Robert J.; Pang, Genevieve; Storch, Gregory A.; Thach, Robert E.; Orrock, John L.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the ubiquity of invasive organisms and their often deleterious effects on native flora and fauna, the consequences of biological invasions for human health and the ecological mechanisms through which they occur are rarely considered. Here we demonstrate that a widespread invasive shrub in North America, Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii), increases human risk of exposure to ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease caused by bacterial pathogens transmitted by the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Using large-scale observational surveys in natural areas across the St. Louis, Missouri region, we found that white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), a preeminent tick host and pathogen reservoir, more frequently used areas invaded by honeysuckle. This habitat preference translated into considerably greater numbers of ticks infected with pathogens in honeysuckle-invaded areas relative to adjacent honeysuckle-uninvaded areas. We confirmed this biotic mechanism using an experimental removal of honeysuckle, which caused a decrease in deer activity and infected tick numbers, as well as a proportional shift in the blood meals of ticks away from deer. We conclude that disease risk is likely to be reduced when honeysuckle is eradicated, and suggest that management of biological invasions may help ameliorate the burden of vector-borne diseases on human health. PMID:20937859

  13. Invasive honeysuckle eradication reduces tick-borne disease risk by altering host dynamics.

    PubMed

    Allan, Brian F; Dutra, Humberto P; Goessling, Lisa S; Barnett, Kirk; Chase, Jonathan M; Marquis, Robert J; Pang, Genevieve; Storch, Gregory A; Thach, Robert E; Orrock, John L

    2010-10-26

    Despite the ubiquity of invasive organisms and their often deleterious effects on native flora and fauna, the consequences of biological invasions for human health and the ecological mechanisms through which they occur are rarely considered. Here we demonstrate that a widespread invasive shrub in North America, Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii), increases human risk of exposure to ehrlichiosis, an emerging infectious disease caused by bacterial pathogens transmitted by the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum). Using large-scale observational surveys in natural areas across the St. Louis, Missouri region, we found that white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), a preeminent tick host and pathogen reservoir, more frequently used areas invaded by honeysuckle. This habitat preference translated into considerably greater numbers of ticks infected with pathogens in honeysuckle-invaded areas relative to adjacent honeysuckle-uninvaded areas. We confirmed this biotic mechanism using an experimental removal of honeysuckle, which caused a decrease in deer activity and infected tick numbers, as well as a proportional shift in the blood meals of ticks away from deer. We conclude that disease risk is likely to be reduced when honeysuckle is eradicated, and suggest that management of biological invasions may help ameliorate the burden of vector-borne diseases on human health. PMID:20937859

  14. Invasion of the lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis: implications for Borrelia burgdorferi endemicity.

    PubMed

    Hamer, Sarah A; Tsao, Jean I; Walker, Edward D; Hickling, Graham J

    2010-08-01

    Lyme disease risk is increasing in the United States due in part to the spread of blacklegged ticks Ixodes scapularis, the principal vector of the spirochetal pathogen Borrelia burgdorferi. A 5-year study was undertaken to investigate hypothesized coinvasion of I. scapularis and B. burgdorferi in Lower Michigan. We tracked the spatial and temporal dynamics of the tick and spirochete using mammal, bird, and vegetation drag sampling at eight field sites along coastal and inland transects originating in a zone of recent I. scapularis establishment. We document northward invasion of these ticks along Michigan's west coast during the study period; this pattern was most evident in ticks removed from rodents. B. burgdorferi infection prevalences in I. scapularis sampled from vegetation in the invasion zone were 9.3% and 36.6% in nymphs and adults, respectively, with the majority of infection (95.1%) found at the most endemic site. There was no evidence of I. scapularis invasion along the inland transect; however, low-prevalence B. burgdorferi infection was detected in other tick species and in wildlife at inland sites, and at northern coastal sites in years before the arrival of I. scapularis. These infections suggest that cryptic B. burgdorferi transmission by other vector-competent tick species is occurring in the absence of I. scapularis. Other Borrelia spirochetes, including those that group with B. miyamotoi and B. andersonii, were present at a low prevalence within invading ticks and local wildlife. Reports of Lyme disease have increased significantly in the invasion zone in recent years. This rapid blacklegged tick invasion--measurable within 5 years--in combination with cryptic pathogen maintenance suggests a complex ecology of Lyme disease emergence in which wildlife sentinels can provide an early warning of disease emergence.

  15. Effects of climate change, invasive species, and disease on the distribution of native European crayfishes.

    PubMed

    Capinha, César; Larson, Eric R; Tricarico, Elena; Olden, Julian D; Gherardi, Francesca

    2013-08-01

    Climate change will require species to adapt to new conditions or follow preferred climates to higher latitudes or elevations, but many dispersal-limited freshwater species may be unable to move due to barriers imposed by watershed boundaries. In addition, invasive nonnative species may expand into new regions under future climate conditions and contribute to the decline of native species. We evaluated future distributions for the threatened European crayfish fauna in response to climate change, watershed boundaries, and the spread of invasive crayfishes, which transmit the crayfish plague, a lethal disease for native European crayfishes. We used climate projections from general circulation models and statistical models based on Mahalanobis distance to predict climate-suitable regions for native and invasive crayfishes in the middle and at the end of the 21st century. We identified these suitable regions as accessible or inaccessible on the basis of major watershed boundaries and present occurrences and evaluated potential future overlap with 3 invasive North American crayfishes. Climate-suitable areas decreased for native crayfishes by 19% to 72%, and the majority of future suitable areas for most of these species were inaccessible relative to native and current distributions. Overlap with invasive crayfish plague-transmitting species was predicted to increase. Some native crayfish species (e.g., noble crayfish [Astacus astacus]) had no future refugia that were unsuitable for the modeled nonnative species. Our results emphasize the importance of preventing additional introductions and spread of invasive crayfishes in Europe to minimize interactions between the multiple stressors of climate change and invasive species, while suggesting candidate regions for the debatable management option of assisted colonization.

  16. Streptococcus pneumoniae biofilm formation and dispersion during colonization and disease

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yashuan; Marks, Laura R.; Pettigrew, Melinda M.; Hakansson, Anders P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is a common colonizer of the human nasopharynx. Despite a low rate of invasive disease, the high prevalence of colonization results in millions of infections and over one million deaths per year, mostly in individuals under the age of 5 and the elderly. Colonizing pneumococci form well-organized biofilm communities in the nasopharyngeal environment, but the specific role of biofilms and their interaction with the host during colonization and disease is not yet clear. Pneumococci in biofilms are highly resistant to antimicrobial agents and this phenotype can be recapitulated when pneumococci are grown on respiratory epithelial cells under conditions found in the nasopharyngeal environment. Pneumococcal biofilms display lower levels of virulence in vivo and provide an optimal environment for increased genetic exchange both in vitro and in vivo, with increased natural transformation seen during co-colonization with multiple strains. Biofilms have also been detected on mucosal surfaces during pneumonia and middle ear infection, although the role of these biofilms in the disease process is debated. Recent studies have shown that changes in the nasopharyngeal environment caused by concomitant virus infection, changes in the microflora, inflammation, or other host assaults trigger active release of pneumococci from biofilms. These dispersed bacteria have distinct phenotypic properties and transcriptional profiles different from both biofilm and broth-grown, planktonic bacteria, resulting in a significantly increased virulence in vivo. In this review we discuss the properties of pneumococcal biofilms, the role of biofilm formation during pneumococcal colonization, including their propensity for increased ability to exchange genetic material, as well as mechanisms involved in transition from asymptomatic biofilm colonization to dissemination and disease of otherwise sterile sites. Greater understanding of pneumococcal biofilm

  17. Advance market commitment for pneumococcal vaccines: putting theory into practice.

    PubMed

    Cernuschi, Tania; Furrer, Eliane; Schwalbe, Nina; Jones, Andrew; Berndt, Ernst R; McAdams, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Markets for life-saving vaccines do not often generate the most desired outcomes from a public health perspective in terms of product quantity, quality, affordability, programmatic suitability and/or sustainability for use in the lowest income countries. The perceived risks and uncertainties about sustainably funded demand from developing countries often leads to underinvestment in development and manufacturing of appropriate products. The pilot initiative Advance Market Commitment (AMC) for pneumococcal vaccines, launched in 2009, aims to remove some of these market risks by providing a legally binding forward commitment to purchase vaccines according to predetermined terms. To date, 14 countries have already introduced pneumococcal vaccines through the AMC with a further 39 countries expected to introduce before the end of 2013.This paper describes early lessons learnt on the selection of a target disease and the core design choices for the pilot AMC. It highlights the challenges faced with tailoring the AMC design to the specific supply situation of pneumococcal vaccines. It points to the difficulty - and the AMC's apparent early success - in establishing a long-term, credible commitment in a constantly changing unpredictable environment. It highlights one of the inherent challenges of the AMC: its dependence on continuous donor funding to ensure long-term purchases of products. The paper examines alternative design choices and aims to provide a starting point to inform discussions and encourage debate about the potential application of the AMC concept to other fields.

  18. Modelling within-Host Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Invasive Bacterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Andrew J; Restif, Olivier; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Sheppard, Mark; Maskell, Duncan J; Mastroeni, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    Mechanistic determinants of bacterial growth, death, and spread within mammalian hosts cannot be fully resolved studying a single bacterial population. They are also currently poorly understood. Here, we report on the application of sophisticated experimental approaches to map spatiotemporal population dynamics of bacteria during an infection. We analyzed heterogeneous traits of simultaneous infections with tagged Salmonella enterica populations (wild-type isogenic tagged strains [WITS]) in wild-type and gene-targeted mice. WITS are phenotypically identical but can be distinguished and enumerated by quantitative PCR, making it possible, using probabilistic models, to estimate bacterial death rate based on the disappearance of strains through time. This multidisciplinary approach allowed us to establish the timing, relative occurrence, and immune control of key infection parameters in a true host–pathogen combination. Our analyses support a model in which shortly after infection, concomitant death and rapid bacterial replication lead to the establishment of independent bacterial subpopulations in different organs, a process controlled by host antimicrobial mechanisms. Later, decreased microbial mortality leads to an exponential increase in the number of bacteria that spread locally, with subsequent mixing of bacteria between organs via bacteraemia and further stochastic selection. This approach provides us with an unprecedented outlook on the pathogenesis of S. enterica infections, illustrating the complex spatial and stochastic effects that drive an infectious disease. The application of the novel method that we present in appropriate and diverse host–pathogen combinations, together with modelling of the data that result, will facilitate a comprehensive view of the spatial and stochastic nature of within-host dynamics. PMID:18399718

  19. Direct Ex-Vivo Evaluation of Pneumococcal Specific T-Cells in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Aamir; Chapel, Helen; Ogg, Graham

    2011-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is an encapsulated bacterium that causes significant global morbidity and mortality. The nasopharynxes of children are believed to be the natural reservoir of pneumococcus and by adulthood nasopharyngeal carriage is infrequent; such infrequency may be due to demonstrable pneumococcal specific T and B-cell responses. HLA Class 2 tetrameric complexes have been used to characterise antigen specific T-cell responses in a variety of models of infection. We therefore sought to determine the frequency and phenotype of pneumococcal specific T-cells, using a novel HLA-DRB1*1501 tetramer complex incorporating a recently defined T-cell epitope derived from the conserved pneumococcal serine/threonine kinase (StkP). We were able to detect direct ex-vivo StkP446–60-tetramer binding in HLA-DRB1*1501 adults. These StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells had increased CD38 expression and were enriched in CCR7- CD45RA+ expression indicating recent and on-going activation and differentiation. Furthermore, these StkP446–60-tetramer binding T-cells demonstrated rapid effector function by secreting interferon-gamma on stimulation with recombinant StkP. This is the first study to directly enumerate and characterise pneumococcal specific T-cells using HLA class 2 tetrameric complexes. We found that ex-vivo pneumococcal-specific T cells were detectable in healthy adults and that they were enriched with cell surface markers associated with recent antigen exposure and later stages of antigen-driven differentiation. It is likely that these activated pneumococcal specific T-cells reflect recent immunostimulatory pneumococcal exposure in the nasopharynx and it is possible that they may be preventing subsequent colonisation and disease. PMID:22039412

  20. Invasive meningococcal disease in the 21st century—an update for the clinician.

    PubMed

    Dwilow, Rachel; Fanella, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    Neisseria meningitidis is a gram-negative diplococcus, for which humans are the only reservoir. While colonization is common, invasive meningococcal disease in the form of meningitis or bacteremia can be devastating and potentially fatal. Certain populations are at higher risk for disease including infants, adolescents, those with asplenia or complement deficiencies, and potentially those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Use of conjugate meningococcal vaccines has impacted disease epidemiology in both high- and low-income countries. Outbreaks of serogroup B disease at university campuses have drawn further attention to the recent development of a novel serogroup B vaccine now approved in many countries. This review covers key aspects of the pathogenesis and management of meningococcal disease, as well as the very recent developments in disease epidemiology, outbreaks, and the evolution of meningococcal immunizations. PMID:25637287

  1. Capsules of virulent pneumococcal serotypes enhance formation of neutrophil extracellular traps during in vivo pathogenesis of pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Moorthy, Anandi Narayana; Rai, Prashant; Jiao, Huipeng; Wang, Shi; Tan, Kong Bing; Qin, Liang; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Zhang, Yongliang; Teluguakula, Narasaraju; Chow, Vincent Tak Kwong

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are released by activated neutrophils to ensnare and kill microorganisms. NETs have been implicated in tissue injury since they carry cytotoxic components of the activated neutrophils. We have previously demonstrated the generation of NETs in infected murine lungs during both primary pneumococcal pneumonia and secondary pneumococcal pneumonia after primary influenza. In this study, we assessed the correlation of pneumococcal capsule size with pulmonary NETs formation and disease severity. We compared NETs formation in the lungs of mice infected with three pneumococcal strains of varying virulence namely serotypes 3, 4 and 19F, as well as a capsule-deficient mutant of serotype 4. In primary pneumonia, NETs generation was strongly associated with the pneumococcal capsule thickness, and was proportional to the disease severity. Interestingly, during secondary pneumonia after primary influenza infection, intense pulmonary NETs generation together with elevated myeloperoxidase activity and cytokine dysregulation determined the disease severity. These findings highlight the crucial role played by the size of pneumococcal capsule in determining the extent of innate immune responses such as NETs formation that may contribute to the severity of pneumonia. PMID:27034012

  2. Invasive Group B Streptococcal Disease in South Africa: Importance of Surveillance Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Meiring, Susan; Cutland, Clare L.; Schrag, Stephanie J.; Madhi, Shabir A.

    2016-01-01

    Data on neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) invasive disease burden are needed to refine prevention policies. Differences in surveillance methods and investigating for cases can lead to varying disease burden estimates. We compared the findings of laboratory-based passive surveillance for GBS disease across South Africa, and for one of the provinces compared this to a real-time, systematic, clinical surveillance in a population-defined region in Johannesburg, Soweto. Passive surveillance identified a total of 799 early-onset disease (EOD, <7 days age) and 818 LOD (late onset disease, 7–89 days age) cases nationwide. The passive surveillance provincial incidence varied for EOD (range 0.00 to 1.23/1000 live births), and was 0.03 to 1.04/1000 live births for LOD. The passive surveillance rates for Soweto, were not significantly different compared to those from the systematic surveillance (EOD 1.23 [95%CI 1.06–1.43] vs. 1.50 [95%CI 1.30–1.71], respectively, rate ratio 0.82 [95%CI 0.67–1.01]; LOD 1.04 [95% CI 0.90–1.23] vs. 1.22 [95%CI 1.05–1.42], rate ratio 0.85 [95% CI 0.68–1.07]). A review of the few cases missed in the passive system in Soweto, suggested that missing key identifiers, such as date of birth, resulted in their omission during the electronic data extraction process. Our analysis suggests that passive surveillance provides a modestly lower estimate of invasive GBS rates compared to real time sentinel-site systematic surveillance, however, this is unlikely to be the reason for the provincial variability in incidence of invasive GBS disease in South Africa. This, possibly reflects that invasive GBS disease goes undiagnosed due to issues related to access to healthcare, poor laboratory capacity and varying diagnostic procedures or empiric antibiotic treatment of neonates with suspected sepsis in the absence of attempting to making a microbiological diagnosis. An efficacious GBS vaccine for pregnant women, when available, could be used as a

  3. Invasive Group B Streptococcal Disease in South Africa: Importance of Surveillance Methodology.

    PubMed

    Quan, Vanessa; Verani, Jennifer R; Cohen, Cheryl; von Gottberg, Anne; Meiring, Susan; Cutland, Clare L; Schrag, Stephanie J; Madhi, Shabir A

    2016-01-01

    Data on neonatal group B streptococcal (GBS) invasive disease burden are needed to refine prevention policies. Differences in surveillance methods and investigating for cases can lead to varying disease burden estimates. We compared the findings of laboratory-based passive surveillance for GBS disease across South Africa, and for one of the provinces compared this to a real-time, systematic, clinical surveillance in a population-defined region in Johannesburg, Soweto. Passive surveillance identified a total of 799 early-onset disease (EOD, <7 days age) and 818 LOD (late onset disease, 7-89 days age) cases nationwide. The passive surveillance provincial incidence varied for EOD (range 0.00 to 1.23/1000 live births), and was 0.03 to 1.04/1000 live births for LOD. The passive surveillance rates for Soweto, were not significantly different compared to those from the systematic surveillance (EOD 1.23 [95%CI 1.06-1.43] vs. 1.50 [95%CI 1.30-1.71], respectively, rate ratio 0.82 [95%CI 0.67-1.01]; LOD 1.04 [95% CI 0.90-1.23] vs. 1.22 [95%CI 1.05-1.42], rate ratio 0.85 [95% CI 0.68-1.07]). A review of the few cases missed in the passive system in Soweto, suggested that missing key identifiers, such as date of birth, resulted in their omission during the electronic data extraction process. Our analysis suggests that passive surveillance provides a modestly lower estimate of invasive GBS rates compared to real time sentinel-site systematic surveillance, however, this is unlikely to be the reason for the provincial variability in incidence of invasive GBS disease in South Africa. This, possibly reflects that invasive GBS disease goes undiagnosed due to issues related to access to healthcare, poor laboratory capacity and varying diagnostic procedures or empiric antibiotic treatment of neonates with suspected sepsis in the absence of attempting to making a microbiological diagnosis. An efficacious GBS vaccine for pregnant women, when available, could be used as a probe to better

  4. Non-invasive Diagnosis of Fibrosis in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Anil; Sharma, Praveen

    2012-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease in developed as well as in developing countries. Its prevalence continues to rise currently affecting approximately 20-30% of adults and 10% of children in the United States. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease represents a wide spectrum of conditions ranging from fatty liver, which in general follows a benign non-progressive clinical course, to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a more serious form of NAFLD that may progress to cirrhosis and end-stage liver disease. Liver biopsy remains the gold standard for evaluating the degree of hepatic necroinflammation and fibrosis; however, several non-invasive investigations, such as serum biomarkers, have been developed to establish the diagnosis and also to evaluate treatment response. There has been a substantial development of non-invasive risk scores, biomarker panels, and radiological modalities to identify at risk patients with NAFLD without recourse to liver biopsy on a routine basis. Examples include combination of serum markers like NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS), BARD score, fibrometer, FIB4, and non-invasive tools like fibroscan which assess fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. Other markers of fibrosis that have been evaluated include high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, plasma pentraxin 3, interleukin-6, and cytokeratin-18. This review focuses on the methods currently available in daily clinical practice in hepatology and touches briefly on the potential future markers under investigation. PMID:25755423

  5. Immunization with Pneumococcal Surface Protein K of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae Provides Protection in a Mouse Model of Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Lance E.; Luo, Xiao; Thornton, Justin A.; Moon, Bo Youn; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2015-01-01

    Current vaccinations are effective against encapsulated strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, but they do not protect against nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae (NESp), which is increasing in colonization and incidence of pneumococcal disease. Vaccination with pneumococcal proteins has been assessed for its ability to protect against pneumococcal disease, but several of these proteins are not expressed by NESp. Pneumococcal surface protein K (PspK), an NESp virulence factor, has not been assessed for immunogenic potential or host modulatory effects. Mammalian cytokine expression was determined in an in vivo mouse model and in an in vitro cell culture system. Systemic and mucosal mouse immunization studies were performed to determine the immunogenic potential of PspK. Murine serum and saliva were collected to quantitate specific antibody isotype responses and the ability of antibody and various proteins to inhibit epithelial cell adhesion. Host cytokine response was not reduced by PspK. NESp was able to colonize the mouse nasopharynx as effectively as encapsulated pneumococci. Systemic and mucosal immunization provided protection from colonization by PspK-positive (PspK+) NESp. Anti-PspK antibodies were recovered from immunized mice and significantly reduced the ability of NESp to adhere to human epithelial cells. A protein-based pneumococcal vaccine is needed to provide broad protection against encapsulated and nonencapsulated pneumococci in an era of increasing antibiotic resistance and vaccine escape mutants. We demonstrate that PspK may serve as an NESp target for next-generation pneumococcal vaccines. Immunization with PspK protected against pneumococcal colonization, which is requisite for pneumococcal disease. PMID:26311246

  6. Optimizing Outcomes in Immunocompromised Hosts: Understanding the Role of Immunotherapy in Invasive Fungal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Sharada; Win, Mar Soe; Chai, Louis Yi Ann

    2015-01-01

    A major global concern is the emergence and spread of systemic life-threatening fungal infections in critically ill patients. The increase in invasive fungal infections, caused most commonly by Candida and Aspergillus species, occurs in patients with impaired defenses due to a number of reasons such as underlying disease, the use of chemotherapeutic and immunosuppressive agents, broad-spectrum antibiotics, prosthetic devices and grafts, burns, neutropenia and HIV infection. The high morbidity and mortality associated with these infections is compounded by the limited therapeutic options and the emergence of drug resistant fungi. Hence, creative approaches to bridge the significant gap in antifungal drug development needs to be explored. Here, we review the potential anti-fungal targets for patient-centered therapies and immune-enhancing strategies for the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal diseases. PMID:26635780

  7. Methods and challenges in measuring the impact of national pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccine introduction on morbidity and mortality in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Zeev, Naor; Kapanda, Lester; King, Carina; Beard, James; Phiri, Tambosi; Mvula, Hazzie; Crampin, Amelia C.; Mwansambo, Charles; Costello, Anthony; Parashar, Umesh; Tate, Jacqueline E.; Verani, Jennifer R.; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Heyderman, Robert S.; Cunliffe, Nigel A.; French, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background Pneumonia and gastroenteritis are leading causes of vaccine-preventable childhood morbidity and mortality. Malawi introduced pneumococcal conjugate and rotavirus vaccines to the immunisation programme in 2011 and 2012, respectively. Evaluating their effectiveness is vital to ensure optimal implementation and justify sustained investment. Methods/Design A national evaluation platform was established to determine vaccine effectiveness and impact in Malawi. Impact and effectiveness against vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease, radiological pneumonia and rotavirus gastroenteritis are investigated using before-after incidence comparisons and case-control designs, respectively. Mortality is assessed using a prospective population cohort. Cost-effectiveness evaluation is nested within the case-control studies. We describe platform characteristics including strengths and weaknesses for conducting vaccine evaluations. Discussion Integrating data from individual level and ecological methods across multiple sites provides comprehensive information for policymakers on programme impact and vaccine effectiveness including changes in serotype/genotype distribution over time. Challenges to robust vaccine evaluation in real-world conditions include: vaccination ascertainment; pre-existing rapid decline in mortality and pneumococcal disease in the context of non-vaccine interventions; and the maintenance of completeness and quality of reporting at scale and over time. In observational non-randomised designs ascertainment of vaccine status may be biased particularly in infants with fatal outcomes. In the context of multiple population level interventions targeting study endpoints attribution of reduced incidence to vaccine impact may be flawed. Providing evidence from several independent but complementary studies will provide the greatest confidence in assigning impact. Welcome declines in disease incidence and in child mortality make accrual of required sample sizes

  8. Prognostic value of non-invasive stress testing for coronary artery disease in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Bigvava, Tamar; Zamani, Seyedeh Mahsa; Pieske-Kraigher, Elisabeth; Gebker, Rolf; Pieske, Burkert; Kelle, Sebastian

    2015-12-01

    Detecting coronary artery disease (CAD) in obese patients remains a challenge but can have substantial prognostic implications for this patient group. Until now, sufficient data was not available on which to base the selection of the imaging modality in obese patients. The decision on which imaging modality to use should therefore follow the general guidelines. In this article, the authors discuss the prognostic value of the different non-invasive stress testing methods for CAD in obese patients.

  9. Disease Progression in Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria Is Linked to Variation in Invasion Gene Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Divis, Paul C.; Siner, Angela; Zainudin, Ramlah; Wong, Ing Tien; Lu, Chan Woon; Singh-Khaira, Sarina K.; Millar, Scott B.; Lynch, Sean; Willmann, Matthias; Singh, Balbir; Krishna, Sanjeev; Cox-Singh, Janet

    2014-01-01

    Emerging pathogens undermine initiatives to control the global health impact of infectious diseases. Zoonotic malaria is no exception. Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite of Southeast Asian macaques, has entered the human population. P. knowlesi, like Plasmodium falciparum, can reach high parasitaemia in human infections, and the World Health Organization guidelines for severe malaria list hyperparasitaemia among the measures of severe malaria in both infections. Not all patients with P. knowlesi infections develop hyperparasitaemia, and it is important to determine why. Between isolate variability in erythrocyte invasion, efficiency seems key. Here we investigate the idea that particular alleles of two P. knowlesi erythrocyte invasion genes, P. knowlesi normocyte binding protein Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb, influence parasitaemia and human disease progression. Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb reference DNA sequences were generated from five geographically and temporally distinct P. knowlesi patient isolates. Polymorphic regions of each gene (approximately 800 bp) were identified by haplotyping 147 patient isolates at each locus. Parasitaemia in the study cohort was associated with markers of disease severity including liver and renal dysfunction, haemoglobin, platelets and lactate, (r = ≥0.34, p = <0.0001 for all). Seventy-five and 51 Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb haplotypes were resolved in 138 (94%) and 134 (92%) patient isolates respectively. The haplotypes formed twelve Pknbpxa and two Pknbpxb allelic groups. Patients infected with parasites with particular Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb alleles within the groups had significantly higher parasitaemia and other markers of disease severity. Our study strongly suggests that P. knowlesi invasion gene variants contribute to parasite virulence. We focused on two invasion genes, and we anticipate that additional virulent loci will be identified in pathogen genome-wide studies. The multiple sustained entries of this diverse pathogen into the

  10. Non invasive indexes for the assessment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Petta, Salvatore; Handberg, Aase; Craxì, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects about 20%-30% of the general population, and its clinical relevance arises from the fact that 20%-30% of these subjects develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a condition at risk of cirrhosis progression. In addition NAFLD, and in particular NASH patients, are also at high risk of cardiovascular alterations, suffering overall from an increased liver and no liver-related events of risk and death. At the moment liver biopsy is the gold standard for a correct evaluation of NASH and fibrosis among NAFLD patients. However, the high and increasing prevalence of NAFLD has triggered an intensive search for alternative and non-invasive methods for evaluating disease severity. Specifically we can distinguish two main groups of non-invasive methodologies, namely 'serum markers' that use clinical and/or biochemical variables, and methodologies derived from elaboration of parameters arising from liver imaging techniques. All these tools showed encouraging results, even though their utility in clinical practice in the individual patients is still under debate. Therefore further efforts are needed in order to generate non-invasive algorithms that correctly assess liver damage in NAFLD patients. In particular, it should be interesting to perform gender-specific analysis, by combining old and new tools, with the aim to generate more accurate scores. Finally we think that non-invasive scores should not only be able to correctly classify the severity of liver disease in NAFLD patients, but also predict liver and non-liver related morbidity and mortality, further acting as time-dependent markers of liver and systemic disease activity. This review summarizes the present knowledge on noninvasive diagnosis in NAFLD patients, and suggest future directions for this complex research area. PMID:23394090

  11. Disease progression in Plasmodium knowlesi malaria is linked to variation in invasion gene family members.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Atique M; Pinheiro, Miguel M; Divis, Paul C; Siner, Angela; Zainudin, Ramlah; Wong, Ing Tien; Lu, Chan Woon; Singh-Khaira, Sarina K; Millar, Scott B; Lynch, Sean; Willmann, Matthias; Singh, Balbir; Krishna, Sanjeev; Cox-Singh, Janet

    2014-08-01

    Emerging pathogens undermine initiatives to control the global health impact of infectious diseases. Zoonotic malaria is no exception. Plasmodium knowlesi, a malaria parasite of Southeast Asian macaques, has entered the human population. P. knowlesi, like Plasmodium falciparum, can reach high parasitaemia in human infections, and the World Health Organization guidelines for severe malaria list hyperparasitaemia among the measures of severe malaria in both infections. Not all patients with P. knowlesi infections develop hyperparasitaemia, and it is important to determine why. Between isolate variability in erythrocyte invasion, efficiency seems key. Here we investigate the idea that particular alleles of two P. knowlesi erythrocyte invasion genes, P. knowlesi normocyte binding protein Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb, influence parasitaemia and human disease progression. Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb reference DNA sequences were generated from five geographically and temporally distinct P. knowlesi patient isolates. Polymorphic regions of each gene (approximately 800 bp) were identified by haplotyping 147 patient isolates at each locus. Parasitaemia in the study cohort was associated with markers of disease severity including liver and renal dysfunction, haemoglobin, platelets and lactate, (r = ≥ 0.34, p =  <0.0001 for all). Seventy-five and 51 Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb haplotypes were resolved in 138 (94%) and 134 (92%) patient isolates respectively. The haplotypes formed twelve Pknbpxa and two Pknbpxb allelic groups. Patients infected with parasites with particular Pknbpxa and Pknbpxb alleles within the groups had significantly higher parasitaemia and other markers of disease severity. Our study strongly suggests that P. knowlesi invasion gene variants contribute to parasite virulence. We focused on two invasion genes, and we anticipate that additional virulent loci will be identified in pathogen genome-wide studies. The multiple sustained entries of this diverse pathogen into the human

  12. Streptococcus pneumoniae oropharyngeal colonization in school-age children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Impact of the heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine.

    PubMed

    Principi, Nicola; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Cappa, Marco; Maffeis, Claudio; Chiarelli, Franco; Bona, Gianni; Gambino, Monia; Ruggiero, Luca; Patianna, Viviana; Matteoli, Maria Cristina; Marigliano, Marco; Cipriano, Paola; Parlamento, Silvia; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) to investigate the theoretical risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in these patients and the potential protective efficacy of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs). An oropharyngeal swab was obtained from 299 patients aged 6-17 y with DM1 who were enrolled during routine clinical visits. DNA from swabs was analyzed for S. pneumoniae using real-time polymerase chain reaction. S. pneumoniae was identified in the swabs of 148 subjects (49.8%). Colonization was strictly age-related and declined significantly in the group aged ≥15 years (odds ratio [OR] 0.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.57). Carriage was also significantly influenced by sex (lower in females: OR 0.56; 95% CI, 0.35-0.91), ethnicity (less common among non-Caucasians: OR 0.34; 95% CI, 0.13-0.89), parental smoking habit (more frequent among children with at least one smoker between parents: OR 1.76; 95% CI, 0.90-2.07), and the administration of antibiotic therapy in the previous 3 months (less frequent among patients who received antibiotics: OR 0.21; 95% CI, 0.07-0.62). Multivariate analyses of the entire study population showed no association between carriage and PCV7 vaccination status. Serotypes 19F, 9V, and 4 were the most frequently identified serotypes. In conclusion, school-age children and adolescents with DM1 are frequently colonized by S. pneumoniae, and protection against pneumococcal carriage following infant and toddler vaccination was not effective after several years. Together with the need to increase vaccine uptake in all the children aged <2 years, these results suggest that PCV booster doses are needed in DM1 patients to maintain the protection offered by these vaccinations.

  13. Invasion Ability and Disease Dynamics of Environmentally Growing Opportunistic Pathogens under Outside-Host Competition

    PubMed Central

    Merikanto, Ilona; Laakso, Jouni T.; Kaitala, Veijo

    2014-01-01

    Most theories of the evolution of virulence concentrate on obligatory host-pathogen relationship. Yet, many pathogens replicate in the environment outside-host where they compete with non-pathogenic forms. Thus, replication and competition in the outside-host environment may have profound influence on the evolution of virulence and disease dynamics. These environmentally growing opportunistic pathogens are also a logical step towards obligatory pathogenicity. Efficient treatment methods against these diseases, such as columnaris disease in fishes, are lacking because of their opportunist nature. We present a novel epidemiological model in which replication and competition in the outside-host environment influences the invasion ability of a novel pathogen. We also analyze the long-term host-pathogen dynamics. Model parameterization is based on the columnaris disease, a bacterial fresh water fish disease that causes major losses in fish farms worldwide. Our model demonstrates that strong competition in the outside-host environment can prevent the invasion of a new environmentally growing opportunist pathogen and long-term disease outbreaks. PMID:25415341

  14. Insights into Parkinson's disease models and neurotoxicity using non-invasive imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Pernaute, Rosario; Jenkins, Bruce G.; Isacson, Ole

    2005-09-01

    Loss of dopamine in the nigrostriatal system causes a severe impairment in motor function in patients with Parkinson's disease and in experimental neurotoxic models of the disease. We have used non-invasive imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate in vivo the changes in the dopamine system in neurotoxic models of Parkinson's disease. In addition to classic neurotransmitter studies, in these models, it is also possible to characterize associated and perhaps pathogenic factors, such as the contribution of microglia activation and inflammatory responses to neuronal damage. Functional imaging techniques are instrumental to our understanding and modeling of disease mechanisms, which should in turn lead to development of new therapies for Parkinson's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Variation in Inflammatory Response during Pneumococcal Infection Is Influenced by Host-Pathogen Interactions but Associated with Animal Survival

    PubMed Central

    Escudero, Laura; Sylvius, Nicolas; Norman, Martin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a crucial part of innate immune responses but, if imbalanced, can lead to serious clinical conditions or even death. Cytokines regulate inflammation, and studies report their impact on clinical outcome. However, host and pathogen genetic backgrounds influence cytokine production, making it difficult to evaluate which inflammatory profiles (if any) relate to improved prognosis. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common human pathogen associated with asymptomatic nasopharyngeal carriage. Infrequently, it can lead to a wide range of diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. Studies show that both pneumococcal serotype and host genetic background affect the development of disease and contribute to variation in inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated the impact of the host and pneumococcal genetic backgrounds on pulmonary cytokine responses and their relationship to animal survival. Two inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and CBA/Ca, were infected with 10 pneumococcal strains, and the concentrations of six pulmonary cytokines were measured at 6 h and 24 h postinfection. Collected data were analyzed by principal-component analysis to identify whether there is any pattern in the observed cytokine variation. Our results show that host-pneumococcus combination was at the core of observed variation in cytokine responses, yet the resulting cytokine profile discriminated only between survivors and fatalities but not mouse or pneumococcal strains used during infection. Therefore, our results indicate that although alternative inflammatory profiles are generated during pneumococcal infection, a common pattern emerged, which determined the clinical outcome of pneumococcal infections. PMID:26787718

  16. Variation in Inflammatory Response during Pneumococcal Infection Is Influenced by Host-Pathogen Interactions but Associated with Animal Survival.

    PubMed

    Jonczyk, Magda S; Escudero, Laura; Sylvius, Nicolas; Norman, Martin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Andrew, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation is a crucial part of innate immune responses but, if imbalanced, can lead to serious clinical conditions or even death. Cytokines regulate inflammation, and studies report their impact on clinical outcome. However, host and pathogen genetic backgrounds influence cytokine production, making it difficult to evaluate which inflammatory profiles (if any) relate to improved prognosis.Streptococcus pneumonia is a common human pathogen associated with asymptomatic nasopharyngeal carriage. Infrequently, it can lead to a wide range of diseases with high morbidity and mortality rates. Studies show that both pneumococcal serotype and host genetic background affect the development of disease and contribute to variation in inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated the impact of the host and pneumococcal genetic backgrounds on pulmonary cytokine responses and their relationship to animal survival. Two inbred mouse strains, BALB/c and CBA/Ca, were infected with 10 pneumococcal strains, and the concentrations of six pulmonary cytokines were measured at 6 h and 24 h postinfection. Collected data were analyzed by principal-component analysis to identify whether there is any pattern in the observed cytokine variation. Our results show that host-pneumococcus combination was at the core of observed variation in cytokine responses, yet the resulting cytokine profile discriminated only between survivors and fatalities but not mouse or pneumococcal strains used during infection. Therefore, our results indicate that although alternative inflammatory profiles are generated during pneumococcal infection, a common pattern emerged, which determined the clinical outcome of pneumococcal infections.

  17. Sometimes There Is More Than One Puzzle on the Table: Pneumococcal Bacteremia as a New Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sheybani, Fereshte; Naderi, Hamidreza; Mirfeizi, Zahra; Erfani, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Infection is common and a leading cause of death in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). SLE is associated with a diverse spectrum of immune impairments including humoral defects and hypocomplementemia that contribute to a lupus patient's increased susceptibility to infection with encapsulated bacteria. Nonetheless, there are only few reports of severe invasive bacterial infection as the initial presentation of SLE in the literature. Here, we report a rare case of SLE presenting with pneumococcal bacteremia. Based on the high resolution chest computed tomography and the result of blood cultures, the bacteremia was assumed to be secondary to pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26798529

  18. The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Andrea L.; Huber, Victor C.; Chaussee, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses. PMID:27047460

  19. The Association between Invasive Group A Streptococcal Diseases and Viral Respiratory Tract Infections.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Andrea L; Huber, Victor C; Chaussee, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections of the upper respiratory tract are associated with a variety of invasive diseases caused by Streptococcus pyogenes, the group A streptococcus, including pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, toxic shock syndrome, and bacteremia. While these polymicrobial infections, or superinfections, are complex, progress has been made in understanding the molecular basis of disease. Areas of investigation have included the characterization of virus-induced changes in innate immunity, differences in bacterial adherence and internalization following viral infection, and the efficacy of vaccines in mitigating the morbidity and mortality of superinfections. Here, we briefly summarize viral-S. pyogenes superinfections with an emphasis on those affiliated with influenza viruses. PMID:27047460

  20. [Current aspects of invasive diseases caused by Candida and other yeast fungi].

    PubMed

    Pemán, Javier; Quindós, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Invasive candidiasis is the most common invasive fungal disease causing an unacceptably high mortality. Candida albicans remains the predominant origin, but an epidemiological shift has been described in the last decades. Some species of Candida have emerged as an important cause of severe candidaemia and can exhibit reduced susceptibility to the current antifungal agents. Candida parapsilosis has been associated with candidaemia in neonates and young adults, whereas Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei are most frequently isolated in blood cultures from older patients (>65 years). Other yeasts are becoming important causes of invasive mycoses, such as Cryptococcus, Trichosporon, Malassezia, Geotrichum or Saprochaete/Magnusiomyces. Cryptococcosis is more relevant as a cause of meningitis in HIV-infected people, but cryptococcal infections are also a clinical challenge in transplant recipients. Diagnosis remains an important problem, causing unacceptable delays in starting a correct and direct treatment. However, there are some new approaches that can help in the prompt and specific diagnosis of invasive yeast infections, such as in situ hybridisation using PNA-FISH probes, causal agent identification in blood cultures using MALDi-TOF MS, or new and rapid nucleic acids detection assays.

  1. Breath Analysis as a Potential and Non-Invasive Frontier in Disease Diagnosis: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jorge; Porto-Figueira, Priscilla; Cavaco, Carina; Taunk, Khushman; Rapole, Srikanth; Dhakne, Rahul; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu; Câmara, José S.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, a small number of diseases, particularly cardiovascular (CVDs), oncologic (ODs), neurodegenerative (NDDs), chronic respiratory diseases, as well as diabetes, form a severe burden to most of the countries worldwide. Hence, there is an urgent need for development of efficient diagnostic tools, particularly those enabling reliable detection of diseases, at their early stages, preferably using non-invasive approaches. Breath analysis is a non-invasive approach relying only on the characterisation of volatile composition of the exhaled breath (EB) that in turn reflects the volatile composition of the bloodstream and airways and therefore the status and condition of the whole organism metabolism. Advanced sampling procedures (solid-phase and needle traps microextraction) coupled with modern analytical technologies (proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry, e-noses, etc.) allow the characterisation of EB composition to an unprecedented level. However, a key challenge in EB analysis is the proper statistical analysis and interpretation of the large and heterogeneous datasets obtained from EB research. There is no standard statistical framework/protocol yet available in literature that can be used for EB data analysis towards discovery of biomarkers for use in a typical clinical setup. Nevertheless, EB analysis has immense potential towards development of biomarkers for the early disease diagnosis of diseases. PMID:25584743

  2. Recommendations for Risk Categorization and Prophylaxis of Invasive Fungal Diseases in Hematological Malignancies: A Critical Review of Evidence and Expert Opinion (TEO-4)

    PubMed Central

    Boğa, Can; Bolaman, Zahit; Çağırgan, Seçkin; Karadoğan, İhsan; Özcan, Mehmet Ali; Özkalemkaş, Fahir; Saba, Rabin; Sönmez, Mehmet; Şenol, Esin; Akan, Hamdi; Akova, Murat

    2015-01-01

    This is the last of a series of articles on invasive fungal infections prepared by opinion leaders in Turkey. The aim of these articles is to guide clinicians in managing invasive fungal diseases in hematological malignancies and stem cell transplantation based on the available best evidence in this field. The previous articles summarized the diagnosis and treatment of invasive fungal disease and this article aims to explain the risk categorization and guide the antifungal prophylaxis in invasive fungal disease. PMID:26316478

  3. Non-invasive imaging of flow and vascular function in disease of the aorta

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Matthew C.; Hundley, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    With advancements in technology and a better understanding of human cardiovascular physiology, research as well as clinical care can go beyond dimensional anatomy offered by traditional imaging and investigate aortic functional properties and the impact disease has on this function. Linking the knowledge of the histopathological changes with the alterations in aortic function observed on noninvasive imaging results in a better understanding of disease pathophysiology. Translating this to clinical medicine, these noninvasive imaging assessments of aortic function are proving to be able to diagnosis disease, better predict risk, and assess response to therapies. This review is designed to summarize the various hemodynamic measures that can characterize the aorta, the various non-invasive techniques, and applications for various disease states. PMID:26381770

  4. Non-invasive Diagnosis of Early Pulmonary Disease in PECAM Deficient Mice Using Infrared Pulse Oximetry

    PubMed Central

    Early, Merideth A.; Lishnevsky, Marta; Gilchrist, John M.; Higgins, David M.; Orme, Ian M.; Muller, William A.; Gonzalez-Juarerro, Mercedes; Schenkel, Alan R.

    2009-01-01

    Pulse oximetry is a common tool for detecting reduced pulmonary function in human interstitial lung diseases. It has not previously been used in a mouse model of interstitial lung disease. Further, Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule deficient mice rarely show symptoms until disease is advanced. Using blood oxygen saturation, different stages of disease could be identified in a non-invasive manner. These stages could be correlated to pathology. Collagen deposition, using Picrosirius Red, did correlate with blood oxygen saturation. These studies are the first to show the use of an infrared pulse oximetry system to analyze the progression of a fibrotic interstitial lung disease in a mouse model of the human diseases. Further, these studies show that an early alveolar damage/enlargement event precedes the fibrosis in this mouse model, a stage that represents the best targets for disease analysis and prevention. This stage does not have extensive collagen deposition. Most importantly, targeting this earliest stage of disease for therapeutic intervention may lead to novel treatment for human disease. PMID:19646434

  5. Fibrosis assessment: impact on current management of chronic liver disease and application of quantitative invasive tools.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Hou, Jin-Lin

    2016-05-01

    Fibrosis, a common pathogenic pathway of chronic liver disease (CLD), has long been indicated to be significantly and most importantly associated with severe prognosis. Nowadays, with remarkable advances in understanding and/or treatment of major CLDs such as hepatitis C, B, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, there is an unprecedented requirement for the diagnosis and assessment of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis in various clinical settings. Among the available approaches, liver biopsy remains the one which possibly provides the most direct and reliable information regarding fibrosis patterns and changes in the parenchyma at different clinical stages and with different etiologies. Thus, many endeavors have been undertaken for developing methodologies based on the strategy of quantitation for the invasive assessment. Here, we analyze the impact of fibrosis assessment on the CLD patient care based on the data of recent clinical studies. We discuss and update the current invasive tools regarding their technological features and potentials for the particular clinical applications. Furthermore, we propose the potential resolutions with application of quantitative invasive tools for some major issues in fibrosis assessment, which appear to be obstacles against the nowadays rapid progress in CLD medicine.

  6. Invasive Disease Due to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae among Children in Arkansas

    PubMed Central

    O'Neill, Joshua M.; St. Geme III, Joseph W.; Cutter, David; Adderson, Elisabeth E.; Anyanwu, Juliana; Jacobs, Richard F.; Schutze, Gordon E.

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we reviewed cases of invasive disease due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae among children hospitalized at Arkansas Children's Hospital from 1993 to 2001. A total of 28 cases were examined, including 21 associated with bacteremia and 4 associated with meningitis. Of the patients examined, 86% were ≤4 years of age, and 68% had underlying medical conditions. Characterization of the bacterial isolates by multilocus sequence type genotyping revealed significant overall genetic diversity, similar to the diversity in the general population structure for nontypeable H. influenzae. However, four separate pairs of isolates were closely related genetically, a relationship confirmed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and Southern hybridization studies using probes for the major H. influenzae adhesin genes. These results suggest that selected strains of nontypeable H. influenzae may have more invasive potential, especially in young children and patients with underlying medical conditions. At this point, the specific factors that contribute to enhanced virulence remain unclear. PMID:12843045

  7. Serotype IV and invasive group B Streptococcus disease in neonates, Minnesota, USA, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Ferrieri, Patricia; Lynfield, Ruth; Creti, Roberta; Flores, Aurea E

    2013-04-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of invasive disease in neonates in the United States. Surveillance of invasive GBS disease in Minnesota, USA, during 2000-2010 yielded 449 isolates from 449 infants; 257 had early-onset (EO) disease (by age 6 days) and 192 late-onset (LO) disease (180 at age 7-89 days, 12 at age 90-180 days). Isolates were characterized by capsular polysaccharide serotype and surface-protein profile; types III and Ia predominated. However, because previously uncommon serotype IV constitutes 5/31 EO isolates in 2010, twelve type IV isolates collected during 2000-2010 were studied further. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, they were classified into 3 profiles; by multilocus sequence typing, representative isolates included new sequence type 468. Resistance to clindamycin or erythromycin was detected in 4/5 serotype IV isolates. Emergence of serotype IV GBS in Minnesota highlights the need for serotype prevalence monitoring to detect trends that could affect prevention strategies.

  8. Small bowel transplantation complicated by cytomegalovirus tissue invasive disease without viremia.

    PubMed

    Avsar, Yesim; Cicinnati, Vito R; Kabar, Iyad; Wolters, Heiner; Anthoni, Christoph; Schmidt, Hartmut H J; Beckebaum, Susanne

    2014-06-01

    We report on a small bowel transplant patient, donor/recipient seropositive (D+/R+) for cytomegalovirus (CMV), with a clinical course complicated by CMV disease. Anti-CMV prophylaxis was given for 100 days. Immunosuppression consisted of alemtuzumab, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone. Five months posttransplant, CMV tissue invasive disease of the upper gastrointestinal tract was evident without the presence of viremia, tested by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Complete viral load suppression was achieved with intravenous ganciclovir, followed by valganciclovir for secondary prophylaxis. Mycophenolate mofetil and prednisolone were discontinued. Shortly thereafter the patient presented with recurrent CMV and candida esophagitis. While on ganciclovir and caspofungin, the patient developed CMV tissue invasive disease of the ileal graft, with persistent absence of viremia. Foscarnet and CMV immunoglobulin were added. Viral load declined to undetectable levels; however, clinical improvement did not occur due to occurrence of graft rejection. Despite infliximab and high dose prednisolone, graft rejection was progressive, requiring surgical explantation of the graft. This case highlights the importance of additional diagnostic tools such as endoscopy including PCR analysis of tissue samples. Extension of primary antiviral prophylaxis interval up to 6 months and prolonged retreatment for recurrent CMV disease may be useful to avoid severe CMV-related complications. PMID:24703746

  9. A Retrospective Study of the Clinical Burden of Hospitalized All-Cause and Pneumococcal Pneumonia in Canada

    PubMed Central

    McNeil, Shelly A.; Qizilbash, Nawab; Ye, Jian; Gray, Sharon; Zanotti, Giovanni; Munson, Samantha; Dartois, Nathalie; Laferriere, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Background. Routine vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae is recommended in Canada for infants, the elderly, and individuals with chronic comorbidity. National incidence and burden of all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia in Canada (excluding Quebec) were assessed. Methods. Incidence, length of stay, and case-fatality rates of hospitalized all-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia were determined for 2004–2010 using ICD-10 discharge data from the Canadian Institutes for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database. Population-at-risk data were obtained from the Statistics Canada census. Temporal changes in pneumococcal and all-cause pneumonia rates in adults ≥65 years were analyzed by logistic regression. Results. Hospitalization for all-cause pneumonia was highest in children <5 years and in adults >70 years and declined significantly from 1766/100,000 to 1537/100,000 per year in individuals aged ≥65 years (P < 0.001). Overall hospitalization for pneumococcal pneumonia also declined from 6.40/100,000 to 5.08/100,000 per year. Case-fatality rates were stable (11.6% to 12.3%). Elderly individuals had longer length of stay and higher case-fatality rates than younger groups. Conclusions. All-cause and pneumococcal pneumonia hospitalization rates declined between 2004 and 2010 in Canada (excluding Quebec). Direct and indirect effects from pediatric pneumococcal immunization may partly explain some of this decline. Nevertheless, the burden of disease from pneumonia remains high. PMID:27445530

  10. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  11. Relationship between invasion of the periodontium by periodontal pathogens and periodontal disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Luzia; Azevedo, Nuno Filipe; Felino, António; Pinto, Miguel Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial invasion of the periodontal tissues has been suggested as a relevant step in the etiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. However, its exact importance remains to be defined. The present systematic review assessed the scientific evidence concerning the relationship between the quality or quantity of periodontal microbiota in periodontal tissues and development of periodontal disease. The databases Medline-PubMed, Cochrane-CENTRAL, ISI Web of Knowledge and SCOPUS were searched, up to January 2014. Studies that reported evaluation of periodontal pathogens invasion on human tissues were selected. The screening of 440 title/abstracts elected 26 papers for full-text reading. Twenty three papers were subsequently excluded because of insufficient data or a study protocol not related to the objectives of this systematic review. All included studies were case-control studies that evaluated intracellular or adherent bacteria to epithelial cells from periodontal pockets versus healthy sulci. Study protocols presented heterogeneity regarding case and control definitions and methodological approaches for microbial identification. No consistent significant differences were found related to the presence/absence or proportion of specific periopathogens across the studies, as only one study found statistically significant differences regarding the presence of A. actinomycetemcomitans (p = 0.043), T. forsythia (P < 0.001), P. intermedia (P < 0.001), C. ochracea (P < 0.001) and C. rectus (P = 0.003) in epithelial cells from periodontal pockets vs. healthy sulci. All studies reported a larger unspecific bacterial load in or on the epithelial cells taken from a diseased site compared to a healthy sulcus. The current available data is of low to moderate quality and inconsistent mainly due to study design, poor reporting and methodological diversity. As so, there is insufficient evidence to support or exclude the invasion by periodontal pathogens as a key step in the

  12. A random six-phase switch regulates pneumococcal virulence via global epigenetic changes

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Ana Sousa; Chai, Melissa H.; Atack, John M.; Furi, Leonardo; De Ste Croix, Megan; Haigh, Richard; Trappetti, Claudia; Ogunniyi, Abiodun D.; Shewell, Lucy K.; Boitano, Matthew; Clark, Tyson A.; Korlach, Jonas; Blades, Matthew; Mirkes, Evgeny; Gorban, Alexander N.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.; Oggioni, Marco R.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus) is the world’s foremost bacterial pathogen in both morbidity and mortality. Switching between phenotypic forms (or ‘phases’) that favour asymptomatic carriage or invasive disease was first reported in 1933. Here, we show that the underlying mechanism for such phase variation consists of genetic rearrangements in a Type I restriction-modification system (SpnD39III). The rearrangements generate six alternative specificities with distinct methylation patterns, as defined by single-molecule, real-time (SMRT) methylomics. The SpnD39III variants have distinct gene expression profiles. We demonstrate distinct virulence in experimental infection and in vivo selection for switching between SpnD39III variants. SpnD39III is ubiquitous in pneumococci, indicating an essential role in its biology. Future studies must recognize the potential for switching between these heretofore undetectable, differentiated pneumococcal subpopulations in vitro and in vivo. Similar systems exist in other bacterial genera, indicating the potential for broad exploitation of epigenetic gene regulation. PMID:25268848

  13. Risk factors for the severity and mortality of pneumococcal pneumonia: Importance of premorbid patients' performance status.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Takashi; Kagiyama, Naho; Uozumi, Ryuji; Odashima, Kyuto; Kurashima, Kazuyoshi; Morita, Satoshi; Takayanagi, Noboru

    2016-10-01

    Comorbidity is known to be associated with the severity and mortality of pneumonia. The severity of each underlying disease varies, and performance status, which is known to be a prognostic factor of malignant diseases, reflects the overall patient condition as affected by his/her comorbidity and underlying diseases of various severity. We investigated whether premorbid patients' performance status is associated with the severity and mortality of pneumococcal pneumonia. This retrospective study assessed these factors in hospitalized patients suffering from pneumococcal pneumonia from 2002 to 2015. We included 424 patients aged 68.9 ± 14.1 years in the study, of which 68.9% were men. A multivariate analysis found that advanced age (≥65 years), diabetes mellitus, and poor performance status were independent factors associated with severity, whereas old pulmonary tuberculosis, poor performance status, pneumococcal bacteremia, and severe pneumonia were independent factors that were associated with non-survival. Poor performance status was associated with the severity and mortality of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:27593263

  14. Resting-state networks link invasive and noninvasive brain stimulation across diverse psychiatric and neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Michael D.; Buckner, Randy L.; Liu, Hesheng; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Lozano, Andres M.; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Brain stimulation, a therapy increasingly used for neurological and psychiatric disease, traditionally is divided into invasive approaches, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), and noninvasive approaches, such as transcranial magnetic stimulation. The relationship between these approaches is unknown, therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear, and the ideal stimulation site for a given technique is often ambiguous, limiting optimization of the stimulation and its application in further disorders. In this article, we identify diseases treated with both types of stimulation, list the stimulation sites thought to be most effective in each disease, and test the hypothesis that these sites are different nodes within the same brain network as defined by resting-state functional-connectivity MRI. Sites where DBS was effective were functionally connected to sites where noninvasive brain stimulation was effective across diseases including depression, Parkinson's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder, essential tremor, addiction, pain, minimally conscious states, and Alzheimer’s disease. A lack of functional connectivity identified sites where stimulation was ineffective, and the sign of the correlation related to whether excitatory or inhibitory noninvasive stimulation was found clinically effective. These results suggest that resting-state functional connectivity may be useful for translating therapy between stimulation modalities, optimizing treatment, and identifying new stimulation targets. More broadly, this work supports a network perspective toward understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease, highlighting the therapeutic potential of targeted brain network modulation. PMID:25267639

  15. Pediatricians' perspectives on pneumococcal conjugate vaccines: An exploratory study in the private sector.

    PubMed

    Zodpey, Sanjay; Farooqui, Habib Hasan; Chokshi, Maulik; Kumar, Balu Ravi; Thacker, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of information on supply-side determinants, their utilization, and the access to pneumococcal vaccination in India. The objective of this exploratory study was to document the perceptions and perspectives of practicing pediatricians with regard to pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in selected metropolitan areas of India. A qualitative study was conducted to generate evidence on the perspective of pediatricians practicing in the private sector regarding pneumococcal vaccination. The pediatricians were identified from 11 metropolitan areas on the basis of PCV vaccine sales in India through multilevel stratified sampling method. Relevant information was collected through in-depth personal interviews. Finally, qualitative data analysis was carried out through standard techniques such as the identification of key domains, words, phrases, and concepts from the respondents. We observed that the majority (67.7%) of the pediatricians recommended pneumococcal vaccination to their clients, whereas 32.2% recommended it to only those who could afford it. More than half (62.9%) of the pediatricians had no preference for any brand and recommended both a 10-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV10) and a 13-valent PCV (PCV13), whereas 8.0% recommended none. An overwhelming majority (97.3%) of the pediatricians reported that the main reason for a patient not following the pediatrician's advice for pneumococcal vaccination was the price of PCV. To reduce childhood pneumonia-related burden and mortality, pediatricians should use every opportunity to increase awareness about vaccine-preventable diseases, especially vaccine-preventable childhood pneumonia among their patients. PMID:26354401

  16. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius Kills Streptococcus pneumoniae Planktonic Cells and Pneumococcal Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Talekar, Sharmila J.; Chochua, Sopio; Nelson, Katie; Klugman, Keith P.; Quave, Cassandra L.; Vidal, Jorge E.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC’s, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC)50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms. PMID:24823499

  17. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Sharmila J; Chochua, Sopio; Nelson, Katie; Klugman, Keith P; Quave, Cassandra L; Vidal, Jorge E

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC)50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms.

  18. Epidemiology of invasive fungal diseases on the basis of autopsy reports

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients and cost to health services. They are difficult to prevent, diagnose, and treat. This difficulty in diagnosis leads us to treat them empirically by using several tools, including epidemiological data, non-culture methods and images. Most of the available epidemiological information may not be accurate because we are dealing with a disease that only has an estimated 50% chance of being diagnosed before death. Therefore, autopsy reports become a valuable tool, not only to define the real epidemiology, but also to address the trend in pre-mortem diagnosis, which is the best marker available to prove the efficiency of the research in IFD. This article reviews and analyzes the data on IFD obtained from 11 single-center, multi-center and nationwide autopsy reports published between 2008 and 2013, and also discusses the issues we need to address in order to improve the quality of the epidemiological data on invasive fungal disease obtained from autopsy reports. PMID:25343038

  19. Epidemiology of invasive fungal diseases on the basis of autopsy reports.

    PubMed

    Dignani, María Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Invasive fungal diseases (IFDs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients and cost to health services. They are difficult to prevent, diagnose, and treat. This difficulty in diagnosis leads us to treat them empirically by using several tools, including epidemiological data, non-culture methods and images. Most of the available epidemiological information may not be accurate because we are dealing with a disease that only has an estimated 50% chance of being diagnosed before death. Therefore, autopsy reports become a valuable tool, not only to define the real epidemiology, but also to address the trend in pre-mortem diagnosis, which is the best marker available to prove the efficiency of the research in IFD. This article reviews and analyzes the data on IFD obtained from 11 single-center, multi-center and nationwide autopsy reports published between 2008 and 2013, and also discusses the issues we need to address in order to improve the quality of the epidemiological data on invasive fungal disease obtained from autopsy reports.

  20. Non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Rosa; Buzzetti, Elena; Roccarina, Davide; Tsochatzis, Emmanuel A

    2015-10-21

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) consists of a broad spectrum of disorders, ranging from simple steatosis to alcoholic steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Fatty liver develops in more than 90% of heavy drinkers, however only 30%-35% of them develop more advanced forms of ALD. Therefore, even if the current "gold standard" for the assessment of the stage of alcohol-related liver injury is histology, liver biopsy is not reasonable in all patients who present with ALD. Currently, although several non-invasive fibrosis markers have been suggested as alternatives to liver biopsy in patients with ALD, none has been sufficiently validated. As described in other liver disease, the diagnostic accuracy of such tests in ALD is acceptable for the diagnosis of significant fibrosis or cirrhosis but not for lesser fibrosis stages. Existing data suggest that the use of non-invasive tests could be tailored to first tier screening of patients at risk, in order to diagnose early patients with progressive liver disease and offer targeted interventions for the prevention of decompensation. We review these tests and critically appraise the existing evidence.

  1. Nasopharyngeal colonization of Gambian infants by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae before the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Usuf, E.; Bojang, A.; Hill, P.C.; Bottomley, C.; Greenwood, B.; Roca, A.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae commonly colonize the upper respiratory tract and can cause invasive disease. Several studies suggest an inverse relationship between these two bacteria in the nasopharynx. This association is of particular concern as the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) that affect pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage become widespread. A cohort of children in rural Gambia were recruited at birth and followed for 1 year, before the introduction of PCV into the routine immunization program. Nasopharyngeal swabs were taken immediately after birth, every 2 weeks for the first 6 months and then every other month. The presence of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae was determined using conventional microbiologic methods. Prevalence of S. aureus carriage was 71.6% at birth, decreasing with age to reach a plateau at approximately 20% between 10 to 20 weeks of age. Carriage with any S. pneumoniae increased during the first 10 weeks of life to peak at approximately 90%, mostly of PCV13 serotypes. Although in the crude analysis S. aureus carriage was inversely associated with carriage of any S. pneumoniae and PCV13 serotypes, after adjusting by age and season, there was a positive association with any carriage (odds ratio 1.32; 95% confidence interval 1.07–1.64; p 0.009) and no association with carriage of PCV13 serotypes (odds ratio 0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.70–1.41; p 0.973). Among Gambian infants, S. aureus and S. pneumoniae are not inversely associated in nasopharyngeal carriage after adjustment for age. Further carriage studies following the introduction of PCV are needed to better understand the relationship between the two bacteria. PMID:26909154

  2. Population genetics of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, an invasive vector of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Goubert, C; Minard, G; Vieira, C; Boulesteix, M

    2016-09-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is currently one of the most threatening invasive species in the world. Native to Southeast Asia, the species has spread throughout the world in the past 30 years and is now present in every continent but Antarctica. Because it was the main vector of recent Dengue and Chikungunya outbreaks, and because of its competency for numerous other viruses and pathogens such as the Zika virus, A. albopictus stands out as a model species for invasive diseases vector studies. A synthesis of the current knowledge about the genetic diversity of A. albopictus is needed, knowing the interplays between the vector, the pathogens, the environment and their epidemiological consequences. Such resources are also valuable for assessing the role of genetic diversity in the invasive success. We review here the large but sometimes dispersed literature about the population genetics of A. albopictus. We first debate about the experimental design of these studies and present an up-to-date assessment of the available molecular markers. We then summarize the main genetic characteristics of natural populations and synthesize the available data regarding the worldwide structuring of the vector. Finally, we pinpoint the gaps that remain to be addressed and suggest possible research directions.

  3. Population genetics of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, an invasive vector of human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Goubert, C; Minard, G; Vieira, C; Boulesteix, M

    2016-01-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is currently one of the most threatening invasive species in the world. Native to Southeast Asia, the species has spread throughout the world in the past 30 years and is now present in every continent but Antarctica. Because it was the main vector of recent Dengue and Chikungunya outbreaks, and because of its competency for numerous other viruses and pathogens such as the Zika virus, A. albopictus stands out as a model species for invasive diseases vector studies. A synthesis of the current knowledge about the genetic diversity of A. albopictus is needed, knowing the interplays between the vector, the pathogens, the environment and their epidemiological consequences. Such resources are also valuable for assessing the role of genetic diversity in the invasive success. We review here the large but sometimes dispersed literature about the population genetics of A. albopictus. We first debate about the experimental design of these studies and present an up-to-date assessment of the available molecular markers. We then summarize the main genetic characteristics of natural populations and synthesize the available data regarding the worldwide structuring of the vector. Finally, we pinpoint the gaps that remain to be addressed and suggest possible research directions. PMID:27273325

  4. Minimally Invasive Treatment of the Thoracic Spine Disease: Completely Percutaneous and Hybrid Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Francesco Ciro, Tamburrelli; Laura, Scaramuzzo; Maurizio, Genitiempo; Luca, Proietti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of a limited invasive approach for the treatment of upper thoracic spine disease. Seven patients with type-A thoracic fractures and three with tumors underwent long thoracic stabilization through a minimally invasive approach. Four patients underwent a completely percutaneous approach while the other three underwent a modified hybrid technique, a combination of percutaneous and open approach. The hybrid constructs were realized using a percutaneous approach to the spine distally to the spinal lesion and by open approach proximally. In two patients, the stabilization was extended proximally up to the cervical spine. Clinical and radiographic assessment was performed during the first year after the operation at 3, 6, and 12 months. No technically related complications were seen. The postoperative recovery was rapid even in the tumor patients with neurologic impairment. Blood loss was irrelevant. At one-year follow-up there was no loosening or breakage of the screws or failure of the implants. When technically feasible a completely percutaneous approach has to be taken in consideration; otherwise, a combined open-percutaneous approach could be planned to minimize the invasivity of a completely open approach to the thoracic spine. PMID:24455233

  5. Minimally invasive treatment of the thoracic spine disease: completely percutaneous and hybrid approaches.

    PubMed

    Tamburrelli, Francesco Ciro; Francesco Ciro, Tamburrelli; Scaramuzzo, Laura; Laura, Scaramuzzo; Genitiempo, Maurizio; Maurizio, Genitiempo; Proietti, Luca; Luca, Proietti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of a limited invasive approach for the treatment of upper thoracic spine disease. Seven patients with type-A thoracic fractures and three with tumors underwent long thoracic stabilization through a minimally invasive approach. Four patients underwent a completely percutaneous approach while the other three underwent a modified hybrid technique, a combination of percutaneous and open approach. The hybrid constructs were realized using a percutaneous approach to the spine distally to the spinal lesion and by open approach proximally. In two patients, the stabilization was extended proximally up to the cervical spine. Clinical and radiographic assessment was performed during the first year after the operation at 3, 6, and 12 months. No technically related complications were seen. The postoperative recovery was rapid even in the tumor patients with neurologic impairment. Blood loss was irrelevant. At one-year follow-up there was no loosening or breakage of the screws or failure of the implants. When technically feasible a completely percutaneous approach has to be taken in consideration; otherwise, a combined open-percutaneous approach could be planned to minimize the invasivity of a completely open approach to the thoracic spine.

  6. Population genetics of the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus, an invasive vector of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Goubert, C; Minard, G; Vieira, C; Boulesteix, M

    2016-09-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus is currently one of the most threatening invasive species in the world. Native to Southeast Asia, the species has spread throughout the world in the past 30 years and is now present in every continent but Antarctica. Because it was the main vector of recent Dengue and Chikungunya outbreaks, and because of its competency for numerous other viruses and pathogens such as the Zika virus, A. albopictus stands out as a model species for invasive diseases vector studies. A synthesis of the current knowledge about the genetic diversity of A. albopictus is needed, knowing the interplays between the vector, the pathogens, the environment and their epidemiological consequences. Such resources are also valuable for assessing the role of genetic diversity in the invasive success. We review here the large but sometimes dispersed literature about the population genetics of A. albopictus. We first debate about the experimental design of these studies and present an up-to-date assessment of the available molecular markers. We then summarize the main genetic characteristics of natural populations and synthesize the available data regarding the worldwide structuring of the vector. Finally, we pinpoint the gaps that remain to be addressed and suggest possible research directions. PMID:27273325

  7. Risk of death from pneumococcal pneumonia is a stable serotype-associated property: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Weinberger, Daniel M.; Harboe, Zitta B.; Sanders, Elisabeth A.M.; Ndiritu, Moses; Klugman, Keith P.; Rückinger, Simon; Dagan, Ron; Adegbola, Richard; Cutts, Felicity; Johnson, Hope L.; O’Brien, Katherine L.; Scott, J. Anthony; Lipsitch, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Background The 92 capsular serotypes of Streptococcus pneumoniae differ greatly in nasopharyngeal carriage prevalence, invasiveness and disease incidence. There has been some debate, though, as to whether serotype independently affects the outcome of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Published studies have shown variable results with regards to case-fatality ratios for specific serotypes and the role of host factors in affecting these relationships. We evaluated whether risk of death from IPD is a stable serotype-associated property across studies, and then compared the pooled effect estimates with epidemiologic and biological correlates. Methods We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of serotype-specific disease outcome for pneumonia and meningitis cases. Study-specific estimates of risk of death (risk ratio, RR) were pooled from 9 studies that provided serotype-specific data on pneumonia and meningitis using a random-effects method with serotype 14 as the reference. Pooled RRs were compared to RRs from adult cases with low co-morbidity scores to evaluate potential confounding by host factors. Results There were significant differences in the RR estimates between serotypes among bacteremic pneumonia cases. Overall, types 1, 7F and 8 were associated with decreased RRs and types 3, 6A, 6B, 9N and 19F were associated with increased RRs. Outcomes among meningitis cases did not differ significantly between types. Serotypes with increased RRs tended to have a high carriage prevalence, low invasiveness, and were more heavily encapsulated in vitro. These results suggest that IPD outcome, like other epidemiologic measures, is a stable serotype-associated property. PMID:20715907

  8. Serotype and genotype distribution among invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates in Colombia, 2005-2010.

    PubMed

    Parra, Eliana L; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n = 629) and multilocus sequence typing (n = 10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ≥0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain(6B)ST90, Spain(9V)ST156, Spain(23F)ST81, and Colombia(23F)ST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction.

  9. Serotype and Genotype Distribution among Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolates in Colombia, 2005–2010

    PubMed Central

    Parra, Eliana L.; Ramos, Viviana; Sanabria, Olga; Moreno, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    In Colombia, a laboratory-based surveillance of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates as part of SIREVA II PAHO has been conducted since 1994. This study describes the serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance, and genetic relationships of pneumococcal isolates recovered in Colombia from 2005 to 2010. In this study, demographic data of invasive S. pneumoniae isolates were analyzed, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined. Pulse field gel electrophoresis (n = 629) and multilocus sequence typing (n = 10) were used to determine genetic relationship of isolates with minimal inhibitory concentration to penicillin ≥0.125 µg/mL. A total of 1775 isolates of S. pneumoniae were obtained. Fifteen serotypes accounted for 80.7% of isolates. Serotype 14 (23.1%) was the most frequent in the general population. Penicillin resistance was 30.7% in meningitis and 9.0% in non-meningitis. Clones Spain6BST90, Spain9VST156, Spain23FST81, and Colombia23FST338 were associated to isolates. Additionally, serotype 6A isolates were associated with ST460 and ST473, and 19A isolates with ST276, ST320, and ST1118. In conclusion, the surveillance program provided updated information of trends in serotype distribution, antimicrobial resistance and the circulation of clones in invasive pneumococcal diseases. These results could be helpful to understand the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in Colombia, and provide a baseline to measure the impact of vaccine introduction. PMID:24416330

  10. Development of a non-invasive murine infection model for acute otitis media.

    PubMed

    Stol, K; van Selm, S; van den Berg, S; Bootsma, H J; Blokx, W A M; Graamans, K; Tonnaer, E L G M; Hermans, P W M

    2009-12-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most frequent diseases in childhood, and Streptococcus pneumoniae is among the main causative bacterial agents. Since current experimental models used to study the bacterial pathogenesis of OM have several limitations, such as the invasiveness of the experimental procedures, we developed a non-invasive murine OM model. In our model, adapted from a previously developed rat OM model, a pressure cabin is used in which a 40 kPa pressure increase is applied to translocate pneumococci from the nasopharyngeal cavity into both mouse middle ears. Wild-type pneumococci were found to persist in the middle ear cavity for 144 h after infection, with a maximum bacterial load at 96 h. Inflammation was confirmed at 96 and 144 h post-infection by IL-1beta and TNF-alpha cytokine analysis and histopathology. Subsequently, we investigated the contribution of two surface-associated pneumococcal proteins, the streptococcal lipoprotein rotamase A (SlrA) and the putative proteinase maturation protein A (PpmA), to experimental OM in our model. Pneumococci lacking the slrA gene, but not those lacking the ppmA gene, were significantly reduced in virulence in the OM model. Importantly, pneumococci lacking both genes were significantly more attenuated than the DeltaslrA single mutant. This additive effect suggests that SlrA and PpmA exert complementary functions during experimental OM. In conclusion, we have developed a highly reproducible and non-invasive murine infection model for pneumococcal OM using a pressure cabin, which is very suitable to study pneumococcal pathogenesis and virulence in vivo.

  11. Disease Burden of Invasive Listeriosis and Molecular Characterization of Clinical Isolates in Taiwan, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Tsung; Ko, Wen-Chien; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Lu, Jang-Jih; Tsai, Hsih-Yeh; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2015-01-01

    The information about disease burden and epidemiology of invasive listeriosis in Asia is scarce. From 2000 to 2013, a total of 338 patients with invasive listeriosis (bacteremia, meningitis, and peritonitis) were treated at four medical centers in Taiwan. The incidence (per 10,000 admissions) of invasive listeriosis increased significantly during the 14-year period among the four centers (0.15 in 2000 and >1.25 during 2010-2012) and at each of the four medical centers. Among these patients, 45.9% were elderly (>65 years old) and 3.3% were less than one year of age. More than one-third (36.7%) of the patients acquired invasive listeriosis in the spring (April to June). Among the 132 preserved Listeria monocytogenes isolates analyzed, the most frequently isolated PCR serogroup-sequence type (ST) was IIb-ST87 (23.5%), followed by IIa-ST378 (19.7%) and IIa-ST155 (12.1%). Isolation of PCR serogroups IIb and IVb increased significantly with year, with a predominance of IIb-ST87 isolates (23.5%) and IIb-ST 228 isolates emerging in 2013. A total of 12 different randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) patterns (Patterns I to XII) were identified among the 112 L. monocytogenes isolates belonging to eight main PCR serogroup-STs. Identical RAPD patterns were found among the isolates exhibiting the same PCR serogroup-ST. In conclusion, our study revealed that during 2000-2013, listeriosis at four medical centers in Taiwan was caused by heterogeneous strains and that the upsurge in incidence beginning in 2005 was caused by at least two predominant clones. PMID:26555445

  12. Invasive meningococcal disease in England and Wales: implications for the introduction of new vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ladhani, Shamez N; Flood, Jessica S; Ramsay, Mary E; Campbell, Helen; Gray, Stephen J; Kaczmarski, Edward B; Mallard, Richard H; Guiver, Malcolm; Newbold, Lynne S; Borrow, Ray

    2012-05-21

    A number of meningococcal vaccines have either been recently licensed or are in late-phase clinical trials. To inform national vaccination policy, it is important to define the burden of disease and the potential impact of any new vaccine. This study describes the epidemiology of invasive meningococcal disease across all age groups in England and Wales for recent epidemiological years between 2006 and 2010. The Health Protection Agency (HPA) conducts enhanced national meningococcal surveillance through a combination of clinical and laboratory reporting. Between 2006/07 and 2010/11, the average annual incidence of invasive meningococcal disease across all age groups was 2.0/100,000. Capsular group B (MenB) accounted for 87% (4777/5471) cases, with an overall incidence of 1.8/100,000. The highest MenB incidence observed among infants (36.2/100,000) where cases increased from birth to 5 months of age then gradually declined. An annual average of 245 MenB cases occurred in infants (135 in those aged ≤ 6 months) representing 26% (and 14%) of all MenB cases, respectively. After infancy, MenB rates declined until the age of 12 years, rising to a second smaller peak at 18 years. MenB case fatality ratio (CFR) was 5.2% (247/4777 cases) overall and was highest among ≥ 65 year-olds (28/161; 17.4%). The largest number of deaths (n=125), however, occurred among <5 year-olds. Clonal complexes cc269 and cc41/44 each accounted for around a third of cases across the age groups. Other capsular groups rarely caused invasive disease, although capsular group Y (MenY) cases more than doubled from 35 in 2006/07 to 86 in 2010/11. Thus, universal meningococcal vaccination with an effective broad-spectrum formulation has potential to prevent most disease, particularly if the vaccine is immunogenic early in infancy, but, there is currently little justification for routine quadrivalent ACWY conjugate vaccination in the UK, although the increase in MenY disease warrants continued

  13. Non-invasive therapy to reduce the body burden of aluminium in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher; Korchazhkina, Olga; Job, Deborah; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Polwart, Anthony; Crome, Peter

    2006-09-01

    There are unexplained links between human exposure to aluminium and the incidence, progression and aetiology of Alzheimer's disease. The null hypothesis which underlies any link is that there would be no Alzheimer's disease in the effective absence of a body burden of aluminium. To test this the latter would have to be reduced to and retained at a level that was commensurate with an Alzheimer's disease-free population. In the absence of recent human interference in the biogeochemical cycle of aluminium the reaction of silicic acid with aluminium has acted as a geochemical control of the biological availability of aluminium. This same mechanism might now be applied to both the removal of aluminium from the body and the reduced entry of aluminium into the body while ensuring that essential metals, such as iron, are unaffected. Based upon the premise that urinary aluminium is the best non-invasive estimate of body burden of aluminium patients with Alzheimer's disease were asked to drink 1.5 L of a silicic acid-rich mineral water each day for five days and, by comparison of their urinary excretion of aluminium pre-and post this simple procedure, the influence upon their body burden of aluminium was determined. Drinking the mineral water increased significantly (P<0.001) their urinary excretion of silicic acid (34.3 +/- 15.2 to 55.7 +/- 14.2 micromol/mmol creatinine) and concomitantly reduced significantly P=0.037) their urinary excretion of aluminium (86.0 +/- 24.3 to 62.2 +/- 23.2 nmol/mmol creatinine). The latter was achieved without any significant (P>0.05) influence upon the urinary excretion of iron (20.7 +/- 9.5 to 21.7 +/- 13.8 nmol/mmol creatinine). The reduction in urinary aluminium supported the future longer-term use of silicic acid as non-invasive therapy for reducing the body burden of aluminium in Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Desialylation of airway epithelial cells during influenza virus infection enhances pneumococcal adhesion via galectin binding

    PubMed Central

    Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Banerjee, Aditi; Feng, Chiguang; Amin, Mohammed N.; Frieman, Matthew B.; Chen, Wilbur H.; Cross, Alan S.; Wang, Lai-Xi; Vasta, Gerardo R.

    2015-01-01

    The continued threat of worldwide influenza pandemics, together with the yearly emergence of antigenically drifted influenza A virus (IAV) strains, underscore the urgent need to elucidate not only the mechanisms of influenza virulence, but also those mechanisms that predispose influenza patients to increased susceptibility to subsequent infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. Glycans displayed on the surface of epithelia that are exposed to the external environment play important roles in microbial recognition, adhesion, and invasion. It is well established that the IAV hemagglutinin and pneumococcal adhesins enable their attachment to the host epithelia. Reciprocally, the recognition of microbial glycans by host carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) can initiate innate immune responses, but their relevance in influenza or pneumococcal infections is poorly understood. Galectins are evolutionarily conserved lectins characterized by affinity for β-galactosides and a unique sequence motif, with critical regulatory roles in development and immune homeostasis. In this study, we examined the possibility that galectins expressed in the airway epithelial cells might play a significant role in viral or pneumococcal adhesion to airway epithelial cells. Our results in a mouse model for influenza and pneumococcal infection revealed that the murine lung expresses a diverse galectin repertoire, from which selected galectins, including galectin 1 (Gal1) and galectin 3 (Gal3), are released to the bronchoalveolar space. Further, the results showed that influenza and subsequent S. pneumoniae infections significantly alter the glycosylation patterns of the airway epithelial surface and modulate galectin expression. In vitro studies on the human airway epithelial cell line A549 were consistent with the observations made in the mouse model, and further revealed that both Gal1 and Gal3 bind strongly to IAV and S. pneumoniae, and that exposure of the cells to viral neuraminidase or

  15. Cytokine Profiles during Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease Predict Outcome in African Children.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, James J; Heath, Jennifer N; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Naranbhai, Vivek; Mandala, Wilson; MacLennan, Jenny M; Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Graham, Stephen M; Drayson, Mark T; Molyneux, Malcolm E; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-07-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella is a leading cause of sepsis in African children. Cytokine responses are central to the pathophysiology of sepsis and predict sepsis outcome in other settings. In this study, we investigated cytokine responses to invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease in Malawian children. We determined serum concentrations of 48 cytokines with multiplexed immunoassays in Malawian children during acute iNTS disease (n = 111) and in convalescence (n = 77). Principal component analysis and logistic regression were used to identify cytokine signatures of acute iNTS disease. We further investigated whether these responses are altered by HIV coinfection or severe malnutrition and whether cytokine responses predict inpatient mortality. Cytokine changes in acute iNTS disease were associated with two distinct cytokine signatures. The first is characterized by increased concentrations of mediators known to be associated with macrophage function, and the second is characterized by raised pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines typical of responses reported in sepsis secondary to diverse pathogens. These cytokine responses were largely unaltered by either severe malnutrition or HIV coinfection. Children with fatal disease had a distinctive cytokine profile, characterized by raised mediators known to be associated with neutrophil function. In conclusion, cytokine responses to acute iNTS infection in Malawian children are reflective of both the cytokine storm typical of sepsis secondary to diverse pathogens and the intramacrophage replicative niche of NTS. The cytokine profile predictive of fatal disease supports a key role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of NTS sepsis. PMID:27170644

  16. Cytokine Profiles during Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease Predict Outcome in African Children

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, James J.; Heath, Jennifer N.; Msefula, Chisomo L.; Gondwe, Esther N.; Naranbhai, Vivek; Mandala, Wilson; MacLennan, Jenny M.; Molyneux, Elizabeth M.; Graham, Stephen M.; Drayson, Mark T.; Molyneux, Malcolm E.

    2016-01-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella is a leading cause of sepsis in African children. Cytokine responses are central to the pathophysiology of sepsis and predict sepsis outcome in other settings. In this study, we investigated cytokine responses to invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease in Malawian children. We determined serum concentrations of 48 cytokines with multiplexed immunoassays in Malawian children during acute iNTS disease (n = 111) and in convalescence (n = 77). Principal component analysis and logistic regression were used to identify cytokine signatures of acute iNTS disease. We further investigated whether these responses are altered by HIV coinfection or severe malnutrition and whether cytokine responses predict inpatient mortality. Cytokine changes in acute iNTS disease were associated with two distinct cytokine signatures. The first is characterized by increased concentrations of mediators known to be associated with macrophage function, and the second is characterized by raised pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines typical of responses reported in sepsis secondary to diverse pathogens. These cytokine responses were largely unaltered by either severe malnutrition or HIV coinfection. Children with fatal disease had a distinctive cytokine profile, characterized by raised mediators known to be associated with neutrophil function. In conclusion, cytokine responses to acute iNTS infection in Malawian children are reflective of both the cytokine storm typical of sepsis secondary to diverse pathogens and the intramacrophage replicative niche of NTS. The cytokine profile predictive of fatal disease supports a key role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of NTS sepsis. PMID:27170644

  17. Cytokine Profiles during Invasive Nontyphoidal Salmonella Disease Predict Outcome in African Children.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, James J; Heath, Jennifer N; Msefula, Chisomo L; Gondwe, Esther N; Naranbhai, Vivek; Mandala, Wilson; MacLennan, Jenny M; Molyneux, Elizabeth M; Graham, Stephen M; Drayson, Mark T; Molyneux, Malcolm E; MacLennan, Calman A

    2016-07-01

    Nontyphoidal Salmonella is a leading cause of sepsis in African children. Cytokine responses are central to the pathophysiology of sepsis and predict sepsis outcome in other settings. In this study, we investigated cytokine responses to invasive nontyphoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease in Malawian children. We determined serum concentrations of 48 cytokines with multiplexed immunoassays in Malawian children during acute iNTS disease (n = 111) and in convalescence (n = 77). Principal component analysis and logistic regression were used to identify cytokine signatures of acute iNTS disease. We further investigated whether these responses are altered by HIV coinfection or severe malnutrition and whether cytokine responses predict inpatient mortality. Cytokine changes in acute iNTS disease were associated with two distinct cytokine signatures. The first is characterized by increased concentrations of mediators known to be associated with macrophage function, and the second is characterized by raised pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines typical of responses reported in sepsis secondary to diverse pathogens. These cytokine responses were largely unaltered by either severe malnutrition or HIV coinfection. Children with fatal disease had a distinctive cytokine profile, characterized by raised mediators known to be associated with neutrophil function. In conclusion, cytokine responses to acute iNTS infection in Malawian children are reflective of both the cytokine storm typical of sepsis secondary to diverse pathogens and the intramacrophage replicative niche of NTS. The cytokine profile predictive of fatal disease supports a key role of neutrophils in the pathogenesis of NTS sepsis.

  18. Survey of Obstetrics and Gynecology Residents Regarding Pneumococcal Vaccination in Pregnancy: Education, Knowledge, and Barriers to Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Emily E.; Hoppe, Kara K.; Schulkin, Jay; Eckert, Linda O.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine is recommended for adults over 65 years of age and younger adults with certain medical conditions. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state insufficient evidence to recommend routine pneumococcal vaccination during pregnancy, but the vaccine is indicated for pregnant women with certain medical conditions. We designed this project to gauge obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) resident knowledge of maternal pneumococcal vaccination. Methods. We administered a 22-question survey to OB/GYN residents about maternal pneumococcal vaccination. We performed descriptive analysis for each question. Results. 238 OB/GYN residents responded. Overall, 69.3% of residents reported receiving vaccination education and 86.0% reported having ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. Most residents knew that asplenia (78.2%), pulmonary disease (77.3%), and HIV/AIDS (69.4%) are indications for vaccination but less knew that cardiovascular disease (45.0%), diabetes (35.8%), asthma (42.8%), nephrotic syndrome (19.7%), and renal failure (33.6%) are also indications for vaccination. Conclusion. OB/GYN residents are taught about vaccines and have ready access to vaccine guidelines and safety data. However, knowledge of indications for pneumococcal vaccination in pregnancy is lacking. Likely, the opportunity to vaccinate at-risk pregnant patients is being missed. PMID:26949324

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Crohn's Disease-Associated Adherent-Invasive E. coli Strain LF82

    PubMed Central

    de Vallée, Amélie; Dossat, Carole; Vacherie, Benoit; Zineb, El Hajji; Segurens, Beatrice; Barbe, Valerie; Sauvanet, Pierre; Neut, Christel; Colombel, Jean-Frédéric; Medigue, Claudine; Mojica, Francisco J. M.; Peyret, Pierre; Bonnet, Richard; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2010-01-01

    Background Ileal lesions of Crohn's disease (CD) patients are abnormally colonized by pathogenic adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) able to invade and to replicate within intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Principal Findings We report here the complete genome sequence of E. coli LF82, the reference strain of adherent-invasive E. coli associated with ileal Crohn's disease. The LF82 genome of 4,881,487 bp total size contains a circular chromosome with a size of 4,773,108 bp and a plasmid of 108,379 bp. The analysis of predicted coding sequences (CDSs) within the LF82 flexible genome indicated that this genome is close to the avian pathogenic strain APEC_01, meningitis-associated strain S88 and urinary-isolated strain UTI89 with regards to flexible genome and single nucleotide polymorphisms in various virulence factors. Interestingly, we observed that strains LF82 and UTI89 adhered at a similar level to Intestine-407 cells and that like LF82, APEC_01 and UTI89 were highly invasive. However, A1EC strain LF82 had an intermediate killer phenotype compared to APEC-01 and UTI89 and the LF82 genome does not harbour most of specific virulence genes from ExPEC. LF82 genome has evolved from those of ExPEC B2 strains by the acquisition of Salmonella and Yersinia isolated or clustered genes or CDSs located on pLF82 plasmid and at various loci on the chromosome. Conclusion LF82 genome analysis indicated that a number of genes, gene clusters and pathoadaptative mutations which have been acquired may play a role in virulence of AIEC strain LF82. PMID:20862302

  20. New Nocardia taxon among isolates of Nocardia brasiliensis associated with invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, R J; Brown, B A; Blacklock, Z; Ulrich, R; Jost, K; Brown, J M; McNeil, M M; Onyi, G; Steingrube, V A; Gibson, J

    1995-01-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis, the second most frequently isolated aerobic actinomycete in the clinical laboratory, is usually associated with localized cutaneous infections. However, 22% of 238 N. brasiliensis isolates from the United States and 12% of 66 isolates from Queensland, Australia, which had been collected over a 17-year period, were associated with extracutaneous and/or disseminated diseases. Of the 62 invasive isolates, 37 (60%) were susceptible to ciprofloxacin and/or were susceptible to clarithromycin and resistant to minocycline, compared with only 6 (3%) of 242 localized cutaneous isolates. The 43 isolates with this susceptibility pattern appeared to define a new taxon. They were similar to Nocardia asteroides complex isolates clinically in proportions from persons with pulmonary (70%), central nervous system (23%), and/or disseminated diseases (37%) in the setting of corticosteroids (74%) or AIDS (14%). This putative new taxon differed from N. brasiliensis in the hydrolysis of adenine (92 versus 4%), beta-lactamase patterns on isoelectric focusing, and the presence of two early mycolic acid-ester peaks by high-performance liquid chromatography. Restriction analysis of a 439-bp fragment of the 65-kDa heat shock protein gene revealed that N. brasiliensis and the new taxon had different restriction patterns with 8 of the 11 enzymes tested. Screening of invasive isolates of N. brasiliensis for susceptibility to ciprofloxacin will identify most isolates of the new taxon, which likely represents a new Nocardia species. PMID:7650180

  1. Comparing Supervised Exercise Therapy to Invasive Measures in the Management of Symptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Thomas; McHugh, Seamus; Kheirelseid, Elrasheid A.; Lee, Michael J.; McCaffrey, Noel; Moneley, Daragh; Leahy, Austin L.; Naughton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Consensus rightly demands the incorporation of supervised exercise training (SET) into PAD treatment protocols. However, the exact role of SET particularly its relationship with intervention requires further clarification. While supervised exercise is undoubtedly an excellent tool in the conservative management of mild PAD its use in more advanced disease as an adjunct to open or endovascular intervention is not clearly defined. Indeed its use in isolation in this cohort is incompletely reported. The aim of this review is to clarify the exact role of SET in the management of symptomatic PAD and in particular to assess its role in comparison with or as an adjunct to invasive intervention. A systematic literature search revealed a total 11 randomised studies inclusive of 969 patients. All studies compared SET and intervention with monotherapy. Study results suggest that exercise is a complication-free treatment. Furthermore, it appears to offer significant improvements in patients walk distances with a combination of both SET and intervention offering a superior walking outcome to monotherapy in those requiring invasive measures. PMID:26601122

  2. Barlow’s mitral valve disease: results of conventional and minimally invasive repair approaches

    PubMed Central

    Melnitchouk, Serguei I.; Seeburger, Joerg; Kaeding, Anna F.; Misfeld, Martin; Mohr, Friedrich W.

    2013-01-01

    Barlow’s valve is a clinically important form of degenerative mitral valve (MV) disease that is characterized by unique clinical, echocardiographic and pathological features. Successful and durable repair of Barlow’s MV represents a clinical challenge for most cardiac surgeons. An armamentarium of different MV repair techniques may be required, resectional, neochordal or plicational techniques. Although conventional sternotomy remains the mainstay approach for MV surgery in the majority of cardiac surgery centers, minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is becoming increasingly accepted amongst patients, referring physicians and practicing cardiac surgeons. As surgical approaches, instrumentation and operative experience develop, select centers are now performing MIS MV surgery for nearly all MV patients. Although successful Barlow’s MV repair is more complex than that for most degenerative pathologies, several centers have published relatively large series of MIS MV repair for Barlow’s disease. In this review article, we highlight and compare the early and long-term results of conventional and minimally invasive approaches to Barlow’s and bileaflet mitral prolapse disease. Recent studies from various large volume centers around the world have demonstrated equivalent safety and efficacy outcomes of the MIS approach compared to conventional sternotomy surgery. In addition, MIS MV surgery may allow patients to benefit from a cosmetically appealing incision, a faster recovery and a quicker return to normal activities. However, a definite learning curve has been demonstrated for MIS MV surgery. If a patient with Barlow’s disease or other complex MV pathology desires to undergo MIS MV surgery, referral to a center and/or surgeon with extensive experience in MIS MV surgery is recommended. PMID:24349980

  3. Invasive cervical cancer accompanied by IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Rin; Yamanishi, Yukio; Uda, Satoko; Terashima, Tsuyoshi; Higashi, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Toshihiro

    2016-09-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disease that affects multiple organs and generates nodules or thickening. Discriminating these diseases from malignancy is important because glucocorticoid treatment is effective for patients with IgG4-RD. Coexistence of IgG4-RD with various malignant diseases has been reported, but there are few reports with regard to gynecologic malignant diseases. We encountered a case of invasive cervical cancer stage IIB accompanied by IgG4-RD. The patient was a 46-year-old woman. On pelvic magnetic resonance imaging, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography and computed tomography, systemic multiple lymph node swelling was seen, including in the neck and the mediastinum in addition to uterine cervix. Diagnosis (and hence, appropriate treatment choice) was achieved on pathology of the submandibular gland and uterus, and analysis of serum IgG4. IgG4-RD should be suspected in patients presenting with malignancy and unusual multiple lymph node swelling. PMID:27238361

  4. Single-Plex Quantitative Assays for the Detection and Quantification of Most Pneumococcal Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    Chochua, Sopio; Satzke, Catherine; Dunne, Eileen M.; Mulholland, Kim; Klugman, Keith P.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae globally kills more children than any other infectious disease every year. A prerequisite for pneumococcal disease and transmission is colonization of the nasopharynx. While the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has reduced the burden of pneumococcal disease, understanding the impact of vaccination on nasopharyngeal colonization has been hampered by the lack of sensitive quantitative methods for the detection of >90 known S. pneumoniae serotypes. In this work, we developed 27 new quantitative (q)PCR reactions and optimized 26 for a total of 53 qPCR reactions targeting pneumococcal serotypes or serogroups, including all vaccine types. Reactions proved to be target-specific with a limit of detection of 2 genome equivalents per reaction. Given the number of probes required for these assays and their unknown shelf-life, the stability of cryopreserved reagents was evaluated. Our studies demonstrate that two-year cryopreserved probes had similar limit of detection as freshly-diluted probes. Moreover, efficiency and limit of detection of 1-month cryopreserved, ready-to-use, qPCR reaction mixtures were similar to those of freshly prepared mixtures. Using these reactions, our proof-of-concept studies utilizing nasopharyngeal samples (N=30) collected from young children detected samples containing ≥2 serotypes/serogroups. Samples colonized by multiple serotypes/serogroups always had a serotype that contributes at least 50% of the pneumococcal load. In addition, a molecular approach called S6-q(PCR)2 was developed and proven to individually detect and quantify epidemiologically-important serogroup 6 strains including 6A, 6B, 6C and 6D. This technology will be useful for epidemiological studies, diagnostic platforms and to study the pneumobiome. PMID:25798884

  5. Single-plex quantitative assays for the detection and quantification of most pneumococcal serotypes.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Fuminori; Chochua, Sopio; Satzke, Catherine; Dunne, Eileen M; Mulholland, Kim; Klugman, Keith P; Vidal, Jorge E

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae globally kills more children than any other infectious disease every year. A prerequisite for pneumococcal disease and transmission is colonization of the nasopharynx. While the introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines has reduced the burden of pneumococcal disease, understanding the impact of vaccination on nasopharyngeal colonization has been hampered by the lack of sensitive quantitative methods for the detection of >90 known S. pneumoniae serotypes. In this work, we developed 27 new quantitative (q)PCR reactions and optimized 26 for a total of 53 qPCR reactions targeting pneumococcal serotypes or serogroups, including all vaccine types. Reactions proved to be target-specific with a limit of detection of 2 genome equivalents per reaction. Given the number of probes required for these assays and their unknown shelf-life, the stability of cryopreserved reagents was evaluated. Our studies demonstrate that two-year cryopreserved probes had similar limit of detection as freshly-diluted probes. Moreover, efficiency and limit of detection of 1-month cryopreserved, ready-to-use, qPCR reaction mixtures were similar to those of freshly prepared mixtures. Using these reactions, our proof-of-concept studies utilizing nasopharyngeal samples (N=30) collected from young children detected samples containing ≥2 serotypes/serogroups. Samples colonized by multiple serotypes/serogroups always had a serotype that contributes at least 50% of the pneumococcal load. In addition, a molecular approach called S6-q(PCR)2 was developed and proven to individually detect and quantify epidemiologically-important serogroup 6 strains including 6A, 6B, 6C and 6D. This technology will be useful for epidemiological studies, diagnostic platforms and to study the pneumobiome.

  6. Impact of the Hajj on pneumococcal transmission.

    PubMed

    Memish, Z A; Assiri, A; Almasri, M; Alhakeem, R F; Turkestani, A; Al Rabeeah, A A; Akkad, N; Yezli, S; Klugman, K P; O'Brien, K L; van der Linden, M; Gessner, B D

    2015-01-01

    Over two million Muslim pilgrims assemble annually in Mecca and Medina, Saudi Arabia, to complete the Hajj. The large number of people in a crowded environment increases the potential for pneumococcal carriage amplification. We evaluated pneumococcal carriage prevalence with four cross-sectional studies conducted at beginning-Hajj (Mecca) and end-Hajj (Mina) during 2011 and 2012. A questionnaire was administered and a nasopharyngeal swab was collected. The swab was tested for pneumococcus, serotype and antibiotic resistance. A total of 3203 subjects (1590 at beginning-Hajj and 1613 at end-Hajj) originating from 18 countries in Africa or Asia were enrolled. The overall pneumococcal carriage prevalence was 6.0%. There was an increase in carriage between beginning-Hajj and end-Hajj cohorts for: overall carriage (4.4% versus 7.5%, prevalence ratio (PR) 1.7, 95% CI 1.3-2.3), and carriage of 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine serotypes (2.3% versus 4.1%, PR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2-2.7), 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) serotypes (1.1% versus 3.6%, PR 3.2, 95% CI 1.9-5.6), 10-valent PCV serotypes (0.6% versus 1.6%, PR 2.6, 95% CI 1.2-5.3), antibiotic non-susceptible isolates (2.5% versus 6.1%, PR 2.5, 95% CI 1.7-3.6) and multiple non-susceptible isolates (0.6% versus 2.2%, PR 3.8, 95% CI 1.8-7.9). Fifty-two different serotypes were identified, most commonly serotypes 3 (17%), 19F (5%) and 34 (5%). These results suggest that the Hajj may increase pneumococcal carriage-particularly conjugate vaccine serotypes and antibiotic non-susceptible strains, although the exact mechanism remains unknown. The Hajj may therefore provide a mechanism for the global distribution of pneumococci.

  7. Second hand smoke exposure and the risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Invasive meningococcal disease remains an important cause of serious morbidity and mortality in children and young people. There is a growing body of literature to suggest that exposure to passive smoke may play a role in the development of the disease, therefore we have performed a systematic review to provide a comprehensive estimate of the magnitude of this effect for smoking by any household member, by individual family members, and of maternal smoking before and after birth. Methods Four databases (Medline, Embase, PsychINFO and CAB Abstracts database) were searched to identify studies (to June 2012) and reference lists scanned for further studies. Titles, abstracts and full texts were checked for eligibility independently by two authors. Quality of included studies was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Pooled odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using random effect models, with heterogeneity quantified using I2. Results We identified 18 studies which assessed the effects of SHS on the risk of invasive meningococcal disease in children. SHS in the home doubled the risk of invasive meningococcal disease (OR 2.18, 95% CI 1.63 to 2.92, I2 = 72%), with some evidence of an exposure-response gradient. The strongest effect was seen in children under 5 years (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.51 to 4.09, I2 = 47%). Maternal smoking significantly increased the risk of invasive meningococcal disease by 3 times during pregnancy (OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.52-5.66) and by 2 times after birth (OR 2.26, 95% CI 1.54-3.31). Conclusions SHS exposure, and particularly passive foetal exposure to maternal smoking during pregnancy, significantly increases the risk of childhood invasive meningococcal disease. It is likely that an extra 630 cases of invasive meningococcal disease annually in children under 16 are directly attributable to SHS exposure in UK homes. PMID:23228219

  8. Collective migration models: Dynamic monitoring of leader cells in migratory/invasive disease processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, Zachary Steven

    Leader cells are a fundamental biological process that have only been investigated since the early 2000s. These cells have often been observed emerging at the edge of an artificial wound in 2D epithelial cell collective invasion, created with either a mechanical scrape from a pipette tip or from the removal of a plastic, physical blocker. During migration, the moving cells maintain cell-cell contacts, an important quality of collective migration; the leader cells originate from either the first or the second row, they increase in size compared to other cells, and they establish ruffled lamellipodia. Recent studies in 3D have also shown that cells emerging from an invading collective group that also exhibit leader-like properties. Exactly how leader cells influence and interact with follower cells as well as other cells types during collective migration, however, is another matter, and is a subject of intense investigation between many different labs and researchers. The majority of leader cell research to date has involved epithelial cells, but as collective migration is implicated in many different pathogenic diseases, such as cancer and wound healing, a better understanding of leader cells in many cell types and environments will allow significant improvement to therapies and treatments for a wide variety of disease processes. In fact, more recent studies on collective migration and invasion have broadened the field to include other cell types, including mesenchymal cancer cells and fibroblasts. However, the proper technology for picking out dynamic, single cells within a moving and changing cell population over time has severely limited previous investigation into leader cell formation and influence over other cells. In line with these previous studies, we not only bring new technology capable of dynamically monitoring leader cell formation, but we propose that leader cell behavior is more than just an epithelial process, and that it is a critical physiological

  9. Invasive meningococcal disease in Malta: an epidemiological overview, 1994-2007.

    PubMed

    Muscat, Mark; Spiteri, Gianfranco; Calleja, Neville; Haider, Julie; Gray, Stephen J; Melillo, Jackie Maistre; Mamo, Julian; Cuschieri, Paul

    2009-11-01

    Since 1996, Malta has experienced an upsurge of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) following an almost 30 year period with a negligible number of annually reported cases. We reviewed the 233 IMD cases notified during a 14 year period (1994-2007), and analysed epidemiological and laboratory surveillance data. The crude incidence per 100,000 inhabitants peaked in 2000 at 8.1 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 5.7-11.6] and again in 2006 at 8.9 (95 % CI 6.4-12.4), thereby placing Malta amongst the countries with the highest incidence of the disease in Europe. Of the total cases, 137 (59 %) were confirmed and 30 (13 %) were classified as probable. However, 66 cases (28 %) had no laboratory evidence of the disease and were classified as possible. Information on the serogroup was available for 114 cases. Serogroup B formed the largest proportion (76 %, n=87) followed by serogroup C (16 %, n=18). B : 4 : P1.19,15 strains (n=46) predominated throughout the study period since their first identification in 1998. With 28 deaths attributed to IMD, the overall case fatality rate was 12 %. Apart from stressing the importance of maintaining high vigilance for IMD, our findings underscore the importance of enhancing laboratory surveillance of the disease, including characterization of the meningococci. Until vaccines against a broad range of serogroup B meningococci become available for universal use, the main methods of control remain the early treatment of cases and the prevention of secondary cases.

  10. Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase-4 during Pneumococcal Pneumonia Reduces Inflammation and Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Luciana P; Garcia, Cristiana C; Vago, Juliana P; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Galvão, Izabela; David, Bruna A; Rachid, Milene A; Silva, Patrícia M R; Russo, Remo C; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2016-07-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. The inflammatory response to bacteria is necessary to control infection, but it may also contribute to tissue damage. Phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, such as rolipram (ROL), effectively reduce inflammation. Here, we examined the impact of ROL in a pneumococcal pneumonia murine model. Mice were infected intranasally with 10(5)-10(6) CFU of Streptococcus pneumoniae, treated with ROL in a prophylactic or therapeutic schedule in combination, or not, with the antibiotic ceftriaxone. Inflammation and bacteria counts were assessed, and ex vivo phagocytosis assays were performed. ROL treatment during S. pneumoniae infection decreased neutrophil recruitment into lungs and airways and reduced lung injury. Prophylactic ROL treatment also decreased cytokine levels in the airways. Although modulation of inflammation by ROL ameliorated pneumonia, bacteria burden was not reduced. On the other hand, antibiotic therapy reduced bacteria without reducing neutrophil infiltration, cytokine level, or lung injury. Combined ROL and ceftriaxone treatment decreased lethality rates and was more efficient in reducing inflammation, by increasing proresolving protein annexin A1 (AnxA1) expression, and bacterial burden by enhancing phagocytosis. Lack of AnxA1 increased inflammation and lethality induced by pneumococcal infection. These data show that immunomodulatory effects of phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors are useful during severe pneumococcal pneumonia and suggest their potential benefit as adjunctive therapy during infectious diseases. PMID:26677751

  11. Is household antibiotic use a risk factor for antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal infection?

    PubMed Central

    Kwan-Gett, T. S.; Davis, R. L.; Shay, D. K.; Black, S.; Shinefield, H.; Koepsell, T.

    2002-01-01

    We used microbiology and pharmacy data from health-maintenance organizations to determine whether antibiotic use by a household member increases the risk of penicillin-non-susceptible pneumococcal disease. Though it has been well established that an individual's antibiotic use increases one's risk of antibiotic-resistant infection, it is unclear whether the risk is increased if a member of one's household is exposed to antibiotics. We therefore conducted a case-control study of patients enrolled in health maintenance organizations in Western Washington and Northern California. Cases were defined as individuals with penicillin-non-susceptible pneumococcal infection; controls were individuals with penicillin-susceptible pneumococcal infection. Socioeconomic variables were obtained by linking addresses with 1997 census block group data. One-hundred and thirty-four cases were compared with 798 controls. Individual antibiotic use prior to diagnosis increased the odds of penicillin non-susceptibility, with the strongest effect seen for beta-lactam use within 2 months (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.2, 2.8). When household antibiotic use by persons other than the patient were considered, at 4 months prior to diagnosis there was a trend towards an association between penicillin non-susceptibility and beta-lactam antibiotic use, and a possible association in a small subgroup of patients with eye and ear isolates. However, no significant overall pattern of association was seen. We conclude that though antibiotic use of any kind within 2 months prior to diagnosis is associated with an increased risk of penicillin-non-susceptible pneumococcal disease, there is no significant overall pattern of association between household antibiotic use and penicillin-non-susceptible pneumococcal infection. PMID:12558332

  12. Portable, Non-Invasive Fall Risk Assessment in End Stage Renal Disease Patients on Hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, Thurmon E; Barth, Adam T; Zhang, Xiaoyue; Songra, Rahul; Abdel-Rahman, Emaad; Lach, John

    2010-01-01

    Patients with end stage renal diseases (ESRD) on hemodialysis (HD) have high morbidity and mortality due to multiple causes, one of which is dramatically higher fall rates than the general population. The mobility mechanisms that contribute to falls in this population must be understood if adequate interventions for fall prevention are to be achieved. This study utilizes emerging non-invasive, portable gait, posture, strength, and stability assessment technologies to extract various mobility parameters that research has shown to be predictive of fall risk in the general population. As part of an ongoing human subjects study, mobility measures such as postural and locomotion profiles were obtained from five (5) ESRD patients undergoing HD treatments. To assess the effects of post-HD-fatigue on fall risk, both the pre- and post-HD measurements were obtained. Additionally, the effects of inter-HD periods (two days vs. three days) were investigated using the non-invasive, wireless, body-worn motion capture technology and novel signal processing algorithms. The results indicated that HD treatment influenced strength and mobility (i.e., weaker and slower after the dialysis, increasing the susceptibility to falls while returning home) and inter-dialysis period influenced pre-HD profiles (increasing the susceptibility to falls before they come in for a HD treatment). Methodology for early detection of increased fall risk - before a fall event occurs - using the portable mobility assessment technology for out-patient monitoring is further explored, including targeting interventions to identified individuals for fall prevention.

  13. Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor

    MedlinePlus

    Pneumococcal Vaccination Recommendations for Children 1 and Adults by Age and/or Risk Factor Routine Recommendations for Pneumococcal Conjugate ... X X X X X 1 For PCV13 vaccination of healthy children, see “Recommen- dations for Pneumococcal ...

  14. Minimally invasive treatment of pilonidal disease: crystallized phenol and laser depilation.

    PubMed

    Girgin, Mustafa; Kanat, Burhan Hakan; Ayten, Refik; Cetinkaya, Ziya; Kanat, Zekiye; Bozdağ, Ahmet; Turkoglu, Ahmet; Ilhan, Yavuz Selim

    2012-01-01

    Pilonidal disease has been treated surgically and by various other methods for many years. The most important problem associated with such treatment is recurrence, but cosmetic outcome is another important issue that cannot be ignored. Today, crystallized phenol is recognized as a treatment option associated with good medical and cosmetic outcomes. We hypothesized that the addition of laser depilation to crystallized phenol treatment of pilonidal disease might increase the rate of success, and this study aimed to determine if the hypothesis was true. Patients who were treated with crystallized phenol and 755-nm alexandrite laser depilation were retrospectively analyzed. In total, 42 (31 male and 11 female) patients were treated with crystallized phenol and alexandrite laser depilation and were followed up between January 2009 and January 2012. In all, 38 patients (90.5%) had chronic disease and 4 (9.5%) had recurrent disease. Among the patients, 26 (61.9%) recovered following 1 crystallized phenol treatment, and the remaining patients had complete remission following repeated treatment. Some patients needed multiple treatments, even up to 8 times. None of the patients had a recurrence during a mean 24 months (range, 6-30 months) of follow-up. Whatever method of treatment is used for pilonidal disease, hair cleaning positively affects treatment outcome. The present results support the hypothesis that the addition of laser depilation (which provides more permanent and effective depilation than other methods) to crystallized phenol treatment (a non-radical, minimally invasive method associated with very good cosmetic results) can increase the effectiveness of the treatment and also reduce the recurrence rate of the disease. PMID:23294066

  15. Pneumococcal phosphoglycerate kinase interacts with plasminogen and its tissue activator.

    PubMed

    Fulde, M; Bernardo-García, N; Rohde, M; Nachtigall, N; Frank, R; Preissner, K T; Klett, J; Morreale, A; Chhatwal, G S; Hermoso, J A; Bergmann, S

    2014-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is not only a commensal of the nasopharyngeal epithelium, but may also cause life-threatening diseases. Immune-electron microscopy studies revealed that the bacterial glycolytic enzyme, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), is localised on the pneumococcal surface of both capsulated and non-capsulated strains and colocalises with plasminogen. Since pneumococci may concentrate host plasminogen (PLG) together with its activators on the bacterial cell surface to facilitate the formation of plasmin, the involvement of PGK in this process was studied. Specific binding of human or murine PLG to strain-independent PGK was documented, and surface plasmon resonance analyses indicated a high affinity interaction with the kringle domains 1-4 of PLG. Crystal structure determination of pneumococcal PGK together with peptide array analysis revealed localisation of PLG-binding site in the N-terminal region and provided structural motifs for the interaction with PLG. Based on structural analysis data, a potential interaction of PGK with tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) was proposed and experimentally confirmed by binding studies, plasmin activity assays and thrombus degradation analyses. PMID:24196407

  16. Understanding Host-Adherent-Invasive Escherichia coli Interaction in Crohn's Disease: Opening Up New Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Massier, Sébastien; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette; Billard, Elisabeth; Barnich, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A trillion of microorganisms colonize the mammalian intestine. Most of them have coevolved with the host in a symbiotic relationship and some of them have developed strategies to promote their replication in the presence of competing microbiota. Recent evidence suggests that perturbation of the microbial community favors the emergence of opportunistic pathogens, in particular adherent-invasive Escherichia coli (AIEC) that can increase incidence and severity of gut inflammation in the context of Crohn's disease (CD). This review will report the importance of AIEC as triggers of intestinal inflammation, focusing on their impact on epithelial barrier function and stimulation of mucosal inflammation. Beyond manipulation of immune response, restoration of gut microbiota as a new treatment option for CD patients will be discussed. PMID:25580435

  17. Review of invasive meningococcal disease during the last 40 years in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Mustafa; Altinel, Serdar

    2015-01-01

    Due to the lack of comprehensive surveillance data representing Turkey, the authors aimed to derive information by panoramically reviewing all articles related to invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) published in the last 40 years. The following databases were reviewed: Ulakbim (the national database), BIOSIS Previews (from 1995), Evidence-Based Medicine Reviews-Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (from 2005), Embase (from 1996), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (from 1946) and Journals@Ovid Full Text (2014). Twenty-seven articles, 10 published in international journals and 17 in national journals, were identified. Only two were multicenter sentinel meningitis surveillance studies. Also, 74% of IMD patients were aged 5 years or younger and the median overall case fatality rate during childhood was 18.44%. Turkey is a country where meningococcal vaccination on a national basis is recommended by WHO. A vaccination strategy for serogroups B and W135 targeting the first 5 years, covering especially the first 12 months, would be appropriate.

  18. The continuing role of Haemophilus influenzae type b carriage surveillance as a mechanism for early detection of invasive disease activity.

    PubMed

    Jacups, Susan P

    2011-12-01

    Prior to the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines, Hib was the leading cause of bacterial meningitis in children under five years of age worldwide. In countries that have adopted Hib vaccination schedules, invasive disease has reduced markedly. Oro-naso pharyngeal carriage is recognized as the most significant source of infection. Hib carriage is significantly associated with poverty, such as overcrowding, poor ventilation in houses, lack of running water, and high smoking rates. Additionally, many Indigenous minority groups report high rates of Hib carriage. A resurgence of Hib disease among Alaskan children in the 1990s, lead to a change in approach to eliminate Hib disease and carriage in high-risk populations. This new approach identifies strategies for eliminating Hib disease focusing on the reservoirs of colonization within families and communities. Monitoring Hib carriage continues to offer an early warning system, whereby intervention could prevent invasive disease resurgence.

  19. Non-invasive methods for the diagnosis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Papagianni, Marianthi; Sofogianni, Areti; Tziomalos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest chronic liver disease and includes simple steatosis and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Since NASH progresses to cirrhosis more frequently and increases liver-related and cardiovascular disease risk substantially more than simple steatosis, there is a great need to differentiate the two entities. Liver biopsy is the gold standard for the diagnosis of NAFLD but its disadvantages, including the risk of complications and sampling bias, stress the need for developing alternative diagnostic methods. Accordingly, several non-invasive markers have been evaluated for the diagnosis of simple steatosis and NASH, including both serological indices and imaging methods. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the role of these markers in the diagnosis of NAFLD. Current data suggest that ultrasound and the fibrosis-4 score are probably the most appealing methods for detecting steatosis and for distinguishing NASH from simple steatosis, respectively, because of their low cost and relatively high accuracy. However, currently available methods, both serologic and imaging, cannot obviate the need for liver biopsy for diagnosing NASH due to their substantial false positive and false negative rates. Therefore, the current role of these methods is probably limited in patients who are unwilling or have contraindications for undergoing biopsy. PMID:25866601

  20. Non-invasive detection of periodontal disease using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Subhash, Narayanan; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Prasanthila, Janam

    2012-03-01

    In clinical diagnostic procedures, gingival inflammation is considered as the initial stage of periodontal breakdown. This is often detected clinically by bleeding on probing as it is an objective measure of inflammation. Since conventional diagnostic procedures have several inherent drawbacks, development of novel non-invasive diagnostic techniques assumes significance. This clinical study was carried out in 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients to demonstrate the applicability of diffuse reflectance (DR) spectroscopy for quantification and discrimination of various stages of inflammatory conditions in periodontal disease. The DR spectra of diseased lesions recorded using a point monitoring system consisting of a tungsten halogen lamp and a fiber-optic spectrometer showed oxygenated hemoglobin absorption dips at 545 and 575 nm. Mean DR spectra on normalization shows marked differences between healthy and different stages of gingival inflammation. Among the various DR intensity ratios investigated, involving oxy Hb absorption peaks, the R620/R575 ratio was found to be a good parameter of gingival inflammation. In order to screen the entire diseased area and its surroundings instantaneously, DR images were recorded with an EMCCD camera at 620 and 575 nm. We have observed that using the DR image intensity ratio R620/R575 mild inflammatory tissues could be discriminated from healthy with a sensitivity of 92% and specificity of 93%, and from moderate with a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 96%. The sensitivity and specificity obtained between moderate and severe inflammation are 82% and 76% respectively.

  1. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination: patient perceptions

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, P.; Gibbons, Y; Primrose, W; Ellis, G; Downie, G

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of the influenza vaccine in reducing mortality and hospital admissions is established, particularly in the elderly. However, up to 50% of those at risk do not receive the vaccine. These patients are also at risk from pneumococcal infection and there is considerable overlap between the target group for each vaccine.
This study sought to identify at risk individuals from consecutive admissions to an acute geriatric unit and to gain an insight into their perceptions with regard to vaccination. The awareness of each vaccine was recorded, together with the vaccination history.
Seventy four per cent of the final cohort had heard of the influenza vaccine, while only 13% had heard of the pneumococcal vaccine. Fifty per cent perceived themselves to be at risk from influenza and its complications and 87% of the cohort believed it to be a serious infection.
Influenza vaccine was judged to confer good protection by 72% of the sample and yet up to 50% believed that the vaccine can make the recipient ill.
Influenza is perceived as a serious infection by patients and yet many do not believe themselves to be at particular risk. Although influenza vaccination is believed to confer protection, the decision whether, or not, to accept the vaccine is coloured by many factors, including popular myths and anecdotal information from friends and relatives. The uptake of influenza vaccine is suboptimal and the awareness of the pneumococcal vaccine certainly in the elderly is poor. The need for a comprehensive nationwide education campaign promoting both influenza and pneumococcal vaccine is highlighted.


Keywords: influenza vaccine; pneumococcal vaccine PMID:10727564

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Invasive Serotype 1 Pneumococcus in South Africa, 1989 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Mushal; Tempia, Stefano; Wolter, Nicole; de Gouveia, Linda; von Mollendorf, Claire; Jolley, Keith A.; Mbelle, Nontombi; Wadula, Jeannette; Cornick, Jennifer E.; Everett, Dean B.; McGee, Lesley; Breiman, Robert F.; Gladstone, Rebecca A.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Klugman, Keith P.; von Gottberg, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Serotype 1 is an important cause of invasive pneumococcal disease in South Africa and has declined following the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in 2011. We genetically characterized 912 invasive serotype 1 isolates from 1989 to 2013. Simpson's diversity index (D) and recombination ratios were calculated. Factors associated with sequence types (STs) were assessed. Clonal complex 217 represented 96% (872/912) of the sampled isolates. Following the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), ST diversity increased in children <5 years (D, 0.39 to 0.63, P = 0.002) and individuals >14 years (D, 0.35 to 0.54, P < 0.001): ST-217 declined proportionately in children <5 years (153/203 [75%] versus 21/37 [57%], P = 0.027) and individuals >14 years (242/305 [79%] versus 96/148 [65%], P = 0.001), whereas ST-9067 increased (4/684 [0.6%] versus 24/228 [11%], P < 0.001). Three subclades were identified within ST-217: ST-217C1 (353/382 [92%]), ST-217C2 (15/382 [4%]), and ST-217C3 (14/382 [4%]). ST-217C2, ST-217C3, and single-locus variant (SLV) ST-8314 (20/912 [2%]) were associated with nonsusceptibility to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and co-trimoxazole. ST-8314 (20/912 [2%]) was also associated with increased nonsusceptibility to penicillin (P < 0.001). ST-217C3 and newly reported ST-9067 had higher recombination ratios than those of ST-217C1 (4.344 versus 0.091, P < 0.001; and 0.086 versus 0.013, P < 0.001, respectively). Increases in genetic diversity were noted post-PCV13, and lineages associated with antimicrobial nonsusceptibility were identified. PMID:26962082

  3. Phylogenetic Analysis of Invasive Serotype 1 Pneumococcus in South Africa, 1989 to 2013.

    PubMed

    du Plessis, Mignon; Allam, Mushal; Tempia, Stefano; Wolter, Nicole; de Gouveia, Linda; von Mollendorf, Claire; Jolley, Keith A; Mbelle, Nontombi; Wadula, Jeannette; Cornick, Jennifer E; Everett, Dean B; McGee, Lesley; Breiman, Robert F; Gladstone, Rebecca A; Bentley, Stephen D; Klugman, Keith P; von Gottberg, Anne

    2016-05-01

    Serotype 1 is an important cause of invasive pneumococcal disease in South Africa and has declined following the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in 2011. We genetically characterized 912 invasive serotype 1 isolates from 1989 to 2013. Simpson's diversity index (D) and recombination ratios were calculated. Factors associated with sequence types (STs) were assessed. Clonal complex 217 represented 96% (872/912) of the sampled isolates. Following the introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13), ST diversity increased in children <5 years (D, 0.39 to 0.63, P = 0.002) and individuals >14 years (D, 0.35 to 0.54, P < 0.001): ST-217 declined proportionately in children <5 years (153/203 [75%] versus 21/37 [57%], P = 0.027) and individuals >14 years (242/305 [79%] versus 96/148 [65%], P = 0.001), whereas ST-9067 increased (4/684 [0.6%] versus 24/228 [11%], P < 0.001). Three subclades were identified within ST-217: ST-217C1 (353/382 [92%]), ST-217C2 (15/382 [4%]), and ST-217C3 (14/382 [4%]). ST-217C2, ST-217C3, and single-locus variant (SLV) ST-8314 (20/912 [2%]) were associated with nonsusceptibility to chloramphenicol, tetracycline, and co-trimoxazole. ST-8314 (20/912 [2%]) was also associated with increased nonsusceptibility to penicillin (P < 0.001). ST-217C3 and newly reported ST-9067 had higher recombination ratios than those of ST-217C1 (4.344 versus 0.091, P < 0.001; and 0.086 versus 0.013, P < 0.001, respectively). Increases in genetic diversity were noted post-PCV13, and lineages associated with antimicrobial nonsusceptibility were identified. PMID:26962082

  4. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination in Hematological Malignancies: a Systematic Review of Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Mannocci, Alice; Colamesta, Vittoria; D’Egidio, Valeria; Sestili, Cristina; Spadea, Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of getting influenza and pneumococcal disease is higher in cancer patients, and serum antibody levels tend to be lower in patients with hematological malignancy. Objective To assess flu and pneumococcal vaccinations efficacy, effectiveness, and safety in onco-hematological patients. Methods Two systematic reviews and possible meta-analysis were conducted to summarize the results of all primary study in the scientific literature about the flu and pneumococcal vaccine in onco-hematological patients. Literature searches were performed using Pub-Med and Scopus databases. StatsDirect 2.8.0 was used for the analysis. Results 22 and 26 studies were collected respectively for flu and pneumococcal vaccinations. Protection rate of booster dose was 30% (95% CI=6–62%) for H1N1. Pooled prevalence protection rate of H3N2 and B was available for meta-analysis only for first dose, 42.6% (95% CI=23.2 – 63.3 %) and 39.6 % (95% CI=26%–54.1%) for H3N2 and B, respectively. Response rate of booster dose resulted 35% (95% CI=19.7–51.2%) for H1N1, 23% (95% CI=16.6–31.5%) for H3N2, 29% (95% CI=21.3–37%) for B. Conclusion Despite the low rate of response, flu, and pneumococcal vaccines are worthwhile for patients with hematological malignancies. Patients undergoing chemotherapy in particular rituximab, splenectomy, transplant recipient had lower and impaired response. No serious adverse events were reported for both vaccines.

  5. Influenza and Pneumococcal Vaccination in Hematological Malignancies: a Systematic Review of Efficacy, Effectiveness, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    La Torre, Giuseppe; Mannocci, Alice; Colamesta, Vittoria; D’Egidio, Valeria; Sestili, Cristina; Spadea, Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    Background The risk of getting influenza and pneumococcal disease is higher in cancer patients, and serum antibody levels tend to be lower in patients with hematological malignancy. Objective To assess flu and pneumococcal vaccinations efficacy, effectiveness, and safety in onco-hematological patients. Methods Two systematic reviews and possible meta-analysis were conducted to summarize the results of all primary study in the scientific literature about the flu and pneumococcal vaccine in onco-hematological patients. Literature searches were performed using Pub-Med and Scopus databases. StatsDirect 2.8.0 was used for the analysis. Results 22 and 26 studies were collected respectively for flu and pneumococcal vaccinations. Protection rate of booster dose was 30% (95% CI=6–62%) for H1N1. Pooled prevalence protection rate of H3N2 and B was available for meta-analysis only for first dose, 42.6% (95% CI=23.2 – 63.3 %) and 39.6 % (95% CI=26%–54.1%) for H3N2 and B, respectively. Response rate of booster dose resulted 35% (95% CI=19.7–51.2%) for H1N1, 23% (95% CI=16.6–31.5%) for H3N2, 29% (95% CI=21.3–37%) for B. Conclusion Despite the low rate of response, flu, and pneumococcal vaccines are worthwhile for patients with hematological malignancies. Patients undergoing chemotherapy in particular rituximab, splenectomy, transplant recipient had lower and impaired response. No serious adverse events were reported for both vaccines. PMID:27648207

  6. First report of Puccinia psidii caused rust-disease epiphytotic on the invasive shrub Rhodomyrtus tomentosa in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Aiton) Hassk. (downy-rose myrtle, Family: Myrtaceae) of south Asian origin is an invasive shrub that has formed monotypic stands in Florida. During the winter and spring of 2010-2012, a rust disease of epiphytotic proportion was observed on young foliage, stem terminals and i...

  7. Clonal Complex 17 Group B Streptococcus strains causing invasive disease in neonates and adults originate from the same genetic pool

    PubMed Central

    Teatero, Sarah; Ramoutar, Erin; McGeer, Allison; Li, Aimin; Melano, Roberto G.; Wasserscheid, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Fittipaldi, Nahuel

    2016-01-01

    A significant proportion of group B Streptococcus (GBS) neonatal disease, particularly late-onset disease, is associated with strains of serotype III, clonal complex (CC) 17. CC17 strains also cause invasive infections in adults. Little is known about the phylogenetic relationships of isolates recovered from neonatal and adult CC17 invasive infections. We performed whole-genome-based phylogenetic analysis of 93 temporally and geographically matched CC17 strains isolated from both neonatal and adult invasive infections in the metropolitan region of Toronto/Peel, Canada. We also mined the whole-genome data to reveal mobile genetic elements carrying antimicrobial resistance genes. We discovered that CC17 GBS strains causing neonatal and adult invasive disease are interspersed and cluster tightly in a phylogenetic tree, signifying that they are derived from the same genetic pool. We identified limited variation due to recombination in the core CC17 genome. We describe that loss of Pilus Island 1 and acquisition of different mobile genetic elements carrying determinants of antimicrobial resistance contribute to CC17 genetic diversity. Acquisition of some of these mobile genetic elements appears to correlate with clonal expansion of the strains that possess them. Our results provide a genome-wide portrait of the population structure and evolution of a major disease-causing clone of an opportunistic pathogen. PMID:26843175

  8. [Biological factors influencing infectious diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes].

    PubMed

    Boštíková, Vanda; Pasdiorová, Markéta; Marek, Jan; Prášil, Petr; Salavec, Miloslav; Sleha, Radek; Střtítecká, Hana; Blažek, Pavel; Hanovcová, Irena; Šošovičková, Renáta; Špliňo, Milan; Smetana, Jan; Chlíbek, Roman; Hytych, Václav; Kuča, Kamil; Boštík, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Studies focused on arbovirus diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes have become increasingly significant in recent years, due to the fact that these vectors have successfully migrated to Europe and become established in the region. Mosquitoes, represented by more than 3 200 species, occur naturally worldwide, except in Antarctica. They feed on the blood of warm-blooded animals and by this route, they are capable of transmitting dangerous diseases. Some species can travel a distance of 10 km per night and can fly continuously for up to 4 hours at a speed of 1-2 km/h. Most species are active at night, in the evening or morning. It usually takes a mosquito female about 50 seconds to penetrate the skin of mammals and the subsequent blood meal usually takes about 2.5 minutes. Mosquitoes live for several weeks or months, depending on the environmental conditions. The VectorNet project is a European network of information exchange and sharing of data relating to the geographical distribution of arthropod vectors and transmission of infectious agents between human populations and animals. It aims at the development of strategic plans and vaccination policies which are the main tasks of this time, as well as the development and application of new disinfectants to control vector populations.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide subtypes of Haemophilus influenzae type b from an outbreak of invasive disease.

    PubMed Central

    Inzana, T J; Pichichero, M E

    1984-01-01

    Thirty isolates of Haemophilus influenzae type b were obtained during an outbreak of invasive H. influenzae type b disease and were classified by the electrophoretic profile of their lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The LPS was extracted by a rapid micromethod and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and silver staining. The isolates could be divided into 1 of 14 subtypes based on the profile of two to four bands. No subtype was predominant. However, all isolates obtained from duplicate sites of the same individual were of the same subtype. Isolates obtained from two patients (6 weeks apart) who attended the same day-care center differed in LPS subtype but were identical in their major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile. Nasopharyngeal cultures were obtained from healthy children, their immediate families, and employees of the day-care center. Of 13 H. influenzae isolates examined from these contacts, only 1 was type b, which was obtained from a day-care worker and had the same LPS subtype and major outer membrane protein electrophoretic profile as one of the disease isolates. The remaining nasopharyngeal isolates were untypable, and most, but not all, were different in LPS pattern. Thus, LPS subtyping of H. influenzae type b may be useful in examining the predominance or transmission of a strain during an outbreak and may distinguish some strains not differentiated by outer membrane protein pattern. Images PMID:6333433

  10. [Biological factors influencing infectious diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes].

    PubMed

    Boštíková, Vanda; Pasdiorová, Markéta; Marek, Jan; Prášil, Petr; Salavec, Miloslav; Sleha, Radek; Střtítecká, Hana; Blažek, Pavel; Hanovcová, Irena; Šošovičková, Renáta; Špliňo, Milan; Smetana, Jan; Chlíbek, Roman; Hytych, Václav; Kuča, Kamil; Boštík, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Studies focused on arbovirus diseases transmitted by invasive species of mosquitoes have become increasingly significant in recent years, due to the fact that these vectors have successfully migrated to Europe and become established in the region. Mosquitoes, represented by more than 3 200 species, occur naturally worldwide, except in Antarctica. They feed on the blood of warm-blooded animals and by this route, they are capable of transmitting dangerous diseases. Some species can travel a distance of 10 km per night and can fly continuously for up to 4 hours at a speed of 1-2 km/h. Most species are active at night, in the evening or morning. It usually takes a mosquito female about 50 seconds to penetrate the skin of mammals and the subsequent blood meal usually takes about 2.5 minutes. Mosquitoes live for several weeks or months, depending on the environmental conditions. The VectorNet project is a European network of information exchange and sharing of data relating to the geographical distribution of arthropod vectors and transmission of infectious agents between human populations and animals. It aims at the development of strategic plans and vaccination policies which are the main tasks of this time, as well as the development and application of new disinfectants to control vector populations. PMID:27450526

  11. Saliva proteomics as an emerging, non-invasive tool to study livestock physiology, nutrition and diseases.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Elsa; Mau, Marcus

    2012-07-19

    Saliva is an extraordinary fluid in terms of research and diagnostic possibilities. Its composition in electrolytes, hormones and especially its proteome contains information about feeding status, nutritional requirements and adaptations to diet and environment, and also about health status of animals. It is easy to collect on a non-invasive and routine basis without any need for special training. Therefore, the analysis of salivary proteomes is going to emerge into a field of high interest with the future goal to maintain and improve livestock productivity and welfare. Moreover, the comprehensive analysis and identification of salivary proteins and peptides in whole and glandular saliva is a necessary pre-requisite to identify animal disease biomarkers and a powerful tool to better understand animal physiology. This review focuses on the different approaches used to study the salivary proteomes of farm animals, in respect to the physiology of nutrition and food perception in relation to food choices. The potential of animal saliva as a source of disease biomarkers will also be pointed out. Special emphasis is laid on the 'ruminating triad' - cattle, goat and sheep - as well as swine as major species of animal production in Western and Southern Europe.

  12. The effect of physicians' awareness on influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates and correlates of vaccination in patients with diabetes in Turkey: an epidemiological Study "diaVAX".

    PubMed

    Satman, Ilhan; Akalin, Sema; Cakir, Bekir; Altinel, Serdar

    2013-12-01

    We aimed to examine the effect of increased physician awareness on the rate and determinants of influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations in diabetic patients. Diabetic patients (n = 5682, mean [SD] age: 57.3 [11.6] years, 57% female) were enrolled by 44 physicians between Sept 2010 and Jan 2011. The physicians were initially questioned regarding vaccination practices, and then, they attended a training program. During the last five years, the physicians recommended influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations to 87.9% and 83.4% of the patients, respectively; however; only 27% of the patients received the influenza and 9.8% received the pneumococcal vaccines. One year after the training, the vaccination rates increased to 63.3% and 40.7%, respectively. The logistic regression models revealed that variables which increased the likelihood of having been vaccinated against influenza were: longer duration of diabetes, presence of hyperlipidemia and more use of concomitant medications whereas more use of anti-hyperglycemic medications was associated with increased odds of vaccination. On the other hand, older age, longer duration of diabetes and presence of a cardiovascular disease were variables which decreased the likelihood of having been vaccinated against pneumococcal disease during the past five years. However, during the study period, variables which decreased the odds of having been vaccinated included: older age and anti-hyperglycemic medications for influenza, and presence of hyperlipidemia and a family history of hypertension for pneumococcal disease. While variables which increased the likelihood of vaccination in the same period were: increased number of co-morbidities for influenza, and family history of diabetes for pneumococcal disease. We conclude that increased awareness of physicians may help improve vaccination rates against influenza and pneumococcal disease. However, diabetic patients with more severe health conditions are less likely to having been

  13. Treatment Costs of Pneumonia, Meningitis, Sepsis, and Other Diseases among Hospitalized Children in Viet Nam

    PubMed Central

    Anh, Dang Duc; Tho, Le Huu; Kim, Soon Ae; Nyambat, Batmunkh; Kilgore, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the costs of treatment of children who present with the signs and symptoms of invasive bacterial diseases in Khanh Hoa province, Viet Nam. The study was an incidence-based cost-of-illness analysis from the health system perspective. The hospital costs included labour, materials and capital costs, both direct and indirect. Costs were determined for 980 children, with an average age of 12.67 months (standard deviation±11.38), who were enrolled in a prospective surveillance at the Khanh Hoa General Hospital during 2005-2006. Of them, 57% were male. By disease-category, 80% were suspected of having pneumonia, 8% meningitis, 3% very severe disease consistent with pneumococcal sepsis, and 9% other diseases. Treatment costs for suspected pneumonia, meningitis, very severe disease, and other diseases were US$ 31, US$ 57, US$ 73, and US$ 24 respectively. Costs ranged from US$ 24 to US$ 164 across different case-categories. Both type of disease and age of patient had statistically significant effects on treatment costs. The results showed that treatment costs for bacterial diseases in children were considerable and might differ by as much as seven times among invasive pneumococcal diseases. Changes in costs were sensitive to both age of patient and case-category. These cost-of-illness data will be an important component in the overall evidence base to guide the development of vaccine policy in Viet Nam. PMID:20941894

  14. Kingella kingae Expresses Four Structurally Distinct Polysaccharide Capsules That Differ in Their Correlation with Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Porsch, Eric A.; Seed, Patrick C.; Heiss, Christian; Naran, Radnaa; Amit, Uri; Yagupsky, Pablo; Azadi, Parastoo; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Kingella kingae is an encapsulated gram-negative organism that is a common cause of osteoarticular infections in young children. In earlier work, we identified a glycosyltransferase gene called csaA that is necessary for synthesis of the [3)-β-GalpNAc-(1→5)-β-Kdop-(2→] polysaccharide capsule (type a) in K. kingae strain 269–492. In the current study, we analyzed a large collection of invasive and carrier isolates from Israel and found that csaA was present in only 47% of the isolates. Further examination of this collection using primers based on the sequence that flanks csaA revealed three additional gene clusters (designated the csb, csc, and csd loci), all encoding predicted glycosyltransferases. The csb locus contains the csbA, csbB, and csbC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [6)-α-GlcpNAc-(1→5)-β-(8-OAc)Kdop-(2→] (type b). The csc locus contains the cscA, cscB, and cscC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [3)-β-Ribf-(1→2)-β-Ribf-(1→2)-β-Ribf-(1→4)-β-Kdop-(2→] (type c). The csd locus contains the csdA, csdB, and csdC genes and is associated with a capsule that is a polymer of [P-(O→3)[β-Galp-(1→4)]-β-GlcpNAc-(1→3)-α-GlcpNAc-1-] (type d). Introduction of the csa, csb, csc, and csd loci into strain KK01Δcsa, a strain 269–492 derivative that lacks the native csaA gene, was sufficient to produce the type a capsule, type b capsule, type c capsule, and type d capsule, respectively, indicating that these loci are solely responsible for determining capsule type in K. kingae. Further analysis demonstrated that 96% of the invasive isolates express either the type a or type b capsule and that a disproportionate percentage of carrier isolates express the type c or type d capsule. These results establish that there are at least four structurally distinct K. kingae capsule types and suggest that capsule type plays an important role in promoting K. kingae invasive disease. PMID:27760194

  15. Serological criteria and carriage measurement for evaluation of new pneumococcal vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-01-01

    The best method of evaluating the efficacy of a vaccine is to compare the incidence of the disease against which it is prepared in randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials involving vaccinated and unvaccinated subjects. In the case of Streptococcus pneumoniae, the proposed alternatives are evaluations of the so-called “correlates of protection” (i.e. markers of the vaccine-induced immune response that predict protection from infection and disease) and nasopharyngeal carriage. The aim of this paper is to discuss the most important limitations of the immunological criteria suggested for licensing new pneumococcal vaccines, and comment on the use of carriage as an endpoint for evaluating efficacy. Data showed why the use of a single serological correlate of protection cannot be considered the best means of evaluating pneumococcal vaccines and highlighted the importance of using carriage for efficacy evaluation but in the meantime the need to develop new sensitive and specific methods. PMID:25970715

  16. Budget impact analysis of a pneumococcal vaccination programme in the 65-year-old Spanish cohort using a dynamic model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess the costs and clinical benefits of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) administered annually to the 65-year-old cohort in Spain versus the alternative of not vaccinating patients and treating them only when infected. Methods Cases of pneumococcal disease avoided were calculated through a dynamic model based on the work of Anderson and May (1999). Sixty-six percent of the 65-year-old cohort was assumed to have been vaccinated with one PCV13 dose (304,492 subjects). Base-case estimated vaccine effectiveness and serotype coverage were 58% and 60%, respectively. Disease-related costs were calculated based on published data. Results Over the 5-year period, a total of 125,906 cases of pneumococcal disease would be avoided. Net savings of €102 million would be obtained. The cost-saving distribution was not homogeneous, starting in the 2nd year and increasing through the 5th. To demonstrate model robustness, an additional scenario analysis was performed using extreme values of model parameters (vaccination programme coverage, vaccine effectiveness, discount rate and disease costs). Under those scenarios, net savings were always achieved. Conclusions Based on the assumptions of the model, the 65-year-cohort pneumococcal vaccination campaign appears to be a cost-saving intervention in the Spanish population under different scenarios. PMID:23578307

  17. Invasive and Noninvasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Capsule and Surface Protein Diversity following the Use of a Conjugate Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Croney, Christina M.; Nahm, Moon H.; Juhn, Steven K.; Briles, David E.

    2013-01-01

    The 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) was introduced in the United States in 2010 for the prevention of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) and otitis media. While many studies have reported its potential efficacy for IPD, not much is known about the epidemiology of noninvasive disease following its introduction. We characterized the capsular types and surface protein genes of noninvasive pediatric pneumococcal isolates collected between 2002 and 2010 (n = 1,058) at Children's of Alabama following the introduction of PCV7 and tested a subset of noninvasive and previously characterized IPD isolates for the presence of the pspA, pspC, and rrgC genes, which encode protection-eliciting proteins. PCV7 serotypes had dramatically decreased by 2010 (P < 0.0001), and only 50% of all noninvasive infections were caused by the PCV13 capsular serotypes. Serotype 19A accounted for 32% of the noninvasive isolates, followed by serotypes 35B (9%), 19F (7%), and 6C (6%). After 7 years of PCV7 usage, there were no changes in the frequencies of the pspA or pspC genes; 96% of the strains were positive for family 1 or 2 pspA genes, and 81% were also positive for pspC. Unexpectedly, more noninvasive than invasive strains were positive for rrgC (P < 0.0001), and the proportion of rrgC-positive strains in 2008 to 2010 was greater than that in 2002 to 2008 (IPD, P < 0.02; noninvasive, P < 0.001). Serotypes 19F, 19A, and 35B were more frequently rrgC positive (P < 0.005) than other serotypes. A vaccine containing antigens, such as PspA, PspC, and/or RrgC, can provide coverage against most non-PCV13-type pneumococci. Continued surveillance is critical for optimal future vaccine development. PMID:24006139

  18. Refractory invasive aspergillosis controlled with posaconazole and pulmonary surgery in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Kepenekli, Eda; Soysal, Ahmet; Kuzdan, Canan; Ermerak, Nezih Onur; Yüksel, Mustafa; Bakır, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Among primary immunodefiencies, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has the highest prevalence of invasive fungal diseases. Voriconazole is recommended for the primary treatment of invasive aspergillosis in most patients. In patients whose aspergillosis is refractory to voriconazole, therapeutic options include changing class of antifungal, for example using an amphotericin B formulation, an echinocandin, combination therapy, or further use of azoles. Posaconazole is a triazole derivative which is effective in Aspergillosis prophylaxis and treatment. Rarely, surgical therapy may be needed in some patients. Lesions those are contiguous with the great vessels or the pericardium, single cavitary lesion that cause hemoptysis, lesions invading the chest wall, aspergillosis that involves the skin and the bone are the indications for surgical therapy.Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immundeficiency caused by defects in the phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotidephosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex which is mainstay of killing microorganisms. CGD is characterized by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and by abnormally exuberant inflammatory responses leading to granuloma formation, such as granulomatous enteritis, genitourinary obstruction, and wound dehiscence. The diagnosis is made by neutrophil function testing and the genotyping.Herein, we present a case with CGD who had invasive pulmonary aspergillosis refractory to voriconazole and liposomal amphotericine B combination therapy that was controlled with posaconazole treatment and pulmonary surgery. PMID:24401677

  19. Refractory invasive aspergillosis controlled with posaconazole and pulmonary surgery in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease: case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Among primary immunodefiencies, chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) has the highest prevalence of invasive fungal diseases. Voriconazole is recommended for the primary treatment of invasive aspergillosis in most patients. In patients whose aspergillosis is refractory to voriconazole, therapeutic options include changing class of antifungal, for example using an amphotericin B formulation, an echinocandin, combination therapy, or further use of azoles. Posaconazole is a triazole derivative which is effective in Aspergillosis prophylaxis and treatment. Rarely, surgical therapy may be needed in some patients. Lesions those are contiguous with the great vessels or the pericardium, single cavitary lesion that cause hemoptysis, lesions invading the chest wall, aspergillosis that involves the skin and the bone are the indications for surgical therapy. Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is an inherited immundeficiency caused by defects in the phagocyte nicotinamide adenine dinucleotidephosphate (NADPH) oxidase complex which is mainstay of killing microorganisms. CGD is characterized by recurrent life-threatening bacterial and fungal infections and by abnormally exuberant inflammatory responses leading to granuloma formation, such as granulomatous enteritis, genitourinary obstruction, and wound dehiscence. The diagnosis is made by neutrophil function testing and the genotyping. Herein, we present a case with CGD who had invasive pulmonary aspergillosis refractory to voriconazole and liposomal amphotericine B combination therapy that was controlled with posaconazole treatment and pulmonary surgery. PMID:24401677

  20. Safety and preliminary immunogenicity of Cuban pneumococcal conjugate vaccine candidate in healthy children: a randomized phase I clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Dotres, Carlos P; Puga, Rinaldo; Ricardo, Yariset; Broño, Carmen R; Paredes, Beatriz; Echemendía, Vladimir; Rosell, Sandra; González, Nadezhda; García-Rivera, Dagmar; Valdés, Yury; Goldblatt, David; Vérez-Bencomo, Vicente

    2014-09-15

    A new heptavalent conjugate vaccine (PCV7-TT) is under development in Cuba. PCV7-TT contains 2 μg of serotypes 1, 5, 14, 18C, 19F, 23F and 4 μg of 6B, each one conjugated to tetanus toxoid (TT). This vaccine was designed with the serotypes that cause most invasive pneumococcal diseases (IPD) worldwide. In the present study, we investigated the safety and explored the immunogenicity of PCV7-TT during a controlled, randomized and double blind clinical trial phase I in 4-5-year-old children. PCV7-TT was well tolerated and as safe as Synflorix used as control vaccine. Following a single-dose vaccination, all individual serotypes included in PCV7-TT induced statistically significant increase of IgG GMC and OPA GMT. These are the first clinical results of PCV7-TT in children and they pave the way toward next clinical trials in children and infants. This clinical trial was published in the Cuban Public Register of Clinical Trials with code RPCEC00000173.

  1. Mucosal immunization with PsaA protein, using chitosan as a delivery system, increases protection against acute otitis media and invasive infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Xu, J-H; Dai, W-J; Chen, B; Fan, X-Y

    2015-03-01

    As infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (mainly via the mucosal route) is a leading cause of acute otitis media, sinus and bacterial pneumonia, the mucosal immunity plays an important role in the prevention of pneumococcal diseases. Therefore, intranasal vaccination may be an effective immunization strategy, but requires appropriate mucosal vaccine delivery systems. In this work, chitosan was used as a mucosal delivery system to form chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles based on ionotropic gelation methods and used to immunize BALB/c mice intranasally. Compared to mice immunized with naked PsaA, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-4 in spleen lymphocytes, the systemic (IgG in serum) and mucosal (IgA in mucosal lavage) specific antibodies were enhanced significantly in mice inoculated with chitosan-PsaA. Furthermore, increased protection against acute otitis media following middle ear challenge with pneumococcus serotype 14, and improved survival following intraperitoneal challenge with pneumococcus serotype 3 or serotype 14, was found in the mice immunized with chitosan-PsaA nanoparticles. Thus, intranasal immunization with chitosan-PsaA can successfully induce mucosal and systemic immune responses and increase protection against pneumococcal acute otitis media and invasive infections. Hence, intranasal immunization with PsaA protein, based on chitosan as a delivery system, is an efficient immunization strategy for preventing pneumococcal infections.

  2. The Pattern of Myometrial Invasion As a Predictor of Lymph Node Metastasis or Extrauterine Disease in Low Grade Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Euscher, Elizabeth; Fox, Patricia; Bassett, Roland; Al-Ghawi, Hayma; Ali-Fehmi, Rouba; Barbuto, Denise; Djordjevic, Bojana; Frauenhoffer, Elizabeth; Kim, Insun; Hong, Sun Rang; Montiel, Delia; Moschiano, Elizabeth; Roma, Andres; Silva, Elvio; Malpica, Anais

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of lymph node metastases (LN+) or extrauterine disease (ED) in low grade (FIGO grades 1 or 2) endometrioid carcinoma (LGEC) in a multi institutional setting. For LGEC with and without LNM or ED, each of the 9 participating institutions evaluated patients age, tumor size, myometrial invasion (MI), FIGO grade, % solid component, the presence or absence of papillary architecture, microcystic elongated and fragmented glands (MELF) and single cell/cell cluster invasion (SCI), lymphovascular invasion (LVI), lower uterine segment (LUS) and cervical stromal (CX) involvement and numbers of pelvic (PLN) and para-aortic (PALN) LNs sampled.302 cases were reviewed: LN+ or ED +, 96; LN-/ED-, 208. Patients' ages ranged from 23-91 yrs (median 61). Table 1 summarizes the histopathologic variables that were noted for the LN+ or ED+ group: tumor size ≥2cm, 93/96 (97%), MI >50%, 54/96 (56%), MELF, 67/96 (70%), SCI, 33/96 (34%), LVI, 79/96 (82%), >20% solid, 65/96 (68%), papillary architecture present, 68/96 (72%), LUS involved, 64/96 (67%) and CX involved, 31/96 (32%). For the LN-/ED- group, the results were as follows: tumor size ≥2cm, 152/208 (73%), MI >50%, 56/208 (27%), MELF, 79/208 (38%), single cell invasion, 19/208 (9%) , LVI, 56/208 (27%), >20% solid, 160/208 (77%), papillary architecture present, 122/208 (59%), LUS involved, 77/208 (37%), CX involved, 31/208 (15%). There was no evidence of a difference in the number of pelvic or para-aortic LNs sampled between groups (p=0.9 and 0.1, respectively). Following multivariate analysis, depth of myometrial invasion, cervical stromal involvement, lymphovascular space invasion, and the single cell pattern of invasion emerged as significant predictors of advanced stage disease. Although univariate analysis pointed to LUS involvement, MELF pattern of invasion, and papillary architecture as possible predictors of advanced stage disease, these were not shown to be significant by

  3. Invasive pulmonary fungal infections in patients with connective tissue disease: a retrospective study from northern China

    PubMed Central

    Ge, H.F.; Liu, X.Q.; Zhu, Y.Q.; Chen, H.Q.; Chen, G.Z.

    2016-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary fungal infection (IPFI) is a potentially fatal complication in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD). The current study aimed to uncover the clinical characteristics and risk factors of patients with IPFI-CTD. The files of 2186 CTD patients admitted to a single center in northern China between January 2011 and December 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. A total of 47 CTD patients with IPFI were enrolled into this study and assigned to the CTD-IPFI group, while 47 uninfected CTD patients were assigned to the control group. Clinical manifestations were recorded, and risk factors of IPFI were calculated by stepwise logistical regression analysis. Forty-seven (2.15%) CTD patients developed IPFI. Systemic lupus erythematosus patients were responsible for the highest proportion (36.17%) of cases with IPFI. Candida albicans (72.3%) accounted for the most common fungal species. CTD-IPFI patients had significantly elevated white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and fasting glucose values compared to controls (P<0.05). Cough, sputum and blood in phlegm were the most common symptoms. Risk factors of IPFI in CTD included maximum prednisone dose ≥30 mg/day within 3 months prior to infection, anti-microbial drug therapy, and interstitial pneumonia. CTD patients who have underlying interstitial pneumonia, prior prednisone or multiple antibiotics, were more likely to develop IPFI. PMID:27683823

  4. Improved survival with an ambulatory model of non-invasive ventilation implementation in motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Sheers, Nicole; Berlowitz, David J; Rautela, Linda; Batchelder, Ian; Hopkinson, Kim; Howard, Mark E

    2014-06-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) increases survival and quality of life in motor neuron disease (MND). NIV implementation historically occurred during a multi-day inpatient admission at this institution; however, increased demand led to prolonged waiting times. The aim of this study was to evaluate the introduction of an ambulatory model of NIV implementation. A prospective cohort study was performed. Inclusion criteria were referral for NIV implementation six months pre- or post-commencement of the Day Admission model. This model involved a 4-h stay to commence ventilation with follow-up in-laboratory polysomnography titration and outpatient attendance. Outcome measures included waiting time, hospital length of stay, adverse events and polysomnography data. Results indicated that after changing to the Day Admission model the median waiting time fell from 30 to 13.5 days (p < 0.04) and adverse events declined (4/17 pre- (three deaths, one acute admission) vs. 0/12 post-). Survival was also prolonged (median (IQR) 278 (51-512) days pre- vs 580 (306-1355) days post-introduction of the Day Admission model; hazard ratio 0.41, p = 0.04). Daytime PaCO2 was no different. In conclusion, reduced waiting time to commence ventilation and improved survival were observed following introduction of an ambulatory model of NIV implementation in people with MND, with no change in the effectiveness of ventilation.

  5. High burden of invasive group A streptococcal disease in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R; Patel, M; Currie, B J; Holt, D C; Harris, T; Krause, V

    2016-04-01

    Although the incidence of invasive group A streptococcal disease in northern Australia is very high, little is known of the regional epidemiology and molecular characteristics. We conducted a case series of Northern Territory residents reported between 2011 and 2013 with Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from a normally sterile site. Of the 128 reported episodes, the incidence was disproportionately high in the Indigenous population at 69·7/100 000 compared to 8·8/100 000 in the non-Indigenous population. Novel to the Northern Territory is the extremely high incidence in haemodialysis patients of 2205·9/100 000 population; and for whom targeted infection control measures could prevent transmission. The incidences in the tropical north and semi-arid Central Australian regions were similar. Case fatality was 8% (10/128) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurred in 14 (11%) episodes. Molecular typing of 82 isolates identified 28 emm types, of which 63 (77%) were represented by four emm clusters. Typing confirmed transmission between infant twins. While the diverse range of emm types presents a challenge for effective coverage by vaccine formulations, the limited number of emm clusters raises optimism should cluster-specific cross-protection prove efficacious. Further studies are required to determine effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for contacts and to inform public health response. PMID:26364646

  6. High burden of invasive group A streptococcal disease in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    PubMed

    Boyd, R; Patel, M; Currie, B J; Holt, D C; Harris, T; Krause, V

    2016-04-01

    Although the incidence of invasive group A streptococcal disease in northern Australia is very high, little is known of the regional epidemiology and molecular characteristics. We conducted a case series of Northern Territory residents reported between 2011 and 2013 with Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from a normally sterile site. Of the 128 reported episodes, the incidence was disproportionately high in the Indigenous population at 69·7/100 000 compared to 8·8/100 000 in the non-Indigenous population. Novel to the Northern Territory is the extremely high incidence in haemodialysis patients of 2205·9/100 000 population; and for whom targeted infection control measures could prevent transmission. The incidences in the tropical north and semi-arid Central Australian regions were similar. Case fatality was 8% (10/128) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurred in 14 (11%) episodes. Molecular typing of 82 isolates identified 28 emm types, of which 63 (77%) were represented by four emm clusters. Typing confirmed transmission between infant twins. While the diverse range of emm types presents a challenge for effective coverage by vaccine formulations, the limited number of emm clusters raises optimism should cluster-specific cross-protection prove efficacious. Further studies are required to determine effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for contacts and to inform public health response.

  7. Ankle Brachial Index: simple non-invasive estimation of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieniak, Marcin; Cieślicki, Krzysztof; Żyliński, Marek; Górski, Piotr; Murgrabia, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Gerard

    2014-11-01

    According to international guidelines, patients with Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD) are burdened with high cardiovascular risk. One of the simplest, non-invasive methods for PAD detection is the ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement. The ABI is calculated as the ratio of systolic blood pressure at the ankle (pressure in the posterior tibial artery or the dorsal artery) to the systolic pressure in the arm (in the brachial artery) when the body is in a horizontal position. The physiological value of the ABI is assumed to be between 1 and 1.3; however, these limits vary from study to study. A value less than 0.9 indicates PAD. Some authors propose also measuring the ABI on both sides of the body to highlight possible differences in blood pressure between the opposite arterial segments. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the ABI diagnostic criteria used in different publications. Additionally, ABI measurements were performed on 19 healthy patients in age ranged from 20 to 63 years. The results showed a slight dependence between age and the differences between the values obtained from left and right sides of the body.

  8. Characterisation of Invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae Isolated from Cambodian Children between 2007 – 2012

    PubMed Central

    Giess, Adam; Soeng, Sona; Sar, Poda; Kumar, Varun; Nhoung, Pheakdey; Bousfield, Rachel; Turner, Paul; Stoesser, Nicole; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Parry, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV13) was introduced in Cambodia in January 2015. There are limited data concerning the common serotypes causing invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD). Knowledge of the circulating pneumococcal serotypes is important to monitor epidemiological changes before and after vaccine implementation. Methods All episodes of IPD defined by the isolation of Streptococcus pneumoniae from blood, cerebrospinal fluid or other sterile site in Cambodian children admitted to the Angkor Hospital for Children in Siem Reap, Northwestern Cambodia, between 1st January 2007 and 1st July 2012 were retrospectively studied. Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates that could be retrieved underwent phenotypic typing and whole genome sequencing. Results There were 90 Cambodian children hospitalized with IPD with a median (IQR) age of 2.3 years (0.9–6.2). The case fatality was 15.6% (95% CI 8–23). Of 50 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates available for further testing, 46% were penicillin non-susceptible and 8% were ceftriaxone non-susceptible, 78% were cotrimoxazole resistant, 30% were erythromycin resistant and 30% chloramphenicol resistant. There were no significant changes in resistance levels over the five-year period. The most common serotypes were 1 (11/50; 22%), 23F (8/50; 16%), 14 (6/50; 12%), 5 (5/50; 10%) and 19A (3/50; 6%). Coverage by PCV7, PCV10 and PCV13 was 44%, 76% and 92% respectively. We identified novel multilocus sequence types and resistotypes using whole genome sequencing. Conclusions This study suggests IPD is an important disease in Cambodian children and can have a significant mortality. PCV13 coverage of the serotypes determined in studied strains was high and consistent with another recent study. The phenotypic resistance patterns observed were similar to other regional studies. The use of whole genome sequencing in the present study provides additional typing and resistance information together with the description of novel

  9. The data management of a phase III efficacy trial of an 11-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and related satellite studies conducted in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A large phase III placebo-controlled, randomized efficacy trial of an investigational 11-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine against pneumonia in children less than 2 years of age was conducted in the Philippines from July 2000 to December 2004. Clinical data from 12,194 children who were given either study vaccine or placebo was collected from birth up to two years of age for the occurrence of radiologically proven pneumonia as the primary endpoint, and for clinical pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal disease as the secondary endpoints. Several tertiary endpoints were also explored. Along the core trial, several satellite studies on herd immunity, cost-effectiveness of the study vaccine, acute otitis media, and wheezing were conducted. Results We describe here in detail how the relevant clinical records were managed and how quality control procedures were implemented to ensure that valid data were obtained respectively for the core trial and for the satellite studies. We discuss how the task was achieved, what the challenges were and what might have been done differently. Conclusions There were several factors that made the task of data management doable and efficient. First, a pre-trial data management system was available. Secondly, local committed statisticians, programmers and support staff were available and partly familiar to clinical trials. Thirdly, the personnel had undergone training during trial and grew with the task they were supposed to do. Thus the knowledge needed to develop and operate clinical data system was fully transferred to local staff. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN62323832 PMID:22676626

  10. Invasive fungal disease in university hospital: a PCR-based study of autopsy cases.

    PubMed

    Ruangritchankul, Komkrit; Chindamporn, Ariya; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Poumsuk, Ubon; Keelawat, Somboon; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) has high mortality rate, especially in the growing population of immunocompromised patients. In spite of introduction of novel diagnostic approaches, the intravital recognition of IFD is challenging. Autopsy studies remain a key tool for assessment of epidemiology of visceral mycoses. We aimed to determine species distribution and trends of IFD over the last 10 years in unselected autopsy series from a large university hospital. Forty-five cases of visceral mycoses, confirmed by histopathology and panfungal PCR, were found in 587 consecutive autopsies. Major underlying diseases were diabetes mellitus (20%), hematologic malignancies (15.6%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (15.6%). There was a high risk for disseminated IFD in immunocompromised patients stayed in the hospital over 1 month with a fever longer than 3 weeks. The most common fungi were Aspergillus spp. (58%), Candida spp. (16%), Mucorales (14%) and Fusarium spp. (10%). We found significant increase in Aspergillus flavus (P = 0.04) and Mucorales (P < 0.01) infections over the last 5 years. Concordance rate between histopathology and panfungal PCR was 89.5% to the genus level. All 6 cases of fusariomycosis were misinterpreted as aspergillosis by histology alone. The precise species identification, necessary for targeted antifungal treatment, was rendered only by the molecular technique. Panfungal PCR showed high performance on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, providing important epidemiological data in retrospective autopsy series. Rapid detection of fungi by panfungal PCR assay has high potential for intravital diagnostics of IFD in surgical and biopsy specimens. PMID:26823814

  11. Invasive fungal disease in university hospital: a PCR-based study of autopsy cases

    PubMed Central

    Ruangritchankul, Komkrit; Chindamporn, Ariya; Worasilchai, Navaporn; Poumsuk, Ubon; Keelawat, Somboon; Bychkov, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal disease (IFD) has high mortality rate, especially in the growing population of immunocompromised patients. In spite of introduction of novel diagnostic approaches, the intravital recognition of IFD is challenging. Autopsy studies remain a key tool for assessment of epidemiology of visceral mycoses. We aimed to determine species distribution and trends of IFD over the last 10 years in unselected autopsy series from a large university hospital. Forty-five cases of visceral mycoses, confirmed by histopathology and panfungal PCR, were found in 587 consecutive autopsies. Major underlying diseases were diabetes mellitus (20%), hematologic malignancies (15.6%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (15.6%). There was a high risk for disseminated IFD in immunocompromised patients stayed in the hospital over 1 month with a fever longer than 3 weeks. The most common fungi were Aspergillus spp. (58%), Candida spp. (16%), Mucorales (14%) and Fusarium spp. (10%). We found significant increase in Aspergillus flavus (P = 0.04) and Mucorales (P < 0.01) infections over the last 5 years. Concordance rate between histopathology and panfungal PCR was 89.5% to the genus level. All 6 cases of fusariomycosis were misinterpreted as aspergillosis by histology alone. The precise species identification, necessary for targeted antifungal treatment, was rendered only by the molecular technique. Panfungal PCR showed high performance on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens, providing important epidemiological data in retrospective autopsy series. Rapid detection of fungi by panfungal PCR assay has high potential for intravital diagnostics of IFD in surgical and biopsy specimens. PMID:26823814

  12. Prevalence of nasopharyngeal pneumococcal colonization in children and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of carriage isolates

    PubMed Central

    Utterson, Elizabeth C.; Todd, Elizabeth M.; McFarland, Michelle; Sivapalan, Janardan; Niehoff, Joan M.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.; Morley, S. Celeste

    2015-01-01

    Summary Nasopharyngeal (NP) pneumococcal carriage predisposes children to pneumococcal infections. Defining the proportion of pneumococcal isolates that are antibiotic-resistant enables the appropriate choice of empiric therapies. We have defined the antibiogram of NP carriage isolates derived from a pediatric population following introduction of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. PMID:26327122

  13. Virulence gene profiling and pathogenicity characterization of non-typhoidal Salmonella accounted for invasive disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Porwollik, Steffen; Dagan, Amir; Marzel, Alex; Schorr, Yosef Ilan; Desai, Prerak T; Agmon, Vered; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2013-01-01

    Human infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars (NTS) infrequently causes invasive systemic disease and bacteremia. To understand better the nature of invasive NTS (iNTS), we studied the gene content and the pathogenicity of bacteremic strains from twelve serovars (Typhimurium, Enteritidis, Choleraesuis, Dublin, Virchow, Newport, Bredeney, Heidelberg, Montevideo, Schwarzengrund, 9,12:l,v:- and Hadar). Comparative genomic hybridization using a Salmonella enterica microarray revealed a core of 3233 genes present in all of the iNTS strains, which include the Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1-5, 9, 13, 14; five fimbrial operons (bcf, csg, stb, sth, sti); three colonization factors (misL, bapA, sinH); and the invasion gene, pagN. In the iNTS variable genome, we identified 16 novel genomic islets; various NTS virulence factors; and six typhoid-associated virulence genes (tcfA, cdtB, hlyE, taiA, STY1413, STY1360), displaying a wider distribution among NTS than was previously known. Characterization of the bacteremic strains in C3H/HeN mice showed clear differences in disease manifestation. Previously unreported characterization of serovars Schwarzengrund, 9,12:l,v:-, Bredeney and Virchow in the mouse model showed low ability to elicit systemic disease, but a profound and elongated shedding of serovars Schwarzengrund and 9,12:l,v:- (as well as Enteritidis and Heidelberg) due to chronic infection of the mouse. Phenotypic comparison in macrophages and epithelial cell lines demonstrated a remarkable intra-serovar variation, but also showed that S. Typhimurium bacteremic strains tend to present lower intracellular growth than gastroenteritis isolates. Collectively, our data demonstrated a common core of virulence genes, which might be required for invasive salmonellosis, but also an impressive degree of genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity, highlighting that bacteremia is a complex phenotype, which cannot be attributed merely to an enhanced invasion or intracellular

  14. Risk factors for invasive fungal disease in critically ill adult patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Over 5,000 cases of invasive Candida species infections occur in the United Kingdom each year, and around 40% of these cases occur in critical care units. Invasive fungal disease (IFD) in critically ill patients is associated with increased morbidity and mortality at a cost to both the individual and the National Health Service. In this paper, we report the results of a systematic review performed to identify and summarise the important risk factors derived from published multivariable analyses, risk prediction models and clinical decision rules for IFD in critically ill adult patients to inform the primary data collection for the Fungal Infection Risk Evaluation Study. Methods An internet search was performed to identify articles which investigated risk factors, risk prediction models or clinical decisions rules for IFD in critically ill adult patients. Eligible articles were identified in a staged process and were assessed by two investigators independently. The methodological quality of the reporting of the eligible articles was assessed using a set of questions addressing both general and statistical methodologies. Results Thirteen articles met the inclusion criteria, of which eight articles examined risk factors, four developed a risk prediction model or clinical decision rule and one evaluated a clinical decision rule. Studies varied in terms of objectives, risk factors, definitions and outcomes. The following risk factors were found in multiple studies to be significantly associated with IFD: surgery, total parenteral nutrition, fungal colonisation, renal replacement therapy, infection and/or sepsis, mechanical ventilation, diabetes, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) or APACHE III score. Several other risk factors were also found to be statistically significant in single studies only. Risk factor selection process and modelling strategy also varied across studies, and sample sizes were inadequate for obtaining

  15. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  16. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  17. Detecting Lung Diseases from Exhaled Aerosols: Non-Invasive Lung Diagnosis Using Fractal Analysis and SVM Classification

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Jinxiang; Zhao, Weizhong; Yuan, Jiayao Eddie; Kim, JongWon; Si, Xiuhua; Xu, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Background Each lung structure exhales a unique pattern of aerosols, which can be used to detect and monitor lung diseases non-invasively. The challenges are accurately interpreting the exhaled aerosol fingerprints and quantitatively correlating them to the lung diseases. Objective and Methods In this study, we presented a paradigm of an exhaled aerosol test that addresses the above two challenges and is promising to detect the site and severity of lung diseases. This paradigm consists of two steps: image feature extraction using sub-regional fractal analysis and data classification using a support vector machine (SVM). Numerical experiments were conducted to evaluate the feasibility of the breath test in four asthmatic lung models. A high-fidelity image-CFD approach was employed to compute the exhaled aerosol patterns under different disease conditions. Findings By employing the 10-fold cross-validation method, we achieved 100% classification accuracy among four asthmatic models using an ideal 108-sample dataset and 99.1% accuracy using a more realistic 324-sample dataset. The fractal-SVM classifier has been shown to be robust, highly sensitive to structural variations, and inherently suitable for investigating aerosol-disease correlations. Conclusion For the first time, this study quantitatively linked the exhaled aerosol patterns with their underlying diseases and set the stage for the development of a computer-aided diagnostic system for non-invasive detection of obstructive respiratory diseases. PMID:26422016

  18. Empyema and bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in children under five years of age*, **

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Maria Regina Alves; Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana Maria Costa; Ferrero, Fernando; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Ruvinsky, Raul; Sant'Anna, Clemax Couto; Brandileone, Maria Cristina de Cunto; March, Maria de Fátima Bazhuni Pombo; Maggi, Ruben; Feris-Iglesias, Jesus; Benguigui, Yehuda; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira

    2014-01-01

    We compared bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia (BPP) and pneumococcal empyema (PE), in terms of clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings, in under-fives. A cross-sectional nested cohort study, involving under-fives (102 with PE and 128 with BPP), was conducted at 12 centers in Argentina, Brazil, and the Dominican Republic. Among those with PE, mean age was higher; disease duration was longer; and tachypnea, dyspnea, and high leukocyte counts were more common. Among those with BPP, fever and lethargy were more common. It seems that children with PE can be distinguished from those with BPP on the basis of clinical and laboratory findings. Because both conditions are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, prompt diagnosis is crucial. PMID:24626272

  19. Predicting the impact of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines: serotype composition is not enough.

    PubMed

    Hausdorff, William P; Hoet, Bernard; Adegbola, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. A heptavalent polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccine (PCV) has proven highly effective in preventing pneumococcal disease in industrialized countries. Two higher-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines are now widely available, even in the poorest countries. These differ from each other in the number of serotypes and carrier proteins used for their conjugation. Some have assumed that the only meaningful clinical difference between PCV formulations is a function of the number of serotypes each contains. A careful review of recent clinical data with these and several unlicensed PCV formulations points to important similarities but also that some key properties of each vaccine likely differ from one another.

  20. Imipramine reverses depressive-like parameters in pneumococcal meningitis survivor rats.

    PubMed

    Barichello, Tatiana; Milioli, Graziele; Generoso, Jaqueline S; Cipriano, Andreza L; Costa, Caroline S; Moreira, Ana Paula; Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Comim, Clarissa M; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio; Quevedo, João

    2012-06-01

    Pneumococcal meningitis is a severe infectious disease of the central nervous system, associated with acute inflammation and might cause damage to the host, such as deafness, blindness, seizure, and learning deficits. However, infectious diseases can play a significant role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disturbances. In this context, we evaluated depressive-like parameters; corticosterone and ACTH levels in pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats. Wistar rats underwent a magna cistern tap receiving either 10 μL sterile saline or a Streptococcus pneumoniae suspension at the concentration of 5 × 10(9) cfu/mL. After 3 days of meningitis induction procedure, the animals were treated with imipramine at 10 mg/kg or saline for 14 days (3rd-17th day). The consumption of sweet food was measured for 7 days (10th-17th day). The meningitis group decreased the sucrose intake and increased the levels of corticosterone and ACTH levels in the serum and TNF-α in the cortex; however, the treatment with imipramine reverted the reduction of sweet food consumption, normalized hormonal levels and TNF-α in the cortex. Our results supported the hypothesis that the pneumococcal meningitis surviving rats showed depressive-like behavior and alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  1. Influenza A Virus Alters Pneumococcal Nasal Colonization and Middle Ear Infection Independently of Phase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Wren, John T.; Blevins, Lance K.; Pang, Bing; King, Lauren B.; Perez, Antonia C.; Murrah, Kyle A.; Reimche, Jennifer L.; Alexander-Miller, Martha A.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is both a widespread nasal colonizer and a leading cause of otitis media, one of the most common diseases of childhood. Pneumococcal phase variation influences both colonization and disease and thus has been linked to the bacteria's transition from colonizer to otopathogen. Further contributing to this transition, coinfection with influenza A virus has been strongly associated epidemiologically with the dissemination of pneumococci from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Using a mouse infection model, we demonstrated that coinfection with influenza virus and pneumococci enhanced both colonization and inflammatory responses within the nasopharynx and middle ear chamber. Coinfection studies were also performed using pneumococcal populations enriched for opaque or transparent phase variants. As shown previously, opaque variants were less able to colonize the nasopharynx. In vitro, this phase also demonstrated diminished biofilm viability and epithelial adherence. However, coinfection with influenza virus ameliorated this colonization defect in vivo. Further, viral coinfection ultimately induced a similar magnitude of middle ear infection by both phase variants. These data indicate that despite inherent differences in colonization, the influenza A virus exacerbation of experimental middle ear infection is independent of the pneumococcal phase. These findings provide new insights into the synergistic link between pneumococcus and influenza virus in the context of otitis media. PMID:25156728

  2. Influenza A virus alters pneumococcal nasal colonization and middle ear infection independently of phase variation.

    PubMed

    Wren, John T; Blevins, Lance K; Pang, Bing; King, Lauren B; Perez, Antonia C; Murrah, Kyle A; Reimche, Jennifer L; Alexander-Miller, Martha A; Swords, W Edward

    2014-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is both a widespread nasal colonizer and a leading cause of otitis media, one of the most common diseases of childhood. Pneumococcal phase variation influences both colonization and disease and thus has been linked to the bacteria's transition from colonizer to otopathogen. Further contributing to this transition, coinfection with influenza A virus has been strongly associated epidemiologically with the dissemination of pneumococci from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Using a mouse infection model, we demonstrated that coinfection with influenza virus and pneumococci enhanced both colonization and inflammatory responses within the nasopharynx and middle ear chamber. Coinfection studies were also performed using pneumococcal populations enriched for opaque or transparent phase variants. As shown previously, opaque variants were less able to colonize the nasopharynx. In vitro, this phase also demonstrated diminished biofilm viability and epithelial adherence. However, coinfection with influenza virus ameliorated this colonization defect in vivo. Further, viral coinfection ultimately induced a similar magnitude of middle ear infection by both phase variants. These data indicate that despite inherent differences in colonization, the influenza A virus exacerbation of experimental middle ear infection is independent of the pneumococcal phase. These findings provide new insights into the synergistic link between pneumococcus and influenza virus in the context of otitis media.

  3. Prevalence of Heptavalent Vaccine-related Pneumococcal Serotypes in Nasopharyngeal carrier in children under five years old in Shahrekord, Iran by Multiplex-PCR during 2010- 2011

    PubMed Central

    Rastabi, Reza Imani; Doosti, Abbas; Askari, Shahin; Hafizi, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heptavalent pneumococcal vaccine which included pneumococcal serotypes 4, 6B, 9V,14, 18C, 19F and 23F has been regularly used and is effective on preventing invasive pneumococcal infection. This study aimed to determine vaccine-related serotype distribution in nasopharyngeal carrier and healthy children under five years old. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study from September 2010 to September 2011, 363 nasopharyngeal specimens were collected from healthy children in day care centers. In positive cultures of streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumonia) distribution, serotypes were detected by Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Electrophoresis of PCR products was used for detection of serotypes of S. pneumoniae. Results: The carrier rate of S. pneumoniae was 29.5% with 95% confidence interval as 24.8- 34.5%. Electrophoresis of PCR products for detection of serotypes of S. pneumonia revealed 430, 220, 753, 189, 573, 304, and 384 bp (s) for 4, 6B, 9V, 14, 18C, 19F, and 23F serotypes of S. pneumoniae, respectively. The frequency of 23F, 6B, 19F, and 18C serotypes were 43%, 34%, 18%, and 5% respectively, but other serotypes (4, 9V and 14) were not detected. Conclusion: Based on the 30% carrier rate and high prevalence of most of heptavalent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine serotypes in our study, this vaccine should be used for prevention of invasive infection in Iranian children. PMID:25584276

  4. Outpatient-Based Pneumococcal Vaccine Campaign and Survey of Perceptions about Pneumococcal Vaccination in Patients and Doctors

    PubMed Central

    Song, Joon Young; Heo, Jung Yeon; Noh, Ji Yun; Seo, Yu Bin; Kim, In Seon; Choi, Won Suk; Kim, Woo Joo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose