Science.gov

Sample records for pneumocystis

  1. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  2. MedlinePlus: Pneumocystis Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... With CD4 and CD8 (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Related Issues Pneumocystis Pneumonia (PCP) and HIV (American Academy of Family Physicians) Also in Spanish Statistics and Research Pneumocystis Pneumonia Statistics (Centers for Disease Control and ...

  3. Pneumocystis carinii karyotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S T; Steele, P E; Cushion, M T; Walzer, P D; Stringer, S L; Stringer, J R

    1990-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis techniques were used to examine the chromosomes of Pneumocystis carinii isolated from laboratory rats and two human subjects. P. carinii organisms isolated from each of four rat colonies and from two patients each produced a distinct band pattern, but in all cases the bands ranged in size from 300 to 700 kilobase pairs. P. carinii from three rat colonies produced patterns containing 15 prominent bands. Of these 15 bands, 2 stained more intensely than would be expected of bands of their size, suggesting that the P. carinii haploid genome contains 17 to 19 chromosomes. Summing the molecular sizes of the bands and accounting for staining intensities suggested that the haploid genome of rat-derived P. carinii contains on the order of 10(7) base pairs. Human-derived P. carinii produced patterns containing 10 to 12 bands which appeared to be similar to the 15-band patterns seen in rat-derived P. carinii with respect to the size range of the bands. P. carinii from the fourth rat colony produced a more complex band pattern containing approximately 22 bands, most of which appeared to comigrate with the bands present in one of the 15-band P. carinii patterns, suggesting that these animals were simultaneously infected by two different varieties of P. carinii. Hybridization experiments using oligonucleotide probes specific for the P. carinii 18S rRNA gene supported this possibility. The band pattern of P. carinii derived from a given rat colony was generally stable over time. P. carinii band patterns were not strictly rat strain specific and appeared to be transferrable between animals housed in the same room. Images PMID:1975595

  4. Characterizing Pneumocystis in the Lungs of Bats: Understanding Pneumocystis Evolution and the Spread of Pneumocystis Organisms in Mammal Populations

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Haroon; Pinçon, Claire; Aliouat-Denis, Cecile-Marie; Derouiche, Sandra; Taylor, Maria-Lucia; Pottier, Muriel; Carreto-Binaghi, Laura-Helena; González-González, Antonio E.; Courpon, Aurore; Barriel, Véronique; Guillot, Jacques; Chabé, Magali; Suarez-Alvarez, Roberto O.; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Bats belong to a wide variety of species and occupy diversified habitats, from cities to the countryside. Their different diets (i.e., nectarivore, frugivore, insectivore, hematophage) lead Chiroptera to colonize a range of ecological niches. These flying mammals exert an undisputable impact on both ecosystems and circulation of pathogens that they harbor. Pneumocystis species are recognized as major opportunistic fungal pathogens which cause life-threatening pneumonia in severely immunocompromised or weakened mammals. Pneumocystis consists of a heterogeneous group of highly adapted host-specific fungal parasites that colonize a wide range of mammalian hosts. In the present study, 216 lungs of 19 bat species, sampled from diverse biotopes in the New and Old Worlds, were examined. Each bat species may be harboring a specific Pneumocystis species. We report 32.9% of Pneumocystis carriage in wild bats (41.9% in Microchiroptera). Ecological and behavioral factors (elevation, crowding, migration) seemed to influence the Pneumocystis carriage. This study suggests that Pneumocystis-host association may yield much information on Pneumocystis transmission, phylogeny, and biology in mammals. Moreover, the link between genetic variability of Pneumocystis isolated from populations of the same bat species and their geographic area could be exploited in terms of phylogeography. PMID:23001662

  5. Pneumocystis carinii, an opportunist in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, M S; Smith, J W

    1991-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii has been recognized as a cause of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients for over 40 years. Until the 1980s, Pneumocystis pneumonia (pneumocystosis) was most often seen in patients undergoing chemotherapy for malignancy or transplantation. Infection could be prevented by trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis; thus, it was an uncommon clinical problem. With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, Pneumocystis pneumonia has become a major problem in the United States because it develops in approximately 80% of patients with AIDS and because almost two-thirds of patients have adverse reactions to anti-Pneumocystis drugs. Thus, physicians and laboratories in any community may be called upon to diagnose and provide care for patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia. The classification of the organism is currently controversial, but it is either a protozoan or a fungus. P. carinii appears to be acquired during childhood by inhalation and does not cause clinical disease in healthy persons but remains latent. If the person becomes immunosuppressed, the latent infection may become activated and lead to clinical disease. Damage of type I pneumocytes by Pneumocystis organisms leads to the foamy alveolar exudate which is characteristic of the disease. Diagnosis is established by morphologic demonstration of Pneumocystis organisms in material from the lungs. Current efforts to find better anti-Pneumocystis drugs should provide more effective therapy and prophylaxis. Images PMID:2070342

  6. Pneumocystis pneumonia: importance of gallium scan for early diagnosis and description of a new immunoperoxidase technique to demonstrate Pneumocystis carinii

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.; McLeod, R.; Young, Q.; Abrahams, C.; Chambliss, M.; Walzer, P.; Kabins, S.A.

    1983-07-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia presented in a homosexual with fever, a normal chest radiograph, and pulmonary gallium uptake. Bronchial washings yielded Mycobaterium tuberculosis, but despite antituberculosis therapy he remained febrile, and gallium uptake in the lung increased. Subsequently, silver stain of transbronchial lung biopsy obtained 2 months earlier at the time that tuberculosis was diagnosed showed many Pneumocystis cysts in alveolar spaces. In contrast to Pneumocystis cysts in infected lung tissue from other humans, our patient's Pneumocystis cysts reacted more avidly with antiserum to rat Pneumocystis than with antiserum to human pneumocystis, raising the possibility that organisms that infect humans may have varied surface antigenic properties.

  7. Competitive coexistence of two Pneumocystis species.

    PubMed

    Icenhour, Crystal R; Arnold, Jonathan; Medvedovic, Mario; Cushion, Melanie T

    2006-05-01

    Pneumocystis are fungal pathogens of mammalian lungs that can cause lethal pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. In some mammals, coinfections of genetically distinct Pneumocystis populations have been identified, but the nature of their interaction and its significance are unknown. Two species that infect rats, Pneumocystis carinii and Pneumocystis wakefieldiae, were studied over a 6-year period, representing approximately 700 generations of Pneumocystis. Population densities of each species were analyzed within the framework of the Lotka-Volterra competition model, which revealed the two species were in competition and predicted competitive exclusion of one species. However, stable coexistence was observed in 460 replicate populations. Selected extrinsic factors that might mitigate the extinction were evaluated. Logistic-regression analyses showed that higher relative humidity and higher organism lung burdens were associated with infections comprised of P. carinii alone, while lower temperatures and an increased rat census were associated with the presence of P. wakefieldiae. PCR and immunofluorescent analysis of rat lung tissue showed that both species were present within the same alveoli, excluding habitat heterogeneity as a mechanism of coexistence. These data suggest that P. carinii and P. wakefieldiae were in competitive coexistence, which was influenced in part by extrinsic factors. To our knowledge, this is the first report to evaluate interactions of pathogenic fungal species within a mammalian host using ecological models. PMID:15949973

  8. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization in chronic pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, S.; Respaldiza, N.; Campano, E.; Martínez-Risquez, M.T.; Calderón, E.J.; De La Horra, C.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii causes pneumonia in immunosuppressed individuals. However, it has been reported the detection of low levels of Pneumocystis DNA in patients without signs and symptoms of pneumonia, which likely represents colonization. Several studies performed in animals models and in humans have demonstrated that Pneumocystis induces a local and a systemic response in the host. Since P. jirovecii colonization has been found in patients with chronic pulmonary diseases it has been suggested that P. jirovecii may play a role in the physiopathology and progression of those diseases. In this report we revise P. jirovecii colonization in different chronic pulmonary diseases such us, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial lung diseases, cystic fibrosis and lung cancer. PMID:21678787

  9. Barcoding markers for Pneumocystis species in wildlife.

    PubMed

    Danesi, Patrizia; da Rold, Graziana; Rizzoli, Annapaola; Hauffe, Heidi C; Marangon, Stefano; Samerpitak, Kittipan; Demanche, Cristine; Guillot, Jacques; Capelli, Gioia; de Hoog, Sybren G

    2016-02-01

    Lung specimens (n = 216) from six wildlife species were examined for occurrence of Pneumocystis species in pulmonary tissues. Among small mammals the shrew Sorex antinorii (80 %) were most frequently colonized. In contrast, foxes and badgers did not yield positive amplification. Host-specificity was noted, at least at the level of the host genus. Phylogenetic trees based on partial mtLSU and mtSSU showed high diversity of species corresponding to animal host diversity. Nuclear rDNA ITS data confirmed unambiguous separation of species. In conclusion, ITS is an excellent marker to distinguish species of the genus Pneumocystis. PMID:26781376

  10. Pneumatoceles and pneumothorax after Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sauleda, J; Aran, X; Gea, J; Aguar, M C; Sanz, M; Broquetas, J M

    1993-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) is common in patients with AIDS. The usual chest X-ray pattern is a diffuse interstitial pulmonary infiltrate. Nevertheless, unusual roentgenographic forms can appear. A patient with PCP that resulted in pneumatoceles and a further pneumothorax is described. PMID:8284529

  11. Pneumocystis carinii: genetic diversity and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Smulian, A G

    2001-12-01

    As an important opportunistic pulmonary pathogen, Pneumocystis carinii has been the focus of extensive research over the decades. The use of laboratory animal models has permitted a detailed understanding of the host-parasite interaction but an understanding of the basic biology of P. carinii has lagged due in large part to the inability of the organism to grow well in culture and to the lack of a tractable genetic system. Molecular techniques have demonstrated extensive heterogeneity among P. carinii organisms isolated from different host species. Characterization of the genes and genomes of the Pneumocystis family has supported the notion that the family comprises different species rather than strains within the genus Pneumocystis and contributed to the understanding of the pathophysiology of infection. Many of the technical obstacles in the study of the organisms have been overcome in the past decade and the pace of research into the basic biology of the organism has accelerated. Biochemical pathways have been inferred from the presence of key enzyme activities or gene sequences, and attempts to dissect cellular pathways have been initiated. The Pneumocystis genome project promises to be a rich source of information with regard to the functional activity of the organism and the presence of specific biochemical pathways. These advances in our understanding of the biology of this organism should provide for future studies leading to the control of this opportunistic pathogen.

  12. The lipids of Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, E S

    1998-01-01

    Information about a number of Pneumocystis carinii lipids obtained by the analyses of organisms isolated and purified from infected lungs of corticosteroid-immunosuppressed rats has been reported in recent years. Of the common opportunistic protists associated with AIDS (Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, and the microsporidia), more is currently known about the lipids of P. carinii than the others. Lipids that are synthesized by the organism but not by humans are attractive targets for drug development. Thus, the elucidation of delta 7C-24-alykylated sterol and cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid biosyntheses in P. carinii is currently being examined in detail, since these have been identified as P. carinii-specific lipids. The development of low-toxicity drugs that prevent sterol C-24 alkylation and the specific inhibition of the lipoxygenase that forms cis-9,10-epoxystearic acid might prove fruitful. Although humans can synthesize coenzyme Q10, the anti-P. carinii activity and low toxicity of ubiquinone analogs such as atovaquone suggest that the electron transport chain in the pathogen may differ importantly from that in the host. Although resistance to atovaquone has been observed, development of other naphthoquinone drugs would provide a broader armamentarium of drugs to treat patients with P. carinii pneumonia. Studies of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and of infected lungs have demonstrated that the infection causes a number of chemical abnormalities. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained after the removal of lung cellular material and the organisms has been shown to contain larger amounts of surfactant proteins and smaller amounts of phospholipids than do comparable samples from P. carinii-free lungs. Increased phospholipase activity, inhibition of surfactant secretion by type II cells, and uptake and catabolism of lipids by the pathogen may explain this phenomenon related to P. carinii pneumonia. Although not yet thoroughly examined, initial studies on the uptake and

  13. Oral Immunization of Mice with Live Pneumocystis murina Protects against Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Samuelson, Derrick R; de la Rua, Nicholas M; Charles, Tysheena P; Ruan, Sanbao; Taylor, Christopher M; Blanchard, Eugene E; Luo, Meng; Ramsay, Alistair J; Shellito, Judd E; Welsh, David A

    2016-03-15

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, particularly those infected with HIV. In this study, we evaluated the potential of oral immunization with live Pneumocystis to elicit protection against respiratory infection with Pneumocystis murina. C57BL/6 mice vaccinated with live P. murina using a prime-boost vaccination strategy were protected from a subsequent lung challenge with P. murina at 2, 7, 14, and 28 d postinfection even after CD4(+) T cell depletion. Specifically, vaccinated immunocompetent mice had significantly faster clearance than unvaccinated immunocompetent mice and unvaccinated CD4-depleted mice remained persistently infected with P. murina. Vaccination also increased numbers of CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, CD19(+) B cells, and CD11b(+) macrophages in the lungs following respiratory infection. In addition, levels of lung, serum, and fecal P. murina-specific IgG and IgA were increased in vaccinated animals. Furthermore, administration of serum from vaccinated mice significantly reduced Pneumocystis lung burden in infected animals compared with control serum. We also found that the diversity of the intestinal microbial community was altered by oral immunization with P. murina. To our knowledge, our data demonstrate for the first time that an oral vaccination strategy prevents Pneumocystis infection.

  14. Pneumocystis carinii infections in zoo animals.

    PubMed

    Poelma, F G

    1975-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii was found to be present in the lungs of twenty-three zoo animals in the Netherlands. The following species were represented: red kangaroo, common tree shrew, Senegal-Galago, Demidoff's-Galago, brown howler monkey, woolly monkey, long-haired spider monkey, white-eared marmoset, chimpanzee, three-toed sloth, palm squirrel, red panda, fennec fox, tree hyrax and large-toothed hyrax.

  15. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in developing countries*

    PubMed Central

    De Armas Rodríguez, Y.; Wissmann, G.; Müller, A.L.; Pederiva, M.A.; Brum, M.C.; Brackmann, R.L.; Capó De Paz, V.; Calderón, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is a serious fungal infection among immunocompromised patients. In developed countries, the epidemiology and clinical spectrum of PcP have been clearly defined and well documented. However, in most developing countries, relatively little is known about the prevalence of pneumocystosis. Several articles covering African, Asian and American countries were reviewed in the present study. PcP was identified as a frequent opportunistic infection in AIDS patients from different geographic regions. A trend to an increasing rate of PcP was apparent in developing countries from 2002 to 2010. PMID:21894262

  16. Pneumocystis Pneumonia Presenting as an Enlarging Solitary Pulmonary Nodule

    PubMed Central

    Diacovo, Maria Julia; Martinez-Galvez, Nydia

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a life threatening infection that usually presents with diffuse bilateral ground-glass infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a single nodular granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia in a male with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after R-CHOP therapy. He presented with symptoms of productive cough, dyspnea, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain that failed to resolve despite treatment with multiple antibiotics. Chest X-ray revealed right lower lobe atelectasis and CT of chest showed development of 2 cm nodular opacity with ground-glass opacities. Patient underwent bronchoscopy and biopsy that revealed granulomatous inflammation in a background of organizing pneumonia pattern with negative cultures. Respiratory symptoms resolved but the solitary nodular opacity increased in size prompting a surgical wedge resection which revealed granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia infection. This case is the third documented report of Pneumocystis pneumonia infection within a solitary pulmonary nodule in an individual with hematologic neoplasm. Although Pneumocystis pneumonia most commonly occurs in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with diffuse infiltrates, the diagnosis should not be overlooked when only a solitary nodule is present. PMID:27648318

  17. Pneumocystis Pneumonia Presenting as an Enlarging Solitary Pulmonary Nodule.

    PubMed

    Patel, Krunal Bharat; Gleason, James Benjamin; Diacovo, Maria Julia; Martinez-Galvez, Nydia

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a life threatening infection that usually presents with diffuse bilateral ground-glass infiltrates in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of a single nodular granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia in a male with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after R-CHOP therapy. He presented with symptoms of productive cough, dyspnea, and right-sided pleuritic chest pain that failed to resolve despite treatment with multiple antibiotics. Chest X-ray revealed right lower lobe atelectasis and CT of chest showed development of 2 cm nodular opacity with ground-glass opacities. Patient underwent bronchoscopy and biopsy that revealed granulomatous inflammation in a background of organizing pneumonia pattern with negative cultures. Respiratory symptoms resolved but the solitary nodular opacity increased in size prompting a surgical wedge resection which revealed granulomatous Pneumocystis pneumonia infection. This case is the third documented report of Pneumocystis pneumonia infection within a solitary pulmonary nodule in an individual with hematologic neoplasm. Although Pneumocystis pneumonia most commonly occurs in patients with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and with diffuse infiltrates, the diagnosis should not be overlooked when only a solitary nodule is present. PMID:27648318

  18. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations in Pneumocystis and sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Huang, Laurence; Crothers, Kristina; Atzori, Chiara; Benfield, Thomas; Miller, Robert; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik

    2004-10-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) remains a major cause of illness and death in HIV-infected persons. Sulfa drugs, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) and dapsone are mainstays of PCP treatment and prophylaxis. While prophylaxis has reduced the incidence of PCP, its use has raised concerns about development of resistant organisms. The inability to culture human Pneumocystis, Pneumocystis jirovecii, in a standardized culture system prevents routine susceptibility testing and detection of drug resistance. In other microorganisms, sulfa drug resistance has resulted from specific point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Similar mutations have been observed in P. jirovecii. Studies have consistently demonstrated a significant association between the use of sulfa drugs for PCP prophylaxis and DHPS gene mutations. Whether these mutations confer resistance to TMP-SMX or dapsone plus trimethoprim for PCP treatment remains unclear. We review studies of DHPS mutations in P. jirovecii and summarize the evidence for resistance to sulfamethoxazole and dapsone.

  19. Care of the AIDS patient with Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Carr, Rebecca Lamb; Dodge, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia and AIDS have been linked together for many years. In the 1980s and 1990s, these diseases often resulted in admission to the critical care unit for many patients. Since the discovery of antiretroviral therapy and Pneumocystis prophylaxis, this has been a less frequent occurrence. Knowledge about caring for this patient in the critical care unit is often not available. Psychological and physiological needs common to this population are different from other populations and must be addressed. Pharmacological challenges are common and may go unrecognized until complications ensue. This article seeks to alleviate some of the mystery associated with these issues. PMID:19855202

  20. Radioimmunoimaging of pneumocystis carinii infection in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vallabhajosula, S.; Shane, L.B.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Lipszyc, H.; Walzer, P.

    1984-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinil pneumonia (PCP) is seen in patients with impaired immunity due to chemotherapeutic suppression or to a primary disorder, congenital or AIDS. Although radiogallium imaging has been helpful in the workup of PCP, it is non-specific. Since there is no early specific non-invasive method to diagnose PCP, the authors are developing an imaging technique using radiolabeled antibodies. Fulminant PCP was induced in rats by injecting cortisone, 20mg 2-3 times/wk for 8 wks. PC cells isolated from rat lung were injected into rabbits. The antiserum thus derived was separated and purified using Protein-A bound sepharose column with identification of IgG by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both rabbit antipneumocystis antibodies and purified IgG(Sigma) were iodinated with I-131 to a high specific activity (3-5..mu..Ci/ug) using a lactoperoxidase method. /sup 131/I-labeled specific and non-specific IgG were injected into rats with PC infection and imaged with an Anger camera. After sacrifice, I-131 activity/gram tissue (lung, liver, heart) was determined and expressed as organ ratios. An increased uptake of specific antibody in lungs of rats with PCP was demonstrated by organ counting and imaging. This increase was not seen in normal controls or rats injected with non-specific IgG. These data provide a basis for radioimmunoimaging of infectious diseases.

  1. Absence of Pneumocystis dihydropteroate synthase mutants in Brittany, France.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Robert-Gangneux, Florence; Perrot, Maëla; Rouillé, Amélie; Virmaux, Michèle; Damiani, Céline; Totet, Anne; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Nevez, Gilles

    2013-05-01

    Archival Pneumocystis jirovecii specimens from 84 patients monitored at Rennes University Hospital (Rennes, France) were assayed at the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) locus. No patient was infected with mutants. The results provide additional data showing that P. jirovecii infections involving DHPS mutants do not represent a public health issue in Brittany, western France.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension Can Be a Sequela of Prior Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Steve D.; Han, Soo; Harmsen, Ann; Shampeny, Katie; Harmsen, Allen G.

    2007-01-01

    Improved treatment regimens have reduced fatalities from opportunistic diseases, such as Pneumocystis pneumonia, in AIDS patients. However, serious chronic conditions, including pulmonary hypertension (PH), are increasing in this group. We report here that when CD4 T cells in Pneumocystis-infected mice are temporally depleted and then allowed to return, the extended inflammation results in PH that persists after Pneumocystis is eliminated. Using this model of PH, we have found that i) the onset of PH is correlated with the return of CD4 T cells, but PH persists after CD4 levels diminish; ii) vascular remodeling accompanies PH, but whereas temporary medial hypertrophy is evident with transient PH in immunocompetent mice, persistent PH is associated with perivascular fibrosis; iii) elevated levels of the fibrotic mediator FIZZ1 are found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of mice with persistent PH; and iv) although Th2-related mechanisms may be involved in PH etiology, PH still occurs in interleukin-4 receptor-deficient mice under these conditions. Overall, the data presented here demonstrate that the immune response to an infectious disease pathogen, such as Pneumocystis, can, when perturbed and prolonged, lead to later development of a serious chronic condition such as PH. PMID:17640969

  3. CD4(+) T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    de la Rua, Nicholas M; Samuelson, Derrick R; Charles, Tysheena P; Welsh, David A; Shellito, Judd E

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4(+) T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4(+) T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8(+) T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8(+) T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4(+) T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8(+) T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8(+) T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8(+) T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ(+) CD8(+) T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8(+) T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  4. CD4+ T-Cell-Independent Secondary Immune Responses to Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    de la Rua, Nicholas M.; Samuelson, Derrick R.; Charles, Tysheena P.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients, especially in the context of HIV/AIDS. In the murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, CD4+ T-cells are required for clearance of a primary infection of Pneumocystis, but not the memory recall response. We hypothesized that the memory recall response in the absence of CD4+ T-cells is mediated by a robust memory humoral response, CD8+ T-cells, and IgG-mediated phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages. To investigate the role of CD8+ T-cells and alveolar macrophages in the immune memory response to Pneumocystis, mice previously challenged with Pneumocystis were depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages prior to re-infection. Mice depleted of CD4+ T-cells prior to secondary challenge cleared Pneumocystis infection within 48 h identical to immunocompetent mice during a secondary memory recall response. However, loss of CD8+ T-cells or macrophages prior to the memory recall response significantly impaired Pneumocystis clearance. Specifically, mice depleted of CD8+ T-cells or alveolar macrophages had significantly higher fungal burden in the lungs. Furthermore, loss of alveolar macrophages significantly skewed the lung CD8+ T-cell response toward a terminally differentiated effector memory population and increased the percentage of IFN-γ+ CD8+ T-cells. Finally, Pneumocystis-infected animals produced significantly more bone marrow plasma cells and Pneumocystis-specific IgG significantly increased macrophage-mediated killing of Pneumocystis in vitro. These data suggest that secondary immune memory responses to Pneumocystis are mediated, in part, by CD8+ T-cells, alveolar macrophages, and the production of Pneumocystis-specific IgG. PMID:27242785

  5. Correlation of Pneumocystis carinii cyst density with mortality in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, W; Miller, C N; Chew, K L; Mayall, B H; Griffiss, J M

    1992-06-01

    Fifteen percent to 20% of patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and pneumocystis pneumonia do poorly despite early intervention. It is not known what distinguishes those who die, despite early intervention and aggressive therapy, from those who readily respond to therapy. We used image analysis to determine the relative abundance of cysts within aggregates of Pneumocystis carinii found in induced sputa (21 patients) and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (14 patients) from 35 patients with pneumocystis pneumonia. We calculated a cyst density (number of cysts per area of aggregate) for each aggregate and a mean cyst density for all of the aggregates on the smear. Six patients died within 2 weeks of diagnosis; four of these six patients who had autopsies all had residual P carinii. The mean cyst density for those who died was 9.7 +/- 3.9 (range, 5 to 15 x 10(-3)). The 29 patients who survived beyond 2 weeks had a mean cyst density of 18.4 +/- 8.7 (range, 5 to 35 x 10(-3); P = .01). Mean cyst density was not influenced by the number of aggregates present in the smear, the variation in cyst density among aggregates in a smear, or the episode of pneumocystis pneumonia. Cyst density determinations alone should not be used to predict outcome for individuals with P carinii pneumonia until further study is completed. Nevertheless, the current study suggests that a low cyst density specimen, which may indirectly indicate a greater proportion of trophozoites compared with a high cyst density specimen, may be associated with an unfavorable outcome in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated pneumocystis pneumonia.

  6. β-Glucans Are Masked but Contribute to Pulmonary Inflammation During Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Geetha; Davis, A Sally; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Qiu, Ju; Huang, Da Wei; Sassi, Monica; Bishop, Lisa; Handley, Grace; Sherman, Brad; Lempicki, Richard; Kovacs, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    β-glucans, which can activate innate immune responses, are a major component in the cell wall of the cyst form of Pneumocystis In the current study, we examined whether β-1,3-glucans are masked by surface proteins in Pneumocystis and what role β-glucans play in Pneumocystis-associated inflammation. For 3 species, including Pneumocystis jirovecii, which causes Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans, Pneumocystis carinii, and Pneumocystis murina, β-1,3-glucans were masked in most organisms, as demonstrated by increased exposure following trypsin treatment. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and microarray techniques, we demonstrated in a mouse model of Pneumocystis pneumonia that treatment with caspofungin, an inhibitor of β-1,3-glucan synthesis, for 21 days decreased expression of a broad panel of inflammatory markers, including interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and multiple chemokines/chemokine ligands. Thus, β-glucans in Pneumocystis cysts are largely masked, which likely decreases innate immune activation; this mechanism presumably was developed for interactions with immunocompetent hosts, in whom organism loads are substantially lower. In immunosuppressed hosts with a high organism burden, organism death and release of glucans appears to be an important contributor to deleterious host inflammatory responses. PMID:27324243

  7. Comparison of different blood compartments for the detection of circulating DNA using a rat model of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Fréalle, E; Gantois, N; Aliouat-Denis, C M; Leroy, S; Zawadzki, C; Perkhofer, S; Aliouat, E M; Dei-Cas, E

    2015-09-01

    Pneumocystis is mostly found in the alveolar spaces, but circulation of viable organisms also occurs and suggests that the detection of DNA in blood could be used as a noninvasive procedure to improve the diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP). In order to determine the optimal compartment for Pneumocystis DNA detection, we used a rat model of PcP and tested the presence of Pneumocystis with a quantitative mtLSU targeting real-time PCR in four blood compartments: whole blood, clot, serum and Platelet-Rich-Plasma (PRP). All samples from 4 Pneumocystis-free control rats were negative. Pneumocystis was detected in 79, 64, 57, and 57% of samples from 14 PcP rats, respectively, but DNA release was not related to pulmonary loads. These data confirm the potential usefulness of Pneumocystis DNA detection in the blood for PcP diagnosis and suggest that whole blood could be the most appropriate compartment for Pneumocystis detection.

  8. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in Latin America. A public health problem?

    PubMed

    Calderón, Enrique J; de Armas, Yaxsier; Panizo, Maria Mercedes; Wissmann, Gustavo

    2013-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) is a well-recognized major opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients. During the 1980s, the HIV pandemic turned PcP into a major worldwide medical and public health problem. With the introduction of Pneumocystis chemoprophylaxis and the development of highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the treatment of HIV infection, there has been a decrease in PcP incidence in developed countries. However, the prevalence of AIDS-related PcP in developing countries remains high because a lot of people do not have access to ART or ignore their HIV infection status. This article discusses the information available about PcP among Latin American countries where there is a great regional heterogeneity in the prevalence of HIV infection and in ART coverage, as well as in the observed frequencies of PcP that range from 5.9 to 55% in this area. PMID:23750728

  9. An outbreak of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia at a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Chusid, M J; Heyrman, K A

    1978-12-01

    Eleven cases of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were diagnosed during a 3 1/2-year period at a pediatric hospital where this infection had never been identified previously despite appropriate studies. The incidence of infection was 3.0, 7.4, and 4.2 cases per 1,000 patient months in children being treated for acute leukemia, neuroblastoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma, respectively. The outbreak coincided with increased intensity of chemotherapy for these malignancies. Ten of the patients had received four or more chemotherapeutic agents within three months of the onset of infection. Because no exogenous source of the epidemic was found, latent endogenous infection activated by immunosuppression was presumed to be the ultimate cause of the outbreak. Increased intensity of chemotherapy may result in P carinii outbreaks and may be an indication for anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole in patients at risk.

  10. Pulmonary paracoccidioidomycosis misdiagnosed as Pneumocystis pneumonia in an immunocompromised host.

    PubMed Central

    Silletti, R P; Glezerov, V; Schwartz, I S

    1996-01-01

    Yeast cells of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis can resemble the cysts of Pneumocystis carinii in smears stained with Grocott's modification of the Gomori methanamine silver stain. Furthermore, P. brasiliensis can cross-react in material stained with a widely used P. carinii immunofluorescent stain which uses monoclonal antibodies. The need to differentiate P. brasiliensis and P. carinii will become more important as the increasing incidence of immunosuppression results in the reactivation of latent P. brasiliensis infections. PMID:8862614

  11. Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii dihydropteroate synthase polymorphisms in patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Costa, M C; Gaspar, J; Mansinho, K; Esteves, F; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, in order to improve the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutations in pulmonary specimens of HIV-infected patients with P. jirovecii pneumonia, we evaluated a microfiltration procedure for the removal of human cell contamination and a nested-PCR method, for amplification in specimens with low parasite load. In the studied population, PCR amplification of the DHPS gene was more successful in unfiltered than in filtered specimens, with both touchdown-PCR and nested-PCR procedures (p<0.05 and p<0.001, respectively), but the amount of host DNA in the samples analysed seems to be inversely related with the successful PCR parasite detection. Amplification of P. jirovecii DHPS gene with nested-PCR was achieved in 77.5% of the specimens studied, demonstrating that this is a useful method for the identification of mutations in pulmonary specimens, including samples with low parasite loads, and will facilitate the evaluation of the relationship between the P. jirovecii DHPS polymorphisms and clinical resistance to sulfa drugs.

  12. Alveolar response to experimental Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Lanken, P. N.; Minda, M.; Pietra, G. G.; Fishman, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to characterize the alveolar response to Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, light and electron miscropy were used to trace the development of experimental infections with P carinii in rats treated with cortisone acetate and a low-protein diet. The first changes were found by the eighth day of treatment and consisted of the selective attachment of Pneumocystis organisms, mostly trophozoites, to alveolar Type 1 pneumocytes; the host cells were undamaged, and no inflammatory response was seen. After approximately one month of treatment, the seemingly innocuous host-parasite interaction was succeeded by focal necrosis of the Type 1 pneumocytes adjacent to organisms; hyperplasia of nearby Type 2 pneumocytes also occurred, to replace the dead Type 1 pneumocytes. Even at this stage, inflammatory reaction was conspicuously absent except for occasional alveolar macrophages in the diseased alveoli; in addition, all cells of the alveolar-capillary membrane other than Type 1 pneumocytes appeared entirely normal. Not only does the present study clarify the nature of alveolar injury caused by Pneumocystis carinii, but it also provides an experimental animal model in which selective injury of the alveolar lining cells occurs. Images Figure 5 Figure 9 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 6 Figure 10 Figure 3 Figure 7 Figure 4 Figure 8 PMID:6966893

  13. Clearance of Pneumocystis murina infection is not dependent on MyD88.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Chiara; Bishop, Lisa R; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A; Kovacs, Joseph A

    2014-06-01

    To determine if myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), which is necessary for signaling by most TLRs and IL-1Rs, is necessary for control of Pneumocystis infection, MyD88-deficient and wild-type mice were infected with Pneumocystis by exposure to infected seeder mice and were followed for up to 106 days. MyD88-deficient mice showed clearance of Pneumocystis and development of anti-Pneumocystis antibody responses with kinetics similar to wild-type mice. Based on expression levels of select genes, MyD88-deficient mice developed immune responses similar to wild-type mice. Thus, MyD88 and the upstream pathways that rely on MyD88 signaling are not required for control of Pneumocystis infection. PMID:24680862

  14. Clearance of Pneumocystis murina infection is not dependent on MyD88

    PubMed Central

    Ripamonti, Chiara; Bishop, Lisa R.; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    To determine if myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), which is necessary for signaling by most TLRs and IL-1Rs, is necessary for control of Pneumocystis infection, MyD88-deficient and wild-type mice were infected with Pneumocystis by exposure to infected seeder mice and were followed for up to 106 days. MyD88-deficient mice showed clearance of Pneumocystis and development of anti-Pneumocystis antibody responses with kinetics similar to wild-type mice. Based on expression levels of select genes, MyD88-deficient mice developed immune responses similar to wild-type mice. Thus, MyD88 and the upstream pathways that rely on MyD88 signaling are not required for control of Pneumocystis infection. PMID:24680862

  15. The ecology of pneumocystis: perspectives, personal recollections, and future research opportunities.

    PubMed

    Walzer, Peter D

    2013-01-01

    I am honored to receive the second Lifetime Achievement Award by International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists and to give this lecture. My research involves Pneumocystis, an opportunistic pulmonary fungus that is a major cause of pneumonia ("PcP") in the immunocompromised host. I decided to focus on Pneumocystis ecology here because it has not attracted much interest. Pneumocystis infection is acquired by inhalation, and the cyst stage appears to be the infective form. Several fungal lung infections, such as coccidiomycosis, are not communicable, but occur by inhaling < 5 μm spores from environmental sources (buildings, parks), and can be affected by environmental factors. PcP risk factors include environmental constituents (temperature, humidity, SO2 , CO) and outdoor activities (camping). Clusters of PcP have occurred, but no environmental source has been found. Pneumocystis is communicable and outbreaks of PcP, especially in renal transplant patients, are an ongoing problem. Recent evidence suggests that most viable Pneumocystis organisms detected in the air are confined to a patient's room. Further efforts are needed to define the risk of Pneumocystis transmission in health care facilities; to develop more robust preventive measures; and to characterize the effects of climatological and air pollutant factors on Pneumocystis transmission in animal models similar to those used for respiratory viruses.

  16. Techniques for examining Pneumocystis carinii in fresh specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Ruffolo, J J; Cushion, M T; Walzer, P D

    1986-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii was examined in fresh preparations of infected rat lung homogenates and tissue culture supernatants by a variety of light microscope techniques, vital dyes, and histologic stains. Phase-contrast microscopy, Nomarski interference-contrast microscopy, and bright-field microscopy with oblique illumination provided excellent views of P. carinii. Erythrosin B, and to a lesser extent trypan blue, were helpful in assessing organism viability. The use of Triton X-100-Giemsa stain permitted differentiation of the developmental stages in the P. carinii life cycle. The techniques developed here are easily adaptable to the microbiology laboratory and thus should have important clinical and research applications. Images PMID:2422197

  17. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in a Yorkshire terrier dog.

    PubMed

    Cabañes, F J; Roura, X; Majó, N; Bragulat, M R; Domingo, M

    2000-12-01

    A 14-month-old male Yorkshire terrier was presented to the Autonomous University of Barcelona Veterinary Teaching Hospital because of a history of chronic non-productive cough and acute dyspnea. A follow-up radiograph revealed a diffuse, bilaterally interstitial-alveolar lung disease with presence of air bronchograms. The dog died 5 h after admission with severe dyspnea. Histological sections of the necropsy specimens revealed the presence of characteristic Pneumocystis carinii cysts within alveolar spaces. A diagnosis of P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) was made on the basis of these results. To our knowledge, PCP has not been described in a Yorkshire terrier dog.

  18. Inhibition of Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Merali, S; Zhang, Y; Sloan, D; Meshnick, S

    1990-01-01

    A new reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography assay procedure for dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) that involves the elution of the enzyme incubation solution with a series of three solvents of decreasing polarity (ammonium phosphate buffer, 10% methanol, and 50% methanol) was designed. By this procedure DHPS was detected in Escherichia coli and Pneumocystis carinii with specific activities of 450 and 14 U/mg, respectively. A comparison of the effects of five sulfa drugs on P. carinii DHPS activity revealed that dapsone is the most potent of these drugs. PMID:2203302

  19. Vitamin D as Supplemental Therapy for Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Guang-Sheng; Zhang, Chen; Zimmerman, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and primaquine (PMQ) has been shown to be effective for therapy of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Since a high concentration of ATRA has significant adverse effects, the possibility that vitamin D can be used to replace ATRA for PCP therapy was investigated. C57BL/6 mice were immunosuppressed by depleting CD4+ cells and infected with Pneumocystis murina 1 week after initiation of immunosuppression. Three weeks after infection, the mice were treated orally for 3 weeks with vitamin D3 (VitD3) alone, PMQ alone, a combination of VitD3 and PMQ (VitD3-PMQ), or a combination of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX). Results showed that VitD3 (300 IU/kg/day) had a synergistic effect with PMQ (5 mg/kg/day) for therapy of PCP. Flow cytometric studies showed that this VitD3-PMQ combination recovered the CD11blow CD11chigh alveolar macrophage population in mice with PCP as effectively as TMP-SMX. The VitD3-PMQ combination also reduced the massive infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs and the severity of lung damage. VitD3 was also shown to reduce the dose of TMP-SMX required for effective treatment of PCP. Taken together, results of this study suggest that a VitD3-PMQ combination can be used as an alternative therapy for PCP. PMID:26666941

  20. A 32-Year-Old Female with AIDS, Pneumocystis jiroveci Pneumonia, and Methemoglobinemia

    PubMed Central

    Giangreco, Guillermo J.; Campbell, Dean; Cowan, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of methemoglobinemia with significant hemoglobin desaturation in a young female with AIDS who was being treated for Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. A review of the etiology, pathophysiology, and treatment of methemoglobinemia is presented. PMID:24829836

  1. Genome analysis of three Pneumocystis species reveals adaptation mechanisms to life exclusively in mammalian hosts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Chen, Zehua; Huang, Da Wei; Kutty, Geetha; Ishihara, Mayumi; Wang, Honghui; Abouelleil, Amr; Bishop, Lisa; Davey, Emma; Deng, Rebecca; Deng, Xilong; Fan, Lin; Fantoni, Giovanna; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gogineni, Emile; Goldberg, Jonathan M; Handley, Grace; Hu, Xiaojun; Huber, Charles; Jiao, Xiaoli; Jones, Kristine; Levin, Joshua Z; Liu, Yueqin; Macdonald, Pendexter; Melnikov, Alexandre; Raley, Castle; Sassi, Monica; Sherman, Brad T; Song, Xiaohong; Sykes, Sean; Tran, Bao; Walsh, Laura; Xia, Yun; Yang, Jun; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zheng, Xin; Stephens, Robert; Nusbaum, Chad; Birren, Bruce W; Azadi, Parastoo; Lempicki, Richard A; Cuomo, Christina A; Kovacs, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major cause of life-threatening pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients including transplant recipients and those with HIV/AIDS, yet surprisingly little is known about the biology of this fungal pathogen. Here we report near complete genome assemblies for three Pneumocystis species that infect humans, rats and mice. Pneumocystis genomes are highly compact relative to other fungi, with substantial reductions of ribosomal RNA genes, transporters, transcription factors and many metabolic pathways, but contain expansions of surface proteins, especially a unique and complex surface glycoprotein superfamily, as well as proteases and RNA processing proteins. Unexpectedly, the key fungal cell wall components chitin and outer chain N-mannans are absent, based on genome content and experimental validation. Our findings suggest that Pneumocystis has developed unique mechanisms of adaptation to life exclusively in mammalian hosts, including dependence on the lungs for gas and nutrients and highly efficient strategies to escape both host innate and acquired immune defenses. PMID:26899007

  2. Genome analysis of three Pneumocystis species reveals adaptation mechanisms to life exclusively in mammalian hosts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Liang; Chen, Zehua; Huang, Da Wei; Kutty, Geetha; Ishihara, Mayumi; Wang, Honghui; Abouelleil, Amr; Bishop, Lisa; Davey, Emma; Deng, Rebecca; Deng, Xilong; Fan, Lin; Fantoni, Giovanna; Fitzgerald, Michael; Gogineni, Emile; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Handley, Grace; Hu, Xiaojun; Huber, Charles; Jiao, Xiaoli; Jones, Kristine; Levin, Joshua Z.; Liu, Yueqin; Macdonald, Pendexter; Melnikov, Alexandre; Raley, Castle; Sassi, Monica; Sherman, Brad T.; Song, Xiaohong; Sykes, Sean; Tran, Bao; Walsh, Laura; Xia, Yun; Yang, Jun; Young, Sarah; Zeng, Qiandong; Zheng, Xin; Stephens, Robert; Nusbaum, Chad; Birren, Bruce W.; Azadi, Parastoo; Lempicki, Richard A.; Cuomo, Christina A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major cause of life-threatening pneumonia in immunosuppressed patients including transplant recipients and those with HIV/AIDS, yet surprisingly little is known about the biology of this fungal pathogen. Here we report near complete genome assemblies for three Pneumocystis species that infect humans, rats and mice. Pneumocystis genomes are highly compact relative to other fungi, with substantial reductions of ribosomal RNA genes, transporters, transcription factors and many metabolic pathways, but contain expansions of surface proteins, especially a unique and complex surface glycoprotein superfamily, as well as proteases and RNA processing proteins. Unexpectedly, the key fungal cell wall components chitin and outer chain N-mannans are absent, based on genome content and experimental validation. Our findings suggest that Pneumocystis has developed unique mechanisms of adaptation to life exclusively in mammalian hosts, including dependence on the lungs for gas and nutrients and highly efficient strategies to escape both host innate and acquired immune defenses. PMID:26899007

  3. Characterization of chemokine and chemokine receptor expression during Pneumocystis infection in healthy and immunodeficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Lisa R.; Lionakis, Michail S.; Sassi, Monica; Murphy, Philip M.; Hu, Xiaojun; Huang, Da Wei; Sherman, Brad; Qiu, Ju; Yang, Jun; Lempicki, Richard A.; Kovacs, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    We examined gene expression levels of multiple chemokines and chemokine receptors during Pneumocystis murina infection in wild-type and immunosuppressed mice, using microarrays and qPCR. In wild-type mice, expression of chemokines that are ligands for Ccr2, Cxcr3, Cxcr6, and Cxcr2 increased at days 32 to 41 post-infection, with a return to baseline by day 75 to 150. Concomitant increases were seen in Ccr2 ,Cxcr3, and Cxcr6, but not in Cxcr2 expression. Induction of these same factors also occurred in CD40-ligand and CD40 knockout mice but only at a much later time-point, during uncontrolled Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Expression of CD4 Th1 markers was increased in wild-type mice during clearance of infection. Ccr2 and Cx3cr1 knockout mice cleared Pneumocystis infection with kinetics similar to wild-type mice, and all animals developed anti-Pneumocystis antibodies. Upregulation of Ccr2, Cxcr3, and Cxcr6 and their ligands supports an important role for T helper cells and mononuclear phagocytes in the clearance of Pneumocystis infection. However, based on the current and prior studies, no single chemokine receptor appears to be critical to the clearance of Pneumocystis. PMID:26052064

  4. Apical Pneumocystis jiroveci as an AIDS defining illness: A case report illustrating a change in the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, Kyle; Kalra, Vivek; Adebowale, Adeniran; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha; Soo-Shin, Myung

    2014-11-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is a common acquired immune deficiency syndrome defining illness. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia is classically described as having symmetrical bilateral perihilar ground-glass opacities on chest radiographs. We present an "atypical" case of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia presenting as symmetric biapical cystic spaces with relative sparing of the remainder of the lungs in a 22 year-old male, previously undiagnosed with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Our case illustrates that formerly unusual presentations of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia are becoming more common as acquired immune deficiency syndrome defining illnesses as more patients are being imaged with further imaging such as high resolution computed tomography. PMID:25926907

  5. Albendazole inhibits Pneumocystis carinii proliferation in inoculated immunosuppressed mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, M S; Edlind, T D; Lee, C H; Dean, R; Queener, S F; Shaw, M M; Smith, J W

    1994-01-01

    Albendazole, a benzimidazole derivative widely used for treating helminth infections, was successfully used to treat and prevent development of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in transtracheally inoculated immunosuppressed mice. For treatment, 3 weeks postinoculation, albendazole at 300 and 600 mg/kg of body weight per day was administered in food for 3 weeks. For prophylaxis, albendazole was begun on the same day as inoculation at 300 mg/kg/day for 7 days, and then the dose was reduced to 150 mg/kg/day for 35 additional days. With these regimens, albendazole was effective both for treatment and prophylaxis. Both dexamethasone-immunosuppressed and L3T4+ monoclonal antibody-immunosuppressed mouse models were used, and albendazole inhibited P. carinii infection in both. PMID:7986016

  6. Sulfa use, dihydropteroate synthase mutations, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Cheryl R; Poole, Charles; Kazanjian, Powel; Meshnick, Steven R

    2004-10-01

    A systematic review was conducted to examine the associations in Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) patients between dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutations and sulfa or sulfone (sulfa) prophylaxis and between DHPS mutations and sulfa treatment outcome. Selection criteria included study populations composed entirely of PCP patients and mutation or treatment outcome results for all patients, regardless of exposure status. Based on 13 studies, the risk of developing DHPS mutations is higher for PCP patients receiving sulfa prophylaxis than for PCP patients not receiving sulfa prophylaxis (p < 0.001). Results are too heterogeneous (p < 0.001) to warrant a single summary effect estimate. Estimated effects are weaker after 1996 and stronger in studies that included multiple isolates per patient. Five studies examined treatment outcome. The effect of DHPS mutations on treatment outcome has not been well studied, and the few studies that have been conducted are inconsistent even as to the presence or absence of an association.

  7. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-08-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia.

  8. Monodrug efficacies of sulfonamides in prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W T; Killmar, J

    1996-01-01

    A remarkably high rate of adverse events is associated with the use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in patients with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection. We examined the efficacies of sulfonamides alone in the prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonitis, with the assumption that at least some of the adverse events with the drug combination might be due to trimethoprim. With the immunosuppressed rat model, eight sulfonamides were studied at 100, 10, and 1.0 mg/kg/day (10 rats per dosage and drug). P. carinii infection was prevented in all animals (100%) receiving dosages of as little as 1.0 mg of sulfamethoxazole, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfadimethoxine per kg per day, as little as 10 mg of sulfameter, sulfachlorpyridazine, and sulfaquinoxaline per kg per day; and 100 mg of sulfaguanidine and sulfanilamide per kg per day. These studies suggest that a sulfonamide, such as sulfamethoxazole, might provide effective prophylaxis for P. carinii pneumonitis without trimethoprim. PMID:8849260

  9. Surface labeling of Pneumocystis carinii from in vitro culture

    SciTech Connect

    Radding, J.A.; Armstrong, M.Y.; Bogucki, M.S.; Richards, F.F. )

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii is an opportunistic pathogen of man, carried as a commensal in healthy subjects. It frequently causes a fatal pneumonia in the immunosuppressed host. It is a major complication of HIV-1 infection in man (AIDS). Using surface radioiodination of rat-derived P. carinii trophozoites obtained from in vitro culture, a major surface glycoprotein (gp120) has been identified. The glycoprotein exhibits adherent behavior similar to that of the intact organism. Purification of gp120 by conventional methods was unsuccessful as the glycoprotein irreversibly bound to numerous column matrices. A combination of gel chromatography and hydroxyapatite chromatography in sodium dodecylsulfate was utilized to purify the glycoprotein. Some preliminary characterization of the glycoprotein is presented.

  10. Reversed halo sign in pneumocystis pneumonia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The reversed halo sign may sometimes be seen in patients with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, but is rarely associated with other diseases. Case presentation We present a case study of a 32-year-old male patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, who had previously been treated with chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. A chest X-ray showed bilateral patchy infiltrates. High-resolution computed tomography revealed the reversed halo sign in both upper lobes. The patient was diagnosed with pneumocystis pneumonia, which was successfully treated with sulfamethoxazole trimethoprim; the reversed halo sign disappeared, leaving cystic lesions. Cases such as this one are rare, but show that the reversed halo sign may occur in patients who do not have cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Conclusion Physicians can avoid making an incorrect diagnosis and prescribing the wrong treatment by carefully evaluating all clinical criteria rather than assuming that the reversed halo sign only occurs with cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. PMID:21092271

  11. Diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia: evaluation of four serologic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Calé, S S; Badura, R; de Boer, M G; Maltez, F; Calderón, E J; van der Reijden, T J; Márquez-Martín, E; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) relies on microscopic visualization of Pneumocystis jirovecii organisms or DNA detection in pulmonary specimens. This study aimed to assess the usefulness of (1-3)-β-d-glucan (BG), Krebs von den Lungen-6 antigen (KL-6), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) as serologic biomarkers in the diagnosis of PCP. Serum levels of BG, KL-6, LDH and SAM were investigated in 145 Portuguese patients, 50 patients from the Netherlands, 25 Spanish patients and 40 Portuguese blood donors. Data on clinical presentation, chest imaging and gasometry tests were available. PCP cases were confirmed by microscopy and PCR techniques. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. BG was found to be the most reliable serologic biomarker for PCP diagnosis, followed by KL-6, LDH and SAM. The BG/KL-6 combination test was the most accurate serologic approach for PCP diagnosis, with 94.3% sensitivity and 89.6% specificity. Although less sensitive/specific than the reference standard classic methods based on bronchoalveolar lavage followed by microscopic or molecular detection of P. jirovecii organisms, the BG/KL-6 test may provide a less onerous procedure for PCP diagnosis, as it uses a minimally invasive and inexpensive specimen (blood), which may be also a major benefit for the patient's care. The BG/KL-6 combination test should be interpreted within the clinical context, and it may be used as a preliminary screening test in patients with primary suspicion of PCP, or as an alternative diagnostic procedure in patients with respiratory failure or in children, avoiding the associated risk of complications by the use of bronchoscopy.

  12. Near-Universal Prevalence of Pneumocystis and Associated Increase in Mucus in the Lungs of Infants With Sudden Unexpected Death

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Sergio L.; Ponce, Carolina A.; Gallo, Miriam; Pérez, Francisco; Astorga, J.-Felipe; Bustamante, Rebeca; Chabé, Magali; Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Iturra, Pablo; Miller, Robert F.; Aliouat, El Moukthar; Dei-Cas, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pneumocystis without obvious accompanying pathology is occasionally reported in autopsied infant lungs. Its prevalence and significance are unknown. Interestingly, this mild infection induces a strong activation of mucus secretion–related genes in young immunocompetent rodents that has not been explored in infants. Excess mucus is induced by multiple airway offenders through nonspecific pathways and would explain a cofactor role of Pneumocystis in respiratory disease. We undertook characterization of the prevalence of Pneumocystis and associated mucus in infant lungs. Methods. Samples from 128 infants (mean age, 101 days) who died suddenly and unexpectedly in Santiago during 1999–2004 were examined for Pneumocystis using nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) amplification of the P. jirovecii mtLSU ribosomal RNA gene and immunofluorescence microscopy (IF). Pneumocystis-negative infants 28 days and older and their age-closest positives were studied for MUC5AC expression and Pneumocystis burden by Western blot and quantitative PCR, respectively. Results. Pneumocystis DNA was detected by nPCR in 105 of the 128 infants (82.0%) and Pneumocystis organisms were visualized by IF in 99 (94.3%) of the DNA-positive infants. The infection was commonest at 3–4 months with 40 of 41 (97.6%) infants of that age testing positive. MUC5AC was significantly increased in Pneumocystis-positive tissue specimens (P = .013). Death was unexplained in 113 (88.3%) infants; Pneumocystis was detected in 95 (84.0%) of them vs 10 of 15 (66.7%) with explained death (P = .28). Conclusions. A highly focal Pneumocystis infection associated to increased mucus expression is almost universally present in the lungs of infants dying unexpectedly in the community regardless of autopsy diagnosis. PMID:23074306

  13. Development and validation of a Pneumocystis jirovecii real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre L; Ambasta, Anshula; Wilmer, Amanda; Williscroft, Holly; Ritchie, Gordon; Pillai, Dylan R; Champagne, Sylvie; Gregson, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pneumocystis jirovecii (PJ), a pathogenic fungus, causes severe interstitial Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) among immunocompromised patients. A laboratory-developed real-time polyermase chain reaction (PCR) assay was validated for PJ detection to improve diagnosis of PCP. METHODS: Forty stored bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples (20 known PJ positive [PJ+] and 20 known PJ negative [PJ−]) were initially tested using the molecular assay. Ninety-two sequentially collected BAL samples were then analyzed using an immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and secondarily tested using the PJ real-time PCR assay. Discrepant results were resolved by retesting BAL samples using another real-time PCR assay with a different target. PJ real-time PCR assay performance was compared with the existing gold standard (ie, IFA) and a modified gold standard, in which a true positive was defined as a sample that tested positive in two of three methods in a patient suspected to have PCP. RESULTS: Ninety of 132 (68%) BAL fluid samples were collected from immunocompromised patients. Thirteen of 92 (14%) BALs collected were PJ+ when tested using IFA. A total of 40 BAL samples were PJ+ in the present study including: all IFA positive samples (n=13); all referred PJ+ BAL samples (n=20); and seven additional BAL samples that were IFA negative, but positive using the modified gold standard. Compared with IFA, the PJ real-time PCR had sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 100%, 91%, 65% and 100%, respectively. Compared with the modified gold standard, PJ real-time PCR had a sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 100%. CONCLUSION: PJ real-time PCR improved detection of PJ in immunocompromised patients. PMID:26600815

  14. Pneumocystis Infection in an Immunocompetent Host Can Promote Collateral Sensitization to Respiratory Antigens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Swain, Steve D.; Meissner, Nicole; Han, Soo; Harmsen, Allen

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis is assumed to pass without persistent pathology in immunocompetent hosts. However, when immunocompetent BALB/c mice were inoculated with Pneumocystis, a vigorous Th2-like pulmonary inflammation ensued and peaked at 14 days postinfection. This coincided with a 10-fold increase in the number of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the lung, and these cells were capable of presenting antigen in vitro, as well as greater uptake of antigen in vivo. When mice were presented with exogenous antigen at the 14-day time point of the infection, they developed respiratory sensitization to that antigen, in the form of increased airway hyperresponsiveness upon a later challenge, whereas mice not infected but presented with antigen did not. Like other forms of collateral sensitization, this response was dependent on interleukin-4 receptor signaling. This ability to facilitate sensitization to exogenous antigen has been previously reported for other infectious disease agents; however, Pneumocystis appears to be uniquely capable in this respect, as a single intranasal dose without added adjuvant, when it was administered at the appropriate time, was sufficient to initiate sensitization. Pneumocystis infection probably occurs in most humans during the first few years of life, and in the vast majority of cases, it fails to cause any overt direct pathology. However, as we show here, Pneumocystis can be an agent of comorbidity at this time by facilitating respiratory sensitization that may relate to the later development or exacerbation of obstructive airway disease. PMID:21343358

  15. Growth and airborne transmission of cell-sorted life cycle stages of Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Anna; Halliez, Marie C M; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Chabé, Magali; Standaert-Vitse, Annie; Fréalle, Emilie; Gantois, Nausicaa; Pottier, Muriel; Pinon, Anthony; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis organisms are airborne opportunistic pathogens that cannot be continuously grown in culture. Consequently, the follow-up of Pneumocystis stage-to-stage differentiation, the sequence of their multiplication processes as well as formal identification of the transmitted form have remained elusive. The successful high-speed cell sorting of trophic and cystic forms is paving the way for the elucidation of the complex Pneumocystis life cycle. The growth of each sorted Pneumocystis stage population was followed up independently both in nude rats and in vitro. In addition, by setting up a novel nude rat model, we attempted to delineate which cystic and/or trophic forms can be naturally aerially transmitted from host to host. The results showed that in axenic culture, cystic forms can differentiate into trophic forms, whereas trophic forms are unable to evolve into cystic forms. In contrast, nude rats inoculated with pure trophic forms are able to produce cystic forms and vice versa. Transmission experiments indicated that 12 h of contact between seeder and recipient nude rats was sufficient for cystic forms to be aerially transmitted. In conclusion, trophic- to cystic-form transition is a key step in the proliferation of Pneumocystis microfungi because the cystic forms (but not the trophic forms) can be transmitted by aerial route from host to host. PMID:24223207

  16. Study of the epidemiology of Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. suis in abattoir swine in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Esgalhado, Rita; Esteves, Francisco; Antunes, Francisco; Matos, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis has been identified in various mammalian species, including domestic, wild and zoo animals. This study's main objectives were: (1) to estimate the prevalence of the Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. suis infection in slaughtered pigs in Portugal, (2) assess the prevalence differences within distinct age groups of animals, (3) determine the possible associations between pulmonary lesions and the infection, and (4) genetically characterize the P. carinii f. sp. suis isolates recovered from infected animals using PCR with DNA sequencing. An epidemiological cross-sectional study was conducted using 215 pig lung tissue samples which demonstrated a global prevalence of 7% (14 positive samples). This value was later validated by statistical analysis as being representative of the national population prevalence. Regarding the assessment of relations between the different variables investigated during the study (age, gender, geographical region, type of farming, weight and pulmonary lesion) and the P. carinii f. sp. suis infection, no significant statistical differences were found, and apparently, no predisposing factors could be defined. Nevertheless, infection by Pneumocystis in pigs is ubiquitous and it can be detected in healthy animals. Thus, the colonization of P. carinii f. sp. suis among healthy individuals suggests that asymptomatic carriers can be an effective reservoir for susceptible animals and participate in the transmission of infection. The present data confirmed that porcine Pneumocystis is genetically distinct from Pneumocystis DNA detected in other mammalian hosts.

  17. Fatal pulmonary co-infection with pneumocystis and cytomegalovirus in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chuganji, Eri; Abe, Toshikazu; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Nakano, Noriyuki; Kanai, Takao; Ohara, Gen; Takayashiki, Norio; Noguchi, Masayuki; Morishita, Yukio; Aoki, Makoto; Tokuda, Yasuharu

    2014-01-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual Japanese man who admitted to having sex with men presented with a two-week history of dyspnea and fever. Chest imaging showed diffuse pulmonary frosted-glass-like shadows. A blood test revealed positive HIV antibodies with a CD4 cell count of 66/μL. Bronchoalveolar lavage identified pneumocystis. Although the patient exhibited a transient response to anti-pneumocystis treatment and mega-dose steroid pulse therapy, he eventually died from respiratory failure. An autopsy suggested massive cytomegalovirus and pneumocystis pneumonitis. The pulmonary co-infection with cytomegalovirus may have been worsened by the use of mega-dose steroids, and such therapy should be avoided in patients with a high HIV viral load and low CD4 count.

  18. Virtual Screening of Phytochemicals to Novel Target (HAT) Rtt109 in Pneumocystis Jirovecii using Bioinformatics Tools

    PubMed Central

    Adithavarman, Abhinand Ponneri; Dakshinamoorthi, Anusha; David, Darling Chellathai; Ragunath, Padmavathi Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungus that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV and other immunosuppressed patients. Treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia with the currently available antifungals is challenging and associated with considerable adverse effects. There is a need to develop drugs against novel targets with minimal human toxicities. Histone Acetyl Transferase (HAT) Rtt109 is a potential therapeutic target in Pneumocystis jirovecii species. HAT is linked to transcription and is required to acetylate conserved lysine residues on histone proteins by transferring an acetyl group from acetyl CoA to form e-N-acetyl lysine. Therefore, inhibitors of HAT can be useful therapeutic options in Pneumocystis pneumonia. Aim To screen phytochemicals against (HAT) Rtt109 using bioinformatics tool. Materials and Methods The tertiary structure of Pneumocystis jirovecii (HAT) Rtt109 was modeled by Homology Modeling. The ideal template for modeling was obtained by performing Psi BLAST of the protein sequence. Rtt109-AcCoA/Vps75 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (PDB structure 3Q35) was chosen as the template. The target protein was modeled using Swiss Modeler and validated using Ramachandran plot and Errat 2. Comprehensive text mining was performed to identify phytochemical compounds with antipneumonia and fungicidal properties and these compounds were filtered based on Lipinski’s Rule of 5. The chosen compounds were subjected to virtual screening against the target protein (HAT) Rtt109 using Molegro Virtual Docker 4.5. Osiris Property Explorer and Open Tox Server were used to predict ADME-T properties of the chosen phytochemicals. Results Tertiary structure model of HAT Rtt 109 had a ProSA score of -6.57 and Errat 2 score of 87.34. Structure validation analysis by Ramachandran plot for the model revealed 97% of amino acids were in the favoured region. Of all the phytochemicals subjected to virtual screening against the target protein (HAT) Rtt109, baicalin

  19. Low genetic diversity of Pneumocystis jirovecii among Cuban population based on two-locus mitochondrial typing.

    PubMed

    de Armas, Yaxsier; Friaza, Vicente; Capó, Virginia; Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Govín, Anamays; de la Horra, Carmen; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Calderón, Enrique J

    2012-05-01

    Genotypes of two different loci of the Pneumocystis jirovecii mitochondrial gene were studied in specimens from a total of 75 Pneumocystis pneumonia patients in Spain, France and Cuba. A new genotype of the mitochondrial small subunit rRNA gene of P. jirovecii (160A/196T) was identified, which was revealed to be the most common in these three countries, especially in Cuba where its proportion reached 93.8%. Our data imply that the new genotype might be circulating worldwide and also suggests that the distribution of P. jirovecii genotypes could be narrower in islands such as Cuba.

  20. Neither Classical nor Alternative Macrophage Activation Is Required for Pneumocystis Clearance during Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuo-Qian; Wang, Jing; Hoy, Zachary; Keegan, Achsah; Bhagwat, Samir; Gigliotti, Francis

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis is a respiratory fungal pathogen that causes pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia [PcP]) in immunocompromised patients. Alveolar macrophages are critical effectors for CD4+ T cell-dependent clearance of Pneumocystis, and previous studies found that alternative macrophage activation accelerates fungal clearance during PcP-related immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, the requirement for either classically or alternatively activated macrophages for Pneumocystis clearance has not been determined. Therefore, RAG2−/− mice lacking either the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) receptor (IFN-γR) or interleukin 4 receptor alpha (IL-4Rα) were infected with Pneumocystis. These mice were then immune reconstituted with wild-type lymphocytes to preserve the normal T helper response while preventing downstream effects of Th1 or Th2 effector cytokines on macrophage polarization. As expected, RAG2−/− mice developed severe disease but effectively cleared Pneumocystis and resolved IRIS. Neither RAG/IFN-γR−/− nor RAG/IL-4Rα−/− mice displayed impaired Pneumocystis clearance. However, RAG/IFN-γR−/− mice developed a dysregulated immune response, with exacerbated IRIS and greater pulmonary function deficits than those in RAG2 and RAG/IL-4Rα−/− mice. RAG/IFN-γR−/− mice had elevated numbers of lung CD4+ T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, and NK cells but severely depressed numbers of lung CD8+ T suppressor cells. Impaired lung CD8+ T cell responses in RAG/IFN-γR−/− mice were associated with elevated lung IFN-γ levels, and neutralization of IFN-γ restored the CD8 response. These data demonstrate that restricting the ability of macrophages to polarize in response to Th1 or Th2 cytokines does not impair Pneumocystis clearance. However, a cell type-specific IFN-γ/IFN-γR-dependent mechanism regulates CD8+ T suppressor cell recruitment, limits immunopathogenesis, preserves lung function, and enhances the resolution of Pc

  1. Inhibition of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase by sulfa drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Y L; Hossler, P A; Calhoun, D H; Meshnick, S R

    1995-01-01

    Forty-four sulfa drugs were screened against crude preparations of recombinant Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constants (Km) for p-aminobenzoic acid and 7,8-dihydro-6-hydroxymethylpterin pyrophosphate were 0.34 +/- 0.02 and 2.50 +/- 0.71 microM, respectively. Several sulfa drugs, including sulfathiazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, and sulfathiourea, inhibited dihydropteroate synthetase approximately as well as sulfamethoxazole, as determined by the concentrations which cause 50% inhibition and/or by Ki. For all sulfones and sulfonamides tested, unsubstituted p-amino groups were necessary for activity, and sulfonamides containing an N1-heterocyclic substituent were found to be the most effective inhibitors. Folate biosynthesis in isolated intact P. carinii was approximately equally sensitive to inhibition by sulfamethoxazole, sulfachlorpyridazine, sulfamethoxypyridazine, sulfisoxazole, and sulfathiazole. Two of these drugs, sulfamethoxypyridazine and sulfisoxazole, are known to be less toxic than sulfamethoxazole and should be further evaluated for the treatment of P. carinii pneumonia. PMID:7486915

  2. Regulation of the plasma membrane potential in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    VanderHeyden, N; McLaughlin, G L; Docampo, R

    2000-02-15

    Many protists use a H(+) gradient across the plasma membrane, the proton motive force, to drive nutrient uptake. This force is generated in part by the plasma membrane potential (DeltaPsi). We investigated the regulation of the DeltaPsi in Pneumocystis carinii using the potentiometric fluorescent dye bisoxonol. The steady state DeltaPsi in a buffer containing Na(+) and K(+) (standard buffer) was found to be -78+/-8 mV. In the absence of Na(+) and K(+) (NMG buffer) or Cl(-) (gluconate buffer), DeltaPsi was not significantly changed suggesting that cation and anion conductances do not play a significant role in the regulation of DeltaPsi in P. carinii. The DeltaPsi was also not affected by inhibitors of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, ouabain (1 mM), and the K(+)/H(+)-ATPase, omeprazole (1 mM). In contrast, inhibitors of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase, dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (100 microM), N-ethylmaleimide (100 microM) and diethylstilbestrol (25 microM), significantly depolarized the DeltaPsi to -43+/-7, -56+/-5 and -40+/-12 mV, respectively. The data support that the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase plays a significant role in the regulation of DeltaPsi in P. carinii.

  3. Pneumocystis jirovecii multilocus gene sequencing: findings and implications.

    PubMed

    Matos, Olga; Esteves, Francisco

    2010-08-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) remains a major cause of respiratory illness among immunocompromised patients, especially patients infected with HIV, but it has also been isolated from immunocompetent persons. This article discusses the application of multilocus genotyping analysis to the study of the genetic diversity of P. jirovecii and its epidemiological and clinical parameters, and the important concepts achieved to date with these approaches. The multilocus typing studies performed until now have shown that there is an important genetic diversity of stable and ubiquitous P. jirovecii genotypes; infection with P. jirovecii is not necessarily clonal, recombination between some P. jirovecii multilocus genotypes has been suggested. P. jirovecii-specific multilocus genotypes can be associated with severity of PcP. Patients infected with P. jirovecii, regardless of the form of infection they present with, are part of a common human reservoir for future infections. The CYB, DHFR, DHPS, mtLSU rRNA, SOD and the ITS loci are suitable genetic targets to be used in further epidemiological studies focused on the identification and characterization of P. jirovecii haplotypes correlated with drug resistance and PcP outcome.

  4. DNA sequences identical to Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. carinii and Pneumocystis carinii f. sp. hominis in samples of air spora.

    PubMed Central

    Wakefield, A E

    1996-01-01

    Samples of ambient air collected with three different types of spore traps in a rural location were examined for the presence of Pneumocystis carinii by screening for P. carinii-specific DNA sequences by DNA amplification. Eleven spore trap samples were analyzed by nested PCR, using oligonucleotide primers designed for the gene encoding the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA of P. carinii f. sp. carinii and P. carinii f. sp. hominis. The samples were collected over a 3-year period during the months of May to September, with a range of sampling times from 9 to 240 h. One air sample from an animal facility housing P. carinii-infected rats was also examined. P. carinii-specific amplification products were obtained from samples from each of the spore traps. The amplification products from eight air samples were cloned and sequenced. The majority of the recombinants from each of these samples had sequences identical to those of P. carinii f. sp. carinii and P. carinii f. sp. hominis, and a number of clones had single-base differences. These data suggest that sequences identical to those of P. carinii f. sp. carinii and P. carinii f. sp. hominis can be detected in samples of air collected in a rural location and that P. carinii may be a component of the air spora of rural Oxfordshire. PMID:8784583

  5. Comparative Genomics Suggests That the Human Pathogenic Fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii Acquired Obligate Biotrophy through Gene Loss

    PubMed Central

    Cissé, Ousmane H.; Pagni, Marco; Hauser, Philippe M.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungal parasite that colonizes specifically humans and turns into an opportunistic pathogen in immunodeficient individuals. The fungus is able to reproduce extracellularly in host lungs without eliciting massive cellular death. The molecular mechanisms that govern this process are poorly understood, in part because of the lack of an in vitro culture system for Pneumocystis spp. In this study, we explored the origin and evolution of the putative biotrophy of P. jirovecii through comparative genomics and reconstruction of ancestral gene repertoires. We used the maximum parsimony method and genomes of related fungi of the Taphrinomycotina subphylum. Our results suggest that the last common ancestor of Pneumocystis spp. lost 2,324 genes in relation to the acquisition of obligate biotrophy. These losses may result from neutral drift and affect the biosyntheses of amino acids and thiamine, the assimilation of inorganic nitrogen and sulfur, and the catabolism of purines. In addition, P. jirovecii shows a reduced panel of lytic proteases and has lost the RNA interference machinery, which might contribute to its genome plasticity. Together with other characteristics, that is, a sex life cycle within the host, the absence of massive destruction of host cells, difficult culturing, and the lack of virulence factors, these gene losses constitute a unique combination of characteristics which are hallmarks of both obligate biotrophs and animal parasites. These findings suggest that Pneumocystis spp. should be considered as the first described obligate biotrophs of animals, whose evolution has been marked by gene losses. PMID:25062922

  6. Sulfa resistance and dihydropteroate synthase mutants in recurrent Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Nahimana, Aimable; Rabodonirina, Meja; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Meneau, Isabelle; Francioli, Patrick; Bille, Jacques; Hauser, Philippe M

    2003-07-01

    Failure of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis is associated with mutations in Pneumocystis carinii gene coding for dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS). The DHPS genotype was analyzed in AIDS patients who had two separate episodes of P. carinii pneumonia. The results suggest that DHPS mutations can be selected de novo within patients by the pressure of a sulfa or sulfone drug.

  7. Pneumocystis carinii glycoprotein A binds macrophage mannose receptors.

    PubMed Central

    O'Riordan, D M; Standing, J E; Limper, A H

    1995-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii causes life-threatening pneumonia in patients with impaired immunity. Recent studies suggest that alveolar macrophages interact with P. carinii through macrophage mannose receptors. However, the ligand(s) on P. carinii that is recognized by these receptors has not been fully defined. P. carinii contains a major mannose-rich surface antigen complex termed glycoprotein A (gpA). It was therefore hypothesized that gpA binds directly to macrophage mannose receptors and mediates organism attachment to these phagocytes. To assess this, gpA was purified from P. carinii by continuous-elution gel electrophoresis. 125I-labeled gpA bound to alveolar macrophages in a saturable fashion. In addition, gpA binding was substantially inhibited by both alpha-mannan and EDTA, further suggesting that gpA interacts with macrophage mannose receptors. Macrophage membrane proteins capable of binding to gpA were isolated with a gpA-Sepharose column. A 165-kDa membrane-associated protein was specifically eluted from the gpA-Sepharose column with EDTA (20 mM). This protein was identified as the macrophage mannose receptor by immunoprecipitation with a polyclonal anti-mannose receptor antiserum. To further investigate the role of gpA in P. carinii-macrophage interactions, 51Cr-labeled P. carinii cells were incubated with macrophages in the presence of increasing concentrations of soluble gpA, and organism attachment was quantified. Soluble gpA (2.5 mg/dl) competitively inhibited P. carinii attachment to alveolar macrophages by 51.3% +/- 3.7% (P = 0.01). Our findings demonstrate that gpA present on P. carinii interacts directly with mannose receptors, thereby mediating organism attachment to alveolar macrophages. PMID:7868247

  8. AIDS-related Pneumocystis jirovecii genotypes in French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Le Gal, Solène; Blanchet, Denis; Damiani, Céline; Guéguen, Paul; Virmaux, Michèle; Abboud, Philippe; Guillot, Geneviève; Kérangart, Stéphane; Merle, Cédric; Calderon, Enrique; Totet, Anne; Carme, Bernard; Nevez, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    The study described Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) multilocus typing in seven AIDS patients living in French Guiana (Cayenne Hospital) and seven immunosuppressed patients living in Brest, metropolitan France (Brest Hospital). Archival P. jirovecii specimens were examined at the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) locus using a PCR-RFLP technique, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 and ITS 2 and the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA (mtLSUrRNA) gene using PCR and sequencing. Analysis of typing results were combined with an analysis of the literature on P. jirovecii mtLSUrRNA types and ITS haplotypes. A wild DHPS type was identified in six Guianese patients and in seven patients from metropolitan France whereas a DHPS mutant was infected in the remaining Guianese patient. Typing of the two other loci pointed out a high diversity of ITS haplotypes and an average diversity of mtLSUrRNA types in French Guiana with a partial commonality of these haplotypes and types described in metropolitan France and around the world. Combining DHPS, ITS and mtLSU types, 12 different multilocus genotypes (MLGs) were identified, 4 MLGs in Guianese patients and 8 MLGs in Brest patients. MLG analysis allows to discriminate patients in 2 groups according to their geographical origin. Indeed, none of the MLGs identified in the Guianese patients were found in the Brest patients and none of the MLGs identified in the Brest patients were found in the Guianese patients. These results show that in French Guiana (i) PCP involving DHPS mutants occur, (ii) there is a diversity of ITS and mtLSUrRNA types and (iii) although partial type commonality in this territory and metropolitan France can be observed, MLG analysis suggests that P. jirovecii organisms from French Guiana may present specific characteristics.

  9. Ploidy of Cell-Sorted Trophic and Cystic Forms of Pneumocystis carinii

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Anna; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Standaert-Vitse, Annie; Werkmeister, Elisabeth; Pottier, Muriel; Pinçon, Claire; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Once regarded as an AIDS-defining illness, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is nowadays prevailing in immunocompromised HIV-negative individuals such as patients receiving immunosuppressive therapies or affected by primary immunodeficiency. Moreover, Pneumocystis clinical spectrum is broadening to non-severely-immunocompromised subjects who could be colonized by the fungus while remaining asymptomatic for PcP, thus being able to transmit the infection by airborne route to susceptible hosts. Although the taxonomical position of the Pneumocystis genus has been clarified, several aspects of its life cycle remain elusive such as its mode of proliferation within the alveolus or its ploidy level. As no long-term culture model exists to grow Pneumocystis organisms in vitro, an option was to use a model of immunosuppressed rat infected with Pneumocystis carinii and sort life cycle stage fractions using a high-through-put cytometer. Subsequently, ploidy levels of the P. carinii trophic and cystic form fractions were measured by flow cytometry. In the cystic form, eight contents of DNA were measured thus strengthening the fact that each mature cyst contains eight haploid spores. Following release, each spore evolves into a trophic form. The majority of the trophic form fraction was haploid in our study. Some less abundant trophic forms displayed two contents of DNA indicating that they could undergo (i) mating/fusion leading to a diploid status or (ii) asexual mitotic division or (iii) both. Even less abundant trophic forms with four contents of DNA were suggestive of mitotic divisions occurring following mating in diploid trophic forms. Of interest, was the presence of trophic forms with three contents of DNA, an unusual finding that could be related to asymmetrical mitotic divisions occurring in other fungal species to create genetic diversity at lower energetic expenses than mating. Overall, ploidy data of P. carinii life cycle stages shed new light on the complexity of its

  10. Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis spp. co-infection in wild bats from Argentina, French Guyana, and Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis organisms cause host infections primarily affecting the lung tissue. H. capsulatum is endemic in the United States of America and Latin American countries. In special environments, H. capsulatum is commonly associated with bat and bird droppings. Pneumocystis-host specificity has been primarily studied in laboratory animals, and its ability to be harboured by wild animals remains as an important issue for understanding the spread of this pathogen in nature. Bats infected with H. capsulatum or Pneumocystis spp. have been found, with this mammal serving as a probable reservoir and disperser; however, the co-infection of bats with both of these microorganisms has never been explored. To evaluate the impact of H. capsulatum and Pneumocystis spp. infections in this flying mammal, 21 bat lungs from Argentina (AR), 13 from French Guyana (FG), and 88 from Mexico (MX) were screened using nested-PCR of the fragments, employing the Hcp100 locus for H. capsulatum and the mtLSUrRNA and mtSSUrRNA loci for Pneumocystis organisms. Results Of the 122 bats studied, 98 revealed H. capsulatum infections in which 55 of these bats exhibited this infection alone. In addition, 51 bats revealed Pneumocystis spp. infection of which eight bats exhibited a Pneumocystis infection alone. A total of 43 bats (eight from AR, one from FG, and 34 from MX) were found co-infected with both fungi, representing a co-infection rate of 35.2% (95% CI = 26.8-43.6%). Conclusion The data highlights the H. capsulatum and Pneumocystis spp.co-infection in bat population’s suggesting interplay with this wild host. PMID:24495513

  11. Pneumocystis pneumonia in a non-HIV patient on chronic corticosteroid therapy: a question of prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Plakke, Michael J; Jalota, Leena; Lloyd, Benjamin J

    2013-01-01

    A man in his late 50s with a history of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis presented with fever and mild dyspnoea. He was HIV-negative and had been on corticosteroids as immunosuppression for 6 months prior to tapering them off 1 week before presentation. He was not taking prophylaxis for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After unsuccessful treatment for community-acquired pneumonia, his condition worsened and he required intubation and mechanical ventilation. Full respiratory workup including bronchoscopy revealed P jirovecii as a source for the patient's infection. He was treated successfully with a 21-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole  and eventually weaned off the ventilator. He has had no complications to date. In our review of this case and the existing literature, we believe that proper utilisation of prophylaxis for pneumocystis pneumonia may have prevented our patient's transfer to intensive care unit. In our article, we discuss this issue and explore current evidence for prophylaxis. PMID:23456156

  12. Late-onset Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Perez-Ordoño, L; Hoyo, I; Sanclemente, G; Ricart, M J; Cofan, F; Perez-Villa, F; de la Bellacasa, J Puig; Moreno, A; Cervera, C

    2014-04-01

    Anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis is recommended for at least 6-12 months after solid organ transplantation, as most cases of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) occur during the first year post transplantation. Herein, we report 4 cases of late-onset PCP (>1 year post transplant). PCP appeared in a range of 50-68 months post transplant. Two cases had history of humoral rejection episodes treated with rituximab, and the other 2 had low CD4+ T-cell count (<200 cells/mm(3) ) at the time of diagnosis. All 4 patients survived. In conclusion, although the number of cases is low, we must be aware of the possibility of late-onset PCP in solid organ transplant patients. The role of previous use of rituximab or persistent CD4+ T-cell lymphopenia should be addressed in future studies. PMID:24456244

  13. High prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization among HIV-positive patients in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Robson M; Müller, André L; Zimerman, Ricardo A; Antunes, Denise B; Zinn, Vitor F; Friaza, Vicente; de la Horra, Carmen; Calderón, Enrique J; Wissmann, Gustavo

    2014-11-01

    A high prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization was observed in patients positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) admitted to a tertiary hospital in southern Brazil between August 2012 and December 2012. Amplification of the mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA gene in oropharyngeal samples through nested polymerase chain reaction identified P. jirovecii colonization in 26 of 58 (44.8%) HIV-positive patients admitted for causes other than Pneumocystis pneumonia. Colonization was more frequent among patients with an absolute CD4 count ≤200 cells/μl. These findings suggest that the HIV-infected population is a major reservoir and source of P. jirovecii infection and that identification of such individuals may contribute to future strategies for improving management of HIV-infected patients.

  14. Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus–infected Adults and Adolescents: Current Concepts and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tasaka, Sadatomo

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is one of the most common opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus–infected adults. Colonization of Pneumocystis is highly prevalent among the general population and could be associated with the transmission and development of PCP in immunocompromised individuals. Although the microscopic demonstration of the organisms in respiratory specimens is still the golden standard of its diagnosis, polymerase chain reaction has been shown to have a high sensitivity, detecting Pneumocystis DNA in induced sputum or oropharyngeal wash. Serum β-D-glucan is useful as an adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of PCP. High-resolution computed tomography, which typically shows diffuse ground-glass opacities, is informative for the evaluation of immunocompromised patients with suspected PCP and normal chest radiography. Trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is the first-line agent for the treatment of mild to severe PCP, although it is often complicated with various side effects. Since TMP-SMX is widely used for the prophylaxis, the putative drug resistance is an emerging concern. PMID:26327786

  15. Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-infected Adults and Adolescents: Current Concepts and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Tasaka, Sadatomo

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is one of the most common opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected adults. Colonization of Pneumocystis is highly prevalent among the general population and could be associated with the transmission and development of PCP in immunocompromised individuals. Although the microscopic demonstration of the organisms in respiratory specimens is still the golden standard of its diagnosis, polymerase chain reaction has been shown to have a high sensitivity, detecting Pneumocystis DNA in induced sputum or oropharyngeal wash. Serum β-D-glucan is useful as an adjunctive tool for the diagnosis of PCP. High-resolution computed tomography, which typically shows diffuse ground-glass opacities, is informative for the evaluation of immunocompromised patients with suspected PCP and normal chest radiography. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is the first-line agent for the treatment of mild to severe PCP, although it is often complicated with various side effects. Since TMP-SMX is widely used for the prophylaxis, the putative drug resistance is an emerging concern.

  16. Treatment with Interleukin-7 Restores Host Defense against Pneumocystis in CD4+ T-Lymphocyte-Depleted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, D. R.; Assouline, B.; Morre, M.; Shellito, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. CD4+ T lymphocytes are critical for host defense against this infection, but in the absence of CD4+ T lymphocytes, CD8+ T lymphocytes may provide limited host defense. The cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7) functions to enhance lymphocyte proliferation, survival, and recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection. However, there is little known about the role of IL-7 in PCP or its potential use as an immunotherapeutic agent. We hypothesized that treatment with recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) would augment host defense against Pneumocystis and accelerate pathogen clearance in CD4-depleted mice. Control and CD4-depleted mice were infected with Pneumocystis, and rhIL-7 was administered via intraperitoneal injection. Our studies indicate that endogenous murine IL-7 is part of the normal host response to Pneumocystis murina and that administration of rhIL-7 markedly enhanced clearance of Pneumocystis in CD4-depleted mice. Additionally, we observed increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes to the lungs and decreased apoptosis of pulmonary CD8+ T lymphocytes in rhIL-7-treated animals compared to those in untreated mice. The antiapoptotic effect of rhIL-7 was associated with increased levels of Bcl-2 protein in T lymphocytes. rhIL-7 immunotherapy in CD4-depleted mice also increased the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-positive CD8+ central memory T lymphocytes in the lungs. We conclude that rhIL-7 has a potent therapeutic effect in the treatment of murine Pneumocystis pneumonia in CD4-depleted mice. This therapeutic effect is mediated through enhanced recruitment of CD8+ T cells and decreased apoptosis of lung T lymphocytes, with a preferential action on central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:26483405

  17. Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization is associated with enhanced Th1 inflammatory gene expression in lungs of humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Meghan E.; Tedrow, John R.; Hillenbrand, Maria E.; Lucht, Lorrie; Richards, Thomas; Norris, Karen A.; Zhang, Yingze; Sciurba, Frank C.; Kaminski, Naftali; Morris, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex disease, the pathogenesis of which remains incompletely understood. Colonization with Pneumocystis jirovecii may play a role in COPD pathogenesis; however, the mechanisms by which such colonization contributes to COPD are unknown. The objective of this study was to determine lung gene expression profiles associated with Pneumocystis colonization in patients with COPD to identify potential key pathways involved in disease pathogenesis. Using COPD lung tissue samples made available through the Lung Tissue Research Consortium (LTRC), Pneumocystis colonization status was determined by nested PCR. Microarray gene expression profiles were performed for each sample and the profiles of colonized and non-colonized samples compared. Overall, 18 participants (8.5%) were Pneumocystis-colonized. Pneumocystis colonization was associated with fold increase in expression of four closely related genes: INF-γ and the three chemokine ligands CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11. These ligands are chemoattractants for the common cognate receptor CXCR3, which is predominantly expressed on activated Th1 T-lymphocytes. Although these ligand–receptor pairs have previously been implicated in COPD pathogenesis, few initiators of ligand expression and subsequent lymphocyte trafficking have been identified: our findings implicate Pneumocystis as a potential trigger. The finding of upregulation of these inflammatory genes in the setting of Pneumocystis colonization sheds light on infectious-immune relationships in COPD. PMID:24438206

  18. Association between Pneumocystis spp. and co-infections with Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida in Austrian pigs with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kureljušić, B; Weissenbacher-Lang, C; Nedorost, N; Stixenberger, D; Weissenböck, H

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective study, 218 pig lung tissue samples were analyzed to examine a possible association between Pneumocystis spp. using in situ hybridization, Bordetella bronchiseptica (B.b.) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M.h.) by quantitative PCR, and Pasteurella multocida (P.m.; IHC). Compared to the bacterial agents (B.b., 5%; M.h., 30%; P.m., 23%), Pneumocystis occurred with a higher prevalence (51%). Co-infections with two or three pathogens were present in 28% of the examined cases. Those of Pneumocystis and M.h. were most commonly seen, followed by Pneumocystis and P.m. and M.h. and P.m. Histologically, interstitial pneumonia was found in both the Pneumocystis positive lungs and lungs with a mild M.h. infection. The B.b. and P.m. positive lungs were mainly associated with suppurative bronchopneumonia and severe M.h. cases with fibrinous or fibrino-haemorrhagic pneumonia. In suckling piglets, the number of samples positive for Pneumocystis predominated, whereas samples from fattening pigs were mainly positive for bacteria or Pneumocystis and bacteria. PMID:26654847

  19. Association between Pneumocystis spp. and co-infections with Bordetella bronchiseptica, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Pasteurella multocida in Austrian pigs with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kureljušić, B; Weissenbacher-Lang, C; Nedorost, N; Stixenberger, D; Weissenböck, H

    2016-01-01

    In this retrospective study, 218 pig lung tissue samples were analyzed to examine a possible association between Pneumocystis spp. using in situ hybridization, Bordetella bronchiseptica (B.b.) using immunohistochemistry (IHC), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M.h.) by quantitative PCR, and Pasteurella multocida (P.m.; IHC). Compared to the bacterial agents (B.b., 5%; M.h., 30%; P.m., 23%), Pneumocystis occurred with a higher prevalence (51%). Co-infections with two or three pathogens were present in 28% of the examined cases. Those of Pneumocystis and M.h. were most commonly seen, followed by Pneumocystis and P.m. and M.h. and P.m. Histologically, interstitial pneumonia was found in both the Pneumocystis positive lungs and lungs with a mild M.h. infection. The B.b. and P.m. positive lungs were mainly associated with suppurative bronchopneumonia and severe M.h. cases with fibrinous or fibrino-haemorrhagic pneumonia. In suckling piglets, the number of samples positive for Pneumocystis predominated, whereas samples from fattening pigs were mainly positive for bacteria or Pneumocystis and bacteria.

  20. Impact of HIV Infection Status on Interpretation of Quantitative PCR for Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii

    PubMed Central

    Louis, M.; Guitard, J.; Jodar, M.; Ancelle, T.; Magne, D.; Lascols, O.

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) is now a key diagnostic tool for Pneumocystis pneumonia. However, cutoffs to distinguish between infected and colonized patients according to their HIV status have not yet been determined. According to clinical, radiological, and biological data, we retrospectively classified bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples subjected to qPCR over a 3-year period into four categories, i.e., definite PCP, probable PCP, Pneumocystis colonization, and no infection. Fungal burden was then analyzed according to the HIV status of the patients. Among 1,212 episodes of pneumonia screened in immunocompromised patients, 52 and 27 HIV-positive patients were diagnosed with a definite and probable PCP, whereas 4 and 22 HIV-negative patients had definite and probable PCP, respectively. Among patients with definite or a probable PCP, HIV-negative patients had a significantly lower burden than HIV-positive patients (P < 10−4). In both groups, the median fungal burden was significantly higher in patients with definite PCP than in colonized patients. A single cutoff at 1.5 × 104 copies/ml allowed to differentiate colonized and infected HIV-positive patients with 100% sensitivity and specificity. In HIV-negative patients, cutoff values of 2.87 × 104 and 3.39 × 103 copies/ml resulted in 100% specificity and sensitivity, respectively. Using cutoffs determined for the whole population would have led us to set aside the diagnosis of PCP in 9 HIV-negative patients with definite or probable PCP. qPCR appeared to be the most sensitive test to detect Pneumocystis in BAL samples. However, because of lower inocula in HIV-negative patients, different cutoffs must be used according to the HIV status to differentiate between colonized and infected patients. PMID:26468505

  1. Pneumocystis Elicits a STAT6-Dependent, Strain-Specific Innate Immune Response and Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Nicole N.; Siemsen, Dan W.; McInnerney, Kate; Harmsen, Allen G.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that exposure to pathogens such as fungi can be an agent of comorbidity, such as exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although many studies have examined allergic responses to fungi and their effects on pulmonary function, the possible pathologic implications of the early innate responses to fungal pathogens have not been explored. We examined early responses to the atypical fungus Pneumocystis in two common strains of mice in terms of overall immunological response and related pathology, such as cell damage and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We found a strong strain-specific response in BALB/c mice that included recruitment of neutrophils, NK, NKT, and CD4 T cells. This response was accompanied by elevated indicators of lung damage (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid albumin and LDH) and profound AHR. This early response was absent in C57BL/6 mice, although both strains exhibited a later response associated with the clearance of Pneumocystis. We found that this AHR could not be attributed exclusively to the presence of recruited neutrophils, NKT, NK, or CD4 cells or to the actions of IFN-γ or IL-4. However, in the absence of STAT6 signaling, AHR and inflammatory cell recruitment were virtually absent. Gene expression analysis indicated that this early response included activation of several transcription factors that could be involved in pulmonary remodeling. These results show that exposure to a fungus such as Pneumocystis can elicit pulmonary responses that may contribute to morbidity, even without prior sensitization, in the context of certain genetic backgrounds. PMID:21960549

  2. Pneumocystis jirovecii multilocus genotyping in pooled DNA samples: a new approach for clinical and epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Gaspar, J; de Sousa, B; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Matos, O

    2012-06-01

    Specific single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are recognized as important DNA sequence variations influencing the pathogenesis of Pneumocystis jirovecii and the clinical outcome of Pneumocystis pneumonia, which is a major worldwide cause of illness among immunocompromised patients. Genotyping platforms for pooled DNA samples are promising methodologies for genetic characterization of infectious organisms. We have developed a new typing strategy for P. jirovecii, which consisted of DNA pools prepared according to clinical data (HIV diagnosis, microscopic and molecular detection of P. jirovecii, parasite burden, clinical diagnosis and follow-up of infection) from individual samples using quantitative real-time PCR followed by multiplex-PCR/single base extension (MPCR/SBE). The frequencies of multiple P. jirovecii SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215 and SOD110) encoded at three distinct loci, the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), the mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA) and the superoxide dismutase (SOD) loci, were estimated in seven DNA pooled samples, representing a total of 100 individual samples. The studied SNPs were confirmed to be associated with distinct clinical parameters of infection such as parasite burden and follow-up. The MPCR/SBE-DNA pooling methodology, described in the present study, was demonstrated to be a useful high-throughput procedure for large-scale P. jirovecii SNPs screening and a powerful tool for evaluation of clinically relevant SNPs potentially related to parasite burden, clinical diagnosis and follow-up of P. jirovecii infection. In further studies, the candidate SNPs mt85, SOD215 and SOD110 may be used as molecular markers in association with MPCR/SBE-DNA pooling to generate useful information for understanding the patterns and causes of Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  3. Diversity of Pneumocystis jirovecii during Infection Revealed by Ultra-Deep Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alanio, Alexandre; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Mercier-Delarue, Séverine; Dromer, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an uncultivable fungal pathogen responsible for Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in immunocompromised patients, the physiopathology of which is only partially understood. The diversity of the Pneumocystis strains associated with acute infection has mainly been studied by Sanger sequencing techniques precluding any identification of rare genetic events (< 20% frequency). We used next-generation sequencing to detect minority variants causing infection, and analyzed the complexity of the genomes of infection-causing P. jirovecii. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing (UDPS) of PCR amplicons of two nuclear target region [internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR)] and one mitochondrial DNA target region [the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA large subunit gene (mtLSU)] was performed on 31 samples from 25 patients. UDPS revealed that almost all patients (n = 23/25, 92%) were infected with mixtures of strains. An analysis of repeated samples from six patients showed that the proportion of each variant change significantly (by up to 30%) over time on treatment in three of these patients. A comparison of mitochondrial and nuclear UDPS data revealed heteroplasmy in P. jirovecii. The recognition site for the homing endonuclease I-SceI was recovered from the mtLSU gene, whereas its two conserved motifs of the enzyme were not. This suggests that heteroplasmy may result from recombination induced by unidentified homing endonucleases. This study sheds new light on the biology of P. jirovecii during infection. PCP results from infection not with a single microorganism, but with a complex mixture of different genotypes, the proportions of which change over time due to intricate selection and reinfection mechanisms that may differ between patients, treatments, and predisposing diseases. PMID:27252684

  4. Immunosuppression for ipilimumab-related toxicity can cause pneumocystis pneumonia but spare antitumor immune control

    PubMed Central

    Arriola, Edurne; Wheater, Matthew; Krishnan, Radhika; Smart, James; Foria, Vipul; Ottensmeier, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Ipilimumab is a standard therapy for advanced melanoma. Severe immune related adverse events occur in up to 30% of patients and require treatment with immunosuppressants such as steroids or the anti-TNFα antibody, infliximab. We describe two patients with advanced melanoma treated with ipilimumab. Both suffered from severe immune related side effects and required prolonged immunosuppression with steroids and/or infliximab. Both patients recovered and in spite of the immune suppression, demonstrate clinical evidence of tumor control. This argues that distinct immunological effector functions control nosocomial infection and tumor, respectively. To our knowledge, these are also the first two case reports of pneumocystis pneumonia in this setting. PMID:26451305

  5. Quantification and assessment of viability of Pneumocystis carinii organisms by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Lapinsky, S E; Glencross, D; Car, N G; Kallenbach, J M; Zwi, S

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of drug efficacy in animal models of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia requires an accurate method of quantification of organisms, as well as a means of assessing viability. Lung homogenates were prepared from a colony of athymic nude F344 rats experiencing a spontaneous outbreak of P. carinii pneumonia. With the fluorescent nucleic acid stain propidium iodide, flow cytometric analysis was able to quantify P. carinii cysts and trophozoites reproducibly. As this stain is excluded by living cells, this method was also used to assess the viability of organisms. Application of this technique to analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens was demonstrated. PMID:2056058

  6. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia: a late presentation following treatment for stage IV neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Edward; Glaser, Adam W; Picton, Susan V

    2003-09-01

    This report describes a child who develops Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia 7 months after high-dose chemotherapy for stage IV neuroblastoma. In addition to chemotherapy the child had also been treated with abdominal radiotherapy and 13-cis-retinoic acid. Standard practice has been to treat patients with prophylactic co-trimoxazole for 3 months after high-dose therapy, but this report highlights the intensity and complexity of current treatment for stage IV neuroblastoma and the need to be aware of prolonged lymphopenia after such treatment. PMID:14631621

  7. Diamidines versus Monoamidines as Anti-Pneumocystis Agents: An in vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Stanicki, Dimitri; Pottier, Muriel; Gantois, Nausicaa; Pinçon, Claire; Forge, Delphine; Mahieu, Isabelle; Boutry, Sébastien; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques; Martinez, Anna; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Aliouat, El-Moukhtar

    2013-01-01

    Some compounds articulated around a piperazine or an ethylenediamine linker have been evaluated in vitro to determine their activity in the presence of a 3T6 fibroblast cell line and an axenic culture of Pneumocystis carinii, respectively. The most efficient antifungal derivatives, namely N,N′-bis(benzamidine-4-yl)ethane-1,2-diamine (compound 6, a diamidine) and N-(benzamidine-4-yl)-N′-phenylethane-1,2-diamine (compound 7, a monoamidine), exhibited no cytotoxicity and were evaluated in vivo in a rat model. Only the diamidine 6 emerged as a promising hit for further studies. PMID:24276317

  8. Scintigraphic pattern of pneumothorax complicating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Finestone, H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F.; Wasserman, I.; Garcia, H. )

    1990-08-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is a serious though infrequently reported pulmonary complication of AIDS. An unsuspected lung collapse was discovered via gallium scintigraphy for the study of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Neither the pneumonia nor the pneumothorax were apparent on the most recent chest roentgenogram. In evaluating gallium images during the work-up of AIDS patients with associated pulmonary pathology, the possible complication of lung collapse should be considered. If pneumothorax is suspected on gallium imaging, a chest roentgenogram in expiration must be obtained for prompt delineation of this serious, yet correctable, condition.

  9. Memory CD4+ T cells are required for optimal NK cell effector functions against the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle N; Zheng, Mingquan; Ruan, Sanbao; Kolls, Jay; D'Souza, Alain; Shellito, Judd E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of NK cells or their interplay with other immune cells during opportunistic infections. Using our murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, we found that loss of NK cells during immunosuppression results in substantial Pneumocystis lung burden. During early infection of C57B/6 CD4(+) T cell-depleted mice, there were significantly fewer NK cells in the lung tissue compared with CD4(+) T cell-intact animals, and the NK cells present demonstrated decreased upregulation of the activation marker NKp46 and production of the effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Furthermore, coincubation studies revealed a significant increase in fungal killing when NK cells were combined with CD4(+) T cells compared with either cell alone, which was coincident with a significant increase in perforin production by NK cells. Finally, however, we found through adoptive transfer that memory CD4(+) T cells are required for significant NK cell upregulation of the activation marker NK group 2D and production of IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin during Pneumocystis infection. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a role for NK cells in immunity to Pneumocystis pneumonia, as well as to establish a functional relationship between CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in the host response to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

  10. Conserved natural IgM antibodies mediate innate and adaptive immunity against the opportunistic fungus Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Rapaka, Rekha R; Ricks, David M; Alcorn, John F; Chen, Kong; Khader, Shabaana A; Zheng, Mingquan; Plevy, Scott; Bengtén, Eva; Kolls, Jay K

    2010-12-20

    Host defense against opportunistic fungi requires coordination between innate and adaptive immunity for resolution of infection. Antibodies generated in mice vaccinated with the fungus Pneumocystis prevent growth of Pneumocystis organisms within the lungs, but the mechanisms whereby antibodies enhance antifungal host defense are poorly defined. Nearly all species of fungi contain the conserved carbohydrates β-glucan and chitin within their cell walls, which may be targets of innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we show that natural IgM antibodies targeting these fungal cell wall carbohydrates are conserved across many species, including fish and mammals. Natural antibodies bind fungal organisms and enhance host defense against Pneumocystis in early stages of infection. IgM antibodies influence recognition of fungal antigen by dendritic cells, increasing their migration to draining pulmonary lymph nodes. IgM antibodies are required for adaptive T helper type 2 (Th2) and Th17 cell differentiation and guide B cell isotype class-switch recombination during host defense against Pneumocystis. These experiments suggest a novel role for the IgM isotype in shaping the earliest steps in recognition and clearance of this fungus. We outline a mechanism whereby serum IgM, containing ancient specificities against conserved fungal antigens, bridges innate and adaptive immunity against fungal organisms.

  11. New Short Tandem Repeat-Based Molecular Typing Method for Pneumocystis jirovecii Reveals Intrahospital Transmission between Patients from Different Wards.

    PubMed

    Gits-Muselli, Maud; Peraldi, Marie-Noelle; de Castro, Nathalie; Delcey, Véronique; Menotti, Jean; Guigue, Nicolas; Hamane, Samia; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Bergeron, Anne; Valade, Sandrine; Molina, Jean-Michel; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia is a severe opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients caused by the unusual fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii. Transmission is airborne, with both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals acting as a reservoir for the fungus. Numerous reports of outbreaks in renal transplant units demonstrate the need for valid genotyping methods to detect transmission of a given genotype. Here, we developed a short tandem repeat (STR)-based molecular typing method for P. jirovecii. We analyzed the P. jirovecii genome and selected six genomic STR markers located on different contigs of the genome. We then tested these markers in 106 P. jirovecii PCR-positive respiratory samples collected between October 2010 and November 2013 from 91 patients with various underlying medical conditions. Unique (one allele per marker) and multiple (more than one allele per marker) genotypes were observed in 34 (32%) and 72 (68%) samples, respectively. A genotype could be assigned to 55 samples (54 patients) and 61 different genotypes were identified in total with a discriminatory power of 0.992. Analysis of the allelic distribution of the six markers and minimum spanning tree analysis of the 61 genotypes identified a specific genotype (Gt21) in our hospital, which may have been transmitted between 10 patients including six renal transplant recipients. Our STR-based molecular typing method is a quick, cheap and reliable approach to genotype Pneumocystis jirovecii in hospital settings and is sensitive enough to detect minor genotypes, thus enabling the study of the transmission and pathophysiology of Pneumocystis pneumonia. PMID:25933203

  12. Acute microbiologically negative hypoxic interstitial pneumonia on HAART: Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome unmasking Pneumocystis Jiroveci infection with an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sovaila, S; de Raigniac, A; Picard, C; Taulera, O; Lascoux-Combe, C; Sereni, D; Bourgarit, A

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy for AIDS sometimes engenders inflammatory manifestations resulting from an inappropriate and unbalanced immune-system restoration, called Immune Reconstitution inflammatory Syndrome, which, in turn, can unmask a subclinical infection/pathology. Despite our patient’s evident syndrome, the atypical clinical, microbiologic and radiologic feature of Pneumocystis pneumonia made its diagnosis difficult. PMID:22802889

  13. Pneumocystis pneumonia increases the clearance rate of inhaled /sup 99m/Tc DTPA from lung to blood

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.K.; Higenbottam, T.W.

    1985-10-01

    Despite no radiographic change, a patient with Pneumocystis pneumonia showed increased clearance of inhaled /sup 99m/Tc DTPA from lung to blood. Gas transfer for carbon monoxide was also reduced, but improved with treatment. This was paralleled by serial increase in the t1/2 LB.

  14. Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients: Risks and Prophylaxis Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Shunsuke; Sugimoto, Mineharu

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii infection causes fulminant interstitial pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia, PCP) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who are receiving biological and/or nonbiological antirheumatic drugs. Recently, we encountered a PCP outbreak among RA outpatients at our institution. Hospital-acquired, person-to-person transmission appears to be the most likely mode of this cluster of P. jirovecii infection. Carriage of P. jirovecii seems a time-limited phenomenon in immunocompetent hosts, but in RA patients receiving antirheumatic therapy, clearance of this organism from the lungs is delayed. Carriers among RA patients can serve as sources and reservoirs of P. jirovecii infection for other susceptible patients in outpatient facilities. Development of PCP is a matter of time in such carriers. Considering the poor survival rates of PCP cases, prophylactic antibiotics should be considered for RA patients who are scheduled to receive antirheumatic therapy. Once a new case of PCP occurs, we should take prompt action not only to treat the PCP patient but also to prevent other patients from becoming new carriers of P. jirovecii. Short-term prophylaxis with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is effective in controlling P. jirovecii infection and preventing future outbreaks of PCP among RA patients. PMID:26396551

  15. Mutations in the Pneumocystis jirovecii DHPS gene confer cross-resistance to sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Iliades, Peter; Meshnick, Steven R; Macreadie, Ian G

    2005-02-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major opportunistic pathogen that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and results in a high degree of mortality in immunocompromised individuals. The drug of choice for PCP is typically sulfamethoxazole (SMX) or dapsone in conjunction with trimethoprim. Drug treatment failure and sulfa drug resistance have been implicated epidemiologically with point mutations in dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) of P. jirovecii. P. jirovecii cannot be cultured in vitro; however, heterologous complementation of the P. jirovecii trifunctional folic acid synthesis (PjFAS) genes with an E. coli DHPS-disrupted strain was recently achieved. This enabled the evaluation of SMX resistance conferred by DHPS mutations. In this study, we sought to determine whether DHPS mutations conferred sulfa drug cross-resistance to 15 commonly available sulfa drugs. It was established that the presence of amino acid substitutions (T(517)A or P(519)S) in the DHPS domain of PjFAS led to cross-resistance against most sulfa drugs evaluated. The presence of both mutations led to increased sulfa drug resistance, suggesting cooperativity and the incremental evolution of sulfa drug resistance. Two sulfa drugs (sulfachloropyridazine [SCP] and sulfamethoxypyridazine [SMP]) that had a higher inhibitory potential than SMX were identified. In addition, SCP, SMP, and sulfadiazine (SDZ) were found to be capable of inhibiting the clinically observed drug-resistant mutants. We propose that SCP, SMP, and SDZ should be considered for clinical evaluation against PCP or for future development of novel sulfa drug compounds.

  16. Mutations in the Pneumocystis jirovecii DHPS Gene Confer Cross-Resistance to Sulfa Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Iliades, Peter; Meshnick, Steven R.; Macreadie, Ian G.

    2005-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a major opportunistic pathogen that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and results in a high degree of mortality in immunocompromised individuals. The drug of choice for PCP is typically sulfamethoxazole (SMX) or dapsone in conjunction with trimethoprim. Drug treatment failure and sulfa drug resistance have been implicated epidemiologically with point mutations in dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) of P. jirovecii. P. jirovecii cannot be cultured in vitro; however, heterologous complementation of the P. jirovecii trifunctional folic acid synthesis (PjFAS) genes with an E. coli DHPS-disrupted strain was recently achieved. This enabled the evaluation of SMX resistance conferred by DHPS mutations. In this study, we sought to determine whether DHPS mutations conferred sulfa drug cross-resistance to 15 commonly available sulfa drugs. It was established that the presence of amino acid substitutions (T517A or P519S) in the DHPS domain of PjFAS led to cross-resistance against most sulfa drugs evaluated. The presence of both mutations led to increased sulfa drug resistance, suggesting cooperativity and the incremental evolution of sulfa drug resistance. Two sulfa drugs (sulfachloropyridazine [SCP] and sulfamethoxypyridazine [SMP]) that had a higher inhibitory potential than SMX were identified. In addition, SCP, SMP, and sulfadiazine (SDZ) were found to be capable of inhibiting the clinically observed drug-resistant mutants. We propose that SCP, SMP, and SDZ should be considered for clinical evaluation against PCP or for future development of novel sulfa drug compounds. PMID:15673759

  17. Identification of relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms in Pneumocystis jirovecii: relationship with clinical data.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Gaspar, J; Marques, T; Leite, R; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Matos, O

    2010-07-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a poorly understood pathogen that causes opportunistic pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP)) in patients with AIDS. The present study was aimed at correlating genetic differences in P. jirovecii isolates and clinical patient data. A description of genetic diversity in P. jirovecii isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients, based on the identification of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at five distinct loci encoding mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), cytochrome b (CYB), superoxide dismutase (SOD), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), was achieved using PCR with DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The statistical analysis revealed several interesting correlations among the four most relevant SNPs (mt85, SOD110, SOD215, and DHFR312) and specific clinical parameters: mt85C was associated with undiagnosed or atypical PcP episodes and favourable follow-up; SOD215C was associated with favourable follow-up; and DHFR312T was associated with PcP cases presenting moderate to high parasite burdens. The genotypes mt85C/SOD215C and SOD110T/SOD215C were found to be associated with less virulent P. jirovecii infections, whereas the genotype SOD110T/SOD215T was found to be related to more virulent PcP episodes. The present work demonstrated that potential P. jirovecii haplotypes may be related to the clinical data and outcome of PcP.

  18. Small-intestine pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Shetty, Jayarama; Pins, Michael R

    2012-09-01

    A Pneumocystis jiroveci infection-associated mass clinically mimicking a malignancy (ie, pseudotumor) is rare and usually occurs in the lung in association with Pneumocystis pneumonia. Pneumocystis jiroveci pseudotumors of the small intestine are extremely rare and represent an unusual form of disseminated P jiroveci infection. We present a case of small-intestine P jiroveci pseudotumor as an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-presenting illness in a patient with coinfection with cytomegalovirus, no pulmonary symptoms, and no known risk factors for human immunodeficiency virus infection. This case reinforces the potential importance of cytomegalovirus coinfection in the disseminated form of Pneumocystis infection and illustrates the importance of an expanded differential diagnosis when confronted with a clinically atypical mass lesion.

  19. Kinetic and Structural Analysis for Potent Antifolate Inhibition of Pneumocystis jirovecii, Pneumocystis carinii, and Human Dihydrofolate Reductases and Their Active-Site Variants

    PubMed Central

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Adair, Ona O.; Gangjee, Aleem

    2013-01-01

    A major concern of immunocompromised patients, in particular those with AIDS, is susceptibility to infection caused by opportunistic pathogens such as Pneumocystis jirovecii, which is a leading cause of pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. We report the first kinetic and structural data for 2,4-diamino-6-[(2′,5′-dichloro anilino)methyl]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine (OAAG324), a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from P. jirovecii (pjDHFR), and also for trimethoprim (TMP) and methotrexate (MTX) with pjDHFR, Pneumocystis carinii DHFR (pcDHFR), and human DHFR (hDHFR). OAAG324 shows a 9.0-fold selectivity for pjDHFR (Ki, 2.7 nM) compared to its selectivity for hDHFR (Ki, 24.4 nM), whereas there is only a 2.3-fold selectivity for pcDHFR (Ki, 6.3 nM). In order to understand the determinants of inhibitory potency, active-site mutations of pj-, pc-, and hDHFR were explored to make these enzymes more like each other. The most unexpected observations were that the variant pcDHFR forms with K37Q and K37Q/F69N mutations, which made the enzyme more like the human form, also made these enzymes more sensitive to the inhibitory activity of OAAG324, with Ki values of 0.26 and 0.71 nM, respectively. A similar gain in sensitivity was also observed for the hDHFR N64F variant, which showed a lower Ki value (0.58 nM) than native hDHFR, pcDHFR, or pjDHFR. Structural data are reported for complexes of OAAG324 with hDHFR and its Q35K and Q35S/N64F variants and for the complex of the K37S/F69N variant of pcDHFR with TMP. These results provide useful insight into the role of these residues in the optimization of highly selective inhibitors of DHFR against the opportunistic pathogen P. jirovecii. PMID:23545530

  20. Retrospective study of Pneumocystis pneumonia over half a century in mainland China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Lian; Wang, Xiao-Li; Wei, Wei; An, Chun-Li

    2011-05-01

    A retrospective study was performed on case reports of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) from 1959 to 2009 in mainland China. The epidemiological characteristics of PCP over half a century were investigated over two time spans. The first was from 1959, when the first incidence of PCP was reported, to 1984, before the emergence of AIDS in mainland China. The second was from 1985, when the first AIDS case was reported in mainland China, to the end of 2009. A total of 2351 PCP cases were reported during these two time spans, covering a 51-year period. Only seven PCP cases were reported during the first time span. Six were diagnosed by autopsy, accordingly without treatment, whilst the other was diagnosed by open lung biopsy in a living patient who eventually recovered following treatment with sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. The other 2344 PCP cases were reported during the second time span (1985-2009) from 21 provinces, four municipalities and three autonomous regions. Among the 2344 PCP cases, 70.22 % (1646/2344) were identified together with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection or were in AIDS patients. The remaining 698 non-HIV-infected patients had undergone organ transplantation, had other underlying diseases such as malignancy or hypoimmunity, or had undetermined diagnosis. The results of statistical analysis indicated that AIDS was the most common underlying disease of PCP for patients <1 year and >14 years. For patients aged between 1 and 14 years, haematological malignancy was the most common underlying disease. The trend of the underlying diseases changed with time, showing that the number of PCP patients afflicted by HIV/AIDS increased dramatically, reaching almost threefold during the most recent 5 years compared with the level of the previous 10 years. The number of patients undergoing organ transplantation or with other underlying diseases rose constantly, but the number of malignancies tended to decline from 1995-2004 to 2005-2009. During the

  1. GENERALIZED CYTOMEGALIC INCLUSION-BODY DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA IN ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Symmers, W. St. C.

    1960-01-01

    Three cases of generalized cytomegalic inclusion-body disease (salivary virus disease) in adults are reported, bringing the number of published cases up to 34. The infection is very rare in adults although well known in infants. As is often found in infants with this disease, pneumonia due to Pneumocystis carinii was also present in each case. The first patient had Wegener's granulomatosis, which presented with acute otitis media: a review of histological material obtained at mastoidectomy eight weeks before death showed that inclusion-body cytomegaly was already present then. Various antibiotics and prednisolone were given, and the lesions in the respiratory organs and the arteritis healed to a considerable extent. Renal failure, however, was progressive and led to death. The second patient had thrombotic purpura and died after a few weeks' illness, during which oxytetracycline and hydrocortisone were given. Congenital absence of the spleen was found at laparotomy, which was performed with the object of doing a splenectomy. Focal cryptococcal pneumonia was present post mortem: six years before death a solitary cryptococcal granuloma of one lung had been treated by lobectomy. The third patient had had Hodgkin's disease for 18 years. During the first 12 years the disease had the characteristics of the so-called indolent form (“Hodgkin's paragranuloma”) and it then passed into the typical form. Deep x-ray therapy and cytotoxic drugs were used during the course of the disease at various times, and streptomycin and tuberculostatic drugs were given because of intercurrent tuberculous meningitis which developed three months before death. In all three cases it seems likely that the underlying disease, or the drugs used in its treatment, predisposed to cytomegalic inclusion-body disease and concomitant pneumocystis pneumonia by lowering the patients' resistance. Just as some unusual types of fungal and bacterial infections have become less rare since the introduction

  2. Pulmonary coinfection by Trichomonas vaginalis and Pneumocystis sp. as a novel manifestation of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Duboucher, Christophe; Noël, Christophe; Durand-Joly, Isabelle; Gerbod, Delphine; Delgado-Viscogliosi, Pilar; Jouveshomme, Stéphane; Leclerc, Catherine; Cartolano, Gian-Luigi; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Capron, Monique; Viscogliosi, Eric

    2003-05-01

    A 41-year-old man was hospitalized, presenting increasing dyspnea and extensive ground-glass opacities on chest X-ray. Infection by human immunodeficiency virus was confirmed. Cytologic examination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid revealed numerous trichomonads and aggregates of Pneumocystis sp. Treatment was followed by rapid improvement of respiratory symptoms and chest X-ray. The trichomonad species found in the lungs was identified as Trichomonas vaginalis by small-subunit rRNA gene amplification and sequencing. With the exception of rare cases of contamination of newborn babies during delivery, T. vaginalis has never been found in lungs in healthy or immunocompromised adults. In the present case, T. vaginalis is found as coinfecting agent. Our data, like those found in the literature, suggest that trichomonads are overlooked parasites that may be regularly implicated in diverse human pathologies. PMID:12792927

  3. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients receiving tumor-necrosis-factor-inhibitor therapy: implications for chemoprophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Grubbs, James A; Baddley, John W

    2014-10-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) is an important opportunistic infection that has been increasingly reported in patients with rheumatic disease. Reported incidence among patients taking TNF inhibitors (TNFi) has varied, but has usually been low. Still, disease causes significant mortality among those affected and must be considered in patients with rheumatological disease presenting with dyspnea and cough. Diagnosis can be difficult in the non-HIV population, and our understanding of the epidemiology and natural history after exposure is changing. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is believed to be the most effective agent for treatment and prophylaxis, but is associated with significant adverse effects. Given the low incidence reported in most studies of patients on TNFi, prophylaxis is probably not beneficial for this patient population as a whole. PMID:25182673

  4. T cytotoxic-1 CD8+ T cells are effector cells against pneumocystis in mice.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Florencia; Mc Allister, Florencia; Steele, Chad; Zheng, Mingquan; Young, Erana; Shellito, Judd E; Marrero, Luis; Kolls, Jay K

    2004-01-15

    Host defenses are profoundly compromised in HIV-infected hosts due to progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes. A hallmark of HIV infection is Pneumocystis carinii (PC) pneumonia. Recently, CD8+ T cells, which are recruited to the lung in large numbers in response to PC infection, have been associated with some level of host defense as well as contributing to lung injury in BALB/c mice. In this study, we show that CD8+ T cells that have a T cytotoxic-1 response to PC in BALB/c mice, as determined by secretion of IFN-gamma, have in vitro killing activity against PC and effect clearance of the organism in adoptive transfer studies. Moreover, non-T cytotoxic-1 CD8+ T cells lacked in vitro effector activity and contributed to lung injury upon adoptive transfer. This dichotomous response in CD8+ T cell response may in part explain the clinical heterogeneity in the severity of PC pneumonia.

  5. Common variable immune deficiency in a Pomeranian with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    KANEMOTO, Hideyuki; MORIKAWA, Rei; CHAMBERS, James Kenn; KASAHARA, Koichi; HANAFUSA, Yasuko; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; OHNO, Koichi; NAKAYAMA, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    A Pomeranian dog, 1 year- and 8 month-old neutered female, was presented with persistent respiratory distress and recurrent generalized demodicosis. Physical examination revealed cyanosis, rough respiratory sounds, multifocal alopecia and dermal erosions on the dorsal side of the forelimbs, perineal area and skin around the eyes. A severe diffuse interstitial lung pattern was observed on thoracic radiographs. The blood examination revealed neutrophilia and hypoglobulinemia. Serum immunoglobulin concentrations of IgG and IgA were low. Histopathological examination revealed severe diffuse interstitial pneumonia with Pneumocystis carinii infection. Severe lymphoid depletion was observed in the spleen and other organs with lymphoid follicles consisted mainly of CD3-positive T cells and few cells of B-cell lineage. B-cell hypoplasia with subsequent antibody deficiency was suspected. PMID:25715954

  6. Mixed Pulmonary Infection with Penicillium notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci in a Patient with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Shabnam; Hemmatian, Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Penicillium notatum is a fungus that widely exists in the environment and is often non-pathogenic to humans. However, in immunocompromised hosts it may be recognized as a cause of systemic mycosis. A 44-year-old man with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was admitted to our hospital with fever and neutropenia. Due to no improvement after initial treatment, he underwent bronchoscopy. The patient was found to have P. notatum and Pneumocystis jiroveci infection, and therefore was given voriconazole, primaquine and clindamycin. The patient was successfully treated and suffered no complications. Conclusion: This case highlights P. notatum as a cause of infection in immunocompromised patients. To the best of our knowledge, mixed lung infection with P. notatum and P. jiroveci in a patient with AML has not been previously reported. PMID:27403180

  7. Genetic characterization of the UCS and Kex1 loci of Pneumocystis jirovecii.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Tavares, A; Costa, M C; Gaspar, J; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2009-02-01

    Nucleotide variation in the Pneumocystis jirovecii upstream conserved sequence (UCS) and kexin-like serine protease (Kex1) loci was studied in pulmonary specimens from Portuguese HIV-positive patients. DNA was extracted and used for specific molecular sequence analysis. The number of UCS tandem repeats detected in 13 successfully sequenced isolates ranged from three (9 isolates, 69%) to four (4 isolates, 31%). A novel tandem repeat pattern and two novel polymorphisms were detected in the UCS region. For the Kex1 gene, the wild-type (24 isolates, 86%) was the most frequent sequence detected among the 28 sequenced isolates. Nevertheless, a nonsynonymous (1 isolate, 3%) and three synonymous (3 isolates, 11%) polymorphisms were detected and are described here for the first time.

  8. [Pneumocystis pneumonia developed in two patients with rheumatoid arthritis during treatment of adalimumab].

    PubMed

    Ikeuchi, Hidekazu; Umemoto, Azusa; Tsukida, Mayuko; Sakurai, Noriyuki; Maeshima, Akito; Kuroiwa, Takashi; Hiromura, Keiju; Nojima, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    While tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors have dramatically improved the clinical outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in recent years, infectious complications are a serious concern. Adalimumab (ADA) is a newly-developed human monoclonal antibody against TNF-alpha. Here we report 2 cases of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) which developed in RA patients during ADA therapy. One patient is a 66-year-old woman who had a history of RA for 6 months. The patient was given ADA at 40 mg biweekly for her active arthritis which had been refractory to 6 mg/week of methotrexate (MTX), and 5 mg/day of prednisolone (PSL). One hundred and six days later, she was admitted to our hospital because of fever, cough, and dyspnea. Another patient is a 62-year-old man who had a history of RA for 3 years. Since his arthritis was so active even under the treatment with MTX (8 mg/week) and PSL (15 mg/day), the patient started to be given ADA at 40 mg biweekly. After 28 days, the patient was admitted to the hospital because of dyspnea. Chest roentgenogram and computed tomography revealed interstitial pneumonia in both patients. Beta-D-glucan levels were so high in their serum suggesting the diagnosis of PCP, which was confirmed by the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA in the sputa by polymerase chain reaction. The patients were immediately treated with sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and high-dose prednisolone, which successfully improved pneumonia, and they were discharged from the hospital on the 8(th) and 16(th) day, respectively. PCR and β-D-glucan were useful for the early diagnosis of PCP and lead to the timely induction of adequate treatment and the rescue of these patients. PMID:22041430

  9. Nebulised pentamidine as treatment for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R F; Godfrey-Faussett, P; Semple, S J

    1989-01-01

    Nebulised pentamidine was used to treat 30 patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Fourteen patients (group 1) received pentamidine isethionate 4 mg/kg (six patients) or 8 mg/kg (eight patients) via a standard jet nebuliser (Acorn, system 22) with a flow rate of 8 l/min. The aerosol droplets had a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 2.6 microns (geometric standard deviation (GSD) 2.9) and 46% of droplets were less than 3.9 microns. A further 16 patients (group 2) received 8 mg/kg pentamidine via a jet nebuliser with baffles to limit droplet size to below 4 microns (Respirgard II). This generated aerosol droplets with a mass median aerodynamic diameter of 0.8 micron (GSD 1.5) and 98% were less than 3.9 microns. Only three of the 14 patients in group 1 responded clinically to treatment, one after the lower dose of pentamidine. Treatment was discontinued in 10 patients and one patient died at bronchoscopy from haemorrhage. Thirteen of the 16 patients in group 2 responded. Side effects occurred infrequently; two patients from group 1 had a cough, six patients (four from group 2) had contact bleeding at bronchoscopy, and two further patients had haemoptysis. The differing response rate may be due to differences in the mean droplet size of the aerosols produced by the nebulisers. Nebulised pentamidine (8 mg/kg) when delivered by Respirgard II nebuliser appears to be as effective as conventional treatment for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia of mild to moderate severity. PMID:2788936

  10. Lung and chest wall mechanics in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and severe Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, E; Calderini, E; Robatto, F M; Puccio, P; Milic-Emili, J

    1997-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the mechanical characteristics of the respiratory system in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). In 12 mechanically ventilated patients, total respiratory system mechanics was assessed using the technique of rapid airway occlusion during constant flow inflation, and was partitioned into lung and chest wall components using the oesophageal balloon technique. We measured interrupter resistance (Rint), which mainly reflects airway resistance, additional resistance (deltaR) due to viscoelastic behaviour and time constant inequalities, and static elastance (Est). In addition, the static inflation volume-pressure (V-P) curve was assessed. In eight patients, computed tomography scans were performed within 2 days of the assessment of respiratory mechanics. Compared to values reported in the literature for normal subjects, Est and deltaR were markedly increased in AIDS patients with PCP, whilst Rint exhibited a relatively smaller increase. These changes, which involved only the lung and airways, were mainly due to the reduction of ventilated lung units, but additional factors were involved to cause independent modifications of lung stiffness, airway calibre, and viscoelastic properties. The changes in Rint, deltaR, and Est were similar to those observed in other studies on patients with ARDS of different aetiologies. At variance with common observations in the latter patients, none of the AIDS patients with PCP exhibited an inflection point on the static inflation V-P curve, suggesting little or no alveolar recruitment during lung inflation. This finding could be related to the distinctive histopathology of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Indeed, computed tomography revealed homogeneous diffuse interstitial and alveolar infiltration rather than the dense, dependent opacities observed in other studies on acute respiratory

  11. Pneumocystis and Pneumocystosis: first meeting of experts from Latin-American and Portuguese-speaking countries - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Francisco; Medrano, Francisco J; de Armas, Yaxsier; Wissmann, Gustavo; Calderón, Enrique J; Matos, Olga

    2014-05-01

    The Pneumocystis and Pneumocystosis: first meeting of experts from Latin-American and Portuguese-speaking countries was held in Lisbon, Portugal, on 24-26 October 2013. A total of 20 speakers from Latin America, Africa and Europe participated in the meeting. The epidemiological studies presented in this meeting begin to change the misconception that since the AIDS epidemic, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) has become an infrequent disease, showing that today PcP remains a major opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients in both developed and developing countries and an emerging problem in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection worldwide. PcP management remains a challenge. Right now, the combination of caspofungin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is a promising therapeutic approach that needs to be assessed in controlled clinical trials. PMID:24617414

  12. Pneumocystis and Pneumocystosis: first meeting of experts from Latin-American and Portuguese-speaking countries - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Francisco; Medrano, Francisco J; de Armas, Yaxsier; Wissmann, Gustavo; Calderón, Enrique J; Matos, Olga

    2014-05-01

    The Pneumocystis and Pneumocystosis: first meeting of experts from Latin-American and Portuguese-speaking countries was held in Lisbon, Portugal, on 24-26 October 2013. A total of 20 speakers from Latin America, Africa and Europe participated in the meeting. The epidemiological studies presented in this meeting begin to change the misconception that since the AIDS epidemic, Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) has become an infrequent disease, showing that today PcP remains a major opportunistic infection in HIV-infected patients in both developed and developing countries and an emerging problem in immunocompromised patients without HIV infection worldwide. PcP management remains a challenge. Right now, the combination of caspofungin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is a promising therapeutic approach that needs to be assessed in controlled clinical trials.

  13. Abnormal lung gallium-67 uptake preceding pulmonary physiologic impairment in an asymptomatic patient with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Reiss, T.F.; Golden, J. )

    1990-05-01

    Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia was suggested by a diffuse, bilateral pulmonary uptake of gallium-67 in an asymptomatic, homosexual male with the antibody to the immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who was undergoing staging evaluation for lymphoma clinically localized to a left inguinal lymph node. Chest radiograph and pulmonary function evaluation, including lung volumes, diffusing capacity and arterial blood gases, were within normal limits. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed Pneumocystis carinii organisms. In this asymptomatic, HIV-positive patient, active alveolar infection, evidenced by abnormal gallium-67 scanning, predated pulmonary physiologic abnormalities. This observation raises questions concerning the natural history of this disease process and the specificity of physiologic tests for excluding disease. It also has implications for the treatment of neoplasia in the HIV-positive patient population.

  14. Pneumocystis jerovecii pneumonia in a patient with untreated chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: a novel case and postulations concerning the mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kalkanis, Alexandros; Judson, Marc A; Napier, Mark B

    2013-11-28

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL), even when severe, is not directly associated with opportunistic infections. Opportunistic infections that occur with CLL are almost exclusively related to immunosuppression caused by chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat CLL. We report a case of Pneumocystis jirovecii (PJ) pneumonia that occurred in a patient with untreated CLL with pulmonary involvement. We suspect that PJ pneumonia resulted from an inadequate immune response in the lung parenchyma resulting from excessive local accumulation of CLL cells.

  15. Coinfection pulmonaire par pneumocystis jirovecii et pseudomonas aeruginosa au cours du SIDA: à propos de deux cas

    PubMed Central

    Mamoudou, Savadogo; Bellaud, Guillaume; Ana, Canestri; Gilles, Pialoux

    2015-01-01

    Rapporter deux cas cliniques de coinfections pulmonaires par Pneumocystis jirovecii et par Pseudomonas aeruginosa chez des patients vivant avec le VIH. Les deux patients étaient âgés respectivement de 32 ans et 46 ans. Un patient a été pris en charge à l'hôpital Yalgado Ouédraogo de Ouagadougou au Burkina Faso et l'autre a été pris en charge à l'hôpital Ténon de Paris, en France. Les deux souffraient de pneumopathie confirmée à la radiographie et à la tomodensitométrie. L'un des patients était sévèrement immuno déprimé, contrairement à l'autre. L'examen bactériologique dans les crachats avait permis d'isoler Pseudomonas aeruginosa et Pneumocystis jirovecii chez les deux patients. Sous traitement, l’évolution a été favorable. Les coinfections morbides sont relativement fréquentes chez les patients vivant avec le VIH. Devant une symptomatologie respiratoire du sujet vivant avec le VIH, il faut savoir rechercher en plus du Bacille de Koch, Pneumocystis jirovecii et Pseudomonas aeruginosa par un lavage broncho alvéolaire. PMID:26516396

  16. [Autopsy case of pulmonary zygomycosis and pneumocystis pneumonia in a patient with interstitial pneumonia treated by corticosteroid therapy].

    PubMed

    Mukasa, Yosuke; Ichiyasu, Hidenori; Akaike, Kimitaka; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu

    2010-11-01

    We report a 75-year-old man with pneumoconiosis, interstitial pneumonia and diabetes mellitus, who had carcinoma of the buccal mucosa. After resection of the carcinoma, he was given corticosteroids for the deterioration of interstitial pneumonia, but 38 days after initiating steroid therapy, he was admitted to our hospital with severe hypoxemia and multiple cavitary lesions superimposed on ground-glass attenuation in both lung fields. The Aspergillus antigen was positive in his serum and examination of his bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid revealed mixed infections with filamentous fungus and Pneumocystis jirovecii. Pulmonary aspergillosis and pneumocystis pneumonia with an immunocompromised state was diagnosed, and voriconazole, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and high-dose corticosteroids were given. At 20 days after these treatments he developed bloody sputum, and Cunninghamella bertholletiae was isolated from the BAL fluid obtained at admission. A diagnosis of pulmonary zygomycosis was finally established. Amphotericin B therapy was started, and the dose was increased thereafter. Despite intensive treatment he died 18 days later. Histological examination of lung tissue obtained at autopsy showed invasive growth of zygomycetes in the necrotic tissue and the cavity wall. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of concurrent Cunninghamella bertholletiae and Pneumocystis jirovecii infection during steroid therapy for interstitial pneumonia. PMID:21141065

  17. Is there an association of Pneumocystis infection with the presence of arena-, hanta-, and poxvirus antibodies in wild mice and shrews in Finland?

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, J; Kallio, E R; Kallio-Kokko, H; Vapalahti, O; Vaheri, A; Henttonen, H

    2006-04-01

    As part of studies on the nature of the endemic virus infections in natural rodent hosts, the possible association of cyst forms of Pneumocystis spp. with the presence of hanta-, cowpox-, and arenavirus antibodies in wild mice (Apodemus flavicollis, N=105; Apodemus agrarius, N=63; Micromys minutus, N=50) and the common shrew (Sorex araneus, N=101) was studied in south-central Finland. One hantavirus (Saaremaa virus, SAAV) seropositive A. agrarius, and 2 cowpoxvirus (CPXV) seropositive S. araneus were detected, and antibodies against an arenavirus (Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, LCMV) were found in all 3 mouse species but not in shrews. Cyst forms of Pneumocystis spp. were detected in all species except A. agrarius. There was no significant association between virus antibodies (LCMV in mice, and CPXV in shrews) and cyst forms of Pneumocystis in any of the species. Concurrent presence of virus antibodies (LCMV) and cyst forms of Pneumocystis were detected only in 1 M. minutus. In conclusion, we found no evidence of any association between Pneumocystis and antibodies to any of the viruses tested.

  18. Effect of oral washes on the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with a low parasite burden and on detection of organisms in subclinical infections.

    PubMed

    Matos, O; Costa, M C; Lundgren, B; Caldeira, L; Aguiar, P; Antunes, F

    2001-08-01

    This study was designed to assess the efficacy of using oral washes (OWs) to diagnose Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in patients with a low parasite burden and to detect cases of subclinical infection. A total of 104 paired induced sputum (IS) samples and OWs from 104 HIV-seropositive patients and 32 OWs from immunocompetent healthy controls were studied. All of the control samples were negative. Fifty-two IS specimens were positive for Pneumocystis carinii, and 26 of these cases were also detected in the OWs using conventional stain or polymerase chain reaction. Twenty-four of the PCP cases had a high or a moderate parasite load and 28 had a low parasite load; among them, Pneumocystis carinii was detected in the OWs of 15 and 11 cases, respectively. Fifteen of the 104 IS samples studied belonged to patients who were asymptomatic carriers or who had a subclinical infection, and Pneumocystis carinii was detected in the OWs of 4 of these cases. The parasite was not detected in 37 IS samples and in 74 OWs. The results of this study indicate that in patients with a low pulmonary parasite burden, the number of organisms reaching the oral cavity is insufficient for reliable detection in OWs. Thus, OWs are less useful than IS samples for detecting Pneumocystis carinii in cases of pneumonia in which a low parasite burden and/or subclinical infection are present.

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Caspofungin Combined with Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole for Pneumocystis Pneumonia: A Pilot Study in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Maria Luísa; Esteves, Francisco; de Sousa, Bruno; Cardoso, Fernando; Cushion, Melanie T.; Antunes, Francisco; Matos, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in immunocompromised patients. There are limited alternative therapeutic choices to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) which is the standard first line therapy/prophylaxis for PcP. The efficacy of low doses of caspofungin and caspofungin in association with TMP-SMX standard-prophylactic dose was evaluated in an experimental model of Pneumocystis. Susceptibility of Pneumocystis spp. to low doses of caspofungin and caspofungin/TMP-SMX was evaluated in Balb/c immunosuppressed mice, infected intranasally with P. murina. Caspofungin was administered once daily at 0.1 mg/kg, 0.05 mg/kg, and 0.001 mg/kg and TMP-SMX was administered by oral gavage (12.25 mg/62.5 mg/day), for 21 days. Efficacy was calculated based on the reduction in organism burden determined through quantitative fluorescent-based real-time PCR (qPCR). Serum β-1,3-D-glucan was measured as an additional marker of infection. The present data showed that caspofungin demonstrated anti-Pneumomocystis effect. However, the doses administrated were too low to achieve Pneumocystis eradication, which suggests that echinocandin treatment should not be administrated as mono-therapy. After 21 days of treatment, P. murina was not detected in the lungs of mice with either TMP-SMX or caspofungin/TMP-SMX. The results showed that, even at the lowest concentrations tested, the efficacy of caspofungin in association with TMP-SMX was higher than the efficacy of either drug used alone. The administration of caspofungin/TMP-SMX was at least 1.4 times more effective against P. murina infection than TMP-SMX used alone. The most promising result was achieved with the combination of caspofungin 0.05 mg/kg/day with TMP-SMX 12.5 mg–62.5 mg/day, which reduced the parasite burden to undetectable levels immediately at the 14th day of treatment, showing a highly marked anti-Pneumomocystis effect. These data suggest that the administration of low doses of

  20. Therapeutic potential of caspofungin combined with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole for pneumocystis pneumonia: a pilot study in mice.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Maria Luísa; Esteves, Francisco; de Sousa, Bruno; Cardoso, Fernando; Cushion, Melanie T; Antunes, Francisco; Matos, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in immunocompromised patients. There are limited alternative therapeutic choices to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) which is the standard first line therapy/prophylaxis for PcP. The efficacy of low doses of caspofungin and caspofungin in association with TMP-SMX standard-prophylactic dose was evaluated in an experimental model of Pneumocystis. Susceptibility of Pneumocystis spp. to low doses of caspofungin and caspofungin/TMP-SMX was evaluated in Balb/c immunosuppressed mice, infected intranasally with P. murina. Caspofungin was administered once daily at 0.1 mg/kg, 0.05 mg/kg, and 0.001 mg/kg and TMP-SMX was administered by oral gavage (12.25 mg/62.5 mg/day), for 21 days. Efficacy was calculated based on the reduction in organism burden determined through quantitative fluorescent-based real-time PCR (qPCR). Serum β-1,3-D-glucan was measured as an additional marker of infection. The present data showed that caspofungin demonstrated anti-Pneumomocystis effect. However, the doses administrated were too low to achieve Pneumocystis eradication, which suggests that echinocandin treatment should not be administrated as mono-therapy. After 21 days of treatment, P. murina was not detected in the lungs of mice with either TMP-SMX or caspofungin/TMP-SMX. The results showed that, even at the lowest concentrations tested, the efficacy of caspofungin in association with TMP-SMX was higher than the efficacy of either drug used alone. The administration of caspofungin/TMP-SMX was at least 1.4 times more effective against P. murina infection than TMP-SMX used alone. The most promising result was achieved with the combination of caspofungin 0.05 mg/kg/day with TMP-SMX 12.5 mg-62.5 mg/day, which reduced the parasite burden to undetectable levels immediately at the 14(th) day of treatment, showing a highly marked anti-Pneumomocystis effect. These data suggest that the administration of low doses of

  1. Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis correlates to increasing chloride channel accessory 1 (hCLCA1) suggesting a pathway for up-regulation of airway mucus responses, in infant lungs

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Francisco J.; Ponce, Carolina A.; Rojas, Diego A.; Iturra, Pablo A.; Bustamante, Rebeca I.; Gallo, Myriam; Hananias, Karime; Vargas, Sergio L.

    2014-01-01

    Fungal colonization with Pneumocystis is associated with increased airway mucus in infants during their primary Pneumocystis infection, and to severity of COPD in adults. The pathogenic mechanisms are under investigation. Interestingly, increased levels of hCLCA1 – a member of the calcium-sensitive chloride conductance family of proteins that drives mucus hypersecretion – have been associated with increased mucus production in patients diagnosed with COPD and in immunocompetent rodents with Pneumocystis infection. Pneumocystis is highly prevalent in infants; therefore, the contribution of Pneumocystis to hCLCA1 expression was examined in autopsied infant lungs. Respiratory viruses that may potentially increase mucus, were also examined. hCLCA1 expression was measured using actin-normalized Western-blot, and the burden of Pneumocystis organisms was quantified by qPCR in 55 autopsied lungs from apparently healthy infants who died in the community. Respiratory viruses were diagnosed using RT-PCR for RSV, metapneumovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza viruses; and by PCR for adenovirus. hCLCA1 levels in virus positive samples were comparable to those in virus-negative samples. An association between Pneumocystis and increased hCLCA1 expression was documented (P=0.028). Additionally, increasing Pneumocystis burden correlated with increasing hCLCA1 protein expression levels (P=0.017). Results strengthen the evidence of Pneumocystis-associated up-regulation of mucus-related airway responses in infant lungs. Further characterization of this immunocompetent host-Pneumocystis-interaction, including assessment of potential clinical significance, is warranted. PMID:25379375

  2. Common invasive fungal diseases: an overview of invasive candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, and Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Schmiedel, Yvonne; Zimmerli, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Every year, Candida, Aspergillus, Cryptococcus and Pneumocystis infect an estimated two million individuals worldwide. Most are immunocompromised or critically ill. Candida is the most common fungal pathogen of the critically ill and of recipients of transplanted abdominal organs. In high-risk haemato-oncological patients, in contrast, the introduction of antifungal prophylaxis with fluconazole and later with mould-active posaconazole has led to a remarkable reduction of invasive candidiasis and is likely to have a similar effect on invasive aspergillosis. Invasive aspergillosis remains the dominant invasive fungal disease (IFD) of haemato-oncological patients and solid-organ transplant recipients and is increasingly found in individuals with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on corticosteroids. In the developed world, owing to antiretroviral therapy Pneumocystis pneumonia and cryptococcosis have become rare in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and are mainly found in solid-organ transplant recipients or immunocompromised patients. In the developing world, cryptococcosis remains a common and highly lethal disease of HIV positive individuals. With invasive candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis, timely diagnosis is the principal challenge. The clinical presentation is nonspecific and current diagnostic tests lack sensitivity and specificity. The combination of several tests improves sensitivity, but not specificity. Standardised polymerase chain-reaction-based assays may be promising tools for more rapid and specific diagnosis of candidiasis and invasive aspergillosis. Nevertheless, initiation of treatment is often based solely on clinical suspicion. Empirical therapy, however, may lead to over-treatment of patients without IFD or it may miss its target in the case of resistance. Despite the success of antifungal prophylaxis in reducing the incidence of IFDs in haemato-oncological patients, there are a considerable number of

  3. The incidence, mortality and timing of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia after hematopoietic cell transplantation: a CIBMTR® analysis

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kirsten M.; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Chen, Min; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Agwu, Allison L.; Chen, Allen R.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Szabolcs, Paul; Boeckh, Michael J.; Auletta, Jeffrey J.; Lindemans, Caroline A.; Zanis-Neto, Jose; Malvezzi, Mariester; Lister, John; de Toledo Codina, Jose Sanchez; Sackey, Kwesi; Holter Chakrabarty, Jennifer L.; Ljungman, Per; Wingard, John R.; Seftel, Matthew D.; Seo, Sachiko; Hale, Gregory A.; Wirk, Baldeep; Smith, Marilyn S.; Savani, Bipin N.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ustun, Celalettin; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Szer, Jeffrey; Storek, Jan; Yong, Agnes; Riches, Marcie R.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP) is associated with high morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Little is known about PJP infections after HSCT because of the rarity of disease given routine prophylaxis. We report the results of a CIBMTR study evaluating the incidence, timing, prophylaxis agents, risk factors, and mortality of PJP after autologous (auto) and allogeneic (allo) HSCT. Between 1995 and 2005, 0.63% allo recipients and 0.28% auto recipients of first HSCT developed PJP. Cases occurred as early as 30 days to beyond a year after allo HSCT. A nested case cohort analysis with supplemental data (n=68 allo cases, n=111 allo controls) revealed that risk factors for PJP infection included lymphopenia and mismatch after HSCT. After allo or auto HSCT, overall survival was significantly poorer among cases vs. controls (p=0.0004). After controlling for significant variables, proportional hazards model revealed that PJP cases were 6.87 times more likely to die vs. matched controls (p<0.0001). We conclude PJP infection is rare after HSCT but is associated with high mortality. Factors associated with GVHD and with poor immune reconstitution are among the risk factors for PJP and suggest that protracted prophylaxis for PJP in high-risk HSCT recipients may improve outcomes. PMID:26726945

  4. ECIL guidelines for treatment of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Georg; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Pagano, Livio; Robin, Christine; Cordonnier, Catherine; Schellongowski, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The initiation of systemic antimicrobial treatment of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is triggered by clinical signs and symptoms, typical radiological and occasionally laboratory findings in patients at risk of this infection. Diagnostic proof by bronchoalveolar lavage should not delay the start of treatment. Most patients with haematological malignancies present with a severe PCP; therefore, antimicrobial therapy should be started intravenously. High-dose trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is the treatment of choice. In patients with documented intolerance to this regimen, the preferred alternative is the combination of primaquine plus clindamycin. Treatment success should be first evaluated after 1 week, and in case of clinical non-response, pulmonary CT scan and bronchoalveolar lavage should be repeated to look for secondary or co-infections. Treatment duration typically is 3 weeks and secondary anti-PCP prophylaxis is indicated in all patients thereafter. In patients with critical respiratory failure, non-invasive ventilation is not significantly superior to intubation and mechanical ventilation. The administration of glucocorticoids must be decided on a case-by-case basis.

  5. Role of APOBEC3F Gene Variation in HIV-1 Disease Progression and Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Penugonda, Sudhir; Thorball, Christian W; Bartha, Istvan; Goedert, James J; Donfield, Sharyne; Buchbinder, Susan; Binns-Roemer, Elizabeth; Kirk, Gregory D; Zhang, Wenyan; Fellay, Jacques; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2016-03-01

    Human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases are intrinsic resistance factors to HIV-1. However, HIV-1 encodes a viral infectivity factor (Vif) that degrades APOBEC3 proteins. In vitro APOBEC3F (A3F) anti-HIV-1 activity is weaker than A3G but is partially resistant to Vif degradation unlike A3G. It is unknown whether A3F protein affects HIV-1 disease in vivo. To assess the effect of A3F gene on host susceptibility to HIV- acquisition and disease progression, we performed a genetic association study in six well-characterized HIV-1 natural cohorts. A common six-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) haplotype of A3F tagged by a codon-changing variant (p. I231V, with allele (V) frequency of 48% in European Americans) was associated with significantly lower set-point viral load and slower rate of progression to AIDS (Relative Hazards (RH) = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.91) and delayed development of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) (RH = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.37-0.76). A validation study in the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV (ICGH) showed a consistent association with lower set-point viral load. An in vitro assay revealed that the A3F I231V variant may influence Vif mediated A3F degradation. Our results provide genetic epidemiological evidence that A3F modulates HIV-1/AIDS disease progression.

  6. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia: still a concern in patients with haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, Catherine; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg; Einsele, Hermann; Donnelly, J Peter; Alanio, Alexandre; Hauser, Philippe M; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Matos, Olga; Bretagne, Stéphane; Maertens, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii can cause life-threatening pneumonia following treatment for haematological malignancies or after HSCT. The mortality rate of P. jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in these patients is 30%-60%, especially after HSCT. The clinical presentation of PCP in haematology differs from that associated with HIV infection, with the disease being acute and more often severe, having a lower fungal burden and being more frequently linked to treatment with corticosteroids. Most cases occur in patients not receiving adequate prophylaxis. The development of new therapies, including targeted treatments and monoclonal antibodies in various haematological diseases, justifies constant vigilance in order to identify new at-risk populations and give prophylaxis accordingly. The fifth and sixth European Conferences on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5 and ECIL-6) aimed to review risk factors for PCP in haematology patients and to establish evidence-based recommendations for PCP diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment. This article focuses on the magnitude of the problem, the main differences in clinical presentation between haematology patients and other immunocompromised populations, especially HIV-infected patients, and the main risk factors. PMID:27550990

  7. Management of Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia in Kidney Transplantation to Prevent Further Outbreak.

    PubMed

    Goto, Norihiko; Futamura, Kenta; Okada, Manabu; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Tsujita, Makoto; Hiramitsu, Takahisa; Narumi, Shunji; Watarai, Yoshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The outbreak of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) among kidney transplant recipients is emerging worldwide. It is important to control nosocomial PJP infection. A delay in diagnosis and treatment increases the number of reservoir patients and the number of cases of respiratory failure and death. Owing to the large number of kidney transplant recipients compared to other types of organ transplantation, there are greater opportunities for them to share the same time and space. Although the use of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) as first choice in PJP prophylaxis is valuable for PJP that develops from infections by trophic forms, it cannot prevent or clear colonization, in which cysts are dominant. Colonization of P. jirovecii is cleared by macrophages. While recent immunosuppressive therapies have decreased the rate of rejection, over-suppressed macrophages caused by the higher levels of immunosuppression may decrease the eradication rate of colonization. Once a PJP cluster enters these populations, which are gathered in one place and uniformly undergoing immunosuppressive therapy for kidney transplantation, an outbreak can occur easily. Quick actions for PJP patients, other recipients, and medical staff of transplant centers are required. In future, lifelong prophylaxis may be required even in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:26609250

  8. Pneumocystis carinii mutations are associated with duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis exposure in AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Kazanjian, P; Armstrong, W; Hossler, P A; Burman, W; Richardson, J; Lee, C H; Crane, L; Katz, J; Meshnick, S R

    2000-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine whether Pneumocystis carinii dyhydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene mutations in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia (PCP) are affected by duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis and influence response to sulfa or sulfone therapy. The P. carinii DHPS genes from 97 AIDS patients with PCP between 1991 and 1999 from 4 medical centers were amplified, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and sequenced. Mutations were observed in 76% of isolates from patients exposed to sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis compared with 23% of isolates from patients not exposed (P=.001). Duration of prophylaxis increased the risk of mutations (relative risk [RR] for each exposure month, 1.06; P=.02). Twenty-eight percent of patients with mutations failed sulfa or sulfone treatment; mutations increased the risk of sulfa or sulfone treatment failure (RR, 2.1; P=0.01). Thus, an increased duration of sulfa or sulfone prophylaxis increases the chance of developing a P. carinii mutation. The majority of patients with mutations respond to sulfa or sulfone therapy.

  9. Phylogeny of Pneumocystis carinii from 18 Primate Species Confirms Host Specificity and Suggests Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Demanche, Christine; Berthelemy, Madeleine; Petit, Thierry; Polack, Bruno; Wakefield, Ann E.; Dei-Cas, Eduardo; Guillot, Jacques

    2001-01-01

    Primates are regularly infected by fungal organisms identified as Pneumocystis carinii. They constitute a valuable population for the confirmation of P. carinii host specificity. In this study, the presence of P. carinii was assessed by direct examination and nested PCR at mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU) rRNA and dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) genes in 98 lung tissue samples from captive or wild nonhuman primates. Fifty-nine air samples corresponding to the environment of different primate species in zoological parks were also examined. Cystic forms of P. carinii were detected in smears from 7 lung tissue samples corresponding to 5 New World primate species. Amplifications at the mtLSU rRNA gene were positive for 29 lung tissue samples representing 18 different primate species or subspecies and 2 air samples corresponding to the environment of two simian colonies. Amplifications at the DHPS gene were positive for 8 lung tissue samples representing 6 different primate species. Direct sequencing of nested PCR products demonstrated that a specific mtLSU rRNA and DHPS sequence could be attributed to each primate species or subspecies. No nonhuman primate harbored the human type of P. carinii (P. carinii f. sp. hominis). Genetic divergence in primate-derived P. carinii organisms varied in terms of the phylogenetic divergence existing among the corresponding host species, suggesting coevolution. PMID:11376046

  10. ECIL guidelines for treatment of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in non-HIV-infected haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Georg; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Pagano, Livio; Robin, Christine; Cordonnier, Catherine; Schellongowski, Peter

    2016-09-01

    The initiation of systemic antimicrobial treatment of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is triggered by clinical signs and symptoms, typical radiological and occasionally laboratory findings in patients at risk of this infection. Diagnostic proof by bronchoalveolar lavage should not delay the start of treatment. Most patients with haematological malignancies present with a severe PCP; therefore, antimicrobial therapy should be started intravenously. High-dose trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is the treatment of choice. In patients with documented intolerance to this regimen, the preferred alternative is the combination of primaquine plus clindamycin. Treatment success should be first evaluated after 1 week, and in case of clinical non-response, pulmonary CT scan and bronchoalveolar lavage should be repeated to look for secondary or co-infections. Treatment duration typically is 3 weeks and secondary anti-PCP prophylaxis is indicated in all patients thereafter. In patients with critical respiratory failure, non-invasive ventilation is not significantly superior to intubation and mechanical ventilation. The administration of glucocorticoids must be decided on a case-by-case basis. PMID:27550993

  11. Comparative genomics of Pneumocystis carinii with other protists: implications for life style.

    PubMed

    Cushion, Melanie T

    2004-01-01

    Three protistan genomes were analyzed for differential genetic traits that may be associated with biological adaptations to their unique life styles. The microsporidian, Encephalitozoon cuniculi, an obligate intracellular parasite; the ascomycetes, Pneumocystis carinii, considered an opportunistic pathogen; and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model organism exhibiting a free-living life style, were used in comparisons of genomic architecture, reproductive strategies, and metabolic capacity predicted by the presence of signature genes. Genome size, gene number, and metabolic function decreased as the organisms became more dependent on their hosts. In contrast, gene density and the percentage of genes dedicated to cell growth and division were substantially increased in the genome of E. cuniculi. The obligate life style was associated with reductions in gene number, genome size, and reduced metabolic capacity while the free-living life style was coincident with gene duplications and duplication of large portions of the genome. The genomic characteristics and metabolic capacity of P. carinii were usually intermediate between those of the other two protistan genomes, but unique characteristics such as the presence of a single rDNA locus may indicate that these organisms could be in the process of becoming more host dependent.

  12. Structure, expression and phylogenetic analysis of the gene encoding actin I in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, L D; McDowell, J M; Tidwell, R R; Meagher, R B; Dykstra, C C

    1994-07-01

    Actin is a major component of the cytoskeleton and one of the most abundant proteins found in eukaryotic cells. Comparative sequence analysis shows that this essential gene has been highly conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution making it useful for phylogenetic analysis. Complete cDNA clones for the actin-encoding gene were isolated and characterized from Pneumocystis carinii purified from immunosuppressed rat lungs. The nucleotide sequence encodes a protein of 376 amino acids. The predicted actin protein of P. carinii shares a high degree of conservation to other known actins. Only one major actin gene was found in P. carinii. The P. carinii actin sequence was compared with 30 other actin sequences. Gene phylogenies constructed using both neighbor-joining and protein parsimony methods places the P. carinii actin sequence closest to the majority of the fungi. Since the phylogenetic relationship of P. carinii to fungi and protists has been questioned, these data on the actin gene phylogeny support the grouping of P. carinii with the fungi.

  13. Epidemiology and clinical relevance of Pneumocystis jirovecii Frenkel, 1976 dihydropteroate synthase gene mutations.

    PubMed

    Matos, O; Esteves, F

    2010-09-01

    A review was conducted to examine the published works that studied the prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutations in patients with P. jirovecii pneumonia (PcP), in develop and developing countries, and that focused the problem of the possible association of these mutations with exposure to sulpha or sulphone drugs and their influence in the PcP outcome. Studies conducted in United States of America presented higher P. jirovecii mutations rates, in comparison with European countries, and in developing countries, lower rates of DHPS mutations were reported, due to limited use of sulpha drugs. A significant association was reported between the use of sulpha or sulphone agents for PcP prophylaxis in HIV-infected patients and the presence of DHPS mutations. However these mutations were also detected in PcP patients who were not currently receiving sulpha or sulphone agents. The outcome and mortality of HIV-infected patients with PcP harbouring DHPS gene mutations were related primarily to the underlying severity of illness and the initial severity of PcP, more than to the presence of mutations.

  14. Pneumocystis jirovecii multilocus genotyping profiles in patients from Portugal and Spain.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Montes-Cano, M A; de la Horra, C; Costa, M C; Calderón, E J; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2008-04-01

    Pneumonia caused by the opportunistic organism Pneumocystis jirovecii is a clinically important infection affecting AIDS and other immunocompromised patients. The present study aimed to compare and characterise the frequency pattern of DNA sequences from the P. jirovecii mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA) gene, the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear rRNA operon in specimens from Lisbon (Portugal) and Seville (Spain). Total DNA was extracted and used for specific molecular sequence analysis of the three loci. In both populations, mtLSU rRNA gene analysis revealed an overall prevalence of genotype 1. In the Portuguese population, genotype 2 was the second most common, followed by genotype 3. Inversely, in the Spanish population, genotype 3 was the second most common, followed by genotype 2. The DHPS wild-type sequence was the genotype observed most frequently in both populations, and the DHPS genotype frequency pattern was identical to distribution patterns revealed in other European studies. ITS types showed a significant diversity in both populations because of the high sequence variability in these genomic regions. The most prevalent ITS type in the Portuguese population was Eg, followed by Cg. In contrast to other European studies, Bi was the most common ITS type in the Spanish samples, followed by Eg. A statistically significant association between mtLSU rRNA genotype 1 and ITS type Eg was revealed.

  15. Role of APOBEC3F Gene Variation in HIV-1 Disease Progression and Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Penugonda, Sudhir; Thorball, Christian W; Bartha, Istvan; Goedert, James J; Donfield, Sharyne; Buchbinder, Susan; Binns-Roemer, Elizabeth; Kirk, Gregory D; Zhang, Wenyan; Fellay, Jacques; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2016-03-01

    Human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases are intrinsic resistance factors to HIV-1. However, HIV-1 encodes a viral infectivity factor (Vif) that degrades APOBEC3 proteins. In vitro APOBEC3F (A3F) anti-HIV-1 activity is weaker than A3G but is partially resistant to Vif degradation unlike A3G. It is unknown whether A3F protein affects HIV-1 disease in vivo. To assess the effect of A3F gene on host susceptibility to HIV- acquisition and disease progression, we performed a genetic association study in six well-characterized HIV-1 natural cohorts. A common six-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) haplotype of A3F tagged by a codon-changing variant (p. I231V, with allele (V) frequency of 48% in European Americans) was associated with significantly lower set-point viral load and slower rate of progression to AIDS (Relative Hazards (RH) = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.91) and delayed development of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) (RH = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.37-0.76). A validation study in the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV (ICGH) showed a consistent association with lower set-point viral load. An in vitro assay revealed that the A3F I231V variant may influence Vif mediated A3F degradation. Our results provide genetic epidemiological evidence that A3F modulates HIV-1/AIDS disease progression. PMID:26942578

  16. Role of APOBEC3F Gene Variation in HIV-1 Disease Progression and Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    An, Ping; Penugonda, Sudhir; Thorball, Christian W.; Bartha, Istvan; Goedert, James J.; Donfield, Sharyne; Buchbinder, Susan; Binns-Roemer, Elizabeth; Kirk, Gregory D.; Zhang, Wenyan; Fellay, Jacques; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Winkler, Cheryl A.

    2016-01-01

    Human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases are intrinsic resistance factors to HIV-1. However, HIV-1 encodes a viral infectivity factor (Vif) that degrades APOBEC3 proteins. In vitro APOBEC3F (A3F) anti-HIV-1 activity is weaker than A3G but is partially resistant to Vif degradation unlike A3G. It is unknown whether A3F protein affects HIV-1 disease in vivo. To assess the effect of A3F gene on host susceptibility to HIV- acquisition and disease progression, we performed a genetic association study in six well-characterized HIV-1 natural cohorts. A common six-Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) haplotype of A3F tagged by a codon-changing variant (p. I231V, with allele (V) frequency of 48% in European Americans) was associated with significantly lower set-point viral load and slower rate of progression to AIDS (Relative Hazards (RH) = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.91) and delayed development of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) (RH = 0.53, 95% CI: 0.37–0.76). A validation study in the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV (ICGH) showed a consistent association with lower set-point viral load. An in vitro assay revealed that the A3F I231V variant may influence Vif mediated A3F degradation. Our results provide genetic epidemiological evidence that A3F modulates HIV-1/AIDS disease progression. PMID:26942578

  17. Activity of bilobalide, a sesquiterpene from Ginkgo biloba, on Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Atzori, C; Bruno, A; Chichino, G; Bombardelli, E; Scaglia, M; Ghione, M

    1993-01-01

    The sesquiterpene bilobalide, extracted from Ginkgo biloba leaves, was tested in vitro and in vivo for the ability to inhibit Pneumocystis carinii growth. Bilobalide was inhibitory to trophozoites cultured on human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HEL 299) at approximately the same concentration as trimethoprim plus sulfamethoxazole (lowest effective concentration, 50 micrograms of bilobalide per ml versus 9/45 microgram of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole per ml), inducing microscopically detectable morphological changes in the cytoplasm of the parasite. In pharmacologically immunosuppressed Sprague-Dawley rats transtracheally infected with a suspension of about 5 x 10(6) P. carinii trophozoites per ml, the daily intraperitoneal administration of bilobalide (10 mg/kg of body weight for 8 days) lowered the number of organisms by approximately 2 logs (that is, about 99%). There was no apparent toxicity either in uninfected HEL 299 feeder cells or in infected and uninfected animals. These studies suggest that the sesquiterpene bilobalide might be useful for therapy of and prophylaxis against P. carinii infections in humans. Images PMID:8363381

  18. A cytotoxicity assay for evaluation of candidate anti-Pneumocystis carinii agents.

    PubMed Central

    Cushion, M T; Chen, F; Kloepfer, N

    1997-01-01

    A series of over 60 agents representing several different classes of compounds were evaluated for their effects on the ATP pools of Pneumocystis carinii populations derived from immunosuppressed rats. A cytotoxicity assay based on an ATP-driven bioluminescent reaction was used to determine the concentration of agent which decreased the P. carinii ATP pools by 50% versus untreated controls (IC50). A ranking system based on the IC50 value was devised for comparison of relative responses among the compounds evaluated in the cytotoxic assay and for comparison to in vivo efficacy. With few exceptions, there was a strong correlation between results from the ATP assay and the performance of the compound in vivo. Antibiotics, with the exception of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), were ineffective at reducing the ATP pools and were not active clinically or in the rat model of P. carinii pneumonia. Likewise, other agents not expected to be effective, e.g., antiviral compounds, did not show activity. Standard anti-P. carinii compounds, e.g., TMP-SMX, pentamidine, and dapsone, dramatically reduced ATP levels. Analogs of the quinone and topoisomerase inhibitor groups were shown to reduce ATP concentrations and hold promise for further in vivo investigation. The cytotoxicity assay provides a rapid assessment of response, does not rely on replicating organisms, and should be useful for assessment of structure-function relationships. PMID:9021195

  19. Intermittent Courses of Corticosteroids Also Present a Risk for Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Non-HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Bernal, Maria L.; Martin-Garrido, Isabel; Donazar-Ezcurra, Mikel; Limper, Andrew H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is rising in the non-HIV population and associates with higher morbidity and mortality. The aggressive immunosuppressive regimens, as well as the lack of stablished guidelines for chemoprophylaxis, are likely contributors to this increased incidence. Herein, we have explored the underlying conditions, immunosuppressive therapies, and clinical outcomes of PCP in HIV-negative patients. Methods. Retrospective analysis of PCP in HIV-negative patients at Mayo Clinic from 2006–2010. The underlying condition, immunosuppressive therapies, coinfection, and clinical course were determined. PCP diagnosis required symptoms of pneumonia and identification of the organisms by visualization or by a real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results. A total of 128 cases of PCP were identified during the study period. Hematological malignancies were the predisposing condition for 50% of the patients. While 87% had received corticosteroids or other immunosuppressive therapies for >4 weeks prior to the diagnosis, only 7 were receiving PCP prophylaxis. Up to 43% of patients were not on daily steroids. Sixty-seven patients needed Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and 53 received mechanical ventilation. The mortality for those patients requiring ICU was 40%. Conclusions. PCP diagnosis in the HIV-negative population requires a high level of suspicion even if patients are not receiving daily corticosteroids. Mortality remains high despite adequate treatment. PMID:27721666

  20. Sterols of Saccharomyces cerevisiae erg6 Knockout Mutant Expressing the Pneumocystis carinii S-Adenosylmethionine:Sterol C-24 Methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Edna S; Johnston, Laura Q; Nkinin, Stephenson W; Romero, Becky I; Giner, José-Luis

    2015-01-01

    The AIDS-associated lung pathogen Pneumocystis is classified as a fungus although Pneumocystis has several distinct features such as the absence of ergosterol, the major sterol of most fungi. The Pneumocystis carinii S-adenosylmethionine:sterol C24-methyltransferase (SAM:SMT) enzyme, coded by the erg6 gene, transfers either one or two methyl groups to the C-24 position of the sterol side chain producing both C28 and C29 24-alkylsterols in approximately the same proportions, whereas most fungal SAM:SMT transfer only one methyl group to the side chain. The sterol compositions of wild-type Sacchromyces cerevisiae, the erg6 knockout mutant (Δerg6), and Δerg6 expressing the P. carinii or the S. cerevisiae erg6 gene were analyzed by a variety of chromatographic and spectroscopic procedures to examine functional complementation in the yeast expression system. Detailed sterol analyses were obtained using high performance liquid chromatography and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-NMR). The P. carinii SAM:SMT in the Δerg6 restored its ability to produce the C28 sterol ergosterol as the major sterol, and also resulted in low levels of C29 sterols. This indicates that while the P. carinii SAM:SMT in the yeast Δerg6 cells was able to transfer a second methyl group to the side chain, the action of Δ(24(28)) -sterol reductase (coded by the erg4 gene) in the yeast cells prevented the formation and accumulation of as many C29 sterols as that found in P. carinii.

  1. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for diagnosing Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-uninfected immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kei; Aoshima, Masahiro; Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Eri; Hashimoto, Kohei; Otsuka, Yoshihito

    2014-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is becoming an established nucleic acid amplification method offering rapid, accurate, and cost-effective diagnosis of infectious diseases. We retrospectively evaluated 78 consecutive HIV-uninfected patients who underwent LAMP method for diagnosing Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Diagnosis of PCP was made by the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) with positive LAMP or conventional staining (CS) (Grocott methenamine silver staining or Diff-Quick™) on the basis of compatible clinical symptoms and radiologic findings. Additionally, we reviewed HIV-uninfected immunocompromised patients who underwent subcontract PCR as a historical control. LAMP was positive in 10 (90.9%) of 11 positive-CS patients. Among 13 negative-CS patients with positive LAMP, 11 (84.6%) had PCP, and the remaining 2 were categorized as having P. jirovecii colonization. LDH levels in negative-CS PCP were higher than in positive-CS PCP (p = 0.026). (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan levels in negative-CS PCP were lower than in positive-CS PCP (p = 0.011). The interval from symptom onset to diagnosis as PCP in LAMP group (3.45 ± 1.77 days; n = 22) was shorter than in subcontract PCR group (6.90 ± 2.28 days; n = 10; p < 0.001). As for patients without PCP, duration of unnecessary PCP treatment in LAMP group (2; 2-3 days; n = 10) was shorter than in subcontract PCR group (7; 7-12.25 days; n = 6; p = 0.003). LAMP showed higher sensitivity (95.4%) and positive predictive value (91.3%) than subcontract PCR did. Pneumocystis LAMP method is a sensitive and cost-effective diagnostic method and is easy to administer in general hospitals. In-house LAMP method would realize early diagnosis of PCP, resulting in improving PCP prognosis and reducing unnecessary PCP-specific treatment.

  2. Comparative Genomics Suggests that the Fungal Pathogen Pneumocystis Is an Obligate Parasite Scavenging Amino Acids from Its Host's Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Hauser, Philippe M.; Burdet, Frédéric X.; Cissé, Ousmane H.; Keller, Laurent; Taffé, Patrick; Sanglard, Dominique; Pagni, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a fungus causing severe pneumonia in immuno-compromised patients. Progress in understanding its pathogenicity and epidemiology has been hampered by the lack of a long-term in vitro culture method. Obligate parasitism of this pathogen has been suggested on the basis of various features but remains controversial. We analysed the 7.0 Mb draft genome sequence of the closely related species Pneumocystis carinii infecting rats, which is a well established experimental model of the disease. We predicted 8’085 (redundant) peptides and 14.9% of them were mapped onto the KEGG biochemical pathways. The proteome of the closely related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe was used as a control for the annotation procedure (4’974 genes, 14.1% mapped). About two thirds of the mapped peptides of each organism (65.7% and 73.2%, respectively) corresponded to crucial enzymes for the basal metabolism and standard cellular processes. However, the proportion of P. carinii genes relative to those of S. pombe was significantly smaller for the “amino acid metabolism” category of pathways than for all other categories taken together (40 versus 114 against 278 versus 427, P<0.002). Importantly, we identified in P. carinii only 2 enzymes specifically dedicated to the synthesis of the 20 standard amino acids. By contrast all the 54 enzymes dedicated to this synthesis reported in the KEGG atlas for S. pombe were detected upon reannotation of S. pombe proteome (2 versus 54 against 278 versus 427, P<0.0001). This finding strongly suggests that species of the genus Pneumocystis are scavenging amino acids from their host's lung environment. Consequently, they would have no form able to live independently from another organism, and these parasites would be obligate in addition to being opportunistic. These findings have implications for the management of patients susceptible to P. jirovecii infection given that the only source of infection would be other humans. PMID

  3. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for diagnosing Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-uninfected immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Kei; Aoshima, Masahiro; Ohkuni, Yoshihiro; Hoshino, Eri; Hashimoto, Kohei; Otsuka, Yoshihito

    2014-12-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is becoming an established nucleic acid amplification method offering rapid, accurate, and cost-effective diagnosis of infectious diseases. We retrospectively evaluated 78 consecutive HIV-uninfected patients who underwent LAMP method for diagnosing Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). Diagnosis of PCP was made by the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii (P. jirovecii) with positive LAMP or conventional staining (CS) (Grocott methenamine silver staining or Diff-Quick™) on the basis of compatible clinical symptoms and radiologic findings. Additionally, we reviewed HIV-uninfected immunocompromised patients who underwent subcontract PCR as a historical control. LAMP was positive in 10 (90.9%) of 11 positive-CS patients. Among 13 negative-CS patients with positive LAMP, 11 (84.6%) had PCP, and the remaining 2 were categorized as having P. jirovecii colonization. LDH levels in negative-CS PCP were higher than in positive-CS PCP (p = 0.026). (1 → 3)-β-D-glucan levels in negative-CS PCP were lower than in positive-CS PCP (p = 0.011). The interval from symptom onset to diagnosis as PCP in LAMP group (3.45 ± 1.77 days; n = 22) was shorter than in subcontract PCR group (6.90 ± 2.28 days; n = 10; p < 0.001). As for patients without PCP, duration of unnecessary PCP treatment in LAMP group (2; 2-3 days; n = 10) was shorter than in subcontract PCR group (7; 7-12.25 days; n = 6; p = 0.003). LAMP showed higher sensitivity (95.4%) and positive predictive value (91.3%) than subcontract PCR did. Pneumocystis LAMP method is a sensitive and cost-effective diagnostic method and is easy to administer in general hospitals. In-house LAMP method would realize early diagnosis of PCP, resulting in improving PCP prognosis and reducing unnecessary PCP-specific treatment. PMID:25187511

  4. Three-dimensional reconstruction of rabbit-derived Pneumocystis carinii from serial-thin sections. I: Trophozoite.

    PubMed

    Palluault, F; Pietrzyk, B; Dei-Cas, E; Slomianny, C; Soulez, B; Camus, D

    1991-01-01

    The highly complex ultrastructural morphology of the endomembrane system in Pneumocystis carinii led us to perform three-dimensional reconstruction from serial-thin sections using the CATIA (Conception Assistée Tridimensionnelle Inter Active) Dassault system program. The three-dimensional reconstruction of a small trophozoite made it possible to better understand the morphological relationship among organelles and to suggest cytophysiological hypotheses. By reconstructing other parasite stages, we gathered information about the evolution of organelles during the life cycle and about their physiology.

  5. Absence of mutations associated with sulfa resistance in Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthase gene from non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Demanche, C; Guillot, J; Berthelemy, M; Petitt, T; Roux, P; Wakefield, A E

    2002-06-01

    The dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene from Pneumocystis carinii isolated from non-human primates was amplified using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced to analyse point mutations associated with sulfa resistance. P. carinii DHPS gene amplification was obtained from eight lung samples from five New World primate species and one Old World primate species. None of the animals had been exposed to sulfa drugs and only the wild-type P. carinii DHPS sequence at codons 55 and 57 was observed. These data support the hypothesis that high rates of DHPS mutants in P. carinii f. sp. hominis have arisen with increased use of sulfa drugs for P. carinii pneumonia prophylaxis.

  6. Two cases of fatal Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia as a complication of tacrolimus therapy in ulcerative colitis--a need for prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Escher, M; Stange, E F; Herrlinger, K R

    2010-11-01

    Here we report 2 cases of fatal Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with severe ulcerative colitis receiving combination immunosuppression including tacrolimus. We discuss the necessity of a P. jirovecii prophylaxis especially in elderly patients according to the European evidence-based consensus on the prevention and management of opportunistic infections in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21122569

  7. Pulmonary nocardiosis caused by Nocardia exalbida complicating Pneumocystis pneumonia in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Imai, Kentaro; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Koga, Michiko; Nakamura, Hitomi; Miura, Toshiyuki; Gonoi, Tohru; Yazawa, Katsukiyo; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Fujii, Takeshi

    2011-08-01

    A 47-year-old man with optimally controlled type-2 diabetes mellitus and chronic hepatitis B was admitted to a local hospital because of a 1-week history of cough and high-grade fever. He was diagnosed with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and Klebsiella pneumonia from a chest radiograph and sputum. Simultaneously, he was found to have HIV infection with a CD4 count of 76/μl. Despite alteration of treatment secondary to the development of allergic reaction to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), the patient was able to complete a 3-week therapy for PCP after being switched to pentamidine isetionate. After the treatment of PCP, he was referred to our hospital for the initiation of anti-HIV therapy. He presented with recurrent high-grade fever of a few days' duration prior to his initial visit, which subsequently led to his admission. Chest computed tomography (CT) showed the enlargement of a previously identified infiltrate in the left upper lung field, and the sputum culture upon admission was positive for Gram-positive branching rods; the organism was later identified as Nocardia exalbida. Due to his allergy to sulfonamide, the patient was treated with imipenem (IMP) and amikacin (AMK) given intravenously for 17 days, followed by garenoxacin (GRNX) taken orally for 6 months, without any adverse effects. The chest infiltrate resolved completely, and he remains stable without relapse 8 months after the completion of the therapy. Pulmonary nocardiosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis of recurring pneumonia in immunocompromised patients, especially in HIV-infected individuals. Oral administration of GRNX following IMP and AMK can be used as an alternative to TMP-SMX therapy in cases of pulmonary nocardiosis caused by N. exalbida. PMID:21249414

  8. Genetic diversity of Pneumocystis jirovecii in colonized Cuban infants and toddlers.

    PubMed

    Monroy-Vaca, Ernesto X; de Armas, Yaxsier; Illnait-Zaragozí, María T; Diaz, Raúl; Toraño, Gilda; Vega, Dania; Alvarez-Lam, Ileana; Calderón, Enrique J; Stensvold, Christen R

    2014-03-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a leading cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised patients. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of P. jirovecii from colonized Cuban infants and toddlers by analysis of four genetic loci: mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU) rRNA, cytochrome b (CYB), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and β-tubulin (β-tub). We determined the multilocus profiles based on concatenated genotype data (multilocus genotype; MLG) and nucleotide sequences (multilocus sequence analysis; MLSA) respectively, calculated the discriminatory power of each analysis, and investigated possible associations with demographic and clinical data. Sixteen of 51 PCR-positive nasopharyngeal swab specimens (years 2010-2013) with high P. jirovecii load were selected for downstream analysis. In mixed allelic profiles all genotypes/nucleotide sequence patterns were considered separately. All samples could be genotyped based on mtLSU, CYB and β-tub locus. However, the SOD locus could be successfully amplified in only 7/16 (44%) specimens. Eight different P. jirovecii MLGs were identified among the 16 cases and eight samples presented identical MLG (MLG 1). Seventeen MLSA profiles were distinguished. No statistical association between genotypes or MLGs and demographic or clinical data could be identified. For MLSA the higher discriminatory power (S=0.976) was observed. The combination of mtLSU, CYB and β-tub loci proved to be useful for molecular epidemiology studies of P. jirovecii. A total of 17 different MLSA profiles observed in 16 specimens indicated high genetic variability of P. jirovecii circulating in colonized Cuban infants and toddlers. PMID:24412726

  9. Prevalence and genotype distribution of Pneumocystis jirovecii in Cuban infants and toddlers with whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Monroy-Vaca, Ernesto X; de Armas, Yaxsier; Illnait-Zaragozí, María T; Toraño, Gilda; Diaz, Raúl; Vega, Dania; Alvarez-Lam, Ileana; Calderón, Enrique J; Stensvold, Christen R

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence and genotype distribution of Pneumocystis jirovecii obtained from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs from immunocompetent Cuban infants and toddlers with whooping cough (WC). A total of 163 NP swabs from 163 young Cuban children with WC who were admitted to the respiratory care units at two pediatric centers were studied. The prevalence of the organism was determined by a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the P. jirovecii mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU) rRNA gene. Genotypes were identified by direct sequencing of mtLSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene amplicons. qPCR detected P. jirovecii DNA in 48/163 (29.4%) samples. mtLSU rDNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of three different genotypes in the population. Genotype 2 was most common (48%), followed in prevalence by genotypes 1 (23%) and 3 (19%); mixed-genotype infections were seen in 10% of the cases. RFLP analysis of DHPS PCR products revealed four genotypes, 18% of which were associated with resistance to sulfa drugs. Only contact with coughers (prevalence ratio [PR], 3.51 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.79 to 6.87]; P = 0.000) and exposure to tobacco smoke (PR, 1.82 [95% CI, 1.14 to 2.92]; P = 0.009) were statistically associated with being colonized by P. jirovecii. The prevalence of P. jirovecii in infants and toddlers with WC and the genotyping results provide evidence that this population represents a potential reservoir and transmission source of P. jirovecii. PMID:24131683

  10. Prognostic factors influencing the outcome in pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, P.; Torres, A.; Miro, J. M.; Vieigas, C.; Mallolas, J.; Zamora, L.; Gatell, J. M.; Valls, M. E.; Riquelme, R.; Rodríguez-Roisin, R.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Studies attempting to identify the prognostic factors that influence the outcome of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in patients with AIDS using a multivariate analysis are few. In order to identify those prognostic factors amenable to medical intervention, univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on 102 patients with AIDS suffering a first episode of PCP. METHODS--One hundred and two consecutive patients with AIDS (51% drug abusers, 45% homosexuals, and 4% with other HIV risk factors) admitted to our institution between 1986 and 1989 whose respiratory infection was diagnosed by bronchoalveolar lavage were studied prospectively. RESULTS--The overall mortality was 28%, rising to 79% in those patients who required mechanical ventilation. According to univariate analysis the following variables were related to a poor prognosis: age > 35 years; risk factor for HIV infection other than drug abuse; and AIDS diagnosis confirmed before 1988; PaO2 < 8 kPa at admission; severe acute respiratory failure on admission (PaO2/FIO2 < 20 kPa); mechanical ventilation; antibiotic therapy for PCP other than trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole; multiple microbial pulmonary infection; serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) > 22.5 mukat/l on admission; serum albumin level < 30 g/l. Multivariate analysis showed that only mechanical ventilation was independently associated with a poor outcome. CONCLUSIONS--The mortality of AIDS patients presenting with a first episode of PCP before 1990 was high (28%). The main prognostic factor associated with poor outcome was the requirement for mechanical ventilation due to severe acute respiratory failure. PMID:7638811

  11. Prevalence and genotype distribution of Pneumocystis jirovecii in Cuban infants and toddlers with whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Monroy-Vaca, Ernesto X; de Armas, Yaxsier; Illnait-Zaragozí, María T; Toraño, Gilda; Diaz, Raúl; Vega, Dania; Alvarez-Lam, Ileana; Calderón, Enrique J; Stensvold, Christen R

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the prevalence and genotype distribution of Pneumocystis jirovecii obtained from nasopharyngeal (NP) swabs from immunocompetent Cuban infants and toddlers with whooping cough (WC). A total of 163 NP swabs from 163 young Cuban children with WC who were admitted to the respiratory care units at two pediatric centers were studied. The prevalence of the organism was determined by a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting the P. jirovecii mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU) rRNA gene. Genotypes were identified by direct sequencing of mtLSU ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene amplicons. qPCR detected P. jirovecii DNA in 48/163 (29.4%) samples. mtLSU rDNA sequence analysis revealed the presence of three different genotypes in the population. Genotype 2 was most common (48%), followed in prevalence by genotypes 1 (23%) and 3 (19%); mixed-genotype infections were seen in 10% of the cases. RFLP analysis of DHPS PCR products revealed four genotypes, 18% of which were associated with resistance to sulfa drugs. Only contact with coughers (prevalence ratio [PR], 3.51 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.79 to 6.87]; P = 0.000) and exposure to tobacco smoke (PR, 1.82 [95% CI, 1.14 to 2.92]; P = 0.009) were statistically associated with being colonized by P. jirovecii. The prevalence of P. jirovecii in infants and toddlers with WC and the genotyping results provide evidence that this population represents a potential reservoir and transmission source of P. jirovecii.

  12. Identification, characterization, and expression of the BiP endoplasmic reticulum resident chaperonins in Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Stedman, T T; Buck, G A

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated, characterized, and examined the expression of the genes encoding BiP endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident chaperonins responsible for transport, maturation, and proper folding of membrane and secreted proteins from two divergent strains of Pneumocystis carinii. The BiP genes, Pcbip and Prbip, from the P. c. carinii (prototype) strain and the P. c. rattus (variant) strain, respectively, are single-copy genes that reside on chromosomes of approximately 330 and approximately 350 kbp. Both genes encode approximately 72.5-kDa proteins that are most homologous to BiP genes from other organisms and exhibit the amino-terminal signal peptides and carboxyl-terminal ER retention sequences that are hallmarks of BiP proteins. We established short-term P. carinii cultures to examine expression and induction of Pcbip in response to heat shock, glucose starvation, inhibition of protein transport or N-linked glycosylation, and other conditions known to affect proper transport, glycosylation, and maturation of membrane and secreted proteins. These studies indicated that Pcbip mRNA is constitutively expressed but induced under conditions known to induce BiP expression in other organisms. In contrast to mammalian BiP genes but like other fungal BiP genes, P. carinii BiP mRNA levels are induced by heat shock. Finally, the Prbip and Pcbip coding sequences surprisingly exhibit only approximately 83% DNA and approximately 90% amino acid sequence identity and show only limited conservation in noncoding flanking and intron sequences. Analyses of the P. carinii BiP gene sequences support inclusion of P. carinii among the fungi but suggest a large divergence and possible speciation among P. carinii strains infecting a given host. PMID:8890193

  13. National Lupus Hospitalization Trends Reveal Rising Rates of Herpes Zoster and Declines in Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Sara G.; Schmajuk, Gabriela; Trupin, Laura; Gensler, Lianne; Katz, Patricia P.; Yelin, Edward H.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Yazdany, Jinoos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infection is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Therapeutic practices have evolved over the past 15 years, but effects on infectious complications of SLE are unknown. We evaluated trends in hospitalizations for severe and opportunistic infections in a population-based SLE study. Methods Data derive from the 2000 to 2011 United States National Inpatient Sample, including individuals who met a validated administrative definition of SLE. Primary outcomes were diagnoses of bacteremia, pneumonia, opportunistic fungal infection, herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus, or pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP). We used Poisson regression to determine whether infection rates were changing in SLE hospitalizations and used predictive marginals to generate annual adjusted rates of specific infections. Results We identified 361,337 SLE hospitalizations from 2000 to 2011 meeting study inclusion criteria. Compared to non-SLE hospitalizations, SLE patients were younger (51 vs. 62 years), predominantly female (89% vs. 54%), and more likely to be racial/ethnic minorities. SLE diagnosis was significantly associated with all measured severe and opportunistic infections. From 2000 to 2011, adjusted SLE hospitalization rates for herpes zoster increased more than non-SLE rates: 54 to 79 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 24 to 29 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conversely, SLE hospitalizations for PCP disproportionately decreased: 5.1 to 2.5 per 10,000 SLE hospitalizations compared with 0.9 to 1.3 per 10,000 non-SLE hospitalizations. Conclusions Among patients with SLE, herpes zoster hospitalizations are rising while PCP hospitalizations are declining. These trends likely reflect evolving SLE treatment strategies. Further research is needed to identify patients at greatest risk for infectious complications. PMID:26731012

  14. Population structure of Pneumocystis jirovecii isolated from immunodeficiency virus-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Francisco; Gaspar, Jorge; Tavares, Adélcia; Moser, Inês; Antunes, Francisco; Mansinho, Kamal; Matos, Olga

    2010-03-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) is an important opportunistic infection among immunocompromised patients. Genetic characterization of P. jirovecii isolated from HIV-positive patients, based on identification of multiple nucleotide sequences at eight distinct loci, was achieved by using PCR with DNA sequencing and RFLP. The present study showed that the mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), the cytochrome b (CYB), the superoxide dismutase (SOD), the beta-tubulin (beta-tub), the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) loci sequences were more variable and therefore giving additional information than the thioredoxin reductase (Trr1) and the thymidylate synthase (TS) genes. Genotyping at those six most informative loci enabled the identification of 48 different P. jirovecii multilocus genotypes (MLGs). Significant statistical associations between infecting P. jirovecii genotypes and patients' age groups or PcP clinical status were found. Also, mtLSU rRNA sequences and specific genotypes from other three loci (CYB, SOD, and DHFR) were statistically associated. The results suggested large recombination between most P. jirovecii MLGs. However, one MLG occurred at a higher frequency than would be expected according to panmictic expectations, suggesting linkage disequilibrium and clonal propagation. The persistence of this specific MLG may be a consequence of clonal reproduction of this successful genotypic array in a P. jirovecii population with epidemic structure. The present study provided the description of multiple genomic regions of P. jirovecii, improving the understanding of genetic variability and frequency distribution of polymorphic genotypes, and exploring the criteria of clonality by testing over-representation of MLGs.

  15. [Pneumocystis jiroveci infection in immunocompetent patients with pulmonary disorders, in Portugal].

    PubMed

    Matos, Olga; Costa, Marina Célia; Correia, Isabel; Monteiro, Paula; Vieira, Jorge Roldão; Soares, Jorge; Bonnet, Marina; Esteves, Francisco; Antunes, Francisco

    2006-01-01

    The use of molecular tools with a great capacity to detect and differentiate strains of Pneumocystis has resulted: in the identification of low numbers of P. jiroveci organisms in clinically silent, colonized, immunocompromised patients and in immunocompetent persons. Considering this information, the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of P. jiroveci carriers (subclinical infections) in Portuguese patients with pulmonary disorders and in healthy individuals. A total of 45 pulmonary specimens were collected from 45 immunocompetent adults with pulmonary disorders, and 37 oral washings from 37 healthy adults, between March 2001 and February 2004. All samples were analysed by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies and by amplification of the LSU mtrRNA by nested PCR. The results obtained in this study indicate that: 1) P. jiroveci is frequently detected (24.4%) in patients with pulmonary disorders in Portugal; 2) this population might play a role in circulation and transmission of P. jiroveci organisms in the community; 3) patients receiving corticosteroids are more likely to have detectable P. jiroveci in lungs (18%) than patients who are not receiving this immunosuppressor (12%); 4) P. jiroveci is infrequently detected in healthy adults. This may be due to very low numbers of latent organisms present in the lungs of healthy adults, difficulty in detecting few organisms, or due to the type of samples used. Screening of these individuals and notification of the results to their physician might be important: for further follow-up and whether or not prophylaxis or treatment should be prescribed; and for the clarification of the epidemiology of P. jiroveci asymptomatic infections.

  16. Microculture screening assay for primary in vitro evaluation of drugs against Pneumocystis carinii.

    PubMed Central

    Comley, J C; Mullin, R J; Wolfe, L A; Hanlon, M H; Ferone, R

    1991-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii inoculated into 96-well filtration plate assemblies was shown to synthesize radiolabeled folates de novo from [para-3H]aminobenzoic acid ([3H]pABA). At the end of each incubation with [3H]pABA, a vacuum manifold was used to remove the medium and wash P. carinii. The membrane at the base of each well was dried and punched out, and the level of 3H retained was determined by direct scintillation counting. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of duplicate filters confirmed that direct counting of 3H retained on membranes (after correction for unmetabolized [3H]pABA) was an accurate reflection of total [3H]pABA incorporation by P. carinii. Greater than 95% of the 3H recovered was shown to be present as polyglutamated species. After digestion with rat plasma folic acid gamma-glutamyl hydrolase, para-aminobenzoylglutamate, N10-formyltetrahydrofolate, and tetrahydrofolate were identified as the major 3H-labeled components. para-Aminobenzoylglutamate was presumed to have arisen from folylpolyglutamates synthesized by P. carinii and was therefore included in the calculation of total [3H]pABA incorporation. P. carinii incorporation of [3H]pABA under optimal conditions was used as a selective measure of in vitro viability against which the inhibitory effects of some antipneumocystis agents (pentamidine, sulfamethoxazole, 566C80, and piritrexim) were quantitated. The concentrations of pentamidine, sulfamethoxazole, 566C80, and piritrexim required for 50% inhibition in this assay were 7.3, 0.1, 1.4, and approximately 100 microM, respectively. The results suggest that this 96-well [3H]pABA incorporation assay has considerable potential for objective in vitro drug screening against P. carinii. PMID:1759815

  17. Aerosolized pentamidine: Effect on diagnosis and presentation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Jules-Elysee, K.M.; Stover, D.E.; Zaman, M.B.; Bernard, E.M.; White, D.A. )

    1990-05-15

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of previous aerosolized pentamidine therapy on diagnosis and presentation of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. This was a retrospective study of fifty-two consecutive patients with P. carinii pneumonia and underlying infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who had bronchoscopy. Twenty-one patients who were on aerosolized pentamidine therapy served as the study group. Thirty-one patients who had not received the drug served as the control group. The yield of bronchoalveolar lavage for P. carinii pneumonia was 62% for the study group and 100% for the control group (P less than 0.05). This lower yield was significant for the subset of patients having their first episode of P. carinii pneumonia. The yield of transbronchial biopsy was similar for both groups of patients (81% compared with 84%). The yield of bronchoscopy was not influenced by use of zidovudine. Review of lavage specimen slides suggested that there may be fewer organisms present in patients receiving aerosolized pentamidine. An atypical roentgenographic presentation of upper lobe predominant infiltrates was seen in 38% of the study patients and 7% of the control patients. In addition, pneumothoraces and cystic changes were also frequently seen in the study patients. Gallium scans, when done, were also atypical in the study group. Markers of the severity of disease, however, were similar in both groups. The yield of bronchoalveolar lavage for P. carinii pneumonia in HIV-infected patients is lower in patients receiving aerosolized pentamidine. Unusual roentgenographic presentations and atypical gallium scans are also found in this setting.

  18. Mapping by sequencing the Pneumocystis genome using the ordering DNA sequences V3 tool.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zheng; Lance, Britton; Vargas, Claudia; Arpinar, Budak; Bhandarkar, Suchendra; Kraemer, Eileen; Kochut, Krys J; Miller, John A; Wagner, Jeff R; Weise, Michael J; Wunderlich, John K; Stringer, James; Smulian, George; Cushion, Melanie T; Arnold, Jonathan

    2003-04-01

    A bioinformatics tool called ODS3 has been created for mapping by sequencing. The tool allows the creation of integrated genomic maps from genetic, physical mapping, and sequencing data and permits an integrated genome map to be stored, retrieved, viewed, and queried in a stand-alone capacity, in a client/server relationship with the Fungal Genome Database (FGDB), and as a web-browsing tool for the FGDB. In that ODS3 is programmed in Java, the tool promotes platform independence and supports export of integrated genome-mapping data in the extensible markup language (XML) for data interchange with other genome information systems. The tool ODS3 is used to create an initial integrated genome map of the AIDS-related fungal pathogen, Pneumocystis carinii. Contig dynamics would indicate that this physical map is approximately 50% complete with approximately 200 contigs. A total of 10 putative multigene families were found. Two of these putative families were previously characterized in P. carinii, namely the major surface glycoproteins (MSGs) and HSP70 proteins; three of these putative families (not previously characterized in P. carinii) were found to be similar to families encoding the HSP60 in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the heat-shock psi protein in S. pombe, and the RNA synthetase family (i.e., MES1) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Physical mapping data are consistent with the 16S, 5.8S, and 26S rDNA genes being single copy in P. carinii. No other fungus outside this genus is known to have the rDNA genes in single copy.

  19. Relationship Between Pneumocystis carinii Burden and the Degree of Host Immunosuppression in an Airborne Transmission Experimental Model.

    PubMed

    Khalife, Sara; Chabé, Magali; Gantois, Nausicaa; Audebert, Christophe; Pottier, Muriel; Hlais, Sani; Pinçon, Claire; Chassat, Thierry; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal; Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie; Aliouat, El Moukhtar

    2016-05-01

    To quantitatively assess the risk of contamination by Pneumocystis depending on the degree of immunosuppression (ID) of the exposed rat hosts, we developed an animal model, where rats went through different doses of dexamethasone. Then, natural and aerial transmission of Pneumocystis carinii occurred during cohousing of the rats undergoing gradual ID levels (receivers) with nude rats developing pneumocystosis (seeders). Following contact between receiver and seeder rats, the P. carinii burden of receiver rats was determined by toluidine blue ortho staining and by qPCR targeting the dhfr monocopy gene of this fungus. In this rat model, the level of circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes remained significantly stable and different for each dose of dexamethasone tested, thus reaching the goal of a new stable and gradual ID rat model. In addition, an inverse relationship between the P. carinii burden and the level of circulating CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes was evidenced. This rat model may be used to study other opportunistic pathogens or even co-infections in a context of gradual ID.

  20. Relationship Between Pneumocystis carinii Burden and the Degree of Host Immunosuppression in an Airborne Transmission Experimental Model.

    PubMed

    Khalife, Sara; Chabé, Magali; Gantois, Nausicaa; Audebert, Christophe; Pottier, Muriel; Hlais, Sani; Pinçon, Claire; Chassat, Thierry; Pierrot, Christine; Khalife, Jamal; Aliouat-Denis, Cécile-Marie; Aliouat, El Moukhtar

    2016-05-01

    To quantitatively assess the risk of contamination by Pneumocystis depending on the degree of immunosuppression (ID) of the exposed rat hosts, we developed an animal model, where rats went through different doses of dexamethasone. Then, natural and aerial transmission of Pneumocystis carinii occurred during cohousing of the rats undergoing gradual ID levels (receivers) with nude rats developing pneumocystosis (seeders). Following contact between receiver and seeder rats, the P. carinii burden of receiver rats was determined by toluidine blue ortho staining and by qPCR targeting the dhfr monocopy gene of this fungus. In this rat model, the level of circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes remained significantly stable and different for each dose of dexamethasone tested, thus reaching the goal of a new stable and gradual ID rat model. In addition, an inverse relationship between the P. carinii burden and the level of circulating CD4(+) or CD8(+) T lymphocytes was evidenced. This rat model may be used to study other opportunistic pathogens or even co-infections in a context of gradual ID. PMID:26509699

  1. Evaluation of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay for the Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Singh, Preeti; Singh, Sundeep; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Guleria, Randeep; Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Mohan, Anant

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is one of the common opportunistic infection among HIV and non-HIV immunocompromised patients. The lack of a rapid and specific diagnostic test necessitates a more reliable laboratory diagnostic test for PCP. In the present study, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay was evaluated for the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii. 185 clinical respiratory samples, including both BALF and IS, were subjected to GMS staining, nested PCR, and LAMP assay. Of 185 respiratory samples, 12/185 (6.5%), 41/185 (22.2%), and 49/185 (26.5%) samples were positive by GMS staining, nested PCR, and LAMP assay, respectively. As compared to nested PCR, additional 8 samples were positive by LAMP assay and found to be statistically significant (p < 0.05) with the detection limit of 1 pg. Thus, the LAMP assay may serve as a better diagnostic tool for the detection of P. jirovecii with high sensitivity and specificity, less turn-around time, operational simplicity, single-step amplification, and immediate visual detection. PMID:26664746

  2. Relationship between Radiological Stages and Prognoses of Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Non-AIDS Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiang-Dong; Jia, Peng; Gao, Li; Su, Li; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ren-Gui; Wang, Guang-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although radiological features of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) immunocompromised patients have been reported by other authors, there were no studies on the radiological stages of PCP previously. This study aimed to elucidate the radiological stages and prognoses of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients. Methods: Retrospective analysis of radiological manifestations and prognoses of 105 non-AIDS PCP immunocompromised patients from August 2009 to April 2016 was conducted. Chest radiograph was divided into three stages: early stage (normal or nearly normal chest radiograph), mid stage (bilateral pulmonary infiltrates), and late stage (bilateral pulmonary consolidations); chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was also divided into three stages: early stage (bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacity [GGO]), mid stage (bilateral diffuse GGO and patchy consolidations), and late stage (bilateral diffuse consolidations). Results: The case fatality rate (CFR) of all patients was 34.3% (36/105), all of them took routine chest X-ray (CXR), and 84 underwent chest CT examinations. According to the CXR most near the beginning of anti-PCP therapy, 18 cases were at early stage and CFR was 0 (0/18, P < 0.01), 50 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 28.0% (14/50, P > 0.05), and 37 cases were at late stage and CFR was 59.5% (22/37, P < 0.01). According to the chest HRCT most near the beginning of anti-PCP therapy, 40 cases were at early stage and CFR was 20.0% (8/40, P > 0.05), 34 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 47.1% (16/34, P > 0.05), and 10 cases were at late stage and CFR was 80.0% (8/10, P < 0.05); barotrauma, including pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and pneumohypoderma, was found in 18 cases and the CFR was 77.8% (14/18, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Based on the radiological manifestations, the course of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients can be divided into three stages: early stage, mid stage

  3. Alterations in cysteine proteinase content of rat lung associated with development of Pneumocystis carinii infection.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, D J; Stubberfield, C R; McBride, J D; Wilson, D L

    1991-01-01

    The rate of hydrolysis of three cysteine-type proteinase substrates, N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Arg-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide (AMC) (cathepsin B), Arg-AMC (cathepsin H), and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Phe-Arg-AMC (cathepsin L), were determined in rat lung throughout the time course of the induction of Pneumocystis carinii infection by immunosuppression. Cathepsin B-like and cathepsin L-like activities fell below control values initially, but from week 8 of the immunosuppressive treatment significant increases above the control were noted. Cathepsin H-like activity was greater than control levels from week 3, and by week 12 it was 7,600% of the mean control value. When compared with the relative degree of infection, as assessed from the number of cysts present in lung impression smears, cathepsin B-like and cathepsin L-like activities were significantly increased only at heavy parasite burdens while cathepsin H-like activity displayed a close correlation with parasite number (r = 0.884; P less than 0.001). Activity was detected in lysates of purified P. carinii with all three substrates. Treatment of heavily infected animals with co-trimoxazole cleared the lungs of P. carinii, and this was accompanied by a marked reduction in proteinase activity, in particular, cathepsin H-like activity, which fell from 108- to 3-fold the mean control value following drug treatment. Analysis of cathepsin H isozyme patterns by fluorography following isoelectric focusing revealed differences between treated and control lung samples. In the immunosuppressed group, there was a time-dependent increase in the intensity of some of the bands observed in the controls and an appearance of several novel bands which corresponded to bands observed in lysates of P. carinii. It is likely, therefore, that the increased proteinase activity observed in the treated group is due, at least in part, to isozymes from P. carinii; consequently, cathepsin H-like activity might be of use diagnostically in the

  4. Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-positive patients in Spain: epidemiology and environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Palomares-Sancho, Ines; Diaz, Asuncion; Resino, Rosa; De Miguel, Angel Gil; Resino, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Specific environmental factors may play a role in the development of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in HIV-positive patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the PCP incidence and mortality in hospitalized HIV-positive patients in Spain during the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era (1997 to 2011), as well as to analyze the climatological factors and air pollution levels in relation to hospital admissions and deaths. Methods We carried out a retrospective study. Data were collected from the National Hospital Discharge Database and the State Meteorological Agency of Spain. A case-crossover analysis was applied to identify environmental risk factors related to hospitalizations and deaths. For each patient, climatic factors and pollution levels were assigned based on readings from the nearest meteorological station to his or her postal code. Results There were 13,139 new PCP diagnoses and 1754 deaths in hospitalized HIV-positive patients from 1997 to 2011. The PCP incidence (events per 1000 person-years) dropped from 11.6 in 1997 to 2000, to 5.4 in 2004 to 2011 (p<0.001). The mortality (events per 10,000 person-years) also decreased from 14.3 in 1997 to 2000, to 7.5 in 2004 to 2011 (p<0.001). Most hospital admissions and deaths occurred in the winter season and the fewest occurred in the summer, overlapping respectively with the lowest and highest temperatures of the year in Spain. Moreover, lower temperatures prior to PCP admission, as well as higher concentrations of NO2 and particulate matter up to 10 m in size (PM10) at the time of admission were associated with higher likelihoods of hospital admission due to PCP when two weeks, one month, 1.5 months or two months were used as controls (p<0.01). Furthermore, higher concentrations of ozone at one month (p=0.007), 1.5 months (p<0.001) and two months (p=0.006) prior to admission were associated with higher likelihoods of hospital admission with PCP. For PCP-related deaths, lower

  5. High incidence of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients receiving biweekly rituximab and cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisone.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Sarah; O'Connor, Shaun; Lee, Newton; Filshie, Robin; Nandurkar, Harshal; Tam, Constantine S

    2010-05-01

    The risk of infection with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in patients undergoing chemotherapy is closely related to the intensity of corticosteroid exposure. PCP is uncommon with classical (3-weekly) R-CHOP, but the risk may be higher with biweekly R-CHOP (R-CHOP-14) due to the increased frequency of prednisolone pulses. Among 47 consecutive patients treated with R-CHOP-14 at our institution, five (11%) developed microbiologically proven PCP, with a further two (4%) having classical clinical and radiological features of PCP, but without microbiological confirmation. None of these patients were HIV-positive or had additional risk factors for PCP. Our experience suggests that PCP prophylaxis should be considered in institutions using R-CHOP-14 for the treatment of patients with aggressive lymphomas. PMID:20367135

  6. Three-dimensional reconstruction of rabbit-derived Pneumocystis carinii from serial-thin sections. II: Intermediate precyst.

    PubMed

    Palluault, F; Pietrzyk, B; Dei-Cas, E; Slomianny, C; Soulez, B; Camus, D

    1991-01-01

    Three-dimensional reconstruction of a binucleate intermediate precyst of Pneumocystis carinii was performed from serial-thin sections using the CATIA (Conception Assistée Tridimensionnelle Inter Active) Dassault system program. The presence of a mitochondrion, complex well-developed endoplasmic structures, and numerous Golgi vesicles was established. A better understanding of the ultrastructure of rabbit-derived P. carinii stages made it possible to formulate hypotheses on the evolution and physiology of the endomembrane system. Thus, the presence of the well-developed endoplasmic saccular structure and more than 230 Golgi vesicles in its vicinity might be implicated in the differentiation of the parasite surface structures and might also be related to nuclear division and individualization of intracystic bodies.

  7. Rapid detection of mutations in the human-derived Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthase gene associated with sulfa resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, L; Kovacs, J A

    2001-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that point mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene of human-derived Pneumocystis carinii are related to exposure to sulfa drugs and possibly represent the emergence of sulfa resistance. We developed a simple single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) method to permit rapid detection of these mutations. With plasmid constructs, SSCP was able to detect as little as 10% of a minority population. The SSCP assay was compared to direct sequencing for typing the DHPS gene by examining 37 clinical isolates with known DHPS sequences and 41 clinical isolates with unknown DHPS sequences. The typing results were consistent between these two methods for all isolates except 11 in which mutations were detected by SSCP but not by direct sequencing. Sequencing of individual clones after subcloning confirmed the presence of mutations in a minority population as determined by SSCP. SSCP is a very simple and sensitive method for rapid identification of P. camii DHPS mutations.

  8. Quantitative structure-activity relationship studies of a series of sulfa drugs as inhibitors of Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthetase.

    PubMed

    Johnson, T; Khan, I A; Avery, M A; Grant, J; Meshnick, S R

    1998-06-01

    Sulfone and sulfanilamide sulfa drugs have been shown to inhibit dihydropteroate synthetase (DHPS) isolated from Pneumocystis carinii. In order to develop a pharmacophoric model for this inhibition, quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for sulfa drugs active against DHPS have been studied. Accurate 50% inhibitory concentrations were collected for 44 analogs, and other parameters, such as partition coefficients and molar refractivity, were calculated. Conventional multiple regression analysis of these data did not provide acceptable QSAR. However, three-dimensional QSAR provided by comparative molecular field analysis did give excellent results. Upon removal of poorly correlated analogs, a data set of 36 analogs, all having a common NHSO2 group, provided a cross-validated r2 value of 0.699 and conventional r2 value of 0.964. The resulting pharmacophore model should be useful for understanding and predicting the binding of DHPS by new sulfa drugs.

  9. Simplified exercise test for the initial differential diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in HIV antibody positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Sauleda, J.; Gea, J.; Aran, X.; Aguar, M. C.; Orozco-Levi, M.; Broquetas, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND--This study was designed to evaluate the usefulness of a simplified exercise test in the differential diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). METHODS--Forty five subjects with antibodies against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and pneumonia were included and divided into two groups: those with PCP and those with "other pneumonias" (non-PCP). The test involved pedalling for two minutes on a stretcher bed and was considered positive if SaO2 decreased by at least 3%. RESULTS--During the exercise the mean(SE) SaO2 fell in patients with PCP from 88(4)% to 84(3)%, p < 0.01, whilst it improved slightly in subjects with non-PCP from 91(1)% to 93(3)%, p < 0.05. Sensitivity was 77% and specificity 91%. CONCLUSIONS--This simple test seems potentially useful for the initial investigation of HIV antibody positive patients with pneumonia. PMID:8128398

  10. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene.

  11. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii’s physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  12. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens.

    PubMed

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii's physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene.

  13. Retrospective Analysis of Bacterial and Viral Co-Infections in Pneumocystis spp. Positive Lung Samples of Austrian Pigs with Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Kureljušić, Branislav; Nedorost, Nora; Matula, Bettina; Schießl, Wolfgang; Stixenberger, Daniela; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was the retrospective investigation of viral (porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), torque teno sus virus type 1 and 2 (TTSuV1, TTSuV2)) and bacterial (Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. b.), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. h.), and Pasteurella multocida (P. m.)) co-infections in 110 Pneumocystis spp. positive lung samples of Austrian pigs with pneumonia. Fifty-one % were positive for PCV2, 7% for PRRSV, 22% for TTSuV1, 48% for TTSuV2, 6% for B. b., 29% for M. h., and 21% for P. m. In 38.2% only viral, in 3.6% only bacterial and in 40.0% both, viral and bacterial pathogens were detected. In 29.1% of the cases a co-infection with 1 pathogen, in 28.2% with 2, in 17.3% with 3, and in 7.3% with 4 different infectious agents were observed. The exposure to Pneumocystis significantly decreased the risk of a co-infection with PRRSV in weaning piglets; all other odds ratios were not significant. Four categories of results were compared: I = P. spp. + only viral co-infectants, II = P. spp. + both viral and bacterial co-infectants, III = P. spp. + only bacterial co-infectants, and IV = P. spp. single infection. The evaluation of all samples and the age class of the weaning piglets resulted in a predomination of the categories I and II. In contrast, the suckling piglets showed more samples of category I and IV. In the group of fattening pigs, category II predominated. Suckling piglets can be infected with P. spp. early in life. With increasing age this single infections can be complicated by co-infections with other respiratory diseases. PMID:27428002

  14. Copy Number Variation of Mitochondrial DNA Genes in Pneumocystis jirovecii According to the Fungal Load in BAL Specimens.

    PubMed

    Valero, Clara; Buitrago, María José; Gits-Muselli, Maud; Benazra, Marion; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Hamane, Samia; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane; Alanio, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is an unculturable fungus and the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia, a life-threatening opportunistic infection. Although molecular diagnosis is often based on the detection of mtLSU rRNA mitochondrial gene, the number of copies of mitochondrial genes had not been investigated. We developed and optimized six real-time PCR assays in order to determine the copy number of four mitochondrial genes (mtSSU rRNA, mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB) in comparison to nuclear genome (DHPS and HSP70) and tested 84 bronchoalveolar fluids of patients at different stages of the infection. Unexpectedly, we found that copy number of mitochondrial genes varied from gene to gene with mtSSU rRNA gene being more represented (37 copies) than NAD1 (23 copies), mtLSU rRNA (15 copies) and CYTB (6 copies) genes compared to nuclear genome. Hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) allowed us to define five major clusters, significantly associated with fungal load (p = 0.029), in which copy number of mitochondrial genes was significantly different among them. More importantly, copy number of mtLSU rRNA, NAD1, and CYTB but not mtSSU rRNA differed according to P. jirovecii physiological state with a decreased number of copies when the fungal load is low. This suggests the existence of a mixture of various subspecies of mtDNA that can harbor different amplification rates. Overall, we revealed here an unexpected variability of P. jirovecii mtDNA copy number that fluctuates according to P. jirovecii's physiological state, except for mtSSU that is the most stable and the most present mitochondrial gene. PMID:27672381

  15. Retrospective Analysis of Bacterial and Viral Co-Infections in Pneumocystis spp. Positive Lung Samples of Austrian Pigs with Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Weissenbacher-Lang, Christiane; Kureljušić, Branislav; Nedorost, Nora; Matula, Bettina; Schießl, Wolfgang; Stixenberger, Daniela; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Aim of this study was the retrospective investigation of viral (porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), torque teno sus virus type 1 and 2 (TTSuV1, TTSuV2)) and bacterial (Bordetella bronchiseptica (B. b.), Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. h.), and Pasteurella multocida (P. m.)) co-infections in 110 Pneumocystis spp. positive lung samples of Austrian pigs with pneumonia. Fifty-one % were positive for PCV2, 7% for PRRSV, 22% for TTSuV1, 48% for TTSuV2, 6% for B. b., 29% for M. h., and 21% for P. m. In 38.2% only viral, in 3.6% only bacterial and in 40.0% both, viral and bacterial pathogens were detected. In 29.1% of the cases a co-infection with 1 pathogen, in 28.2% with 2, in 17.3% with 3, and in 7.3% with 4 different infectious agents were observed. The exposure to Pneumocystis significantly decreased the risk of a co-infection with PRRSV in weaning piglets; all other odds ratios were not significant. Four categories of results were compared: I = P. spp. + only viral co-infectants, II = P. spp. + both viral and bacterial co-infectants, III = P. spp. + only bacterial co-infectants, and IV = P. spp. single infection. The evaluation of all samples and the age class of the weaning piglets resulted in a predomination of the categories I and II. In contrast, the suckling piglets showed more samples of category I and IV. In the group of fattening pigs, category II predominated. Suckling piglets can be infected with P. spp. early in life. With increasing age this single infections can be complicated by co-infections with other respiratory diseases. PMID:27428002

  16. Absence of Pneumocystis jirovecii Colonization in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals With and Without Airway Obstruction and With Undetectable Viral Load.

    PubMed

    Ronit, Andreas; Klitbo, Ditte Marie; Kildemoes, Anna Overgaard; Benfield, Thomas; Gerstoft, Jan; Vestbo, Jørgen; Jensen, Jørgen Skov; Kurtzhals, Jørgen; Nielsen, Susanne Dam

    2016-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii colonization has been associated with non-acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) pulmonary comorbidity. We used spirometry to measure pulmonary function and analyzed oral wash specimens by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), targeting the large mitochondrial ribosomal subunit. For sensitivity control, a blinded subsample was subjected to touch-down PCRs, targeting both large and small ribosomal subunits and the major surface glycoprotein. Pneumocystis jirovecii deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected in 1 of 156 (95% confidence interval, .1%-3.5%) virologically suppressed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals confirmed by all PCR methods. Thus, prevalence of P jirovecii colonization was low and unlikely to be a major cause of pulmonary comorbidity in this group of well treated HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27006967

  17. Pneumocystis murina infection and cigarette smoke exposure interact to cause increased organism burden, development of airspace enlargement, and pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Paul J; Preston, Angela M; Ling, Tony; Du, Ming; Fields, W Bradley; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Beck, James M

    2008-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by the presence of airflow obstruction and lung destruction with airspace enlargement. In addition to cigarette smoking, respiratory pathogens play a role in pathogenesis, but specific organisms are not always identified. Recent reports demonstrate associations between the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA in lung specimens or respiratory secretions and the presence of emphysema in COPD patients. Additionally, human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals who smoke cigarettes develop early emphysema, but a role for P. jirovecii in pathogenesis remains speculative. We developed a new experimental model using immunocompetent mice to test the interaction of cigarette smoke exposure and environmentally acquired Pneumocystis murina infection in vivo. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke and P. murina would interact to cause increases in total lung capacity, airspace enlargement, and pulmonary inflammation. We found that exposure to cigarette smoke significantly increases the lung organism burden of P. murina. Pulmonary infection with P. murina, combined with cigarette smoke exposure, results in changes in pulmonary function and airspace enlargement characteristic of pulmonary emphysema. P. murina and cigarette smoke exposure interact to cause increased lung inflammatory cell accumulation. These findings establish a novel animal model system to explore the role of Pneumocystis species in the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:18490462

  18. A heart transplant recipient lost due to Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia under trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis: case report.

    PubMed

    Celik, Tuncay; Gedik, Ender; Kayabas, Uner; Bayindir, Yasar; Gulbas, Gazi; Firat, Ahmet Kemal; Togal, Turkan

    2010-12-01

    Infections in solid-organ transplant recipients are the most important causes of morbidity and mortality. A primary goal in organ transplant is the prevention or effective treatment of infection, which is the most common life-threatening complication of long-term immunosuppressive therapy. A 21-year-old woman who underwent heart transplant 3 years previous owing to dilated cardiomyopathy was referred to our hospital with symptoms of high fever and cough. The patient's history revealed that she had received a trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole double-strength tablet each day for prophylactic purposes. On chest radiograph, pneumonia was detected, and in broncho-alveolar lavage sample, Pneumocystis jiroveci cysts were found. After diagnosing P. jiroveci pneumonia, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was initiated at 20 mg/kg/d including intravenous trimethoprim in divided dosages every 6 hours. On the sixth day of therapy, she died in intensive care unit. In solid-organ transplant recipients, although antipneumocystis prophylaxis is recommended within the first 6 to 12 months after transplant, lifelong prophylaxis is also used in several settings. In addition, the physician should keep in mind that P. jiroveci pneumonia may develop in solid organ recipients, despite trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis. PMID:21143101

  19. ECIL guidelines for preventing Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Johan; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg; Einsele, Hermann; Donnelly, J Peter; Alanio, Alexandre; Hauser, Philippe M; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Matos, Olga; Bretagne, Stéphane; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    The 5th European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) meeting aimed to establish evidence-based recommendations for the prophylaxis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in non-HIV-infected patients with an underlying haematological condition, including allogeneic HSCT recipients. Recommendations were based on the grading system of the IDSA. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole given 2-3 times weekly is the drug of choice for the primary prophylaxis of PCP in adults ( A-II: ) and children ( A-I: ) and should be given during the entire period at risk. Recent data indicate that children may benefit equally from a once-weekly regimen ( B-II: ). All other drugs, including pentamidine, atovaquone and dapsone, are considered second-line alternatives when trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is poorly tolerated or contraindicated. The main indications of PCP prophylaxis are ALL, allogeneic HSCT, treatment with alemtuzumab, fludarabine/cyclophosphamide/rituximab combinations, >4 weeks of treatment with corticosteroids and well-defined primary immune deficiencies in children. Additional indications are proposed depending on the treatment regimen. PMID:27550992

  20. ECIL guidelines for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Hauser, Philippe M; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Matos, Olga; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg; Einsele, Hermann; Donnelly, J Peter; Cordonnier, Catherine; Maertens, Johan; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    The Fifth European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) convened a meeting to establish evidence-based recommendations for using tests to diagnose Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in adult patients with haematological malignancies. Immunofluorescence assays are recommended as the most sensitive microscopic method (recommendation A-II: ). Real-time PCR is recommended for the routine diagnosis of PCP ( A-II: ). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is recommended as the best specimen as it yields good negative predictive value ( A-II: ). Non-invasive specimens can be suitable alternatives ( B-II: ), acknowledging that PCP cannot be ruled out in case of a negative PCR result ( A-II: ). Detecting β-d-glucan in serum can contribute to the diagnosis but not the follow-up of PCP ( A-II: ). A negative serum β-d-glucan result can exclude PCP in a patient at risk ( A-II: ), whereas a positive test result may indicate other fungal infections. Genotyping using multilocus sequence markers can be used to investigate suspected outbreaks ( A-II: ). The routine detection of dihydropteroate synthase mutations in cases of treatment failure is not recommended ( B-II: ) since these mutations do not affect response to high-dose co-trimoxazole. The clinical utility of these diagnostic tests for the early management of PCP should be further assessed in prospective, randomized interventional studies. PMID:27550991

  1. Evaluation of Diagnostic Value and Epidemiological Implications of PCR for Pneumocystis carinii in Different Immunosuppressed and Immunocompetent Patient Groups

    PubMed Central

    Sing, Andreas; Trebesius, Karlheinz; Roggenkamp, Andreas; Rüssmann, Holger; Tybus, Karin; Pfaff, Friederike; Bogner, Johannes R.; Emminger, Christoph; Heesemann, Jürgen

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the value of single and nested PCRs for diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in a variety of respiratorily distressed patient groups, 574 respiratory samples from 334 patients (89 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV]-positive patients, 61 transplant recipients, 66 malignancy patients, 34 otherwise immunosuppressed patients, and 84 immunocompetent patients) were prospectively examined by microscopy and single and nested PCRs. The resulting data were correlated with clinical evidence of PCP. Microscopy and single PCR of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens from HIV patients were 100% sensitive and specific in detecting PCP, whereas nested PCR, although being 100% sensitive, reached a specificity of only 97.5%. In the three non-HIV immunosuppressed patient groups, both single and nested PCR invariably produced lower positive predictive values than microscopy. Among immunocompetent patients, the positive predictive values of both PCRs were 0%. Therefore, the diagnostic values of the PCR methods tested do not seem to offer any additional advantage compared to that of conventional microscopy for these patient groups. However, nested PCR identified a significant percentage of clinically silent P. carinii colonizations in about 17 to 20% of immunocompetent and immunosuppressed non-HIV patients. PMID:10747126

  2. Pneumonia associated with infection with pneumocystis, respiratory syncytial virus, chlamydia, mycoplasma, and cytomegalovirus in children in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed Central

    Shann, F; Walters, S; Pifer, L L; Graham, D M; Jack, I; Uren, E; Birch, D; Stallman, N D

    1986-01-01

    Paired serum samples were collected from 94 children with pneumonia admitted to Goroka Hospital, Papua New Guinea. All but three of the children were aged 1-24 months. Only nine children were malnourished, with weight for age less than 70% of the Harvard median (three had weight for age less than 60% of the Harvard median). Pneumocystis carinii antigen was detected in the serum of 23 children. Twenty two children had serological evidence of recent infection with respiratory syncytial virus. Five children were probably infected with Chlamydia trachomatis at the time of the study, and there was less convincing serological evidence of current infection in a further 11 children. Five children showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Although only one child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to cytomegalovirus, 86 children had this antibody. No child showed a fourfold rise in antibody to Ureaplasma urealyticum or Legionella pneumophila. P carinii, respiratory syncytial virus, C trachomatis, M pneumoniae, and cytomegalovirus may be important causes of pneumonia in children in developing countries. PMID:3002538

  3. Rising incidence of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia suggests iatrogenic exposure of immune-compromised patients may be becoming a significant problem.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Peter V; McCaughey, Conall; Nager, Aaron; McKenna, James; O'Neill, Hugh; Feeney, Susan A; Fairley, Derek; Watt, Alison; Cox, Ciara; Curran, Tanya

    2012-07-01

    Against a background of point-source outbreaks of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in renal transplant units in Europe, we undertook a retrospective 3 year observational review of PCP in Northern Ireland. This showed an unexpected increase in incidence, with a mortality rate of 30 %. Fifty-one cases were confirmed compared to 10 cases confirmed in the preceding 7 years. Where undiagnosed HIV infection had previously been the main risk factor for PCP, this was now equally matched by chemotherapy for haematological and non-haematological malignancy and immune suppression for a range of autoimmune conditions. Congenital immunodeficiency and transplantation were less common predisposing factors, but renal grafts also showed a rising incidence. Asymptomatic carriage was uncommon. At presentation both upper and lower respiratory samples were of equal use in establishing the diagnosis, and treatment resulted in rapid clearance. These data suggest the need for considering PCP in at-risk patients, reviewing its mode of acquisition and whether iatrogenic colonization is a treatable pre-condition.

  4. Recovery of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in respiratory specimens from HIV positive patients being evaluated for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, R. L.; Doherty, J. J.; Zimmerman, L. H.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Despite the immune suppression, frequent hospital admissions, and many intercurrent illnesses associated with HIV infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been cited relatively infrequently as a respiratory pathogen in HIV positive patients. METHODS--The microbiological isolates, medical records, radiographic reports, and laboratory data from 224 patients undergoing sputum induction and/or bronchoalveolar lavage for evaluation of respiratory symptoms suspicious for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) from 1989 to 1992 were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS--An increasing number of respiratory isolates with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found over this time period. Eighteen of the 224 patients were identified in whom P aeruginosa was recovered on at least one occasion. These patients were more likely to have a history of smoking and prior PCP than those in whom Pseudomonas was not recovered. Mean CD4 counts were also significantly lower in these patients. CONCLUSIONS--Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be recovered from a substantial number of respiratory isolates from HIV positive patients suspected of having PCP. The prevalence of this phenomenon may be increasing. PMID:7597670

  5. Pneumocystis jiroveci in Portuguese immunocompromised patients: association of specific ITS genotypes with treatment failure, bad clinical outcome and childhood.

    PubMed

    Matos, Olga; Lee, Chao-Hung; Jin, Shaoling; Li, Baozheng; Costa, Marina C; Gonçalves, Luzia; Antunes, Francisco

    2003-11-01

    We analyzed the genetic variation among isolates of Pneumocystis jiroveci from Portuguese immunocompromised patients with PCP at the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the nuclear rRNA operon and at the dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene. Pulmonary secretions from 42 patients with PCP corresponding to 43 episodes were studied. Demographic, immunological, and clinical data were obtained from all patients. By combining the two regions ITS1 and ITS2, we found 17 different ITS types of P. jiroveci, two of them were new types (Pb and Pe). The four most prevalent ITS types were Eg (23.3%), Eb and Ne (11.6% each), and Bi (9.3%). A single type was detected in 95.3% of the samples and 4.7% had mixed infections with three different ITS types. DHPS mutants were present in 17 (46%), and the wildtype was present in 20 (54%) of 37 isolates. No association was found between ITS and DHPS types and between DHPS types and therapy or response to anti-PCP treatment. Type Ne presented an association with negative response to anti-PCP treatment (P<0.001) and with death before 120 days after PCP diagnosis (P=0.025). Type Eb was significantly more common in children than in adults (P=0.001). Our data suggest an association of specific ITS genotypes with treatment failure, bad clinical outcome and childhood.

  6. Transmission of Pneumocystis carinii DNA from a Patient with P. carinii Pneumonia to Immunocompetent Contact Health Care Workers

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Sergio L.; A. Ponce, Carolina; Gigliotti, Francis; Ulloa, Ana V.; Prieto, Susana; Muñoz, Maria P.; Hughes, Walter T.

    2000-01-01

    The transmission of Pneumocystis carinii from person to person was studied by detecting P. carinii-specific DNA in prospectively obtained noninvasive deep-nasal-swab samples from a child with a documented P. carinii pneumonia (PCP), his mother, two contact health care workers, and 30 hospital staff members who did not enter the patient's room (controls). Nested-DNA amplification was done by using oligonucleotide primers designed for the gene encoding the mitochondrial large subunit rRNA of rat P. carinii (P. carinii f. sp. carinii) that amplifies all forms of P. carinii and internal primers specific for human P. carinii (f. sp. hominis). P. carinii f. sp. hominis DNA was detected in samples from the patient and all of his contacts versus none of the 30 hospital staff members. The results, as previously shown in murine models of P. carinii pneumonia, document that person-to-person transmission of P. carinii is possible. This observation suggests that immunocompromised patients not on PCP prophylaxis should not enter the room of a patient with PCP, and it also raises the question as to whether healthy contacts can transmit the disease to immunocompromised patients at risk. PMID:10747139

  7. Multicentre study highlighting clinical relevance of new high-throughput methodologies in molecular epidemiology of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; de Sousa, B; Calderón, E J; Huang, L; Badura, R; Maltez, F; Bassat, Q; de Armas, Y; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2016-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii causes severe interstitial pneumonia (PcP) in immunosuppressed patients. This multicentre study assessed the distribution frequencies of epidemiologically relevant genetic markers of P. jirovecii in different geographic populations from Portugal, the USA, Spain, Cuba and Mozambique, and the relationship between the molecular data and the geographical and clinical information, based on a multifactorial approach. The high-throughput typing strategy for P. jirovecii characterization consisted of DNA pooling using quantitative real-time PCR followed by multiplex-PCR/single base extension. The frequencies of relevant P. jirovecii single nucleotide polymorphisms (mt85, SOD110, SOD215, DHFR312, DHPS165 and DHPS171) encoded at four loci were estimated in ten DNA pooled samples representing a total of 182 individual samples. Putative multilocus genotypes of P. jirovecii were shown to be clustered due to geographic differences but were also dependent on clinical characteristics of the populations studied. The haplotype DHFR312T/SOD110C/SOD215T was associated with severe AIDS-related PcP and high P. jirovecii burdens. The frequencies of this genetic variant of P. jirovecii were significantly higher in patients with AIDS-related PcP from Portugal and the USA than in the colonized patients from Portugal, and Spain, and children infected with P. jirovecii from Cuba or Mozambique, highlighting the importance of this haplotype, apparently associated with the severity of the disease and specific clinical groups. Patients from the USA and Mozambique showed higher rates of DHPS mutants, which may suggest the circulation of P. jirovecii organisms potentially related with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance in those geographical regions. This report assessed the worldwide distribution of P. jirovecii haplotypes and their epidemiological impact in distinct geographic and clinical populations.

  8. Multicentre study highlighting clinical relevance of new high-throughput methodologies in molecular epidemiology of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; de Sousa, B; Calderón, E J; Huang, L; Badura, R; Maltez, F; Bassat, Q; de Armas, Y; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2016-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii causes severe interstitial pneumonia (PcP) in immunosuppressed patients. This multicentre study assessed the distribution frequencies of epidemiologically relevant genetic markers of P. jirovecii in different geographic populations from Portugal, the USA, Spain, Cuba and Mozambique, and the relationship between the molecular data and the geographical and clinical information, based on a multifactorial approach. The high-throughput typing strategy for P. jirovecii characterization consisted of DNA pooling using quantitative real-time PCR followed by multiplex-PCR/single base extension. The frequencies of relevant P. jirovecii single nucleotide polymorphisms (mt85, SOD110, SOD215, DHFR312, DHPS165 and DHPS171) encoded at four loci were estimated in ten DNA pooled samples representing a total of 182 individual samples. Putative multilocus genotypes of P. jirovecii were shown to be clustered due to geographic differences but were also dependent on clinical characteristics of the populations studied. The haplotype DHFR312T/SOD110C/SOD215T was associated with severe AIDS-related PcP and high P. jirovecii burdens. The frequencies of this genetic variant of P. jirovecii were significantly higher in patients with AIDS-related PcP from Portugal and the USA than in the colonized patients from Portugal, and Spain, and children infected with P. jirovecii from Cuba or Mozambique, highlighting the importance of this haplotype, apparently associated with the severity of the disease and specific clinical groups. Patients from the USA and Mozambique showed higher rates of DHPS mutants, which may suggest the circulation of P. jirovecii organisms potentially related with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole resistance in those geographical regions. This report assessed the worldwide distribution of P. jirovecii haplotypes and their epidemiological impact in distinct geographic and clinical populations. PMID:27021425

  9. Effects of steroidal allenic phosphonic acid derivatives on the parasitic protists Leishmania donovani, Leishmania mexicana mexicana, and Pneumocystis carinii carinii.

    PubMed

    Beach, D H; Chen, F; Cushion, M T; Macomber, R S; Krudy, G A; Wyder, M A; Kaneshiro, E S

    1997-01-01

    Several pathogenic fungi and protozoa are known to have sterols distinct from those of their mammalian hosts. Of particular interest as targets for drug development are the biosyntheses of the sterols of important parasites such as the kinetoplastid flagellates and the AIDS-associated opportunistic protist Pneumocystis carinii. These pathogens synthesize sterols with an alkyl group at C-24, and some have a double bond at C-22 of the side chain. Humans and other mammalian hosts are incapable of C-24 alkylation and C-22 desaturation. In the present study, three steroidal compounds with side chains substituted by phosphonyl-linked groups were synthesized and tested for their effects on Leishmania donovani and L. mexicana mexicana culture growth. The compounds inhibited organism proliferation at concentrations in micrograms per milliliter. The most potent inhibitors of this group of compounds were characterized by two ethyl groups at the phosphate function. Leishmania organisms treated with 17-[2-(diethylphosphonato) ethylidienyl]3-methoxy-19-norpregna-1,3,5-triene exhibited reduced growth after transfer into inhibitor-free medium. Because there are currently no axenic methods available for the continuous subcultivation of P. carinii, the effects of these drugs on this organism were evaluated by two alternative screening methods. The same two diethyl phosphonosteroid compounds that inhibited Leishmania proliferation were also the most active against P. carinii as determined by the potent effect they had on reducing cellular ATP content. Cystic as well as trophic forms responded to the drug treatments, as evaluated by a dual fluorescent staining live-dead assay. Other modifications of steroidal phosphonates may lead to the development of related drugs with increased activity and specificity for the pathogens.

  10. (1-3)-beta-D-glucan in association with lactate dehydrogenase as biomarkers of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Lee, C-H; de Sousa, B; Badura, R; Seringa, M; Fernandes, C; Gaspar, J F; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2014-07-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is a major HIV-related illness caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii. Definitive diagnosis of PcP requires microscopic detection of P. jirovecii in pulmonary specimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of two serum markers in the diagnosis of PcP. Serum levels of (1-3)-beta-d-glucan (BG) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were investigated in 100 HIV-positive adult patients and 50 healthy blood donors. PcP cases were confirmed using indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-Pneumocystis antibodies and nested-PCR to amplify the large subunit mitochondrial rRNA gene of P. jirovecii in pulmonary specimens. BG and LDH levels in serum were measured using quantitative microplate-based assays. BG and LDH positive sera were statistically associated with PcP cases (P ≤ 0.001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative predictive values (PPV/NPV), and positive/negative likelihood ratios (PLR/NLR) were 91.3 %, 61.3 %, 85.1 %, 79.2 %, 2.359, and 0.142, respectively, for the BG kit assay, and 91.3 %, 35.5 %, 75.9 %, 64.7 %, 1.415 and 0.245, respectively, for the LDH test. Serologic markers levels combined with the clinical diagnostic criteria for PcP were evaluated for their usefulness in diagnosis of PcP. The most promising cutoff levels for diagnosis of PcP were determined to be 400 pg/ml of BG and 350 U/l of LDH, which combined with clinical data presented 92.8 % sensitivity, 83.9 % specificity, 92.8 % PPV, 83.9 % NPV, 5.764 PLR and 0.086 NLR (P < 0.001). This study confirmed that BG is a reliable indicator for detecting P. jirovecii infection. The combination between BG/LDH levels and clinical data is a promising alternative approach for PcP diagnosis.

  11. Analysis of a Population-Based Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia Index as an Outcome Measure of Access and Quality of Care for the Treatment of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Peter S.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Drucker, Ernest; Fang, Jing; Goldberg, Clara; Memmott, Margaret; Bonuck, Karen; Deb, Nandini; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. A population-based Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) Index was developed in New York City to identify geographic areas and subpopulations at increased risk for PCP. Methods. A zip code–level PCP Index was created from AIDS surveillance and hospital discharge records and defined as (number of PCP-related hospitalizations)/(number of persons living with AIDS). Results. In 1997, there were 2262 hospitalizations for PCP among 39 740 persons living with AIDS in New York City (PCP Index = .05691). PCP Index values varied widely across neighborhoods with high AIDS prevalence (West Village = .02532 vs Central Harlem = .08696). Some neighborhoods with moderate AIDS prevalence had strikingly high rates (Staten Island = .14035; northern Manhattan = .08756). Conclusions. The PCP Index highlights communities in particular need of public health interventions to improve HIV-related service delivery. (Am J Public Health. 2002;92:395–398) PMID:11867318

  12. A Case of Pneumonia Caused by Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Cryptococcus Neoformans in a Patient with HTLV-1 Associated Adult T- Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma: Occam's Razor Blunted.

    PubMed

    Desai, Anish; Fe, Alexander; Desai, Amishi; Ilowite, Jonathan; Cunha, Burke A; Mathew, Joseph P

    2016-02-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is usually preceded by infection with human T-cell lymphotropic virus I (HTLV-I). Patients with ATLL frequently get opportunistic infections of the lungs, intestines, and central nervous system. Pneumocystis pneumonia is commonly known as an AIDS defining illness. Grocott's methenamine silver stain of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples obtained via bronchoscopy remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Pulmonary cryptococcosis is seen in patients with T-cell deficiencies and a diagnosis is made by culture of sputum, BAL, or occasionally of pleural fluid. We present the second case of coinfection with these two organisms in a patient with ATLL who was successfully treated with trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, corticosteroids, and fluconazole. We illustrate the need for high clinical vigilance for seeking out an additional diagnosis, especially in immunocompromised patients if they are not improving despite receiving appropriate treatment. PMID:27024978

  13. Detection of Pneumocystis carinii and characterization of mutations associated with sulfa resistance in bronchoalveolar lavage samples from human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects.

    PubMed

    Zingale, Anna; Carrera, Paola; Lazzarin, Adriano; Scarpellini, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    One hundred ninety-four bronchoalveolar specimens were evaluated by microscopic examination and by amplification of a sequence of a Pneumocystis carinii dihidropteroate synthase gene for identification of mutations linked to sulfa resistance. PCR sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 86.7%, respectively, compared to results of microscopic examination. However, 7 out of 19 microscopy-negative, PCR-positive samples were collected from subjects with a clinically high probability of P. carinii pneumonia, suggesting that PCR may be more sensitive than microscopic examination, although the absolute performance of PCR cannot be determined. Mutations were identified in 28 out of 70 (40%) PCR-positive specimens and were significantly more common in patients exposed to sulfa drugs (21 out of 29 [72.4%]) than in those not exposed to sulfa drugs (4 out of 35 [11.4%]).

  14. Evaluation of different real time PCRs for the detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii DNA in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded bronchoalveolar lavage samples.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Bertie H C G M; Voskuil, W Sebastiaan; Maraha, Boulos; van der Zee, Anneke; Westenend, Pieter J; Kusters, Johannes G

    2015-06-01

    The presence of Pneumocystis jirovecii in fresh clinical materials can be detected by PCR with high sensitivity and is thus preferred over microscopic methods. However, fresh materials are not always available, and on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded materials, PCR may result in reduced detection rates. In this study the diagnostic sensitivity of P. jirovecii real time PCR on DNA isolated from fresh bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples versus that from matched FFPE derived DNA is analyzed. Our results indicate that when targeting a small DNA fragment P. jirovecii PCR can be performed on FFPE BAL samples with acceptable sensitivity (up to 83.3%). This is considerably higher than the 33.3% positives observed by classical staining of these samples.

  15. Detection of Pneumocystis carinii and Characterization of Mutations Associated with Sulfa Resistance in Bronchoalveolar Lavage Samples from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Zingale, Anna; Carrera, Paola; Lazzarin, Adriano; Scarpellini, Paolo

    2003-01-01

    One hundred ninety-four bronchoalveolar specimens were evaluated by microscopic examination and by amplification of a sequence of a Pneumocystis carinii dihidropteroate synthase gene for identification of mutations linked to sulfa resistance. PCR sensitivity and specificity were 100 and 86.7%, respectively, compared to results of microscopic examination. However, 7 out of 19 microscopy-negative, PCR-positive samples were collected from subjects with a clinically high probability of P. carinii pneumonia, suggesting that PCR may be more sensitive than microscopic examination, although the absolute performance of PCR cannot be determined. Mutations were identified in 28 out of 70 (40%) PCR-positive specimens and were significantly more common in patients exposed to sulfa drugs (21 out of 29 [72.4%]) than in those not exposed to sulfa drugs (4 out of 35 [11.4%]). PMID:12791912

  16. [Neutrophilia in the bronchoalveolar lavage of patients with AIDS and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Reflections on its prognostic value in the Spanish setting].

    PubMed

    Sauleda, J; Gea, J; Aran, X; Gimferrer, E; Conangla, M; Broquetas, J M

    1994-04-01

    The prognostic value of neutrophilia (> 5%) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in our context is studied in 21 patients with AIDS and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Neutrophilia does not seem to be a good prognostic indicator in our context. We have found this condition, with a mean of 6 +/- 4%, in only 33% of our sample. The sensitivity of this parameter with respect to risk of death was very low (25%), while specificity was moderate (65%). In contrast with what has been reported in studies done with Anglo-Saxon populations, neutrophilia in BAL is probably of little prognostic use in our context. This may be due to various factors, among them the type of population (most being intravenous drug users) and the therapeutic protocol (early empirical treatment). PMID:8025785

  17. Severe pneumonia caused by combined infection with Pneumocystis jiroveci, parainfluenza virus type 3, cytomegalovirus, and Aspergillus fumigatus in a patient with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Taehoon; Bae, Yun-Jeong; Park, Soo-Kyung; Park, Hyun Jung; Kim, Sung-Han; Cho, You Sook; Moon, Hee-Bom; Lee, Sang-Oh; Kim, Tae-Bum

    2010-11-01

    Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) are severe adverse cutaneous reactions to drugs. We report here the first case of severe pneumonia caused by an unusual combined infection with Pneumocystis carinii (jiroveci), parainfluenza virus type 3, cytomegalovirus and Aspergillus fumigatus in a 63-year-old female patient with allopurinol-induced SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. Following treatment with high-dose systemic corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin for SJS/TEN, her mucocutaneous lesions improved and she was due to be discharged. However, 15 days after cessation of corticosteroids, she developed pneumonia. Broncho-alveolar lavage revealed that the cause of infection was Pneumocystis carinii (jiroveci), parainfluenza virus type 3, cytomegalovirus and Aspergillus. These findings indicate that patients with SJS/TEN, particularly those treated with systemic corticosteroids, may be susceptible to infection with combinations of pathological agents resulting from damage to the bronchial epithelia. PMID:21057748

  18. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a weakened immune system due to AIDS, cancer, transplantation, or corticosteroid use, call your provider if ... transplant recipients Organ transplant recipients People who take long-term, high- ...

  19. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (PCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a drug that is usually inhaled in an aerosol form to prevent PCP. Pentamidine is also used ... between $120 and $250 per month. Patients using aerosol pentamidine get PCP more often than people taking ...

  20. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia in relation to CD4+ lymphocyte count in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yukio; Asakura, Yoshitaka; Mori, Masakazu; Azuma, Teruhisa; Maruyama, Dai; Kim, Sung-Won; Watanabe, Takashi; Tobinai, Kensei

    2010-10-01

    An increasing incidence of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) receiving rituximab treatment has been reported. We reviewed patients with B-NHL who underwent chemotherapy from 2004 to 2008 at our institution to identify risk factors for PCP development during and after chemotherapy. Among 297 patients with B-NHL, six developed PCP. Of 121 patients (41%) who received PCP prophylaxis with sulfamethoxazole–trimethoprim during chemotherapy, none developed PCP (0%), while among 176 patients (59%) who had no prophylaxis, six (3.4%) developed PCP at a median of 2 months (range: 1–3 months) after starting chemotherapy. Patients with CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200/mm3 before chemotherapy had a higher risk of developing PCP (p=0.045), while a history of rituximab treatment was not related to PCP. CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200/mm3 during and after chemotherapy were observed in 18.9% of patients. PMID:20919860

  1. Correlation between imaging features of Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonitis (PCP), CD4+ T lymphocyte count, and plasma HIV viral load: A study in 50 consecutive AIDS patients

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying-Ying; Liu, Shui-Teng; Liu, Yan; Liu, Ying-Xia; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Zhu, Wen-Ke; Le, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Wei-Ye; Zhou, Bo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the imaging manifestations of Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonitis (PCP) in AIDS patients, and the correlation between imaging features, CD4+ lymphocyte count, and plasma HIV viral load. Materials and methods A total of consecutive 50 AIDS patients with PCP were reviewed retrospectively. Chest CT manifestations, CD4+ lymphocyte count, and plasma HIV viral load were analyzed to investigate their correlation. Results PCP chest CT manifestations included ground-glass opacities dominated in 28 cases (28/50, 56%), lung cysts dominated in 10 cases (10/50, 20%), consolidation dominated in 6 cases (6/50, 12%), interstitial lesion dominated in 3 cases (3/50, 6%), and mixed lesions in 3 cases (3/50, 6%). In these 50 patients, CD4+ lymphocyte count ranged from 2 to 373 cells/µL. Plasma HIV viral load ranged from 500 to 5.28×107 copies/mL. CD4+ lymphocyte count in ground-glass opacities dominated patients was higher than that of lung cyst dominated patients (P<0.05). Plasma virus load of lung cysts dominated PCP patients was higher than that of consolidation dominated patients (P<0.05). Conclusions The typical chest imaging features of PCP in AIDS patients included lung ground-glass opacities and lung cysts. The chest imaging features were correlated with CD4+ T lymphocyte count and plasma HIV viral load. PMID:23256070

  2. Mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase gene of human-derived Pneumocystis carinii isolates from Italy are infrequent but correlate with prior sulfa prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Kovacs, Joseph A; Cargnel, Antonietta; Valerio, Antonella; Fantoni, Giovanna; Atzori, Chiara

    2002-05-15

    Mutations in the human-derived Pneumocystis carinii dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene have been reported with increasing frequency and have been linked to prior sulfa prophylaxis and possible emergence of sulfa resistance. This study was done to examine the prevalence and clinical significance of P. carinii DHPS mutations in Italian patients. A previously described single-strand conformation polymorphism technique was used to identify P. carinii DHPS mutations in 107 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Overall prevalence (8%) was low compared with that in other reports. Mutations were observed in 19% (6/31) of patients exposed to sulfa prophylaxis, compared with 4% (3/76) of patients not exposed to sulfa prophylaxis (P=.017). No significant association was observed between the presence of DHPS mutations and mortality, CD4 cell count, or demographic factors. The study confirms the association between DHPS mutations and prior sulfa prophylaxis and shows that the prevalence of DHPS mutations in an Italian patient population is lower than that in other populations.

  3. A multiplex real-time PCR assay for identification of Pneumocystis jirovecii, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii in samples from AIDS patients with opportunistic pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gago, Sara; Esteban, Cristina; Valero, Clara; Zaragoza, Oscar; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge; Buitrago, María José

    2014-04-01

    A molecular diagnostic technique based on real-time PCR was developed for the simultaneous detection of three of the most frequent causative agents of fungal opportunistic pneumonia in AIDS patients: Pneumocystis jirovecii, Histoplasma capsulatum, and Cryptococcus neoformans/Cryptococcus gattii. This technique was tested in cultured strains and in clinical samples from HIV-positive patients. The methodology used involved species-specific molecular beacon probes targeted to the internal transcribed spacer regions of the rDNA. An internal control was also included in each assay. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was tested in 24 clinical strains and 43 clinical samples from AIDS patients with proven fungal infection. The technique developed showed high reproducibility (r(2) of >0.98) and specificity (100%). For H. capsulatum and Cryptococcus spp., the detection limits of the method were 20 and 2 fg of genomic DNA/20 μl reaction mixture, respectively, while for P. jirovecii the detection limit was 2.92 log10 copies/20 μl reaction mixture. The sensitivity in vitro was 100% for clinical strains and 90.7% for clinical samples. The assay was positive for 92.5% of the patients. For one of the patients with proven histoplasmosis, P. jirovecii was also detected in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample. No PCR inhibition was detected. This multiplex real-time PCR technique is fast, sensitive, and specific and may have clinical applications.

  4. Comparison of corticosteroid- and L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed mouse models of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia for evaluation of drugs and leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, M S; Current, W L; Orazi, A; Bauer, N L; Neiman, R S; Queener, S F; Smith, J W

    1994-01-01

    An immunologically immunosuppressed mouse model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia using antibody developed by Dialynas et al. (Immunol. Rev. 74:29-55, 1983) directed to L3T4+ T cells (referred to as L3T4+ antibody) was compared with a corticosteroid-immunosuppressed mouse model. Corticosteroid- or L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed BALB/c mice transtracheally inoculated with P. carinii developed severe infections within 5 weeks after inoculation and responded to treatments with an echinocandin B analog, LY302146, or trimethoprim plus sulfamethoxazole so that they had decreased numbers of P. carinii cysts and trophozoites. LY302146 appeared to be more effective in L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed mice than in dexamethasone-immunosuppressed mice. Leukocyte populations in lungs of both mouse models during development of infection and during treatment were compared by using immune cell-specific staining. Lungs of L3T4+ antibody-immunosuppressed mice had many more cells detected with pan-B antibody and pan-T antibody than dexamethasone-immunosuppressed mice and the lungs of successfully treated mice had about the same numbers of macrophages as those of nonimmunosuppressed uninfected mice. The immunologically immunosuppressed model will allow study of cytokines and other immune modulators alone and in combination with drugs. PMID:8556494

  5. Utility of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and bronchial washings in the diagnosis and treatment of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tuazon, C.U.; Delaney, M.D.; Simon, G.L.; Witorsch, P.; Varma, V.M.

    1985-11-01

    Twenty patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia were evaluated by /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy for initial diagnosis and response to therapy. Lung uptake of /sup 67/Ga was demonstrated in 100% of AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, including those with subclinical infection. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy identified P. carinii in the bronchial washings of 100% of cases (19 patients), whereas only 13 of 16 (81%) patients had P. carinii in lung tissue obtained by transbronchial biopsy. Repeat fiberoptic bronchoscopy was performed in 16 of 20 patients. After 2 to 4 wk of therapy, P. carinii was identified in bronchial washings in 8 of 16 (50%) patients and in transbronchial biopsy in 1 of 10 (10%) patients examined. Bronchial washing has a higher yield than transbronchial biopsy in demonstrating P. carinii in patients with AIDS and may evolve as the procedure of choice in such patients. Based on the clinical course and results of /sup 67/Ga scintigraphy and fiberoptic bronchoscopy in AIDS patients with P. carinii pneumonia, optimal therapy may require at least 3 wk of treatment.

  6. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T.; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R2 = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R2 = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R2 = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781–1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592–0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients. PMID:27579328

  7. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) in patients receiving neoadjuvant and adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy for breast cancer: incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Waks, Adrienne G; Tolaney, Sara M; Galar, Alicia; Arnaout, Amal; Porter, Julie B; Marty, Francisco M; Winer, Eric P; Hammond, Sarah P; Baden, Lindsey R

    2015-11-01

    Opportunistic infection with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) has not been recognized as a significant complication of early-stage breast cancer treatment. However, we have observed an increase in PCP incidence among patients receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Herein we identify risk factors for and calculate incidence of PCP in this population. We identified all cases of PCP at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital (DFCI/BWH) from 1/1/2000 to 12/31/2013 in patients with stage I-III breast cancer treated with an adriamycin/cyclophosphamide (AC)-containing regimen. Nineteen cases of PCP in non-metastatic breast cancer patients were identified. All patients with PCP were diagnosed after receipt of either three or four cycles of AC chemotherapy on a dose-dense schedule. Patients who developed PCP were treated with median 16.4 mg prednisone equivalents/day as nausea prophylaxis for a median 64 days. The overall incidence of PCP among 2057 patients treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant dose-dense AC for three or more cycles was 0.6 % (95 % confidence interval 0.3-1.0 %). No PCP was diagnosed in 1001 patients treated with non-dose-dense AC. There was one death from PCP. Women receiving dose-dense AC chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer are at risk for PCP. Administering the same chemotherapy and corticosteroid dose over an 8-week versus 12-week non-dose-dense schedule appears to have created a novel infectious vulnerability. Replacing dexamethasone with alternative anti-emetics may mitigate this risk.

  8. Effect of zidovudine and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis on progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Graham, N M; Zeger, S L; Park, L P; Phair, J P; Detels, R; Vermund, S H; Ho, M; Saah, A J

    1991-08-01

    Although used widely, the effectiveness of zidovudine therapy and primary prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been assessed in a large cohort. We have done an observational study between October, 1986, and October, 1990, of a cohort of 2145 HIV-1-seropositive men and 371 who seroconverted during the study. A Markov chain transitional analysis was used to examine the effect of zidovudine and PCP prophylaxis on the probability of progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS (after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months) after follow-up visits categorised into one of six disease states. The six starting states were based on CD4+ lymphocyte counts and the presence of HIV-related symptoms. Use of pre-AIDS zidovudine and PCP prophylaxis was associated with significant reductions in rates of progression to AIDS at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months for participants starting with less than 350 CD4+ lymphocytes/microliter. For those starting with 350 or more CD4+ lymphocytes/microliter, non-significant protective trends were seen during 12, 18, and 24 month intervals. In multivariate log-linear models virtually all the treatment effect was due to zidovudine. However, after adjusting for the effects of zidovudine, PCP prophylaxis reduced significantly the probability of progression to a first episode of PCP during 6, 12, 18, and 24 month intervals. This study suggests that early primary PCP prophylaxis is effective in preventing first episodes of PCP, and that the efficacy of zidovudine demonstrated in clinical trials can be translated to the population level. PMID:1677108

  9. Correlation Between Pneumocystis jirovecii Mitochondrial Genotypes and High and Low Fungal Loads Assessed by Single Nucleotide Primer Extension Assay and Quantitative Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Olivi, Martine; Cabaret, Odile; Foulet, Françoise; Bellanger, Anne-Pauline; Millon, Laurence; Berceanu, Ana; Cordonnier, Catherine; Costa, Jean-Marc; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We designed a single nucleotide primer extension (SNaPshot) assay for Pneumocystis jirovecii genotyping, targeting mt85 SNP of the mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA locus, to improve minority allele detection. We then analyzed 133 consecutive bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluids tested positive for P. jirovecii DNA by quantitative real-time PCR, obtained from two hospitals in different locations (Hospital 1 [n = 95] and Hospital 2 [n = 38]). We detected three different alleles, either singly (mt85C: 39.1%; mt85T: 24.1%; mt85A: 9.8%) or together (27%), and an association between P. jirovecii mt85 genotype and the patient's place of hospitalization (p = 0.011). The lowest fungal loads (median = 0.82 × 10(3) copies/μl; range: 15-11 × 10(3) ) were associated with mt85A and the highest (median = 1.4 × 10(6) copies/μl; range: 17 × 10(3) -1.3 × 10(7) ) with mt85CTA (p = 0.010). The ratios of the various alleles differed between the 36 mixed-genotype samples. In tests of serial BALs (median: 20 d; range 4-525) from six patients with mixed genotypes, allele ratio changes were observed five times and genotype replacement once. Therefore, allele ratio changes seem more frequent than genotype replacement when using a SNaPshot assay more sensitive for detecting minority alleles than Sanger sequencing. Moreover, because microscopy detects only high fungal loads, the selection of microscopy-positive samples may miss genotypes associated with low loads.

  10. Application of real time polymerase chain reaction targeting kex 1 gene & its comparison with the conventional methods for rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in clinical specimens

    PubMed Central

    Revathy, Mani; Therese, Kulandai Lily; Bagyalakshmi, Radhakishnan; Chandrasekar, Chokaliingam; Kumar, Suria; Madhavan, Hajib N.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: As there are no standard laboratory techniques for the rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in India, this study was undertaken to evaluate and establish an optimal and rapid technique for the detection of P. jirovecii by comparing three different techniques - staining technique, application of a real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting kex 1 gene and application of nested PCR targeting mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU) gene for rapid detection of P. jirovecii in HIV positive patients. Methods: One hundred and fifty sputum specimens from HIV positive (n = 75) and HIV negative (n = 75) patients were subjected to three different techniques -KOH/Calcoflour and Grocott methanamine silver staining (GMS), RT-PCR targeting kex1 gene, PCR targeting mtLSU region followed by DNA sequencing and BLAST analysis. Results: Among the 75 HIV positive patients, P. jirovecii was detected in 19 (25.33%) patients by the staining techniques, and in 23 (30.65%) patients each by PCR targeting mtLSU region and by RT- PCR targeting kex1 gene of P. jirovecii. PCR based DNA sequencing targeting mtLSU region revealed 97-100 per cent sequence homology with P. jirovecii sequences in GenBank. Interpretation & conclusions: Of the three techniques for detection of P. jirovecii evaluated in this study, false negativity was found to be more in staining technique and it also required high technical expertise to interpret the result. Both nested PCR and RT-PCR were reliable and equally sensitive, in rapid detection of P. jirovecii, but RT-PCR technique also generated the copy numbers for knowing the severity of infection. PMID:25366209

  11. Clinical Relevance of Multiple Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia: Development of a Multiplex PCR-Single-Base-Extension Methodology▿

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, F.; Gaspar, J.; De Sousa, B.; Antunes, F.; Mansinho, K.; Matos, O.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) is a major cause of respiratory illness in patients with AIDS. The identification of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at three distinct P. jirovecii loci encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was achieved using multiplex-PCR (MPCR) followed by direct sequencing and two single-base extension (SBE) techniques. Four SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215, and SOD110), correlated previously with parameters of disease, were amplified and genotyped simultaneously. The concordance of results between the standard sequencing technique (direct sequencing) and SBE analysis was 96.9% for the acrylamide gel electrophoresis and 98.4% for the capillary electrophoresis. The cross-genetic analysis established several statistical associations among the SNPs studied: mt85C-SOD110T, SOD110T-SOD215C, and SOD110C-SOD215T. These results were confirmed by cluster analysis. Data showed that among the isolates with low to moderate parasite burden, the highest percentages of DHFR312C, mt85C, SOD110T, and SOD215C were detected, whereas for high parasite burden cases the highest frequencies were observed among isolates with DHFR312T, mt85T, SOD110C, and SOD215T. The polymorphisms studied were shown to be suitable genetic targets potentially correlated with PcP clinical data that can be used as predictors of outcome in further studies to help clinical decision-making in the management of PcP. The MPCR/SBE protocol described for the first time in the present study was shown to be a rapid, highly accurate method for genotyping P. jirovecii SNPs encoded by different loci that could be used for epidemiological studies and as an additional procedure for the prognostic classification and diagnosis of PcP. PMID:21389160

  12. Clinical relevance of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms in Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia: development of a multiplex PCR-single-base-extension methodology.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Gaspar, J; De Sousa, B; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Matos, O

    2011-05-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) is a major cause of respiratory illness in patients with AIDS. The identification of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at three distinct P. jirovecii loci encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was achieved using multiplex-PCR (MPCR) followed by direct sequencing and two single-base extension (SBE) techniques. Four SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215, and SOD110), correlated previously with parameters of disease, were amplified and genotyped simultaneously. The concordance of results between the standard sequencing technique (direct sequencing) and SBE analysis was 96.9% for the acrylamide gel electrophoresis and 98.4% for the capillary electrophoresis. The cross-genetic analysis established several statistical associations among the SNPs studied: mt85C-SOD110T, SOD110T-SOD215C, and SOD110C-SOD215T. These results were confirmed by cluster analysis. Data showed that among the isolates with low to moderate parasite burden, the highest percentages of DHFR312C, mt85C, SOD110T, and SOD215C were detected, whereas for high parasite burden cases the highest frequencies were observed among isolates with DHFR312T, mt85T, SOD110C, and SOD215T. The polymorphisms studied were shown to be suitable genetic targets potentially correlated with PcP clinical data that can be used as predictors of outcome in further studies to help clinical decision-making in the management of PcP. The MPCR/SBE protocol described for the first time in the present study was shown to be a rapid, highly accurate method for genotyping P. jirovecii SNPs encoded by different loci that could be used for epidemiological studies and as an additional procedure for the prognostic classification and diagnosis of PcP.

  13. Plasma IL-6/IL-10 Ratio and IL-8, LDH, and HBDH Level Predict the Severity and the Risk of Death in AIDS Patients with Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jia; Su, Junwei; Xie, Yirui; Yin, Michael T; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Zhou, Qihui; Zhu, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To identify blood biomarkers to predict severity and mortality in AIDS PCP patients. Methods. Biomarkers including clinical parameters and plasma inflammatory cytokines were assessed in 32 HIV-infected patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) at time of admission. Predictive value of the biomarkers for clinical severity and in-hospital mortality was evaluated by corresponding ROC curve. Results. Levels of CRP, WBC, LDH, HBDH, and Ferritin were significantly higher in the severe and nonsurvivor AIDS PCP patients. These important biochemical indicators have inverse correlation with oxygenation index, especially levels of LDH (P = 0.008, R (2) = 0.258), HBDH (P = 0.001, R (2) = 0.335), and Ferritin (P = 0.005, R (2) = 0.237). Plasma IL-8 and IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with PaO2/FiO2 ≤ 200 mmHg and nonsurvivors than in those with PaO2/FiO2 > 200 mmHg and survivors. Severe and nonsurvival groups showed higher ratio of mean IL-6/IL-10 level (1.78 ± 1.56, P < 0.001; 1.11 ± 0.72, P = 0.043), larger AUC (95% CI 0.781-1.000, P < 0.001; 95% CI 0.592-0.917, P = 0.043), and more significantly inverse correlation with the oxygenation index. Conclusion. Plasma IL-8, LDH, and HBDH levels and IL-6/IL-10 ratio could be helpful for early evaluation of the severity and predicting fatal outcomes in AIDS PCP patients. PMID:27579328

  14. Sensitivity and specificity of indirect immunofluorescence and Grocott-technique in comparison with immunocytology (alkaline phosphatase anti alkaline phosphatase = APAAP) for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL).

    PubMed

    Arastéh, K N; Simon, V; Musch, R; Weiss, R O; Przytarski, K; Futh, U M; Pleuger, F; Huhn, D; L'age, M P

    1998-12-16

    The purpose of the study was to compare the sensitivity and specificity of the indirect method of immunofluorescence with the immunocytological technique of alkaline phosphatase anti alkaline phosphatase complex (APAAP) for the detection of Pneumocystis carinii by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in HIV-1 positive patients. - 83 HIV-1 positive patients with clinical presentations suggestive of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PcP) were included in the study. 28 samples were found Pc-positive by immunofluorescence (IFT), 26 by Grocott and 29 by APAAP. In comparison to the lab results 33 patients were diagnosed as PcP according to the clinical course (i.e. therapeutic outcome, drugs used, and therapy changes). Compared to the clinical diagnoses, the following lab tests proved to be false positive and false negative: false positive: IF = 1, Grocott = 0, APAAP = 4 (3F6). false negative: IF = 5, Grocott = 7, APAAP = 4 (3F6). - Grocott stain shows insufficient correlation to the clinical diagnoses (p = 0.0156, McNemar-Test, two-tailed). - The two different detection methods (IFT and APAAP) showed no significant statistical difference with regard to their sensitivity (p = 0.3438, McNemar-Test, two tailed) and specificity. Considering cost and time the immunofluorescence technique seems to be the most suitable for the diagnosis of PcP in HIV-1 positive patients.

  15. Multicenter study of trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole-related hepatotoxicity: incidence and associated factors among HIV-infected patients treated for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen-Jia; Huang, Chung-Hao; Liu, Chun-Eng; Tang, Hung-Jen; Yang, Chia-Jui; Lee, Yi-Chien; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Tsai, Mao-Song; Lin, Shu-Wen; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lu, Po-Liang; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of hepatotoxicity related to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) administered at a therapeutic dose may vary among study populations of different ethnicities and hepatotoxic metabolites of TMP/SMX may be decreased by drug-drug interaction with fluconazole. We aimed to investigate the incidence of hepatotoxicity and the role of concomitant use of fluconazole in HIV-infected patients receiving TMP/SMX for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We reviewed medical records to collect clinical characteristics and laboratory data of HIV-infected patients who received TMP/SMX for treatment of P. jirovecii pneumonia at 6 hospitals around Taiwan between September 2009 and February 2013. Hepatotoxicity was defined as 2-fold or greater increase of aminotransferase or total bilirubin level from baselines. Roussel UCLAF Causality Assessment Method (RUCAM) was used to analyze the causality of drug-induced liver injuries. NAT1 and NAT2 acetylator types were determined with the use of polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) restriction fragment length polymorphism to differentiate common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) predictive of the acetylator phenotypes in a subgroup of patients. During the study period, 286 courses of TMP/SMX treatment administered to 284 patients were analyzed. One hundred and fifty-two patients (53.1%) developed hepatotoxicity, and TMP/SMX was considered causative in 47 (16.4%) who had a RUCAM score of 6 or greater. In multivariate analysis, concomitant use of fluconazole for candidiasis was the only factor associated with reduced risk for hepatotoxicity (adjusted odds ratio, 0.372; 95% confidence interval, 0.145-0.957), while serostatus of hepatitis B or C virus, NAT1 and NAT2 acetylator types, or receipt of combination antiretroviral therapy was not. The incidence of hepatotoxicity decreased with an increasing daily dose of fluconazole up to 4.0 mg/kg. We conclude that the incidence of TMP/SMX-related hepatotoxicity was 16.4% in HIV

  16. Rapid detection of Pneumocystis carinii in bronchoalveolar lavage specimens from human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: use of a simple DNA extraction procedure and nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Rabodonirina, M; Raffenot, D; Cotte, L; Boibieux, A; Mayençon, M; Bayle, G; Persat, F; Rabatel, F; Trepo, C; Peyramond, D; Piens, M A

    1997-11-01

    We report on the development of a rapid nested PCR protocol for the detection of Pneumocystis carinii DNA in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens in which the protocol included the use of a commercially available DNA extraction kit (GeneReleaser). GeneReleaser enabled us to obtain amplification-ready DNA within 20 min without requiring the purification of the DNA. The nested PCR was performed with the primers pAZ102-E, pAZ102-H, and pAZ102-L2 (A. E. Wakefield, F. J. Pixley, S. Banerji, K. Sinclair, R. F. Miller, E. R. Moxon, and J. M. Hopkin, Lancet 336:451-453, 1990.). Results were obtained in about 4 h with the adoption of denaturation, annealing, and extension steps shortened to 20 seconds. The sensitivity of the nested PCR was tested with a P. carinii cyst suspension and was found to be less than one cyst (one to eight nuclei). The detection limit was the same with the use of GeneReleaser or proteinase K-phenol chloroform for DNA extraction. The nested PCR assay was prospectively compared with staining with Giemsa and methenamine silver stains for the detection of P. carinii in 127 BAL samples from 105 human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients investigated for acute respiratory illness. Twenty-five BAL specimens (20%) were positive by staining and the nested PCR and 25 (20%) were negative by staining and positive by the nested PCR. These 25 BAL specimens with conflicting results were obtained from 23 patients, 82% of whom were receiving prophylactic therapy against P. carinii pneumonia (PCP). Only two patients were diagnosed with possible PCP. The final diagnosis was not PCP for 20 patients who were considered to be colonized or to have a low level of infection. This colonization is not of clinical importance but is of epidemiological importance. Our rapid, simple, and sensitive amplification protocol may be performed in clinical laboratories for the routine diagnosis of PCP with BAL specimens.

  17. Vancomycın resıstant enterococcus bacteremıa ın a patıent wıth Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonıa, granulocystıc sarcoma and acute respıratory dıstress syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Emre, Julide Celdir; Baysak, Aysegul; Oz, Adnan Tolga; Ece, Gulfem; Arda, Bilgin; Bacakoglu, Feza

    2014-01-01

    In this case report we aimed to present a patient with granulocytic sarcomaa, neutropenic fever, ARDS and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumoniae that was hospitalized in our intensive care unit. The patient recovered and then developed vancomycin resistant enterococci (VRE) bacteremia due to port catheter during follow up. The patient had risk factors for VRE bacteremia and he was administered linezolide without removing the catheter. He was discharged with recovery. PMID:25018799

  18. The hydroxymethyldihydropterin pyrophosphokinase domain of the multifunctional folic acid synthesis Fas protein of Pneumocystis carinii expressed as an independent enzyme in Escherichia coli: refolding and characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ballantine, S P; Volpe, F; Delves, C J

    1994-08-01

    The folic acid synthesis (Fas) protein of Pneumocystis carinii is a multifunctional enzyme containing dihydroneopterin aldolase, 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin pyrophosphokinase (PPPK), and dihydropteroate synthase activities. Isolation of the stretch of fas cDNA shown by amino acid similarity to the bacterial counterparts to code for PPPK activity (fasC domain) is described. FasC was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli inclusion bodies using an inducible tac promoter expression system. Solubilization of the inclusion bodies in 6 M guanidine hydrochloride and refolding of the recombinant protein yielded enzymatically active PPPK which was purified to homogeneity by anion-exchange and gel-filtration chromatography. Sequence analysis showed that the first 13 amino acids of the purified protein were in agreement with those predicted from the DNA sequence and, furthermore, that the amino-terminal methionine had been removed. The enzyme is active in the monomeric form, exhibiting maximum activity at around pH 8.0. Isoelectric focusing gave a pI of 9.1. The Km value for 6-hydroxymethyl-7,8-dihydropterin was 3.6 microM in 50 mM Tris buffer, pH 8.2. The production of independently folded, active P. carinii PPPK will allow detailed biochemical and structural studies, increasing our understanding of this enzyme domain.

  19. Mutations in the dihydropteroate synthase gene of Pneumocystis jiroveci isolates from Portuguese patients with Pneumocystis pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Costa, M C; Helweg-Larsen, J; Lundgren, Bettina; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2003-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of mutations of the P. jiroveci dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) gene in an immunocompromised Portuguese population and to investigate the possible association between DHPS mutations and sulpha exposure. In the studied population, DHPS gene mutations were not significantly more frequent in patients exposed to sulpha drugs compared with patients not exposed (P=0.390). The results of this study suggest that DHPS gene mutations are frequent in the Portuguese immunocompromised population but do not seem associated with previous sulpha exposure. These results are consistent with the possibility of an incidental acquisition and transmission of P. jiroveci mutant types, either by person to person transmission or from an environmental source.

  20. Updates on Aspergillus, Pneumocystis and other opportunistic pulmonary mycoses.

    PubMed

    Curbelo, Jose; Galván, Jose María; Aspa, Javier

    2015-12-01

    Mycoses are serious diseases with potentially fatal outcome. The introduction of immunosuppressive treatments and life support techniques has led to a growing prevalence of different degrees of immunosuppression. Compromised immune response is the primary risk factor for the development of opportunistic mycoses. Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for improving prognosis. However, isolation in cultures or identification using antigen detection techniques cannot distinguish between colonization and invasive infection, and the clinical status of the patient often prevents biopsy sampling. Clinicians thus find themselves in an uncertain position, requiring them to quickly recognize clinical and radiological signs and interpret microbiological results in context. The aim of this review is to provide a general overview of the profile of patients susceptible to these infections, the role of the immune system and, in more detail, the major diagnostic developments that have gained most acceptance and recognition among the scientific community.

  1. Unsuspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and vertically acquired HIV infection in infants requiring intensive care.

    PubMed Central

    Tasker, R. C.; Wilkinson, K.; Slater, T. J.; Novelli, V.

    1994-01-01

    When an infant develops acute respiratory failure of sufficient severity to necessitate supportive mechanical ventilation a cause should always be sought. A chest radiograph showing predominantly interstitial lung disease and an infant's failure to respond to standard antibiotic treatment are indications for non-bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage. If P carinii pneumonia is diagnosed a congenital immunodeficiency should be sought and the parents counselled about HIV infection. Earlier investigation may be indicated by features of immunodeficiency when taking a history, performing a general examination, or analysing the results of basic haematological testing. Images p462-a PMID:8124183

  2. HIV-related Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia in Older Patients Hospitalized in the Early HAART Era

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Benjamin; Lyons, Thomas M; Parada, Jorge P; Uphold, Constance R; Yarnold, Paul R; Hounshell, Jennie B; Sipler, Alison M; Goetz, Matthew B; DeHovitz, Jack A; Weinstein, Robert A; Campo, Rafael E; Bennett, Charles L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether older age continues to influence patterns of care and in-hospital mortality for hospitalized persons with HIV-related Pneumocustis carinii pneumonia (PCP), as determined in our prior study from the 1980s. DESIGN Retrospective chart review. PATIENTS/SETTING Patients (1,861) with HIV-related PCP at 78 hospitals in 8 cities from 1995 to 1997. MEASUREMENTS Medical record notation of possible HIV infection; alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient; CD4 lymphocyte count; presence or absence of wasting; timely use of anti-PCP medications; in-hospital mortality. MAIN RESULTS Compared to younger patients, patients ≥50 years of age were less likely to have HIV mentioned in their progress notes (70% vs 82%, P < .001), have mild or moderately severe PCP cases at admission (89% vs 96%, P < .002), receive anti-PCP medications within the first 2 days of hospitalization (86% vs 93%, P <.002), and survive hospitalization (82% vs 90%, P < .003). However, age was not a significant predicator of mortality after adjustment for severity of PCP and timeliness of therapy. CONCLUSIONS While inpatient PCP mortality has improved by 50% in the past decade, 2-fold age-related mortality differences persist. As in the 1980s, these differences are associated with lower rates of recognition of HIV, increased severity of illenss at admission, and delays in initiation of PCP-specific treatments among older individuals—factors suggestive of delayed recognition of HIV infection, pneumonia, and PCP, respectively. Continued vigilance for the possibility of HIV and HIV-related PCP among persons ≥50 years of age who present with new pulmonary symptoms should be encouraged. PMID:11556938

  3. Pediatric Pulmonary and Cardiovascular Complications of Vertically Transmitted HIV Infection (P2C2)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome; Lung Diseases; Cardiovascular Diseases; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure; HIV Infections; Cytomegalovirus Infections; Pneumocystis Carinii Infections; Ebstein-Barr Virus Infections

  4. Opportunistic Infections and Other Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... toxo) Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) Tuberculosis (TB) Vaginal yeast infections Treatments for HIV/AIDS Research and clinical ... fact sheet Urinary tract infections fact sheet Vaginal yeast infections fact sheet More information on opportunistic infections ...

  5. Lung gallium scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... inflammation in the lungs, most often due to sarcoidosis or a certain type of pneumonia. Normal Results ... up very little gallium. What Abnormal Results Mean Sarcoidosis Other respiratory infections, most often pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia ...

  6. HIV/AIDS and Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) are bacterial infections. Viral infections include cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C. Fungi cause thrush (candidiasis), cryptococcal meningitis, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) and histoplasmosis, and parasites ...

  7. Fungus or parasite or both: a diagnostic challenge.

    PubMed

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Piliang, Melissa; Duggal, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Protothecosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by achlorophilic algae Prototheca wickerhamii, mainly in immunocompromised hosts. Due to their morphologic appearance in routine culture media, they can often mimic yeast-like opportunistic pathogens such as Pneumocystis jirovecii. This can delay the identification of other culprit organisms. We present a fatal case of protothecosis in a 74-year-old immunosuppressed male with concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP). The presence of a coinfection along with resemblance in routine culture media and microbiological and histopathological staining can prove to be a diagnostic challenge and delay appropriate care of an immunosuppressed patient. PMID:25722621

  8. Fungus or Parasite or Both: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Panchabhai, Tanmay S.; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Piliang, Melissa; Duggal, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Protothecosis is a rare opportunistic infection caused by achlorophilic algae Prototheca wickerhamii, mainly in immunocompromised hosts. Due to their morphologic appearance in routine culture media, they can often mimic yeast-like opportunistic pathogens such as Pneumocystis jirovecii. This can delay the identification of other culprit organisms. We present a fatal case of protothecosis in a 74-year-old immunosuppressed male with concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP). The presence of a coinfection along with resemblance in routine culture media and microbiological and histopathological staining can prove to be a diagnostic challenge and delay appropriate care of an immunosuppressed patient. PMID:25722621

  9. Radiology Of The Month: Spontaneous Bilateral Pneumothoraces in an HIV-Infected Patient.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Megan; Patel, Anish; Degeyter, Kyle; Neitzschman, Harold

    2016-01-01

    A 36-year-old woman with past medical history of HIV/AIDS not on HAART therapy (CD4 count of 34) and recurrent Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia presented to the emergency room for cough, chest pain, and worsening shortness of breath over the past 72 hours. PMID:27389385

  10. [Diagnostic imaging and therapeutic implications in lung infections in patients with HIV-1 infection].

    PubMed

    Carella, E; Moschini, G L; Romanelli, F; Bossalini, G; Alberici, F; Viale, P; Ratti, G

    1997-05-01

    We studied retrospectively 132 episodes of infectious pneumonias in 89 patients examined from 1990 to 1995. Pneumocystis carinii was found to be the most common cause of pneumonia (33 patients). The other causes were: Streptococcus pneumoniae (15), Mycobacterium tuberculosis (14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8), Staphylococcus aureus (5), Cytomegalovirus (4), Haemophilus influentiae (4), Mycobacterium avium intracellulare (2), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2), E. coli (2), Serratia marcescens (1). No etiologic agent was found in 40 cases. We stress the need of a more frequent use of invasive diagnostic procedures in the study of focal lung consolidations because this radiologic sign is highly aspecific and may be caused by too many different pathogenic agents, needing different therapies-i.e., Streptococcus pneumoniae (15 cases), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8), Staphylococcus aureus (5), Klebsiella pneumoniae (2), Escherichia coli (2), Pneumocystis carinii, Serratia marcescens and Haemophilus influentiae (1). Since there is an increase in mortality among patients treated with empiric antibiotic therapy, we stress the need of the routinary use of bronchoalveolar lavage in HIV+ patients with lung consolidation to perform specific therapy. Moreover, Pneumocystis carinii is by far the most frequent cause of diffuse interstitial infiltrates, and PCP has very suggestive clinical (dyspnea), radiologic (diffuse perihilar interstitial infiltrates; ground glass opacities; pneumatoceles) and laboratory (CD3+CD4 < 200/mcl; LDH > 600 UI/dl; PO2 < 70 mmHg) patterns, always related to the discovery of Pneumocystis carinii in escreatum. Thus, we decided to treat 15 patients with specific therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia with the above diagnostic algorithm, obtaining in all of them complete clinical and radiologic recovery. To conclude, in critical patients, invasive procedures should be performed only in the cases in which PCP is clinically improbable.

  11. Pulmonary complications of AIDS: radiologic features. [AIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.A.; Pomeranz, S.; Rabinowitz, J.G.; Rosen, M.J.; Train, J.S.; Norton, K.I.; Mendelson, D.S.

    1984-07-01

    Fifty-two patients with pulmonary complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were studied over a 3-year period. The vast majority of the patients were homosexual; however, a significant number were intravenous drug abusers. Thirteen different organisms were noted, of which Pneumocystis carinii was by far the most common. Five patients had neoplasia. Most patients had initial abnormal chest films; however, eight patients subsequently shown to have Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia had normal chest films. A significant overlap in chest radiographic findings was noted among patients with different or multiple organisms. Lung biopsy should be an early consideration for all patients with a clinical history consistent with the pulmonary complications of AIDS. Of the 52 patients, 41 had died by the time this report was completed.

  12. Towards New Antifolates Targeting Eukaryotic Opportunistic Infections

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.; Bolstad, D; Bolstad, E; Wright, D; Anderson, A

    2009-01-01

    Trimethoprim, an antifolate commonly prescribed in combination with sulfamethoxazole, potently inhibits several prokaryotic species of dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). However, several eukaryotic pathogenic organisms are resistant to trimethoprim, preventing its effective use as a therapeutic for those infections. We have been building a program to reengineer trimethoprim to more potently and selectively inhibit eukaryotic species of DHFR as a viable strategy for new drug discovery targeting several opportunistic pathogens. We have developed a series of compounds that exhibit potent and selective inhibition of DHFR from the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma as well as the fungus Candida glabrata. A comparison of the structures of DHFR from the fungal species Candida glabrata and Pneumocystis suggests that the compounds may also potently inhibit Pneumocystis DHFR.

  13. Antimicrobial activity of polycationic peptides.

    PubMed

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Barchiesi, F; Del Prete, M S; Scalise, G

    1999-11-01

    The in vitro activity of six polycationic peptides, buforin II, cecropin P1, indolicidin, magainin II, nisin, and ranalexin, were evaluated against several clinical isolates of gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic bacteria, yeasts, Pneumocystis carinii and Cryptosporidium parvum, by using microbroth dilution methods. The peptides exhibited different antibacterial activities and rapid time-dependent killing. The gram-negative organisms were more susceptible to buforin II and cecropin P1, whereas buforin II and ranalexin were the most active compounds against the gram-positive strains. Similarly, ranalexin showed the highest activity against Candida spp., whereas magainin II exerted the highest anticryptococcal activity. Finally, the peptides showed high anti-Pneumocystis activity, whereas no compound had strong inhibitory effect on C. parvum. PMID:10612440

  14. Role of vaccinations and prophylaxis in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Despoina; Tsoulas, Christos; Tragiannidis, Athanassios; Sipsas, Nikolaos V

    2015-04-01

    Targeted strategies for reducing the increased risk of infection in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases include vaccinations as well as antibiotic prophylaxis in selected patients. However, there are still issues under debate: Is vaccination in patients with rheumatic diseases immunogenic? Is it safe? What is the impact of immunosuppressive drugs on vaccine immunogenicity and safety? Does vaccination cause disease flares? In which cases is prophylaxis against Pneumocystis jirovecii required? This review addresses these important questions to which clinicians and researchers still do not have definite answers. The first part includes immunization recommendations and reviews current data on vaccine efficacy and safety in patients with rheumatic diseases. The second part discusses prophylaxis for Pneumocystis pneumonia.

  15. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  16. [Extrapulmonary pneumocystosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Valdebenito, Carlos; Bonacic, Macarena; Matamala, Jennifer; Wolff, Marcelo

    2015-06-01

    We report a case of a middle-age male patient, with newly HIV infection in AIDS stage diagnosis, no comorbitidies, who was hospitalized for subacute malaise, fever, self-limited unproductive cough and no bloody chronic diarrea. The diagnosis of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia was performed by imagenological suspicion and stains of cysts of this pathogen with bronchoalveolar lavage samples. Treatment was initiated with oral cotrimoxazole and starting HAART with good clinical outcome. Concomitantly, an etiologic study was conducted for chronic diarrhea and through histopathological examination of colonic mucosa, numerous extracellular cystic structures Pneumocystis characteristics were observed, performing the diagnosis of extrapulmonary pneumocystosis. Extrapulmonary pneumocystosis is a rare cause of P. jiroveci infection, requires a high index of suspicion and should be approached in HIV patients with severe AIDS which is common in co-infection of various infections and is peremptory to make an etiologic diagnosis and early treatment.

  17. Antifungal activity of 10 Guadeloupean plants.

    PubMed

    Biabiany, Murielle; Roumy, Vincent; Hennebelle, Thierry; François, Nadine; Sendid, Boualem; Pottier, Muriel; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Rouaud, Isabelle; Lohézic-Le Dévéhat, Françoise; Joseph, Henry; Bourgeois, Paul; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2013-11-01

    Screening of the antifungal activities of ten Guadeloupean plants was undertaken to find new extracts and formulations against superficial mycoses such as onychomycosis, athlete's foot, Pityriasis versicolor, as well as the deep fungal infection Pneumocystis pneumonia. For the first time, the CMI of these plant extracts [cyclohexane, ethanol and ethanol/water (1:1, v/v)] was determined against five dermatophytes, five Candida species, Scytalidium dimidiatum, a Malassezia sp. strain and Pneumocystis carinii. Cytotoxicity tests of the most active extracts were also performed on an HaCat keratinocyte cell line. Results suggest that the extracts of Bursera simaruba, Cedrela odorata, Enterolobium cyclocarpum and Pluchea carolinensis have interesting activities and could be good candidates for developing antifungal formulations. PMID:23280633

  18. Antifungal and cytotoxic activity of withanolides from Acnistus arborescens.

    PubMed

    Roumy, Vincent; Biabiany, Murielle; Hennebelle, Thierry; Aliouat, El Moukhtar; Pottier, Muriel; Joseph, Henry; Joha, Sami; Quesnel, Bruno; Alkhatib, Racha; Sahpaz, Sevser; Bailleul, François

    2010-07-23

    Three compounds were isolated from Acnistus arborescens, a tree commonly used in South and Central America in traditional medicine against several infectious diseases, some of which are caused by fungi. Bioassay-guided fractionation of a MeOH extract of leaves, based on its anti-Pneumocystis carinii activity, led to the isolation of compounds 1-3. Mono- and bidimensional NMR analyses enabled identification of two new withanolides, (20R,22R)-5beta,6beta-epoxy-4beta,12beta,20-trihydroxy-1-oxowith-2-en-24-enolide (1) and (20R,22R)-16beta-acetoxy-3beta,4beta;5beta,6beta-diepoxy-12beta,20-dihydroxy-1-oxowith-24-enolide (2), and withanolide D (3). Antifungal activity on 13 fungi responsible for human infections (five dermatophytes, one nondermatophyte mold, six yeasts, and Pneumocystis carinii) was examined. Cytotoxicity of these compounds was also evaluated in vitro. PMID:20590148

  19. Immune reconstitution syndrome in a human immunodeficiency virus infected child due to giardiasis leading to shock.

    PubMed

    Nandy, Sneha; Shah, Ira

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome has been reported in association with tuberculosis, herpes zoster (shingles), Cryptococcus neoformans, Kaposi's sarcoma, Pneumocystis pneumonia, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, herpes simplex virus, Histoplasma capsulatum, human papillomavirus, and Cytomegalovirus. However, it has never been documented with giardiasis. We present a 7-year-old HIV infected girl who developed diarrhea and shock following the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, and her stool showed the presence of giardiasis. PMID:26985424

  20. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of new (2E,6E)-10-(dimethylamino)-3,7-dimethyl-2,6-decadien-1-ol ethers as inhibitors of human and Trypanosoma cruzi oxidosqualene cyclase.

    PubMed

    Galli, Ubaldina; Oliaro-Bosso, Simonetta; Taramino, Silvia; Venegoni, Serena; Pastore, Emanuele; Tron, Gian Cesare; Balliano, Gianni; Viola, Franca; Sorba, Giovanni

    2007-01-01

    New dimethylamino truncated squalene ether derivatives containing a different aromatic moiety (phenyl, naphthyl, and biphenyl) or a simple alkyl (n-hexylic) group were synthesized as inhibitors of the oxidosqualene cyclase (OSC) and of the sterol biosynthetic pathway. The activity against human OSC was compared with the activity against the OSCs of pathogenic organisms such as Pneumocystis carinii and Trypanosoma cruzi. The phenyl derivative was the most potent inhibitor of T. cruzi OSC.

  1. A multiplexed nucleic acid microsystem for point-of-care detection of HIV co-infection with MTB and PCP.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingjia; Kong, Jilie

    2013-12-15

    Many individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), especially children in African countries, die of co-infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) (coinfection rate: 50%) or Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) (coinfection rate: 81%). The present proposal describes a rapid, portable, low-cost, multiplexed point-of-care diagnostic technique for simultaneously detecting HIV, MTB, and PCP. This technique incorporates a creative micro-device (hardware) and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification strategy (software). PMID:24209377

  2. Radiogallium scan in P. carinii pneumonia

    SciTech Connect

    Parthasarathy, K.L.; Bakshi, S.P.; Bender, M.A.

    1982-02-01

    A gallium scan performed on a patient with fever of unknown origin (FUO) revealed an abnormal uptake of radiotracer in the lungs despite negative chest roentgenographic examination and other routine diagnostic studies. Subsequent lung biopsy results confirmed the presence of Pneumocystis (P.) carinii infection. A repeat gallium scan obtained following appropriate antibiotic therapy was essentially normal. The importance of radiogallium scanning in an immunosuppressed patient with FUO is emphasized.

  3. Dapsone and sulfapyridine.

    PubMed

    Paniker, U; Levine, N

    2001-01-01

    Dapsone and sulfapyridine are structurally related compounds with anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory effects. Dapsone remains the most important drug for leprosy and is useful in the prophylaxis of Pneumocystis pneumonia in patients with HIV disease. The medical treatment of choice for dermatitis herpetiformis is dapsone; and sulfapyridine also can be used for those patients who are intolerant of dapsone. Other neutrophilic disorders also may respond to these drugs. Toxic side effects of both dapsone and sulfapyridine are mediated through the hydroxylamine metabolite. These include hemolysis, methemoglobinemia, and agranulocytosis. Careful monitoring for possible adverse reactions includes frequently performing complete blood counts and regular blood chemistry profile determinations.

  4. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  5. Sloth biology: an update on their physiological ecology, behavior and role as vectors of arthropods and arboviruses.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, D P; Da Costa, C P; Duarte, D P

    2001-01-01

    This is a review of the research undertaken since 1971 on the behavior and physiological ecology of sloths. The animals exhibit numerous fascinating features. Sloth hair is extremely specialized for a wet tropical environment and contains symbiotic algae. Activity shows circadian and seasonal variation. Nutrients derived from the food, particularly in Bradypus, only barely match the requirements for energy expenditure. Sloths are hosts to a fascinating array of commensal and parasitic arthropods and are carriers of various arthropod-borne viruses. Sloths are known reservoirs of the flagellate protozoan which causes leishmaniasis in humans, and may also carry trypanosomes and the protozoan Pneumocystis carinii.

  6. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected infant

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, E. D.; Smith, A.; Golitko, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY World Health Organization-classified very severe pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is recognized as a life-threatening condition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected infants. We recount the use of nasal bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) in an HIV-infected African infant with very severe pneumonia and treatment failure due to suspected infection with P. jirovecii. We also examine the potential implications of BCPAP use in resource-poor settings with a high case index of acute respiratory failure due to HIV-related pneumonia, but limited access to mechanical ventilation. PMID:21396221

  7. [Corticosteroids in the treatment of infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Kronig, I; Schibler, M; Rougemont, M; Emonet, S

    2013-04-24

    The addition of a corticosteroid has become a common practice for the treatment of some infectious diseases, such as meningitis, septic shock, moderate to severe Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The belief that steroids may have a beneficial effect in the early stage of pro-inflammatory infections explains the renewed interest for these treatments. This review of recent literature helps determine the use of steroids in the treatment of infectious diseases as formal guidance, questionable or rather contraindicated. When there is a clear scientific indication for the use of corticosteroids regardless of the current infection, the latter is never a formal contraindication.

  8. Patterns of gallium-67 scintigraphy in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the AIDS related complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bitran, J.; Bekerman, C.; Weinstein, R.; Bennett, C.; Ryo, U.; Pinsky, S.

    1987-07-01

    Thirty-two patients with AIDS related complex (ARC) or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) underwent /sup 67/Ga scans as part of their evaluation. Three patterns of /sup 67/Ga biodistribution were found: lymph node uptake alone; diffuse pulmonary uptake; normal scan. Gallium-67 scans were useful in identifying clinically occult Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in seven of 15 patients with ARC who were asymptomatic and had normal chest radiographs. Gallium scans are a useful ancillary procedure in the evaluation of patients with ARC or AIDS.

  9. Dapsone-induced pure red cell aplasia and cholestatic jaundice: A new experience for diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Singh, Jitendra; Raja, Deep Chandh; Mishra, Sanjay; Goel, Madhu Mati

    2016-01-01

    Dapsone (4,4’- diaminodiphenylsulfone) is the parent compound of the sulfones, and it has potent antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory effects. It is used in the treatment of leprosy, dermatitis herpetiformis, and prophylactically to prevent Pneumocystis pneumonia and toxoplasmosis in patients unable to tolerate trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole. We hereby report a case of dapsone toxicity who developed pure red cell aplasia and cholestatic jaundice in a suspected case of dermatitis herpetiformis. Patient had an excellent response to corticosteroids after withdrawal of dapsone. PMID:27512715

  10. Sulfa drug screening in yeast: fifteen sulfa drugs compete with p-aminobenzoate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Castelli, L A; Nguyen, N P; Macreadie, I G

    2001-05-30

    Sulfa drugs have been used as antimicrobials for decades but resistance is now a problem. For major eukaryotic pathogens, including Plasmodium and Pneumocystis, sulfa drug testing is difficult or impossible. We have shown that the eukaryote yeast can be used as a model for the study of sulfa drugs within certain parameters. Fifteen sulfa drugs inhibited yeast growth in a manner indicating competition with p-aminobenzoate (pABA). Such competition resulted from direct addition of pABA or through increased expression of the pABA synthase gene (ABZ1). The model system predicts that overexpression of the pABA synthase gene can lead to drug resistance.

  11. Vitamin B3 confers resistance to sulfa drugs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Olga; Nichols, Brian P

    2005-10-01

    Sulfa drugs are ubiquitous antibiotics used to treat bacterial infections and diseases caused by eukaryotes, such as Pneumocystis carinii, the leading cause of pneumonia (PCP) in HIV patients. A daily regimen of sulfonamides and multivitamins including vitamin B3 is also recommended for persons with HIV. We show that exogenous vitamin B3 (nicotinate) confers resistance to sulfa drugs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model for P. carinii. We propose a model of metabolic rerouting in which increased nicotinate leads to increased intracellular concentration of p-aminobenzoate, thus leading to sulfonamide resistance.

  12. Rhodococcus equi Sepsis in a Renal Transplant Recipient: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Macken, Eline; de Jonge, Hylke; Van Caesbroeck, Daniël; Verhaegen, Jan; Van Kerkhoven, Dana; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Kuypers, Dirk

    2015-04-01

    Rhodococcus equi is an unusual cause of infection in humans, but has emerged as an opportunistic pathogen among immunocompromised patients. Primary pulmonary involvement is the most common clinical presentation, although the spectrum of disease is broad. Diagnosing R. equi infections remains challenging, both from clinical and microbiological view, and no standard treatment has been established. In this report, we present a detailed case of a 57-year-old male renal transplant recipient who developed R. equi bacteremia with a concomitant Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We describe the clinical features of R. equi infections, highlight the importance of an early diagnosis, and briefly review treatment options for this rare infection. PMID:27500216

  13. Delayed presentation of severe combined immunodeficiency due to prolonged maternal T cell engraftment.

    PubMed

    Al-Muhsen, Saleh Z

    2010-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder with heterogenous genetic etiologies. We describe a typical case in a 9-year-old boy that was masked by a clinically functional maternal T cell engraftment leading to late presentation with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and cytomegalovirus infection, probably following exhaustion of maternally engrafted cells. Based on immunological findings, he had a T- B+SCID phenotype.This report suggests that in rare cases, engrafted maternal T cell might persist for long time leading to partial constitution of immune function and delayed clinical presentation of SCID.

  14. Epidemiology of invasive mycoses in North America.

    PubMed

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of invasive mycoses is increasing, especially among patients who are immunocompromised or hospitalized with serious underlying diseases. Such infections may be broken into two broad categories: opportunistic and endemic. The most important agents of the opportunistic mycoses are Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Pneumocystis jirovecii, and Aspergillus spp. (although the list of potential pathogens is ever expanding); while the most commonly encountered endemic mycoses are due to Histoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioides immitis/posadasii, and Blastomyces dermatitidis. This review discusses the epidemiologic profiles of these invasive mycoses in North America, as well as risk factors for infection, and the pathogens' antifungal susceptibility. PMID:20088682

  15. Cutaneous gallium uptake in patients with AIDS with mycobacterium avium-intracellulare septicemia

    SciTech Connect

    Allwright, S.J.; Chapman, P.R.; Antico, V.F.; Gruenewald, S.M.

    1988-07-01

    Gallium imaging is increasingly being used for the early detection of complications in patients with AIDS. A 26-year-old homosexual man who was HIV antibody positive underwent gallium imaging for investigation of possible Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Widespread cutaneous focal uptake was seen, which was subsequently shown to be due to mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) septicemia. This case demonstrates the importance of whole body imaging rather than imaging target areas only, the utility of gallium imaging in aiding the early detection of clinically unsuspected disease, and shows a new pattern of gallium uptake in disseminated MAI infection.

  16. Detection of thoracic infections by nuclear medicine techniques in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J. )

    1989-11-01

    The challenge of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) for nuclear medicine has been the early detection of related intrathoracic opportunistic infections, inflammatory conditions, and neoplasms. Gallium-67 citrate scanning has proved a sensitive test not only for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia but for many of the other opportunistic infections and malignancies, including mycobacterial infections and lymphoma. Patterns and intensity of gallium uptake may suggest more specific diagnoses. Indium-111-labeled white blood cells may also be a valuable diagnostic tool in the AIDS patient.41 references.

  17. Dapsone-induced pure red cell aplasia and cholestatic jaundice: A new experience for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Singh, Jitendra; Raja, Deep Chandh; Mishra, Sanjay; Goel, Madhu Mati

    2016-01-01

    Dapsone (4,4'- diaminodiphenylsulfone) is the parent compound of the sulfones, and it has potent antiparasitic, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulatory effects. It is used in the treatment of leprosy, dermatitis herpetiformis, and prophylactically to prevent Pneumocystis pneumonia and toxoplasmosis in patients unable to tolerate trimethoprim with sulfamethoxazole. We hereby report a case of dapsone toxicity who developed pure red cell aplasia and cholestatic jaundice in a suspected case of dermatitis herpetiformis. Patient had an excellent response to corticosteroids after withdrawal of dapsone. PMID:27512715

  18. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials. PMID:25968483

  19. Pathology Image of the Month:Cough and Shortness of Breath in a Noncompliant Patient with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, Reggie; Dewenter, Tracy; McGoey, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    A 37- year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) was admitted to the intensive care unit following a four month history of progressive shortness of breath, productive cough, and flu-like symptoms. His HIV/AIDS was diagnosed at the age of 19 (CD4 count =15; viral load = 294,436 copies/ mL) and was complicated by hemodialysis-dependent, HIV-associated nephropathy, prior Pneumocystis pneumonia and known noncompliance with prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Chest film at admission was interpreted as diffuse bilateral interstitial and airspace opacities with a right sided layering density representative of laminar pleural effusion. Bacterial blood cultures were subsequently negative. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and an image from the cytologic cell block is seen above in Figure 1. The patient's respiratory status continued to deteriorate and he was converted to comfort care. Following death, an unlimited autopsy examination was requested by the family and authorized by the coroner. At autopsy, additional gross pathologic findings included 350ml of chylous appearing pleural fluid and serous ascites (700ml). Histopathology revealed intra-alveolar acute fibrinopurulent exudate, chronic pericarditis and end-stage nephropathy. Similar cells to those shown above in Figure 1 were identified in lung epithelium and in pancreatic acinar cells. Special stain for Pneumocystis was negative. PMID:27159517

  20. [Pneumocystosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Sodqi, M; Oulad Lahsen, A; Chakib, A; Marih, L; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2016-08-01

    Pneumocystosis is an opportunistic disease caused by invasion of unicellular fungus Pneumocystic jirovecii which is responsible for febrile pneumonia among patients with cellular immunodeficiency especially those HIV infected. Despite the decreasing of its incidence due to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, as well as anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis among these patients, Pneumocystis pneumonia remains the first AIDS-defining event and a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. The usual radiological presentation is that of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the detection of trophozoides and/or cysts P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples using several staining techniques. The use of polymerase chain reaction in the BAL samples in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more has allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. The standard regimen of treatment is the association of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole which has been utilized as an effective treatment with a favourable recovery. Early HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy should reduce the incidence of this dreaded disease. PMID:27349824

  1. Finding the sweet spot: how human fungal pathogens acquire and turn the sugar inositol against their hosts.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyang

    2015-03-03

    Inositol is an essential nutrient with important structural and signaling functions in eukaryotes. Its role in microbial pathogenesis has been reported in fungi, protozoans, and eubacteria. In a recent article, Porollo et al. [mBio 5(6):e01834-14, 2014, doi:10.1128/mBio.01834-14] demonstrated the importance of inositol metabolism in the development and viability of Pneumocystis species--obligate fungal pathogens that remain unculturable in vitro. To understand their obligate nature, the authors used innovative comparative genomic approaches and discovered that Pneumocystis spp. are inositol auxotrophs due to the lack of inositol biosynthetic enzymes and that inositol insufficiency is a contributing factor preventing fungal growth in vitro. This work is in accord with other studies suggesting that inositol plays a conserved role in microbial pathogenesis. Inositol uptake and metabolism therefore may represent novel antimicrobial drug targets. Using comparative genomics to analyze metabolic pathways offers a powerful tool to gain new insights into nutrient utilization in microbes, especially obligate pathogens.

  2. Pathology Image of the Month:Cough and Shortness of Breath in a Noncompliant Patient with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Thomasson, Reggie; Dewenter, Tracy; McGoey, Robin R

    2015-01-01

    A 37- year-old man with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) was admitted to the intensive care unit following a four month history of progressive shortness of breath, productive cough, and flu-like symptoms. His HIV/AIDS was diagnosed at the age of 19 (CD4 count =15; viral load = 294,436 copies/ mL) and was complicated by hemodialysis-dependent, HIV-associated nephropathy, prior Pneumocystis pneumonia and known noncompliance with prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Chest film at admission was interpreted as diffuse bilateral interstitial and airspace opacities with a right sided layering density representative of laminar pleural effusion. Bacterial blood cultures were subsequently negative. A bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and an image from the cytologic cell block is seen above in Figure 1. The patient's respiratory status continued to deteriorate and he was converted to comfort care. Following death, an unlimited autopsy examination was requested by the family and authorized by the coroner. At autopsy, additional gross pathologic findings included 350ml of chylous appearing pleural fluid and serous ascites (700ml). Histopathology revealed intra-alveolar acute fibrinopurulent exudate, chronic pericarditis and end-stage nephropathy. Similar cells to those shown above in Figure 1 were identified in lung epithelium and in pancreatic acinar cells. Special stain for Pneumocystis was negative.

  3. Highlights and summaries of the 11th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists.

    PubMed

    Kaneshiro, Edna S; Cushion, Melanie T; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Weiss, Louis M; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    The 11th in the series of International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-11) was held in August 2010 on the Big Island of Hawaii. These meetings are devoted to agents of infections that cause serious problems in AIDS patients and other individuals with defective immune systems. International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists serves as a forum for exchange of current research information on Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium and the Microsporidia, Toxoplasma, free-living amoebae, kinetoplastid flagellates and other pathogens that are particularly pathogenic in immunodeficient hosts. Studies on interactions between host and pathogen, especially host responses, were highlighted in this year's symposium. The lack of in vitro cultivation methods for luxuriant growth of Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium and the Enterocytozoon bieneusi remains a major hindrance to understanding the basic biology of these organisms and precludes genetic manipulations. However, slow but steady progress is being achieved by hard work including data mining of some completed or partially completed genome sequencing of several IWOP organisms. Of great concern is evidence for dramatic decline in research funding for these pathogens and the lack of appreciation by the larger scientific community concerning the state of art and challenges faced by researchers working on these organisms that can provide critical insight into emerging and reemerging pathogens.

  4. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis: a common cause of pulmonary disease in the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Suffredini, A.F.; Ognibene, F.P.; Lack, E.E.; Simmons, J.T.; Brenner, M.; Gill, V.J.; Lane, H.C.; Fauci, A.S.; Parrillo, J.E.; Masur, H.

    1987-07-01

    During a 4.4-year period, nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis was seen in 41 of 110 (38%) patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and accounted for 32% (48/152) of all episodes of clinical pneumonitis. Diffuse alveolar damage was typically a feature of nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis, but neither lung biopsy nor bronchoalveolar lavage detected a pathogen. Of these 41 patients, 13 had no associated pulmonary tumor and had not been exposed to pulmonary toxins, whereas 28 patients had either concurrent pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma, previous experimental therapies, or a history of pneumocystis pneumonia or drug abuse. Of these 41, 23 had normal chest radiographs. The clinical features of patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis were similar to those of patients with pneumocystis pneumonia, although histologic findings showed less severe alveolar damage in patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis (p less than 0.001). Pathologic evaluation and clinical follow-up suggest that many clinical episodes of pneumonitis in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are due to nonspecific interstitial pneumonitis of unknown cause.

  5. Atovaquone for Prophylaxis of Toxoplasmosis after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mendorf, Alexander; Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Langebrake, Claudia; Rohde, Holger; Ayuk, Francis; Regier, Marc; Christopeit, Maximilian; Zabelina, Tatjana; Bacher, Adelbert; Stübig, Thomas; Wolschke, Christine; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis and infections by other opportunistic agents such as Pneumocystis jirovecii constitute life-threatening risks for patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has been well established for post-transplant toxoplasmosis and pneumocystis prophylaxis, but treatment may be limited due to toxicity. We explored atovaquone as an alternative and compared it with TMP-SMX regarding toxicity and efficacy during the first 100 days after transplantation in 155 consecutive adult stem cell recipients. Eight patients with a prior history of TMP-SMX intolerance received atovaquone as first-line prophylaxis. TMP-SMX was used for 141 patients as first-line strategy, but 13 patients (9.2%) were later switched to atovaquone due to TMP-SMX toxicity or gastrointestinal symptoms. No active toxoplasmosis or active P. jirovecii infection developed under continued prophylaxis with either TMP-SMX or atovaquone. However, for reasons of TMP-SMX and/or atovaquone toxicity, 7 patients were unable to tolerate any efficacious toxoplasmosis prophylaxis and therefore obtained inhalative pentamidine as P. jirovecii prophylaxis but no toxoplasmosis prophylaxis. Importantly, 2 of these patients developed severe toxoplasmosis. In summary, atovaquone appears as a valid alternative for at least some post-transplant patients who cannot tolerate TMP-SMX. This should be further confirmed by multicenter trials.

  6. Pneumocandins from Zalerion arboricola. II. Modification of product spectrum by mutation and medium manipulation.

    PubMed

    Masurekar, P S; Fountoulakis, J M; Hallada, T C; Sosa, M S; Kaplan, L

    1992-12-01

    Zalerion arboricola ATCC 20868 produces pneumocandin A0 (L-671,329), a cyclic hexapeptide with a dimethylmyristic acid side chain. This compound has anti-candida and anti-pneumocystis activities. We were interested in looking for other related compounds produced by this organism. To facilitate this search, a simple medium (S2) composed of D-mannitol, peptonized milk, lactic acid, glycine, KH2PO4 and trace elements, which supported the production of a number of such compounds, was designed. For the isolation of mutants, either spores or growing mycelia were treated with N-nitroso-N-methylurethane or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and survivors were screened for changes in the product spectrum. From approximately 1,500 survivors tested, 5 mutants were isolated. Mutants ATCC 20957, 74030, 20958 and 20988 exclusively produce various pneumocandins other than A0. These compounds were active against Candida and Pneumocystis carinii. The yield of A0 was found to be increased 2.5-fold over that of the parent in the fifth mutant, MF5415. Further medium studies indicated that the addition of soybean oil to S2 medium improved the yields. Subsequent development of another series of media containing Pharmamedia as a nitrogen source resulted in increase in production by 10- approximately 20-fold. Overall, these studies resulted in substantial improvement in the production of A0 as well as discovery and/or facile production of 7 other related compounds.

  7. The incidence and spectrum of AIDS-defining illnesses in persons treated with antiretroviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Forrest, D M; Seminari, E; Hogg, R S; Yip, B; Raboud, J; Lawson, L; Phillips, P; Schechter, M T; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Montaner, J S

    1998-12-01

    The incidence and spectrum of primary AIDS-defining illnesses in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients receiving antiretroviral drugs may have changed since the introduction of newer antiretroviral agents. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients enrolled in the British Columbia Drug Treatment Program who were ever prescribed antiretroviral drugs between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 1996. Rates were calculated on a 6-month basis. There were 344 AIDS cases diagnosed among 2,533 participants between 1994 and 1996. The incidence of primary AIDS diseases decreased from 1994 to 1996, with a sharp decline in 1995 and 1996. There was no statistically significant change in the incidence of primary AIDS diagnoses relative to one another, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and Kaposi's sarcoma remain the most common AIDS index diagnoses. In patients receiving antiretroviral therapy in the modern era, the incidence of AIDS-defining illnesses has decreased substantially, but the spectrum of AIDS-defining illnesses remains unchanged.

  8. [EPIDEMIOLOGY OF VISCERAL FUNGAL INFECTION IN FRANCE AND IN THE WORLD].

    PubMed

    Blot, Mathieu; Lanternier, Fanny; Lortholary, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are severe infections and constantly rising in developed countries. Indeed, advances in hematology, oncology, transplantation and intensive care medicine, are responsible for a longer and deeper immunodepression, in patients which are increasingly older. Only HIV-associated cryptococcosis and Pneumocystis pneumonia are decreasing, in countries where HAART are available and have been able to restore immunity. An increase in the antifungal therapies exposure lead to the emergence of less susceptible species/isolates to usual treatments, and other fungi (Mucorales, Scedosporium, Fusarium). However, in developing countries where access to HAART is limited, cryptococcosis remains a major public health. To a lesser degree, some endemic mycoses are on the rise. PMID:26979032

  9. Significance of diffuse pulmonary uptake in radiogallium scans: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, S.M.; Sziklas, J.J.; Spencer, R.P.; Rosenberg, R.

    1980-04-01

    Diffuse pulmonary uptake of radiogallium was observed in 50 out of 510 scans (9.8%) performed in a general hospital over a period of 1 y. Of the 50 cases, 80% had bilateral, diffuse distribution, and 20% unilateral. A variety of clinical conditions produced a similar picture on the pulmonary images. The most common cause of the diffuse uptake was infectious disease (48%) followed by infiltrative disorders (30%) and neoplastic conditions (22%). On a repeat study there was significant reduction in the intensity of pulmonary radiogallium uptake following drug therapy in three patients - sarcoidosis on corticosteroid therapy, pneumocystis carinii treated with trimethoprim and sulfamethoxozole, and interstitial pulmonary fibrosis on corticosteroids. No close correlation was observed between the underlying clinical disorder and the pattern or intensity of pulmonary uptake of radiogallium.

  10. Innovative use of dapsone.

    PubMed

    Wozel, V E Gottfried

    2010-07-01

    After synthesis of dapsone (4,4' diaminodiphenylsulfone) in 1908, the compound was known exclusively in chemistry. Following the epoch-making discovery of the antimicrobial potential for sulfonamides emerged, the sulfone class was included in the medical armamentarium. The therapeutic role of sulfones related to both pathogen-caused diseases and chronic inflammatory dermatoses has led to extensive use in dermatology. At present dapsone is the only sulfone congener available for clinical practice. The sulfone is used in rifampin-based multiple-drug regiments to treat multibacillary and paucibacillary leprosy and to treat Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia and prevent toxoplasmosis in individuals with AIDS. In dermatology, dapsone is the preferred drug for treating dermatitis herpetiformis (Duhring's disease) and is useful in the management of a broad range of chronic inflammatory entities, especially autoimmune bullous disorders. With proper administration and monitoring, the sulfone should be considered a useful and safe agent. PMID:20510768

  11. [HIV in the lung from 1982 to 2013].

    PubMed

    Mayaud, C; Cadranel, J

    2014-02-01

    During the last 30 years pulmonary involvement has played a major role in the history of HIV infection. Initially, the unexplained occurrence of pneumocystis revealed the emergence of AIDS and the suspicion of its African origin. Before the era of triple therapy the natural history of AIDS was dominated by the occurrence of repeated lung infections and respiratory physicians were at the forefront of their diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis. With the provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART), the natural history of AIDS has been transformed in those patients who benefit from it. In addition to paradoxical reactions observed following the introduction of ART, the pulmonologist is also facing a chronic stage of controlled HIV infection, and unexpected events, the incidence of which increases with time: pulmonary arterial hypertension and lung cancer certainly, COPD and fibrosis perhaps… but this story remains to be written.

  12. The practice of infectious diseases in the 1990s: the Canadian experience.

    PubMed

    Schlech, W F

    1995-02-01

    A survey of the members of the Canadian Infectious Disease Society was carried out to determine the content of an infectious diseases consultative practice in the 1990s. Respondents were asked to identify all new inpatient, outpatient, and telephone consultations during a 1-week period in 1990. Consultations were categorized by the infectious disease syndrome of the patient and by the microorganism that was identified. Bacterial infections were the most common cause of inpatient consultations, while viral infections were more common in outpatients. Consultations for parasitic infections were primarily for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia related to infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). "Newer" infectious disease syndromes such as chronic fatigue syndrome, toxic shock syndrome, and Lyme disease were all represented in the responses for the 1-week study period. The significant impact of HIV infection on the overall consultative load suggests that there will be a continuing need for newly trained infectious disease consultants into the 21st century.

  13. Remission of diarrhoea due to cryptosporidiosis in an immunodeficient child treated with hyperimmune bovine colostrum.

    PubMed Central

    Tzipori, S; Roberton, D; Chapman, C

    1986-01-01

    A boy aged 6 months who presented with poor weight gain, diarrhoea, and infection with Pneumocystis carinii was found to have congenital hypogammaglobulinaemia, which did not improve despite monthly treatment with intravenous gammaglobulin. At the age of 3 years and 2 months he developed severe vomiting and diarrhoea due to cryptosporidiosis, which failed to respond to conventional treatment. Infusion of hyperimmune bovine colostrum produced against parasite antigen, given by nasogastric tube, was started after symptoms had persisted for three weeks. His vomiting and diarrhoea resolved within five days of treatment, and oocysts were no longer seen in the stools after eight days. Later, however, he developed a rare complication, and oocysts were found in the common bile duct. Hyperimmune bovine colostrum may be useful in the treatment of many patients with immunodeficiency disorders. PMID:3096462

  14. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage after erlotinib combined with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in a patient with esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chuan-Hua; Liu, Rong-Rui; Lin, Li; Liu, Jian-Zhi; Ge, Fei-Jiao; Li, Shan-Shan; Ye, Chen-Yang; Chen, Yu-Ling; Wang, Yan; Xu, Jian-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening clinical pathologic syndrome caused by a variety of diseases. We report a case of DAH related to combination therapy of chemoradiotherapy and erlotinib. As to know, DAH following chemoradiotherapy was only reported among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients with hematologic malignancies till now. DAH associated with chemoradiotherapy for oesophageal carcinoma has not been reported. This is the first DAH report on erlotinib-combined chemoradiotherapy for esophageal cancer. The authors believe epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib increased the lung injury. Molecular targeted drugs are gradually applied to be combined with chemoradiation, whether this combination will cause the increase of serious adverse reactions need further study. This case can provide certain reference for erlotinib in the treatment. Meanwhile, after long term hormone therapy for DAH, the patient was diagnosed with pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. It reminds us to attach importance to the immunosuppressive diseases after long-term hormone treatment.

  15. Length of survival of patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed Central

    Marasca, G; McEvoy, M

    1986-01-01

    An analysis of the lengths of survival of patients with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome presenting with different opportunistic diseases was performed using epidemiological data routinely collected at the PHLS Communicable Disease Surveillance Centre. The overall crude case fatality rate was 55.4% (93/168). The median survival times were: 21.2 months for Kaposi's sarcoma, 12.5 months for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, and 13.3 months for other opportunistic infections. The shortest median survival time (6.6 months) was found for those with both Kaposi's sarcoma and P carinii pneumonia. There were significant differences between durations of survival of patients with Kaposi's sarcoma and those with all other diseases, which indicated impaired cellular immunity apart from opportunistic infections. This analysis shows that those with Kaposi's sarcoma alone have the most favourable prognosis. PMID:3089373

  16. A Woman in Her 30s With a Past History of HIV Disease Presented With Recurrent Fever, Night Sweats, and Small Bilateral Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Hashmi, Hafiz Rizwan Talib; Niazi, Masooma; Adrish, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    A woman in her 30s presented with recurrent low-grade fever and cough (onset, 1 week). She reported occasional night sweats and weight loss of approximately 20 pounds over the past 4 months. She denied nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, or any urinary complaints. Her past medical history was significant for chronic hepatitis C and HIV infection, the latter diagnosed in 2001. She was noncompliant with highly active antiretroviral therapy for more than 4 years and had pneumocystis pneumonia 2 years prior to this presentation. She had a 10-pack per year smoking history and reported active use of cocaine and heroin. The patient denied any occupational exposures. PMID:27287594

  17. Tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis as an off-target of sulfa drugs.

    PubMed

    Haruki, Hirohito; Pedersen, Miriam Grønlund; Gorska, Katarzyna Irena; Pojer, Florence; Johnsson, Kai

    2013-05-24

    The introduction of sulfa drugs for the chemotherapy of bacterial infections in 1935 revolutionized medicine. Although their mechanism of action is understood, the molecular bases for most of their side effects remain obscure. Here, we report that sulfamethoxazole and other sulfa drugs interfere with tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis through inhibition of sepiapterin reductase. Crystal structures of sepiapterin reductase with bound sulfa drugs reveal how structurally diverse sulfa drugs achieve specific inhibition of the enzyme. The effect of sulfa drugs on tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent neurotransmitter biosynthesis in cell-based assays provides a rationale for some of their central nervous system-related side effects, particularly in high-dose sulfamethoxazole therapy of Pneumocystis pneumonia. Our findings reveal an unexpected aspect of the pharmacology of sulfa drugs and might translate into their improved medical use.

  18. Sulfa hypersensitivity in patients with HIV infection: onset, treatment, critical review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ryan, C; Madalon, M; Wortham, D W; Graziano, F M

    1998-05-01

    Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole is the most effective medication used in both the treatment and prevention of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in patients with HIV/AIDS. Its use, however, is accompanied by a high incidence of adverse reactions, especially fever, myalgia and rash (sulfa hypersensitivity). In a group of our patients, we have examined the clinical parameters at the time of onset of sulfa hypersensitivity, and the success of a desensitization protocol for this adverse event. We also have performed a comprehensive review of the literature on sulfa hypersensitivity and have compared our results to those previously reported in the literature. Our findings indicate that the sulfa hypersensitivity reaction is more likely to develop in patients with advanced disease and that desensitization can restore tolerability to the drug in approximately two thirds of those who attempt it.

  19. Disseminated bilateral chorioretinitis due to Histoplasma capsulatum in a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Macher, A; Rodrigues, M M; Kaplan, W; Pistole, M C; McKittrick, A; Lawrinson, W E; Reichert, C M

    1985-08-01

    A 31-year-old white male homosexual was healthy until March 1984, when he developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, which resolved with treatment. In April 1984 he developed fever, followed by hepatosplenomegaly, headaches, blurred vision, pancytopenia and pulmonary infiltrates. On June 11, intracytoplasmic yeast were noted within leukocytes on a peripheral blood smear, and amphotericin B was started. The patient developed progressive respiratory and renal insufficiency and died on June 13, 1984. Autopsy histopathology demonstrated disseminated histoplasmosis and Histoplasma capsulatum was cultured from numerous tissues. Ocular histopathologic examination using special fungal stains and electron microscopy revealed numerous budding yeasts characteristic of Histoplasma capsulatum in the choroid, retina and central retinal vein. Their identification as H. capsulatum was confirmed by immunofluorescent staining.

  20. Pathogens in children with severe combined immune deficiency disease or AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Lauzon, D; Delage, G; Brochu, P; Michaud, J; Jasmin, G; Joncas, J H; Lapointe, N

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated the frequency and severity of illnesses caused by various microbial pathogens in 15 children with severe combined immune deficiency disease (SCID) and 8 with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). There were 35 viral, 23 bacterial, 19 mycotic and 13 parasitic infections. Nineteen of the 23 patients died of infection; Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, giant-cell pneumonia due to paramyxoviruses and various disseminated viral infections were responsible for most deaths in both groups. The emerging role of paramyxoviruses was illustrated by the fact that they were responsible for giant-cell pneumonia in seven patients. Viral enteric infections were frequent in both groups. The variety of infectious microorganisms and the severity of resulting illnesses in the patients with AIDS were similar to those in the patients with SCID. Images Fig. 1 PMID:3719484

  1. Pneumocystosis in wild small mammals from California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laakkonen, Juha; Fisher, Robert N.; Case, Ted J.

    2001-01-01

    Cyst forms of the opportunistic fungal parasite Pneumocystis carinii were found in the lungs of 34% of the desert shrew, Notiosorex crawfordi (n = 59), 13% of the ornate shrew, Sorex ornatus (n = 55), 6% of the dusky-footed wood rat, Neotoma fuscipes (n = 16), 2.5% of the California meadow vole,Microtus californicus (n = 40), and 50% of the California pocket mouse, Chaetodipus californicus (n= 2) caught from southern California between February 1998 and February 2000. Cysts were not found in any of the harvest mouse, Reithrodontomys megalotis (n = 21), California mouse,Peromyscus californicus (n = 20), brush mouse, Peromyscus boylii (n = 7) or deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus (n = 4) examined. All infections were mild; extrapulmonary infections were not observed. Other lung parasites detected were Hepatozoon sp./spp. from M. californicus andNotiosorex crawfordi, Chrysosporium sp. (Emmonsia) from M. californicus, and a nematode from S. ornatus.

  2. [Triple fungal infection in a patient with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Alidjinou, Kazali; Mathieu, Daniel; Colombel, Jean Frédéric; François, Nadine; Poulain, Daniel; Sendid, Boualem

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of invasive mycoses is increasing, especially among patients who are immunocompromised or hospitalized with serious underlying diseases. Such infections are associated with a high morbidity and significant mortality, requiring early diagnosis and appropriate treatment but also an optimal prophylaxis in patients with high risk factors. We report a case of triple fungal infection including an invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by Aspergillus fumigatus, a candidemia by Candida albicans and a Pneumocystis pneumonia. The overall clinical picture of this patient was liver cirrhosis with medical history of immunosuppressive treatment for Crohn disease and a non-hodgkin lymphoma. There was no antifungal prophylaxis for this patient. Under treatment, the issue was unfavourable with multivisceral failure.

  3. Guidelines for the naming of genes, gene products, and mutants in the opportunistic protists.

    PubMed

    Limper, Andrew H; Weiss, Louis M

    2011-01-01

    The opportunistic protists encompass a wide diversity of organisms including Pneumocystis, Toxoplasma, cryptosporidia, microsporidia, and related genera. Recent advances in the molecular biology and cellular biochemistry of these organisms have led to the identification of an ever growing numbers of key genes and their cognate proteins. Until now, these molecules have not been designated using any consistent nomenclature system, leading to considerable confusion. The participants of the 11th International Workshop on Opportunistic Protists met on August 3, 2010 to reach consensus of a nomenclature system for genes, gene products, and mutants in the opportunistic protists. The following summary reports the consensus agreement to move toward a unified nomenclature system for these organisms. The system is adapted from that used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  4. Protists as opportunistic pathogens: public health impact in the 1990s and beyond.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J E; Jones, J L; Dykewicz, C A

    2000-01-01

    Protist organisms (protozoa and fungi) have become increasingly prominent as opportunistic pathogens among persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and among organ transplant recipients--two immunocompromised populations that have increased dramatically in the past two decades. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia continues to be the most common serious opportunistic infection (OI) among HIV-infected persons in the United States, occurring frequently among persons not previously receiving medical care. Toxoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, cryptosporidiosis, and isosporiasis occur frequently in HIV-infected persons in the developing world. Candidiasis and aspergillosis are common OIs in organ transplant recipients. As these populations of immunosuppressed patients continue to expand worldwide new OIs caused by protist pathogens are likely to emerge.

  5. Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex as protein-losing enteropathy in a non-HIV patient.

    PubMed

    Konjeti, Venkata Rajesh; Paluri, Sravanthi

    2014-01-01

    Disseminated mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) causing protein-losing enteropathy (PLE) due to intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) in a non-HIV immunocompromised state is extremely rare. We present a case of 56-year-old male who was evaluated for worsening dyspnea and found to have right-sided chylous pleural effusion as well as worsening abdominal and retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy. He had a history of psoriasis for which hewas on etanercept and alefacept which were stopped two years prior to the presentation. The evaluation revealed a MAC infection in his lymph nodes--a low CD4 count but negative for HIV. He was started on MAC therapy. He subsequently developed noninfectious diarrhea, Hypoalbuminemia, recurrentpleural effusions, ascites, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP). Despite appropriate antibiotics and management--including total parental nutrition (TPN) with a medium-chain triglyceride enriched low fat diet--the patient's clinical condition deteriorated rapidly resulting in death. PMID:25672059

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Allergic Bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Galiatsatos, Panagis; Melia, Michael T.; Silhan, Leann L.

    2016-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) results from a hypersensitivity response to airways colonization with Aspergillus fumigatus, and it occurs most often in individuals with asthma or cystic fibrosis. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is an indolent, but potentially progressive, disease in patients. In patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), ABPA is rare, and its description in the literature is limited to case reports. We describe the occurrence of ABPA in a 37-year-old woman with well controlled HIV infection. This represents the first documented case of ABPA in an HIV-infected patient whose only pulmonary comorbidity included the ramifications of prior acute respiratory distress syndrome due to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. We also review prior case reports of ABPA in HIV-infected patients and consider risk factors for its development. PMID:27419184

  7. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: Ga-67 citrate imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Woolfenden, J.M.; Carrasquillo, J.A.; Larson, S.M.; Simmons, J.T.; Masur, H.; Smith, P.D.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Ognibene, F.P.

    1987-02-01

    All gallium-67 citrate scans obtained in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, Md.) were retrospectively analyzed and correlated with the results of bronchoscopy, chest radiography, and endoscopy. There were 164 scans of 95 patients. Twenty scans were from patients with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia; 19 were abnormal, for a sensitivity of 95%. Ga-67 uptake tended to be less in patients receiving therapy for P. carinii pneumonia. Chest radiographs were normal at least initially in three patients with abnormal scans and P. carinii pneumonia. Unusually prominent colonic activity was associated with infection in some patients. No lesions of Kaposi sarcoma showed tracer uptake. Gallium scanning is useful for detecting P. carinii pneumonia and other opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS, but it is not useful for localizing Kaposi sarcoma.

  8. Gallium-67 scans of the chest in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.J.; Garay, S.M.; Greene, J.B.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.; McCauley, D.I.

    1987-07-01

    Eighty-six (/sup 67/Ga)citrate chest scans were performed in 71 adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Forty-five of these patients also had Kaposi's sarcoma. Only 29 of 57 abnormal scans were correlated with abnormal chest radiographs. Chest radiographs were negative for 27 scans and unavailable for one. Several scan patterns were seen. Diffusely increased lung uptake was seen most commonly with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, but also other infections and noninfectious inflammatory conditions. Focal uptake corresponding to regional lymph node groups occurred most often with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare but aslo with lymphoma. Localized intrapulmonary uptake was seen in bacterial pneumonias. Perihilar activity occurred in two cases. When chest radiographs were abnormal and /sup 67/Ga scans negative, the most common diagnosis was pulmonary Kaposi's sarcoma.

  9. [Czech eponyms in pathology].

    PubMed

    Steiner, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    The 24th European Congress of Pathology taking place in Prague is an opportunity to remind our society of the Czech names appearing as eponyms in pathological terminology: Karel Rokitanský - R. protuberance in dermoid cyst; R. thrombogenic theory of atherosclerosis; Mayer - R. - Küster - Hauser - Winckel syndrome (congenital malformation of the vagina and uterus); Václav Treitz - T. duodenal ligament; T. retroperitoneal hernia; T. uremic colitis; Vilém Dušan Lambl - L. excrescences of heart valves; Lamblia (Giardia) intestinalis, and also the foundation of urological cytology; Stanislav Provázek - Prowazek - Halberstädter bodies (trachoma), Rickettsia Prowazeki (typhus fever); Josef Vaněk - V. tumor (gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp), and also discovery of the etiology of pneumocystic pneumonia; Otto Jírovec - Pneumocystis Jiroveci; Blahoslav Bednář - B. tumor (pigmented dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans).

  10. Pneumocystosis in wild small mammals from California.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, J; Fisher, R N; Case, T J

    2001-04-01

    Cyst forms of the opportunistic fungal parasite Pneumocystis carinii were found in the lungs of 34% of the desert shrew, Notiosorex crawfordi (n = 59), 13% of the ornate shrew, Sorex ornatus (n = 55), 6% of the dusky-footed wood rat, Neotoma fuscipes (n = 16), 2.5% of the California meadow vole, Microtus californicus (n = 40), and 50% of the California pocket mouse, Chaetodipus californicus (n = 2) caught from southern California between February 1998 and February 2000. Cysts were not found in any of the harvest mouse, Reithrodontomys megalotis (n = 21), California mouse, Peromyscus californicus (n = 20), brush mouse, Peromyscus boylii (n = 7) or deer mouse, Peromyscus maniculatus (n = 4) examined. All infections were mild; extrapulmonary infections were not observed. Other lung parasites detected were Hepatozoon sp./spp. from M. californicus and Notiosorex crawfordi, Chrysosporium sp. (Emmonsia) from M. californicus, and a nematode from S. ornatus. PMID:11310900

  11. The burden of serious fungal diseases in Russia.

    PubMed

    Klimko, N; Kozlova, Y; Khostelidi, S; Shadrivova, O; Borzova, Y; Burygina, E; Vasilieva, N; Denning, D W

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of fungal infections in Russia is unknown. We estimated the burden of fungal infections in Russia according to the methodology of the LIFE program (www.LIFE-worldwide.org). The total number of patients with serious and chronic mycoses in Russia in 2011 was three million. Most of these patients (2,607,494) had superficial fungal infections (recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis, oral and oesophageal candidiasis with HIV infection and tinea capitis). Invasive and chronic fungal infections (invasive candidiasis, invasive and chronic aspergillosis, cryptococcal meningitis, mucormycosis and Pneumocystis pneumonia) affected 69,331 patients. The total number of adults with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and severe asthma with fungal sensitisation was 406,082.

  12. Small intestinal lymphoma in three patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, J J; Bridges, N; Feiner, H D; Valensi, Q

    1985-01-01

    Three cases of small bowel lymphoma in young homosexual men are presented. All three had acquired immune deficiency syndrome as demonstrated by demography, sexual history, cachexia, opportunistic infections by Cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis carinii, atypical Mycobacterium, Candida, and/or evidence of immune deficiency, such as skin test anergy, lymphopenia, inversion of T-helper/T-suppressor ratio, and diminished lymphocyte response to either phytohemmaglutinin or pokeweed mitogen. All had peripheral and/or abdominal lymphadenopathy, and gastrointestinal symptoms, e.g., diarrhea, spasms, constipation, and oral candidiasis. The diagnosis of lymphoma was made at laparotomy in all cases. All three had complete removal of localized tumor (stage Ie or IIe), yet died within 6 months of surgery and/or chemotherapy. Thus gastrointestinal complaints may not always be related to "gay bowel" syndrome, or other infectious diseases in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Small intestinal lymphoma should be added to the list of neoplasms to which this group is susceptible.

  13. [Consortium for detection and management of lung damage induced by bleomycin].

    PubMed

    Biya, Josette; Stoclin, Annabelle; Dury, Sandra; Le Pavec, Jérôme; Mir, Olivier; Lazarovici, Julien; Fermé, Christophe; Annereau, Maxime; Ekpe, Kenneth; Massard, Christophe; Michot, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Bleomycin is a cytotoxic antibiotic and a component of chemotherapy regimens of germ cell tumors and lymphoma. Bleomycin lung injuries occur in 10% of patients, and lead to severe interstitial pneumonia in 3% of patients. Pulmonary toxicity is related to endothelial cells injury induce by free radicals and inflammatory cytokines. Diagnosis of bleomycin-induced lung toxicity is based on the combination of clinical and radiological features, and requires to rule out differential diagnoses including pneumocystis. "Bleomycin-induced pneumonitis" is the most frequent pattern; eosinophilic pneumonitis and organizing pneumonia are rarer. Occurrence of bleomycin lung toxicity requires an immediate and often permanent discontinuation. Treatment is based on steroid. Regular clinical and pulmonary function tests monitoring are mandatory for early detection of bleomycin-induced lung toxicity. PMID:27241272

  14. Diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of lung infiltrates in febrile neutropenic patients (allogeneic SCT excluded): updated guidelines of the Infectious Diseases Working Party (AGIHO) of the German Society of Hematology and Medical Oncology (DGHO)†

    PubMed Central

    Maschmeyer, G.; Carratalà, J.; Buchheidt, D.; Hamprecht, A.; Heussel, C. P.; Kahl, C.; Lorenz, J.; Neumann, S.; Rieger, C.; Ruhnke, M.; Salwender, H.; Schmidt-Hieber, M.; Azoulay, E.

    2015-01-01

    Up to 25% of patients with profound neutropenia lasting for >10 days develop lung infiltrates, which frequently do not respond to broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy. While a causative pathogen remains undetected in the majority of cases, Aspergillus spp., Pneumocystis jirovecii, multi-resistant Gram-negative pathogens, mycobacteria or respiratory viruses may be involved. In at-risk patients who have received trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) prophylaxis, filamentous fungal pathogens appear to be predominant, yet commonly not proven at the time of treatment initiation. Pathogens isolated from blood cultures, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or respiratory secretions are not always relevant for the etiology of pulmonary infiltrates and should therefore be interpreted critically. Laboratory tests for detecting Aspergillus galactomannan, β-d-glucan or DNA from blood, BAL or tissue samples may facilitate the diagnosis; however, most polymerase chain reaction assays are not yet standardized and validated. Apart from infectious agents, pulmonary side-effects from cytotoxic drugs, radiotherapy or pulmonary involvement by the underlying malignancy should be included into differential diagnosis and eventually be clarified by invasive diagnostic procedures. Pre-emptive treatment with mold-active systemic antifungal agents improves clinical outcome, while other microorganisms are preferably treated only when microbiologically documented. High-dose TMP/SMX is first choice for treatment of Pneumocystis pneumonia, while cytomegalovirus pneumonia is treated primarily with ganciclovir or foscarnet in most patients. In a considerable number of patients, clinical outcome may be favorable despite respiratory failure, so that intensive care should be unrestrictedly provided in patients whose prognosis is not desperate due to other reasons. PMID:24833776

  15. A fatal case of acute interstitial pneumonia (AIP) in a woman affected by glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Balzarini, Laura; Mancini, Chiara; Marvisi, Maurizio

    2014-03-01

    This report presents the case of a 67-year-old woman affected by glioblastoma. After a few days of adjuvant therapy with temozolomide and prophylaxis with trimetrophin-sulfamethoxazolo to prevent Pneumocystis Jiroveci, she had progressive and rapid worsening of symptoms with weakness, dyspnea and orthopnea. She had peripheral edema and proximal hyposthenia of the lower limbs. Chest CT showed bilateral ground-glass opacities and laboratory exams revealed hypoxemia and hypocapnia, an initial reduction in platelet and white blood cells, and an elevation of LDH, AST, ALT, and active urinary sediment. Blood cultures, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) data and transbronchial biopsy showed no infections, and in particular no evidence of Pneumocystis Jiroveci pneumonia. Histological examination revealed a typical pattern of AIP. She was treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics and high-dose steroids. The symptoms worsened and respiratory failure required mechanical ventilation. The pneumonia was not responsive to medical or invasive care. She died after ten days of hospitalization. At present very little can be found in the literature about lung toxicity caused by temozolomide. This case can be added as a new report describing this risk. The combination therapy with temozolamide and trimetophin-sulfamethoxazolo could have a synergistic action inducing various forms of pulmonary toxicity. ESTABLISHED FACTS: Acute interstitial pneumonia is a common manifestation of lung toxicity caused by drugs. The clinical course is favorable with a good response to corticosteroids. NOVEL INSIGHT: This is the first fatal case of lung toxicity caused by Temozolomide. Clinicians must be aware that a combination therapy including trimetophin-sulfamethoxazolo could have a synergistic action in inducing pulmonary toxicity.

  16. Trimethoprim-associated hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Babayev, Revekka; Terner, Sofia; Chandra, Subani; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Mohan, Sumit

    2013-12-01

    Hyponatremia associated with diuretic use can be clinically difficult to differentiate from the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH). We report a case of a 28-year-old man with HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) and Pneumocystis pneumonia who developed hyponatremia while receiving trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX). Serum sodium level on admission was 135 mEq/L (with a history of hyponatremia) and decreased to 117 mEq/L by day 7 of TMP/SMX treatment. In the setting of suspected euvolemia and Pneumocystis pneumonia, he was treated initially for SIADH with fluid restriction and tolvaptan without improvement in serum sodium level. A diagnosis of hyponatremia secondary to the diuretic effect of TMP subsequently was confirmed, with clinical hypovolemia and high renin, aldosterone, and urinary sodium levels. Subsequent therapy with sodium chloride stabilized serum sodium levels in the 126- to 129-mEq/L range. After discontinuation of TMP/SMX treatment, serum sodium, renin, and aldosterone levels normalized. TMP/SMX-related hyponatremia likely is underdiagnosed and often mistaken for SIADH. It should be considered for patients on high-dose TMP/SMX treatment and can be differentiated from SIADH by clinical hypovolemia (confirmed by high renin and aldosterone levels). TMP-associated hyponatremia can be treated with sodium supplementation to offset ongoing urinary losses if the TMP/SMX therapy cannot be discontinued. In this Acid-Base and Electrolyte Teaching Case, a less common cause of hyponatremia is presented, and a stepwise approach to the diagnosis is illustrated.

  17. Topographic Diversity of the Respiratory Tract Mycobiome and Alteration in HIV and Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Lijia; Lucht, Lorrie; Tipton, Laura; Rogers, Matthew B.; Fitch, Adam; Kessinger, Cathy; Camp, Danielle; Kingsley, Lawrence; Leo, Nicolas; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Fong, Serena; Stone, Stephen; Dermand, John C.; Kleerup, Eric C.; Huang, Laurence; Ghedin, Elodie

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Microbiome studies typically focus on bacteria, but fungal species are common in many body sites and can have profound effects on the host. Wide gaps exist in the understanding of the fungal microbiome (mycobiome) and its relationship to lung disease. Objectives: To characterize the mycobiome at different respiratory tract levels in persons with and without HIV infection and in HIV-infected individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: Oral washes (OW), induced sputa (IS), and bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were collected from 56 participants. We performed 18S and internal transcribed spacer sequencing and used the neutral model to identify fungal species that are likely residents of the lung. We used ubiquity–ubiquity plots, random forest, logistic regression, and metastats to compare fungal communities by HIV status and presence of COPD. Measurements and Main Results: Mycobiomes of OW, IS, and BAL shared common organisms, but each also had distinct members. Candida was dominant in OW and IS, but BAL had 39 fungal species that were disproportionately more abundant than in the OW. Fungal communities in BAL differed significantly by HIV status and by COPD, with Pneumocystis jirovecii significantly overrepresented in both groups. Other fungal species were also identified as differing in HIV and COPD. Conclusions: This study systematically examined the respiratory tract mycobiome in a relatively large group. By identifying Pneumocystis and other fungal species as overrepresented in the lung in HIV and in COPD, it is the first to determine alterations in fungal communities associated with lung dysfunction and/or HIV, highlighting the clinical relevance of these findings. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00870857). PMID:25603113

  18. Value of bronchoalveolar lavage in the management of severe acute pneumonia and interstitial pneumonitis in the immunocompromised child.

    PubMed Central

    de Blic, J; McKelvie, P; Le Bourgeois, M; Blanche, S; Benoist, M R; Scheinmann, P

    1987-01-01

    The diagnostic value of 73 bronchoalveolar lavages was assessed in 67 immunocompromised children (aged 3 months to 16 years) with pulmonary infiltrates. Thirty one children had primary and 19 secondary immune deficiency, 14 acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and three AIDS related complex. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed during fibreoptic bronchoscopy, under local anaesthesia in all but two. One or more infective agents was found in eight of 11 patients with severe acute pneumonia and in 26 of 62 patients with interstitial pneumonitis. In interstitial pneumonitis, the most frequently encountered agents were Pneumocystis carinii (12), cytomegalovirus (8), and Aspergillus fumigatus (3). The yield was related to the severity of interstitial pneumonitis. The mean cellular count and cytological profile in lavage returns from patients with varying infective agents or underlying pathological conditions showed no significant difference, except in those children with AIDS and AIDS related complex who had appreciable lymphocytosis (mean percentage of lymphocytes 28 (SD 17]. In children with AIDS and chronic interstitial pneumonitis lymphocytosis without pneumocystis infection was observed in eight of nine bronchoalveolar lavage returns and was suggestive of pulmonary lymphoid hyperplasia. Finally, bronchoalveolar lavage produced a specific diagnosis from the microbiological or cytological findings in 44 instances (60%). Transient exacerbation of tachypnoea was observed in the most severely ill children but there was no case of respiratory decompensation attributable to the bronchoscopy. Bronchoalveolar lavage is a safe and rapid examination for the investigation of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised children. It should be performed as a first line investigation and should reduce the use of open lung biopsy techniques. PMID:2827334

  19. How to manage lung infiltrates in adults suffering from haematological malignancies outside allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maschmeyer, Georg; Donnelly, J Peter

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary complications affect up to 40% of patients with severe neutropenia lasting for more than 10 d. As they are frequently associated with fever and elevation of C-reactive protein or other signs of inflammation, they are mostly handled as pneumonia. However, the differential diagnosis is broad, and a causative microbial agent remains undetected in the majority of cases. Pulmonary side effects from cytotoxic treatment or pulmonary involvement by the underlying malignancy must always be taken into account and may provide grounds for invasive diagnostic procedures in selected patients. Pneumocystis jirovecii (in patients not receiving co-trimoxazole as prophylaxis), multi-resistant gram-negative bacilli, mycobacteria or respiratory viruses may be involved. High-risk patients may be infected by filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus spp., but these infections are seldom proven when treatment is initiated. Microorganisms isolated from cultures of blood, bronchoalveolar lavage or respiratory secretions need careful interpretation as they may be irrelevant for determining the aetiology of pulmonary infiltrates, particularly when cultures yield coagulase-negative staphylococci, enterococci or Candida species. Non-culture based diagnostics for detecting Aspergillus galactomannan, beta-D-glucan or DNA from blood, bronchoalveolar lavage or tissue samples can facilitate the diagnosis, but must always be interpreted in the context of clinical and imaging findings. Systemic antifungal treatment with mould-active agents, given in combination with broad-spectrum antibiotics, improves clinical outcome when given pre-emptively. Co-trimoxazole remains the first-line treatment for Pneumocystis pneumonia, while cytomegalovirus pneumonia will respond to ganciclovir or foscarnet in most cases. The clinical outcome of acute respiratory failure can also be successful with proper intensive care, when indicated. PMID:26729577

  20. Structural analysis of a holoenzyme complex of mouse dihydrofolate reductase with NADPH and a ternary complex with the potent and selective inhibitor 2, 4-diamino-6-(2′-hydroxydibenz[b, f]azepin-5-yl)methylpteridine

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Rosowsky, Andre

    2008-09-01

    The structures of mouse DHFR holo enzyme and a ternary complex with NADPH and a potent inhibitor are described. It has been shown that 2, 4-diamino-6-arylmethylpteridines and 2, 4-diamino-5-arylmethylpyrimidines containing an O-carboxylalkyloxy group in the aryl moiety are potent and selective inhibitors of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from opportunistic pathogens such as Pneumocystis carinii, the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV/AIDS patients. In order to understand the structure–activity profile observed for a series of substituted dibenz[b, f]azepine antifolates, the crystal structures of mouse DHFR (mDHFR; a mammalian homologue) holo and ternary complexes with NADPH and the inhibitor 2, 4-diamino-6-(2′-hydroxydibenz[b, f]azepin-5-yl)methylpteridine were determined to 1.9 and 1.4 Å resolution, respectively. Structural data for the ternary complex with the potent O-(3-carboxypropyl) inhibitor PT684 revealed no electron density for the O-carboxylalkyloxy side chain. The side chain was either cleaved or completely disordered. The electron density fitted the less potent hydroxyl compound PT684a. Additionally, cocrystallization of mDHFR with NADPH and the less potent 2′-(4-carboxybenzyl) inhibitor PT682 showed no electron density for the inhibitor and resulted in the first report of a holoenzyme complex despite several attempts at crystallization of a ternary complex. Modeling data of PT682 in the active site of mDHFR and P. carinii DHFR (pcDHFR) indicate that binding would require ligand-induced conformational changes to the enzyme for the inhibitor to fit into the active site or that the inhibitor side chain would have to adopt an alternative binding mode to that observed for other carboxyalkyloxy inhibitors. These data also show that the mDHFR complexes have a decreased active-site volume as reflected in the relative shift of helix C (residues 59–64) by 0.6 Å compared with pcDHFR ternary complexes. These data are consistent with the

  1. Spectrum of Opportunistic Infections and Risk Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of Admitted AIDS Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bin; Sun, Jianjun; Cai, Rentian; Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiangrong; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Jiayin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the frequency and the spectrum of major opportunistic infections (OIs), evaluate the major clinical factors associated with each specific OI, and identify the risk factors for in-hospital death among HIV patients in East China. A retrospective cohort study was made including all the HIV-infected patients who were admitted for the first time to the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center during June 1, 2013 to June 1, 2015. The demographic and clinical data were collected. Comparison of continuous variables was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and rank sum test. Person χ2 test and Fisher exact test were applied to analyze the categorical variables. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the risk for the occurrence of in-hospital death. In total, 920 patients were enrolled with age of 41.59 ± 13.36 years and 91% male. Median CD4 was 34 (IQR, 13–94) cells/μL. Among these patients, 94.7% acquired OIs while the rest developed malignancies. Pneumocystis pneumonia and bacterial coinfection (42.1%) was found to be the most common OIs, followed by tuberculosis (31.4%), CMV (20.9%), Cryptococcosis (9.0%), and MAC infection (5.2%). Of the above 5 major OIs, CMV-infected patients had the lowest median CD4 cell count 22.50 (IQR, 7.50–82.00) while the patients with tuberculosis infection had the highest count 61.00 (IQR, 27.00–176.00). In-hospital death rate was 4.2 per 100 person-years among these patients. Of note, admitted patients with 2 types of OIs (2.20, 95% CI 1.39–3.48) and those patients who were 40-year old or older (1.75, 95% CI 1.10–2.78) had a higher risk of such death. Pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis were still the leading causes for the admission of HIV-infected patients in East China, and these patients tended to have very low CD4 cell counts. It is believed that expanding the HIV screening test and pushing the infected ones get ART earlier is required for generating a more successful HIV management

  2. Spectrum of Opportunistic Infections and Risk Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of Admitted AIDS Patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Sun, Jianjun; Cai, Rentian; Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiangrong; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Jiayin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the frequency and the spectrum of major opportunistic infections (OIs), evaluate the major clinical factors associated with each specific OI, and identify the risk factors for in-hospital death among HIV patients in East China.A retrospective cohort study was made including all the HIV-infected patients who were admitted for the first time to the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center during June 1, 2013 to June 1, 2015. The demographic and clinical data were collected. Comparison of continuous variables was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and rank sum test. Person χ test and Fisher exact test were applied to analyze the categorical variables. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the risk for the occurrence of in-hospital death.In total, 920 patients were enrolled with age of 41.59 ± 13.36 years and 91% male. Median CD4 was 34 (IQR, 13-94) cells/μL. Among these patients, 94.7% acquired OIs while the rest developed malignancies. Pneumocystis pneumonia and bacterial coinfection (42.1%) was found to be the most common OIs, followed by tuberculosis (31.4%), CMV (20.9%), Cryptococcosis (9.0%), and MAC infection (5.2%). Of the above 5 major OIs, CMV-infected patients had the lowest median CD4 cell count 22.50 (IQR, 7.50-82.00) while the patients with tuberculosis infection had the highest count 61.00 (IQR, 27.00-176.00). In-hospital death rate was 4.2 per 100 person-years among these patients. Of note, admitted patients with 2 types of OIs (2.20, 95% CI 1.39-3.48) and those patients who were 40-year old or older (1.75, 95% CI 1.10-2.78) had a higher risk of such death.Pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis were still the leading causes for the admission of HIV-infected patients in East China, and these patients tended to have very low CD4 cell counts. It is believed that expanding the HIV screening test and pushing the infected ones get ART earlier is required for generating a more successful HIV management strategy.

  3. [Rituximab therapy in the treatment of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) -positive interstitial pneumonia: case report].

    PubMed

    Miyaoka, Tokiko; Itabashi, Mitsuyo; Kumon, Saeko; Akiyama, Kenichi; Iwabuchi, Yuko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Takahito; Takei, Takashi; Nitta, Kosaku

    2016-01-01

    pneumocystis pneumonia. In this case, rituximab was effective for IP due to MPA, but pneumocystis pneumonia could not be prevented in spite of prophylactic antibiotics. This case suggests that deliberative dose adjustments, careful patient observation, and prophylactic measures for infection are critical in rituximab treatment. PMID:26950980

  4. Primary brain tumors treated with steroids and radiotherapy: Low CD4 counts and risk of infection

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, Michael A.; Parisi, Michele; Grossman, Stuart; Kleinberg, Lawrence . E-mail: kleinla@jhmi.edu

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: Patients with primary brain tumors are often treated with high doses of corticosteroids for prolonged periods to reduce intracranial swelling and alleviate symptoms such as headaches. This treatment may lead to immunosuppression, placing the patient at risk of life-threatening opportunistic infections, such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. The risk of contracting some types of infection may be reduced with prophylactic antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to determine the occurrence of low CD4 counts and whether monitoring CD4 counts during and after radiotherapy (RT) is warranted. Methods and Materials: CD4 counts were measured during RT in 70 of 76 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed Grade III and IV astrocytoma and anaplastic oligodendroglioma treated with corticosteroids and seen at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Weekly CD4 measurements were taken in the most recent 25 patients. Prophylactic trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (160 mg/800 mg p.o. every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday) or dapsone (100 mg p.o. daily) in those with sulfa allergy was prescribed only if patients developed a low CD4 count. Carmustine chemotherapy wafers were placed at surgery in 23% of patients, evenly distributed between the groups. No patient received any other chemotherapy concurrent with RT. Results: CD4 counts decreased to <200/mm{sup 3} in 17 (24%) of 70 patients. For the 25 patients with weekly CD4 counts, all CD4 counts were >450/mm{sup 3} before RT, but 6 (24%) of 25 fell to <200/mm{sup 3} during RT. Patients with counts <200/mm{sup 3} were significantly more likely to be hospitalized (41% vs. 9%, p <0.01) and be hospitalized for infection (23% vs. 4%, p <0.05) during RT. Overall survival was not significantly different between the groups. All patients with low CD4 counts were treated with prophylactic antibiotics, and no patient developed Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. No patients developed a serious adverse reaction to antibiotic therapy. The mean dose of

  5. Structural Analysis of a Holoenzyme Complex of Mouse Dihydrofolate Reductase With NADPH And a Ternary Complex With the Potent And Selective Inhibitor 2,4-Diamino-6-(2'-Hydroxydibenz[b,F]azepin-5-YI)

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, V.; Pace, J.; Rosowsky, A.

    2009-05-12

    It has been shown that 2,4-diamino-6-arylmethylpteridines and 2,4-diamino-5-arylmethylpyrimidines containing an O-carboxylalkyloxy group in the aryl moiety are potent and selective inhibitors of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from opportunistic pathogens such as Pneumocystis carinii, the causative agent of Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV/AIDS patients. In order to understand the structure-activity profile observed for a series of substituted dibenz[b,f]azepine antifolates, the crystal structures of mouse DHFR (mDHFR; a mammalian homologue) holo and ternary complexes with NADPH and the inhibitor 2,4-diamino-6-(2{prime}-hydroxydibenz[b,f]azepin-5-yl)methylpteridine were determined to 1.9 and 1.4 A resolution, respectively. Structural data for the ternary complex with the potent O-(3-carboxypropyl) inhibitor PT684 revealed no electron density for the O-carboxylalkyloxy side chain. The side chain was either cleaved or completely disordered. The electron density fitted the less potent hydroxyl compound PT684a. Additionally, cocrystallization of mDHFR with NADPH and the less potent 2{prime}-(4-carboxybenzyl) inhibitor PT682 showed no electron density for the inhibitor and resulted in the first report of a holoenzyme complex despite several attempts at crystallization of a ternary complex. Modeling data of PT682 in the active site of mDHFR and P. carinii DHFR (pcDHFR) indicate that binding would require ligand-induced conformational changes to the enzyme for the inhibitor to fit into the active site or that the inhibitor side chain would have to adopt an alternative binding mode to that observed for other carboxyalkyloxy inhibitors. These data also show that the mDHFR complexes have a decreased active-site volume as reflected in the relative shift of helix C (residues 59-64) by 0.6 A compared with pcDHFR ternary complexes. These data are consistent with the greater inhibitory potency against pcDHFR.

  6. FungalRV: adhesin prediction and immunoinformatics portal for human fungal pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The availability of sequence data of human pathogenic fungi generates opportunities to develop Bioinformatics tools and resources for vaccine development towards benefitting at-risk patients. Description We have developed a fungal adhesin predictor and an immunoinformatics database with predicted adhesins. Based on literature search and domain analysis, we prepared a positive dataset comprising adhesin protein sequences from human fungal pathogens Candida albicans, Candida glabrata, Aspergillus fumigatus, Coccidioides immitis, Coccidioides posadasii, Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Pneumocystis carinii, Pneumocystis jirovecii and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The negative dataset consisted of proteins with high probability to function intracellularly. We have used 3945 compositional properties including frequencies of mono, doublet, triplet, and multiplets of amino acids and hydrophobic properties as input features of protein sequences to Support Vector Machine. Best classifiers were identified through an exhaustive search of 588 parameters and meeting the criteria of best Mathews Correlation Coefficient and lowest coefficient of variation among the 3 fold cross validation datasets. The "FungalRV adhesin predictor" was built on three models whose average Mathews Correlation Coefficient was in the range 0.89-0.90 and its coefficient of variation across three fold cross validation datasets in the range 1.2% - 2.74% at threshold score of 0. We obtained an overall MCC value of 0.8702 considering all 8 pathogens, namely, C. albicans, C. glabrata, A. fumigatus, B. dermatitidis, C. immitis, C. posadasii, H. capsulatum and P. brasiliensis thus showing high sensitivity and specificity at a threshold of 0.511. In case of P. brasiliensis the algorithm achieved a sensitivity of 66.67%. A total of 307 fungal adhesins and adhesin like proteins were predicted from the entire proteomes of eight human pathogenic fungal species. The immunoinformatics

  7. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets. PMID:26113584

  8. Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 in innate immunity against fungi.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro

    2011-08-01

    Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 are type II transmembrane proteins of the C-type lectin family with single carbohydrate recognition domains (CRDs) in their extracellular region. They are expressed mainly in dendritic cells and macrophages. Dectin-1 recognizes β-glucans with its CRD and transduces signals through its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-like motif in the cytoplasmic domain, whereas Dectin-2 recognizes α-mannans and transduces its signal through association with the ITAM-containing Fc receptor γ chain. Upon ligand binding, spleen tyrosine kinase is recruited to the ITAM and activates the caspase recruitment domain family member 9 (CARD9)-nuclear factor-κB axis, resulting in the activation of various genes including those encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines. Both β-glucans and α-mannans are major cell wall components of fungi including Candida albicans and Pneumocystis carinii. Recently, it was reported that Dectin-1 is important in protection against P. carinii by inducing reactive oxygen species, whereas both Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 play important roles in defense against C. albicans by preferentially inducing T(h)17 cell differentiation. In this review, we briefly revisit the structures, ligands, signal transduction and functional roles of Dectin-1 and Dectin-2 in host defense against fungal infection.

  9. Opportunistic Infections in Patients with HTLV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Toshiki; Sekioka, Toshio; Usui, Masakatsu

    2015-01-01

    As an acquired immunodeficiency, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is primarily responsible for opportunistic infections in infected patients. However, opportunistic infections also occur in individuals with human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. Here, we report opportunistic infections in two Japanese HTLV-1-seropositive patients. The first patient was a 67-year-old male, who had cytomegalovirus infection associated with esophagogastritis and terminal ileitis. The patient was HTLV-1-positive and was diagnosed with smoldering adult T cell leukemia (ATL). High levels of serum soluble IL-2 receptor (sIL-2R; 4,304 U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (75.5%) in peripheral blood were also detected. The second patient was a 78-year-old female, a known asymptomatic HTLV-1 carrier, who presented with persistent herpes zoster, followed by Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Disease progression of smoldering ATL along opportunistic infections was observed with very high levels of serum sIL-2R (14,058 U/mL) and an increased percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells (87.2%) in peripheral blood. In patients with suspected opportunistic infections, both HTLV-1 and HIV should be considered. In HTLV-1-positive patients, an increase in the CD4+CD25+ T cell subset may have its value as a prognostic marker. PMID:26693362

  10. Proceedings of the 2013 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan A.; Boyle, Michael C.; Boyle, Molly H.; Cora, Michelle C.; Crabbs, Torrie A.; Cummings, Connie A.; Gruebbel, Margarita M.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Malarkey, David E.; McInnes, Elizabeth F.; Nolte, Thomas; Shackelford, Cynthia C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri” was held in Portland, Oregon in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 32nd annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a caudal tail vertebra duplication in mice; nephroblastematosis in rats; ectopic C cell tumor in a hamster; granular cell aggregates/tumor in the uterus of a hamster; Pneumocystis carinii in the lung of a rat; iatrogenic chronic inflammation in the lungs of control rats; hepatoblastoma arising within an adenoma in a mouse; humoral hypercalcemia of benignancy in a transgenic mouse; acetaminophen induced hepatoxicity in rats; electron microscopy images of iatrogenic intraerythrocytic inclusions in transgenic mice; questionable hepatocellular degeneration/cell death/artifact in rats; atypical endometrial hyperplasia in rats; malignant mixed Müllerian tumors/carcinosarcomas in rats; differential diagnoses of proliferative lesions the intestine of rodents; and finally obstructive nephropathy caused by melamine poisoning in a rat. PMID:24334674

  11. Effects of pentamidine isethionate on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ludewig, G; Williams, J M; Li, Y; Staben, C

    1994-05-01

    We used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system in which to examine the mechanism of action of the anti-Pneumocystis drug pentamidine. Pentamidine at low concentrations inhibited S. cerevisiae growth on nonfermentable carbon sources (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] of 1.25 micrograms/ml in glycerol). Pentamidine inhibited growth on fermentable energy sources only at much higher concentrations (IC50 of 250 micrograms/ml in glucose). Inhibition at low pentamidine concentrations in glycerol was due to cytostatic activity rather than cytotoxic or mutagenic activity. Pentamidine also rapidly inhibited respiration by intact yeast cells, although inhibitory concentrations were much higher than those inhibitory to growth (IC50 of 100 micrograms/ml for respiration). Pentamidine also induced petite mutations, although only at concentrations much higher than those required for growth inhibition. These results suggest that a function essential for respiratory growth is inhibited by pentamidine and that pentamidine affects mitochondrial processes. We propose the hypothesis that the primary cellular target of pentamidine in S. cerevisiae is the mitochondrion.

  12. [Effects of combined addition of atovaquone and lithium on the in vitro cell growth of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans].

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Nobuko; Uehara, Mariko; Seki, Shiori; Nitta, Ayumi; Kogawara, Kento

    2010-02-01

    Atovaquone, an analog of ubiquinone, binds tightly to the ubiquinol oxidation site (Qo site) of parasite cytochrome bc(1) complex to inhibit electron transport at concentrations far lower than those at which the mammalian system is affected. The mode of action is thought similar to that of myxothiazol. To treat Pneumocystis jirovecii and Plasmodium falciparum infections, atovaquone has been used worldwide whereas it is unapproved in Japan. Since the pathogenic Candida species fungi seem resistant to atovaquone, this drug is not clinically available for candidosis, particularly deep mycosis. We examined the effects of atovaquone on cellular respiration and in vitro growth of C. albicans to explore a new therapeutic possibility for fungal infections. Atovaquone strongly inhibited glucose-dependent cellular respiration similarly to antimycin A, stigmatellin, and myxothiazol, specific bc(1) complex inhibitors. However, atovaquone suppressed glucose-dependent cell growth to a much lesser extent versus the comparator agents. When added alone, lithium exerted slight growth inhibition. The combined addition of lithium with atovaquone showed a significant increase in inhibition of growth. Although the way lithium acts synergistically with atovaquone remains to be elucidated, our results suggest a new therapeutic possibility of this combination for the treatment of candidosis.

  13. THE PATIENT-DOCTOR-PSYCHOLOGIST TRIANGLE IN A CASE Of SEVERE IMUNOSUPRESSION IN THE HIV INFECTION.

    PubMed

    Manciuc, Carmen; Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Badescu, Aida; Duceag, Letiţia Doina; Largu, Alexandra Maria

    2016-01-01

    In the last two years the Romanian adult population infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has increased due to sexual transmission, both heterosexual and homosexual. The case presented is that of a 33 year-old man, admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital in Iasi with acute respiratory failure and a confirmation of Kaposi's sarcoma. Tests later proved positive for HIV, the patient being included in the stage AIDS C3 (acute immunodeficiency syndrome). The respiratory failure was suspected to be caused by Pneumocystis carinii and cotrimoxazol therapy, oxygen therapy and anti-retroviral therapy were established. He was also referred to the oncology hospital for treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. The patient's adherence to therapy was influenced by a strong doctor-patient relationship, as well as by psychological counseling and support. Creating a functional doctor-patient-psychologist team is key throughout the HIV-positive patient's existence, for supporting long term adherence to therapy and acceptance of the diagnosis. This case highlights the need for a strong psychosocial compartment in every medical center that deals with HIV-infected individuals. PMID:27125083

  14. Pentamidine analogs as inhibitors of [3H]MK-801 and [3H]ifenprodil binding to rat brain NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Michael L.; Maciejewska, Dorota; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques; Mottamal, Madhusoodanan; Żabiński, Jerzy; Kaźmierczak, Paweł; Rezler, Mateusz; Jarak, Ivana; Piantanida, Ivo; Karminski-Zamola, Grace; Mayence, Annie; Rebernik, Patrick; Kumar, Arvind; Ismail, Mohamed A.; Boykin, David W.; Huang, Tien L.

    2016-01-01

    The anti-protozoal drug pentamidine is active against opportunistic Pneumocystis pneumonia, but in addition has several other biological targets, including the NMDA receptor (NR). Here we describe the inhibitory potencies of 76 pentamidine analogs at 2 binding sites of the NR, the channel binding site labeled with [3H]MK-801 and the [3H]ifenprodil binding site. Most analogs acted weaker at the ifenprodil than at the channel site. The spermine-sensitivity of NR inhibition by the majority of the compounds was reminiscent of other long-chain dicationic NR blockers. The potency of the parent compound as NR blocker was increased by modifying the heteroatoms in the bridge connecting the 2 benzamidine moieties and also by integrating the bridge into a seven-membered ring. Docking of the 45 most spermine-sensitive bisbenzamidines to a recently described acidic interface between the N-terminal domains of GluN1 and GluN2B mediating polyamine stimulation of the NR revealed the domain contributed by GluN1 as the most relevant target. PMID:26117647

  15. Infections Following Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Arnow, Paul M.

    1991-01-01

    The epidemiology of infections associated with orthotopic liver transplantation is summarized herein, and approaches to prophylaxis are outlined. Infection is a major complication following orthotopic liver transplantation, and more than half of transplant recipients develop at least one infection. The risk of infection is highest in the first month after transplantation, and the most common pathogens are bacteria and cytomegalovirus (CMV). Bacterial infections usually occur in the first month, arise in the abdomen, and are caused by aerobes. The peak incidence of CMV infection is late in the first month and early in the second month after transplantationn. CMV syndromes include fever and neutropenia, hepatitis, pneumonitis, gut ulceration, and disseminated infection. Other significant problems are Candida intraabdominal infection, Herpes simplex mucocutaneous infection or hepatitis, adenovirus hepatitis, and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Prophylaxis of infection in liver transplant recipients has not been well-studied. Several different regimens of parenteral, oral absorbable, and/or oral non-absorbable antibiotics active against bacteria and yeast have been used at various centers, but no randomized controlled trials have been conducted. Selective bowel decontamination appears to be a promising approach to the prevention of bacterial and Candida infections, while oral acyclovir may be a relatively convenient and effective agent for CMV prophylaxis. PMID:1650245

  16. [Pneumocystosis in non-HIV-infected immunocompromised patients].

    PubMed

    Fillâtre, P; Revest, M; Belaz, S; Robert-Gangneux, F; Zahar, J-R; Roblot, F; Tattevin, P

    2016-05-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly P. carinii) is an opportunistic fungus responsible for pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Pneumocystosis in non-HIV-infected patients differs from AIDS-associated pneumocystosis in mostly two aspects: diagnosis is more difficult, and prognosis is worse. Hence, efforts should be made to target immunocompromised patients at higher risk of pneumocystosis, so that they are prescribed long-term, low-dose, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, highly effective for pneumocystosis prophylaxis. Patients at highest risk include those with medium and small vessels vasculitis, lymphoproliferative B disorders (chronic or acute lymphocytic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and solid cancer on long-term corticosteroids. Conversely, widespread use of prophylaxis in all patients carrier of inflammatory diseases on long-term corticosteroids is not warranted. The management of pneumocystosis in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients follows the rules established for AIDS patients. The diagnosis relies on the detection of P. jiroveci cyst on respiratory samples, while PCR does not reliably discriminate infection from colonization, in 2015. High-doses trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is, by far, the treatment of choice. The benefit of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy for hypoxic patients, well documented in AIDS patients, has a much lower level of evidence in non-HIV-infected patients, most of them being already on corticosteroid by the time of pneumocystosis diagnosis anyway. However, based on its striking impact on morbi-mortality in AIDS patients, adjuvant corticosteroid is recommended in hypoxic, non-HIV-infected patients with pneumocystosis by many experts and scientific societies.

  17. 99mTc-human immunoglobulin (HIG) in AIDS patients: first results.

    PubMed

    Galli, G; Salvatori, M; Antoni, M; Ortona, L; Ventura, G; Maiuro, G; Pirronti, T; Marano, P

    1991-01-01

    Scintigraphy with 99mTc labelled human polyclonal immunoglobulin was performed in 16 patients with ascertained or suspected AIDS-related infections. 99mTc-HIG lung scanning was compared, in 11 patients, with 67Ga scintigraphy, chest X-ray and high resolution lung CT. 67Ga and 99mTc-HIG were concordantly positive in five cases of BAL-ascertained Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), while one of them was Rx and CT negative. X-ray, 67Ga and 99mTc were concordantly negative in 5 cases. 99mTc-HIG yielded negative results in two cases of Mycobacterium infection, both of which were 67Ga and Rx positive: Mycobacterium avium in diffuse lung involvement and Mycobacterium TBC in excavated infiltrate. 99mTc-HIG was also positive in other 3 AIDS patients: 1 case of intestinal cryptosporidiosis, 1 pulmonary abscess (Staphylococcus and Candida), and 1 sacral abscess; it was negative in 1 case of Kaposi sarcoma (also 201Tl negative). In conclusion, 99mTc-HIG scintigraphy in AIDS patients is feasible, and offers some practical advantages (continuous availability, fast response time, etc.). The initial results seem similar to those of 67Ga in lung scanning (and perhaps more specific for PCP).

  18. Paediatric feather duvet hypersensitivity pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Louise E; Guy, Emma

    2015-01-01

    A previously well 12-year-old boy was admitted with a second insidious episode of dyspnoea, dry cough, anorexia, weight loss and chest pain. At admission, he had an oxygen requirement, significantly impaired lung function and reduced exercise tolerance. Initial forced expiratory volume in 1 s was 26%; a 3 min exercise test stopped at 1 min 50 when saturations dropped to 85%. CT scan showed ground-glass nodularity with lymphadenopathy. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and viruses were negative, and microbiology results for the BAL were reported in the absence of histology. This is because at the time the BAL samples were collected, a lung biopsy was performed. The biopsy was consistent with hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Echo was normal and CT pulmonary angiography negative. After taking a thorough history, exposure to feather duvets prior to each episode was elicited. IgG of avian precipitants was raised at 10.6 mgA/L (normal <10 mgA/L). Clinical improvement began with avoidance of exposure, while the boy was an inpatient. Antigen avoidance continued on discharge. He continues to improve since discharge. The condition was diagnosed as hypersensitivity pneumonitis secondary to exposure to antigens from feather duvets.

  19. Low absolute lymphocyte count and addition of rituximab confer high risk for interstitial pneumonia in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Chung; Liu, Chia-Jen; Liu, Chun-Yu; Pai, Jih-Tung; Hong, Ying-Chung; Teng, Hao-Wei; Hsiao, Liang-Tsai; Chao, Ta-Chung; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Liu, Jin-Hwang; Hsu, Hui-Chi; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chen, Po-Min; Yu, Yuan-Bin; Tzeng, Cheng-Hwai

    2011-10-01

    Several small-scale studies have reported pulmonary toxicity among patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy, though whether the use of rituximab predisposes to interstitial pneumonia (IP) remains unclear. This retrospective study was intended to identify the characteristics and risk factors of IP in patients with DLBCL. Between 2000 and 2009, 529 consecutive patients with DLBCL receiving first-line tri-weekly COP- or CHOP-based chemotherapy with or without rituximab were enrolled as subjects. IP was defined as diffuse pulmonary interstitial infiltrates found on computed tomography scans in conjunction with respiratory symptoms. IP was observed in 26 patients (4.9%), six of whom were confirmed with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. The median number of chemotherapy courses before IP was four cycles. Using multivariate analysis, absolute lymphocyte count less than 1×10(9)/l at diagnosis [odds ratio (OR) 2.75, p=0.014] and the addition of rituximab to chemotherapy (OR 4.56, p=0.003) were identified as independent risk factors for IP. In conclusion, the incidence of IP is increased in patients with DLBCL receiving rituximab-containing chemotherapy. Specific subgroups with lymphopenia at diagnosis may justify close scrutiny to detect pulmonary complications. PMID:21647583

  20. Review of zoonotic parasites in medical and veterinary fields in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Youn, Heejeong

    2009-10-01

    Zoonotic parasites are animal parasites that can infect humans. The major zoonotic protozoa in the Republic of Korea are Babesia bovis, Chilomastix mesnili, Cryptosporidium parvum, Endolimax nana, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hitolytica, Giardia lamblia, Iodamoeba bütschlii, Pneumocystis carinii, Sarcocystis cruzi, and Toxoplasma gondii. The major zoonotic helminths in Korea include trematodes, cestodes, and nematodes. Trematodes are Clonorchis sinensis, Echinostoma hortense, Echinostoma spp., Fasciola hepatica, Heterophyes nocens, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Paragonimus westermani. Cestodes are Diphyllobothrium latum, Dipylidium caninum, Echinococcus granulosus, Hymenolepis nana, Raillietina tetragona, sparganum (Spirometra spp.), Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica. Nematodes are Ancylostoma caninum, Brugia malayi, Capillaria hepatica, Dirofilaria immitis, Gnathostoma dololesi, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Loa loa, Onchocerca gibsoni, Strongyloides stercoralis, Thelazia callipaeda, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus orientalis, Trichuris trichiura, and Trichuris vulpis. The one arthropod is Sarcoptes scabiei. Many of these parasites have disappeared or were in decline after the 1990's. Since the late 1990's, the important zoonotic protozoa have been C. parvum, E. nana, E. coli, E. hitolytica, G. lamblia, I. buetschlii, P. carinii and T. gondii. The important zoonotic helminths have been C. sinensis, H. nocens, M. yokogawai, P. westermani, D. latum, T. asiatica, sparganum, B. malayi, T. orientalis, T. callipaeda and T. spiralis. However, outbreaks of these parasites are only in a few endemic areas. The outbreaks of Enterobius vermicularis and head lice, human parasites, have recently increased in the kindergartens and primary schools in the Republic of Korea. PMID:19885329

  1. Extrapulmonary pneumocystosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ng, V L; Yajko, D M; Hadley, W K

    1997-01-01

    Extrapulmonary pneumocystosis is an exceedingly rare complication of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). Prior to the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) epidemic, only 16 cases of extrapulmonary pneumocystosis in individuals who were immunocompromised by a variety of underlying diseases had been reported. Since the beginning of the HIV-1 and related PCP epidemic, at least 90 cases of extrapulmonary pneumocystosis have been reported. This review briefly presents a history of the discovery of P. carinii and its recognition as a human pathogen, the controversy regarding its taxonomy, and the epidemiology of this organism. A more detailed analysis of the incidence of extrapulmonary pneumocystosis in HIV-1-infected individuals and its occurrence despite widespread prophylaxis for PCP with either aerosolized pentamidine or systemic dapsone-trimethoprim is presented. The clinical features of published cases of extrapulmonary pneumocystosis in non-HIV-1-infected individuals are summarized and contrasted with those in HIV-1 infected individuals. The diagnosis of extrapulmonary pneumocystosis is discussed, and because clinical microbiologists and pathologists are the key individuals in establishing the diagnosis, the characteristic microscopic morphology of P. carinii as its appears when stained with a variety of stains is presented and reviewed. The review concludes with a brief discussion of treatments for extrapulmonary pneumocystosis. PMID:9227859

  2. Preventing opportunistic infections in human immunodeficiency virus-infected persons: implications for the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J E; Hu, D J; Holmes, K K; Jaffe, H W; Masur, H; De Cock, K M

    1996-07-01

    More than 18 million persons in the world are estimated to have been infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the cause of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). As immunodeficiency progresses, these persons become susceptible to a wide variety of opportunistic infections (OIs) The spectrum of OIs varies among regions of the world. Tuberculosis is the most common serious OI in sub-Saharan Africa and is also more common in Latin America and in Asia than in the United States. Bacterial and parasitic infections are prevalent in Africa; protozoal infections such as toxoplasmosis, cryptosporidiosis, and isosporiasis are also common in Latin America. Fungal infections, including cryptococcosis and Penicillium marneffei infection, appear to be prevalent in Southeast Asia. Despite limited health resources in these regions, some measures that are recommended to prevent OIs in the United States may be useful for prolonging and improving the quality of life of HIV-infected persons. These include trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole to prevent Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial infections; isoniazid to prevent tuberculosis; and 23-valent pneumococcal vaccine to prevent disease due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Research is needed to determine the spectrum of OIs and the efficacy of various prevention measures in resource-poor nations, and health officials need to determine a minimum standard of care for HIV-infected persons. An increasing problem in the developing world, HIV/AIDS should receive attention comparable to other tropical diseases.

  3. Ultrashort pulse laser microsurgery on cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, He Z.; Huang, Xu G.; Zheng, Xiguang; Yu, Zhenxin; Gao, Zhaolan

    1995-05-01

    A laser microbeam system has been set up for microsurgery on cell. The relations of laser wavelength, pulse duration and pulse energy to punching effects and self-healing are studied. The experimental results demonstrate that picosecond pulse laser microbeam offers many advantages in cell microsurgery. The mechanism of punching by picosecond microbeam is high field puncture instead of heat effect, and is irrelevant to cell kinds and colors. The diameter and depth of microsurgery can therefore be easily controlled by adjusting the laser pulse energy. The diameter of the minimum aperture is about 0.1 micrometers , much smaller than the theoretical limit ((lambda) /2) for optical microscope due to self- focusing effect. With ultrashort pulse laser microbeam, we can easily cut off any part of a cell. An example is that eight nuclei in the center of unicellular parasite Pneumocystis Carinii can be destroyed one by one by ultrashort pulse laser microbeam without cell wall injury. The holes can also be punched by ultrashort pulse laser microbeam from cell wall to cell nucleus. In a fraction of a second to several seconds after punching, the hole on cell wall or cell membrane can self-heal. Exogenous DNA can be introduced into the cell before its self- healing.

  4. Proceedings of the 2013 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Boyle, Michael C; Boyle, Molly H; Cora, Michelle C; Crabbs, Torrie A; Cummings, Connie A; Gruebbel, Margarita M; Johnson, Crystal L; Malarkey, David E; McInnes, Elizabeth F; Nolte, Thomas; Shackelford, Cynthia C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri," was held in Portland, Oregon, in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 32nd annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a caudal tail vertebra duplication in mice; nephroblastematosis in rats; ectopic C cell tumor in a hamster; granular cell aggregates/tumor in the uterus of a hamster; Pneumocystis carinii in the lung of a rat; iatrogenic chronic inflammation in the lungs of control rats; hepatoblastoma arising within an adenoma in a mouse; humoral hypercalcemia of benignancy in a transgenic mouse; acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats; electron microscopy images of iatrogenic intraerythrocytic inclusions in transgenic mice; questionable hepatocellular degeneration/cell death/artifact in rats; atypical endometrial hyperplasia in rats; malignant mixed Müllerian tumors/carcinosarcomas in rats; differential diagnoses of proliferative lesions of the intestine of rodents; and finally obstructive nephropathy caused by melamine poisoning in a rat.

  5. [Case of trimethoprim-induced hyperkalemia complicating ANCA-associated vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Shishido, Takashi; Ryuzaki, Munekazu; Futatsugi, Koji; Takimoto, Chie; Kobayashi, Emi; Handa, Michiko; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    A 76-year-old man was admitted to our hospital because of severe anemia. Routine screening revealed a sigmoid adenocarcinoma, and he underwent sigmoidectomy. Post-operatively, he developed rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. He was positive for myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody. A renal biopsy revealed idiopathic crescentic glomerulonephritis of the pauci-immune type. He was treated with methylprednisolone semi-pulse therapy with clinical improvement. After the steroid pulse therapy, he was given oral prednisolone, 40 mg per day, and oral trimethoprim (TMP), 160 mg, and sulfamethoxazole (SMX), 800 mg twice weekly for chemoprophylaxis against pneumocystis pneumonia. One month after the initiation of TMP/SMX, he developed hyperkalemia and hyponatremia. His transtubular K gradient was low, and urinary potassium excretion was decreased. On the other hand, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone concentrations were within normal limits. These results suggested that TMP acted similarly to a potassium-sparing diuretic amiloride and reduced renal potassium excretion. Administration of calcium polystyrene sulfonate resulted in correction of the hyperkalemia without discontinuation of TMP/SMX. We emphasize that patients with impaired renal function are at the significant risk of developing trimethoprim-induced hyperkalemia even with chemoprophylaxis.

  6. Causes of death in renal transplant recipients: a study of 102 autopsies from 1968 to 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Reis, M A; Costa, R S; Ferraz, A S

    1995-01-01

    A study was conducted on 102 patients submitted to renal transplant who died and were autopsied at the University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, from 1968 to 1991. The cause of death, based on a review of medical records and autopsy reports, was assigned to one of the following categories: infectious (69.6%); cardiovascular (12.7%); gastrointestinal (7.8%); graft rejection (6.9%); tumoral (2.0%); and undetermined (1.0%). Among the 71 cases of death caused by infection, 28 (39.4%) showed disseminated agents involving two or more organs. Isolated pneumonia involved 17 patients (23.9%), followed by acute pyelonephritis in the transplanted kidney in 10 patients (14.1%). The most frequent agents were: bacteria (58.0%), divided into 'non-classified' (83.0%), Nocardia (10.6%) and Mycobacterium (6.4%); fungi (27.5%) represented by Cryptococcus (22.7%), Aspergillus, Candida and Pneumocystis carinii (18.1% each), Histoplasma (13.6%), Mucor and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (4.5% each); viruses (6.2%) represented by Herpes simplex (60.0%); metazoa (5.0%, S. stercoralis), and protozoa (2.5%, T. cruzi). Cytomegalovirus (CMV) was identified in the lungs of 12 patients and was not directly correlated with death but was associated with other agents. In conclusion, immunodepressed patients such as renal transplant recipients should be carefully monitored for infection due to the high mortality rate. PMID:7884765

  7. Estimating the burden of fungal disease in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, J; Denning, D W; Chau, N V; Yen, N T B; Crump, J A; Day, J N

    2015-10-01

    Data regarding the prevalence of fungal infections in Vietnam are limited yet they are likely to occur more frequently as increasingly sophisticated healthcare creates more iatrogenic risk factors. In this study, we sought to estimate baseline incidence and prevalence of selected serious fungal infections for the year 2012. We made estimates with a previously described actuarial method, using reports on the incidence and prevalence of various established risk factors for fungal infections from Vietnam, or similar environments, supplemented by personal communications. Global data were used if local data were unavailable. We estimated 2,352,748 episodes of serious fungal infection occurred in Vietnam in 2012. Frequent conditions included recurrent vaginal candidiasis (3893/100,000 women annually), tinea capitis (457/100,000 annually) and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (61/100,000/5 year period). We estimated 140 cases of cryptococcal meningitis, 206 of penicilliosis and 608 of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. This is the first summary of Vietnamese fungal infections. The majority of severe disease is due to Aspergillus species, driven by the high prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis. The AIDS epidemic highlights opportunistic infections, such as penicilliosis and cryptococcosis, which may complicate immunosuppressive treatments. These estimates provide a useful indication of disease prevalence to inform future research and resource allocation but should be verified by further epidemiological approaches. PMID:26449514

  8. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Eri; Sugawara, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS. PMID:27688774

  9. Postmortem findings and opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients from a public hospital in Peru.

    PubMed

    Eza, Dominique; Cerrillo, Gustavo; Moore, David A J; Castro, Cecilia; Ticona, Eduardo; Morales, Domingo; Cabanillas, Jose; Barrantes, Fernando; Alfaro, Alejandro; Benavides, Alejandro; Rafael, Arturo; Valladares, Gilberto; Arevalo, Fernando; Evans, Carlton A; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    There is a paucity of HIV autopsy data from South America and none that document the postmortem findings in patients with HIV/AIDS in Peru. The purpose of this autopsy study was to determine the spectrum of opportunistic infections and the causes of mortality in HIV-positive patients at a public hospital in Lima. Clinico-epidemiological information regarding HIV infection in Peru is also reviewed. Sixteen HIV-related hospital postmortems, performed between 1999 and 2004, were included in this retrospective analysis. The primary cause of death was established in 12 patients: one died of neoplasia and 11 of infectious diseases, including 3 from pulmonary infection, 7 from disseminated infection, and 2 from central nervous system infection (one case had dual pathology). Opportunistic infections were identified in 14 cases, comprising cytomegalovirus, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, aspergillosis, tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus, and cryptosporidiosis. Fourteen patients had at least one AIDS-related disease that had been neither clinically suspected nor diagnosed premortem. Moreover, 82% of the diagnoses considered to be of important clinical significance had not been suspected antemortem. The spectrum and frequency of certain opportunistic infections differed from other South American autopsy studies, highlighting the importance of performing HIV/AIDS postmortems in resource-limited countries where locally specific disease patterns may be observed. PMID:16979302

  10. Clinical profile and factors associated with mortality in hospitalized patients with HIV/AIDS: a retrospective analysis from Tripoli Medical Centre, Libya, 2013.

    PubMed

    Shalaka, N S; Garred, N A; Zeglam, H T; Awasi, S A; Abukathir, L A; Altagdi, M E; Rayes, A A

    2015-10-02

    In Libya, little is known about HIV-related hospitalizations and in-hospital mortality. This was a retrospective analysis of HIV-related hospitalizations at Tripoli Medical Centre in 2013. Of 227 cases analysed, 82.4% were males who were significantly older (40.0 versus 36.5 years), reported injection drug use (58.3% versus 0%) and were hepatitis C virus co-infected (65.8% versus 0%) compared with females. Severe immunosuppression was prevalent (median CD4 count = 42 cell/μL). Candidiasis was the most common diagnosis (26.0%); Pneumocystis pneumonia was the most common respiratory disease (8.8%), while cerebral toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in 8.4% of patients. Current HAART use was independently associated with low risk of in-hospital mortality (OR 0.33), while central nervous system symptoms (OR 4.12), sepsis (OR 6.98) and low total lymphocyte counts (OR 3.60) were associated with increased risk. In this study, late presentation with severe immunosuppression was common, and was associated with significant in-hospital mortality.

  11. Defects of T-cell effector function and post-thymic maturation in X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish; Atkinson, T. Prescott; Lipsky, Peter E.; Slater, Jay E.; Nelson, David L.; Strober, Warren

    1999-01-01

    X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome (XHIM) results from mutations in the gene encoding for CD40 ligand (CD154). Patients with the syndrome suffer from infections with opportunistic pathogens such as Cryptosporidium and Pneumocystis carinii. In this study, we demonstrate that activated T cells from patients with XHIM produce markedly reduced levels of IFN-γ, fail to induce antigen-presenting cells to synthesize IL-12, and induce greatly reduced levels of TNF-α. In addition, we show that the patients’ circulating T lymphocytes of both the CD4+ and CD8+ subsets contain a markedly reduced antigen-primed population, as determined by CD45RO expression. Finally, we demonstrate that the defects in antigen priming are likely due to the lack of CD154 expression and insufficient costimulation of T cells by CD80/CD86 interactions. Taken together, this study offers a basis for the increased susceptibility of patients with XHIM to certain opportunistic infections. PMID:10207167

  12. Successful Treatment of Disseminated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Disease in an HIV-Infected Child with a Linezolid-Containing Regimen

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Drusia; Miše, Branko; Katalinić-Janković, Vera; Rutherford, George

    2016-01-01

    Upon HIV infection diagnosis, an 8-month-old boy was transferred for evaluation of worsening respiratory distress requiring mechanical ventilation. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) was diagnosed; the boy also had a nonhealing ulcer at the site of vaccination with Statens Serum Institut (Danish strain) Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine and associated axillary lymphadenopathy. PCP treatment resulted in weaning from mechanical ventilation. Antimycobacterial treatment was immediately attempted but was discontinued because of hepatotoxicity. Over several months, he developed splenic lesions and then disseminated skin and cystic bone lesions. M. bovis was repeatedly cultured from both skin and bone lesions despite various multidrug antimycobacterial regimens which included linezolid. Eventually, treatment with a regimen of rifabutin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and linezolid led to definitive cure. Clinicians should consider a linezolid-containing regimen for treatment of severe disseminated BCG infection, especially if other drug regimens have failed. Although drug toxicity is a particular concern for young children, this patient received linezolid for 13 months without serious toxicity. This case also highlights the need for universal screening among pregnant women to prevent vertical transmission of HIV. Finally, routine immunization with BCG vaccine at birth should be questioned in countries with low and declining burden of tuberculosis. PMID:27803824

  13. Omenn syndrome associated with a functional reversion due to a somatic second-site mutation in CARD11 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Sebastian; Rensing-Ehl, Anne; Pannicke, Ulrich; Lorenz, Myriam R.; Fisch, Paul; Jeelall, Yogesh; Rohr, Jan; Speckmann, Carsten; Vraetz, Thomas; Farmand, Susan; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Krüger, Marcus; Strahm, Brigitte; Henneke, Philipp; Enders, Anselm; Horikawa, Keisuke; Goodnow, Christopher; Schwarz, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Omenn syndrome (OS) is a severe immunodeficiency associated with erythroderma, lymphoproliferation, elevated IgE, and hyperactive oligoclonal T cells. A restricted T-cell repertoire caused by defective thymic T-cell development and selection, lymphopenia with homeostatic proliferation, and lack of regulatory T cells are considered key factors in OS pathogenesis. We report 2 siblings presenting with cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Pneumocystis jirovecii infections and recurrent sepsis; one developed all clinical features of OS. Both carried homozygous germline mutations in CARD11 (p.Cys150*), impairing NF-κB signaling and IL-2 production. A somatic second-site mutation reverting the stop codon to a missense mutation (p.Cys150Leu) was detected in tissue-infiltrating T cells of the OS patient. Expression of p.Cys150Leu in CARD11-deficient T cells largely reconstituted NF-κB signaling. The reversion likely occurred in a prethymic T-cell precursor, leading to a chimeric T-cell repertoire. We speculate that in our patient the functional advantage of the revertant T cells in the context of persistent CMV infection, combined with lack of regulatory T cells, may have been sufficient to favor OS. This first observation of OS in a patient with a T-cell activation defect suggests that severely defective T-cell development or homeostatic proliferation in a lymphopenic environment are not required for this severe immunopathology. PMID:26289640

  14. Potential Impact of Co-Infections and Co-Morbidities Prevalent in Africa on Influenza Severity and Frequency: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Adam L.; McMorrow, Meredith; Walaza, Sibongile; Cohen, Cheryl; Tempia, Stefano; Alexander-Scott, Marissa; Widdowson, Marc-Alain

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases and underlying medical conditions common to Africa may affect influenza frequency and severity. We conducted a systematic review of published studies on influenza and the following co-infections or co-morbidities that are prevalent in Africa: dengue, malaria, measles, meningococcus, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP), hemoglobinopathies, and malnutrition. Articles were identified except for influenza and PCP. Very few studies were from Africa. Sickle cell disease, dengue, and measles co-infection were found to increase the severity of influenza disease, though this is based on few studies of dengue and measles and the measles study was of low quality. The frequency of influenza was increased among patients with sickle cell disease. Influenza infection increased the frequency of meningococcal disease. Studies on malaria and malnutrition found mixed results. Age-adjusted morbidity and mortality from influenza may be more common in Africa because infections and diseases common in the region lead to more severe outcomes and increase the influenza burden. However, gaps exist in our knowledge about these interactions. PMID:26068416

  15. Postmortem findings and opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients from a public hospital in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Eza, Dominique; Cerrillo, Gustavo; Moore, David A.J.; Castro, Cecilia; Ticona, Eduardo; Morales, Domingo; Cabanillas, Jose; Barrantes, Fernando; Alfaro, Alejandro; Benavides, Alejandro; Rafael, Arturo; Valladares, Gilberto; Arevalo, Fernando; Evans, Carlton A.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of HIV autopsy data from South America and none that document the postmortem findings in patients with HIV/AIDS in Peru. The purpose of this autopsy study was to determine the spectrum of opportunistic infections and the causes of mortality in HIV-positive patients at a public hospital in Lima. Clinico-epidemiological information regarding HIV infection in Peru is also reviewed. Sixteen HIV-related hospital postmortems, performed between 1999 and 2004, were included in this retrospective analysis. The primary cause of death was established in 12 patients: one died of neoplasia and 11 of infectious diseases, including 3 from pulmonary infection, 7 from disseminated infection, and 2 from central nervous system infection (one case had dual pathology). Opportunistic infections were identified in 14 cases, comprising cytomegalovirus, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, aspergillosis, tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus, and cryptosporidiosis. Fourteen patients had at least one AIDS-related disease that had been neither clinically suspected nor diagnosed premortem. Moreover, 82% of the diagnoses considered to be of important clinical significance had not been suspected antemortem. The spectrum and frequency of certain opportunistic infections differed from other South American autopsy studies, highlighting the importance of performing HIV/AIDS postmortems in resource-limited countries where locally specific disease patterns may be observed. PMID:16979302

  16. Postmortem findings and opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients from a public hospital in Peru.

    PubMed

    Eza, Dominique; Cerrillo, Gustavo; Moore, David A J; Castro, Cecilia; Ticona, Eduardo; Morales, Domingo; Cabanillas, Jose; Barrantes, Fernando; Alfaro, Alejandro; Benavides, Alejandro; Rafael, Arturo; Valladares, Gilberto; Arevalo, Fernando; Evans, Carlton A; Gilman, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    There is a paucity of HIV autopsy data from South America and none that document the postmortem findings in patients with HIV/AIDS in Peru. The purpose of this autopsy study was to determine the spectrum of opportunistic infections and the causes of mortality in HIV-positive patients at a public hospital in Lima. Clinico-epidemiological information regarding HIV infection in Peru is also reviewed. Sixteen HIV-related hospital postmortems, performed between 1999 and 2004, were included in this retrospective analysis. The primary cause of death was established in 12 patients: one died of neoplasia and 11 of infectious diseases, including 3 from pulmonary infection, 7 from disseminated infection, and 2 from central nervous system infection (one case had dual pathology). Opportunistic infections were identified in 14 cases, comprising cytomegalovirus, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, aspergillosis, tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus, and cryptosporidiosis. Fourteen patients had at least one AIDS-related disease that had been neither clinically suspected nor diagnosed premortem. Moreover, 82% of the diagnoses considered to be of important clinical significance had not been suspected antemortem. The spectrum and frequency of certain opportunistic infections differed from other South American autopsy studies, highlighting the importance of performing HIV/AIDS postmortems in resource-limited countries where locally specific disease patterns may be observed.

  17. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Eri; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS. PMID:27688774

  18. Burden of fungal infections in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Badiane, Aida S; Ndiaye, Daouda; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    Senegal has a high rate of tuberculosis and a low HIV seropositivity rate and aspergilloma, life-threatening fungal infections, dermatophytosis and mycetoma have been reported in this study. All published epidemiology papers reporting fungal infection rates from Senegal were identified. Where no data existed, we used specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies in each to estimate national incidence or prevalence. The results show that tinea capitis is common being found in 25% of children, ~1.5 million. About 191,000 Senegalese women get recurrent vaginal thrush, ≥4 times annually. We estimate 685 incident cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) following TB and prevalence of 2160 cases. Asthma prevalence in adults varies from 3.2% to 8.2% (mean 5%); 9976 adults have allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and 13,168 have severe asthma with fungal sensitisation (SAFS). Of the 59,000 estimated HIV-positive patients, 366 develop cryptococcal meningitis; 1149 develop Pneumocystis pneumonia and 1946 develop oesophageal candidiasis, in which oral candidiasis (53%) and dermatophytosis (16%) are common. Since 2008-2010, 113 cases of mycetoma were diagnosed. In conclusion, we estimate that 1,743,507 (12.5%) people in Senegal suffer from a fungal infection, excluding oral candidiasis, fungal keratitis, invasive candidiasis or aspergillosis. Diagnostic and treatment deficiencies should be rectified to allow epidemiological studies. PMID:26449509

  19. Pneumocystosis in a patient with Crohn's disease treated with combination therapy with adalimumab.

    PubMed

    Desales, Ana L; Mendez-Navarro, Jorge; Méndez-Tovar, Luis J; Ortiz-Olvera, Nayeli X; Cullen, Garret; Ocampo, Joaquín; Lemus, Willian; Tun, Amina E; Mayoral-Zavala, Arturo; Dehesa-Violante, Margarita

    2012-05-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is a potential complication of immunosuppression. Crohn's disease (CD) is an immune granulomatous disorder characterized by transmural inflammation that can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract. Its treatment is based on steroids and immunosuppressants but in non-responders, biologic compounds such as anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) antibodies have been used. Neutralization of TNF causes a decrease in the inflammatory response but increases susceptibility to opportunistic infections such as fungal infections. We report a young male with chronic diarrhea, fever and weight loss who was diagnosed with CD and began conventional treatment with immunosuppressants, but due to lack of response after several weeks, biologic therapy with adalimumab was initiated. Seven weeks later he developed persistent fever and upper respiratory symptoms. After chest CT, bronchoscopy and bronchial lavage, P. jirovecii was identified by silver staining and confirmed by immunofluorescence. To our knowledge this is the second case of pneumocystosis associated with the use of adalimumab in CD and the first reported Mexican case confirmed by microbiological and immunological studies in this setting. PMID:22398055

  20. Microbiological survey of mice (Mus musculus) purchased from commercial pet shops in Kanagawa and Tokyo, Japan.

    PubMed

    Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Morita, Hanako; Ishida, Tomoko; Uchida, Ritsuki; Tanaka, Mai; Ozawa, Midori; Yasuda, Masahiko; Itoh, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Information regarding the prevalence of infectious agents in mice in pet shops in Japan is scarce. This information is particularly useful for minimizing the risk of potential transmission of infections to laboratory mice. Therefore, we surveyed infectious agents in mice from pet shops in Kanagawa and Tokyo, Japan. The survey was conducted in 28 mice from 5 pet shops to screen for 47 items (17 viruses, 22 bacteria and fungi, 10 parasites) using culture tests, serology, PCR, and microscopy. The most common viral agent detected was murine norovirus (17 mice; 60.7%), followed by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (13 mice; 46.4%), and mouse hepatitis virus (12 mice; 42.8%). The most common agent amongst the bacteria and fungi was Pasteurella pneumotropica (10 mice; 35.7%), followed by Helicobacter ganmani and Pneumocystis murina (8 mice; 28.5%, for both). Tritrichomonas muris was the most common parasite (19 mice; 67.8%), followed by Spironucleus muris (13 mice; 46.4%), Aspiculuris tetraptera, and Syphacia obvelata (8 mice each; 28.5%). Remarkably, a zoonotic agent, Hymenolepis nana, was found in 7 mice (25%). Given these results, we suggest that the workers in laboratory animal facilities should recognize again the potential risks of mice outside of the laboratory animal facilities as an infectious source, and avoid keeping mice as pets or as feed for carnivorous reptiles as much as possible for risk management.

  1. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID): from molecular basis to clinical management.

    PubMed

    Sponzilli, Ivonne; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2011-04-01

    Primary immune deficiency diseases (PID) comprise a genetically heterogeneous group of disorders that affect distinct components of the innate and adaptive immune system, such as neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, complement proteins, natural killer cells, as well as T and B lymphocytes. Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a group of disorders characterized by increased susceptibility to severe infections and early death. The diagnosis of SCID is supported by the demonstration of low absolute lymphocyte count and T cell lymphopenia (variably associated with numerical defects of B and NK cells). In the last two decades, advances in the characterization of the molecular pathophysiology of SCID, have permitted the development of novel diagnostic assays based on analysis of the expression of the disease-associated proteins and mutation analysis. More recently, pilot newborn screening programs for the identification of infants with SCID have been initiated in the United States. Prompt and aggressive treatment of infections, antimicrobial prophylaxis (in particular against Pneumocystis jiroveci) and regular administration of immunoglobulins are essential to reduce the risk of early death. However, survival ultimately depends on reconstitution of immune function, that is usually achieved by means of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Gene therapy and enzyme replacement therapy have also been used successfully is selected forms of SCID. Here we review the molecular and cellular pathophysiology and the mainstay of treatment of SCID.

  2. The burden of serious human fungal infections in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Giacomazzi, Juliana; Baethgen, Ludmila; Carneiro, Lilian C; Millington, Maria Adelaide; Denning, David W; Colombo, Arnaldo L; Pasqualotto, Alessandro C

    2016-03-01

    In Brazil, human fungal infections are prevalent, however, these conditions are not officially reportable diseases. To estimate the burden of serious fungal diseases in 1 year in Brazil, based on available data and published literature. Historical official data from fungal diseases were collected from Brazilian Unified Health System Informatics Department (DATASUS). For fungal diseases for which no official data were available, assumptions of frequencies were made by estimating based on published literature. The incidence (/1000) of hospital admissions for coccidioidomycosis was 7.12; for histoplasmosis, 2.19; and for paracoccidioidomycosis, 7.99. The estimated number of cryptococcal meningoencephalitis cases was 6832. Also, there were 4115 cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia in AIDS patients per year, 1 010 465 aspergillosis and 2 981 416 cases of serious Candida infections, including invasive and non-invasive diseases. In this study, we demonstrate that more than 3.8 million individuals in Brazil may be suffering from serious fungal infections, mostly patients with malignant cancers, transplant recipients, asthma, previous tuberculosis, HIV infection and those living in endemic areas for truly pathogenic fungi. The scientific community and the governmental agencies should work in close collaboration in order to reduce the burden of such complex, difficult-to-diagnose and hard to treat diseases.

  3. Microbial antigenic variation mediated by homologous DNA recombination

    PubMed Central

    Vink, Cornelis; Rudenko, Gloria; Seifert, H. Steven

    2012-01-01

    Pathogenic microorganisms employ numerous molecular strategies in order to delay or circumvent recognition by the immune system of their host. One of the most widely used strategies of immune evasion is antigenic variation, in which immunogenic molecules expressed on the surface of a microorganism are continuously modified. As a consequence, the host is forced to constantly adapt its humoral immune response against this pathogen. An antigenic change thus provides the microorganism with an opportunity to persist and/or replicate within the host (population) for an extended period of time or to effectively infect a previously infected host. In most cases, antigenic variation is caused by genetic processes that lead to modification of the amino acid sequence of a particular antigen or to alterations in the expression of biosynthesis genes that induce changes in expression of a variant antigen. Here, we will review antigenic variation systems that rely on homologous DNA recombination and which are found in a wide range of cellular, human pathogens, including bacteria (such as Neisseria spp., Borrelia spp., Treponema pallidum and Mycoplasma spp.), fungi (like Pneumocystis carinii) and parasites (such as the African trypanosome Trypanosoma brucei). Specifically, the various DNA recombination-based antigenic variation systems will be discussed with a focus on the employed mechanisms of recombination, the DNA substrates, and the enzymatic machinery involved. PMID:22212019

  4. Estimating the burden of fungal disease in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Beardsley, J; Denning, D W; Chau, N V; Yen, N T B; Crump, J A; Day, J N

    2015-10-01

    Data regarding the prevalence of fungal infections in Vietnam are limited yet they are likely to occur more frequently as increasingly sophisticated healthcare creates more iatrogenic risk factors. In this study, we sought to estimate baseline incidence and prevalence of selected serious fungal infections for the year 2012. We made estimates with a previously described actuarial method, using reports on the incidence and prevalence of various established risk factors for fungal infections from Vietnam, or similar environments, supplemented by personal communications. Global data were used if local data were unavailable. We estimated 2,352,748 episodes of serious fungal infection occurred in Vietnam in 2012. Frequent conditions included recurrent vaginal candidiasis (3893/100,000 women annually), tinea capitis (457/100,000 annually) and chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (61/100,000/5 year period). We estimated 140 cases of cryptococcal meningitis, 206 of penicilliosis and 608 of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. This is the first summary of Vietnamese fungal infections. The majority of severe disease is due to Aspergillus species, driven by the high prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis. The AIDS epidemic highlights opportunistic infections, such as penicilliosis and cryptococcosis, which may complicate immunosuppressive treatments. These estimates provide a useful indication of disease prevalence to inform future research and resource allocation but should be verified by further epidemiological approaches.

  5. Autoimmunity and dysmetabolism of human acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Mei; Hong, Xue-Zhi; Xu, Jia-Hua; Luo, Jiang-Xi; Mo, Han-You; Zhao, Hai-Lu

    2016-06-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) remains ill-defined by lists of symptoms, infections, tumors, and disorders in metabolism and immunity. Low CD4 cell count, severe loss of body weight, pneumocystis pneumonia, and Kaposi's sarcoma are the major disease indicators. Lines of evidence indicate that patients living with AIDS have both immunodeficiency and autoimmunity. Immunodeficiency is attributed to deficits in the skin- and mucosa-defined innate immunity, CD4 T cells and regulatory T cells, presumably relating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The autoimmunity in AIDS is evident by: (1) overproduction of autoantibodies, (2) impaired response of CD4 cells and CD8 cells, (3) failure of clinical trials of HIV vaccines, and (4) therapeutic benefits of immunosuppression following solid organ transplantation and bone marrow transplantation in patients at risk of AIDS. Autoantibodies are generated in response to antigens such as debris and molecules de novo released from dead cells, infectious agents, and catabolic events. Disturbances in metabolic homeostasis occur at the interface of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity in the development of AIDS. Optimal treatments favor therapeutics targeting on the regulation of metabolism to restore immune homeostasis.

  6. Safety and effectiveness of adalimumab in Japanese rheumatoid arthritis patients: postmarketing surveillance report of the first 3,000 patients.

    PubMed

    Koike, Takao; Harigai, Masayoshi; Ishiguro, Naoki; Inokuma, Shigeko; Takei, Shuji; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-08-01

    This interim analysis of postmarketing surveillance data for adalimumab-treated rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients summarizes safety and effectiveness during the first 24 weeks of therapy for the first 3,000 patients treated in Japan (June 2008-December 2009). Patient eligibility for antitumor necrosis factor therapy was based on the Japanese College of Rheumatology treatment guidelines and Japanese labeling. All patients were screened for tuberculosis. Approximately 50% of the population was biologic naïve, 66% received concomitant methotrexate (MTX), and 72% received concomitant glucocorticoids. The overall incidence rate of adverse events was 31% (5.5% serious) and that of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) was 27% (4.1% serious). Incidence rates of ADRs and serious ADRs were similar regardless of prior biologic therapy or concomitant MTX use but were significantly higher in patients receiving glucocorticoids compared with those not receiving glucocorticoids. Bacterial/bronchial pneumonia occurred in 1.2% of patients; interstitial pneumonia, 0.6%; Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, 0.3%; tuberculosis, 0.13%; and administration-site reactions, 6.1%. Mean 28-joint Disease Activity Scores decreased significantly after 24 weeks from 5.29 to 3.91. All subgroups showed significant improvement, particularly the biologic-naïve patients receiving concomitant MTX. No new safety concerns were identified. ADR Incidence rates were similar to those of other biologic agents approved for RA.

  7. HIV infection in Malaysia: a report of cases seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Ismail, R; Doi, S; Naganathna, N

    1995-12-01

    The spread of HIV infection into Malaysia is estimated to have occurred in the early 1980's. The first case of AIDS was reported here in 1986. As of March 31, 1994, the numbers have increased to 8049 HIV positive individuals detected in the country. The risk behaviours among those tested positive were intravenous drug use in 77.2%, sexual transmission in 4.5%, while the remainder are still under investigation. Pediatric AIDS constitutes 0.2% of positives. The high prevalence among intravenous drug users (IVDU) is likely to be due to mandatory testing for HIV upon entry to rehabilitation centres. The trend of HIV infection in this country seems to be highest amongst the intravenous drug users. The increasing number of HIV infected prostitutes and heterosexuals in our population is worrying. Since 1986, a total of 104 HIV positive individuals have been treated at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Of these, 25 have died and of those still alive, 5 have symptomatic disease. The most common AIDS-defining illness is Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Education programmes have been developed targeting the various high risk groups and the general population.

  8. Age-related presence of selected viral and bacterial pathogens in paraffin-embedded lung samples of dogs with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Wöhrer, Daniela; Spergser, Joachim; Bagrinovschi, Gabriela; Möstl, Karin; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to detect selected pathogens in pneumonic lung tissue of dogs of different age groups by immunohistochemistry (IHC), in situ hybridisation (ISH) or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in order to get information about their involvement in pneumonia formation. In archived formalin-fixed and paraffin wax-embedded lung samples from 68 cases with the clinical and histologic diagnosis of pneumonia the histological pattern of pneumonia was re-evaluated and the samples were further investigated for the following infectious agents: canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2), canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV), Bordetella (B.) bronchiseptica, Pasteurella (P.) multocida, Mycoplasma spp., and Pneumocystis spp. In 47.1% of the samples at least one of the featured respiratory pathogens was detected. In 31.3% of these positive samples more than one pathogen could be found. The correct detection of CDV had been achieved in ten out of eleven positive cases (90.9%) upon initial investigation, but the presence of bacterial pathogens, like B. bronchiseptica (10 cases) and P. multocida (17 cases) had been missed in all but one case. While CDV and CRCoV infections were exclusively found in dogs younger than one year, the vast majority of infections with P. multocida and B. bronchiseptica were both common either in dogs younger than 4 months or older than one year. Thus, this retrospective approach yielded valuable data on the presence, absence and prevalence of certain respiratory pathogens in dogs with pneumonia. PMID:26919147

  9. Successful Tocilizumab Therapy for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Associated with Adult-Onset Still's Disease: A Case-Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Eri; Yamashita, Takeshi; Ishii, Akira; Oda, Aya; Terai, Chihiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 71-year-old Japanese woman with adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) in whom macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) developed despite therapy with oral high-dose prednisolone and intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy twice. She was successfully treated with tocilizumab (TCZ). Soon afterward, her fever ceased and high levels of both ferritin and C-reactive protein levels decreased. Her course was complicated by disseminated intravascular coagulation, cytomegalovirus infection, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. After these were resolved, AOSD-associated MAS was well controlled. She was discharged on hospital day 87. Although biologics such as TCZ are becoming established for the treatment of AOSD, there is no recommended therapy for AOSD-associated MAS. Several biologics have been tried for this complication, but their efficacy and safety remain controversial. We reviewed reported cases of AOSD-associated MAS successfully treated with various biologics. TCZ initiation after adequate nonselective immunosuppressive therapy, such as methylprednisolone pulse therapy or a prednisolone-based combination of immunosuppressants, can be an effective treatment for AOSD-associated MAS. On the other hand, biologics given after insufficient immunosuppressive therapy may cause MAS. A strategy combining adequate immunosuppression and a biologic could be safe if special attention is given to adverse events such as opportunistic infections or biologic-associated MAS.

  10. [Endovascular management of an infectious and ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. Clinical report].

    PubMed

    Amorim, Pedro; Sousa, Gonçalo; Vieira, João; C E Sousa, Lourenço; Ribeiro, Karla; Sobrinho, Gonçalo; Vieira, Teresa; Meireles, Nuno; Albino, Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Infectious aneurysms are about 1-3% of all aneurysms of the infrarenal aorta. Its treatment is challenging and the best strategy is far from consensual. The authors report a case of a HIV + patient with multiple other co-morbidities, which was seen in the emergency department with fever and left back pain. These symptoms would prove to be in relation to a ruptured infectious aneurysm of the abdominal aorta. Facing this situation it was decided to select an endovascular technique with implantation of an aorto uni - iliac stent graft with a right-left femoro-femoral cross-over using a 8 mm PTFE graft and exclusion of the left common iliac . The patient didn't have any complication from the situation or the procedure, but died 18 months postoperatively because of a pneumonia caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci. Although it is not the ideal solution for the treatment of infectious elective aneurysms, we believe that endovascular treatment seems to be a viable option and should be taken into account in a subgroup of patients that for their co-morbidities are not good candidates for conventional surgery and for those in rupture, either as a bridge or as a final solution. PMID:25596398

  11. Linear plasmid vector for cloning of repetitive or unstable sequences in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Godiska, Ronald; Mead, David; Dhodda, Vinay; Wu, Chengcang; Hochstein, Rebecca; Karsi, Attila; Usdin, Karen; Entezam, Ali; Ravin, Nikolai

    2010-04-01

    Despite recent advances in sequencing, complete finishing of large genomes and analysis of novel proteins they encode typically require cloning of specific regions. However, many of these fragments are extremely difficult to clone in current vectors. Superhelical stress in circular plasmids can generate secondary structures that are substrates for deletion, particularly in regions that contain numerous tandem or inverted repeats. Common vectors also induce transcription and translation of inserted fragments, which can select against recombinant clones containing open reading frames or repetitive DNA. Conversely, transcription from cloned promoters can interfere with plasmid stability. We have therefore developed a novel Escherichia coli cloning vector (termed 'pJAZZ' vector) that is maintained as a linear plasmid. Further, it contains transcriptional terminators on both sides of the cloning site to minimize transcriptional interference between vector and insert. We show that this vector stably maintains a variety of inserts that were unclonable in conventional plasmids. These targets include short nucleotide repeats, such as those of the expanded Fragile X locus, and large AT-rich inserts, such as 20-kb segments of genomic DNA from Pneumocystis, Plasmodium, Oxytricha or Tetrahymena. The pJAZZ vector shows decreased size bias in cloning, allowing more uniform representation of larger fragments in libraries. PMID:20040575

  12. Lung parasites of shrews from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Laakkonen, J; Haukisalmi, V; Merritt, J F

    1997-04-01

    We examined lung parasites of three species of soricids, Sorex cinereus (n = 58), Sorex fumeus (n = 23) and Blarina brevicauda (n = 45) collected from Pennsylvania (USA), from 1990 to 1995. Yeast-like cells of Hisfoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum were found in lung sections stained with Grocott's modification of Gomori's methenamine silver, periodic acid-Schiff, Giemsa, and hematoxylin-eosin in two (3%) S. cinereus, eight (35%) S. fumeus and two (4%) B. brevicauda. The number of spores of H. capsulatum in the lungs was low and no inflammatory reaction was evident. The infection was not disseminated to other organs. This is the first report of H. capsulatum infection in any species of shrews of the genus Sorex and the prevalence in S. fumeus was remarkably high compared to those reported for other wild mammals. A nematode, possibly Angiostrongylus michiganensis, was found in the lungs of one S. fumeus on necropsy and in a stained lung section of one S. cinereus. In both cases the host was also infected with the fungus. Pneumocystis carinii, which is the most common lung parasite in Sorex araneus (the numerically dominant Eurasian species of shrew), was not found in any of the North American species of shrew examined in this study. PMID:9131560

  13. The 13th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP13).

    PubMed

    Calderon, Enrique J; Cushion, Melanie T; Xiao, Lihua; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob; Matos, Olga; Kaneshiro, Edna S; Weiss, Louis M

    2015-01-01

    The 13th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-13) was held November 13-15, 2014 in Seville, Spain. The objectives of the IWOP meetings are to: (1) serve as a forum for exchange of new information among active researchers concerning the basic biology, molecular genetics, immunology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, drug development, therapy, and epidemiology of these immunodeficiency-associated pathogenic eukaryotic microorganisms that are seen in patients with AIDS and; (2) to foster the entry of new and young investigators into these underserved research areas. The IWOP meeting focuses on opportunistic protists; e.g. the free-living amoebae, Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, the Microsporidia, and kinetoplastid flagellates. This conference represents the major conference which brings together research groups working on these opportunistic pathogens. Progress has been achieved on understanding the biology of these pathogenic organisms, their involvement in disease causation in both immune deficient and immune competent hosts and is providing important insights into these emerging and reemerging pathogens. A continuing concern of the participants is the ongoing loss of scientific expertise and diversity in this research community. This decline is due to the small size of these research communities and an ongoing lack of understanding by the broader scientific community of the challenges and limitations faced by researchers working on these organisms, which makes these research communities very sensitive to declines in research funding.

  14. Successful Treatment of Life-Threatening Interstitial Lung Disease Secondary to Antisynthetase Syndrome Using Rituximab: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Dasa, Osama; Ruzieh, Mohammed; Oraibi, Omar

    2016-01-01

    We are presenting a case of antisynthetase syndrome (ASS) that manifested with severe interstitial pneumonitis in the presence of anti-Jo-1 and Ro (SSA) antibodies. Our patient developed respiratory failure with high oxygen requirements despite treatment by high-dose steroids. The patient was then treated with rituximab. This treatment led to significant improvement in the patient condition, with resolution of the ground glass opacities on high-resolution computerized tomography and near normalization of pulmonary function tests. In this communication, we performed a literature review and summarized previous reports pertinent to using of rituximab to treat interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to ASS by searching the PubMed database from 1980 to 2014. We were able to find 14 reports that included total of 45 patients with ILD secondary to ASS. A significant improvement in ILD was reported in the majority of reported patients who received rituximab, while there was only 1 mortality-related to Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Rituximab treatment was tolerated well in the majority of cases. It is our conclusion that rituximab can be considered a therapeutic option in ILD secondary to ASS based on our experience with this case and the currently available evidence in the literature. Nevertheless, there is a need for additional controlled studies to assess the efficacy and safety of rituximab in ILD secondary to ASS compared with other immunosuppressive regimens.

  15. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect.

  16. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect. PMID:25758115

  17. Antibiotic prophylaxis in primary immune deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Kuruvilla, Merin; de la Morena, Maria Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Long-term prophylactic antibiotics are being widely implemented as primary or adjunctive therapy in primary immune deficiencies. This practice has transformed clinical outcomes in the setting of chronic granulomatous disease, complement deficiencies, Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, hyper-IgE syndrome, Toll signaling defects, and prevented Pneumocystis in patients with T-cell deficiencies. Yet, controlled trials are few in the context of primary antibody deficiency syndromes, and most of this practice has been extrapolated from data in patients who are immune competent and with recurrent acute otitis media, chronic rhinosinusitis, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. The paucity of guidelines on the subject is reflected in recent surveys among practicing immunologists that highlight differences of habit regarding this treatment. Such discrepancies reinforce the lack of standard protocols on the subject. This review will provide evidence for the use of antibiotic prophylaxis in various primary immune deficiency populations, especially highlighting the role antibiotic prophylaxis in primary antibody deficiency syndromes. We also discussed the relationship of long-term antibiotic use and the prevalence of resistant pathogens. Overall, examination of available data on the use of prophylactic antibiotics in antibody deficiency syndromes merit future investigation in well-designed multicenter prospective trials because this population has few other management options.

  18. The prevalence and clinical course of HIV-associated pulmonary cryptococcosis in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Samuel D; Worodria, William; Davis, JL; Cattamanchi, Adithya; den Boon, Saskia; Kyeyune, Rachel; Kisembo, Harriet; Huang, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence and clinical course of pulmonary cryptococcosis in Sub-Saharan Africa are not well-described. Methods Consecutive HIV-infected adults hospitalized at Mulago Hospital (Kampala, Uganda) between September 2007 and July 2008 with cough ≥ 2 weeks were enrolled. Patients with negative sputum smears for acid-fast bacilli were referred for bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). BAL fluid was examined for mycobacteria, Pneumocystis jirovecii, and fungi. Patients were followed two and six months after hospital discharge. Results Of 407 patients enrolled, 132 (32%) underwent bronchoscopy. Of 132 BAL fungal cultures, 15 (11%) grew Cryptococcus neoformans. None of the patients were suspected to have pulmonary cryptococcosis on admission. The median CD4 count among those with pulmonary cryptococcosis was 23 cells/µL (IQR 7–51). Of 13 patients who completed six-month follow-up, four died and nine were improved, including five who had started antiretroviral therapy (ART) but had not received antifungal medication. Conclusions Pulmonary cryptococcosis is common in HIV-infected TB suspects in Uganda. Early initiation of ART in those with isolated pulmonary infection may improve outcomes, even without anti-fungal therapy. This finding suggests that some HIV-infected patients with C. neoformans isolated from respiratory samples may have colonization or localized infection. PMID:20150818

  19. The 13th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP13)

    PubMed Central

    CALDERON, ENRIQUE J.; CUSHION, MELANIE T.; XIAO, LIHUA; LORENZO-MORALES, JACOB; MATOS, OLGA; KANESHIRO, EDNA S.; WEISS, LOUIS M.

    2015-01-01

    The 13th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-13) was held November 13 to 15, 2014 in Seville, Spain. The objectives of the IWOP meetings are to: (1) Serve as a forum for exchange of new information among active researchers concerning the basic biology, molecular genetics, immunology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, drug development, therapy, and epidemiology of these immunodeficiency associated pathogenic eukaryotic microorganisms that are seen in patients with AIDS; and (2) to foster the entry of new and young investigators into these underserved research areas. The IWOP meeting focuses on opportunistic protists; e.g. the free-living amoebae, Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, the Microsporidia, and kinetoplastid flagellates. This conference represents the major conference which brings together research groups working on these opportunistic pathogens. Progress has been achieved on understanding the biology of these pathogenic organisms, their involvement in disease causation in both immune deficient and immune competent hosts and is providing important insights into these emerging and reemerging pathogens. A continuing concern of the participants is the ongoing loss of scientific expertise and diversity in this research community. This decline is due to the small size of these research communities and an ongoing lack of understanding by the broader scientific community of the challenges and limitations faced by researchers working on these organisms, which makes these research communities very sensitive to declines in research funding. PMID:25923469

  20. Remission of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy following highly active antiretroviral therapy in a man with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Yoganathan, Katie; Brown, David; Yoganathan, Kathir

    2012-01-01

    A 43-year-old Caucasian homosexual man with AIDS presented with blurring of vision, change of personality, and memory loss in March 1999. He had first been admitted 2 months previously for treatment of Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. A magnetic resonance imaging scan on admission showed multiple white matter lesions involving both subcortical cerebral hemispheres and cerebellar regions, with no mass effect or surrounding edema. JC virus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction in the cerebrospinal fluid. These findings were diagnostic of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). His CD4 count was 34 cells/mL, and his HIV ribonucleic acid level was 800,789 copies/mL. He was treated with a combination antiretroviral therapy. He was last reviewed in October 2011. He was fully independent socially and mentally, but he still had some residual neurologic signs with right-sided homonymous hemianopia and visual agnosia. His HIV ribonucleic acid level was undetectable, and his CD4 count was 574 cells/mm(3). Although the median survival of patients with PML was poor before the antiretroviral therapy era, our patient, who is now aged 55 years, is still alive 12 years after the diagnosis. The diagnosis of PML and differential diagnosis of focal neurologic signs in HIV-positive patients are discussed in this case report. PMID:22536089

  1. Diarylsulfones, a novel class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Neamati, N; Mazumder, A; Zhao, H; Sunder, S; Burke, T R; Schultz, R J; Pommier, Y

    1997-01-01

    A majority of reported human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase (HIV-1 IN) inhibitors are polyhydroxylated aromatic compounds containing two phenyl rings separated by aliphatic or aromatic linkers. Most inhibitors possessing a catechol moiety exhibit considerable toxicity in cellular assays. In an effort to identify nonhydroxylated analogs, a series of aromatic sulfones were tested for their ability to inhibit the 3' processing and strand transfer steps that are necessary for HIV replication. Several aromatic sulfones have previously been shown to have moderate activity against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in cellular assays; however, their inhibitory potencies against IN have not been explored. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of a series of sulfones and sulfonamides against IN was determined. Among 52 diaryl sulfones tested, 4 were determined to be highly potent (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50], 0.8 to 10 micrograms/ml), 5 had good potencies (IC50, 11 to 50 micrograms/ml), 10 showed moderate potencies (IC50, 51 to 100 micrograms/ml), and 33 were inactive (IC50, > 100 micrograms/ml) against IN. All of the active compounds exhibited similar potencies against HIV-2 IN. Sulfa drugs, used extensively in treating Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in AIDs patients, were also examined. Among 19 sulfonamides tested, sulfasalazine (IC50, 50 micrograms/ml) was the most potent. We conclude that potent inhibitors of IN can be designed based on the results presented in this study. PMID:9021196

  2. Caveolae in the uptake and targeting of infectious agents and secreted toxins.

    PubMed

    Norkin, L C

    2001-07-28

    A variety of microbial pathogens, including viruses, intracellular bacteria, and prions, as well as certain secreted bacterial toxins, can now be added to the list of ligands that enter cells via caveolae or caveolae-like membrane domains. In general, the caveolae-mediated entry pathway results in transport of these microbes and toxins to intracellular destinations that are different from that of cargo entering by other means. As a result, the caveolae-mediated entry pathway can profoundly affect the host cell-pathogen interaction long after entry has occurred. Furthermore, some microbes such as SV40 that enter via cavolae will be valuable as probes to analyze certain poorly understood intracellular trafficking pathways, such as retrograde transport to the ER. Also, viruses that enter via caveolae may have unique potential as gene and drug delivery vectors. In addition, some extracellular microbial pathogens, such as Pneumocystis carinii, may also interact with host cells via caveolae. Finally, caveolae may play a role in host immune defense mechanisms.

  3. Tobacco use and cessation in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Wewers, Mary Ellen; Ferketich, Amy; Diaz, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis The smoking prevalence estimates among HIV-infected individuals range from 40%-84%; much higher than the overall adult prevalence in the United States. Characteristics that are associated with smokers who are HIV-positive include drug and alcohol abuse, psychiatric comorbidities, and lower education and socioeconomic status. There are important health implications for HIV-infected smokers, including bacterial and Pneumocystis pneumonia, tuberculosis, COPD, lung cancer and coronary artery disease. To date, there have been few tobacco dependence treatment trials conducted among HIV-infected smokers. Most have used nicotine replacement therapy but abstinence rates were low. A recent preliminary study found the use of varenicline to be well tolerated and it may increase abstinence rates with HIV-infected individuals. Recommendations for future research include examining underlying factors that contribute to persistent smoking and barriers to abstinence, identifying ways to increase motivation for quit attempts, increasing the number of multi-centered, two-arm tobacco dependence treatment trials, and using highly efficacious first-line pharmacotherapy in tobacco dependence treatment intervention studies. Addressing the above-mentioned research gaps will help to reduce the tobacco-related disease burden of HIV-infected individuals in the future. PMID:23702169

  4. [Increased risk of infection with biological immunomodifying antirheumatic agents. Clear guidelines are necessary as shown by case reports].

    PubMed

    Söderlin, Maria; Blomkvist, Christian; Dahl, Per; Forsberg, Per; Fohlman, Jan

    Several potent immunosuppressive drugs have become available in the new millennium for patients with rheumatologic diseases, Crohn's disease and other autoimmune disorders. Five patient cases from Växjö central hospital (uptake area 178 000 individuals) with Listeria meningitis, Pneumocystis jiroveci and tuberculosis pneumonia, Listeria sepsis, Legionella pneumonia and E coli sepsis are described. A doubled risk for infections has previously been observed for RA patients, as compared to healthy individuals. There is clearly an increased risk of tuberculosis (depending on the actual and historic environmental prevalence) for patients on TNF antagonists, and therefore tuberculosis screening is now mandatory before start of therapy. Since TNF has a central role in the immune defence, an increased risk of opportunistic infections like listeriosis. mycobacteriosis, and invasive fungal infections has been established. Eight hospitals in southern Sweden participate in a register for the use of TNF blockers in rheumatologic diseases (South Swedish Arthritis Treatment Group, SSATG). Guidelines for screening and treatment of latent and active tuberculosis, possible prophylactic antibiotic treatment for endocarditis and vaccination programs for patients on TNF antagonists are discussed. PMID:16408703

  5. Infections in solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R; Paya, C V

    1997-01-01

    Solid-organ transplantation is a therapeutic option for many human diseases. Infections are a major complication of solid-organ transplantation. All candidates should undergo a thorough infectious-disease screening prior to transplantation. There are three time frames, influenced by surgical factors, the level of immunosuppression, and environmental exposures, during which infections of specific types most frequently occur posttransplantation. Most infections during the first month are related to surgical complications. Opportunistic infections typically occur from the second to the sixth month. During the late posttransplant period (beyond 6 months), transplantation recipients suffer from the same infections seen in the general community. Opportunistic bacterial infections seen in transplant recipients include those caused by Legionella spp., Nocardia spp., Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of viral infections. Herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus and others are also significant pathogens. Fungal infections, caused by both yeasts and mycelial fungi, are associated with the highest mortality rates. Mycobacterial, pneumocystis, and parasitic diseases may also occur. PMID:8993860

  6. Colon perforation with peritonitis in an acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patient due to cytomegalovirus and amoebic colitis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hung-Chin; Lee, Susan Shin-Jung; Wann, Shue-Ren; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Eng-Rin; Yen, Chuan-Min; Liu, Yung-Ching

    2005-11-01

    Invasive amoebiasis is rarely seen in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, even in endemic areas. By contrast, cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is recognized as a major clinical problem in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients. A 34-year-old HIV-infected man with amoeba colitis, disseminated Mycobacterium avian complex and CMV infection with cecum perforation, presented with the initial symptoms of fever, shortness of breath and painful sensation when swallowing. He was treated with fluconazole, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and hydrocortisone under the impression of esophageal candidiasis and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. However, diarrhea and abdominal pain developed on day 6 of hospitalization. Invasive amoebiasis and CMV colitis was diagnosed after examination of colon pathological specimens. Emergent laparotomy was performed. Right hemicolectomy with double barrel ileostomy and colostomy was done due to perforation of the cecum. Iodoquinol was given, followed by metronidazole 14 days afterwards. He underwent closure of double barrel ileostomy and colostomy 5 months later. This case illustrates the diagnostic challenge of caring for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome persons with multiple illnesses and medication use. CMV infection, amoebic colitis and possibly corticosteroid may have played a role in colon perforation in our patient.

  7. The State of Disparities in Opportunistic Infection Prophylaxis for Blacks with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Oramasionwu, Christine U.; Koeller, Jim M.; Lawson, Kenneth A.; Brown, Carolyn M.; Morse, Gene D.; Frei, Christopher R.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this review is to identify and analyze published studies that have evaluated disparities for opportunistic infection (OI) prophylaxis between Blacks and Whites with HIV/AIDS in the United States. Methods The authors conducted a web-based search of MEDLINE (1950 to 2009) to identify original research articles evaluating the use of OI prophylaxis between Blacks and Whites with HIV/AIDS. The search was conducted utilizing the following MeSH headings and search terms alone and in combination: HIV, AIDS, Black, race, ethnicity, disparities, differences, access, opportunistic infection, and prophylaxis. The search was then expanded to include any relevant articles from the referenced citations of the articles that were retrieved from the initial search strategy. Of the 29 articles retrieved from the literature search, 19 articles were excluded. Results Ten publications met inclusion criteria, collectively published between 1991 and 2005. The collective time periods of these studies spanned from 1987 to 2001. Four studies identified a race-based disparity in that Blacks were less likely than Whites to use OI prophylaxis, whereas five studies failed to identify such a relationship between race and OI prophylaxis. One study identified disparities for Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) prophylaxis, but not for Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis. Conclusions The evidence regarding race-based disparities in opportunistic infection prophylaxis is inconclusive. Additional research is warranted to explore potential race-based disparities in OI prophylaxis. PMID:23047780

  8. Tailored total lymphoid irradiation in heart transplant patients: 10-years experience of one center

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To assess safety and efficacy of tailored total lymphoid irradiation (tTLI) in cardiac transplant patients. Methods A total of seven patients, of which five had recalcitrant cellular cardiac allograft rejection (RCCAR), confirmed by endomyocardial biopsies, and two had side effects of immunosuppressive drug therapy, were all treated with tTLI. tTLI was defined by the adjustment of both the fraction interval and the final irradiation dosage both being dependent on the patients general condition, irradiation-dependent response, and the white blood and platelet counts. A mean dose of 6.4 Gy (range, 1.6 - 8.8 Gy) was given. Median follow-up was 7 years (range, 1.8 - 12.2 years). Results tTLI was well tolerated. Two patients experienced a severe infection during tTLI (pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, urosepsis and generalized herpes zoster) and one patient developed a lymphoproliferative disorder after tTLI. The rate of rejection episodes before tTLI was 0.43 episodes/patient/month and decreased to 0.02 episodes/patient/month after tTLI (P < .001). At the end of the observation time, all patients except one were alive. Conclusions tTLI is a useful treatment strategy for the management of RCCAR and in patients with significant side effects of immunosuppressive drug therapy. In this series tTLI demonstrated significantly decreased rejection rates without causing relevant treatment-related toxicity. PMID:20078889

  9. Protein prenyltransferases: anchor size, pseudogenes and parasites.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Washietl, Stefan; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2003-07-01

    Lipid modification of eukaryotic proteins by protein prenyltransferases is required for critical signaling pathways, cell cycle progression, cytoskeleton remodeling, induction of apoptosis and vesicular trafficking. This review analyzes the influence of distinct states of sequential posttranslational processing that can be obtained after single or double prenylation, reversible palmitoylation, proteolytic cleavage of the C-terminus and possible reversible carboxymethylation. This series of modifications, as well as the exact length of the prenyl anchor, are determinants in protein-membrane and specific protein-protein interactions of protein prenyltransferase substrates. Furthermore, the occurrence and distribution of pseudogenes of protein prenyltransferase subunits are discussed. Besides being developed as anti-cancer agents, prenyltransferase inhibitors are effective against an increasing number of parasitic diseases. Extensive screens for protein prenyltransferases in genomic data of fungal and protozoan pathogens unveil a series of new pharmacologic targets for prenyltransferase inhibition, including the parasites Brugia malayi, Onchocerca volvulus, Aspergillus nidulans, Pneumocystis carinii, Entamoeba histolytica, Strongyloides stercoralis, Trichinella spiralis and Cryptosporidium parvum.

  10. AIDS and haemophilia: morbidity and morality in a well defined population.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, P; Hamilton, P J; Bird, G; Fearns, M; Oxley, A; Tedder, R; Cheingsong-Popov, R; Codd, A

    1985-01-01

    One hundred and forty-three multitransfused patients with hereditary haemostatic disorders were examined for evidence of disease related to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Ninety-nine patients with severe haemophilia A were tested for anti-HTLV-III and 76 were found to be positive. All except one of these seropositive patients had received commercial factor VIII concentrates at some time. Eighteen patients with haemophilia B were tested and all were anti-HTLV-III negative. Three out of 36 sexual partners of patients with haemophilia A positive for anti-HTLV-III were also seropositive. One, who had recently received blood transfusions, had AIDS with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Three patients with severe haemophilia A died from Aids. A further 30 haemophiliacs had AIDS related complex or lymphadenopathy that could be related to HTLV-III infection. There was a significant correlation between lymphadenopathy and anti-HTLV-III seropositivity. No evidence of casual spread of AIDS was found since all 68 health care staff tested were anti-HTLV-III negative, including three surgeons who regularly worked with patients positive for anti-HTLV-III. The resources devoted to counselling and laboratory support in centres treating people at risk and their families need to be urgently reassessed. PMID:2994801

  11. Review of Zoonotic Parasites in Medical and Veterinary Fields in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Zoonotic parasites are animal parasites that can infect humans. The major zoonotic protozoa in the Republic of Korea are Babesia bovis, Chilomastix mesnili, Cryptosporidium parvum, Endolimax nana, Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba hitolytica, Giardia lamblia, Iodamoeba bütschlii, Pneumocystis carinii, Sarcocystis cruzi, and Toxoplasma gondii. The major zoonotic helminths in Korea include trematodes, cestodes, and nematodes. Trematodes are Clonorchis sinensis, Echinostoma hortense, Echinostoma spp., Fasciola hepatica, Heterophyes nocens, Metagonimus yokogawai, and Paragonimus westermani. Cestodes are Diphyllobothrium latum, Dipylidium caninum, Echinococcus granulosus, Hymenolepis nana, Raillietina tetragona, sparganum (Spirometra spp.), Taenia saginata, T. solium, and T. asiatica. Nematodes are Ancylostoma caninum, Brugia malayi, Capillaria hepatica, Dirofilaria immitis, Gnathostoma dololesi, Gnathostoma spinigerum, Loa loa, Onchocerca gibsoni, Strongyloides stercoralis, Thelazia callipaeda, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus orientalis, Trichuris trichiura, and Trichuris vulpis. The one arthropod is Sarcoptes scabiei. Many of these parasites have disappeared or were in decline after the 1990's. Since the late 1990's, the important zoonotic protozoa have been C. parvum, E. nana, E. coli, E. hitolytica, G. lamblia, I. buetschlii, P. carinii and T. gondii. The important zoonotic helminths have been C. sinensis, H. nocens, M. yokogawai, P. westermani, D. latum, T. asiatica, sparganum, B. malayi, T. orientalis, T. callipaeda and T. spiralis. However, outbreaks of these parasites are only in a few endemic areas. The outbreaks of Enterobius vermicularis and head lice, human parasites, have recently increased in the kindergartens and primary schools in the Republic of Korea. PMID:19885329

  12. First Line of Defense: Innate Cell-Mediated Control of Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Vanessa; Rivera, Amariliz

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic infections and their effect on the human condition have been widely overlooked and poorly surveilled by many health organizations even though mortality rates have increased in recent years. The increased usage of immunosuppressive and myeloablative therapies for the treatment of malignant as well as non-malignant diseases has contributed significantly to the increased incidence of fungal infections. Invasive fungal infections have been found to be responsible for at least 1.5 million deaths worldwide. About 90% of these deaths can be attributed to Cryptococcus, Candida, Aspergillus, and Pneumocystis. A better understanding of how the host immune system contains fungal infection is likely to facilitate the development of much needed novel antifungal therapies. Innate cells are responsible for the rapid recognition and containment of fungal infections and have been found to play essential roles in defense against multiple fungal pathogens. In this review we summarize our current understanding of host-fungi interactions with a focus on mechanisms of innate cell-mediated recognition and control of pulmonary aspergillosis. PMID:26973640

  13. DNA Double-Strand Breaks and Telomeres Play Important Roles in Trypanosoma brucei Antigenic Variation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human-infecting microbial pathogens all face a serious problem of elimination by the host immune response. Antigenic variation is an effective immune evasion mechanism where the pathogen regularly switches its major surface antigen. In many cases, the major surface antigen is encoded by genes from the same gene family, and its expression is strictly monoallelic. Among pathogens that undergo antigenic variation, Trypanosoma brucei (a kinetoplastid), which causes human African trypanosomiasis, Plasmodium falciparum (an apicomplexan), which causes malaria, Pneumocystis jirovecii (a fungus), which causes pneumonia, and Borrelia burgdorferi (a bacterium), which causes Lyme disease, also express their major surface antigens from loci next to the telomere. Except for Plasmodium, DNA recombination-mediated gene conversion is a major pathway for surface antigen switching in these pathogens. In the last decade, more sophisticated molecular and genetic tools have been developed in T. brucei, and our knowledge of functions of DNA recombination in antigenic variation has been greatly advanced. VSG is the major surface antigen in T. brucei. In subtelomeric VSG expression sites (ESs), VSG genes invariably are flanked by a long stretch of upstream 70-bp repeats. Recent studies have shown that DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), particularly those in 70-bp repeats in the active ES, are a natural potent trigger for antigenic variation in T. brucei. In addition, telomere proteins can influence VSG switching by reducing the DSB amount at subtelomeric regions. These findings will be summarized and their implications will be discussed in this review. PMID:25576484

  14. Detection of abnormalities in febrile AIDS patients with In-111-labeled leukocyte and Ga-67 scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Fineman, D.S.; Palestro, C.J.; Kim, C.K.; Needle, L.B.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Solomon, R.W.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1989-03-01

    Thirty-six patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), who were febrile but without localizing signs, underwent indium-111 leukocyte scintigraphy 24 hours after injection of labeled white blood cells (WBCs) and were restudied 48 hours after injection of gallium-67 citrate. Fifty-six abnormalities were identified as possible sources of the fever; 27 were confirmed with biopsy. Of these 27, 15 were identified only on In-111 WBC scans (including colitis, sinusitis, and focal bacterial pneumonia); six, only on Ga-67 scans (predominantly Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia and lymphadenopathy); and six, on both studies (predominantly pulmonary lesions). In-111 WBC scanning revealed 21 of 27 abnormalities (78%) and gallium scanning, 12 of 27 (44%). If only one scintigraphic study has been performed, particularly with Ga-67, a significant number of lesions would not have been detected. The authors believe radionuclide evaluation of the febrile AIDS patient without localizing signs should begin with In-111 WBC scintigraphy. Gallium scanning may be used depending on results of In-111 WBC scans or if there is a high index of suspicion for P carinii pneumonia.

  15. Diagnostic implications of Ga-67 chest-scan patterns in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, E.L.; Sanger, J.H.; Garay, S.M.; Grossman, R.J.; Tiu, S.; Banner, H.

    1989-03-01

    Consecutive gallium-67 scans (n = 237) of 180 human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive patients with suspected pulmonary infections were evaluated for intensity and pattern of gallium distribution. Scan findings were correlated with the history, chest radiographic findings, and clinicopathologic diagnoses. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) occurred significantly more often with heterogeneous diffuse uptake than with homogeneous diffuse uptake. Heterogeneous diffuse uptake had an 87% positive predictive value for PCP, which was higher than that of other patterns. Localized pulmonary uptake was most commonly due to bacterial pneumonia or PCP; ill-defined, perihilar uptake, to cytomegalovirus or PCP; and focal (lymph node) uptake, to tuberculosis or lymphoma. The positive predictive value of any pulmonary uptake for lung pathology was 93%, and the negative predictive value of a negative scan was 96%. These findings confirm the utility of gallium scanning in the detection of lung pathology related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, particularly PCP. Furthermore, identification of a diffuse pattern may permit the use of a less invasive test more specifically directed at the confirmation of a diagnosis of PCP.

  16. CD4+ T cell–independent DNA vaccination against opportunistic infections

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingquan; Ramsay, Alistair J.; Robichaux, Myles B.; Norris, Karen A.; Kliment, Corrine; Crowe, Christopher; Rapaka, Rekha R.; Steele, Chad; McAllister, Florencia; Shellito, Judd E.; Marrero, Luis; Schwarzenberger, Paul; Zhong, Qiu; Kolls, Jay K.

    2005-01-01

    Depletion or dysfunction of CD4+ T lymphocytes profoundly perturbs host defenses and impairs immunogenicity of vaccines. Here, we show that plasmid DNA vaccination with a cassette encoding antigen (OVA) and a second cassette encoding full-length CD40 ligand (CD40L), a molecule expressed on activated CD4+ T lymphocytes and critical for T cell helper function, can elicit significant titers of antigen-specific immunoglobulins in serum and Tc1 CD8+ T cell responses in CD4-deficient mice. To investigate whether this approach leads to CD4+ T cell–independent vaccine protection against a prototypic AIDS-defining infection, Pneumocystis (PC) pneumonia, we used serum from mice vaccinated with PC-pulsed, CD40L-modifed DCs to immunoprecipitate PC antigens. Kexin, a PC antigen identified by this approach, was used in a similar DNA vaccine strategy with or without CD40L. CD4-deficient mice receiving DNA vaccines encoding Kexin and CD40L showed significantly higher anti-PC IgG titers as well as opsonic killing of PC compared with those vaccinated with Kexin alone. Moreover, CD4-depleted, Kexin-vaccinated mice showed a 3-log greater protection in a PC challenge model. Adoptive transfer of CD19+ cells or IgG to SCID mice conferred protection against PC challenge, indicating a role of humoral immunity in the protection. The results of these studies show promise for CD4-independent vaccination against HIV-related or other opportunistic pathogens. PMID:16308571

  17. New approaches to targeting RNA with oligonucleotides: inhibition of group I intron self-splicing.

    PubMed

    Disney, Matthew D; Childs, Jessica L; Turner, Douglas H

    2004-01-01

    RNA is one class of relatively unexplored drug targets. Since RNAs play a myriad of essential roles, it is likely that new drugs can be developed that target RNA. There are several factors that make targeting RNA particularly attractive. First, the amount of information about the roles of RNA in essential biological processes is currently being expanded. Second, sequence information about targetable RNA is pouring out of genome sequencing efforts at unprecedented levels. Third, designing and screening potential oligonucleotide therapeutics to target RNA is relatively simple. The use of oligonucleotides in cell culture, however, presents several challenges such as oligonucleotide uptake and stability, and selective targeting of genes of interest. Here, we review investigations aimed at targeting RNA with oligonucleotides that can circumvent several of these potential problems. The hallmark of the strategies discussed is the use of short oligonucleotides, which may have the advantage of higher cellular uptake and improved binding selectivity compared to longer oligonucleotides. These strategies have been applied to Group I introns from the mammalian pathogens Pneumocystis carinii and Candida albicans. Both are examples of fungal infections that are increasing in number and prevalence. PMID:14691946

  18. The Spectrum of Infectious Diseases in Kidney Transplantation: A Review of the Classification, Pathogens and Clinical Manifestations.

    PubMed

    Anastasopoulos, Nikolaos-Andreas; Duni, Anila; Peschos, Dimitrios; Agnantis, Niki; Dounousi, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment-of-choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Renal transplant recipients (RTRs) benefit from a longer life expectancy, with a better quality of life. Despite, recent accomplishments in the field of kidney transplantation, both short- and long-term, surgical and medical complications still exist. Among these complications, cardiovascular disease, carcinogenesis and infections are the most important. Infectious diseases constitute the most common complications after renal transplantation and the second most common cause of death among RTRs with a functioning graft. Theoretically, all infectious pathogens could cause disease in immunocompromised RTRs, yet among these, one could identify more important ones, such as the Enterobacteriaceae, causing urinary tract infections; pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii; Candida species which cause invasive fungal infections; herpes viruses; hepatitis viruses and parasites. Early diagnosis and effective treatment are key elements in salvaging both the allograft and the patient. However, clinical manifestations and diagnosis of such infectious diseases are not easily identified due to the altered state of immune response of the RTR. Thus, apart from possessing a deep knowledge of the etiology and the treatment options in each case, transplant physicians should also always remain alert when dealing with RTRs. PMID:26130786

  19. Secondary MGUS following by adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic cystitis after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation in a patient with multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hatsuse, Mayumi; Fuchida, Shin-ichi; Okano, Akira; Murakami, Satoshi; Shimazaki, Chihiro

    2014-11-01

    A 61-year-old man with multiple myeloma (IgG-κ) received autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) after induction of VAD in July 2009, and obtained a very good partial response. In November 2009, he was admitted to our hospital because of adenovirus-induced hemorrhagic cystitis and pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. The pneumonia resolved with sulfamethoxazole and steroid pulse therapy, and cystitis subsided spontaneously. In December 2009, serum protein electrophoresis showed two abnormal protein bands (APB)(IgG-λ, IgA-λ), different from the original M-protein, and IgG thereafter increased to 2,771 mg/dl with a concomitant increase in anti-adenovirus antibody to 4,096. In October 2010, APB disappeared. To date, he has been in stable complete remission for five years since PBSCT. The emergence of APB is considered to be a surrogate marker for long-term remission. Immune reconstitution syndrome and APB after high dose chemotherapy following PBSCT are discussed herein.

  20. Molecular and Nonmolecular Diagnostic Methods for Invasive Fungal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Marios; Anagnostou, Theodora; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Caliendo, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Invasive fungal infections constitute a serious threat to an ever-growing population of immunocompromised individuals and other individuals at risk. Traditional diagnostic methods, such as histopathology and culture, which are still considered the gold standards, have low sensitivity, which underscores the need for the development of new means of detecting fungal infectious agents. Indeed, novel serologic and molecular techniques have been developed and are currently under clinical evaluation. Tests like the galactomannan antigen test for aspergillosis and the β-glucan test for invasive Candida spp. and molds, as well as other antigen and antibody tests, for Cryptococcus spp., Pneumocystis spp., and dimorphic fungi, have already been established as important diagnostic approaches and are implemented in routine clinical practice. On the other hand, PCR and other molecular approaches, such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), have proved promising in clinical trials but still need to undergo standardization before their clinical use can become widespread. The purpose of this review is to highlight the different diagnostic approaches that are currently utilized or under development for invasive fungal infections and to identify their performance characteristics and the challenges associated with their use. PMID:24982319

  1. Extremely prolonged HIV seroconversion associated with an MHC haplotype carrying disease susceptibility genes for antibody deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Padiglione, Alex; Aleksic, Eman; French, Martyn; Arnott, Alicia; Wilson, Kim M; Tippett, Emma; Kaye, Matthew; Gray, Lachlan; Ellett, Anne; Crane, Megan; Leslie, David E; Lewin, Sharon R; Breschkin, Alan; Birch, Chris; Gorry, Paul R; McPhee, Dale A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2010-11-01

    Severe immunodeficiency during primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is unusual. Here, we characterized viral and immunological parameters in a subject presenting with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in the setting of prolonged primary HIV illness and delayed seroconversion. HIV antibody was only detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 12 months after presentation, and Western blot profiles remain indeterminate. Isolated virus was of R5 phenotype, exhibited poor viral fitness, but was otherwise unremarkable. Analysis of HIV antibody isotypes showed failure to mount a detectable HIV IgG response over nearly 2 years of infection, in particular IgG(1)- and IgG(3)-specific responses, despite normal responses to common infections and vaccines. Genetic analysis demonstrated homozygosity for part of an MHC haplotype containing susceptibility genes for common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) syndrome and other antibody deficiency disorders. Thus, a primary disorder of specific antibody production may explain exceptionally slow antibody development in an otherwise severe seroconversion illness. This highlights the need for multiparameter testing, in particular use of a fourth generation HIV test, for confirming HIV infection and underscores the importance of host factors in HIV pathogenesis.

  2. [AIDS in Tunisian women. Study of 92 cases].

    PubMed

    Zouiten, Fayçal; Ben Said, Amel; Ammari, Lamia; Slim, Amine; Kanoun, Fakher; Ben Chaabane, Taoufik

    2002-07-01

    The authors report a retrospective study about 92 cases of HIV-1 infections among adult tunisian women hospitalised or consulting in the department of infectious diseases at Rabta hospital over a period of 15 years and 6 months. The middle age is 33.2 years. 64.1% of patients are married, and the conjoint is HIV-1 positive in 84.1% of cases. The route of transmission is sexual in 75%, parenteral in 22.8% and unknown in 2.2%. According to CD4 level and clinical symptoms, patients are at AIDS stage in 75.5%. The main clinical symptoms are: oral candidiasis in 92.4%, diarrhea in 54.3%, pneumocystis carinii pneumoniae in 11.9%, cerebral toxoplasmosis in 10.9%, septicemia caused particularly by salmonella in 9.7%, tuberculosis in 6.7%, cryptococcal meningitis in 4.3% an Kaposi's sarcoma in 3.2%. Mother to child HIV transmission is found in 33.3%, and the mortality is noted in 43.5% of cases.

  3. HIV-related nontuberculous mycobacterial infection: incidence, survival analysis and associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Arastéh, K N; Cordes, C; Ewers, M; Simon, V; Dietz, E; Futh, U M; Brockmeyer, N H; L'age, M P

    2000-10-30

    To evaluate the incidence and survival time for AIDS-patients affected by different stages of nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection we performed a retrospective study. Data of 1540 hospitalised AIDS-patients was analyzed with respect to survival time and incidence rates. The overall incidence rate of NTM following AIDS was 16.6/100 person-years (PY), with an increase from 12.1/100PY (1987-1990) to 18.9/100PY (1991-1994). Antiretroviral therapy (ART) and toxoplasmosis prophylaxis reduced the risk of NTM disease whereas CD4 cells <40/ microl at time of the first AIDS defining illness led to a 2.5 fold higher risk. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), wasting syndrome and PCP prophylaxis increased the risk of progression from colonization to dissemination. Cryptococcus neoformans infection, wasting syndrome, PCP prophylaxis and CD4 cells <40/ microl were linked to immediate NTM dissemination. Though the incidence of NTM dissemination increased by the factor 1.56 in 1991-1994, survival did not differ between patients with and without NTM infection.

  4. Co-infection by Cryptococcus neoformans and Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS.

    PubMed

    Arastéh, K; Cordes, C; Futh, U; Grosse, G; Dietz, E; Staib, F

    In the observation of various opportunistic pathogens in HIV-positive persons, co-infection by Cryptococcus neoformans together with Mycobacterium avium intracellulare was found if there was a CD4 lymphocyte count as low as 3-20 microl. In 1540 HIV-positive patients under treatment at a Berlin hospital (Auguste-Viktoria-Krankenhaus) during 1985-1994, all AIDS-relevant diseases were examined in a multivariate analysis as variables of influence on the manifestation of a systemic Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. The analysis involved data on 36 cases of cryptococcosis and 202 cases with a typical clinical course in whom MAC had been detected at sterile body sites. As significant and independent factors of influence, the following were identified: C. neoformans infection, wasting syndrome, lower age, low CD4 lymphocyte count and preceding Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PcP) prophylaxis. Cryptococcosis ranged first with an odds ratio of 2.75. The concomitant manifestation of cryptococcosis and systemic MAC infection in six patients is shown. Because both opportunists, C. neoformans and avian mycobacteria, may have their common habitat in droppings of defined species of pet birds, a common source of infection deserves further clinical and epidemiological attention.

  5. Co-infection by Cryptococcus neoformans and Mycobacterium avium intracellulare in AIDS. Clinical and epidemiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Arastéh, K; Cordes, C; Futh, U; Grosse, G; Dietz, E; Staib, F

    In the observation of various opportunistic pathogens in HIV-positive persons, co-infection by Cryptococcus neoformans together with Mycobacterium avium intracellulare was found if there was a CD4 lymphocyte count as low as 3-20/microliters. In 1540 HIV-positive patients under treatment at a Berlin hospital (Auguste-Viktoria-Krankenhaus) during 1985-1994, all AIDS-relevant diseases were examined in a multivariate analysis as variables of influence on the manifestation of a systemic Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection. The analysis involved data on 36 cases of cryptococcosis and 202 cases with a typical clinical course in whom MAC had been detected at sterile body sites. As significant and independent factors of influence, the following were identified: C. neoformans infection, wasting syndrome, lower age, low CD4 lymphocyte count and preceding Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PcP) prophylaxis. Cryptococcosis ranged first with an ods ratio of 2.75. The concomitant manifestation of cryptococcosis and systemic MAC infection in six patients is shown. Because both opportunists, C. neoformans and avian mycobacteria, may have their common habitat in droppings of defined species of pet birds, a common source of infection deserves further clinical and epidemiological attention.

  6. Diffuse lung uptake (DLU) on Ga-67 scintigraph: Clinical, radiologic and pathologic correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Sy, W.M.; Seo, I.S.; Vieira, J.; Zaman, M.

    1985-05-01

    Review, analysis and correlation (clinical, radiologic and pathologic) of 29 consecutive adults (16 drug addicts and/or homosexuals) with DLU on Ga-67 scintigraph were made. Diffuse increased uptake of at least 75% of both lungs was considered as DLU. WFOF cameras were used to obtain 24 to 96 hr. scintigraphs after IV injection of 3-5 mCi of Ga-67 citrate. In 26, tissue diagnosis established: pneumocystis carinii (PC) 15, miliary tuberculosis (TB) 3, sarcoidosis (SR) 3, drug-induced toxicity 2, and toxoplasmosis (TX), primary hyperparathyroidism and nonspecific lymphocytic pneumonia-one each. In two with breast and one with esophageal carcinomas, no lung tissue diagnosis was sought. Concurrent chest x-rays were negative in 16, but in 7/16, lung infiltrate was later documented. An average of 31 days elapsed before x-rays became positive in four with PC, 7 days in two with TB, and 22 days in one with TX. In 13, concurrent x-rays showed lung infiltrate, but in 6, only subtle, localized rather than diffuse infiltrate was noted. Fourteen of 29 had at least two Ga-67 studies. In 12 (7 PC, 2 TB, 3 SR) of 14 whose repeat studies showed significant to total disappearance of DLU, all did well clinically. In two whose initial studies were negative or equivocal, they became clinically worse when the repeat study showed DLU. In three others (2 PC, 1 TX) who died, their single studies recorded intense DLU. DLU on gallium scintigraph indicated a variety of pathology. In 55.2%, gallium scintigraph predated x-ray findings by a few days to weeks. In 20.3%, x-ray findings were only subtle or localized. Scintigraphic changes correlated well with the clinical courses in various diseases.

  7. Antipneumocystis activity of water-soluble lipopeptide L-693,989 in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Schmatz, D M; Powles, M A; McFadden, D C; Pittarelli, L; Balkovec, J; Hammond, M; Zambias, R; Liberator, P; Anderson, J

    1992-01-01

    Water-soluble lipopeptide L-693,989 was evaluated for its antipneumocystis activity in rats. Rats from colonies with latent Pneumocystis carinii infections were immunosuppressed with dexamethasone for 6 weeks to facilitate the development of acute P. carinii pneumonia (PCP). After 6 weeks, the rats were maintained on dexamethasone and were treated twice daily for 4 days with various concentrations of L-693,989. At a dose of 0.15 mg/kg of body weight, the compound effectively eliminated 90% of the cysts in 4 days. Trophozoite forms of P. carinii were still present in these animals, as determined by using a P. carinii-specific DNA probe. A 3-week therapy study showed that the trophozoite load did not expand during treatment and that the trophozoites already present at the initiation of therapy appeared to persist. This may be a consequence of the stage specificity of the compound for cyst development and the severe immunosuppressive effects of dexamethasone on rats. When evaluated as a daily parenteral prophylactic agent, L-693,989 was effective in preventing the development of both P. carinii cysts and trophozoites, demonstrating its potential for use in prophylaxis and implying that the cyst stage of P. carinii is an obligatory step in trophozoite multiplication. The foamy exudate commonly associated with P. carinii infections was absent in the lungs of rats on prophylaxis. The compound was also evaluated via oral administration and was found to have a 90% effective dose of 32 mg/kg for therapy of acute infections and 5 mg/kg for daily prophylaxis. Images PMID:1416888

  8. Regional and temporal changes in AIDS in Europe before HAART.

    PubMed Central

    Blaxhult, A.; Fox, Z.; Colebunders, R.; Francioli, P.; Ben-Ishai, Z.; Fätkenheuer, G.; Parkin, J. M.; Vanhems, P.; Phillips, A. N.; Kirk, O.

    2002-01-01

    In a prospective observational study 4,485 patients from 46 clinical centres in 17 European countries were followed between April 1994 and November 1996. Information on AIDS-defining events (ADEs) were collected together with basic demographic data, treatment history and laboratory results. The centres were divided into four geographical regions (north, central, south-west and south-east) so that it was possible to identify any existing regional differences in ADEs. The regional differences that we observed included a higher risk of all forms of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections (Tb) and wasting disease in the south-west and an increased risk of infections with the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in the north. In Cox multivariable analyses, where north was used as the reference group, we observed hazard ratios of 6.87, 7.77, 2.29 and 0.16 (P < 0.05 in all cases) for pulmonary Tb, extrapulmonary Tb, wasting disease and MAC respectively in the south-west. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) was less commonly diagnosed in the central region (RH = 0.51, 95% CI 0 32-0.79, P = 0.003) and most common in the south-east (RH = 1.04, 95% CI 0.71-1.51, P = 0.85). Comparisons with a similar 'AIDS in Europe' study that concentrated on the early phase of the epidemic reveal that most of the regional differences that were observed in the 1980s still persist in the mid-1990s. PMID:12558340

  9. Consensus definitions of 14 severe acute toxic effects for childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment: a Delphi consensus.

    PubMed

    Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Barzilai, Shlomit; Escherich, Gabriele; Frandsen, Thomas Leth; Halsey, Christina; Hough, Rachael; Jeha, Sima; Kato, Motohiro; Liang, Der-Cherng; Mikkelsen, Torben Stamm; Möricke, Anja; Niinimäki, Riitta; Piette, Caroline; Putti, Maria Caterina; Raetz, Elizabeth; Silverman, Lewis B; Skinner, Roderick; Tuckuviene, Ruta; van der Sluis, Inge; Zapotocka, Ester

    2016-06-01

    Although there are high survival rates for children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, their outcome is often counterbalanced by the burden of toxic effects. This is because reported frequencies vary widely across studies, partly because of diverse definitions of toxic effects. Using the Delphi method, 15 international childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia study groups assessed acute lymphoblastic leukaemia protocols to address toxic effects that were to be considered by the Ponte di Legno working group. 14 acute toxic effects (hypersensitivity to asparaginase, hyperlipidaemia, osteonecrosis, asparaginase-associated pancreatitis, arterial hypertension, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, seizures, depressed level of consciousness, methotrexate-related stroke-like syndrome, peripheral neuropathy, high-dose methotrexate-related nephrotoxicity, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome, thromboembolism, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia) that are serious but too rare to be addressed comprehensively within any single group, or are deemed to need consensus definitions for reliable incidence comparisons, were selected for assessment. Our results showed that none of the protocols addressed all 14 toxic effects, that no two protocols shared identical definitions of all toxic effects, and that no toxic effect definition was shared by all protocols. Using the Delphi method over three face-to-face plenary meetings, consensus definitions were obtained for all 14 toxic effects. In the overall assessment of outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment, these expert opinion-based definitions will allow reliable comparisons of frequencies and severities of acute toxic effects across treatment protocols, and facilitate international research on cause, guidelines for treatment adaptation, preventive strategies, and development of consensus algorithms for reporting on acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treatment. PMID:27299279

  10. Ophthalmic manifestations of HIV in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, L

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related eye disease can be classified as retinal HIV microangiopathy, opportunistic infections, neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and unusual malignancies. There is a 52-100% lifetime accumulative risk of HIV patients developing eye problems. Seventy-seven per cent of patients with ocular manifestations of HIV had CD4 counts < 200 cells/μL. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most prevalent opportunistic infection, however, Africa has a low incidence of this, and more commonly squamous cell carcinoma, compared to the western hemisphere. Due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the anti-CMV therapy may be discontinued if the CD4+ T cell count is > 100 cells/μL for a minimum of three months. Despite HAART, patients with a CD4 count < 50 cells/μL have a similar risk of developing CMV retinitis as compared to the pre-HAART era. Opportunistic infections include CMV, herpetic retinopathy (progressive outer retinal necrosis - PORN), less commonly toxoplasmosis, pneumocystis and cryptococcus. Malignancies associated with HIV include Kaposi's sarcoma and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. Cranial nerve palsies, optic disc swelling and atrophy are characteristic neuro-ophthalmic features. They usually occur secondary to meningitis/encephalitis (from cryptococcus and tuberculosis). With the advent of HAART, new complications have developed in CMV retinitis: immune recovery uveitis (IRU) and cystoid macula oedema (CMO). Immune recovery uveitis occurs in 71% of patients if HAART is started before the induction of the anti-CMV treatment. However, this is reduced to 31% if HAART is started after the induction treatment. Molluscum contagiosum and Kaposi's sarcoma can spontaneously resolve on HAART. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has reduced the frequencies of opportunistic infections and improved the remission duration in HIV patients. PMID:24756590

  11. High Resolution Computed Tomography Lung Spectrum in Symptomatic Adult HIV-Positive Patients in South-East Asian Nation

    PubMed Central

    Puranik, Swapnil; Madhav, Ramavathu Kumar Venu; KSV, Abhinetri; Sharma, B. B.; Garga, Umesh Chand

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary infections remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality and one of the most frequent causes of hospital admission in HIV infected people worldwide. HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary disease. The aim of given study was to determine the High Resolution Computed Tomography spectrum of lung parenchymal and interstitial imaging findings in HIV infected patients presented with chest symptoms. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in a tertiary health care centre, New Delhi, India. The study consisted of 45 patients. A thorough clinical history of all the HIV positive patients presenting with suspicion of pulmonary disease was taken. General physical and respiratory system examination of all patients was done. HRCT scans of the chest were done in all the cases taken in the study. Results: Maximum number of patients was in age group 31-40 years (24 cases). Out of 45 patients included in our study, 32 (71%) were male and 13 (29%) were female. In our series of 45 patients, 62.2% of patients were diagnosed as having pulmonary tuberculosis, followed by bacterial infection in 20% cases and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PJP) in 8.9% patients, while 8.9% of the study did not reveal any significant abnormality. Maximum number (22/28) of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis were indentified to have nodular opacities. The most common HRCT finding in bacterial infection was lobar consolidation. The most common HRCT finding in patients with PCP was diffuse ground glass opacities in mosaic pattern of distribution. Conclusion: HRCT is a highly sensitive tool for detecting lung parenchymal and interstitial lesions and allows better characterization of the lesions. HRCT findings should always be correlated with clinical findings, CD4 counts and other available investigations before arriving at a diagnosis or differential diagnosis. PMID:25121043

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Dapsone Administered Daily and Weekly in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Mirochnick, Mark; Cooper, Ellen; McIntosh, Ken; Xu, Jing; Lindsey, Jane; Jacobus, David; Mofenson, Lynne; Sullivan, John L.; Dankner, Wayne; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Nachman, Sharon; Wara, Diane W.; Johnson, Daniel; Bonagura, Vincent R.; Rathore, Mobeen H.; Cunningham, Coleen K.; McNamara, James

    1999-01-01

    Although dapsone is a commonly used alternative agent for prophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia in children intolerant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, there are few data that describe dapsone pharmacokinetics in children. We studied dapsone pharmacokinetics in 30 children (median age, 2.8 years; age range, 0.3 to 12 years) receiving a new proprietary liquid preparation by three dosing regimens (1 mg/kg of body weight daily, 2 mg/kg daily, or 4 mg/kg weekly). Dosing of children with 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly resulted in peak concentrations equivalent to those reached in adults receiving 100-mg tablets daily. For the entire population, the median half-life was 22.2 h (range, 7.1 to 40.3 h), the median oral clearance was 0.0365 liter/kg/h (range, 0.0104 to 0.1021 liter/kg/h), and the median oral apparent volume of distribution was 1.13 liters/kg (range, 0.50 to 2.32 liters/kg). The median dapsone oral clearance was significantly increased in those infants less than 2 years of age compared to the oral clearance in those over 2 years of age (0.0484 versus 0.0278 liter/kg/h; P = 0.011). These data suggest that absorption of this liquid preparation is adequate and that the concentrations in the sera of children receiving 2 mg/kg daily or 4 mg/kg weekly are equivalent to those seen in adults receiving standard dapsone dosing. Dapsone oral clearance appears to be increased in children under 2 years of age. PMID:10543733

  13. Scalable Preparation and Differential Pharmacologic and Toxicologic Profiles of Primaquine Enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Tekwani, Babu L.; Herath, H. M. T. Bandara; Sahu, Rajnish; Gettayacamin, Montip; Tungtaeng, Anchalee; van Gessel, Yvonne; Baresel, Paul; Wickham, Kristina S.; Bartlett, Marilyn S.; Fronczek, Frank R.; Melendez, Victor; Ohrt, Colin; Reichard, Gregory A.; McChesney, James D.; Rochford, Rosemary; Walker, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    Hematotoxicity in individuals genetically deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity is the major limitation of primaquine (PQ), the only antimalarial drug in clinical use for treatment of relapsing Plasmodium vivax malaria. PQ is currently clinically used in its racemic form. A scalable procedure was developed to resolve racemic PQ, thus providing pure enantiomers for the first time for detailed preclinical evaluation and potentially for clinical use. These enantiomers were compared for antiparasitic activity using several mouse models and also for general and hematological toxicities in mice and dogs. (+)-(S)-PQ showed better suppressive and causal prophylactic activity than (−)-(R)-PQ in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. Similarly, (+)-(S)-PQ was a more potent suppressive agent than (−)-(R)-PQ in a mouse model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. However, at higher doses, (+)-(S)-PQ also showed more systemic toxicity for mice. In beagle dogs, (+)-(S)-PQ caused more methemoglobinemia and was toxic at 5 mg/kg of body weight/day given orally for 3 days, while (−)-(R)-PQ was well tolerated. In a novel mouse model of hemolytic anemia associated with human G6PD deficiency, it was also demonstrated that (−)-(R)-PQ was less hemolytic than (+)-(S)-PQ for the G6PD-deficient human red cells engrafted in the NOD-SCID mice. All these data suggest that while (+)-(S)-PQ shows greater potency in terms of antiparasitic efficacy in rodents, it is also more hematotoxic than (−)-(R)-PQ in mice and dogs. Activity and toxicity differences of PQ enantiomers in different species can be attributed to their different pharmacokinetic and metabolic profiles. Taken together, these studies suggest that (−)-(R)-PQ may have a better safety margin than the racemate in human. PMID:24913163

  14. Positive Family History, Infection, Low Absolute Lymphocyte Count (ALC) and Absent Thymic Shadow: Diagnostic Clues for all Molecular Forms of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID)

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, Laurie M; Railey, Mary Dell; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2015-01-01

    Background Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome uniformly fatal during infancy unless recognized and treated successfully by bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Because SCID infants have no abnormal physical appearance, diagnosis is usually delayed unless newborn screening is performed. Objective In this study, we sought to evaluate the presenting features of all 172 SCID patients transplanted at this institution over the past 31 years. Methods We reviewed original charts from 172 consecutive classic SCID patients who received either T cell-depleted HLA-haploidentical (N=154) or HLA-identical (N=18) non-ablative related marrow transplants at Duke University Medical Center from 1982–2013. Results The mean age at presentation was 4.87 months. When there was a family history of early infant death or known SCID (63/172 or 37%), the mean presentation age was much earlier, 2.0 months compared to 6.6 months. Failure to thrive was common, with 84 patients (50%) having a weight less than the 5th percentile. The leading infections included oral moniliasis (43%), viral infections (61/172 35.5%) and Pneumocystis jiroveci (26%) pneumonia. The group mean ALC was 1454/cmm; 88% of the infants had an ALC less than 3000/cmm. Absent thymic shadow was seen in 92% of infants with electronic radiographic data available. An absence of T cell function was found in all patients. Conclusions SCID infants appear normal at birth but later present with failure to thrive and/or recurrent fungal, viral and bacterial infections. Low ALCs and absent thymic shadow on chest x-ray are key diagnostic clues. The absence of T cell function confirms the diagnosis. PMID:25824440

  15. Antimicrobial therapy for the treatment of opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS patients: a critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Seddon, Jo; Bhagani, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    The widespread use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has entirely changed the management of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and dramatically reduced the rates of opportunistic infections (OI). However, OI continue to cause significant morbidity and mortality in both developed countries, where presentation with advanced HIV infection is common, and also in developing countries where ART is less widely available. Evidence to direct OI guidelines is partly limited by the fact that many large-scale studies date from the pre-ART era and more recent studies are sometimes poorly powered due to the falling rates of OI. Treatment of OI is now known to be as much about antimicrobials as about immune reconstitution with ART, and recent studies help guide the timing of initiation of ART in different infections. OI have also become complicated by the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome phenomenon which may occur once successful immune recovery begins. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole has long been one of the most important antibiotics in the treatment and prevention of OI and remains paramount. It has a broad spectrum of activity against Pneumocystis jiroveci, toxoplasmosis, and bacterial infections and has an important role to play in preventing life-threatening OI. New advances in treating OI are coming from a variety of quarters: in cytomegalovirus eye disease, the use of oral rather than intravenous drugs is changing the face of therapy; in cryptococcal meningitis, improved drug formulations and combination therapy is improving clearance rates and reducing drug toxicities; and in gut disease, the possibility of rapid immune restitution with ART is replacing the need for antimicrobials against cryptosporidia and microsporidia. PMID:22096404

  16. Spontaneous bacterial and fungal infections in genetically engineered mice: Is Escherichia coli an emerging pathogen in laboratory mouse?

    PubMed

    Benga, Laurentiu; Benten, W Peter M; Engelhardt, Eva; Gougoula, Christina; Sager, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The impact of particular microbes on genetically engineered mice depends on the genotype and the environment. Infections resulting in clinical disease have an obvious impact on animal welfare and experimentation. In this study, we investigated the bacterial and fungal aetiology of spontaneous clinical disease of infectious origin among the genetically engineered mice from our institution in relation to their genotype. A total of 63 mice belonging to 33 different mice strains, from severe immunodeficient to wild-type, were found to display infections as the primary cause leading to their euthanasia. The necropsies revealed abscesses localized subcutaneously as well as in the kidney, preputial glands, seminal vesicles, in the uterus, umbilicus or in the lung. In addition, pneumonia, endometritis and septicaemia cases were recorded. Escherichia coli was involved in 21 of 44 (47.72%) of the lesions of bacterial origin, whereas [Pasteurella] pneumotropica was isolated from 19 of 44 (43.18%) cases. The infections with the two agents mentioned above included three cases of mixed infection with both pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus was considered responsible for five of 44 (11.36%) cases whereas Enterobacter cloacae was found to cause lesions in two of 44 (4.54%) mice. Overall, 16 of the 44 (36.36%) cases of bacterial aetiology affected genetically engineered mice without any explicit immunodeficiency or wild-type strains. The remaining 19 cases of interstitial pneumonia were caused by Pneumocystis murina. In conclusion, the susceptibility of genetically modified mice to opportunistic infections has to be regarded with precaution, regardless of the type of genetic modification performed. Beside the classical opportunists, such as [Pasteurella] pneumotropica and Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli should as well be closely monitored to evaluate whether it represents an emerging pathogen in the laboratory mouse.

  17. Estimated Burden of Serious Fungal Infections in Jamaica by Literature Review and Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Gugnani, HC; Denning, DW

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Jamaica is one of the largest countries in the Caribbean with a population of 2 706 500. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in Jamaica is high, while that of tuberculosis (TB) is recorded to be low. In this study, we have estimated the burden of serious fungal infections and some other mycoses in Jamaica. Methods: All published papers reporting on rates of fungal infections in Jamaica and the Caribbean were identified through extensive search of the literature. We also extracted data from published papers on epidemiology and from the World Health Organization (WHO) TB Programme and UNAIDS. Chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA), allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) and severe asthma with fungal sensitization (SAFS) rates were derived from asthma and TB rates. Where there were no available data on some mycoses, we used specific populations at risk and frequencies of fungal infection of each to estimate national prevalence. Results: Over 57 600 people in Jamaica probably suffer from serious fungal infections each year, most related to ‘fungal asthma’ (ABPA and SAFS), recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis and AIDS-related opportunistic infections. Histoplasmosis is endemic in Jamaica, though only a few clinical cases are known. Pneumocystis pneumonia is frequent while cryptococcosis and aspergillosis are rarely recorded. Tinea capitis was common in children. Recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis is very common (3154/100 000) and candidaemia occurs. Subcutaneous mycoses such as chromoblastomycosis and mycetoma also seem to be relatively common. Conclusion: Local epidemiological studies are urgently required to validate or modify these estimates of serious fungal infections in Jamaica. PMID:26426178

  18. Burden of serious fungal infections in Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Osmanov, Ali; Denning, David W

    2015-10-01

    Ukraine has high rates of TB, AIDS and cancer. We estimated the burden of fungal disease from epidemiology papers and specific populations at risk and fungal infection frequencies. HIV/AIDS cases and deaths (2012) and tuberculosis statistics were obtained from the State Service of Ukraine, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases were from M. Miravitlles et al., Thorax 64, 863-868 (2009). Annual estimates are 893,579 Ukrainian women get recurrent vaginal thrush (≥4× per year), 50,847 cases of oral candidiasis and 13,727 cases of oesophageal candidiasis in HIV, and 101 (1%) of 10,085 new AIDS cases develop cryptococcal meningitis, 6152 cases of Pneumocystis pneumonia (13.5 cases per 100,000). Of the 29,265 cases of active respiratory TB in 2012, it is estimated that 2881 new cases of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) occurred and that the 5-year period prevalence is 7724 cases with a total CPA burden of 10,054 cases. Assuming adult asthma prevalence is ~2.9%, 28,447 patients with allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) are likely and 37,491 with severe asthma with fungal sensitisation. We estimate 2278 cases and 376 postsurgical intra-abdominal Candida infections. Invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients is estimated at 303 patients annually; 930 cases in COPD patients. Ninety cases of mucormycosis (2 per 1,000,000) are estimated. In total, ~1,000,000 (2.2%) people in Ukraine develop serious fungal infections annually. PMID:26449513

  19. Good's Syndrome Patients Hospitalized for Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xuefeng; Shi, Juhong; Wang, Mengzhao; Xu, Kaifeng; Xiao, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Good's syndrome (GS) is a rare combination of thymoma and hypogammaglobulinemia, resulting in immunodeficiency. Patients with GS are highly susceptible to bacterial infection, particularly encapsulated bacterial infection in upper and lower respiratory tracts. Good's syndrome patients with moderate-to- severe infection are often hospitalized. Clinical features of GS patients remain to be characterized. Patients with the discharge diagnosis of GS and simultaneous infection from Peking Union Medical College Hospital between January 2001 and July 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Among 14 hospitalized GS patients, 12 of them were admitted for severe infections. Mean patient age was 56.7 + 10.1 years. Average concentrations of serum IgG, IgA, and IgM were 2.3 + 1.9 g/L, 0.28 + 0.28 g/L, and 0.06 + 0.07 g/L, respectively. Respiratory and intestinal tracts were the most common sites for infection, which occurred in 7 and 4 patients, respectively. Pathogens identified in 10 patients included cytomegalovirus in 5 patients, Pneumocystis jirovecii, Clostridium difficile in 2 patients, Klebsiella pneumonia in 2 patients, and Streptococcus pneumonia and Hemophilus influenza in 1 patient. Ten patients were treated with antibiotics and immunoglobulin replacement. Only 1 patient who was on immunosuppressant therapy died from P. jirovecii pneumonia. Infection was the most frequent cause for hospitalization of GS patients. Both respiratory and intestinal tracts were the most common sites of infection. Cytomegalovirus and P. jirovecii represented 2 common opportunistic pathogens isolated from hospitalized GS patients with infections. PMID:26632723

  20. Lack of clinical evidence for a specific HIV-associated glomerulopathy in 203 patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Brunkhorst, R; Brunkhorst, U; Eisenbach, G M; Schedel, I; Deicher, H; Koch, K M

    1992-01-01

    Several authors described a high incidence of proteinuria with frequent progression to nephrotic syndrome and/or renal failure in patients with HIV infection. Though renal histological changes were rather non-specific, the existence of a specific, HIV-associated glomerulopathy was postulated. We repeatedly investigated proteinuria and serum creatinine in 203 HIV-infected patients. One hundred and twenty-two patients (group 1) had early stages of the disease without opportunistic infections, 81 suffered from acute opportunistic infections (group 2). In patients with a positive qualitative test (Combistix), quantitative measurement (Biuret) for proteinuria was carried out; when proteinuria was greater than 0.5 g/24 h, SDS gel electrophoresis was performed. None of the patients of group 1 had a proteinuria greater than 0.5 g/24 h or an elevated serum creatinine. Eleven of 81 patients from group 2 had a proteinuria between 0.5 and 3 g/24 h; one further patient of group 2 developed a transient proteinuria of 7.7 g/24 h. Only three of the proteinuric patients showed a glomerular pattern in SDS gel electrophoresis, all three during acute CMV or EBV infections. Fourteen of 81 group 2 patients showed a transient elevation of serum creatinine (x +/- SD of the maximum serum creatinines: 225.3 +/- 163 mumol/l), most during pentamidine therapy for Pneumocystis carinii infection; one patient treated with high-dose acyclovir had to be temporarily dialysed. In the investigated 203 HIV patients no nephrotic syndrome and no sustained elevation of serum creatinine greater than 200 mumol/l was observed. All cases of proteinuria and elevation of serum creatinine were associated with severe opportunistic infections and the administration of potentially nephrotoxic antibiotics.

  1. HIV and/or AIDS-related deaths and modifiable risk factors: A descriptive study of medical admissions at Oshakati Intermediate Hospital in Northern Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Mgori, N.K.

    2015-01-01

    Background High rates of HIV infection have decreased life expectancy in many African countries. Regardless of worldwide efforts to escalate treatment, care and prevention strategies, the number of deaths due to AIDS-related disorders is still high. Local healthcare workers suspect that there are modifiable factors in the care of HIV and/or AIDS patients which can be identified and improved. Aim To describe the HIV and/or AIDS-related causes of adult mortality and identify modifiable factors amongst patients admitted to Oshakati Intermediate Hospital, northern Namibia. Methods Data was extracted retrospectively and coded using the modified CoDe protocol for AIDS. Modifiable factors relating to the patient, health system or clinical care were identified using a standardised data collection tool. Results A total of 177 HIV and/or AIDS patients were identified, 94 (53.1%) were male and 120 (68%) had a CD4 count of less than 200 cells/mL. The common HIV-related causes of death were tuberculosis (25.9%), renal failure (15.8%), Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (11.3%), cryptococcal meningitis (9%), HIV wasting syndrome (7.9%) and AIDS-defining malignancy (7.9%). The analysis revealed 281 modifiable factors; patient-related factors were the most common (153 [54.4%]), followed by health system factors (97 [34.5%]) and healthcare personnel factors (31 [11%]). Conclusion Our findings have highlighted the challenges in overall HIV and/or AIDS inpatient care and surrounding primary care facilities. The identification of specific modifiable factors can be used to reduce mortality by providing training as well as rational monitoring, planning and resource allocation.

  2. (1, 3)-β-D-glucan assay for diagnosing invasive fungal infections in critically ill patients with hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Azoulay, Elie; Guigue, Nicolas; Darmon, Michael; Mokart, Djamel; Lemiale, Virginie; Kouatchet, Achille; Mayaux, Julien; Vincent, François; Nyunga, Martine; Bruneel, Fabrice; Rabbat, Antoine; Bretagne, Stéphane; Lebert, Christine; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Benoit, Dominique; Pene, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are life-threatening complications of hematological malignancies that must be diagnosed early to allow effective treatment. Few data are available on the performance of serum (1–3)-β-D-glucan (BG) assays for diagnosing IFI in patients with hematological malignancies admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). In this study, 737 consecutive patients with hematological malignancies admitted to 17 ICUs routinely underwent a BG assay at ICU admission. IFIs were diagnosed using standard criteria applied by three independent specialists. Among the 737 patients, 439 (60%) required mechanical ventilation and 273 (37%) died before hospital discharge. Factors known to alter BG concentrations were identified in most patients. IFIs were documented in 78 (10.6%) patients (invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, n = 54; Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, n = 13; candidemia, n = 13; and fusarium infections, n = 3). BG concentrations (pg/mL) were higher in patients with than without IFI (144 (77–510) vs. 50 (30–125), < 0.0001). With 80 pg/mL as the cutoff, sensitivity was 72%, specificity 65%, and area-under-the-curve 0.74 (0.68–0.79). Assuming a prevalence of 10%, the negative and positive predictive values were 94% and 21%. By multivariable analysis, factors independently associated with BG > 80 pg/mL were IFI, admission SOFA score, autologous bone-marrow or hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, and microbiologically documented bacterial infection. In conclusion, in unselected critically ill hematology patients with factors known to affect serum BG, this biomarker showed only moderate diagnostic performance and rarely detected IFI. However, the negative predictive value was high. Studies are needed to assess whether a negative BG test indicates that antifungal de-escalation is safe. PMID:26910891

  3. Benchmarking HIV health care: from individual patient care to health care evaluation. An example from the EuroSIDA study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background State-of-the-art care involving the utilisation of multiple health care interventions is the basis for an optimal long-term clinical prognosis for HIV-patients. We evaluated health care for HIV patients based on four key indicators. Methods Four indicators of health care were assessed: Compliance with current guidelines on initiation of: 1) combination antiretroviral therapy (cART); 2) chemoprophylaxis; 3) frequency of laboratory monitoring; and 4) virological response to cART (proportion of patients with HIV-RNA < 500copies/ml for >90% of time on cART). Results 7097 EuroSIDA patients were included from Northern (n = 923), Southern (n = 1059), West Central (n = 1290) East Central (n = 1366), Eastern (n = 1964) Europe, and Argentina (n = 495). Patients in Eastern Europe with a CD4 < 200cells/mm3 were less likely to initiate cART and Pneumocystis jiroveci-chemoprophylaxis compared to patients from all other regions, and less frequently had a laboratory assessment of their disease status. The proportion of patients with virological response was highest in Northern, 89% vs. 84%, 78%, 78%, 61%, 55% in West Central, Southern, East Central Europe, Argentina and Eastern Europe, respectively (p < 0.0001). Compared to Northern, patients from other regions had significantly lower odds of virological response; the difference was most pronounced for Eastern Europe and Argentina (adjusted OR 0.16 [95%CI 0.11-0.23, p < 0.0001]; 0.20[0.14-0.28, p < 0.0001] respectively). Conclusions This assessment of HIV health care utilization revealed pronounced regional differences in adherence to guidelines and can help to identify gaps and direct target interventions. It may serve as a tool for the assessment and benchmarking of the clinical management of HIV patients in any setting worldwide. PMID:23009317

  4. L’évaluation et le traitement du nourrisson exposé au virus d’immunodéficience humaine de type 1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Dans les pays industrialisés, des soins et un traitement sont offerts aux femmes enceintes et aux nourrissons, afin de faire chuter à 2 % ou moins le taux d’infection périnatale au virus d’immunodéficience humaine de type 1 (VIH-1). Le pédiatre joue un rôle de premier plan dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH-1 de la mère à l’enfant par le dépistage des nourrissons exposés au VIH dont l’infection au VIH de la mère n’a pas été diagnostiquée avant l’accouchement. Il prescrit une prophylaxie antirétrovirale à ces nourrissons, afin de réduire le risque d’acquisition de l’infection au VIH-1 et d’en éviter le plus possible la transmission par le lait maternel. De plus, le pédiatre peut soigner les nourrissons exposés au VIH-1 en les surveillant pour obtenir un dépistage précoce de l’infection au VIH-1 et évaluer les toxicités à court et à long terme de l’exposition aux antirétroviraux, assurer une chimioprophylaxie de la pneumonie à Pneumocystis et soutenir les familles qui vivent avec une infection au VIH-1, grâce à des conseils thérapeutiques aux parents ou aux soignants.

  5. Opportunistic and Other Infections in HIV-Infected Children in Latin America Compared to a Similar Cohort in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, Jorge O.; Freimanis-Hance, Laura; Krauss, Margot; Reyes, Mary F.; Cardoso, Claudete Aparecida Araújo; Mussi-Pinhata, Marisa M.; Cardoso, Edmundo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Opportunistic and other infections have declined since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in developed countries but few studies have addressed the impact of HAART in HIV-infected children from developing countries. This study examines the prevalence and incidence of opportunistic and other infections in Latin America during the HAART era. Vertically HIV-infected children enrolled in a cohort study between 2002 and 2007 were followed for the occurrence of 29 targeted infections. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were performed to calculate the prevalence of infections before enrollment and the incidence rates of opportunistic and other infections after enrollment. Comparisons were made with data from a U.S. cohort (PACTG 219C). Of the 731 vertically HIV-infected children 568 (78%) had at least one opportunistic or other infection prior to enrollment. The most prevalent infections were bacterial pneumonia, oral candidiasis, varicella, tuberculosis, herpes zoster, and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. After enrollment, the overall incidence was 23.5 per 100 person-years; the most common infections (per 100 person-years) were bacterial pneumonia (7.8), varicella (3.0), dermatophyte infections (2.9), herpes simplex (2.5), and herpes zoster (1.8). All of these incidence rates were higher than those reported in PACTG 219C. The types and relative distribution of infections among HIV-infected children in Latin America in this study are similar to those seen in the United States but the incidence rates are higher. Further research is necessary to determine the reasons for these higher rates. PMID:21902581

  6. Microbiological infections in HIV positive Bahraini patients with low CD4+ T-lymphocyte count.

    PubMed

    Ehrahim, Reda Ali; Farid, Eman M A; Yousif, Aziz; Jamsheer, Afaf E

    2002-09-01

    The correlation of CD4+ T-lymphocyte count and the distribution of pathogenic or opportunistic microbial infection most commonly found in HIV positive individuals differ from one area to the other. The present study reports such findings in 67 HIV positive Bahraini patients in the period May 1997 to Nov. 1998. CD4+ T-lymphocyte count was measured using flow cytometry. Bacterial and fungal cultures were performed. Serological diagnosis was performed when indicated. Viral study was done serologically. The distribution of CD4+ T-lymphocyte count in the studied group was: 21 patients (31.3%) less than 100 cells/microl, 5 patients (7.5%) 100-200 cells/microl, 25 patients (37.3%) 201-500 cells/microl and 16 patients (23.9%) with count more than 500 cells/microl. Among patients with low CD4 count (less than 100 cells/microl) (n=21), microbial infections varied from fungal infections 66%, bacterial infections 57% and viral infections 4.8%. Bacterial infections included Salmonellosis (14.3%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (14.3%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.5%), H. influenzae (9.5%), Legionellosis (4.8%) and E. coli (4.8%). Fungal infection included Candida albicans (52.4%), Pneumocystis carinii (9.5%), Cryptococcus neoformans (4.8%). Viral infection included H. simplex to (4.8%). Fungal infections were the highest common infection in thus study. The most common microbial infection was Candida albicans. P. carinii and Cryptococcus neoformans were less common than found in other studies world wide.

  7. Systematic review and meta-analysis: influence of smoking cessation on incidence of pneumonia in HIV

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Smoking is common in people infected with HIV but cessation support is not a routine part of clinical care. The aim was to assess whether smoking is a risk factor for pneumonia in people with HIV and whether smoking cessation ameliorates excess risk. Methods We performed MEDLINE and Embase database searches and included cohort or case-control studies conducted in adult patients infected with HIV extracting a hazard ratio (HR) or odds ratio (OR) that compared the incidence of bacterial pneumonia or pneumonia caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci (PCP) between two smoking categories. Studies were appraised for quality and combined using inverse variance meta-analysis. Results Fourteen cohort and case-control studies were included. Assessment of outcome was good, but assessment of exposure status was poor. Current smokers were at higher risk of bacterial pneumonia than former smokers: HR 1.37 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.78). There was no evidence that former smokers were at higher risk than never smokers: HR 1.24 (95%CI: 0.96, 1.60). Current smokers were at higher risk of bacterial pneumonia than current non-smokers: HR of 1.73 (95%CI: 1.44, 2.06). There was no evidence that smoking increased the incidence of PCP. The HR for current versus non-smokers was 0.94 (95%CI: 0.79, 1.12), but from case-control studies the OR was 1.76 (95%CI: 1.25, 2.48) with heterogeneity. Confined to higher quality studies, the OR was 0.97 (95%CI: 0.81, 1.16). Residual confounding is possible, but available data suggest this is not an adequate explanation. Conclusions Smoking is a risk factor for bacterial pneumonia but not PCP and smoking cessation reduces this risk. See related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/11/16 PMID:23339513

  8. Relevance of nucleic acid amplification techniques for diagnosis of respiratory tract infections in the clinical laboratory.

    PubMed Central

    Ieven, M; Goossens, H

    1997-01-01

    Clinical laboratories are increasingly receiving requests to perform nucleic acid amplification tests for the detection of a wide variety of infectious agents. In this paper, the efficiency of nucleic acid amplification techniques for the diagnosis of respiratory tract infections is reviewed. In general, these techniques should be applied only for the detection of microorganisms for which available diagnostic techniques are markedly insensitive or nonexistent or when turnaround times for existing tests (e.g., viral culture) are much longer than those expected with amplification. This is the case for rhinoviruses, coronaviruses, and hantaviruses causing a pulmonary syndrome, Bordetella pertussis, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Coxiella burnetii. For Legionella spp. and fungi, contamination originating from the environment is a limiting factor in interpretation of results, as is the difficulty in differentiating colonization and infection. Detection of these agents in urine or blood by amplification techniques remains to be evaluated. In the clinical setting, there is no need for molecular diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis carinii. At present, amplification methods for Mycobacterium tuberculosis cannot replace the classical diagnostic techniques, due to their lack of sensitivity and the absence of specific internal controls for the detection of inhibitors of the reaction. Also, the results of interlaboratory comparisons are unsatisfactory. Furthermore, isolates are needed for susceptibility studies. Additional work remains to be done on sample preparation methods, comparison between different amplification methods, and analysis of results. The techniques can be useful for the rapid identification of M. tuberculosis in particular circumstances, as well as the rapid detection of most rifampin-resistant isolates. The introduction of diagnostic amplification techniques into a clinical laboratory implies a level of proficiency for

  9. [Pneumocystosis in non-HIV-infected immunocompromised patients].

    PubMed

    Fillâtre, P; Revest, M; Belaz, S; Robert-Gangneux, F; Zahar, J-R; Roblot, F; Tattevin, P

    2016-05-01

    Pneumocystis jiroveci (formerly P. carinii) is an opportunistic fungus responsible for pneumonia in immunocompromised patients. Pneumocystosis in non-HIV-infected patients differs from AIDS-associated pneumocystosis in mostly two aspects: diagnosis is more difficult, and prognosis is worse. Hence, efforts should be made to target immunocompromised patients at higher risk of pneumocystosis, so that they are prescribed long-term, low-dose, trimethoprime-sulfamethoxazole, highly effective for pneumocystosis prophylaxis. Patients at highest risk include those with medium and small vessels vasculitis, lymphoproliferative B disorders (chronic or acute lymphocytic leukaemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma), and solid cancer on long-term corticosteroids. Conversely, widespread use of prophylaxis in all patients carrier of inflammatory diseases on long-term corticosteroids is not warranted. The management of pneumocystosis in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients follows the rules established for AIDS patients. The diagnosis relies on the detection of P. jiroveci cyst on respiratory samples, while PCR does not reliably discriminate infection from colonization, in 2015. High-doses trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is, by far, the treatment of choice. The benefit of adjuvant corticosteroid therapy for hypoxic patients, well documented in AIDS patients, has a much lower level of evidence in non-HIV-infected patients, most of them being already on corticosteroid by the time of pneumocystosis diagnosis anyway. However, based on its striking impact on morbi-mortality in AIDS patients, adjuvant corticosteroid is recommended in hypoxic, non-HIV-infected patients with pneumocystosis by many experts and scientific societies. PMID:26644039

  10. The 12th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-12).

    PubMed

    Weiss, Louis M; Cushion, Melanie T; Didier, Elizabeth; Xiao, Lihua; Marciano-Cabral, Francine; Sinai, Anthony P; Matos, Olga; Calderon, Enrique J; Kaneshiro, Edna S

    2013-01-01

    The 12th International Workshops on Opportunistic Protists (IWOP-12) was held in August 2012 in Tarrytown, New York. The objectives of the IWOP meetings are to: (1) serve as a forum for exchange of new information among active researchers concerning the basic biology, molecular genetics, immunology, biochemistry, pathogenesis, drug development, therapy, and epidemiology of these immunodeficiency-associated pathogenic eukaryotic microorganisms that are seen in patients with AIDS and (2) foster the entry of new and young investigators into these underserved research areas. The IWOP meeting focuses on opportunistic protists, e.g. the free-living amoebae, Pneumocystis, Cryptosporidium, Toxoplasma, the Microsporidia, and kinetoplastid flagellates. This conference represents the major conference that brings together research groups working on these opportunistic pathogens. Slow but steady progress is being achieved on understanding the biology of these pathogenic organisms, their involvement in disease causation in both immune-deficient and immune-competent hosts, and is providing critical insights into these emerging and reemerging pathogens. This IWOP meeting demonstrated the importance of newly developed genomic level information for many of these pathogens and how analysis of such large data sets is providing key insights into the basic biology of these organisms. A great concern is the loss of scientific expertise and diversity in the research community due to the ongoing decline in research funding. This loss of researchers is due to the small size of many of these research communities and a lack of appreciation by the larger scientific community concerning the state of art and challenges faced by researchers working on these organisms.

  11. Ophthalmic manifestations of HIV in the highly active anti-retroviral therapy era.

    PubMed

    Mowatt, L

    2013-01-01

    HIV-related eye disease can be classified as retinal HIV microangiopathy, opportunistic infections, neuro-ophthalmic manifestations and unusual malignancies. There is a 52-100% lifetime accumulative risk of HIV patients developing eye problems. Seventy-seven per cent of patients with ocular manifestations of HIV had CD4 counts < 200 cells/μL. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most prevalent opportunistic infection, however, Africa has a low incidence of this, and more commonly squamous cell carcinoma, compared to the western hemisphere. Due to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), the anti-CMV therapy may be discontinued if the CD4+ T cell count is > 100 cells/μL for a minimum of three months. Despite HAART, patients with a CD4 count < 50 cells/μL have a similar risk of developing CMV retinitis as compared to the pre-HAART era. Opportunistic infections include CMV, herpetic retinopathy (progressive outer retinal necrosis - PORN), less commonly toxoplasmosis, pneumocystis and cryptococcus. Malignancies associated with HIV include Kaposi's sarcoma and conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma. Cranial nerve palsies, optic disc swelling and atrophy are characteristic neuro-ophthalmic features. They usually occur secondary to meningitis/encephalitis (from cryptococcus and tuberculosis). With the advent of HAART, new complications have developed in CMV retinitis: immune recovery uveitis (IRU) and cystoid macula oedema (CMO). Immune recovery uveitis occurs in 71% of patients if HAART is started before the induction of the anti-CMV treatment. However, this is reduced to 31% if HAART is started after the induction treatment. Molluscum contagiosum and Kaposi's sarcoma can spontaneously resolve on HAART. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy has reduced the frequencies of opportunistic infections and improved the remission duration in HIV patients.

  12. Video‐assisted thoracoscopic surgery after renal transplantation: A single‐institution experience

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hideyuki; Sakamoto, Kei; Kikkawa, Takuma; Isaka, Tamami; Oyama, Kunihiro; Murasugi, Masahide; Fuchinoue, Shohei; Tanabe, Kazunari; Onuki, Takamasa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The number of renal transplantations performed for patients with chronic kidney disease has increased in Japan, but little is known about the outcomes in those who subsequently undergo video‐assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). We therefore investigated the outcomes of consecutive patients requiring VATS after renal transplantation at our institute. Methods We retrospectively collected the clinical data for patients undergoing VATS after renal transplantation between January 2003 and September 2014. Specifically, we compared the serum creatinine level and estimated glomerular filtration rate preoperatively and postoperatively, and investigated the postoperative complications. Results In total, 12 patients underwent VATS after renal transplantation during the study period. All patients received two or three immunosuppressive agents. Operative methods used included VATS wedge resection (n = 4), segmentectomy (n = 4), lobectomy (n = 2), mediastinal tumor resection (n = 1), and chest wall tumor resection (n = 1). No patients required perioperative hemodialysis. There were no intraoperative complications, but one patient developed postoperative hemorrhagic cystitis and another developed pneumonia. One patient developed pneumocystis pneumonia 2 months after left lower lobectomy and required hemodialysis. No further hemodialysis was required by any patient. Of note, no statistically significant differences were observed between the preoperative and postoperative serum creatinine level (P = 0.666) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (P = 0.388). There were no in‐hospital deaths. Univariate analysis revealed no significant risk factors for postoperative complications. Conclusion This report showed favorable results for VATS after renal transplantation. However, clinicians must remain vigilant for complications because transplant recipients remain permanently immunocompromised. PMID:26486097

  13. Scalable preparation and differential pharmacologic and toxicologic profiles of primaquine enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Nanayakkara, N P Dhammika; Tekwani, Babu L; Herath, H M T Bandara; Sahu, Rajnish; Gettayacamin, Montip; Tungtaeng, Anchalee; van Gessel, Yvonne; Baresel, Paul; Wickham, Kristina S; Bartlett, Marilyn S; Fronczek, Frank R; Melendez, Victor; Ohrt, Colin; Reichard, Gregory A; McChesney, James D; Rochford, Rosemary; Walker, Larry A

    2014-08-01

    Hematotoxicity in individuals genetically deficient in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) activity is the major limitation of primaquine (PQ), the only antimalarial drug in clinical use for treatment of relapsing Plasmodium vivax malaria. PQ is currently clinically used in its racemic form. A scalable procedure was developed to resolve racemic PQ, thus providing pure enantiomers for the first time for detailed preclinical evaluation and potentially for clinical use. These enantiomers were compared for antiparasitic activity using several mouse models and also for general and hematological toxicities in mice and dogs. (+)-(S)-PQ showed better suppressive and causal prophylactic activity than (-)-(R)-PQ in mice infected with Plasmodium berghei. Similarly, (+)-(S)-PQ was a more potent suppressive agent than (-)-(R)-PQ in a mouse model of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. However, at higher doses, (+)-(S)-PQ also showed more systemic toxicity for mice. In beagle dogs, (+)-(S)-PQ caused more methemoglobinemia and was toxic at 5 mg/kg of body weight/day given orally for 3 days, while (-)-(R)-PQ was well tolerated. In a novel mouse model of hemolytic anemia associated with human G6PD deficiency, it was also demonstrated that (-)-(R)-PQ was less hemolytic than (+)-(S)-PQ for the G6PD-deficient human red cells engrafted in the NOD-SCID mice. All these data suggest that while (+)-(S)-PQ shows greater potency in terms of antiparasitic efficacy in rodents, it is also more hematotoxic than (-)-(R)-PQ in mice and dogs. Activity and toxicity differences of PQ enantiomers in different species can be attributed to their different pharmacokinetic and metabolic profiles. Taken together, these studies suggest that (-)-(R)-PQ may have a better safety margin than the racemate in human.

  14. Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole-Induced Severe Lactic Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Bulathsinghala, Marie; Keefer, Kimberly; Van de Louw, Andry

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Propylene glycol (PG) is used as a solvent in numerous medications, including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) and lorazepam, and is metabolized in the liver to lactic acid. Cases of lactic acidosis related to PG toxicity have been described and always involved large doses of benzodiazepines and PG. We present the first case of severe lactic acidosis after a 3-day course of TMP/SMX alone, involving allegedly safe amounts of PG. A 31-year-old female with neurofibromatosis and pilocytic astrocytoma, receiving temozolomide and steroids, was admitted to the intensive care unit for pneumonia and acute respiratory failure requiring intubation. Her initial hemodynamic and acid–base statuses were normal. She was treated with intravenous TMP/SMX for possible Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and was successfully extubated on day 2. On day 3, she developed tachypnea and arterial blood gas analysis revealed a severe metabolic acidosis (pH 7.2, PCO2 19 mm Hg, bicarbonates 8 mEq/L) with anion gap of 25 mEq/L and lactate of 12.1 mmol/L. TMP/SMX was discontinued and the lactate decreased to 2.9 mmol/L within 24 hours while her plasma bicarbonates normalized, without additional intervention. The patient never developed hypotension or severe hypoxia, and her renal and liver functions were normal. No other cause for lactic acidosis was identified and it resolved after TMP/SMX cessation alone, suggesting PG toxicity. Although PG-related lactic acidosis is well recognized after large doses of lorazepam, clinicians should bear in mind that TMP/SMX contains PG as well and should suspect PG toxicity in patients developing unexplained metabolic acidosis while receiving TMP/SMX. PMID:27124045

  15. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in hematological disorders: single center experience from Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ullah, K; Ahmed, P; Raza, S; Satti, T; Nisa, Q; Mirza, S; Akhtar, F; Kamal, M K; Akhtar, F M

    2007-12-01

    One hundred and fifty-four patients received allogeneic stem cell transplantations from HLA-matched siblings for various hematological disorders from July 2001 to September 2006. Indications for transplantation included aplastic anemia (n=66), beta-thalassemia major (n=40), CML (n=33), acute leukemia (n=8), and miscellaneous disorders (n=7). One hundred and twenty patients were males and 34 were females. Median patient age was 14 years (range, 1(1/4)-54 years). All patients achieved successful engraftment. Median time to engraftment (ANC>0.5x10(9)/L) was 14 days. Posttransplant complications encountered in our patients included acute graft versus host disease (GvHD) (grade II-IV) 28.5%, chronic GvHD 15.5%, hemorrhagic cystitis 9.7%, VOD liver 5.1%, acute renal failure 3.2%, bacterial infections 51.2%, fungal infections 15.0%, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection 4%, herpes zoster 4%, tuberculosis 2.6%, Pneumocystis jirovicii infection 0.6%, malaria 0.6% patients, graft rejection 5.2% patients, and relapse in 4% patients. Certain unexpected and rare posttransplant complications were also observed in our patients. These included Hickman catheter embolization, Guillain-Barré (GB) syndrome, deep vein thrombosis, hemorrhagic pericarditis with clots leading to cardiac tamponade, idiopathic polycythemia, dengue fever, and cyclosporine-induced neurotoxicity. Mortality was observed in 27.2% patients. Major causes of mortality were GvHD, VOD, disease relapse, intracranial hemorrhage, acute renal failure, pseudomonas septicemia, tuberculosis, disseminated aspergillosis, and CMV infection. At 5 years, overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 72.5% and 70.7%, respectively.

  16. Clinical manifestations and outcome of patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection at tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Virendra Chandrashekhar; Patil, Harsha V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: AIDS has become chronic illness which is well treated with antiretroviral therapy and management of opportunistic infections (OIs). Aims and Objectives: The study clinical profile and outcome of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive patients. Materials and Methods: This was retrospective observational study carried out over a period of 1 year (January 2011–December 2011). All HIV patients admitted in medicine ward, and ICU were enrolled. Statistical analysis was performed using SSPE statistical software trial version 11. The P< 0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Of total 111 patients with a diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, 75 (67.56%) were male and 36 (32.43%) were female patients. A total 52 (46.84%) patients presented with respiratory manifestations, of them 23 (44.23%) had pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), 6 (11.53%) had tubercular effusion, and 3 (5.76%) had Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Respiratory manifestations including pulmonary TB were the most common presentation (P< 0.001). Total 27 (24.32%) patients were presented with the neurological manifestation of them 8 (29.62%) had a cerebro-vascular accident, 5 (18.51%) had cryptococcal meningitis, 4 (14.81%) had tubercular meningitis, and 1 (3.70%) had progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Total 12 (38.70%) had acute gastroenteritis 6 (19.35%) had oral candidiasis, 8 (25%) had general tonic clonic seizure and 7 (21.87%) had pyrexia of unknown origin, 6 (18.75%) had septicemia, 6 (18.75%) had acute renal failure, and 6 (94.11%) had anemia. A total 11 (9.90%) patients succumbed. Conclusions: Overall respiratory manifestations were the common presentation in a present cohort of HIV seropositive patients and TB was the most common OI and the cerebrovascular accident was the most common neurological manifestation. PMID:27190411

  17. Trimethoprim/Sulfamethoxazole-Induced Severe Lactic Acidosis: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bulathsinghala, Marie; Keefer, Kimberly; Van de Louw, Andry

    2016-04-01

    Propylene glycol (PG) is used as a solvent in numerous medications, including trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) and lorazepam, and is metabolized in the liver to lactic acid. Cases of lactic acidosis related to PG toxicity have been described and always involved large doses of benzodiazepines and PG. We present the first case of severe lactic acidosis after a 3-day course of TMP/SMX alone, involving allegedly safe amounts of PG.A 31-year-old female with neurofibromatosis and pilocytic astrocytoma, receiving temozolomide and steroids, was admitted to the intensive care unit for pneumonia and acute respiratory failure requiring intubation. Her initial hemodynamic and acid-base statuses were normal. She was treated with intravenous TMP/SMX for possible Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and was successfully extubated on day 2. On day 3, she developed tachypnea and arterial blood gas analysis revealed a severe metabolic acidosis (pH 7.2, PCO2 19 mm Hg, bicarbonates 8 mEq/L) with anion gap of 25 mEq/L and lactate of 12.1 mmol/L. TMP/SMX was discontinued and the lactate decreased to 2.9 mmol/L within 24 hours while her plasma bicarbonates normalized, without additional intervention. The patient never developed hypotension or severe hypoxia, and her renal and liver functions were normal. No other cause for lactic acidosis was identified and it resolved after TMP/SMX cessation alone, suggesting PG toxicity.Although PG-related lactic acidosis is well recognized after large doses of lorazepam, clinicians should bear in mind that TMP/SMX contains PG as well and should suspect PG toxicity in patients developing unexplained metabolic acidosis while receiving TMP/SMX. PMID:27124045

  18. Repurposing atovaquone: Targeting mitochondrial complex III and OXPHOS to eradicate cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Marco; Lamb, Rebecca; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Mutti, Luciano; Krstic-Demonacos, Marija; Cappello, Anna Rita; Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E.; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P.

    2016-01-01

    Atovaquone is an FDA-approved anti-malarial drug, which first became clinically available in the year 2000. Currently, its main usage is for the treatment of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) and/or toxoplasmosis in immune-compromised patients. Atovaquone is a hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone analogue of ubiquinone, also known as Co-enzyme Q10 (CoQ10). It is a well-tolerated drug that does not cause myelo-suppression. Mechanistically, it is thought to act as a potent and selective OXPHOS inhibitor, by targeting the CoQ10-dependence of mitochondrial complex III. Here, we show for the first time that atovaquone also has anti-cancer activity, directed against Cancer Stem-like Cells (CSCs). More specifically, we demonstrate that atovaquone treatment of MCF7 breast cancer cells inhibits oxygen-consumption and metabolically induces aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect), as well as oxidative stress. Remarkably, atovaquone potently inhibits the propagation of MCF7-derived CSCs, with an IC-50 of 1 μM, as measured using the mammosphere assay. Atovaquone also maintains this selectivity and potency in mixed populations of CSCs and non-CSCs. Importantly, these results indicate that glycolysis itself is not sufficient to maintain the proliferation of CSCs, which is instead strictly dependent on mitochondrial function. In addition to targeting the proliferation of CSCs, atovaquone also induces apoptosis in both CD44+/CD24low/− CSC and ALDH+ CSC populations, during exposure to anchorage-independent conditions for 12 hours. However, it has no effect on oxygen consumption in normal human fibroblasts and, in this cellular context, behaves as an anti-inflammatory, consistent with the fact that it is well-tolerated in patients treated for infections. Future studies in xenograft models and human clinical trials may be warranted, as the IC-50 of atovaquone's action on CSCs (1 μM) is >50 times less than its average serum concentration in humans. PMID:27136895

  19. Toxoplasmosis after allogeneic stem cell transplantation--a single centre experience.

    PubMed

    Busemann, Christoph; Ribback, Silvia; Zimmermann, Kathrin; Sailer, Verena; Kiefer, Thomas; Schmidt, Christian A; Schulz, Katrin; Steinmetz, Ivo; Dombrowski, Frank; Dölken, Gottfried; Krüger, William H

    2012-07-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a rare but possibly underestimated complication following allogeneic stem cell transplantation with a high mortality rate. One reason might be the limitation of the diagnostic instruments relying mainly on imaging and molecular-based techniques. In this report, we present three cases of toxoplasmosis identified among 155 allograft recipients treated at Greifswald University Hospital. Widely disseminated toxoplasmosis was detected post-mortem in two patients allografted for high-risk multiple myeloma. Clinical signs suspicious for toxoplasmosis occurred after days +32 and +75, respectively. In one case, serology and conventional Toxoplasma gondii PCR, targeting the B1 gene, revealed negative results, while in the other patient, toxoplasmosis was not investigated. Both patients received pentamidine for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) prophylaxis. The third patient, a 68-year-old woman allografted for AML, developed cerebral toxoplasmosis from day +395 after allogeneic SCT with typical signs in magnetic resonance tomography. Toxoplasma DNA was amplified from one of two samples of cerebrospinal fluid. The patient died of disseminated toxoplasmosis despite immediate initiation of therapy. Retrospective comparative testing of clinical specimens by the conventional T. gondii PCR and by a real-time PCR targeting a 529-bp genomic fragment suggests a higher sensitivity of the latter method in our patients. In conclusion, we suggest a rigorous real-time PCR monitoring for high-risk patients or patients with signs of infections suspicious for toxoplasmosis, even though low-copy results are presently difficult to interpret. Our reported cases might also encourage the use of trimethoprim-sufmethoxazole instead of pentamidine for PcP prophylaxis in those patients.

  20. Identification of Cryptosporidium parvum Dihydrofolate Reductase Inhibitors by Complementation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Victoria Hertle; Vasquez, John; Nelson, Richard G.; Forney, John R.; Rosowsky, Andre; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

    2000-01-01

    There is a pressing need for drugs effective against the opportunistic protozoan pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum. Folate metabolic enzymes and enzymes of the thymidylate cycle, particularly dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), have been widely exploited as chemotherapeutic targets. Although many DHFR inhibitors have been synthesized, only a few have been tested against C. parvum. To expedite and facilitate the discovery of effective anti-Cryptosporidium antifolates, we have developed a rapid and facile method to screen potential inhibitors of C. parvum DHFR using the model eukaryote, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We expressed the DHFR genes of C. parvum, Plasmodium falciparum, Toxoplasma gondii, Pneumocystis carinii, and humans in the same DHFR-deficient yeast strain and observed that each heterologous enzyme complemented the yeast DHFR deficiency. In this work we describe our use of the complementation system to screen known DHFR inhibitors and our discovery of several compounds that inhibited the growth of yeast reliant on the C. parvum enzyme. These same compounds were also potent or selective inhibitors of the purified recombinant C. parvum DHFR enzyme. Six novel lipophilic DHFR inhibitors potently inhibited the growth of yeast expressing C. parvum DHFR. However, the inhibition was nonselective, as these compounds also strongly inhibited the growth of yeast dependent on the human enzyme. Conversely, the antibacterial DHFR inhibitor trimethoprim and two close structural analogs were highly selective, but weak, inhibitors of yeast complemented by the C. parvum enzyme. Future chemical refinement of the potent and selective lead compounds identified in this study may allow the design of an efficacious antifolate drug for the treatment of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:10722506

  1. Antiparasitic agents.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, J E

    1992-03-01

    In recent years, introduction of new and more effective agents has improved the overall therapy for parasitic infections. This field, however, is still plagued by numerous problems, including the development of resistance to antimicrobial agents (especially with malaria), unavailability of agents in the United States or lack of approval by the Food and Drug Administration, and major toxicities or lack of experience in pregnant women and children, which limits use in these groups of patients. Widespread resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to chloroquine and other agents has complicated the treatment and prophylaxis of this type of malaria. A combination of quinine and Fansidar is usually effective oral therapy for falciparum malaria; quinidine may be administered if intravenous therapy is needed. Mefloquine, which is currently recommended for prophylaxis against chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum, is also effective for single-dose oral treatment, although this regimen has not yet been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Metronidazole has been widely used for treatment of gastroenteritis due to Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia lamblia (not approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the latter) and is considered safe and effective. A new macrolide, azithromycin, has been reported to be effective for cryptosporidiosis in experimental animals; currently, no effective therapy is available for human infections. Combinations of sulfonamides with other antifolates, trimethoprim or pyrimethamine, are recommended therapy for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia or toxoplasmosis, respectively. Therapies for the various types of leishmaniasis and trypanosomiasis are complex, often toxic, and often of limited efficacy. The benzimidazoles are effective for roundworm infections, although thiabendazole has severe toxic effects. The recent introduction of ivermectin has revolutionized the treatment and control of onchocerciasis. Another relatively new agent, praziquantel

  2. Design, synthesis, and antifolate activity of new analogues of piritrexim and other diaminopyrimidine dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors with omega-carboxyalkoxy or omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl substitution in the side chain.

    PubMed

    Chan, David C M; Fu, Hongning; Forsch, Ronald A; Queener, Sherry F; Rosowsky, Andre

    2005-06-30

    As part of a search for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors combining the high potency of piritrexim (PTX) with the high antiparasitic vs mammalian selectivity of trimethoprim (TMP), the heretofore undescribed 2,4-diamino-6-(2',5'-disubstituted benzyl)pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidines 6-14 with O-(omega-carboxyalkyl) or omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl groups on the benzyl moiety were synthesized and tested against Pneumocystis carinii, Toxoplasma gondii, and Mycobacterium avium DHFR vs rat DHFR. Three N-(2,4-diaminopteridin-6-yl)methyl)-2'-(omega-carboxy-1-alkynyl)dibenz[b,f]azepines (19-21) were also synthesized and tested. The pyridopyrimidine with the best combination of potency and selectivity was 2,4-diamino-5-methyl-6-[2'-(5-carboxy-1-butynyl)-5'-methoxy]benzyl]pyrimidine (13), with an IC(50) value of 0.65 nM against P. carinii DHFR, 0.57 nM against M. avium DHFR, and 55 nM against rat DHFR. The potency of 13 against P. carinii DHFR was 20-fold greater than that of PTX (IC(50) = 13 nM), and its selectivity index (SI) relative to rat DHFR was 85, whereas PTX was nonselective. The activity of 13 against P. carinii DHFR was 20 000 times greater than that of TMP, with an SI of 96, whereas that of TMP was only 14. However 13 was no more potent than PTX against M. avium DHFR, and its SI was no better than that of TMP. Molecular modeling dynamics studies using compounds 10 and 13 indicated a slight binding preference for the latter, in qualitative agreement with the IC(50) data. Among the pteridines, the most potent against P. carinii DHFR and M. avium DHFR was the 2'-(5-carboxy-1-butynyl)dibenz[b,f]azepinyl derivative 20 (IC(50) = 2.9 nM), whereas the most selective was the 2'-(5-carboxy-1-pentynyl) analogue 21, with SI values of >100 against both P. carinii and M. avium DHFR relative to rat DHFR. The final compound, 2,4-diamino-5-[3'-(4-carboxy-1-butynyl)-4'-bromo-5'-methoxybenzyl]pyrimidine (22), was both potent and selective against M. avium DHFR (IC(50) = 0.47 nM, SI

  3. Analysis of three crystal structure determinations of a 5-methyl-6-N-methylanilino pyridopyrimidine antifolate complex with human dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed

    Cody, Vivian; Luft, Joseph R; Pangborn, Walter; Gangjee, Aleem

    2003-09-01

    Structural data are reported for the first example of the potent antifolate inhibitor 2,4-diamino-5-methyl-6-[(3',4',5'-trimethoxy-N-methylanilino)methyl]pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine (1) in complex with human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) and NADPH. Small differences in crystallization conditions resulted in the growth of two different forms of a binary complex. The structure determination of an additional crystal of a ternary complex of hDHFR with NADPH and (1) grown under similar conditions is also reported. Diffraction data were collected to 2.1 A resolution for an R3 lattice from a hDHFR ternary complex with NADPH and (1) and to 2.2 A resolution from a binary complex. Data were also collected to 2.1 A resolution from a binary complex with hDHFR and (1) in the first example of a tetragonal P4(3)2(1)2 lattice. Comparison of the intermolecular contacts among these structures reveals differences in the backbone conformation (1.9-3.2 A) for flexible loop regions (residues 40-46, 77-83 and 103-107) that reflect differences in the packing environment between the rhombohedral and tetragonal space groups. Analysis of the packing environments shows that the tetragonal lattice is more tightly packed, as reflected in its smaller V(M) value and lower solvent content. The conformation of the inhibitor (1) is similar in all structures and is also similar to that observed for TMQ, the parent quinazoline compound. The activity profile for this series of 5-deaza N-substituted non-classical trimethoxybenzyl antifolates shows that the N10-CH(3) substituted (1) has the greatest potency and selectivity for Toxoplasma gondii DHFR (tgDHFR) compared with its N-H or N-CHO analogs. Models of the tgDHFR active site indicate preferential contacts with (1) that are not present in either the human or Pneumocystis carinii DHFR structures. Differences in the acidic residue (Glu30 versus Asp for tgDHFR) affect the precise positioning of the diaminopyridopyrimidine ring, while changes in other

  4. TB-HIV co-infection: a catastrophic comradeship.

    PubMed

    Narendran, G; Swaminathan, S

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic association of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV poses a challenge to human survival. HIV complicates every aspect of TB including presentation, diagnosis and treatment. HIV-TB patients encounter unique problems like drug-drug interactions, cumulative toxicity, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), lower plasma drug levels and emergence of drug resistance during treatment despite adherence. TB may also be overdiagnosed in HIV due to a number of diseases that closely resemble TB. Notable among them are non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Nocardia. Even though diagnostic procedures have improved over the years, patients in developing countries usually seek health care at later stage of the disease. Research data ascertains the duration of therapy for TB to be 6 months with rifampicin and isoniazid, reinforced with ethambutol and pyrazinamide in the first 2 months. The schedule of therapy is still debatable with daily regimens being preferred in the context of HIV. Many reasons exist for persistence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) in sputum, or delayed-clearance of TB from sputum smears in HIV, apart from emergence of drug resistance and non-compliance. Acquired rifampicin resistance (ARR) is a unique phenomenon complicating HIV-associated TB when an intermittent regimen of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) is used without timely initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially in patients harbouring isoniazid-resistant strains Immune restoration is often incomplete ('swiss cheese' pattern) even with effective HAART if not started early. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is the paradoxical worsening of the patient's condition often with radiological deterioration, due to an enhanced immune response with HAART. IRIS occurs despite an effective virological suppression and a favourable response to ATT. The incidence of IRIS in HIV has reached up to 54%, requiring utilization of experts

  5. Laboratory implementation of a rapid three-stain technique for detection of microorganisms from lower respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Maymind, M; Thomas, J G; Abrons, H L; Riley, R S

    1996-01-01

    A rapid, cost-effective method for the evaluation of lower respiratory specimen has become increasingly important in the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases in immunocompromised patients. In the past, the technically demanding, time-consuming, and expensive Gomori-methenamine-silver (GMS) stain was the principal means for the evaluation of these specimens. In this study, we compared the GMS stain with a new rapid, three-stain protocol for the evaluation of lower respiratory specimens. Lower respiratory specimens were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Conventional Wright/Giemsa and Gram stains were utilized, as well as a contemporary strain, calcofluor white (CW). A cell count was performed on the BAL specimens, and cytospins were stained by the three stains. The calcofluor white-stained slides were examined with an epi-fluorescent microscope, whereas the other stains were evaluated with a conventional light microscope. Gomorimethenamine-silver (GMS), acid-fast bacillus (AFB), and Papanicolaou (PAP) stains were performed as controls. Thirty-two BAL procedures were performed in 20 (63%) male patients and 12 (37%) female patients. The clinical diagnosis was pneumonia in 31% of the patients, malignant hematologic disease in 28%, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in 9%, and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 28%. Of these specimens, 78% were adequate for interpretation and 22% were inadequate. Bacteria were found in 50% (16/32) of all BALs, fungi were found in 9% (3/32), and Pneumocystis carinii was found in 9% (3/32). Gram-positive bacteria were most frequently found in patients with pneumonia (80%, 4/5), whereas P. carinii was identified in patients with AIDS. There were no false-positive results. One CW stain was equivocal for P. carinii due to high fluorescent background. Laboratory implementation of the rapid, three-staining technique was accomplished without difficulty in microbiology and hematology laboratory sections. Specimen evaluation

  6. Variable Impact on Mortality of AIDS-Defining Events Diagnosed during Combination Antiretroviral Therapy: Not All AIDS-Defining Conditions Are Created Equal

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The extent to which mortality differs following individual acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)–defining events (ADEs) has not been assessed among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods We analyzed data from 31,620 patients with no prior ADEs who started combination antiretroviral therapy. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate mortality hazard ratios for each ADE that occurred in >50 patients, after stratification by cohort and adjustment for sex, HIV transmission group, number of anti-retroviral drugs initiated, regimen, age, date of starting combination antiretroviral therapy, and CD4+ cell count and HIV RNA load at initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy. ADEs that occurred in <50 patients were grouped together to form a “rare ADEs” category. Results During a median follow-up period of 43 months (interquartile range, 19–70 months), 2880 ADEs were diagnosed in 2262 patients; 1146 patients died. The most common ADEs were esophageal candidiasis (in 360 patients), Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (320 patients), and Kaposi sarcoma (308 patients). The greatest mortality hazard ratio was associated with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (hazard ratio, 17.59; 95% confidence interval, 13.84–22.35) and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (hazard ratio, 10.0; 95% confidence interval, 6.70–14.92). Three groups of ADEs were identified on the basis of the ranked hazard ratios with bootstrapped confidence intervals: severe (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy [hazard ratio, 7.26; 95% confidence interval, 5.55–9.48]), moderate (cryptococcosis, cerebral toxoplasmosis, AIDS dementia complex, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, and rare ADEs [hazard ratio, 2.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.76–3.13]), and mild (all other ADEs [hazard ratio, 1.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.08–2.00]). Conclusions In the combination antiretroviral therapy era, mortality rates

  7. Time to HAART Initiation after Diagnosis and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections in Patients with AIDS in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Crabtree-Ramírez, Brenda; Caro-Vega, Yanink; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Cortes, Claudia P.; Padgett, Denis; Carriquiry, Gabriela; Fink, Valeria; Jayathilake, Karu; Person, Anna K.; McGowan, Catherine; Sierra-Madero, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background Since 2009, earlier initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) after an opportunistic infection (OI) has been recommended based on lower risks of death and AIDS-related progression found in clinical trials. Delay in HAART initiation after OIs may be an important barrier for successful outcomes in patients with advanced disease. Timing of HAART initiation after an OI in “real life” settings in Latin America has not been evaluated. Methods Patients in the Caribbean, Central and South America network for HIV Epidemiology (CCASAnet) ≥18 years of age at enrolment, from 2001–2012 who had an OI before HAART initiation were included. Patients were divided in an early HAART (EH) group (those initiating within 4 weeks of an OI) and a delayed HAART (DH) group (those initiating more than 4 weeks after an OI). All patients with an AIDS-defining OI were included. In patients with more than one OI the first event reported was considered. Calendar trends in the proportion of patients in the EH group (before and after 2009) were estimated by site and for the whole cohort. Factors associated with EH were estimated using multivariable logistic regression models. Results A total of 1457 patients had an OI before HAART initiation and were included in the analysis: 213 from Argentina, 686 from Brazil, 283 from Chile, 119 from Honduras and 156 from Mexico. Most prevalent OI were Tuberculosis (31%), followed by Pneumocystis pneumonia (24%), Invasive Candidiasis (16%) and Toxoplasmosis (9%). Median time from OI to HAART initiation decreased significantly from 5.7 (interquartile range [IQR] 2.8–12.1) weeks before 2009 to 4.3 (IQR 2.0–7.1) after 2009 (p<0.01). Factors associated with starting HAART within 4 weeks of OI diagnosis were lower CD4 count at enrolment (p-<0.001), having a non-tuberculosis OI (p<0.001), study site (p<0.001), and more recent years of OI diagnosis (p<0.001). Discussion The time from diagnosis of an OI to HAART initiation has

  8. Risk factors for AIDS-defining illnesses among a population of poorly adherent people living with HIV/AIDS in Atlanta, Georgia.

    PubMed

    Chow, Jeremy Y; Alsan, Marcella; Armstrong, Wendy; del Rio, Carlos; Marconi, Vincent C

    2015-01-01

    In order to achieve the programmatic goals established in the National HIV/AIDS Strategy, virologic suppression remains the most important outcome within the HIV care continuum for individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therefore, clinicians have dedicated substantial resources to improve adherence and clinic retention for individuals on ART; however, these efforts should be focused first on those most at risk of morbidity and mortality related to AIDS. Our study aimed to characterize the factors that are associated with AIDS-defining illnesses (ADIs) amongst people living with HIV (PLHIV) who are poorly adherent or retained in care in order to identify those at highest risk of poor clinical outcomes. We recruited 99 adult PLHIV with a history of poor adherence to ART, poor clinic attendance, or unsuppressed viral load (VL) from the Infectious Disease Program (IDP) of the Grady Health System in Atlanta, Georgia between January and May 2011 to participate in a survey investigating the acceptability of a financial incentive for improving adherence. Clinical outcomes including the number of ADI episodes in the last five years, VLs, and CD4 counts were abstracted from medical records. Associations between survey items and number of ADIs were performed using chi-square analysis. In our study, 36.4% of participants had ≥1 ADI in the last five years. The most common ADIs were Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, recurrent bacterial pneumonia, and esophageal candidiasis. Age <42.5 years (OR 2.52, 95% CI = 1.08-5.86), male gender (OR 3.51, 95% CI = 1.08-11.34), CD4 nadir <200 cells/µL (OR 11.92, 95% CI = 1.51-94.15), unemployment (OR 3.54, 95% CI = 1.20-10.40), and travel time to clinic <30 minutes (OR 2.80, 95% CI = 1.20-6.52) were all significantly associated with a history of ≥1 ADI in the last five years. Awareness of factors associated with ADIs may help clinicians identify which poorly adherent PLHIV are at highest risk of HIV-related morbidity.

  9. Association between Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy and Type of Infectious Respiratory Disease and All-Cause In-Hospital Mortality in Patients with HIV/AIDS: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Villafuerte-García, Adriana; Cruz-Hervert, Pablo; Delgado-Sánchez, Guadalupe; Ferreyra-Reyes, Leticia; Ferreira-Guerrero, Elizabeth; Mongua-Rodríguez, Norma; Montero-Campos, Rogelio; Melchor-Romero, Ada; García-García, Lourdes

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory manifestations of HIV disease differ globally due to differences in current availability of effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) programs and epidemiology of infectious diseases. Objective To describe the association between HAART and discharge diagnosis and all-cause in-hospital mortality among hospitalized patients with infectious respiratory disease and HIV/AIDS. Material and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of patients hospitalized at a specialty hospital for respiratory diseases in Mexico City between January 1st, 2010 and December 31st, 2011. We included patients whose discharge diagnosis included HIV or AIDS and at least one infectious respiratory diagnosis. The information source was the clinical chart. We analyzed the association between HAART for 180 days or more and type of respiratory disease using polytomous logistic regression and all-cause hospital mortality by multiple logistic regressions. Results We studied 308 patients, of whom 206 (66.9%) had been diagnosed with HIV infection before admission to the hospital. The CD4+ lymphocyte median count was 68 cells/mm3 [interquartile range (IQR): 30–150]. Seventy-five (24.4%) cases had received HAART for more than 180 days. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PJP) (n = 142), tuberculosis (n = 63), and bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (n = 60) were the most frequent discharge diagnoses. Receiving HAART for more than 180 days was associated with a lower probability of PJP [Adjusted odd ratio (aOR): 0.245, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 0.08–0.8, p = 0.02], adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical covariates. HAART was independently associated with reduced odds (aOR 0.214, 95% CI 0.06–0.75) of all-cause in-hospital mortality, adjusting for HIV diagnosis previous to hospitalization, age, access to social security, low socioeconomic level, CD4 cell count, viral load, and discharge diagnoses. Conclusions HAART for 180 days or more was associated

  10. Immune response to fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    of the disease is associated with a delayed hypersensitive response. There are many effective veterinary vaccines against dermatophytoses. Malassezia pachydermatis is an opportunistic yeast that needs predisposing factors to cause disease, often related to an atopic status in the animal. Two species can be differentiated within the genus Cryptococcus with immunologic consequences: C. neoformans infects predominantly immunocompromised hosts, and C. gattii infects non-immunocompromised hosts. Pneumocystis is a fungus that infects only immunosupressed individuals, inducing a host defence mechanism similar to that induced by other fungal pathogens, such as Aspergillus.

  11. Structural analysis of human dihydrofolate reductase as a binary complex with the potent and selective inhibitor 2,4-diamino-6-{2'-O-(3-carboxypropyl)oxydibenz[b,f]-azepin-5-yl}methylpteridine reveals an unusual binding mode.

    PubMed

    Cody, Vivian; Pace, Jim; Nowak, Jessica

    2011-10-01

    In order to understand the structure-activity profile observed for a series of substituted dibenz[b,f]azepine antifolates, the crystal structure of the binary complex of human dihydrofolate reductase (hDHFR) with the potent and selective inhibitor 2,4-diamino-6-{2'-O-(3-carboxypropyl)oxydibenz[b,f]-azepin-5-yl}methylpteridine (PT684) was determined to 1.8 Å resolution. These data revealed that the carboxylate side chain of PT684 occupies two alternate positions, neither of which interacts with the conserved Arg70 in the active-site pocket, which in turn hydrogen bonds to water. These observations are in contrast to those reported for the ternary complex of mouse DHFR (mDHFR) with NADPH [Cody et al. (2008), Acta Cryst. D64, 977-984], in which the 3-carboxypropyl side chain of PT684 was hydrolyzed to its hydroxyl derivative, PT684a. The crystallization conditions differed for the human and mouse DHFR crystals (100 mM K2HPO4 pH 6.9, 30% ammonium sulfate for hDHFR; 15 mM Tris pH 8.3, 75 mM sodium cacodylate, PEG 4K for mDHFR). Additionally, the side chains of Phe31 and Gln35 in the hDHFR complex have a single conformation, whereas in the mDHFR complex they occupied two alternative conformations. These data show that the hDHFR complex has a decreased active-site volume compared with the mDHFR complex, as reflected in a relative shift of helix C (residues 59-64) of 1.2 Å, and a shift of 1.5 Å compared with the ternary complex of Pneumocystis carinii DHFR (pcDHFR) with the parent dibenz[b,f]azepine PT653. These data suggest that the greater inhibitory potency of PT684 against pcDHFR is consistent with the larger active-site volume of pcDHFR and the predicted interactions of the carboxylate side chain with Arg75.

  12. [Professor Adam Nowosławski (1925-2012)--founder of the Polish School of Immunopathology].

    PubMed

    Madaliński, Kazimierz

    2012-01-01

    Professor dr med. Adam Nowosławski, has died at age of 87, on February 3, 2012, the founder of the Polish school of immunopathology, member of Polish Academy of Sciences and of Polish Academy of Art and Sciences. Professor was born on April 30, 1925 in Rzeszów (SE Poland). During the Second World War he took part in the anti-nazi resistance movement; he was the soldier of the 'Baszta' regiment of the Home Army. Subsequently, he was imprisoned in the Pawiak and concentration camps: Majdanek and Buchenwald. The medical studies he has completed at Warsaw Medical Academy between 1946-1951. The degree of doctor of medicine Prof. Adam Nowosławski has obtained in 1963, habilitation degree in the field of immunopathology--in 1966; the title of Professor he has obtained in 1980. His scientific achievements consist of 170 publications, including 101 original papers. His publications were quoted in several American books for students and physicians. Topics of his early papers concerned the immunopatogenesis ofPneumocystis carinii--induced pneumonia in premature babies, immunopatogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis, and the origin of rheumatoid factor. The enormous role in the field of hepatology played research on the virus of hepatitis B. These studies dealt with the discovery of HB core antigen which had the cellular localization different from HB surface antigen and with the parameters of the immune response to infection. Papers published on this topic were the mostly quoted in the literature and earned him national awards. The activity of Prof. Adam Nowosławski in the field of HIV/AIDS prevention was honored by the special prize of the Minister of Health. Professor was the honorary member of the two Societies: Polish Society of Pathologists and Polish Society of Hepatology. He was also the member of International Association for the Study of the Liver and International Academy of Pathology. Prof. Adam Nowosławski received the national medals: Polonia Restituta Crosses

  13. TB-HIV co-infection: a catastrophic comradeship.

    PubMed

    Narendran, G; Swaminathan, S

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic association of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV poses a challenge to human survival. HIV complicates every aspect of TB including presentation, diagnosis and treatment. HIV-TB patients encounter unique problems like drug-drug interactions, cumulative toxicity, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), lower plasma drug levels and emergence of drug resistance during treatment despite adherence. TB may also be overdiagnosed in HIV due to a number of diseases that closely resemble TB. Notable among them are non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Nocardia. Even though diagnostic procedures have improved over the years, patients in developing countries usually seek health care at later stage of the disease. Research data ascertains the duration of therapy for TB to be 6 months with rifampicin and isoniazid, reinforced with ethambutol and pyrazinamide in the first 2 months. The schedule of therapy is still debatable with daily regimens being preferred in the context of HIV. Many reasons exist for persistence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) in sputum, or delayed-clearance of TB from sputum smears in HIV, apart from emergence of drug resistance and non-compliance. Acquired rifampicin resistance (ARR) is a unique phenomenon complicating HIV-associated TB when an intermittent regimen of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) is used without timely initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially in patients harbouring isoniazid-resistant strains Immune restoration is often incomplete ('swiss cheese' pattern) even with effective HAART if not started early. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is the paradoxical worsening of the patient's condition often with radiological deterioration, due to an enhanced immune response with HAART. IRIS occurs despite an effective virological suppression and a favourable response to ATT. The incidence of IRIS in HIV has reached up to 54%, requiring utilization of experts

  14. Steroids are a risk factor for Kaposi's sarcoma-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and mortality in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Mónica; Iglesias, María C.; Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association between Kaposi's sarcoma-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (KS-IRIS) and mortality, with the use of glucocorticoids in HIV-infected individuals. Design: Case–control study. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 145 individuals with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma receiving antiretroviral therapy. The association of different variables with KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality was explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. The main exposure of interest was the use of glucocorticoids. We also compared the time to KS-IRIS and the time to death of individuals treated with glucocorticoids vs. those nontreated with glucocorticoids, and the time to death of individuals with KS-IRIS vs. those without KS-IRIS by hazards regression. Results: Sixty of 145 individuals received glucocorticoids (41.4%) for the management or suspicion of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Fifty individuals had KS-IRIS (37%). The use of glucocorticoids was more frequent in individuals with KS-IRIS than in those without KS-IRIS (54.9 vs. 36.47%, P = 0.047). Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality occurred in 17 cases (11.7%), and glucocorticoid use was more frequent in this group (76.47 vs. 36.7%, P = 0.003). Glucocorticoid use was a risk factor for mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 4.719, 95% confidence interval = 1.383–16.103, P = 0.0132), and was associated with shorter periods to KS-IRIS (P = 0.03) and death (P = 0.0073). KS-IRIS was a risk factor for mortality (P = 0.049). Conclusion: In HIV-infected individuals, the use of glucocorticoids is a risk factor for KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated mortality. In addition, KS-IRIS is a risk factor for mortality. Therefore, glucocorticoid administration in this population requires careful consideration based on individualized risk–benefit analysis. PMID:26636923

  15. AIDS epidemic sparks campaign to encourage condom use.

    PubMed

    1985-12-01

    immune deficiency. The definition also includes the presence of any of several clinical conditions, e.g., Kaposi's sarcoma in a patient under 60 years old, pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, and a whole range of other serious infections. Using the CDC's case definition, the agency has received reports of about 14,000 AIDS cases in the US. The risk groups account for the following proportions of those cases: 73% among homosexual men; 17% among intravenous drug users; 1% among hemophiliacs or patients with coagulation disorders; 2% among transfusion recipients; 1% among heterosexual contacts of individuals in other risk groups; and about 7% among people with unknown risks -- about half of whom are Haitian. About 200 pediatric cases of AIDS have been reported to the CDC. The infection is believed to be spread perinatally. Researchers are experimenting with antiviral compounds for treating AIDS and vaccines for preventing the disease, but the results are unclear. PMID:12280299

  16. Update on HIV/AIDS in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Ruxrungtham, K; Phanuphak, P

    2001-06-01

    Thailand experienced its first case of AIDS in 1984. Approximately 800,000 Thais were infected with HIV in 1995 and 1 million Thais became infected by the year 2000. There have been 5 major epidemic waves: among male homosexuals (started 1984-5), intravenous drug users (started 1988), female commercial sex workers (started 1989), male clients (started 1990), and housewives and the newborn (started 1991). Approximately 96 per cent of HIV-1 infected Thais carried recombinant subtype A/E, the rest carried B'. In a male seroconvertors cohort of 235 cases, median time to show CD4 <200 cells/microL was 6.8 years. Five years survival was significantly lower than that of the other subtype B seroconvertors study, i.e., 82 per cent compared to 90 per cent. Interestingly, 13.5 per cent of seronegative Thais showed homozygous SDF1-3'A polymorphism, which suggests that approximately one-tenth of Thais may become long-term non-progressors after HIV-1 infection. Primary HIV infection syndrome is rare among Thai patients (1.1%). In contrast, it was 50-90 per cent in Western cohorts. In early symptomatic patients, one-third developed pruritic pappular eruptions (PPEs). In advanced stage, disseminated tuberculosis, Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP), cryptococcosis, and esophageal candidiasis are commonly found. In Northern Thailand, however, Penicillium marneffei infection or penicillosis is more common than cryptococcosis. The recent understanding of HIV pathogenesis suggests that HIV eradication is unlikely to be achievable with current strategies. Several National HIV treatment guidelines including the Thai guideline have been recommended treatment with triple antiretroviral regimen when patients become symptomatics or CD4+ <200. Current development of antiretroviral therapy which includes new agents, new formulas, and pharmacokinetic enhancements, is directed to better potency, higher genetic resistant barrier, less pill burden, and once a day dosing. These will ultimately

  17. HIV infection in children--impact upon ENT doctors.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Simon

    2003-12-01

    The global epidemic of HIV infection remains appalling. By 2001, there were an estimated 1.4 million HIV-infected children, with 4.5 million deaths. In the UK, paediatric cases are clustered around population centres where there are high concentrations of infected immigrant adults, and to a lesser extent, areas where IV drug abuse is common. The highest incidence remains in London and the southeast. With the national redistribution of immigrant and refugee families, any doctor in any specialty may expect to be involved with children who are HIV positive, or have clinical AIDS. The majority of children are infected vertically, i.e. infection of the infant from an infected mother in the pre-, peri-, or post-natal periods. Rates of transmission vary from 15-20% in the developed countries. Children with HIV infection may have their primary presentation to ENT doctors, who should have appropriate thresholds for suspecting the diagnosis. The most common presenting features include persistent generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, chronic/recurrent diarrhoea, poor growth, and fever. Fifteen to twenty percent of untreated children will present with an AIDS-defining illness by 12 months, typically with Pneumocystis pneumonia at approximately 3-4 months of age. Seventy percent of perinatally infected children will exhibit some signs or symptoms by 12 months Without treatment, the median age to progression to AIDS is approximately 6 years, and 25-30% will have died by this age. The median age of death is approximately 9 years. Children may also present with repeated/unusual ear infections, sinus disease (inc. mastoiditis), tonsillitis, orbital/peri-orbital cellulitis, oral candidiasis, and dental infections. Infections with streptococcus pneumoniae and group A streptococcus are common, and often progress to severe systemic infection with an appreciable mortality. Infections may be due to unusual pathogens such as Pseudomonas, 'typical' and atypical Mycobacteria

  18. [Detection of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis in cyst samples using a novel single tube multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Can, Hüseyin; İnceboz, Tonay; Caner, Ayşe; Atalay Şahar, Esra; Karakavuk, Muhammet; Döşkaya, Mert; Çelebi, Fehmi; Değirmenci Döşkaya, Aysu; Gülçe İz, Sultan; Gürüz, Yüksel; Korkmaz, Metin

    2016-04-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis, respectively, are important helminthic diseases worldwide as well as in our country. Epidemiological studies conducted in Turkey showed that the prevalence of CE is 291-585/100.000. It has also been showed that the seroprevalence of AE is 3.5%. For the diagnosis of CE and AE, radiological (ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance) and serological methods, in addition to clinical findings, are being used. The definitive diagnosis relies on pathological examination When the hydatid cysts are sterile or does not contain protoscolex, problems may occur during pathological discrimination of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis species. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) targeting mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis using Echi S (5'-TTTATGAATATTGTGACCCTGAGAT-3') and Echi A (5'-GGTCTTAACTCAACTCATGGAG-3') primers and three different probes; Anchor Ech (5'-GTTTGCCACCTCGATGTTGACTTAG-fluoroscein-3'), Granulosus (5'-LC640-CTAAGGTTTTGGTGTAGTAATTGATATTTT-phosphate-3') and Multilocularis (5'-LC705-CTGTGATCTTGGTGTAGTAGTTGAGATT-phosphate-3') that will enable the diagnosis of CE and AE in same assay. During M-RTR-PCR, plasmids containing E.granulosus (GenBank: AF297617.1) and E.multilocularis (GenBank: NC_000928.2) mitochondrial 12S rRNA regions were used as positive controls. Cysts samples of patients which were pathologically confirmed to be CE (n: 10) and AE (n: 15) and healthy human DNA samples (n: 25) as negative control as well as DNA samples of 12 different parasites (Taenia saginata, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Fasciola hepatica, Enterobius vermicularis, Toxoplasma gondii, Pneumocystis jirovecii, Trichomonas vaginalis, Cryptosporidium hominis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax) were used to develop M

  19. Canadian recommendations for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Mason, W P; Maestro, R Del; Eisenstat, D; Forsyth, P; Fulton, D; Laperrière, N; Macdonald, D; Perry, J; Thiessen, B

    2007-06-01

    , followed by 5 cycles if well tolerated. Additional cycles may be considered in partial responders. The dose should be increased to 200 mg/m(2) at cycle 2 if well tolerated. Weekly monitoring of blood count is advised during chemoradiation therapy in patients with a low white blood cell count. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia has been reported, and prophylaxis should be considered. RECOMMENDATION 8: For patients with stable clinical symptoms during combined radiotherapy and temozolomide, completion of 3 cycles of adjuvant therapy is generally advised before a decision is made about whether to continue treatment, because pseudo-progression is a common phenomenon during this time. The recommended duration of therapy is 6 months. A longer duration may be considered in patients who show continuous improvement on therapy. RECOMMENDATION 9: Selected patients with recurrent gbm may be candidates for repeat resection when the situation appears favourable based on an assessment of individual patient factors such as medical history, functional status, and location of the tumour. Entry into a clinical trial is recommended for patients with recurrent disease. RECOMMENDATION 10: The optimal chemotherapeutic strategy for patients who progress following concurrent chemoradiation has not been determined. Therapeutic and clinical-molecular studies with quality of life outcomes are needed.

  20. [Detection of Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis in cyst samples using a novel single tube multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction].

    PubMed

    Can, Hüseyin; İnceboz, Tonay; Caner, Ayşe; Atalay Şahar, Esra; Karakavuk, Muhammet; Döşkaya, Mert; Çelebi, Fehmi; Değirmenci Döşkaya, Aysu; Gülçe İz, Sultan; Gürüz, Yüksel; Korkmaz, Metin

    2016-04-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) and alveolar echinococcosis (AE) caused by Echinococcus granulosus and Echinococcus multilocularis, respectively, are important helminthic diseases worldwide as well as in our country. Epidemiological studies conducted in Turkey showed that the prevalence of CE is 291-585/100.000. It has also been showed that the seroprevalence of AE is 3.5%. For the diagnosis of CE and AE, radiological (ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance) and serological methods, in addition to clinical findings, are being used. The definitive diagnosis relies on pathological examination When the hydatid cysts are sterile or does not contain protoscolex, problems may occur during pathological discrimination of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis species. In this study, we aimed to develop a novel multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) targeting mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene of E.granulosus and E.multilocularis using Echi S (5'-TTTATGAATATTGTGACCCTGAGAT-3') and Echi A (5'-GGTCTTAACTCAACTCATGGAG-3') primers and three different probes; Anchor Ech (5'-GTTTGCCACCTCGATGTTGACTTAG-fluoroscein-3'), Granulosus (5'-LC640-CTAAGGTTTTGGTGTAGTAATTGATATTTT-phosphate-3') and Multilocularis (5'-LC705-CTGTGATCTTGGTGTAGTAGTTGAGATT-phosphate-3') that will enable the diagnosis of CE and AE in same assay. During M-RTR-PCR, plasmids containing E.granulosus (GenBank: AF297617.1) and E.multilocularis (GenBank: NC_000928.2) mitochondrial 12S rRNA regions were used as positive controls. Cysts samples of patients which were pathologically confirmed to be CE (n: 10) and AE (n: 15) and healthy human DNA samples (n: 25) as negative control as well as DNA samples of 12 different parasites (Taenia saginata, Hymenolepis nana, Trichuris trichiura, Fasciola hepatica, Enterobius vermicularis, Toxoplasma gondii, Pneumocystis jirovecii, Trichomonas vaginalis, Cryptosporidium hominis, Strongyloides stercoralis, Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax) were used to develop M

  1. HIV infection in children--impact upon ENT doctors.

    PubMed

    Hoare, Simon

    2003-12-01

    The global epidemic of HIV infection remains appalling. By 2001, there were an estimated 1.4 million HIV-infected children, with 4.5 million deaths. In the UK, paediatric cases are clustered around population centres where there are high concentrations of infected immigrant adults, and to a lesser extent, areas where IV drug abuse is common. The highest incidence remains in London and the southeast. With the national redistribution of immigrant and refugee families, any doctor in any specialty may expect to be involved with children who are HIV positive, or have clinical AIDS. The majority of children are infected vertically, i.e. infection of the infant from an infected mother in the pre-, peri-, or post-natal periods. Rates of transmission vary from 15-20% in the developed countries. Children with HIV infection may have their primary presentation to ENT doctors, who should have appropriate thresholds for suspecting the diagnosis. The most common presenting features include persistent generalised lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, chronic/recurrent diarrhoea, poor growth, and fever. Fifteen to twenty percent of untreated children will present with an AIDS-defining illness by 12 months, typically with Pneumocystis pneumonia at approximately 3-4 months of age. Seventy percent of perinatally infected children will exhibit some signs or symptoms by 12 months Without treatment, the median age to progression to AIDS is approximately 6 years, and 25-30% will have died by this age. The median age of death is approximately 9 years. Children may also present with repeated/unusual ear infections, sinus disease (inc. mastoiditis), tonsillitis, orbital/peri-orbital cellulitis, oral candidiasis, and dental infections. Infections with streptococcus pneumoniae and group A streptococcus are common, and often progress to severe systemic infection with an appreciable mortality. Infections may be due to unusual pathogens such as Pseudomonas, 'typical' and atypical Mycobacteria

  2. Ocular manifestations of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Jabs, D A

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of ocular complications and the clinical outcomes of these complications in patients with various stages of HIV infection. METHODS: Retrospective review of all HIV-infected patients seen in an AIDS ophthalmology clinic from November 1983 through December 31, 1992. RESULTS: Eleven-hundred sixty-three patients were seen for ophthalmologic evaluation. Of these, 781 had the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), 226 had symptomatic HIV infection (AIDs-related complex [ARC]), and 156 had asymptomatic HIV infection. Non-infectious HIV retinopathy was the most common ocular complication, affecting 50% of the patients with AIDS, 34% of the patients with ARC, and 3% of the patients with asymptomatic HIV infection. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the most common opportunistic ocular infection, affecting 37% of the patients with AIDS. Other opportunistic ocular infections, including ocular toxoplasmosis, varicella zoster virus retinitis, and Pneumocystis choroidopathy were all much less common, each occurring in < or = 1% of the patients with AIDS. Treatment of CMV retinitis with either foscarnet or ganciclovir was successful in initially controlling the retinitis. However, relapse represented a significant problem and required frequent re-inductions. As a consequence of the retinal damage associated with relapse, loss of visual acuity occurred. The median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse for all eyes with CMV retinitis was 13.4 months, and the median time to a visual acuity of 20/200 or worse in the better eye was 21.1 months. At last follow-up, 75% of the patients had a final visual acuity of 20/40 or better in at least one eye. Retinal detachments were a frequent ophthalmologic complication of CMV retinitis with a cumulative probability of a retinal detachment in at least one eye of 57% at 12 months after the diagnosis of CMV retinitis. Herpes zoster ophthalmicus developed in 3% of the overall series and was seen in

  3. Toxic epidermal necrolysis following combination of methotrexate and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.

    PubMed

    Yang, C H; Yang, L J; Jaing, T H; Chan, H L

    2000-08-01

    A 15-year-old boy with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (FAB L1), diagnosed in 1995, received combination chemotherapy consisting of 6 weeks of induction (vincristine, epirubicin, L-asparaginase, prednisolone) and 2 weeks of consolidation (cytosine arabinosides, etoposide). After achieving remission, for further maintenance of remission, he was treated with 14 cycles of intensive chemotherapy consisting of 6-MP, 10 mg/kg orally on the first 4 days, and cyclophosphamide, 1200 mg/m2, vincristine, 1.5 mg/m2, epirubicin, 15 mg/m2, and cytosine arabinoside, 40 mg/m2, intravenously on days 4, 11, 39, and 40, respectively. On day 18 of each cycle, he received intravenous methotrexate (MTX) infusion in a total dose of 150 mg/m2 plus oral leucovorin (30 mg/m2 ) rescue 36 h after starting MTX therapy. In addition, oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was given regularly to prevent Pneumocystis carinii infection. The patient achieved remission during the first course of treatment, but 8 months later the disease relapsed. He then received four doses of MTX (800 mg intravenously) plus leucovorin rescue in the following 4 months. During the last MTX therapy, small hemorrhagic bullae were found on the lateral side of the right ankle, but subsided after a few days. Due to partial remission of the disease, he was admitted again in January 1999 for high-dose MTX therapy. An initial hemogram on admission revealed hemoglobin 7.2 g/dL, white cell count 15,200/mm3, platelet count 153/mm3, blood creatinine 0.5 mg/dL, and alanine leucine aminotransferase (ALT) 20 U/L. He received 8500 mg of MTX (5000 mg/m2 ) as a continuous intravenous infusion for 24 h. Thirty-six hours after the start of MTX infusion, leucovorin (30 mg, intravenous) rescue was initiated every 6 h for 3 days. Another preventive measure to cover MTX toxicity included aggressive intravenous fluid replacement (4 L/m2 /day) and the addition of 25 meq/L sodium bicarbonate to the intravenous fluid to alkalinize the

  4. Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections Among HIV-Exposed and HIV-Infected Children: Recommendations from CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Mofenson, Lynne M.; Brady, Michael T.; Danner, Susie P.; Dominguez, Kenneth L.; Hazra, Rohan; Handelsman, Edward; Havens, Peter; Nesheim, Steve; Read, Jennifer S.; Serchuck, Leslie; Van Dyke, Russell

    2010-01-01

    guidelines include 1) greater emphasis on the importance of antiretroviral therapy for preventing and treating OIs, especially those OIs for which no specific therapy exists; 2) information about the diagnosis and management of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes; 3) information about managing antiretroviral therapy in children with OIs, including potential drug--drug interactions; 4) new guidance on diagnosing of HIV infection and presumptively excluding HIV infection in infants that affect the need for initiation of prophylaxis to prevent Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in neonates; 5) updated immunization recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, including hepatitis A, human papillomavirus, meningococcal, and rotavirus vaccines; 6) addition of sections on aspergillosis; bartonella; human herpes virus-6, −7, and −8; malaria; and progressive multifocal leukodystrophy (PML); and 7) new recommendations on discontinuation of OI prophylaxis after immune reconstitution in children. The report includes six tables pertinent to preventing and treating OIs in children and two figures describing immunization recommendations for children aged 0--6 years and 7--18 years. Because treatment of OIs is an evolving science, and availability of new agents or clinical data on existing agents might change therapeutic options and preferences, these recommendations will be periodically updated and will be available at http://AIDSInfo.nih.gov. PMID:19730409

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: correlation but not causation.

    PubMed Central

    Duesberg, P H

    1989-01-01

    by killing T cells, although retroviruses can only replicate in viable cells. In fact, infected T cells grown in culture continue to divide. (vi) HIV is isogenic with all other retroviruses and does not express a late, AIDS-specific gene. (vii) If HIV were to cause AIDS, it would have a paradoxical, country-specific pathology, causing over 90% Pneumocystis pneumonia and Kaposi sarcoma in the U.S. but over 90% slim disease, fever, and diarrhea in Africa.(viii) It is highly improbable that within the last few years two viruses (HIV-1 and HIV-2) that are only 40% sequence-related would have evolved that could both cause the newly defined syndrome AIDS. Also, viruses are improbable that kill their only natural host with efficiencies of 50-100%, as is claimed for HIVs. It is concluded that HIV is not sufficient for AIDS and that it may not even be necessary for AIDS because its activity is just as low in symptomatic carriers as in asymptomatic carriers. The correlation between antibody to HIV and AIDS does not prove causation, because otherwise indistinguishable diseases are now set apart only on the basis of this antibody. I propose that AIDS is not a contagious syndrome caused by one conventional virus or microbe. No such virus or microbe would require almost a decade to cause primary disease, nor could it cause the diverse collection of AIDS diseases. Neither would its host range be as selective as that of AIDS, nor could it survive if it were as inefficiently transmitted as AIDS. Since AIDS is defined by new combinations of conventional diseases, it may be caused by new combinations of conventional pathogens, including acute viral or microbial infections and chronic drug use and malnutrition. The long and unpredictable intervals between infection with HIV and AIDS would then reflect the thresholds for these pathogenic factors to cause AIDS diseases, instead of an unlikely mechanism of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:2644642

  6. Guidelines for the Prevention and Treatment of Opportunistic Infections among HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children: recommendations from CDC, the National Institutes of Health, the HIV Medicine Association of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society, and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mofenson, Lynne M; Brady, Michael T; Danner, Susie P; Dominguez, Kenneth L; Hazra, Rohan; Handelsman, Edward; Havens, Peter; Nesheim, Steve; Read, Jennifer S; Serchuck, Leslie; Van Dyke, Russell

    2009-09-01

    guidelines include 1) greater emphasis on the importance of antiretroviral therapy for preventing and treating OIs, especially those OIs for which no specific therapy exists; 2) information about the diagnosis and management of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndromes; 3) information about managing antiretroviral therapy in children with OIs, including potential drug--drug interactions; 4) new guidance on diagnosing of HIV infection and presumptively excluding HIV infection in infants that affect the need for initiation of prophylaxis to prevent Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in neonates; 5) updated immunization recommendations for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, including hepatitis A, human papillomavirus, meningococcal, and rotavirus vaccines; 6) addition of sections on aspergillosis; bartonella; human herpes virus-6, -7, and -8; malaria; and progressive multifocal leukodystrophy (PML); and 7) new recommendations on discontinuation of OI prophylaxis after immune reconstitution in children. The report includes six tables pertinent to preventing and treating OIs in children and two figures describing immunization recommendations for children aged 0--6 years and 7--18 years. Because treatment of OIs is an evolving science, and availability of new agents or clinical data on existing agents might change therapeutic options and preferences, these recommendations will be periodically updated and will be available at http://AIDSInfo.nih.gov.